WorldWideScience

Sample records for neutrino factory design

  1. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ankenbrandt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a low-energy (4 GeV neutrino factory (NF is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The π^{±} decay to produce muons (μ^{±}, which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by ∼1.4×10^{21} μ^{+} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of μ^{-} decays.

  2. Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M; Tsenov, R; Dracos, M; Bonesini, M; Palladino, V; Tortora, L; Mori, Y; Planche, T; Lagrange, J  B; Kuno, Y; Benedetto, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoini, S; Martini, M; Wildner, E; Prior, G; Blondel, A; Karadzhow, Y; Ellis, M; Kyberd, P; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, F  J  P; Alekou, A; Apollonio, M; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Jenner, L  J; Kurup, A; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Zarrebini, A; Poslimski, J; Blackmore, V; Cobb, J; Tunnell, C; Andreopoulos, C; Bennett, J  R  J; Brooks, S; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Edgecock, T  R; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; McFarland, A; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rees, G; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Booth, C; Skoro, G; Back, J  J; Harrison, P; Berg, J  S; Fernow, R; Gallardo, J  C; Gupta, R; Kirk, H; Simos, N; Stratakis, D; Souchlas, N; Witte, H; Bross, A; Geer, S; Johnstone, C; Mokhov, N; Neuffer, D; Popovic, M; Strait, J; Striganov, S; Morfín, J  G; Wands, R; Snopok, P; Bogacz, S  A; Morozov, V; Roblin, Y; Cline, D; Ding, X; Bromberg, C; Hart, T; Abrams, R  J; Ankenbrandt, C  M; Beard, K  B; Cummings, M  A  C; Flanagan, G; Johnson, R  P; Roberts, T  J; Yoshikawa, C  Y; Graves, V  B; McDonald, K  T; Coney, L; Hanson, G

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that $\\theta_{13} > 0$. The measured value of $\\theta_{13}$ is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO$\

  3. Neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bogomilov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that θ_{13}>0. The measured value of θ_{13} is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (antineutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EUROν Design Study consortium. EUROν coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF collaboration. The EUROν baseline accelerator facility will provide 10^{21} muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  4. Status of the Neutrino Factory accelerator design studies

    CERN Document Server

    Prior, Gersende

    2013-01-01

    This document is a review of the present status of the Neutrino Factory design study, after the publication of the Interim Design Report and before the publication of the Reference Design Report. The different components of the accelerator as well as their current design stage and future tasks are described here.

  5. Evolutionary algorithm for the neutrino factory front end design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poklonskiy, Alexey A.; /Michigan State U.; Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory is an important tool in the long-term neutrino physics program. Substantial effort is put internationally into designing this facility in order to achieve desired performance within the allotted budget. This accelerator is a secondary beam machine: neutrinos are produced by means of the decay of muons. Muons, in turn, are produced by the decay of pions, produced by hitting the target by a beam of accelerated protons suitable for acceleration. Due to the physics of this process, extra conditioning of the pion beam coming from the target is needed in order to effectively perform subsequent acceleration. The subsystem of the Neutrino Factory that performs this conditioning is called Front End, its main performance characteristic is the number of the produced muons.

  6. CrossRef Neutrino factory proton driver and target design

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, Roland; Thomason, John; Davenne, Tristan; Caretta, Ottone; Back, John J

    2016-01-01

    Neutrinos are very elusive particles belonging to the lepton family. They exist in different types corresponding to the different charged leptons, namely electrons, muons and taus. Contrary to electrons, neutrinos hardly interact with matter which makes them very difficult to detect and study. To the best of today’s knowledge, neutrinos have hardly any mass and they can change from one type to another (so-called “neutrino oscillation”). Most physicists think that this oscillation occurs because neutrinos have mass. A Neutrino Factory [1] is a special facility producing a large amount of neutrinos every year (typically 10$^{21}$ neutrinos/year). Its main purpose is to study the change of type of neutrinos between the place where they are generated and a remote location. In a Neutrino Factory, neutrinos result from the decay of muons, unstable particles with a mean lifetime of 2.2 $\\mu$s in their rest frame. Sharp beams of high energy neutrinos are obtained at the end of the long straight sections of a mu...

  7. 40-80 MHZ MUON front-end for the Neutrino factory design study

    CERN Document Server

    Prior, G; Alexandri, A E

    2011-01-01

    To understand better the neutrino properties, machines able to produce 1021 neutrinos per year have to be built. One of the proposed machines is called the neutrino factory. In this scenario, muons produced by the decay of pions coming from the interaction of a proton beam onto a target are accelerated to energies of several GeV and injected in a storage ring where they will decay in neutrinos. The so-called front-end section of the neutrino factory is conceived to reduce the transverse divergence of the muon beam and to adapt its temporal structure to the acceptance of the downstream accelerator to minimize losses. We present a re-evaluation of the muon front-end scenario which used 40-80 MHz radio-frequency (RF) cavities capturing one sign at a time in a single-bunch to bucket mode. The standard software environment of the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) has been used, for comparison of its performance with the IDS-NF baseline front-end design which operates with higher frequen...

  8. Interim Design Report for the International Design Study for a Neutrino Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, S.; Gandhi, R.; Goswami, S.; /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst.; Berg, J.S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Souchlas, N.; /Brookhaven; Ellis, M.; /Brunel U. /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Fermilab /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Imperial Coll., London /Jefferson Lab /Saha Inst.

    2011-10-01

    The starting point for the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) was the output of the earlier International Scoping Study for a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS). The accelerator facility described in section 2 incorporates the improvements that have been derived from the substantial amount of work carried out within the Accelerator Working Group. Highlights of these improvements include: (1) Initial concepts for the implementation of the proton driver at each of the three example sites, CERN, FNAL, and RAL; (2) Detailed studies of the energy deposition in the target area; (3) A reduction in the length of the muon beam phase-rotation and bunching systems; (4) Detailed analyses of the impact of the risk that stray magnetic field in the accelerating cavities in the ionization cooling channel will reduce the maximum operating gradient. Several alternative ionization-cooling lattices have been developed as fallback options to mitigate this technical risk; (5) Studies of particle loss in the muon front-end and the development of strategies to mitigate the deleterious effects of such losses; (6) The development of more complete designs for the muon linac and re-circulating linacs; (7) The development of a design for the muon FFAG that incorporates insertions for injection and extraction; and (8) Detailed studies of diagnostics in the decay ring. Other sub-systems have undergone a more 'incremental' evolution; an indication that the design of the Neutrino Factory has achieved a degree of maturity. The design of the neutrino detectors described in section 3 has been optimized and the Detector Working Group has made substantial improvements to the simulation and analysis of the Magnetized Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) resulting in an improvement in the overall neutrino-detection efficiency and a reduction in the neutrino-energy threshold. In addition, initial consideration of the engineering of the MIND has

  9. Interim Design Report for the International Design Study for a Neutrino Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choubey, S.; Gandhi, R.; Goswami, S.; Berg, J.S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Souchlas, N.; Ellis, M.

    2011-01-01

    The starting point for the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) was the output of the earlier International Scoping Study for a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS). The accelerator facility described in section 2 incorporates the improvements that have been derived from the substantial amount of work carried out within the Accelerator Working Group. Highlights of these improvements include: (1) Initial concepts for the implementation of the proton driver at each of the three example sites, CERN, FNAL, and RAL; (2) Detailed studies of the energy deposition in the target area; (3) A reduction in the length of the muon beam phase-rotation and bunching systems; (4) Detailed analyses of the impact of the risk that stray magnetic field in the accelerating cavities in the ionization cooling channel will reduce the maximum operating gradient. Several alternative ionization-cooling lattices have been developed as fallback options to mitigate this technical risk; (5) Studies of particle loss in the muon front-end and the development of strategies to mitigate the deleterious effects of such losses; (6) The development of more complete designs for the muon linac and re-circulating linacs; (7) The development of a design for the muon FFAG that incorporates insertions for injection and extraction; and (8) Detailed studies of diagnostics in the decay ring. Other sub-systems have undergone a more 'incremental' evolution; an indication that the design of the Neutrino Factory has achieved a degree of maturity. The design of the neutrino detectors described in section 3 has been optimized and the Detector Working Group has made substantial improvements to the simulation and analysis of the Magnetized Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) resulting in an improvement in the overall neutrino-detection efficiency and a reduction in the neutrino-energy threshold. In addition, initial consideration of the engineering of the MIND has generated a

  10. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8degree angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3degree angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design

  11. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  12. SRF for neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory calls for nearly 500 meters of 200 MHz SRF cavities to provide 7.5 GV. Such a facility is more demanding than the largest SRF installation to date, i.e., LEP-II, where 500 m of niobium-coated copper cavities provided more than 3 GV of acceleration. Based on the high real estate gradient desired to minimize muon loss, superconducting cavities are selected to provide active gradients of 15 - 17 MV/m, and a real estate gradient of 7.5 MV/m. At such high gradients, the peak RF power demand for copper cavities would become prohibitively expensive. By virtue of low losses, SC cavities can be filled slowly (rise time 3 ms) reducing the peak power demand to roughly half MW per cell. (author)

  13. Possible experiments at neutrino factories

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O

    2001-01-01

    There are currently plans to construct neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. Such projects are parts of large programmes for the production, cooling, acceleration and storage of muons for dedicated muon colliders, and the lower-energy neutrino factories are perceived as a first step towards the colliders at a much higher energy. We shall explore possible experiments at the projected high- intensity neutrino beams. Among these experiments the measurement of the nuclear coherent scattering cross section would be based on the use of thermal calorimetric detectors segmented so that self-vetoing would supplement the surrounding veto detectors. (4 refs).

  14. CrossRef Neutrino factories

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Neutrinos are produced by many processes in our universe. These elusive particles reach the earth having a certain energy permitting them to react with nuclei in detectors that are specifically designed to probe their properties. However, to get higher intensities and higher energy neutrinos for better statistics and better physics reach, the use of accelerators is necessary to advance in the field of neutrino research. To produce neutrinos with an accelerator, one needs to send a high power beam onto a target to get particles or isotopes that produce neutrinos with the required properties, by decay. The parent particles have to be collected and prepared for injection into an accelerating structure. Accelerator-based experiments can tune the energy of the produced neutrinos by boosting and controlling the energy of the parent particle. The produced neutrinos will travel the distance between the source and the detector, generally through earth; the distance the neutrino travels through earth, the energy of the...

  15. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Rogers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  16. NEUTRINO FACTORY AND BETA BEAM EXPERIMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALBRIGHT, C.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.; GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; KIRK, H.; ET AL.

    2004-09-21

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here. There has been no corresponding activity in the U.S. on Beta Beam facility design and, given the very limited resources, there is little prospect of starting a significant U.S. Beta Beam R&D effort in the near future. However, the Beta Beam concept is interesting, and progress on its development in Europe should be followed. The Neutrino Factory R&D program has reached a critical stage in which support is required for two crucial international experiments and a third-generation international design study. If this support is forthcoming, a Neutrino Factory could be added to the Neutrino Community's road map in about a decade.

  17. Neutrinos: from the Workshop to the Factory

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Over the next 5 years much work will be done to reach a theoretical and practical description of a neutrino factory. How could this project turn out to be an interesting future option for CERN? Neutrino beams travelling from CERN to the Canary Islands? And to the Svalbard archipelago in Norway? Or even to the Pyhaesalmi Mine in Finland? Why neutrinos? And why so far? The answers provide one of CERN's next challenging options: the construction of a high-energy muon storage ring to provide neutrino beams. This project, nicknamed 'neutrino factory', now figures in CERN's middle term plan as a recognized and supported research and development project. International collaborations, with other European laboratories and also with America and Japan, are now being set up. Long baseline locations for neutrino oscillations studies at a CERN based neutrino factory. Early in its history, LEP established that there exist just three kinds of light neutrinos, those associated with the electron, muon, and tau leptons. For a...

  18. The neutrino factory and beta beam experiments and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, C.; Barger, V.; Beacom, J.F.; Berg, J.S.; Black, E.; Blondel, A.; Bogacz, S.; Brice, S.; Caspi, S.; Chou, W.; Cummings, M.; Fernow, R.; Finley, D.; Gallardo,; Geer, S.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Goodman, M.; Harris, D.; Huber, Patrick; Jansson, A.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab /Wisconsin U., Madison /Brookhaven /IIT, Chicago /Geneva U.

    2004-11-01

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here.

  19. Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations at the neutrino factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    We consider the prospects for a neutrino factory measuring mixing angles, the CP violating phase and mass-squared differences by detecting wrong-charge muons arising from the chain μ + → ν e → ν μ → μ - and the right-charge muons coming from the chain μ + → anti ν μ → anti ν μ → μ - (similar to μ - chains), where ν e → ν μ and anti ν μ → anti ν μ are neutrino oscillation channels through a long baseline. First, we study physics with near detectors and consider the treatment of systematic errors including cross section errors, flux errors, and background uncertainties. We illustrate for which measurements near detectors are required, discuss how many are needed, and what the role of the flux monitoring is. We demonstrate that near detectors are mandatory for the leading atmospheric parameter measurements if the neutrino factory has only one baseline, whereas systematic errors partially cancel if the neutrino factory complex includes the magic baseline. Second, we perform the baseline and energy optimization of the neutrino factory including the latest simulation results from the magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND). We also consider the impact of τ decays, generated by appearance channels ν μ → ν τ and ν e → ν τ , on the discovery reaches of the mass orderings, the leptonic CP violation, and the non-zero θ 13 , which we find to be negligible for the considered detector. Third, we make a comparison of a high energy neutrino factory to a low energy neutrino factory and find that they are just two versions of the same experiment optimized for different regions of the parameter space. In addition, we briefly comment on whether it is useful to build the bi-magic baseline at the low energy neutrino factory. Finally, the effects of one additional massive sterile neutrino are discussed in the context of a combined short and long baseline setup. It is found that near detectors can provide the required sensitivity at the

  20. Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations at the neutrino factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jian

    2011-12-19

    We consider the prospects for a neutrino factory measuring mixing angles, the CP violating phase and mass-squared differences by detecting wrong-charge muons arising from the chain {mu}{sup +} {yields} {nu}{sub e} {yields} {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {mu}{sup -} and the right-charge muons coming from the chain {mu}{sup +} {yields} anti {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} anti {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {mu}{sup -} (similar to {mu}{sup -} chains), where {nu}{sub e} {yields} {nu}{sub {mu}} and anti {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} anti {nu}{sub {mu}} are neutrino oscillation channels through a long baseline. First, we study physics with near detectors and consider the treatment of systematic errors including cross section errors, flux errors, and background uncertainties. We illustrate for which measurements near detectors are required, discuss how many are needed, and what the role of the flux monitoring is. We demonstrate that near detectors are mandatory for the leading atmospheric parameter measurements if the neutrino factory has only one baseline, whereas systematic errors partially cancel if the neutrino factory complex includes the magic baseline. Second, we perform the baseline and energy optimization of the neutrino factory including the latest simulation results from the magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND). We also consider the impact of {tau} decays, generated by appearance channels {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} and {nu}{sub e} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}, on the discovery reaches of the mass orderings, the leptonic CP violation, and the non-zero {theta}{sub 13}, which we find to be negligible for the considered detector. Third, we make a comparison of a high energy neutrino factory to a low energy neutrino factory and find that they are just two versions of the same experiment optimized for different regions of the parameter space. In addition, we briefly comment on whether it is useful to build the bi-magic baseline at the low energy neutrino factory. Finally, the

  1. Sterile neutrinos beyond LSND at the neutrino factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meloni, Davide; Tang Jian; Winter, Walter

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the effects of one additional sterile neutrino at the Neutrino Factory. Compared to earlier analyses, which have been motivated by Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) results, we do not impose any constraint on the additional mass squared splitting. This means that the additional mass eigenstate could, with small mixings, be located among the known ones, as it is suggested by the recent analysis of cosmological data. We use a self-consistent framework at the Neutrino Factory without any constraints on the new parameters. We demonstrate for a combined short and long baseline setup that near detectors can provide the expected sensitivity at the LSND-motivated Δm 41 2 -range, while some sensitivity can also be obtained in the region of the atmospheric mass splitting from the long baselines. We point out that limits on such very light sterile neutrinos may also be obtained from a reanalysis of atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data, as well as from supernova neutrino observations. In the second part of the analysis, we compare our sensitivity with the existing literature using additional assumptions, such as |Δm 41 2 |>>|Δm 31 2 |, leading to averaging of the fast oscillations in the far detectors. We demonstrate that while the Neutrino Factory has excellent sensitivity compared to existing studies using similar assumptions, one has to be very careful interpreting these results for a combined short and long baseline setup where oscillations could occur in the near detectors. We also test the impact of additional ν τ detectors at the short and long baselines, and we do not find a substantial improvement of the sensitivities.

  2. A large magnetic detector for the neutrino factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervera, A.; Dydak, F.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    The physics opportunities of the neutrino factory have been the subject of a number of recent studies. It was shown that sensitive measurements of the angle θ 13 , of MSW effects, and of the sign of the atmospheric mass difference Δm 23 2 are possible, and even CP violation in the neutrino mixing matrix may be within reach. The focus of interest is the oscillation ν e →ν μ , which leads in the well-defined neutrino beam of the neutrino factory to 'wrong-sign' muon events. In this paper, we show that a large magnetic detector will be capable of detecting with high efficiency and small backgrounds such wrong-sign muon events. We present a conceptual design of the apparatus and its performance. Various backgrounds are analysed and we demonstrate that they can be sufficiently suppressed by appropriate cuts. We illustrate the performance of the large magnetic detector by its sensitivity to the angle θ 13

  3. Muon Acceleration: Neutrino Factory and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogacz, Alex [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-03-01

    We summarize the current state of a concept for muon acceleration aimed at a future Neutrino Factory and extendable to Higgs Factory. The main thrust of these studies was to reduce the overall cost while maintaining performance by exploring the interplay between the complexity of the cooling systems and the acceptance of the accelerator complex. To ensure adequate survival for the short-lived muons, acceleration must occur at high average gradient. The need for large transverse and longitudinal acceptances drives the design of the acceleration system to an initially low RF frequency, e.g., 325 MHz, which is then increased to 650 MHz as the transverse size shrinks with increasing energy. High-gradient normal conducting RF cavities at these frequencies require extremely high peak-power RF sources. Hence superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are chosen. We consider an SRF-efficient design based on a multi-pass (4.5) ?dogbone? RLA, extendable to multi-pass FFAG-like arcs.

  4. Permanent-Magnet Quadrupoles for Neutrino Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    Using permanent-magnet quadrupoles for the long straight sections of the recirculating linear accelerators and in the muon storage ring proper of a neutrino factory is proposed. The parameters needed for such quadrupoles are compared to the parameters of the permanent-magnet quadrupoles that are used in the Recycler Ring at Fermilab. Using such quadrupoles for ELFE at CERN is also considered.

  5. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration R and D Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises some 140 scientists and engineers located at U.S. National Laboratories and Universities, and at a number of non-U.S. research institutions. In the past year, the MC R and D program has shifted its focus mainly toward the design issues related to the development of a Neutrino Factory based on a muon storage ring. In this paper the status of the various R and D activities is described, and future plans are outlined

  6. Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2000-01-01

    High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy μ + μ - colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings (μSR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included

  7. 17th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Facilities Search

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    NuFact15 is the seventeenth in a series that started in 1999 as an important yearly workshop with emphasis on future neutrino projects. This will be the first edition in Latin America, showing the scientific growth of this field. The main goals of the workshop are to review the progress on studies of future facilities able to improve on measurements of the properties of neutrinos and charged lepton flavor violation as well as new phenomena searches beyond the capabilities of presently planned experiments. Since such progress in the neutrino sector could require innovation in neutrino beams, the role of a neutrino factory within future HEP initiatives will be addressed. The workshops are not only international but also interdisciplinary in that experimenters, theorists and accelerator physicists from the Asian, American and European regions share expertise with the common goal of designing the next generation of experiments.

  8. Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar: Future neutrino facilities: the neutrino factory

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Thursday 19.January 2012 at 14:15  -  IT Auditorium (bldg. 31 3-004) Future neutrino facilities: the neutrino factory by Gersende Prior / University of Geneva and CERN EN/MEF The neutrino factory is one of the proposed designs for a future intense neutrino beam facility. In its current layout, a high-power proton beam impinges on an Hg jet target producing pions, decaying in turn into muons. In order to reduce the particle beam emittance, the muon transverse momentum is reduced through ionization cooling by a technically demanding set-up made of closely-packed RF cavities alternating with absorbers. In this talk I will present the motivation for building an intense neutrino beam and some of the proposed neutrino facilities' design. I will discuss the challenges inherent to the cooling of muons, possible optimization of the current baseline and the on-going R&D. ________________ ATS Seminars Organisers: H. Burkhardt (BE), S. Sgobba (EN), G. deRijk (TE)

  9. The neutrino factory beam and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Cline, David B; Collot, J; De Jong, M; Donini, Andrea; Dydak, Friedrich; Edgecock, R; Gavela-Legazpi, Maria Belen; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Garciá, M Concepción; Gruber, P M; Harris, D A; Hernández, Pilar; Kuno, Y; Litchfield, P J; McFarland, K; Mena, O; Migliozzi, P; Palladino, Vittorio; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Para, A; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez, P; Rigolin, Stefano; Romanino, Andrea; Rubbia, André; Strolin, P; Wojcicki, S G

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations marks a major milestone in the history of neutrino physics, and opens a new window to the still mysterious origin of masses and flavour-mixing. Many current and forthcoming experiments will answer open questions; however, a major step forward, up to and possibly including CP violation in the neutrino-mixing matrix, requires the neutrino beams from a \

  10. Optimising the Target and Capture Sections of the Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Ole Martin; Stapnes, Steinar

    The Neutrino Factory is designed to produce an intense high energy neutrino beam from stored muons. The majority of the muons are obtained from the decay of pions, produced by a proton beam impinging on a free-flowing mercury-jet target and captured by a high magnetic field. It is important to capture a large fraction of the produced pions to maximize the intensity of the neutrino beam. Various optimisation studies have been performed with the aim of maximising the muon influx to the accelerator and thus the neutrino beam intensity. The optimisation studies were performed with the use of Monte Carlo simulation tools. The production of secondary particles, by interactions between the incoming proton beam and the mercury target, was optimised by varying the proton beam impact position and impact angles on the target. The proton beam and target interaction region was studied and showed to be off the central axis of the capture section in the baseline configuration. The off-centred interaction region resulted in ...

  11. Neutrino Factory Accelerator R and D: Status and Priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of worldwide Neutrino Factory R and D efforts. Activities are categorized as simulations, component development, and system tests. An indication of R and D tasks that remain to be accomplished is also given

  12. A low energy neutrino factory with non-magnetic detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    We show that a very precise neutrino/anti-neutrino event separation is not mandatory to cover the physics program of a low energy neutrino factory and thus non-magnetized detectors like water Cerenkov or liquid Argon detectors can be used. We point out, that oscillation itself strongly enhances the signal to noise ratio of a wrong sign muon search, provided there is sufficiently accurate neutrino energy reconstruction. Further, we argue that apart from a magnetic field, other means to distinguish neutrino from anti-neutrino events (at least statistically) can be explored. Combined with the fact that non-magnetic detectors potentially can be made very big, we show that modest neutrino/anti-neutrino separations at the level of 50% to 90% are sufficient to obtain good sensitivity to CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy for $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}>10^{-3}$. These non-magnetized detectors have a rich physics program outside the context of a neutrino factory, including topics like supernova neutrinos and proton...

  13. Neutrino factory and muon collider collaboration R and D activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.; Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaborat

    2001-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises about 140 U.S. and non-U.S. accelerator and particle physicists. The MC is carrying out an R and D program aimed at validating the critical design concepts required for the construction of such machines. We are committed to encouraging international cooperation and coordination of the R and D effort. Main activities of the MC include a Targetry program, a MUCOOL program, a component development program, and a theory and simulation effort. Moreover, the MC has participated in several feasibility studies for a complete Neutrino Factory facility, with the aim of identifying any additional R and D activities needed to prepare a Zeroth-order Design Report (ZDR) in about two years and a Conceptual Design report (CDR) about two years thereafter. In this paper, the R and D goals in each area will be indicated, and the present status and future plans of the R and D program will be described

  14. Pion production models and neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collot, Johann; Kirk, Harold G.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.

    2000-01-01

    Scenarios for the building of muon colliders or storage rings suitable for the generation of robust neutrino beams call for the generation of a prodigious quantity of pions. These pions are then conducted into a decay channel where the resulting muon decay products can be collected for cooling and subsequent acceleration. Central to this concept is the design and construction of a target which will be highly efficient in producing pions of both signs while mitigating the absorption of these pions before they decay. This design effort is being facilitated by using two computer codes FLUKA and MARS. We present comparisons of the two computer codes and also present a comparison of these codes with available data

  15. PION PRODUCTION MODELS AND NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COLLOT, J.; KIRK, H.G.; MOKHOV, N.V.

    2000-01-01

    Scenarios for the building of muon colliders or storage rings suitable for the generation of robust neutrino beams call for the generation of a prodigious quantity of pions. These pions are then conducted into a decay channel where the resulting muon decay products can be collected for cooling and subsequent acceleration. Central to this concept is the design and construction of a target which will be highly efficient in producing pions of both signs while mitigating the absorption of these pions before they decay. This design effort is being facilitated by using two computer codes FLUKA and MARS. The authors present comparisons of the two computer codes and also present a comparison of these codes with available data

  16. Optimized Neutrino Factory for small and large θ13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Recent results from long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments point towards a non-zero value of θ 13 at around 3σ confidence level. In the coming years, further ratification of this result with high significance will have crucial impact on the planning of the future long baseline Neutrino Factory setup aimed to explore leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass ordering. In this talk, we discuss the baseline and energy optimization of the Neutrino Factory including the latest simulation results on the magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND) in the light of both small and large θ 13 . We find that in case of small θ 13 , baselines of about 2500 to 5000 km is the optimal choice for the CP violation measurement with E μ as low as 12 GeV can be considered. However, for large θ 13 , we show that the lower threshold and the backgrounds reconstructed at lower energies allow in fact for muon energies as low as 5 to 8 GeV at considerably shorter baselines, such as Fermilab to Homestake. This suggests that with the latest MIND simulation, low- and high-energy versions of the Neutrino Factory are just two different forms of the same experiment optimized for different regions of the parameter space.

  17. R and D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in R and D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R and D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R and D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

  18. Muon physics possibilities at a muon-neutrino factory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, KP

    2001-01-01

    New intense proton accelerators with above GeV energies and MW beam power, such as they are discussed in connection with neutrino factories, appear to be excellently suited for feeding bright muon sources for low-energy muon science. Muon rates with several orders of magnitude increased flux

  19. R and D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of muon beams to create either an intense source of decay neutrinos aimed at a detector located 3000-7500 km away (a Neutrino Factory), or a Muon Collider that produces high-luminosity collisions at the energy frontier. R and D aimed at producing these facilities has been under way for more than 10 years. This paper will review experimental results from MuCool, MERIT, and MICE and indicate the extent to which they will provide proof-of-principle demonstrations of the key technologies required for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. Progress in constructing components for the MICE experiment will also be described.

  20. Numerical study of a magnetically insulated front-end channel for a neutrino factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diktys Stratakis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A neutrino factory, which can deliver an intense flux of ∼10^{21} neutrinos per year from a multi-GeV stored muon beam, is seemingly the ideal tool for studying neutrino oscillations and CP violations for leptons. The front end of this facility plays a critical role in determining the number of muons that can be accepted by the downstream accelerators. Delivering peak performance requires transporting the muon beams through long sections of a beam channel containing high-gradient rf cavities and strong focusing solenoids. Here, we propose a novel scheme to improve the performance of the cavities, thereby increasing the number of muons within the acceptance of the accelerator chain. The key element of our new scheme is to apply a tangential magnetic field to the rf surfaces, thus forcing any field-emitted electrons to return to the surface before gaining enough energy to damage the cavity. We incorporate this idea into a new lattice design for a neutrino factory, and detail its performance numerically. Although our proposed front-end channel requires more rf power than conventional pillbox designs, it provides enough beam cooling and muon production to be a feasible option for a neutrino factory.

  1. Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the muon collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsharo'a, Mohammad M.; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Atac, Muzaffer; Autin, Bruno R.; Balbekov, Valeri I.; Barger, Vernon D.; Benary, Odette; Bennett, J. Roger J.; Berger, Michael S.; Berg, J. Scott; Berz, Martin; Black, Edgar L.; Blondel, Alain; Bogacz, S. Alex; Bonesini, M.; Bracker, Stephen B.; Bross, Alan D.; Bruno, Luca; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Caldwell, Allen C.; Companelli, Mario; Cassel, Kevin W.; Catanesi, M. Gabriela; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; Chou, Weiren; Cline, David B.; Coney, Linda R.; Conrad, Janet M.; Corlett, John N.; Cremaldi, Lucien; Cummings, Mary Anne; Darve, Christine; DeJongh, Fritz; Drozhdin, Alexandr; Drumm, Paul; Elvira, V. Daniel; Errede, Deborah; Fabich, Adrian; Fawley, William M.; Fernow, Richard C.; Ferrario, Massimo; Finley, David A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Fukui, Yasuo; Furman, Miguel A.; Gabriel, Tony A.; Galea, Raphael; Gallardo, Juan C.; Garoby, Roland; Garren, Alper A.; Geer, Stephen H.; Gilardoni, Simone; Van Ginneken, Andreas J.; Ginzburg, Ilya F.; Godang, Romulus; Goodman, Maury; Gosz, Michael R.; Green, Michael A.; Gruber, Peter; Gunion, John F.; Gupta, Ramesh; Haines, John R.; Hanke, Klaus; Hanson, Gail G.; Han, Tao; Haney, Michael; Hartill, Don; Hartline, Robert E.; Haseroth, Helmut D.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Hoffman, Kara; Holtkamp, Norbert; Holzer, E. Barbara; Johnson, Colin; Johnson, Rolland P.; Johnstone, Carol; Jungmann, Klaus; Kahn, Stephen A.; Kaplan, Daniel M.; Keil, Eberhard K.; Kim, Eun-San; Kim, Kwang-Je; King, Bruce J.; Kirk, Harold G.; Kuno, Yoshitaka; Ladran, Tony S.; Lau, Wing W.; Learned, John G.; Lebedev, Valeri; Lebrun, Paul; Lee, Kevin; Lettry, Jacques A.; Lavender, Marco; Li, Derun; Lombardi, Alessandra; Lu, Changguo; Makino, Kyoko; Malkin, Vladimir; Marfatia, D.; McDonald, Kirk T.; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miller, John R.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mocioiu, I.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Monroe, Jocelyn; Moretti, Aldred; Mori, Yoshiharu; Neuffer, David V.; Ng, King-Yuen; Norem, James H.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the status of our effort to realize a first neutrino factory and the progress made in understanding the problems associated with the collection and cooling of muons towards that end. We summarize the physics that can be done with neutrino factories as well as with intense cold beams of muons. The physics potential of muon colliders is reviewed, both as Higgs Factories and compact high energy lepton colliders. The status and timescale of our research and development effort is reviewed as well as the latest designs in cooling channels including the promise of ring coolers in achieving longitudinal and transverse cooling simultaneously. We detail the efforts being made to mount an international cooling experiment to demonstrate the ionization cooling of muons

  2. Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the Muon Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Alsharo’a

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe the status of our effort to realize a first neutrino factory and the progress made in understanding the problems associated with the collection and cooling of muons towards that end. We summarize the physics that can be done with neutrino factories as well as with intense cold beams of muons. The physics potential of muon colliders is reviewed, both as Higgs factories and compact high-energy lepton colliders. The status and time scale of our research and development effort is reviewed as well as the latest designs in cooling channels including the promise of ring coolers in achieving longitudinal and transverse cooling simultaneously. We detail the efforts being made to mount an international cooling experiment to demonstrate the ionization cooling of muons.

  3. 16th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Beam Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the 16th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Future Neutrino Beam Facilities (NUFACT 2014) that was held at the University of Glasgow (Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom) from 25-30 August 2014. This edition of the NUFACT annual meetings, which started in 1999, consisted of 24 plenary and 92 parallel talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 124 delegates. Furthermore, the International Neutrino Summer School 2014 was held from 10-22 August 2014 at St Andrews, Scotland, in the two weeks before NUFACT 2014. It was intended for young scientists with an interest in neutrino physics in such a way that they would be able to participate and contribute to the NUFACT workshop as well. The objectives of the NUFACT workshops are to review progress on different studies for future accelerator-based neutrino oscillation facilities, with the goal to discover the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, CP violation in the leptonic s...

  4. Lifting degeneracies in the oscillation parameters by a neutrino factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Okamura, Naotoshi

    2005-01-01

    We study the potential of a very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with a neutrino factory and a large segmented water-Cerenkov calorimeter detector in resolving the degeneracies in the neutrino oscillation parameters; the sign of the larger mass-squared difference δm 13 2 , the sign of vertical bar U μ3 vertical bar 2 (=sin 2 θ ATM )-1/2, and a possible two-fold ambiguity in the determination of the CP phase δ MNS . We find that the above problems can be resolved even if the particle charges are not measured. The following results are obtained in our exploratory study for a neutrino factory which delivers 10 21 decaying μ + and μ - at 10 GeV and a 100 kton detector which is placed 2100 km away and is capable of measuring the event energy and distinguishing e + /- from μ + /-, but not their charges. The sign of δm 13 2 can be determined for 4 vertical bar U e3 vertical bar 2 (1- vertical bar U e3 vertical bar 2 )=sin 2 2θ RCT -bar 0.008. That of sin 2 θ ATM -1/2 can be resolved for sin 2 2θ ATM =0.96 when sin 2 2θ RCT -bar 0.06. The CP-violating phase δ MNS can be uniquely constrained for sin 2 2θ RCT -bar 0.02 if its true value is around 90 o or 270 o , while it can be constrained for sin 2 2θ RCT -bar 0.03 if its true value is around 0 deg. or 180 deg

  5. Bucked Coils lattice: a novel ionisation cooling lattice for the Neutrino Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekou, A; Pasternak, J

    2012-01-01

    A successful muon ionisation cooling channel for the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider, requires simultaneously a strong focusing and a large mean RF gradient. To date, all candidate design lattices achieved these requirements with a large magnetic field in the RF cavities, which can potentially limit the achievable gradient leading to RF breakdown. This paper presents the Bucked Coils lattice, designed to reduce the magnetic field at the RF cavities while achieving a satisfactory cooling effect and muon transmission. The Bucked Coils managed to achieve significantly reduced magnetic field components at the RF position, while also achieving a comparable transmission to the FSIIA lattice, the current reference ionisation cooling lattice of the Neutrino Factory. A detailed comparison with respect to the magnetic field reduction, cooling dynamics and transmission is given. A preliminary feasibility study taking into account the hoop stress of the coils and their superconducting operation is also presented.

  6. A Stationary Target for the CERN-Neutrino-Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Sievers, P

    2001-01-01

    As production target for Neutrino Factories,free mercury jets with high axial velocity of about 20 m /s are being studied.For the CERN-Neutrino- Factory proposal with a 4 MW beam power,but with a relatively large beam size at 2 .2 GeV /c and pulsed at 50 Hz ,maximum energy deposition densities of below 20 J /g and average power densities of about 1 kW /g are expected in the target.Therefore a study has been made which discusses the feasibility and limits of a stationary target.It is proposed to use densely packed solid spheres of heavy material and with diameters in the millimeter range.These spheres are con fined inside a Titanium container and cooled by an e fficient water circuit or possibly by He-gas.Dynamic response,as pressure pulses and vibrations are greatly reduced in the small target granules due to relatively long beam bursts,each with a duration of 3.3 s .The encouraging results achieved in this assessment justify to pursue further experimental tests,in particular of the cooling...

  7. Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the Muon Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsharo'a, MM; Ankenbrandt, CM; Atac, M; Autin, BR; Balbekov, VI; Barger, VD; Benary, O; Bennett, JRJ; Berger, MS; Berg, JS; Berz, M; Black, EL; Blondel, A; Bogacz, SA; Bonesini, M; Bracker, SB; Bross, AD; Bruno, L; Buckley-Geer, EJ; Caldwell, AC; Campanelli, M; Cassel, KW; Catanesi, MG; Chattopadhyay, S; Chou, WR; Cline, DB; Coney, LR; Conrad, JM; Corlett, JN; Cremaldi, L; Cummings, MA; Darve, C; DeJongh, F; Drozhdin, A; Drumm, P; Elvira, VD; Errede, D; Fabich, A; Fawley, WM; Fernow, RC; Ferrario, M; Finley, DA; Fisch, NJ; Fukui, Y; Furman, MA; Gabriel, TA; Galea, R; Gallardo, JC; Garoby, R; Garren, AA; Geer, SH; Gilardoni, S; Van Ginneken, AJ; Ginzburg, IF; Godang, R; Goodman, M; Gosz, MR; Green, MA; Gruber, P; Gunion, JF; Gupta, R; Haines, JR; Hanke, K; Hanson, GG; Han, T; Haney, M; Hartill, D; Hartline, RE; Haseroth, HD; Hassanein, A; Hoffman, K; Holtkamp, N; Holzer, EB; Johnson, C; Johnson, RP; Johnstone, C; Jungmann, K; Kahn, SA; Kaplan, DM; Keil, EK; Kim, ES; Kim, KJ; King, BJ; Kirk, HG; Kuno, Y; Ladran, TS; Lau, WW; Learned, JG; Lebedev, V; Lebrun, P; Lee, K; Lettry, JA; Laveder, M; Li, DR; Lombardi, A; Lu, CG; Makino, K; Malkin, V; Marfatia, D; McDonald, KT; Mezzetto, M; Miller, [No Value; Mills, FE; Mocioiu, I; Mokhov, NV; Monroe, J; Moretti, A; Mori, Y; Neuffer, DV; Ng, KY; Norem, JH; Onel, Y; Oreglia, M; Ozaki, S; Padamsee, H; Pakvasa, S; Palmer, RB; Parker, B; Parsa, Z; Penn, G; Pischalnikov, Y; Qian, ZB; Radicioni, E; Raja, R; Ravn, HL; Reed, CB; Reginato, LL; Rehak, P; Rimmer, RA; Roberts, TJ; Roser, T; Rossmanith, R; Samulyak, RV; Scanlan, RM; Schlenstedt, S; Schwandt, P; Sessler, AM; Shaevitz, MH; Shrock, R; Sievers, P; Silvestrov, GI; Simos, N; Skrinsky, AN; Solomey, N; Spampinato, PT; Spentzouris, P; Stefanski, R; Stoltz, P; Stumer, I; Summers, DJ; Teng, LC; Thieberger, PA; Tigner, M; Todosow, M; Tollestrup, AV; Torun, Y; Trbojevic, D; Usubov, ZU; Vsevolozhskaya, TA; Wah, Y; Wang, CX; Wang, HP; Weggel, RJ; Whisnant, K; Willen, EH; Winn, DR; Wurtele, JS; Wu, V; Yokoi, T; Yoon, M; York, R; Yu, S; Zeller, A; Zhao, YX; Zisman, MS; Popovic, Milorad B.; Wilson, Edmund J.N.

    We describe the status of our effort to realize a first neutrino factory and the progress made in understanding the problems associated with the collection and cooling of muons towards that end. We summarize the physics that can be done with neutrino factories as well as with intense cold beams of

  8. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandyopadhyay, A.; Choubey, S.; Gandhi, R.; Goswami, S.; Roberts, B. L.; Bouchez, J.; Antoniadis, I.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G. F.; Schwetz, T.; Umasankar, S.; Karagiorgi, G.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Pascoli, S.; Geer, S.; Campagne, J. E.; Rolinec, M.; Blondel, A.; Campanelli, M.; Kopp, J.; Lindner, M.; Peltoniemi, J.; Dornan, P. J.; Long, K.; Matsushita, T.; Rogers, C.; Uchida, Y.; Dracos, M.; Whisnant, K.; Casper, D.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Popov, B.; Aysto, J.; Marfatia, D.; Okada, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Jungmann, K.; Lesgourgues, J.; Zisman, M.; Tortola, M. A.; Friedland, A.; Davidson, S.; Antusch, S.; Biggio, C.; Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Gavela, B.; Maltoni, M.; Lopez-Pavon, J.; Rigolin, S.; Mondal, N.; Palladino, V.; Filthaut, F.; Albright, C.; de Gouvea, A.; Kuno, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Mezzetto, M.; Lola, S.; Langacker, P.; Baldini, A.; Nunokawa, H.; Meloni, D.; Diaz, M.; King, S. F.; Zuber, K.; Akeroyd, A. G.; Grossman, Y.; Farzan, Y.; Tobe, K.; Aoki, Mayumi; Murayama, H.; Kitazawa, N.; Yasuda, O.; Petcov, S.; Romanino, A.; Chimenti, P.; Vacchi, A.; Smirnov, A. Yu; Couce, E.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Hernandez, P.; Sorel, M.; Valle, J. W. F.; Harrison, P. F.; Lunardini, C.; Nelson, J. K.; Barger, V.; Everett, L.; Huber, P.; Winter, W.; Fetscher, W.; van der Schaaf, A.

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried out by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and

  9. General B factory design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the general considerations that go into the design of an asymmetric B factory collider. Justification is given for the typical parameters of such a facility, and the physics and technology challenges that arise from these parameter choices are discussed. Cost and schedule issues for a B factory are discussed briefly. A summary of existing proposals is presented, noting their similarities and differences

  10. Status of a MIND type Neutrino Factory Far Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, F J P; Bross, A; Wands, R; Cervera, A; Ellis, M

    2013-01-01

    A realistic simulation and analysis of a Magnetized Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) has been developed for the purpose of understanding the potential sensitivity of such a facility. The status of the MIND simulation and reconstruction as discussed in the interim design report is reviewed here. Priorities for producing a more realistic simulation for a reference design report will be discussed, as will be the steps that have already been taken towards an improved simulation.

  11. A Stationary Target for the CERN-Neutrino-Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Sievers, P

    2001-01-01

    As production target for Neutron Factories, free mercury jets with high axial velocity of about 20 m/s are being studied. For the CERN-Neutrino-Factory proposal with a 4 MW beam power, but with a relatively large beam size at 2.2 GeV/c and pulsed at 75 Hz, maximum energy deposition densities of below 20 J/g and average power densities of about 1 kW/g are expected. Therefore a study has been made which discusses the feasibility and limits of a confined, stationary target cooled by a liquid. It is proposed to use solid spheres of high density material with diameters in the millimeter range. These spheres are confined inside a Titanium container and cooled by an efficient water circuit. Alternatively, low density liquid metal cooling could be used. Dynamic response, as pressure pulses and vibrations are greatly reduced by the small size of the target granules in combination with a relatively long beam pulse with a duration of 3.3 ms. The open issue of the lifetime of such as structure and its fatigue limit at...

  12. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab

  13. Handbook factory planning and design

    CERN Document Server

    Wiendahl, Hans-Peter; Nyhuis, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This handbook introduces a methodical approach and pragmatic concept for the planning and design of changeable factories that act in strategic alliances to supply the ever-changing needs of the global market. In the first part, the change drivers of manufacturing enterprises and the resulting new challenges are considered in detail with focus on an appropriate change potential. The second part concerns the design of the production facilities and systems on the factory levels work place, section, building and site under functional, organisational, architectural and strategic aspects keeping in mind the environmental, health and safety aspects including corporate social responsibility. The third part is dedicated to the planning and design method that is based on a synergetic interaction of process and space. The accompanying project management of the planning and construction phase and the facility management for the effective utilization of the built premises close the book. -        Concise overview o...

  14. Feasibility of Injection/Extraction Systems for Muon FFAG Rings in the Neutrino Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, J.; Berg, J.; Aslaninejad, M.; Kelliher, D.; Machida, S.

    2010-01-01

    Non-scaling FFAG rings have been proposed for muon acceleration in a neutrino factory. In order to achieve small orbit excursion and small time of flight variation, lattices with a very compact cell structure and short straight sections are required. The resulting geometry places very challenging constraints on the injection/extraction systems. The feasibility of injection/extraction is discussed and various implementations focusing on minimization of kicker/septum strength are presented. The injection and extraction systems in the nonscaling FFAG for muon acceleration in a neutrino factory were studied in the ring based on FODO lattice. The vertical direction was found to be preferential for both injection and extraction, which allows for lower kicker strengths and facilitates the distribution of kickers due to a lower phase advance per cell in comparison with the horizontal plane. It is possible to design mirror-symmetric schemes in which the kickers can be reused for both signs of muons. The disadvantage of these solutions is a need for special magnets with large aperture in the injection/extraction region due to the large kicked beam oscillations. The strengths of the required kickers are still very challenging and the fields in the septum magnets dictates the need for a superconducting design.

  15. Support Facility for a Mercury Target Neutrino Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    2001-12-06

    A conceptual design for a neutrino-producing facility is presented, including the mercury-jet target system, beam absorber, and facility for the target/capture region. The mercury system is a closed loop that includes a containment structure in the high-magnetic field region, a mercury pool beam absorber, conventional equipment such as magnetic-coupled pumps, valves, a heat exchanger, and a special nozzle insert. The superconducting solenoids in the target region are protected from nuclear heating and radiation damage with water-cooled tungsten-carbide shielding; the decay channel solenoids are protected with water-cooled steel shielding. The target region and decay channel have high-neutron fluxes resulting in components that are highly activated. Therefore, the facility configuration is based on remotely maintaining the target system and the magnets, as well as providing sufficient shielding for personnel. Summaries of cost estimates for the target system, magnet shielding, maintenance equipment, and the facility are also presented.

  16. How well do we need to know the beam properties at a neutrino factory?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.; Crisan, C.

    2000-01-01

    In principle, a neutrino factory can produce a beam with a well known ν e and ν μ flux. In practice, the uncertainties on the muon beam properties will introduce uncertainties into the calculated neutrino fluxes. The authors explore the relationship between the beam systematics and the systematic uncertainties on predicted event rates at a far site. The desired precision with which they must know the beam momentum, direction, divergence, momentum spread, and polarization are discussed

  17. 'Geant Simulation of Muon Cooling Rings,' 'Ionization Cooling Ring for Muons,' 'Geant Simulation of Six-Dimensional Cooling of Muon Beams in Ring Coolers,' 'Recent Progress in Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Research Within the Muon Collaboration,' 'Towards the Higgs Factory/Muon Collider,' 'Status of R and D on Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders,' 'Feasibility Study-II of a Muon-Based Neutrino Source,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'Higgs Factory Muon Collider,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'A Feasibility Study of a Neutrino Source Based on a Muon Storage Ring,' 'Status of Muon Collider Research and Development and Future Plans,'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. G. Hanson and A. Klier; R. Palmer,; Amit Klier and Gail G. Hanson,; Mohammad M. Alsharo, et al,; G. Hanson,; G. Hanson,; S. Ozaki, R. Palmer, M.S. Zisman, and J. Gallardo, eds.,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; N. Holtkamp and D. Finley, eds.; C.M. Ankenbrandt

    2006-01-01

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR DOE AWARD DE-FG02-03ER41267 NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER FELLOW By providing an intense, well controlled, well characterized, narrow beam of muon neutrinos and electron antineutrinos from the decay of muons in a storage ring, a neutrino factory can advance neutrino physics beyond the current round of approved and proposed experiments using conventional neutrino beams produced from a beam of decaying pions and kaons. There is no other comparable single clean source of electron neutrinos (from the decay of UNKNOWN, UNREADABLE IN ORIGINAL FILE) or antineutrinos. A muon storage ring producing 1019 to 1021 muon decays per year should be feasible. These intense neutrino beams can be used to study neutrino oscillations and possible CP violation. An entry-level muon storage ring that could provide 1019 decays per year would allow a determination of the sign of and a first measurement of sin22(UNKNOWN)±13 for favorable values of this parameter. An improved muon storage ring system that could provide 1020 muon decays per year would allow measurement of sin22(UNKNOWN)±13 to (UNKNOWN). A high performance muon storage ring capable of providing more than 1020 muon decays per year would allow the exciting possibility of a measurement of CP violation in the leptonic sector. An intense cold muon beam at the front end of a neutrino factory could enable a rich variety of precision muon physics, such as a more precise measurement of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g - 2) and searches for (UNKNOWN, UNREADABLE IN ORIGINAL FILE) N conversion. In addition, colliding beams of (UNKNOWN) and (UNKNOWN) in a muon collider can provide an effective 'Higgs factory' or multi-TeV center-of-mass energy collisions. A muon collider will be the best way to study the Higgs bosons associated with supersymmetric theories and may be necessary to discover them. Two neutrino factory feasibility studies have been carried out in the U.S. International design efforts are

  18. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams (ν factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both ± μ. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider

  19. Summary of the Superconducting RF Linac for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.

    2010-01-01

    Project-X is a proposed project to be built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory with several potential missions. A primary part of the Project-X accelerator chain is a Superconducting linac, and In October 2009 a workshop was held to concentrate on the linac parameters. The charge of the workshop was to 'focus only on the SRF linac approaches and how it can be used'. The focus of Working Group 2 of this workshop was to evaluate how the different linac options being considered impact the potential realization of Muon Collider (MC) and Neutrino Factory (NF) applications. In particular the working group charge was, 'to investigate the use of a multi-megawatt proton linac to target, phase rotate and collect muons to support a muon collider and neutrino factory'. To focus the working group discussion, three primary questions were identified early on, to serve as a reference: (1) What are the proton source requirements for muon colliders and neutrino factories? (2) What are the issues with respect to realizing the required muon collider and neutrino factory proton sources - (a) General considerations and (b) Considerations specific to the two linac configurations identified by Project-X? (3) What things need to be done before we can be reasonably confident that ICD1/ICD2 can be upgraded to provide the neutrino factory/muon collider needs? A number of presentations were given, and are available at the workshop web-site. This paper does not summarize the individual presentations, but rather addresses overall findings as related to the three guiding questions listed above.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Proton Induced Thermal Shocks and Magnetohydrodynamic Effects in Molten Metal Pion Production Targets for a Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffarzick, D

    2001-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the basic subatomic particles among electrons, protons and many more, which build all matter. Neutrinos appear in three different types. Sources of neutrinos are the sun and nuclear power plants. But the type of neutrinos created there is not exactly known and the type changes between their creation to their detection, so only assumptions can be made. This change of type is called “neutrino oscillation”. In order to enable the nuclear physisists to find out more about the neutrinos and the neutrino oscillation, a neutrino factory will be built which will produce a high intensity neutrino beam with exactly known parameters like number of particles and type of neutrinos. This neutrino beam can then be used to investigate the properties of the neutrinos at near and far detectors. In cooperation with other laboratories CERN has started a study of some of the many technological challenges of a neutrino factory. A major issue of the facility is the pion production target where p...

  1. Muon ring could act as a neutrino factory

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Neutrinos have always been in the particle physics spotlight. However, with new machine ideas opening up the possibility of intense neutrino sources, this area of research could go on to reveal further insights into the weakly $9 interacting particles, thereby complementing the detailed knowledge of the quark sector. Muons, which are heavy relatives of the electron, come in positively and negatively charged versions with properties that are broadly similar to $9 those of electrons. These oppositely charged beams could be made to collide with each other to produce a wealth of particles. As a result of their being more than 200 times as heavy as electrons, muons that are bent by a magnetic $9 guide field lose much less energy than electrons and could be housed in far smaller rings. Several generations of muon colliders could be accommodated on existing laboratory sites. (0 refs).

  2. Optimization of a mercury jet target for a neutrino factory or a muon collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ding

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A study of target parameters for a mercury jet target for a neutrino factory or muon collider is presented. We simulate particle production initiated by incoming protons with kinetic energies between 2 and 100 GeV. For each proton beam kinetic energy, we maximize production by varying the geometric parameters of the target: the mercury jet radius, the incoming proton beam angle, and the crossing angle between the mercury jet and the proton beam. With an 8-GeV proton beam, we study the variation of meson production with the entry direction of the proton beam relative to the jet. We also examine the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam. The number of muons surviving through the neutrino factory front end channel is determined as a function of the proton beam kinetic energy.

  3. Magnet Misalignment Studies for the Front-end of the Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Prior, G; Stratakis, D; Neuffer, D; Snopok, P; Rogers, C

    2013-01-01

    In the Neutrino Factory front-end the muon beam coming from the interaction of a high-power (4 MW) proton beam on a mercury jet target is transformed through a buncher, a phase rotator and an ionization cooling channel before entering the downstream acceleration system. The muon front-end channel is densely packed with solenoid magnets, normal conducting radio-frequency cavities and absorber windows for the cooling section. The tolerance to the misalignment of the different components has to be determined in order on one hand to set the limits beyond which the performance of the front-end channel would be degraded; on the other hand to optimize the design and assembly of the front-end cells such that the component alignment can be checked and corrected for where crucial for the performance of the channel. In this paper we show the results of some of the simulations of the frontend channel performance where the magnetic field direction has been altered compared to the baseline.

  4. The CERN target and horn concept for a neutrino factory based on muon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ravn, H L

    2003-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a high-power pion production target and collection system, which is suggested to be used as source for the proposed CERN muon-neutrino factory. A relatively low-energy proton beam of 2.2 GeV which is pulsed at 50 Hz with similar to 10**1**4 ppp and 4 MW average power has been chosen as driver. The deleterious effects of the up to 1 kW/g power densities deposited in the target and its surroundings by the proton beam are a major technical challenge since it seriously limits the lifetime of all solid components. A target, which consists of a free surface mercury- jet with a high axial velocity, allows efficiently to carry the heat away from the production region without need for beam windows. The secondary pions are collected and injected into the pion decay channel by means of a magnetic horn. This horn which has to surround the Hg-jet target is known to be very radiation resistant as well as light and easy to exchange. The suggested mechanical layout and technical parameter...

  5. Performance of the MIND detector at a Neutrino Factory using realistic muon reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervera, A.; Laing, A.; Martin-Albo, J.; Soler, F.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    A Neutrino Factory producing an intense beam composed of ν e (ν-bar e ) and ν-bar μ (ν μ ) from muon decays has been shown to have the greatest sensitivity to the two currently unmeasured neutrino mixing parameters, θ 13 and δ CP . Using the 'wrong-sign muon' signal to measure ν e →ν μ (ν-bar e →ν-bar μ ) oscillations in a 50 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) sensitivity to δ CP could be maintained down to small values of θ 13 . However, the detector efficiencies used in these previous studies were calculated assuming perfect pattern recognition. In this paper, MIND is reassessed taking into account, for the first time, a realistic pattern recognition for the muon candidate. Reoptimisation of the analysis utilises a combination of methods, including a multivariate analysis similar to the one used in MINOS, to maintain high efficiency while suppressing backgrounds, ensuring that the signal selection efficiency and the background levels are comparable or better than the ones in previous analyses. As a result MIND remains the most sensitive future facility for the discovery of CP violation from neutrino oscillations.

  6. A conceptual design of circular Higgs factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai

    2016-11-30

    Similar to a super B-factory, a circular Higgs factory (CHF) will require strong focusing systems near the interaction points and a low-emittance lattice in the arcs to achieve a factory luminosity. At electron beam energy of 125 GeV, beamstrahlung effects during the collision pose an additional challenge to the collider design. In particular, a large momentum acceptance at the 2% level is necessary to retain an adequate beam lifetime. This turns out to be the most challenging aspect in the design of a CHF. In this paper, an example will be provided to illustrate the beam dynamics in a CHF, emphasizing the chromatic optics. Basic optical modules and advanced analysis will be presented. Most importantly, we will show that 2% momentum aperture is achievable.

  7. Polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering and future neutrino factories

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, G; Forte, Stefano; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the determination of polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments. We summarize the next-to-leading order treatment of charged-current polarized structure functions, their relation to polarized parton distributions and scale dependence, and discuss their description by means of a next-to-leading order evolution code. We discuss current theoretical expectations and positivity constraints on the unmeasured C-odd combinations Delta q-Delta qbar of polarized quark distributions, and their determination in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments. We give estimates of the expected errors on charged-current structure functions at a future neutrino factory, and perform a study of the accuracy in the determination of polarized parton distributions that would be possible at such a facility. We show that these measurements have the potential to distinguish between different theoretical scenarios for the proton spin structure.

  8. Polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering and future neutrino factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, Stefano; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the determination of polarized parton distributions from charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments. We summarize the next-to-leading-order treatment of charged-current polarized structure functions, their relation to polarized parton distributions and scale dependence, and discuss their description by means of a next-to-leading-order evolution code. We discuss current theoretical expectations and positivity constraints on the unmeasured C-odd combinations Δq-Δq-bar of polarized quark distributions, and their determination in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering experiments. We give estimates of the expected errors on charged-current structure functions at a future neutrino factory, and perform a study of the accuracy in the determination of polarized parton distributions that would be possible at such a facility. We show that these measurements have the potential to distinguish between different theoretical scenarios for the proton spin structure

  9. Particle production and energy deposition studies for the neutrino factory target station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Back

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present FLUKA and MARS simulation studies of the pion production and energy deposition in the Neutrino Factory baseline target station, which consists of a 4 MW proton beam interacting with a liquid mercury jet target within a 20 T solenoidal magnetic field. We show that a substantial increase in the shielding is needed to protect the superconducting coils from too much energy deposition. Investigations reveal that it is possible to reduce the magnetic field in the solenoid capture system without adversely affecting the pion production efficiency. We show estimates of the amount of concrete shielding that will be required to protect the environment from the high radiation doses generated by the target station facility. We also present yield and energy deposition results for alternative targets: gallium liquid jet, tungsten powder jet, and solid tungsten bars.

  10. μ+N→τ+N at a muon or neutrino factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, Marc; Turan, Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The experimental discovery of large ν μ -ν τ mixing indicates that analogous mixing in the charged lepton sector could be substantial. We consider the possibility that if a high intensity muon beam, perhaps at the early stages of a muon or neutrino factory, strikes a nuclear target, then conversion of some of the muons into tau leptons could occur (similar to the conversion of muons to electrons at MECO). Using current experimental limits on rare tau decays to bound the size of the relevant operators, we find that a 50 GeV muon beam, with 10 20 muons on target per year, could yield as many as 10 7 μ+N→τ+N events per year. Backgrounds could be substantial, and we comment on the possibility of detection of this process

  11. Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Gouvea, AD; Pitts, K; Scholberg, K; Zeller, GP; Alonso, J; Bernstein, A; Bishai, M; Elliott, S; Heeger, K; Hoffman, K; Huber, P; Kaufman, LJ; Kayser, B; Link, J; Lunardini, C

    2016-01-01

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos. Report of the Community Summer Study 2013 (Snowmass) Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group

  12. Issues in Acceleration of A Muon Beam for a Neutrino Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Delayen; D. Douglas; L. Harwood; V. Lebedev; C. Leemann; L. Merminga

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a concept for acceleration of a large phase-space, pulsed muon beam from 190 MeV to 50 GeV as part of a collaborative study of the feasibility of a neutrino factory based on in-flight decay of muons. The muon beam's initial energy spread was ∼20% and each bunch has the physical size of a soccer ball. Production of the muons will be quite expensive, so prevention of loss due to scraping or decay is critical. The former drives the system to large apertures and the latter calls for high real-estate-average gradients. The solution to be presented utilizes a 3 GeV linac to capture the beam, a 4-pass recirculating linac to get the beam to 10 GeV, and then a 5-pass linac to get the beam to 50 GeV. Throughout the system, longitudinal dynamics issues far outweighed transverse dynamics issues. This paper focuses on the issues surrounding the choice of superconducting rf structures over copper structures

  13. Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P.; Alonso, J.; Bernstein, A.; Bishai, M.; Elliott, S.; Heeger, K.; Hoffman, K.; Huber, P.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kayser, B.; Link, J.; Lunardini, C.

    2013-01-01

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  14. Architectural design of experience based factory model for software ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    architectural design. Automation features are incorporated in the design in which workflow system and intelligent agents are integrated, and the facilitation of cloud environment is empowered to further support the automation. Keywords: architectural design; knowledge management; experience factory; workflow;

  15. Argonne Tau-charm factory collider design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.; Norem, J.

    1995-01-01

    The design approach and design principles for a Tau-charm Factory at Argonne were studied. These studies led to a set of preliminary parameters and tentative component features as presented in this paper

  16. JINR tau-charm factory design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel'shtejn, E.; Aleksandrov, V.; Antropov, V.

    1993-01-01

    The review on tau-charm factory in JINR (Dubna) is presented. The structure scheme of tau-charm factory is described. The problems on injection complex are discussed: the composition, the working regime and parameters. The magnetic lattice of a booster is described. A versatile magnet lattice is used in tau-charm collider. It can realize both conventional flat beam scheme and monochromatization scheme. The results of chromaticity correction in high emittance lattice are presented. The list of parameters of tau-charm collider is given. The technical proposal of magnetic elements of booster and collider and their power supplies is made, as well as RF power supply in collider and vacuum system in its periodic cell. 12 refs.; 12 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Multilevel Factorial Designs With Experiment-Induced Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Dziak, John J; Collins, Linda M

    2017-04-06

    Factorial experimental designs have many applications in the behavioral sciences. In the context of intervention development, factorial experiments play a critical role in building and optimizing high-quality, multicomponent behavioral interventions. One challenge in implementing factorial experiments in the behavioral sciences is that individuals are often clustered in social or administrative units and may be more similar to each other than to individuals in other clusters. This means that data are dependent within clusters. Power planning resources are available for factorial experiments in which the multilevel structure of the data is due to individuals' membership in groups that existed before experimentation. However, in many cases clusters are generated in the course of the study itself. Such experiment-induced clustering (EIC) requires different data analysis models and power planning resources from those available for multilevel experimental designs in which clusters exist prior to experimentation. Despite the common occurrence of both experimental designs with EIC and factorial designs, a bridge has yet to be built between EIC and factorial designs. Therefore, resources are limited or nonexistent for planning factorial experiments that involve EIC. This article seeks to bridge this gap by extending prior models for EIC, developed for single-factor experiments, to factorial experiments involving various types of EIC. We also offer power formulas to help investigators decide whether a particular experimental design involving EIC is feasible. We demonstrate that factorial experiments can be powerful and feasible even with EIC. We discuss design considerations and directions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Neutrinos

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The Standard Model predicts that the neutrinos are massless and do not mix. Generic extensions of the Standard Model predict that neutrinos are massive (but, very likely, much lighter than the charged fermions). Therefore, the search for neutrino masses and mixing tests the Standard Model and probes new phasics. Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric, solar and, more recently, reactor neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. These results have significant theoretical implications: new physics exists, and its scale can be estimated. There are interesting lessons for grand unified theories and for models of extra dimensions. The measured neutrino flavor parameters pose a challenge to flavor models.

  19. Implementing Clinical Research Using Factorial Designs: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Timothy B; Smith, Stevens S; Bolt, Daniel M; Loh, Wei-Yin; Mermelstein, Robin; Fiore, Michael C; Piper, Megan E; Collins, Linda M

    2017-07-01

    Factorial experiments have rarely been used in the development or evaluation of clinical interventions. However, factorial designs offer advantages over randomized controlled trial designs, the latter being much more frequently used in such research. Factorial designs are highly efficient (permitting evaluation of multiple intervention components with good statistical power) and present the opportunity to detect interactions amongst intervention components. Such advantages have led methodologists to advocate for the greater use of factorial designs in research on clinical interventions (Collins, Dziak, & Li, 2009). However, researchers considering the use of such designs in clinical research face a series of choices that have consequential implications for the interpretability and value of the experimental results. These choices include: whether to use a factorial design, selection of the number and type of factors to include, how to address the compatibility of the different factors included, whether and how to avoid confounds between the type and number of interventions a participant receives, and how to interpret interactions. The use of factorial designs in clinical intervention research poses choices that differ from those typically considered in randomized clinical trial designs. However, the great information yield of the former encourages clinical researchers' increased and careful execution of such designs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Results of a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at a meson factory beam-stop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.W.

    1989-04-01

    This document describes a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The oscillation mode searched for is /bar /nu///sub μ/ → /bar /nu///sub e/. The first chapter is a review of the known properties of the neutrino and a description of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillation. Previous experimental limits on this unobserved phenomenon are also given. The second chapter describes the experimental apparatus used by the E645 experiment to detect neutrinos produced in the LAMPF beam stop. The salient features of the detector are its large mass (20 tons of CH 2 ), its fine segmentation (to allow good particle tracking), good energy resolution, its recording of the history both before and after tracks appear in the detector, an active cosmic-ray anticoincidence shield, and 2000 gm/cm 2 of passive cosmic-ray shielding. It is located 26.8 m from the neutrino source, which has a mean neutrino energy of 40 MeV. The third chapter details the reduction of the 1.3 million event data sample to a 49 event sample of neutrino candidates. Principle backgrounds are Michel electrons from stopping cosmic-ray muons and protons from np elastic scattering by cosmic-ray neutrons. The fourth chapter explains how background levels from neutrino-nuclear scattering are predicted. The result of a maximum-likelihood analysis reveals no evidence for oscillation. 90% confidence levels are set at δm 2 = .10 eV 2 for large mixing and sin 2 (2θ) = .014 for large δm 2 . 82 refs., 18 figs., 55 tabs

  1. Theory of factorial design single- and multi-stratum experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Ching-Shui

    2013-01-01

    Bringing together both new and old results, Theory of Factorial Design: Single- and Multi-Stratum Experiments provides a rigorous, systematic, and up-to-date treatment of the theoretical aspects of factorial design. To prepare readers for a general theory, the author first presents a unified treatment of several simple designs, including completely randomized designs, block designs, and row-column designs. As such, the book is accessible to readers with minimal exposure to experimental design. With exercises and numerous examples, it is suitable as a reference for researchers and as a textbook

  2. Designing fractional factorial split-plot experiments using integer programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capehart, Shay R.; Keha, Ahmet; Kulahci, Murat

    2011-01-01

    factorial (FF) design, with the restricted randomisation structure to account for the whole plots and subplots. We discuss the formulation of FFSP designs using integer programming (IP) to achieve various design criteria. We specifically look at the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions...

  3. Design, analysis and presentation of factorial randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Paul

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evaluation of more than one intervention in the same randomised controlled trial can be achieved using a parallel group design. However this requires increased sample size and can be inefficient, especially if there is also interest in considering combinations of the interventions. An alternative may be a factorial trial, where for two interventions participants are allocated to receive neither intervention, one or the other, or both. Factorial trials require special considerations, however, particularly at the design and analysis stages. Discussion Using a 2 × 2 factorial trial as an example, we present a number of issues that should be considered when planning a factorial trial. The main design issue is that of sample size. Factorial trials are most often powered to detect the main effects of interventions, since adequate power to detect plausible interactions requires greatly increased sample sizes. The main analytical issues relate to the investigation of main effects and the interaction between the interventions in appropriate regression models. Presentation of results should reflect the analytical strategy with an emphasis on the principal research questions. We also give an example of how baseline and follow-up data should be presented. Lastly, we discuss the implications of the design, analytical and presentational issues covered. Summary Difficulties in interpreting the results of factorial trials if an influential interaction is observed is the cost of the potential for efficient, simultaneous consideration of two or more interventions. Factorial trials can in principle be designed to have adequate power to detect realistic interactions, and in any case they are the only design that allows such effects to be investigated.

  4. STRUCTURED JETS IN BL LAC OBJECTS: EFFICIENT PeV NEUTRINO FACTORIES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Ghisellini, Gabriele [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Guetta, Dafne [INAF-Osservatorio astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy)

    2014-09-20

    The origin of high-energy neutrinos (0.1–1 PeV range) detected by IceCube remains a mystery. In this work, we explore the possibility that efficient neutrino production can occur in structured jets of BL Lac objects, characterized by a fast inner spine surrounded by a slower layer. This scenario has been widely discussed in the framework of the high-energy emission models for BL Lac objects and radio galaxies. One of the relevant consequences of a velocity structure is the enhancement of the inverse Compton emission caused by the radiative coupling of the two zones. We show that a similar boosting could occur for the neutrino output of the spine through the photo-meson reaction of high-energy protons scattering off the amplified soft target photon field of the layer. Assuming the local density and the cosmological evolution of γ-ray BL Lac object derived from Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we calculate the expected diffuse neutrino intensity, which can match the IceCube data for a reasonable choice of parameters.

  5. Constructing General Orthogonal Fractional Factorial Split-Plot Designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartono, B.; Goos, P.; Schoen, E.

    2015-01-01

    While the orthogonal design of split-plot fractional factorial experiments has received much attention already, there are still major voids in the literature. First, designs with one or more factors acting at more than two levels have not yet been considered. Second, published work on nonregular

  6. Kaon factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1983-03-01

    Kaon factories would provide beams 100-1000 times more intense than those available from present accelerators in the 10-30 GeV range. More intense or cleaner secondary beams of kaons, antiprotons and neutrinos would be of particular interest for high precision experiments and studies of rare processes in both particle and nuclear physics, e.g. symmetry violations in K-decay, neutrino scattering, meson and baryon spectroscopy, hypernuclei, exotic atoms, K + studies of nuclear density and resonance propagation in nuclei. The various accelerators proposed include both fast-cycling synchrotrons providing 100 μA proton beams at 15 to 32 GeV and superconducting isochronous ring cyclotrons giving 100-400 μA at up to 15 GeV. This paper describes these designs and the various technical problems associated with them

  7. Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinando Casolaro; Alberto Trotta

    2014-01-01

    The article made a survey on neutrinos and the role they have for the understanding of nature, both on a microscopic and cosmic scale.   I neutrini Nell'articolo viene fatta una rassegna sui  neutrini e sul ruolo che essi hanno per la comprensione della natura, sia su scala microscopica, che su scala cosmica. Parole Chiave: neutrino, massa, onde gravitazionali

  8. Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Casolaro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article made a survey on neutrinos and the role they have for the understanding of nature, both on a microscopic and cosmic scale.   I neutrini Nell'articolo viene fatta una rassegna sui  neutrini e sul ruolo che essi hanno per la comprensione della natura, sia su scala microscopica, che su scala cosmica. Parole Chiave: neutrino, massa, onde gravitazionali

  9. The Mathematics of Symmetrical Factorial Designs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of deSigns for agricultural experiments and remarked: "It is a startling idea that Galois fields might be helpful to provide people with more and better food." 2. ... biology, chemistry, animal husbandry, industry and so on. The aim of these experiments is to estimate the individual, effect of each factor, called the main effect.

  10. The Mathematics of Symmetrical Factorial Designs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    University and PhD degree from the Indian Statistical ... tific research and it is well known that 'statistical design- ing' of such experiments is ... assignm~nt of treatment combinations to blocks, important treatment effects may get confounded or mixed up with block effects and become non- estimable. GENERAL I ARTICLE.

  11. Lactic acid fermentation from refectory waste: Factorial design analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A factorial experimental design method was used to optimize the lactic acid production using Lactobacillus bulgaricus from refectory waste obtained from Istanbul Technical University mess hall, Turkey. Fermentation experiments were carried out in a batch type reactor system which contains refectory waste with ...

  12. Design and analysis of 2 3 factorial experiments of variables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a 23 factorial experiment is designed to examine the influence of such factors as teaching method,gender and level of study on students' academic performance. The subjects were tested on effect of teaching method,gender and level of study on their academic performance. The data obtained from the ...

  13. Factorial study of rain garden design for nitrogen removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Nitrate (〖NO〗_3^--N ) removal studies in bioretention systems showed great variability in removal rates and in some cases 〖NO〗_3^--N was exported. A 3-way factorial design (2 x 2 x 4) was devised for eight outdoor un-vegetated rain gardens to evaluate the effects of ...

  14. Application of design and analysis of 23 factorial experiment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ekwueme

    In this paper, we consider a 23 factorial experiment of factors influencing recall ability in short – term memory. The factors of interest are ..... Working Memory. Oxford: Clarendon. Press. Box, G. E. et al., 2005. Statistics for Experiments: Design,. Innovation, and Discovery. Wiley Publisher. New. York. Broadbent, D. E., 1975.

  15. KEKB B-factory design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    KEKB is an asymmetric electron-positron collider at 8 x 3.5 GeV which aims at providing electron-positron collision at the center of mass energy of 10.58 GeV. Its mission is to support high energy physics research programs on CP violation and other topics in B-meson decay. Its luminosity goal is 10 34 /cm 2 s. As the construction of the KEKB was approved as a five-year project by the Japanese government, it was begun formally in April, 1994. The low energy ring LER for positrons at 3.5 GeV and the high energy ring HER for electrons at 8 GeV will be built side by side in the existing TRISTAN tunnel with 3 km circumference, and the maximum use of the infrastructure of TRISTAN will be made. The KEKB has only one interaction point in the Tsukuba experimental hall, and the BELLE detector will be installed in this interaction region. The layout of the two rings is explained. In this report, the basic design, hardware systems, the construction schedule, physics requirement, machine parameters, beam-beam interaction, RF parameters, impedance and collective effects, lattice design, interaction region, RF system, magnet system, vacuum system, beam instrumentation, injection and accelerator control system are described. (K.I.)

  16. Physics at the front-end of a neutrino factory a quantitative appraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Anselmino, M.; Ball, R.D.; Boglione, Mariaelena; D'Alesio, U.; Davidson, S.; Lellis, De; Ellis, John R.; Forte, S.; Gambino, P.; Gehrmann, T.; Kataev, A.L.; Kotzinian, A.; Kulagin, Sergey A.; Lehmann-Dronke, B.; Migliozzi, P.; Murgia, F.; Ridolfi, G.

    2004-01-01

    We present a quantitative appraisal of the physics potential for neutrino experiments at the front-end of a muon storage ring. We estimate the forseeable accuracy in the determination of several interesting observables, and explore the consequences of these measurements. We discuss the extraction of individual quark and antiquark densities from polarized and unpolarized deep-inelastic scattering. In particular we study the implications for the undertanding of the nucleon spin structure. We assess the determination of alpha_s from scaling violation of structure functions, and from sum rules, and the determination of sin^2(theta_W) from elastic nu-e and deep-inelastic nu-p scattering. We then consider the production of charmed hadrons, and the measurement of their absolute branching ratios. We study the polarization of Lambda baryons produced in the current and target fragmentation regions. Finally, we discuss the sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model.

  17. Design and manufacture NCS instruments for cement factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thanh Tuy; Nguyen Tien Dung; Dang Nguyet Anh; Nguyen Phuc; Khuong Thanh Tuan; Luong Duc Long; Pham Trong Quyen

    2003-01-01

    The ministry project 'Design and manufacture some of NCS instruments for cement factories' is a part of instrumentation for cement production in Vietnam. The objectives of the project include: 1/Design and manufacture the automatic control system for cement raw material mixing, connected to components X-ray analyzer through serial port of PC; 2/Design and manufacture the automatic discharge control system using gamma rays. The instruments, made by the project , for controlling the conveyor belt weighing machine can be easily improved for various types of conveyor belt weighing machines. Their mobility and software equipped can be adapted for requirement of modern cement production technology. The instruments are operating well in some cement factories and they are helping in quality control. (NHA)

  18. Systems analysis and futuristic designs of advanced biofuel factory concepts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianelli, Russ; Leathers, James; Thoma, Steven George; Celina, Mathias C.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. is addicted to petroleum--a dependency that periodically shocks the economy, compromises national security, and adversely affects the environment. If liquid fuels remain the main energy source for U.S. transportation for the foreseeable future, the system solution is the production of new liquid fuels that can directly displace diesel and gasoline. This study focuses on advanced concepts for biofuel factory production, describing three design concepts: biopetroleum, biodiesel, and higher alcohols. A general schematic is illustrated for each concept with technical description and analysis for each factory design. Looking beyond current biofuel pursuits by industry, this study explores unconventional feedstocks (e.g., extremophiles), out-of-favor reaction processes (e.g., radiation-induced catalytic cracking), and production of new fuel sources traditionally deemed undesirable (e.g., fusel oils). These concepts lay the foundation and path for future basic science and applied engineering to displace petroleum as a transportation energy source for good.

  19. Process study on compression moulding of SMC using factorial design

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Jimmy; Lundström, Staffan; Olofsson, K.

    2008-01-01

    During compression moulding of sheet moulding compounds, voids are formed that can deteriorate the properties of the final product. A large number of processing and material parameters can however be tuned in order to reduce the amount of voids. A factorial design is here applied to plan an experimental series where, in particular, vacuum assisted mouldings are carried out in a circular shaped mould. One result is that the electrical insulation can be considerably improved by choosing optimal...

  20. RF system design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    The paper presents an overview of the design of the RF system for the PEP-II B Factory. An RF station consists of either two or four single-cell cavities driven by a 1.2 MW klystron through a waveguide distribution network. A variety of feedback loops stabilize the RF and its interaction with the beam. System parameters and all the relevant parameters of klystron and cavities are given

  1. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2016-01-22

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  2. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Conceptual Design Report Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Adams, C.; Adamson, P.; Adhikari, S.; Ahmad, Z.; Albright, C.H.; Alion, T.; Amador, E.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Anjos, J. d.; Ankowski, A.; Antonello, M.; Aranda Fernandez, A.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Aristizabal, D.; Arrieta-Diaz, E.; Aryal, K.; Asaadi, J.; Asner, D.; Athar, M.S.; Auger, M.; Aurisano, A.; Aushev, V.; Autiero, D.; Avila, M.; Back, J.J.; Bai, X.; Baibussinov, B.; Baird, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baller, B.; Ballett, P.; Bambah, B.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Barker, G.J.; Barletta, W.A.; Barr, G.; Barros, N.; Bartosz, B.; Bartoszek, L.; Bashyal, A.; Bass, M.; Bay, F.; Beacom, J.; Behera, B.R.; Bellettini, G.; Bellini, V.; Beltramello, O.; Benekos, N.; Benetti, P.A.; Bercellie, A.; Bergevin, M.; Berman, E.; Berns, H.; Bernstein, R.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhandari, B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bian, J.; Biery, K.; Bishai, M.; Blackburn, T.; Blake, A.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blaufuss, E.; Bleakley, B.; Blucher, E.; Bocean, V.; Boffelli, F.; Boissevain, J.; Bolognesi, S.; Bolton, T.; Bonesini, M.; Boone, T.; Booth, C.; Bordoni, S.; Borysova, M.; Bourguille, B.; Boyd, S.B.; Brailsford, D.; Brandt, A.; Bremer, J.; Brice, S.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brown, G.; Brown, R.; Brunetti, G.; Bu, X.; Buchanan, N.; Budd, H.; Bugg, B.; Calafiura, P.; Calligarich, E.; Calvo, E.; Camilleri, L.; Campanelli, M.; Cantini, C.; Carls, B.; Carr, R.; Cascella, M.; Castromonte, C.; Mur, E.Catano; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Chalifour, M.; Chandratre, V.B.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chaussard, L.; Chembra, S.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, M.; Cherdack, D.; Chi, C.; Childress, S.; Choubey, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christodoulou, G.; Christofferson, C.; Church, E.; Cianci, D.; Cline, D.; Coan, T.; Cocco, A.; Coelho, J.; Cole, P.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.; Corey, R.; Corwin, L.; Cranshaw, J.; Crivelli, P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Curioni, A.; Cushing, J.; Adams, D.L.; Dale, D.; Das, S.R.; Davenne, T.; Davies, G.S.; Davies, J.; Dawson, J.; De, K.; de Gouvea, A.; de Jong, J.K.; de Jong, P.; De Lurgio, P.; Decowski, M.; Delbart, A.; Densham, C.; Dharmapalan, R.; Dhingra, N.; Di Luise, S.; Diamantopoulou, M.; Diaz, J.S.; Diaz Bautista, G.; Diwan, M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolph, J.; Drake, G.; Duchesneau, D.; Duvernois, M.; Duyang, H.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dye, S.; Dytman, S.; Eberly, B.; Edgecock, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elliott, S.; Elnimr, M.; Emery, S.; Endress, E.; Eno, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escobar, C.O.; Evans, J.; Falcone, A.; Falk, L.; Farbin, A.; Farnese, C.; Farzan, Y.; Fava, A.; Favilli, L.; Felde, J.; Felix, J.; Fernandes, S.; Fields, L.; Finch, A.; Fitton, M.; Fleming, B.; Forest, T.; Fowler, J.; Fox, W.; Fried, J.; Friedland, A.; Fuess, S.; Fujikawa, B.; Gago, A.; Gallagher, H.; Galymov, S.; Gamble, T.; Gandhi, R.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Gardiner, S.; Garvey, G.; Gehman, V.M.; Gendotti, A.; Geronimo, G. d.; Ghag, C.; Ghoshal, P.; Gibin, D.; Gil-Botella, I.; Gill, R.; Girardelli, D.; Giri, A.; Glavin, S.; Goeldi, D.; Golapinni, S.; Gold, M.; Gomes, R.A.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Goodman, M.C.; Gorbunov, D.; Goswami, S.; Graf, N.; Graf, N.; Graham, M.; Gramelini, E.; Gran, R.; Grant, C.; Grant, N.; Greco, V.; Greenlee, H.; Greenler, L.; Greenley, C.; Groh, M.; Grullon, S.; Grundy, T.; Grzelak, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Guarino, V.; Guarnaccia, E.; Guedes, G.P.; Guenette, R.; Guglielmi, A.; Habig, A.T.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Hadavand, H.; Haenni, R.; Hahn, A.; Haigh, M.D.; Haines, T.; Hamernik, T.; Handler, T.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Hartnell, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Hatcher, R.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hays, S.; Hazen, E.; Headley, M.; Heavey, A.; Heeger, K.; Heise, J.; Hennessy, K.; Hewes, J.; Higuera, A.; Hill, T.; Himmel, A.; Hogan, M.; Holanda, P.; Holin, A.; Honey, W.; Horikawa, S.; Horton-Smith, G.; Howard, B.; Howell, J.; Hurh, P.; Huston, J.; Hylen, J.; Imlay, R.; Insler, J.; Introzzi, G.; Ioanisyan, D.; Ioannisian, A.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jackson, C.; Jaffe, D.E.; James, C.; James, E.; Jediny, F.; Jen, C.; Jhingan, A.; Jimenez, S.; Jo, J.H.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, J.; Jones, B.J.; Joshi, J.; Jostlein, H.; Jung, C.K.; Junk, T.; Kaboth, A.; Kadel, R.; Kafka, T.; Kalousis, L.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Karagiorgi, G.; Karasavvas, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, P.; Kayser, B.; Kazaryan, N.; Kearns, E.; Keener, P.; Kemboi, S.; Kemp, E.; Kettell, S.H.; Khabibullin, M.; Khandaker, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kirby, B.; Kirby, M.; Klein, J.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kohn, S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopylov, A.; Kordosky, M.; Kormos, L.; Kose, U.; Kostelecky, A.; Kramer, M.; Kreslo, I.; Kriske, R.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Kulagin, S.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, G.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kutter, T.; Laminack, A.; Lande, K.; Lane, C.; Lang, K.; Lanni, F.; Learned, J.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, D.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.; Lee, W.M.; Leigui de Oliveira, M.A.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Libo, J.; Lin, C.S.; Lin, S.; Ling, J.; Link, J.; Liptak, Z.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N.; Loew, T.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, K.; Lopes, M.D.L.; Lopez, J.P.; Losecco, J.; Louis, W.; Lowery, J.; Luethi, M.; Luk, K.; Lundberg, B.; Lundin, T.; Luo, X.; Lux, T.; Lykken, J.; Machado, A.A.; Macier, J.R.; Magill, S.; Mahler, G.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Malhotra, S.; Malon, D.; Mammoliti, F.; Mancina, S.; Mandal, S.K.; Mandodi, S.; Manly, S.L.; Mann, A.; Marchionni, A.; Marciano, W.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Marino, A.; Marshak, M.; Marshall, C.; Marshall, J.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Albo, J.; Martinez, D.; Matsuno, S.; Matthews, J.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mayilyan, D.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McCluskey, E.; McConkey, N.; McDonald, K.; McFarland, K.S.; McGowan, A.M.; McGrew, C.; McKeown, R.; McNulty, D.; McTaggart, R.; Mefodiev, A.; Mehrian, M.; Mehta, P.; Mei, D.; Mena, O.; Menary, S.; Mendez, H.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Meng, Y.; Mertins, D.; Merritt, H.; Messier, M.; Metcalf, W.; Mewes, M.; Meyer, H.; Miao, T.; Milincic, R.; Miller, W.; Mills, G.; Mineev, O.; Miranda, O.; Mishra, C.S.; Mishra, S.R.; Mitrica, B.; Mladenov, D.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanta, R.; Mokhov, N.; Montanari, C.; Montanari, D.; Moon, J.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C.; Morfin, J.; Morgan, B.; Morris, C.; Morse, W.; Moss, Z.; Mossey, C.; Moura, C.A.; Mousseau, J.; Mualem, L.; Muether, M.; Mufson, S.; Murphy, S.; Musser, J.; Musser, R.; Nakajima, Y.; Naples, D.; Napolitano, J.; Navarro, J.; Navas, D.; Nelson, J.; Nessi, M.; Newcomer, M.; Ng, Y.; Nichol, R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Nikolics, K.; Niner, E.; Norris, B.; Noto, F.; Novakova, P.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; Nunes, M.S.; O'Keeffe, H.; Oldeman, R.; Oliveira, R.; Olson, T.; Onishchuk, Y.; Osta, J.; Ovsjannikova, T.; Page, B.; Pakvasa, S.; Pal, S.; Palamara, O.; Palazzo, A.; Paley, J.; Palomares, C.; Pantic, E.; Paolone, V.; Papadimitriou, V.; Park, J.; Parke, S.; Parsa, Z.; Pascoli, S.; Patterson, R.; Patton, S.; Patzak, T.; Paulos, B.; Paulucci, L.; Pavlovic, Z.; Pawloski, G.; Peeters, S.; Pennacchio, E.; Perch, A.; Perdue, G.N.; Periale, L.; Perkin, J.D.; Pessard, H.; Petrillo, G.; Petti, R.; Petukhov, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potenza, R.; Potukuchi, B.; Poudyal, N.; Prokofiev, O.; Pruthi, N.; Przewlocki, P.; Pushka, D.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Raboanary, R.; Radeka, V.; Radovic, A.; Raffelt, G.; Rakhno, I.; Rakotondramanana, H.T.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramachers, Y.A.; Rameika, R.; Ramsey, J.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.; Ratoff, P.; Rebel, B.; Regenfus, C.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reitzner, D.; Remoto, A.; Renshaw, A.; Rescia, S.; Richardson, M.; Rielage, K.; Riesselmann, K.; Robinson, M.; Rochester, L.; Rodrigues, O.B.; Rodrigues, P.; Roe, B.; Rosen, M.; Roser, R.M.; Ross-Lonergan, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Rucinski, R.; von Rohr, C.Rudolph; Russell, B.; Ruterbories, D.; Saakyan, R.; Sahu, N.; Sala, P.; Samios, N.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez, M.; Sands, B.; Santana, S.; Santorelli, R.; Santucci, G.; Saoulidou, N.; Scaramelli, A.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmitt, R.; Schmitz, D.; Schneps, J.; Scholberg, K.; Schukraft, A.; Schwehr, J.; Segreto, E.; Seibert, S.; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J.A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shahi, J.; Shahsavarani, S.; Shanahan, P.; Shankar, S.U.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, R.K.; Shaw, T.; Shrock, R.; Shyrma, I.; Simos, N.; Sinev, G.; Singh, I.; Singh, J.; Singh, J.; Singh, V.; Sinnis, G.; Sippach, W.; Smargianaki, D.; Smy, M.; Snider, E.; Snopok, P.; Sobczyk, J.; Sobel, H.; Soderberg, M.; Solomey, N.; Sondheim, W.; Sorel, M.; Sousa, A.; Soustruznik, K.; Spitz, J.; Spooner, N.J.; Stancari, M.; Stancu, I.; Stefan, D.; Steiner, H.M.; Stewart, J.; Stock, J.; Stoica, S.; Stone, J.; Strait, J.; Strait, M.; Strauss, T.; Striganov, S.; Sulej, R.; Sullivan, G.; Sun, Y.; Suter, L.; Sutera, C.M.; Svoboda, R.; Szczerbinska, B.; Szelc, A.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Talaga, R.; Tamsett, M.; Tariq, S.; Tatar, E.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, D.; Terao, K.; Thiesse, M.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Thomson, M.; Thorn, C.; Thorpe, M.; Tian, X.; Tiedt, D.; Timm, S.C.; Tonazzo, A.; Tope, T.; Topkar, A.; Torres, F.R.; Torti, M.; Tortola, M.; Tortorici, F.; Toups, M.; Touramanis, C.; Tripathi, M.; Tropin, I.; Tsai, Y.; Tsang, K.V.; Tsenov, R.; Tufanli, S.; Tull, C.; Turner, J.; Tzanov, M.; Tziaferi, E.; Uchida, Y.; Urheim, J.; Usher, T.; Vagins, M.; Vahle, P.; Valdiviesso, G.A.; Valerio, L.; Vallari, Z.; Valle, J.; Van Berg, R.; Van de Water, R.; Van Gemmeren, P.; Varanini, F.; Varner, G.; Vasseur, G.; Vaziri, K.; Velev, G.; Ventura, S.; Verdugo, A.; Viant, T.; Vieira, T.V.; Vignoli, C.; Vilela, C.; Viren, B.; Vrba, T.; Wachala, T.; Wahl, D.; Wallbank, M.; Walsh, N.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, L.; Wang, T.; Warburton, T.K.; Warner, D.; Wascko, M.; Waters, D.; Watson, T.B.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wei, W.; Weinstein, A.; Wells, D.; Wenman, D.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.; Wilking, M.; Willhite, J.; Wilson, P.; Wilson, R.J.; Winslow, L.; Wittich, P.; Wojcicki, S.; Wong, H.H.; Wood, K.; Worcester, E.; Worcester, M.; Wu, S.; Xin, T.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yarritu, K.; Ye, J.; Yeh, M.; Yershov, N.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zalewska, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zang, L.; Zani, A.; Zani, A.; Zavala, G.; Zeller, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, E.D.; Zito, M.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  3. Design Learning of Teaching Factory in Mechanical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, R. C.; Kusumah, I. H.; Komaro, M.; Rahayu, Y.; Asfiyanur, E. P.

    2018-02-01

    The industrial world that is the target of the process and learning outcomes of vocational high school (SMK) has its own character and nuance. Therefore, vocational education institutions in the learning process should be able to make the appropriate learning approach and in accordance with the industrial world. One approach to learning that is based on production and learning in the world of work is by industry-based learning or known as Teaching Factory, where in this model apply learning that involves direct students in goods or service activities are expected to have the quality so it is worth selling and accepted by consumers. The method used is descriptive approach. The purpose of this research is to get the design of the teaching factory based on the competency requirements of the graduates of the spouse industry, especially in the engineering department. The results of this study is expected to be one of the choice of model factory teaching in the field of machinery engineering in accordance with the products and competencies of the graduates that the industry needs.

  4. Improvement of a microencapsulation with aqueous core by factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, P; Brun, H; Chapelon, R; Pouyet, B

    1992-01-01

    Preparation of microcapsules with aqueous core and polyamide walls is influenced by several factors. We improved the stability of walls and size of capsules by simultaneous variation of four factors: total ratio of polymer, ratio of amines to acid chlorides, concentration of surfactant and speed of stirring. Use of factorial design minimizes the number of experiments and permits us to know the influence of these factors and of their interactions. By increasing the ratio of amines to acid chlorides and with a low concentration of total polymer, we obtained more stable capsules. Surfactant had a negative effect on the hardness of the polymer.

  5. Factorial Design Approach in Proportioning Prestressed Self-Compacting Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Wu-Jian; Khayat, Kamal Henri; Lemieux, Guillaume; Xing, Feng; Wang, Wei-Lun

    2015-03-13

    In order to model the effect of mixture parameters and material properties on the hardened properties of, prestressed self-compacting concrete (SCC), and also to investigate the extensions of the statistical models, a factorial design was employed to identify the relative significance of these primary parameters and their interactions in terms of the mechanical and visco-elastic properties of SCC. In addition to the 16 fractional factorial mixtures evaluated in the modeled region of -1 to +1, eight axial mixtures were prepared at extreme values of -2 and +2 with the other variables maintained at the central points. Four replicate central mixtures were also evaluated. The effects of five mixture parameters, including binder type, binder content, dosage of viscosity-modifying admixture (VMA), water-cementitious material ratio (w/cm), and sand-to-total aggregate ratio (S/A) on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, as well as autogenous and drying shrinkage are discussed. The applications of the models to better understand trade-offs between mixture parameters and carry out comparisons among various responses are also highlighted. A logical design approach would be to use the existing model to predict the optimal design, and then run selected tests to quantify the influence of the new binder on the model.

  6. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Conceptual Design Report Volume 3: Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE June 24, 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Strait, James; Lundin, Tracy; Willhite, Joshua; Hamernik, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Marchionni, Alberto; Kim, Min Jeong; Nessi, Marzio; Montanari, David; Heavey, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This volume of the LBNF/DUNE Conceptual Design Report cover the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE and describes the LBNF Project, which includes design and construction of the beamline at Fermilab, the conventional facilities at both Fermilab and SURF, and the cryostat and cryogenics infrastructure required for the DUNE far detector.

  7. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 3: Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, James [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); McCluskey, Elaine [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lundin, Tracy [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Willhite, Joshua [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hamernik, Thomas [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Papadimitriou, Vaia [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Marchionni, Alberto [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kim, Min Jeong [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LNF); Nessi, Marzio [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Montanari, David [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Heavey, Anne [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-01-21

    This volume of the LBNF/DUNE Conceptual Design Report covers the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE and describes the LBNF Project, which includes design and construction of the beamline at Fermilab, the conventional facilities at both Fermilab and SURF, and the cryostat and cryogenics infrastructure required for the DUNE far detector.

  8. Optimization of minoxidil microemulsions using fractional factorial design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipakdee, Napaphak; Limpongsa, Ekapol; Pongjanyakul, Thaned

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply fractional factorial and multi-response optimization designs using desirability function approach for developing topical microemulsions. Minoxidil (MX) was used as a model drug. Limonene was used as an oil phase. Based on solubility, Tween 20 and caprylocaproyl polyoxyl-8 glycerides were selected as surfactants, propylene glycol and ethanol were selected as co-solvent in aqueous phase. Experiments were performed according to a two-level fractional factorial design to evaluate the effects of independent variables: Tween 20 concentration in surfactant system (X1), surfactant concentration (X2), ethanol concentration in co-solvent system (X3), limonene concentration (X4) on MX solubility (Y1), permeation flux (Y2), lag time (Y3), deposition (Y4) of MX microemulsions. It was found that Y1 increased with increasing X3 and decreasing X2, X4; whereas Y2 increased with decreasing X1, X2 and increasing X3. While Y3 was not affected by these variables, Y4 increased with decreasing X1, X2. Three regression equations were obtained and calculated for predicted values of responses Y1, Y2 and Y4. The predicted values matched experimental values reasonably well with high determination coefficient. By using optimal desirability function, optimized microemulsion demonstrating the highest MX solubility, permeation flux and skin deposition was confirmed as low level of X1, X2 and X4 but high level of X3.

  9. Status of the TRIUMF KAON Factory design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackmore, E.W.

    1989-12-01

    The proposed KAON Factory consists of a chain of 5 accelerator and storage rings which will accelerate a 100 μA beam of protons injected from the TRIUMF H - cyclotron to a final energy of 30 GeV. This beam will be available either as a slow extracted beam with 80-90% duty factor or as a fast extracted beam with a 3 μs pulse every 100 ms. The status of an 11M$ preconstruction design study scheduled for completion in February 1990 will be described. Prototypes of various accelerator components are being fabricated and tested and the design of the conventional facilities, buildings, tunnels and services is being finalized

  10. Magnet design studies for the TRIUMF KAON factory proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, A.J.; Ellstrom, L.; Haddock, C.; Harold, M.; Reeve, P.; Sasaki, H.; Schwandt, P.

    1989-10-01

    TRIUMF is engaged on a one year Project Definition Study of its KAON factory proposal. This proposal calls for a total of 1800 magnets to be installed in three storage rings, two synchrotrons, beam transfer lines and experimental facilities to increase the present beam from 200 μA at 500 MeV to 100 μA at 30 GeV. The paper discusses the current design status concentrating on the ac booster synchrotron ring magnets which will be driven by biased dc current modulated at 50 Hz. Methods of estimating the core losses for this excitation, the coil eddy current losses and design and fabrication features of prototypes will be presented

  11. Optimization of MCM-48 synthesis using factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, A.R. do; Medeiros, R.L.B. de A.; Melo, M. A. de F.; Melo, D.M. de A. [Universitdade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal (Brazil); Souza, M.J.B. de, E-mail: ale3ufs@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    MCM-48 mesoporous materials were hydrothermally synthesized according to the 2{sup 2} factorial design by varying the crystallization time and temperature of the synthesis gel, and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analysis and adsorption of N{sub 2} . In the crystallization temperature and time conditions used, specific areas between 924 to 1102 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}, pore volumes between 0.015 to 0.087 cm{sup 3}.g{sup -1} and pore diameters between 3.2 to 4.0 nm were obtained. It was observed that for the syntheses performed at high temperature, the crystallization time should be reduced so that the material structure is formed. (author)

  12. Designing High Performance Factory Automation Applications on Top of DDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Calvo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available DDS is a recent specification aimed at providing high-performance publisher/subscriber middleware solutions. Despite being a very powerful flexible technology, it may prove complex to use, especially for the inexperienced. This work provides some guidelines for connecting software components that represent a new generation of automation devices (such as PLCs, IPCs and robots using Data Distribution Service (DDS as a virtual software bus. More specifically, it presents the design of a DDS-based component, the so-called Automation Component, and discusses how to map different traffic patterns using DDS entities exploiting the wealth of QoS management mechanisms provided by the DDS specification. A case study demonstrates the creation of factory automation applications out of software components that encapsulate independent stations.

  13. Accelerator design of the KEK B-Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Shin-ichi; Satoh, Kotaro; Kikutani, Eiji

    1991-03-01

    A design study has been made for the KEK B-Factory, an accelerator complex dedicated to the detection of the CP-violation effect of B-mesons. It is an asymmetric two-ring electron-positron collider of 3.5x8 GeV within a new tunnel measuring 1273 m circumference. The design peak luminosity is to be 10 34 cm -2 s -1 , which will be realized in two steps. The luminosity is to be 2 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 with a head-on collision scheme in the first step; it is then increased to a final value of 10 34 cm -2 s -1 with a finite-angle crossing scheme. This document comprises two parts; the first part presents an overview of the design; the second part is a collection of papers giving detailed descriptions of various subjects. Stress is put on the design of the first step; the second step is mentioned when necessary. (author)

  14. PEP-II: An asymmetric B factory. Conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    In this report, the authors have described an updated conceptual design for the high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory (PEP-II) to be built in the PEP tunnel culmination of more than four years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e{sub +}e{sub {minus}} collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 {times} 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. All aspects of the conceptual design were scrutinized in March 1991 by a DOE technical review committee chaired by Dr. L. Edward Temple. The design was deemed feasible and capable of achieving its physics goals. Furthermore, the cost estimate, schedule, and management plan for the project were fully endorsed by the committee. This updated conceptual design report captures the technical progress since the March 1991 review and reflects the lower cost estimate corresponding to the improved design. Although the PEP-II design has continued to evolve, no technical scope changes have been made that invalidate the conclusion of the DOE review. The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, an electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of PEP-II. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two PEP-II storage rings.

  15. Beam and experiments summary [neutrino studies

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Cline, David B; Collot, J; De Jong, M; Donini, Andrea; Dydak, Friedrich; Edgecock, R; Gavela-Legazpi, Maria Belen; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Garciá, M Concepción; Gruber, P; Harris, D A; Hernández, Pilar; Kuno, Y; Litchfield, P J; McFarland, K; Mena, O; Migliozzi, P; Palladino, Vittorio; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Para, A; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez, P; Rigolin, Stefano; Romanino, Andrea; Rubbia, André; Strolin, P; Wojcicki, S G

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations marks a major milestone in the history of neutrino physics, and opens a new window to the still mysterious origin of masses and flavour mixing. Many current and forthcoming experiments will. Answer open questions; however, a major step forward, up to and possibly including CP violation in the neutrino-mixing matrix, requires the neutrino beams from a neutrino factory. The neutrino factory is a new concept for producing neutrino beams of unprecedented quality in terms of intensity, flavour composition, and precision of the beam parameters. Most importantly, the neutrino factory is the only known way to generate a high- intensity beam of electron neutrinos of high energy. The neutrino beam from a neutrino factory, in particular the electron-neutrino beam, enables the exploration of otherwise inaccessible domains in neutrino oscillation physics by exploiting baselines of planetary dimensions. Suitable detectors pose formidable challenges but seem within reach with only mode...

  16. Design and analysis of a 1-ton prototype of the Jinping Neutrino Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongyi; Wang, Yuanqing; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin; Du, Xinxi; Zhang, Tianxiong; Guo, Ziyi; Yuan, Huanxin

    2017-05-01

    The Jinping Neutrino Experiment will perform an in-depth research on solar neutrinos and geo-neutrinos. Two structural options (i.e., cylindrical and spherical schemes) are proposed for the Jinping detector based on other successful underground neutrino detectors. Several key factors in the design are also discussed in detail. A 1-ton prototype of the Jinping experiment is proposed based on physics requirements. Subsequently, the structural design, installation procedure, and mechanical analysis of the neutrino detector prototype are discussed. The results show that the maximum Mises stresses on the acrylic vessel, stainless steel truss, and the tank are all lower than the design values of the strengths. The stability requirement of the stainless steel truss in the detector prototype is satisfied. Consequently, the structural scheme for the 1-ton prototype is safe and reliable.

  17. Design and analysis of a 1-ton prototype of the Jinping Neutrino Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zongyi; Wang, Yuanqing; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin; Du, Xinxi; Zhang, Tianxiong; Guo, Ziyi; Yuan, Huanxin

    2017-01-01

    The Jinping Neutrino Experiment will perform an in-depth research on solar neutrinos and geo-neutrinos. Two structural options (i.e., cylindrical and spherical schemes) are proposed for the Jinping detector based on other successful underground neutrino detectors. Several key factors in the design are also discussed in detail. A 1-ton prototype of the Jinping experiment is proposed based on physics requirements. Subsequently, the structural design, installation procedure, and mechanical analysis of the neutrino detector prototype are discussed. The results show that the maximum Mises stresses on the acrylic vessel, stainless steel truss, and the tank are all lower than the design values of the strengths. The stability requirement of the stainless steel truss in the detector prototype is satisfied. Consequently, the structural scheme for the 1-ton prototype is safe and reliable.

  18. Design and analysis of a 1-ton prototype of the Jinping Neutrino Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zongyi, E-mail: wangzongyi1990@outlook.com [School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang, Yuanqing [Key Laboratory of Civil Engineering Safety and Durability of Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Du, Xinxi [School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhang, Tianxiong [School of Civil Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Ziyi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yuan, Huanxin [School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2017-05-21

    The Jinping Neutrino Experiment will perform an in-depth research on solar neutrinos and geo-neutrinos. Two structural options (i.e., cylindrical and spherical schemes) are proposed for the Jinping detector based on other successful underground neutrino detectors. Several key factors in the design are also discussed in detail. A 1-ton prototype of the Jinping experiment is proposed based on physics requirements. Subsequently, the structural design, installation procedure, and mechanical analysis of the neutrino detector prototype are discussed. The results show that the maximum Mises stresses on the acrylic vessel, stainless steel truss, and the tank are all lower than the design values of the strengths. The stability requirement of the stainless steel truss in the detector prototype is satisfied. Consequently, the structural scheme for the 1-ton prototype is safe and reliable.

  19. Particle physics prospects for the KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryman, D.

    1989-05-01

    The Kaon Factory at TRIUMF will produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, neutrinos and other particles with a hundred-fold increase in intensity over existing machines in the 30 GeV region. This will make possible new high precision experiments designed to test current ideas as well as high sensitivity measurements which could potentially reveal new effects. A sample of particle physics experiments involving rare kaon decays, CP and T violation studies, neutrino properties and reactions and light quark spectroscopy which might take advantage of the new opportunities presented by the Kaon Factory is discussed

  20. Research and design progress of the Jinping Neutrino Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe

    2018-01-01

    Thanks to the 2400 m overburden and the long distance to commercial reactors, the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) is an ideal site for low background neutrino experiments. The Jinping Neutrino Experiment will perform an in-depth research on solar neutrinos, geo-neutrinos and supernova relic neutrinos. Many efforts were devoted to the R&D of the experimental proposal. A new type of liquid scintillator, with high light-yield and Cherenkov and scintillation separation capability, is being developed. The assay and selection of low radioactive stainless-steel (SST) was carried out. A wide field-of-view of 90 degree and high-geometry-efficiency of 98% light concentrator is developed. At the same time, a 1-ton prototype is constructed and placed underground at Jinping laboratory. The simulation and analysis software, electromagnetic calorimeter function, rock damage zone simulation will also be introduced briefly.

  1. Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    neutrino factories and these promise to take neutrino physics to a new era. Hopefully these as well as the long baseline experiments will lead to a determination of the neutrino parameters. Of course, entirely new phenomena could also be discovered. References. [1] R Davis, D S Harmer and K C Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett.

  2. Industry 4.0 learning factory didactic design parameters for industrial engineering education in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Sackey, S. M.; Bester, A.; Adams, D.

    2017-01-01

    To manage the impact of Industry 4.0 on industrial engineering (IE) education curriculum requirements, realistic teaching and learning infrastructure such as a learning factory are required. This paper scans the literature to determine Industry 4.0’s principles and interactions with IE and a learning factory, surveys relevant universities by questionnaire to determine its current status and practices, and formulates didactic design parameters for an Industry 4.0 learning factory to support IE...

  3. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  4. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BIGI, I.; BOLTON, T.; FORMAGGIO, J.; HARRIS, D.; MORFIN, J.; SPENTZOURIS, P.; YU, J.; KAYSER, B.; KING, B.J.; MCFARLAND, K.; PETROV, A.; SCHELLMAN, H.; VELASCO, M.; SHROCK, R.

    2000-01-01

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters

  5. Long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the AGS. Physics design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavis, D.; Carroll, A.; Chiang, I.

    1995-04-01

    The authors present a design for a multi-detector long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the BNL AGS. It has been approved by the BNL-HENP-PAC as AGS Experiment 889. The experiment will search for oscillations in the ν μ , disappearance channel and the ν μ ↔ ν e appearance channel by means of four identical neutrino detectors located 1, 3, 24, and 68km from the AGS neutrino source. Observed depletion of the ν μ flux (via quasi-elastic muon neutrino events, ν μ n → μ - p) in the far detectors not attended by an observed proportional increase of the ν e flux (via quasi-elastic electron neutrino events, ν e n → e - p) in those detectors will be prima facie evidence for the oscillation channel ν μ ↔ ν τ . The experiment is directed toward exploration of the region of the neutrino oscillation parameters Δm 2 and sin 2 2θ, suggested by the Kamiokande and IMB deep underground detectors but it will also explore a region more than two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous accelerator experiments. The experiment will run in a mode new to BNL. It will receive the fast extracted proton beam on the neutrino target approximately 20 hours per day when the AGS is not filling RHIC. A key aspect of the experimental design involves placing the detectors 1.5 degrees off the center line of the neutrino beam, which has the important advantage that the central value of the neutrino energy (∼ 1 GeV) and the beam spectral shape are, to a good approximation, the same in all four detectors. The proposed detectors are massive, imaging, water Cherenkov detectors similar in large part to the Kamiokande and IMB detectors. The design has profited from their decade-long experience, and from the detector designs of the forthcoming SNO and SuperKamiokande detectors

  6. Industry 4.0 learning factory didactic design parameters for industrial engineering education in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sackey, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To manage the impact of Industry 4.0 on industrial engineering (IE education curriculum requirements, realistic teaching and learning infrastructure such as a learning factory are required. This paper scans the literature to determine Industry 4.0’s principles and interactions with IE and a learning factory, surveys relevant universities by questionnaire to determine its current status and practices, and formulates didactic design parameters for an Industry 4.0 learning factory to support IE education in South Africa, making use of existing models of cyber-physical systems and learning factory morphology. In other results, the technical universities are discovered to be more positively disposed, in general terms, to developing an Industry 4.0 learning factory than are the traditional programmes which, with one exception, prefer computational facilities. Of ten universities that offer IE, only one — a traditional programme — has made significant progress towards creating an Industry 4.0 learning factory.

  7. Design of a plant factory suitable for Okinawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Ueno

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A "Plant factory" is one of the advanced facilities for vegetable cultivation in an artificially controlled environment, i.e., temperature, humidity, and CO2 concentration are controlled. Recently, it has become popular in Japan, USA, China and others. However, there are some problems to overcome before they become widespread. A project to develop a specific plant factory called the "Okinawa-type plant factory" has been funded by the Okinawa Prefecture. It addresses the severe environmental and social conditions of Okinawa. The main goal of the project was to reduce energy consumption by 30%. To achieve this, three methods were investigated using solar energy and LED lamps, since this plant factory used artificial illumination. Forty foot reefer containers were employed for the cultivation room, and insulation panels were partially used. Solar energy was used for lighting and air-conditioning. Solar energy was converted to thermal energy for air-conditioning using heat collecting panels. Hot water of 75-85 oC obtained by the collector was used for adsorption refrigeration. Sunlight was introduced in the cultivation room from the skylight windows. DC to DC system was also employed for photovoltaic utilization. The use of solar energy and LED lamps are effective to reduce energy consumption. A 30% reduction in energy use was achieved.

  8. Detection of ultra-high energy neutrino interactions in ice: comparing radio detector array designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtol, Keith; Vieregg, Abigail

    2014-08-01

    Ultra-high energy (UHE, >10^18 eV) cosmic neutrinos are anticipated to reveal the most distant, most obscured, and highest energy particle accelerators in the Universe. An almost guaranteed flux of UHE neutrinos is predicted from the interactions of UHE cosmic rays with the cosmic microwave background, and additional contributions may arise from prompt emission at individual sources. The spectrum of UHE neutrinos is a sensitive discriminator of the cosmological evolution of UHE sources, as well as the composition of UHE cosmic rays. At the same time, UHE neutrinos will enable several tests of fundamental physics, including constraints on the neutrino-nucleon interaction cross section at center-of-momentum energies ~100 TeV, and searches for Lorentz invariance violation.Theoretical predictions and subsequent laboratory measurements of coherent radio emission from showers initiated by neutrino interactions in dielectric media (e.g., ice, sand, salt, lunar regolith) have motivated diverse experimental approaches involving "detectors" comprised of up to millions of cubic kilometers of natural materials. I will discuss simulation results comparing the expected performance of several proposed radio detector array designs with subterranean, ice shelf, and above ice configurations.

  9. Solar neutrino detectors as sterile neutrino hunters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, Marco; Borexino-SOX Collaboration; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cloué, O.; Cribier, M.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Gschwender, M.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Jeschke, D.; Jonquères, N.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Ortica, F.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Reinert, Y.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Veyssière, C.; Vishneva, A.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-09-01

    The large size and the very low radioactive background of solar neutrino detectors such as Borexino at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy offer a unique opportunity to probe the existence of neutrino oscillations into new sterile components by means of carefully designed and well calibrated anti-neutrino and neutrino artificial sources. In this paper we briefly summarise the key elements of the SOX experiment, a program for the search of sterile neutrinos (and other short distance effects) by means of a 144Ce-144Pr anti-neutrino source and, possibly in the medium term future, with a 51Cr neutrino source.

  10. Design of Experiments with Multiple Independent Variables: A Resource Management Perspective on Complete and Reduced Factorial Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Linda M.; Dziak, John J.; Li, Runze

    2009-01-01

    An investigator who plans to conduct experiments with multiple independent variables must decide whether to use a complete or reduced factorial design. This article advocates a resource management perspective on making this decision, in which the investigator seeks a strategic balance between service to scientific objectives and economy. Considerations in making design decisions include whether research questions are framed as main effects or simple effects; whether and which effects are aliased (confounded) in a particular design; the number of experimental conditions that must be implemented in a particular design and the number of experimental subjects the design requires to maintain the desired level of statistical power; and the costs associated with implementing experimental conditions and obtaining experimental subjects. In this article four design options are compared: complete factorial, individual experiments, single factor, and fractional factorial designs. Complete and fractional factorial designs and single factor designs are generally more economical than conducting individual experiments on each factor. Although relatively unfamiliar to behavioral scientists, fractional factorial designs merit serious consideration because of their economy and versatility. PMID:19719358

  11. Oscillations with laboratory neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitta, Biagio

    2001-05-01

    The status of searches for oscillations using neutrinos produced in the laboratory is reviewed. The most recent results from experiments approaching completion are reported and the potential capabilities of long baseline projects being developed in USA and Europe are considered and compared. The steps that should naturally follow this new generation of experiments are outlined and the impact of future facilities - such as neutrino factories or conventional superbeams - in precision measurements of elements of the neutrino mixing matrix is discussed.

  12. Beta Beams: an accelerator based facility to explore Neutrino oscillation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Payet, J; Chance, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, VL; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; De Rosa, G; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery that the neutrino changes flavor as it travels through space has implications for the Standard Model of particle physics (SM)[1]. To know the contribution of neutrinos to the SM, needs precise measurements of the parameters governing the neutrino oscillations. This will require a high intensity beam-based neutrino oscillation facility. The EURONu Design Study will review three currently accepted methods of realizing this facility (the so-called Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make a decision on the layout and construction of the future European neutrino oscillation facility. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron neutrino and antineutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and letting them decay in a race-track shaped storage ring. EURONu Beta Beams are based on CERNs infrastructure and the fact that some of the already ...

  13. Accelerated and Rational Design of Improved CHO Cell Factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grav, Lise Marie

    . This allows us to i) facilitate improved studies of gene functions, ii) remove cellular traits that are disadvantageous to protein production, iii) control and predict the level and stability of protein expression, and iv) design and engineer new cellular functions. Overall, the results of this thesis...

  14. A comparison of two factorial designs, a complete 3 x 3 factorial and a central composite rotatable design, for use in binomial response experiments in aquatic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edginton, Andrea N; Sheridan, Patrick M; Boermans, Herman J; Thompson, Dean G; Holt, John D; Stephenson, Gerald R

    2004-02-01

    Using an amphibian toxicity testing protocol, comparative studies were conducted to assess the predictive precision, degree of similarity of results and efficiency of a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) in relation to a conventional complete 3x3 factorial design. Data were treated with response surface analysis using generalized linear models (glm) and application of profile deviance to generate confidence intervals. Design comparisons were based on studies conducted using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) protocol to examine the interaction of three toxicants at pH levels ranging from 4.5 to 8.5. Test substances included two commercial herbicide formulations based on glyphosate ([N-phosphonomethyl]glycine) isopropylamine salt (Vision, Rodeo) as well as a polyethoxylated tallow amine surfactant blend (MON 0818), which is a key component of the Vision formulation. The generated models from both the CCRD and the factorial designs produced toxicity estimates similar to each other and to previously published results. Trends were also similar to published results in that the surfactant, MON 0818, was comparatively more toxic than Vision, which was more toxic than Rodeo. Further, all toxicants induced higher mortality under alkaline as opposed to acidic conditions. The CCRD was between 66 and 124% more efficient in the Vision and Rodeo experiments in comparison to the complete 3x3 factorial. Thus, the factorial experiment would have required at least 66% more observations to obtain the same precision. There appeared to be no efficiency gain with the use of the CCRD for MON 0818. The CCRD had tighter confidence intervals in 9 of 12 cases across all test substances. Computer simulations using the experimental data for Vision demonstrated that the LCalpha estimates generated from the 1,000 simulated data sets were very close to the "true" value for both designs. This was based on small bias and mean squared error calculations. Coverage

  15. Clustering Words to Match Conditions: An Algorithm for Stimuli Selection in Factorial Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Marc; Haro, Juan; Boada, Roger

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing refinement of language processing models and the new discoveries about which variables can modulate these processes, stimuli selection for experiments with a factorial design is becoming a tough task. Selecting sets of words that differ in one variable, while matching these same words into dozens of other confounding variables…

  16. Factorial Design in Cement Raw Mix Reactivity Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duque Fernández, Gabriel Luis

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper corroborates, that experimental design technics are applicable to raw mix burnability investigations, and with it the obtained results could cover all the range of possible concentrations of industrial interest. Obtained results agree with theory. A negative interaction was found between lime saturation factor (LSF and silicate module (Ms in raw mix burnability and in cement reactivity. In the concentration range studied, working with high LSF and low Ms is recommended.

    En el presente trabajo se corrobora que las técnicas de diseño de experimento son aplicables a las investigaciones de facilidad de quema de los crudos de cemento, obteniéndose resultados que, abarcando el rango de concentraciones de interés industrial, concuerdan de forma satisfactoria con lo esperado por la teoría, con considerable ahorro de tiempo y dinero. Se encontró una interacción con signo negativo entre el factor de saturación de cal (FSC y el módulo de sílice, tanto en facilidad de quema de crudos como en reactividad del cemento. Se recomienda trabajar con factor de saturación de cal alto y módulo de sílice bajo para el rango de concentraciones estudiado.

  17. Design of the magnetized muon shield for the prompt-neutrino facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltay, C.; Bosek, N.; Couch, J.

    1982-01-01

    The main technical challenge in the design of the prompt neutrino beam is the magnetized muon shield. Two satisfactory alternate designs have been developed for such a shield during this past year and the background muon fluxes have been calculated by three independent programs at Columbia, Fermilab, and MIT. The background muon fluxes have been calculated to be satisfactory in all of the detectors that might use the beam. In Section III of this report we describe in detail the three Monte Carlo programs used in these calculations. In Section IV we give the details of the flux calculations for the E-613 shield and the comparisons with the observed fluxes with various configurations of that shield. In Section V we describe the designs that have been developed for the neutrino area shield. In Section VI we discuss the problem of proton beam transport losses and the associated muon fluxes. Finally, in Section VII a comparison of the two solutions is made which covers cost, effectiveness, schedule and responsiveness to future unknowns. We conclude that there are not overwhelming reasons for the choice of one design over the other. However, for a variety of secondary reasons the superconducting design offers advantages. We therefore propose the construction of the prompt neutrino facility with the superconducting magnet design

  18. SuperB A High-Luminosity Asymmetric $e^+ e^-$ Super Flavour Factory : Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bona, M.; Grauges Pous, E.; Colangelo, P.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Eigen, G.; Venturini, M.; Soni, N.; Bruschi, M.; De Castro, S.; Faccioli, P.; Gabrieli, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Semprini Cesare, N.; Spighi, R.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J.; Soni, A.; Khan, A.; Barniakov, A.Y.; Barniakov, M.Y.; Blinov, V.E.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Golubev, V.B.; Kononov, S.A.; Koop, I.A.; Kravchenko, E.A.; Levichev, E.B.; Nikitin, S.A.; Onuchin, A.P.; Piminov, P.A.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Shatilov, D.N.; Skovpen, Y.I.; Solodov, E.A.; Cheng, C.H.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D.J.; Porter, F.C.; Asner, D.M.; Pham, T.N.; Fleischer, R.; Giudice, G.F.; Hurth, T.; Mangano, M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B.T.; Schwartz, A.J.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Soffer, A.; Beard, C.D.; Haas, T.; Mankel, R.; Hiller, G.; Ball, P.; Pappagallo, M.; Pennington, M.R.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Abada, A.; Becirevic, D.; Descotes-Genon, S.; Pene, O.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabresi, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Santoro, V.; Stancari, G.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Calcaterra, A.; Drago, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Guiducci, S.; Isidori, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.M.; Piccolo, M.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Rama, M.; Vaccarezza, C.; Zallo, A.; Zobov, M.; De Sangro, R.; Buzzo, A.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M.R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Matias, J.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Borzumati, F.; Eyges, V.; Prell, S.A.; Pedlar, T.K.; Korpar, S.; Pestonik, R.; Staric, M.; Neubert, M.; Denig, A.G.; Nierste, U.; Agoh, T.; Ohmi, K.; Ohnishi, Y.; Fry, J.R.; Touramanis, C.; Wolski, A.; Golob, B.; Krizan, P.; Flaecher, H.; Bevan, A.J.; Di Lodovico, F.; George, K.A.; Barlow, R.; Lafferty, G.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D.A.; Simi, G.; Patel, P.M.; Robertson, S.H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Kaidalov, A.; Buras, A.J.; Tarantino, C.; Buchalla, G.; Sanda, A.I.; D'Ambrosio, G.; Ricciardi, G.; Bigi, I.; Jessop, C.P.; Losecco, J.M.; Honscheid, K.; Arnaud, N.; Chehab, R.; Fedala, Y.; Polci, F.; Roudeau, P.; Sordini, V.; Soskov, V.; Stocchi, A.; Variola, A.; Vivoli, A.; Wormser, G.; Zomer, F.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Gagliardi, N.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Bonneaud, G.R.; Lombardo, V.; Calderini, G.; Ratti, L.; Speziali, V.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Servoli, L.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Dell'Orso, M.; Forti, F.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Massa, M.; Mazur, M.A.; Morsani, F.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.; Braun, V.; Lenz, A.; Adams, G.S.; Danko, I.Z.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; Di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Gaspero, Mario; Jackson, P.; Martinelli, G.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Morganti, Silvio; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Silvestrini, L.; Voena, C.; Catani, L.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Messi, R.; Santovetti, E.; Satta, A.; Ciuchini, M.; Lubicz, V.; Wilson, F.F.; Godang, R.; Chen, X.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M.; Trivedi, A.; White, R.M.; Wilson, J.R.; Allen, M.T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Brodsky, S.J.; Cai, Y.; Coleman, J.; Convery, M.R.; DeBarger, S.; Dingfelder, J.C.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.S.; Haller, G.; Heifets, S.A.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M.H.; Kocian, M.L.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Li, N.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D.; Messner, R.; Muller, D.R.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; Pivi, M.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Roodman, A.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J.; Snyder, A.; Sullivan, M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W.; Stoeck, H.; Cheng, H.Y.; Li, H.N.; Keum, Y.Y.; Gronau, M.; Grossman, Y.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Gambino, P.; Marchetto, F.; Menichetti, Ezio A.; Mussa, R.; Pelliccioni, M.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Bernabeu, J.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D.A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paradisi, P.; Pich, A.; Sanchis-Lozano, M.A.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Roney, J.M.; Back, J.J.; Gershon, T.J.; Harrison, P.F.; Latham, T.E.; Mohanty, G.B.; Petrov, A.A.; Pierini, M.; INFN

    2007-01-01

    The physics objectives of SuperB, an asymmetric electron-positron collider with a luminosity above 10^36/cm^2/s are described, together with the conceptual design of a novel low emittance design that achieves this performance with wallplug power comparable to that of the current B Factories, and an upgraded detector capable of doing the physics in the SuperB environment.

  19. Application of Factorial Design for Gas Parameter Optimization in CO2 Laser Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Dragsted, Birgitte; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1997-01-01

    The effect of different gas process parameters involved in CO2 laser welding has been studied by applying two-set of three-level complete factorial designs. In this work 5 gas parameters, gas type, gas flow rate, gas blowing angle, gas nozzle diameter, gas blowing point-offset, are optimized...... to be a very useful tool for parameter optimi-zation in laser welding process. Keywords: CO2 laser welding, gas parameters, factorial design, Analysis of Variance........ The bead-on-plate welding specimens are evaluated by a number of quality char-acteristics, such as the penetration depth and the seam width. The significance of the gas pa-rameters and their interactions are based on the data found by the Analysis of Variance-ANOVA. This statistic methodology is proven...

  20. Full factorial design analysis of carbon nanotube polymer-cement composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio de Paiva Cota

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The work described in this paper is related to the effect of adding carbon nanotubes (CNT on the mechanical properties of polymer-cement composites. A full factorial design has been performed on 160 samples to identify the contribution provided by the following factors: polymeric phase addition, CNT weight addition and water/cement ratio. The response parameters of the full factorial design were the bulk density, apparent porosity, compressive strength and elastic modulus of the polymer-cement-based nanocomposites. All the factors considered in this analysis affected significantly the bulk density and apparent porosity of the composites. The compressive strength and elastic modulus were affected primarily by the cross-interactions between polymeric phase and CNT additions, and the water/cement ratio with polymeric phase factors.

  1. Preparation and optimization of PIT solid lipid nanoparticles via statistical factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, C; Tomasello, B; Ruozi, B; Renis, M; Puglisi, G

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was the preparation, physico-chemical characterization and statistical optimization of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) prepared by the PIT method as potential carrier for gene therapy, emphasizing the application of factorial design in such a kind of studies. The preliminary screening from a physico-chemical point of view on three cationic lipids (CTAB, DDAB and DOTAP), selected on the basis of their different chemical structure and increasing lipophilicity, allowed us to select SLN with DOTAP, due to its higher zeta potential and smaller particle size. Afterward, a 2(2) full factorial experimental design was developed in order to study the effects of two independent variables (amount of DOTAP and concentration of lipid matrix) and their interaction on mean particle size and zeta potential values. The factorial planning was validated by ANOVA analysis; the correspondence between the predicted values of size and zeta and those measured experimentally confirmed the validity of the design and the equation applied for its resolution. The factorial design showed a significant influence of the independent variables on the selected parameters; in particular, a higher effect of DOTAP was observed on zeta potential value. Different dilutions of the optimized SLN containing 7% w/w of cutina CP and 1% w/w of DOTAP, with size and zeta potential values respectively of 462.9 nm and 50.8 mV, were in vitro examined to evaluate the possible cytotoxicity on two models of cell cultures: human prostate cancer androgen-non-responsive DU-145 cells and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Formulation optimization of floating microbeads containing modified Chinese yam starch using factorial design

    OpenAIRE

    Adenike Okunlola; Oluwatoyin A Odeku; Rakesh P. Patel

    2012-01-01

    Controlled release floating metformin hydrochloride microbeads were prepared and optimized using a blend of varying concentrations of freeze-dried pregelatinized Chinese yam starch (Dioscorea oppositifolia L) and sodium alginate. Floating microbeads were prepared by the ionotropic gelation method using 10% w/v calcium chloride as the cross-linking agent and sodium bicarbonate as the gas releasing agent. A full 32 factorial design was used to investigate the influence of two variables: concent...

  3. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Edgecock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ^{+} and μ^{-} beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular ^{6}He and ^{18}Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  4. Vacuum system design for the PEP-II B Factory High-Energy Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, C.; Bostic, D.; Daly, E.

    1994-06-01

    The design of the vacuum system for the PEP-II B Factory High-Energy Ring is reviewed. The thermal design and vacuum requirements are particularly challenging in PEP-II due to high stored beam currents up to 3.0 amps in 1658 bunches. The vacuum chambers for the HER arcs are fabricated by electron beam welding extruded copper sections up to 6 m long. Design of these chambers and the vacuum PumPing configuration is described with results from vacuum and thermal analyses

  5. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Edgecock, T.R.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo-Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrzycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T.Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S.K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J.J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López-Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L.J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J.J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J.S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

  6. Fractional Factorial Design for Parameter Sweep Experiments Using Nimrod/E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.C. Peachey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The techniques of formal experimental design and analysis are powerful tools for scientists and engineers. However, these techniques are currently underused for experiments conducted with computer models. This has motivated the incorporation of experimental design functionality into the Nimrod tool chain. Nimrod has been extensively used for exploration of the response of models to their input parameters; the addition of experimental design tools will combine the efficiency of carefully designed experiments with the power of distributed execution. This paper describes the incorporation of one type of design, the fractional factorial design, and associated analysis tools, into the Nimrod framework. The result provides a convenient environment that automates the design of an experiment, the execution of the jobs on a computational grid and the return of results, and which assists in the interpretation of those results. Several case studies are included which demonstrate various aspects of this approach.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of the Thermal Response of 9975 Packaging Using Factorial Design Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Narendra K.

    2005-01-01

    A method is presented for using the statistical design of experiment (2 k Factorial Design) technique in the sensitivity analysis of the thermal response (temperature) of the 9975 radioactive material packaging where multiple thermal properties of the impact absorbing and fire insulating material Celotex and certain boundary conditions are subject to uncertainty. 2 k Factorial Design method is very efficient in the use of available data and is capable of analyzing the impact of main variables (Factors) and their interactions on the component design. The 9975 design is based on detailed finite element (FE) analyses and extensive proof testing to meet the design requirements given in 10CFR71 [1]. However, the FE analyses use Celotex thermal properties that are based on published data and limited experiments. Celotex is an orthotropic material that is used in the home building industry. Its thermal properties are prone to variation due to manufacturing and fabrication processes, and due to long environmental exposure. This paper will evaluate the sensitivity of variations in thermal conductivity of the Celotex, convection coefficient at the drum surface, and drum emissivity (herein called Factors) on the thermal response of 9975 packaging under Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). Application of this methodology will ascertain the robustness of the 9975 design and it can lead to more specific and useful understanding of the effects of various Factors on 9975 performance

  8. Detector design studies for a cubic kilometre Deep Sea neutrino telescope - KM3NeT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, J; Dornic, D [CPPM - Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Cohen, F [IReS - Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Strasbourg (France); Jouvenot, F [formerly University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory (United Kingdom); Maurin, G; Naumann, C [CEA Saclay - DSM/IRFU - Service de Physique des Particules (France)], E-mail: Christopher.naumann@cea.fr, E-mail: gilles.maurin@cea.fr

    2008-11-01

    The KM3NeT consortium is currently preparing the construction of a cubic-kilometre sized neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea as a continuation of the previous efforts by the three Mediterranean projects ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR and as a counterpart to the South-Pole based IceCube detector. The main physics goals of KM3NeT include the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources such as active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants and gamma-ray bursts as well as the search for new physics, such as neutrino signals from neutralino annihilation. A key point during the early phases of this experiment is the determination of the ideal detector layout as well as of important design criteria such as required spatial and temporal resolution of the sensor elements, to optimise the sensitivity in the energy range of interest. For this purpose, several independent Monte-Carlo studies using a range of possible detector configurations are being performed. In this presentation, one of these studies, using the fast and flexible Mathematica-based simulation and reconstruction package NESSY, is described in more detail together with expected results for some exemplary detector configurations.

  9. Design Study for a Future Laguna-LBNO Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Alabau-Gonzalvo, J; Antoniou, F; Benedikt, M; Calviani, M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Ferrari, A; Garoby, R; Gerigk, F; Gilardoni, S; Goddard, B; Kosmicki, A; Lazaridis, C; Osborne, J; Papaphillippou, Y; Parfenova, A; Shaposhnikova, E; Steerenberg, R; Velten, P; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics (LAGUNA) study [1] investigated seven pre-selected underground sites in Europe (Finland, France, Italy, Poland, Romania, Spain and UK), capable of housing large volume detectors for terrestrial, accelerator generated and astrophysical neutrino research. The study was focused on geo-technical assessment of the sites, concluding that no show-stoppers exist for the construction of the required large underground caverns in the chosen sites. The LAGUNA-LBNO FP7/EC-funded design study extends the LAGUNA study in two key aspects: the detailed engineering of detector construction and operation, and the study of a long-baseline neutrino beam from CERN, and possibly other accelerator centres in Europe. Based on the findings of the LAGUNA study, the Pyh¨asalmi mine in Finland is chosen as prime site for the far detector location. The mine offers the deepest underground location in Europe (-1400 m) and a baseline of 2’300 km from CERN (Fig. 1). ...

  10. Detector design studies for a cubic kilometre Deep Sea neutrino telescope - KM3NeT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J; Dornic, D; Cohen, F; Jouvenot, F; Maurin, G; Naumann, C

    2008-01-01

    The KM3NeT consortium is currently preparing the construction of a cubic-kilometre sized neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea as a continuation of the previous efforts by the three Mediterranean projects ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR and as a counterpart to the South-Pole based IceCube detector. The main physics goals of KM3NeT include the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources such as active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants and gamma-ray bursts as well as the search for new physics, such as neutrino signals from neutralino annihilation. A key point during the early phases of this experiment is the determination of the ideal detector layout as well as of important design criteria such as required spatial and temporal resolution of the sensor elements, to optimise the sensitivity in the energy range of interest. For this purpose, several independent Monte-Carlo studies using a range of possible detector configurations are being performed. In this presentation, one of these studies, using the fast and flexible Mathematica-based simulation and reconstruction package NESSY, is described in more detail together with expected results for some exemplary detector configurations.

  11. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (Beta Beams), one based on decays of stored muon beams (Neutrino Factory), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (Superbeam). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R and D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  12. Designing a test of neutrinos as dark matter candidates

    CERN Multimedia

    Marquit, Mirandu

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries of the universe deals with questions of dark matter. There are several experiments and models being designed all over the world to try and determine what would make good dark matter candidates. And with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland, some of these experiments may be ready for testing.

  13. Factorial experimental design intended for the optimization of the alumina purification conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Mounaouer; Ba, Mohamedou; Hidri, Yassine; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the optimal conditions by using the experimental design methodology for the removal of some impurities associated with the alumina. So, three alumina qualities of different origins were investigated under the same conditions. The application of full-factorial designs on the samples of different qualities of alumina has followed the removal rates of the sodium oxide. However, a factorial experimental design was developed to describe the elimination of sodium oxide associated with the alumina. The experimental results showed that chemical analyze followed by XRF prior treatment of the samples, provided a primary idea concerning these prevailing impurities. Therefore, it appeared that the sodium oxide constituted the largest amount among all impurities. After the application of experimental design, analysis of the effectors different factors and their interactions showed that to have a better result, we should reduce the alumina quantity investigated and by against increase the stirring time for the first two samples, whereas, it was necessary to increase the alumina quantity in the case of the third sample. To expand and improve this research, we should take into account all existing impurities, since we found during this investigation that the levels of partial impurities increased after the treatment.

  14. Factory-like Optimum Drilling Design of Cluster Well in Jimsar Well Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yingbiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep heavy oil reservoir of Jimsar well block, which located in Xinjiang oilfield, was developed by cluster well in 2016. In view of the ground environment, long open hole section and poor wellbore stability, the scheme which based on the research of factory-like wellsite platform deployment, well trajectory design and reservoir protection, was designed and carried out in the block. Firstly, the platform was divided into different control regions according to the anti-collision requirement. Secondly, truck-mounted drilling rig and civil power were applied to the factory-like drilling. Thirdly, well track was designed to be three parts: straight, increase and steady. The design can improve the proportion of composite drilling footage. Fourthly, the method of plane scanning and normal surface scanning was adopted to ensure the safety of downhole trajectory. Finally, the natural polymer drilling fluid system and drilling fluid reuse system were used to protect environment and reduce drilling cost. The results show that the maximum reducing time of single drill rig is 32.5 day, and the penetration rate of whole platform is increasing continuously.

  15. Beams for European Neutrino Experiments (BENE) Midterm scientific report

    CERN Document Server

    Baldini, A; Blondel, A; Campagne, J E; Cavata, C; Donini, A; Dracos, M; Dumarchez, J; Edgecock, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Huber, P; Long, K; Lindroos, M; Méot, F; Mezzetto, Mauro; Palladino, V; Rees, G; Sievers, P; Strolin, P; Volpe, C

    2006-01-01

    The activities of BENE during 2004 and 2005 are reviewed. Neutrino oscillation experiments at accelerators offer the richest possibilities of precision studies of neutrino mixing and mass differences, with the potential of important discoveries including leptonic CP or T violation. Two main options for a major initiative have been studied: 1) a high-energy Neutrino Factory coupled to a large dense magnetized detector; 2) a lower energy betabeam and conventional superbeam, coupled to a very large low-density, non-magnetic, detector. Both offer signi cant scienti c breakthroughs over other planned facilities. Much remains to be done to optimize and establish the cost, performance, and feasibility of either solution so as to allow comparison and decision. The proposal of a FP7 Design Study of a Neutrino Facility to be completed by the end of the decade is being prepared. Its success will require strong support and engagement at CERN and other European laboratories and funding agencies. International contributors...

  16. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynatt, Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs

  17. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  18. Application of Full Factorial Experimental Design and Response Surface Methodology for Chromite Beneficiation by Knelson Concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Akar Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is undertaken to determine the effect of operational variables, namely: feed rate, centrifugal force and fluidization water flow rate on the efficiency of Knelson concentrator for chromite ore beneficiation. A full factorial design with three factors at three levels and response surface methodology (RSM were applied for this purpose. The quadratic models were developed to predict the concentrate Cr2O3 grade and recovery as the process responses. The results suggest that all the variables affect the grade and recovery of the Cr2O3 concentrate to some degree. However, the fluidization water rate was found as the most effective parameter.

  19. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  20. Design and construction of drift tube linac cavities for RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Yamada, K.; Arai, S.; Chiba, Y.; Kase, M.; Okuno, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Kamigaito, O.

    2013-09-01

    A new injector linac "RILAC2", has recently been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. The main part of the RILAC2 is a drift tube linac that consists of three newly designed cavities. These cavities operate in continuous wave (CW) mode at a fixed frequency of 36.5 MHz. Their structure is based on a quarter-wavelength resonator because this is the smallest resonator available in this frequency range among the available structures. We adopted the direct coupling method in the construction of these cavities. A power amplifier was directly coupled to the cavity without a long transmission line to reduce the installation area and simultaneously reduce construction cost. A detailed cavity and coupler design was carried out via simulation. Our work also describes the design process using three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation software. Construction and operation tests are also shown.

  1. Design studies for a neutrino telescope based on optical fiber hydrophones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, E.J.; Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Lahmann, R.; Toet, P.M.; Vreugd, J. de

    2015-01-01

    Optical fiber hydrophones provide a promising technology for a future neutrino telescope that enables the acoustic detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in the deep sea. These cosmic neutrinos leave a small acoustic signal that could be detected when the sensitivity of the technology is

  2. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boger, J.; Hahn, R.L.; Rowley, J.K.; Carter, A.L.; Hollebone, B.; Kessler, D.; Blevis, I.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; DeKok, A.; Farine, J.; Grant, D.R.; Hargrove, C.K.; Laberge, G.; Levine, I.; McFarlane, K.; Mes, H.; Noble, A.T.; Novikov, V.M.; O' Neill, M.; Shatkay, M.; Shewchuk, C.; Sinclair, D.; Clifford, E.T.H.; Deal, R.; Earle, E.D.; Gaudette, E.; Milton, G.; Sur, B.; Bigu, J.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cluff, D.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Haq, R.U.; Hewett, J.; Hykawy, J.G.; Jonkmans, G.; Michaud, R.; Roberge, A.; Roberts, J.; Saettler, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Seifert, H.; Sweezey, D.; Tafirout, R.; Virtue, C.J.; Beck, D.N.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, X.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Dycus, F.W.; Gonzalez, J.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Kajiyama, Y.; Koehler, G.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Moebus, M.C.; Norman, E.B.; Okada, C.E.; Poon, A.W.P.; Purgalis, P.; Schuelke, A.; Smith, A.R.; Stokstad, R.G.; Turner, S.; Zlimen, I.; Anaya, J.M.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Fowler, M.M.; Goldschmidt, Azriel; Hime, A.; McGirt, A.F.; Miller, G.G.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wouters, J.M.; Anglin, J.D.; Bercovitch, M.; Davidson, W.F.; Storey, R.S.; Biller, S.; Black, R.A.; Boardman, R.J.; Bowler, M.G.; Cameron, J.; Cleveland, B.; Ferraris, A.P.; Doucas, G.; Heron, H.; Howard, C.; Jelley, N.A. E-mail: N.Jelley1@physics.ox.ac.uk; Knox, A.B.; Lay, M.; Locke, W.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Moorhead, M.; Omori, M.; Tanner, N.W.; Taplin, R.K.; Thorman, M.; Wark, D.L.; West, N.; Barton, J.C.; Trent, P.T.; Kouzes, R.; Lowry, M.M.; Bell, A.L.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.; Dayon, M.; Duncan, F.; Erhardt, L.S.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Ford, R.; Hallin, A.; Hamer, A.; Hart, P.M.; Harvey, P.J.; Haslip, D.; Hearns, C.A.W.; Heaton, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Jillings, C.J.; Korpach, E.P.; Lee, H.W.; Leslie, J.R.; Liu, M.-Q.; Mak, H.B.; McDonald, A.B.; MacArthur, J.D.; McLatchie, W.; Moffat, B.A.; Noel, S.; Radcliffe, T.J.; Robertson, B.C.; Skensved, P.; Stevenson, R.L.; Zhu, X.; Gil, S.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Komar, R.J.; Nally, C.W. [and others

    2000-07-11

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is a second-generation water Cherenkov detector designed to determine whether the currently observed solar neutrino deficit is a result of neutrino oscillations. The detector is unique in its use of D{sub 2}O as a detection medium, permitting it to make a solar model-independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by comparison of the charged- and neutral-current interaction rates. In this paper the physical properties, construction, and preliminary operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are described. Data and predicted operating parameters are provided whenever possible.

  3. New phenomena in neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss two new concepts in neutrino physics: The neutrino Moessbauer effect and non-standard neutrino interactions. We show that neutrinos emitted and absorbed in recoil-free processes (Moessbauer neutrinos) can oscillate in spite of their near monochromaticity. We support this statement by quantum mechanical wave packet arguments and by a quantum field theoretical (QFT) calculation of the combined rate of Moessbauer neutrino emission, propagation and absorption. The QFT approach does not require any a priori assumptions on the neutrino wave function, and it allows us to include a realistic treatment of the different mechanisms leading to broadening of the emission and absorption lines. In the second part of this work, we study the phenomenology of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI). We classifying the allowed NSI operators according to their impact on future oscillation experiments and present numerical results for the NSI sensitivities of reactor, superbeam and neutrino factory experiments. We point out that NSI could mimic standard oscillation effects, and might therefore lead to incorrect fit values for the oscillation parameters. For the case of the neutrino factory, we perform a detailed optimisation study to determine the optimum muon energy and detector configuration. (orig.)

  4. New phenomena in neutrino physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joachim

    2009-04-15

    In this thesis, we discuss two new concepts in neutrino physics: The neutrino Moessbauer effect and non-standard neutrino interactions. We show that neutrinos emitted and absorbed in recoil-free processes (Moessbauer neutrinos) can oscillate in spite of their near monochromaticity. We support this statement by quantum mechanical wave packet arguments and by a quantum field theoretical (QFT) calculation of the combined rate of Moessbauer neutrino emission, propagation and absorption. The QFT approach does not require any a priori assumptions on the neutrino wave function, and it allows us to include a realistic treatment of the different mechanisms leading to broadening of the emission and absorption lines. In the second part of this work, we study the phenomenology of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI). We classifying the allowed NSI operators according to their impact on future oscillation experiments and present numerical results for the NSI sensitivities of reactor, superbeam and neutrino factory experiments. We point out that NSI could mimic standard oscillation effects, and might therefore lead to incorrect fit values for the oscillation parameters. For the case of the neutrino factory, we perform a detailed optimisation study to determine the optimum muon energy and detector configuration. (orig.)

  5. SCREENING OF MEDIUM COMPOUNDS USING A TWO-LEVEL FACTORIAL DESIGN FOR SACCHAROMYCES BOULARDII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUOWEI SHU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Even if the probiotic effect of Saccharomyces boulardii is has been reported, this yeast is rarely used in medium composition. Based on single factor experiment, two-level factorial design was employed to evaluate the effect of carbon sources (sucrose, glucose, nitrogen sources (soy peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, calf serum, malt extract and salts (K2HPO4, KH2PO4, MgSO4, Na2HPO4, NaH2PO4, CaCl2, sodium citrate, sodium glutamate on the growth of S. boulardii. At the same time, the optical density (OD in the medium was measured at 560 nm after 36 h of incubation. The result of two-level factorial design experiment showed that calf serum (p = 0.0214 and sodium citrate (p = 0.0045 are the significant growth factors of S. boulardii, sucrose (p = 0.0861 and malt extract (p = 0.0763 are important factors. In addition, sucrose and sodium citrate showed positive effect on the growth of S. boulardii. However, calf serum and malt extract showed negative effect on the growth. And we determined that the optimum medium composition for S. boulardii was as follow: 37.5 g·L-1 sucrose, 6 g·L-1 calf serum, 6 g·L-1 malt extract, 5 g·L-1 sodium citrate.

  6. Factorial design studies of antiretroviral drug-loaded stealth liposomal injectable: PEGylation, lyophilization and pharmacokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Beeravelli; Krishna, Mylangam Chaitanya; Murthy, Kolapalli Venkata Ramana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate the ritonavir-loaded stealth liposomes by using 32 factorial design and intended to delivered by parenteral delivery. Liposomes were prepared by ethanol injection method using 32 factorial designs and characterized for various physicochemical parameters such as drug content, size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The optimization process was carried out using desirability and overlay plots. The selected formulation was subjected to PEGylation using 10 % PEG-10000 solution. Stealth liposomes were characterized for the above-mentioned parameters along with surface morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, differential scanning calorimeter, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats. Stealth liposomes showed better result compared to conventional liposomes due to effect of PEG-10000. The in vivo studies revealed that stealth liposomes showed better residence time compared to conventional liposomes and pure drug solution. The conventional liposomes and pure drug showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics, whereas stealth liposomes showed long circulation half-life compared to conventional liposomes and pure ritonavir solution. The results of statistical analysis showed significance difference as the p value is (<0.05) by one-way ANOVA. The result of the present study revealed that stealth liposomes are promising tool in antiretroviral therapy.

  7. Optimization of LDL targeted nanostructured lipid carriers of 5-FU by a full factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sare Andalib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC are a mixture of solid and liquid lipids or oils as colloidal carrier systems that lead to an imperfect matrix structure with high ability for loading water soluble drugs. The aim of this study was to find the best proportion of liquid and solid lipids of different types for optimization of the production of LDL targeted NLCs used in carrying 5-Fu by the emulsification-solvent evaporation method. Materials and Methods: The influence of the lipid type, cholesterol or cholesteryl stearate for targeting LDL receptors, oil type (oleic acid or octanol, lipid and oil% on particle size, surface charge, drug loading efficiency, and drug released percent from the NLCs were studied by a full factorial design. Results: The NLCs prepared by 54.5% cholesterol and 25% of oleic acid, showed optimum results with particle size of 105.8 nm, relatively high zeta potential of −25 mV, drug loading efficiency of 38% and release efficiency of about 40%. Scanning electron microscopy of nanoparticles confirmed the results of dynamic light scattering method used in measuring the particle size of NLCs. Conclusions: The optimization method by a full factorial statistical design is a useful optimization method for production of nanostructured lipid carriers.

  8. The LAGUNA design study-towards giant liquid based underground detectors for neutrino physics and astrophysics and proton decay searches

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, D; Autiero, D.; Apostu, A.; Badertscher, A.; Bennet, T.; Bertola, G.; Bertola, P.F.; Besida, O.; Bettini, A.; Booth, C.; Borne, J.L.; Brancus, I.; Bujakowsky, W.; Campagne, J.E.; Danil, G.Cata; Chipesiu, F.; Chorowski, M.; Cripps, J.; Curioni, A.; Davidson, S.; Declais, Y.; Drost, U.; Duliu, O.; Dumarchez, J.; Enqvist, T.; Ereditato, A.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Fynbo, H.; Gamble, T.; Galvanin, G.; Gendotti, A.; Gizicki, W.; Goger-Neff, M.; Grasslin, U.; Gurney, D.; Hakala, M.; Hannestad, S.; Haworth, M.; Horikawa, S.; Jipa, A.; Juget, F.; Kalliokoski, T.; Katsanevas, S.; Keen, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kreslo, I.; Kudryastev, V.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Labarga, L.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Lazanu, I.; Lewke, T.; Loo, K.; Lightfoot, P.; Lindner, M.; Longhin, A.; Maalampi, J.; Marafini, M.; Marchionni, A.; Margineanu, R.M.; Markiewicz, A.; Marrodan-Undagoita, T.; Marteau, J.E.; Matikainen, R.; Meindl, Q.; Messina, M.; Mietelski, J.W.; Mitrica, B.; Mordasini, A.; Mosca, L.; Moser, U.; Nuijten, G.; Oberauer, L.; Oprina, A.; Paling, S.; Pascoli, S.; Patzak, T.; Pectu, M.; Pilecki, Z.; Piquemal, F.; Potzel, W.; Pytel, W.; Raczynski, M.; Rafflet, G.; Ristaino, G.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, R.; Roinisto, J.; Romana, M.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Rubbia, A.; Sadecki, Z.; Saenz, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salmelainen, J.; Sima, O.; Slizowski, J.; Slizowski, K.; Sobczyk, J.; Spooner, N.; Stoica, S.; Suhonen, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Szeglowski, T.; Temussi, M.; Thompson, J.; Thompson, L.; Trzaska, W.H.; Tippmann, M.; Tonazzo, A.; Urbanczyk, K.; Vasseur, G.; Williams, A.; Winter, J.; Wojutszewska, K.; Wurm, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zampaolo, M.; Zito, M.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of a next generation neutrino observatory in Europe is being considered within the LAGUNA design study. To accommodate giant neutrino detectors and shield them from cosmic rays, a new very large underground infrastructure is required. Seven potential candidate sites in different parts of Europe and at several distances from CERN are being studied: Boulby (UK), Canfranc (Spain), Fr\\'ejus (France/Italy), Pyh\\"asalmi (Finland), Polkowice-Sieroszowice (Poland), Slanic (Romania) and Umbria (Italy). The design study aims at the comprehensive and coordinated technical assessment of each site, at a coherent cost estimation, and at a prioritization of the sites within the summer 2010.

  9. Design and Factory Test of the E /E- Frascati Linear Accelerator for DAFNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anamkath, H.; Lyons, S.; Nett, D.; Treas, P.; Whitham, K.; Zante, T.; /Titan Beta, Dublin; Miller, R.; /Titan Beta, Dublin /SLAC; Boni, R.; Hsieh, H.; Sannibale, F.; Vescovi, M.; Vignola, G.; /Frascati

    2011-11-28

    The electron-positron accelerator for the DAFNE project has been built and is in test at Titan Beta in Dublin, CA. This S-Band RF linac system utilizes four 45 MW sledded klystrons and 16-3 m accelerating structures to achieve the required performance. It delivers a 4 ampere electron beam to the positron converter and accelerates the resulting positrons to 550 MeV. The converter design uses a 4.3T pulsed tapered flux compressor along with a pseudo-adiabatic tapered field to a 5 KG solenoid over the first two positron accelerating sections. Quadrupole focusing is used after 100 MeV. The system performance is given in Table 1. This paper briefly describes the design and development of the various subassemblies in this system and gives the initial factory test data.

  10. Effects of process parameters on ozone washing for denim using 3/sup 3/ factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asim, F.; Mahmood, M.

    2017-01-01

    Denim garment is getting popular day by day. It is highly demandable because of its versatility, comfort and durability. Different techniques of denim washing increase this demand drastically. Denim washing is the process to enhance the appearance of a garment. This enhanced appearance may be the aged look, faded look, greyer cast, or any other shade setting or resin application. The two most advanced washing techniques are; ozone wash and laser wash. The effects of ozone on environment as well as on the garment are significant and cannot be neglected because number of benefits achieved such as time saving, less energy consumption, chemical, labour cost reduction, less discharge of water and chemicals. Therefore, effects of process parameters on ozone washing for denim fabric have been investigated in this research work using three level factorial design. 33 factorial design has been designed and conducted to investigate the effect of gas concentration, time and speed on the response variables namely; Shrinkage, Tensile and Tear strength of ozone washing. The influence of individual factors and their interactions has been critically examined using software Design Expert 8.0. Prior to the analysis of variance model accuracy has been examined through various residuals plots. The study of residuals plots shown that the residuals are normally distributed and significant evidence of possible outliers was not found. So the model can be used to predicted results with 95% confidence interval. The results from the experiment suggest that two out of three factors were significant, which are speed and time that influences mainly on the tear strength of the denim garment. (author)

  11. Sudbury neutrino observatory proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewan, G.T.; Evans, H.C.; Lee, H.W.

    1987-10-01

    This report is a proposal by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) collaboration to develop a world class laboratory for neutrino astrophysics. This observatory would contain a large volume heavy water detector which would have the potential to measure both the electron-neutrino flux from the sun and the total solar neutrino flux independent of neutrino type. It will therefore be possible to test models of solar energy generation and, independently, to search for neutrino oscillations with a sensitivity many orders of magnitude greater than that of terrestrial experiments. It will also be possible to search for spectral distortion produced by neutrino oscillations in the dense matter of the sun. Finally the proposed detector would be sensitive to neutrinos from a stellar collapse and would detect neutrinos of all types thus providing detailed information on the masses of muon- and tau-neutrinos. The neutrino detector would contain 1000 tons of D20 and would be located more than 2000 m below ground in the Creighton mine near Sudbury. The operation and performance of the proposed detector are described and the laboratory design is presented. Construction schedules and responsibilities and the planned program of technical studies by the SNO collaboration are outlined. Finally, the total capital cost is estimated to be $35M Canadian and the annual operating cost, after construction, would be $1.8 M Canadian, including the insurance costs of the heavy water

  12. The Positive Emotions after Acute Coronary Events behavioral health intervention: Design, rationale, and preliminary feasibility of a factorial design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jeffery C; Albanese, Ariana M; Campbell, Kirsti A; Celano, Christopher M; Millstein, Rachel A; Mastromauro, Carol A; Healy, Brian C; Chung, Wei-Jean; Januzzi, James L; Collins, Linda M; Park, Elyse R

    2017-04-01

    Positive psychological constructs, such as optimism, are associated with greater participation in cardiac health behaviors and improved cardiac outcomes. Positive psychology interventions, which target psychological well-being, may represent a promising approach to improving health behaviors in high-risk cardiac patients. However, no study has assessed whether a positive psychology intervention can promote physical activity following an acute coronary syndrome. In this article we will describe the methods of a novel factorial design study to aid the development of a positive psychology-based intervention for acute coronary syndrome patients and aim to provide preliminary feasibility data on study implementation. The Positive Emotions after Acute Coronary Events III study is an optimization study (planned N = 128), subsumed within a larger multiphase optimization strategy iterative treatment development project. The goal of Positive Emotions after Acute Coronary Events III is to identify the ideal components of a positive psychology-based intervention to improve post-acute coronary syndrome physical activity. Using a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design, Positive Emotions after Acute Coronary Events III aims to: (1) evaluate the relative merits of using positive psychology exercises alone or combined with motivational interviewing, (2) assess whether weekly or daily positive psychology exercise completion is optimal, and (3) determine the utility of booster sessions. The study's primary outcome measure is moderate-to-vigorous physical activity at 16 weeks, measured via accelerometer. Secondary outcome measures include psychological, functional, and adherence-related behavioral outcomes, along with metrics of feasibility and acceptability. For the primary study outcome, we will use a mixed-effects model with a random intercept (to account for repeated measures) to assess the main effects of each component (inclusion of motivational interviewing in the exercises

  13. Optimization of Emulsifying Effectiveness of Phytosterol in Milk Using Two-Level Fractional Factorial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yunxia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper emulsifying effects of seven emulsifiers including Tween 80, Span 80, tripolyglycerol monostearate, sodium stearoyl lactylate, sucrose ester, soy lecithin and monoglyceride on phytosterol in milk were investigated using single factor test and fractional factorial design. The addition for seven emulsifiers were in the following concentrations: 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4%, 0.5% and 0.6%. The results revealed that tripolyglycerol monostearate, sucrose ester and monoglyceride had a significant emulsifying effect on phytosterol in milk, Tripolyglycerol monostearate showed a positive emulsifying effect on phytosterol in milk, while sucrose ester and monoglyceride exhibited a negative emulsifying effect on phytosterol in milk.

  14. Computer modelling of bunch-by-bunch feedback for the SLAC B-factory design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, D.; Fox, J.D.; Hosseini, W.; Klaisner, L.; Morton, P.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Thompson, K.A.; Lambertson, G.

    1991-05-01

    The SLAC B-factory design, with over 1600 high current bunches circulating in each ring, will require a feedback system to avoid coupled-bunch instabilities. A computer model of the storage ring, including the RF system, wave fields, synchrotron radiation loss, and the bunch-by-bunch feedback system is presented. The feedback system model represents the performance of a fast phase detector front end (including system noise and imperfections), a digital filter used to generate a correction voltage, and a power amplifier and beam kicker system. The combined ring-feedback system model is used to study the feedback system performance required to suppress instabilities and to quantify the dynamics of the system. Results are presented which show the time development of coupled bunch instabilities and the damping action of the feedback system. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Process of chemical recycling of post-consumer PET using a factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Carlos Eduardo de O.; Almeida, Yeda Medeiros B. de; Vinhas, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated important variables in the depolymerization reaction of post-consumer poly (ethylene terephthalate) - PET via alkaline hydrolysis. Through this reaction is obtained terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer, which when purified, is used for the production of PET resin. The study was based on a 2 2 factorial design in which the independent variables were the concentration of NaOH solution and the reaction time, and the dependent variable was the yield of PTA obtained. The experiments that generated the best results, 100 % of yield, were obtained with the higher values of the independent variables. Statistical analysis showed that the concentration of NaOH solution is the variable that most influences in the process. The PTA obtained was analyzed by NMR ¹H technique, confirming the strong resemblance to commercial PTA obtained by petrochemical way. (author)

  16. The Role of Synthetic Biology in the Design of Microbial Cell Factories for Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Verónica Leticia; Rodríguez, Analía; Cristóbal, Héctor Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Insecurity in the supply of fossil fuels, volatile fuel prices, and major concerns regarding climate change have sparked renewed interest in the production of fuels from renewable resources. Because of this, the use of biodiesel has grown dramatically during the last few years and is expected to increase even further in the future. Biodiesel production through the use of microbial systems has marked a turning point in the field of biofuels since it is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional technology. Recent progress in synthetic biology has accelerated the ability to analyze, construct, and/or redesign microbial metabolic pathways with unprecedented precision, in order to permit biofuel production that is amenable to industrial applications. The review presented here focuses specifically on the role of synthetic biology in the design of microbial cell factories for efficient production of biodiesel. PMID:22028591

  17. Application of a complete factorial design for the production of zeaxanthin by Flavobacterium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetto, A; Flores-Cotera, L B; Díaz, C; Langley, E; Sanchez, S

    2001-01-01

    Utilizing a four-liter fermentor and applying a complete factorial design 2(3), the combined effects of agitation speed, aeration rate, and corn steep liquor concentration on zeaxanthin production by Flavobacterium sp. were studied. Maximum growth and production of total carotenoids and zeaxanthin were obtained at 600 rpm, 2 vvm and 4.6% corn steep liquor. Under these conditions, zeaxanthin represented 86% of the total carotenoids produced. Lower values of the variables studied resulted in lower growth, volumetric production of zeaxanthin and total carotenoids, and favored the formation of other carotenoids such as beta-carotene and canthaxanthin. The positive effects on growth and total carotenoids and zeaxanthin formation were in a large extent due to the interaction of agitation/corn steep liquor. However, aeration also had a positive effect on growth.

  18. Fish canning wastewater treatment by activated sludge: Application of factorial design optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel O. Cristóvão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of hydraulic retention time (HRT and initial organic matter concentration for dissolved organic carbon (DOC abatement of wastewater from a fish canning industry of northern Portugal by activated sludge was investigated using response surface methodology (RSM. The two parameters were chosen since it was found that the treatment efficiency is mainly influenced by them. The experimental data on DOC removal were fitted into a quadratic polynomial model using factorial design and RSM. The optimum process conditions were determined by analyzing the response surface of a three-dimensional plot and by solving the regression model equation. The obtained results showed a HRT of 6.4 h and an initial DOC of 406.2 mg/L as the best treatment conditions. Under these conditions, the maximum predicted DOC removal was 88.0%, confirming the feasibility and the reliability of fish canning wastewater treatment by activated sludge for organic content removal.

  19. The Role of Synthetic Biology in the Design of Microbial Cell Factories for Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Leticia Colin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecurity in the supply of fossil fuels, volatile fuel prices, and major concerns regarding climate change have sparked renewed interest in the production of fuels from renewable resources. Because of this, the use of biodiesel has grown dramatically during the last few years and is expected to increase even further in the future. Biodiesel production through the use of microbial systems has marked a turning point in the field of biofuels since it is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional technology. Recent progress in synthetic biology has accelerated the ability to analyze, construct, and/or redesign microbial metabolic pathways with unprecedented precision, in order to permit biofuel production that is amenable to industrial applications. The review presented here focuses specifically on the role of synthetic biology in the design of microbial cell factories for efficient production of biodiesel.

  20. Preparation of one-step NiO/Ni-CGO composites using factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.J.M. de; Sousa, A R.O. de; Camposa, L.F.A.; Macedo, D.A.; Loureiro, F. J.A.; Fagg, D.P.

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the synthesis, processing and characterization of NiO/Ni- CGO composite materials as potential solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The particulate materials were obtained by a one-step synthesis method and characterized by thermal analysis (prior to calcination) and X-ray diffraction (calcined powder). The ceramic processing of samples containing from 30 to 70 wt.% NiO was carried out by factorial design. Besides the NiO content controlled during the chemical synthesis, the impacts of the pore-former content (citric acid, used in proportions of 0, 7.5 and 15 wt.%) and the sintering temperature (1300, 1350 and 1400 °C) were also investigated. The open porosity of NiO-CGO composites and reduced Ni-CGO cermets was modeled as a function of factors (NiO content, citric acid content and sintering temperature) and interaction of factors. (author)

  1. Model-based design of bistable cell factories for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Shyam; Cluett, William R; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2018-04-15

    Metabolism can exhibit dynamic phenomena like bistability due to the presence of regulatory motifs like the positive feedback loop. As cell factories, microorganisms with bistable metabolism can have a high and a low product flux at the two stable steady states, respectively. The exclusion of metabolic regulation and network dynamics limits the ability of pseudo-steady state stoichiometric models to detect the presence of bistability, and reliably assess the outcomes of design perturbations to metabolic networks. Using kinetic models of metabolism, we assess the change in the bistable characteristics of the network, and suggest designs based on perturbations to the positive feedback loop to enable the network to produce at its theoretical maximum rate. We show that the most optimal production design in parameter space, for a small bistable metabolic network, may exist at the boundary of the bistable region separating it from the monostable region of low product fluxes. The results of our analysis can be broadly applied to other bistable metabolic networks with similar positive feedback network topologies. This can complement existing model-based design strategies by providing a smaller number of feasible designs that need to be tested in vivo. http://lmse.biozone.utoronto.ca/downloads/. krishna.mahadevan@utoronto.ca. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Application of fractional factorial design to improve hot smoked Nile Perch (Lates niloticus quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokamté, T.A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the parameters influencing moisture, salt and total phenol content of hot smoked Nile Perch and to compare the influence of processing conditions on its proximate composition and sensory quality. The effect on moisture, salt and total phenol content was investigated using fractional factorial design with seven factors and two levels: X1 for brine concentration, X2 for brining time, X3 for preliminary smoking-drying time, X4 for smoking time, X5 for hot smoking time, X6 for smoking temperature and X7 for hot smoking temperature. A Multiple Linear Regression Analysis was performed to fit the mathematical model to the collected data and the model tested using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results of ANOVA indicated the good accuracy and highest significance of the mathematical model. The range of total protein and lipid content was 17.96 to 34.34% and 0.87 to 4.43%, respectively. The range of general acceptability of smoked Nile Perch was 4.6 to 8.2 based on 9-point hedonic scale. Based on the results obtained, including the overall acceptability, proximate composition and smoking criteria of finished product, samples produced with the following conditions: brining at 4% for 270min, drying at 30°C for 30min and the smoked time/temperature cycles following: 30°C/120min; 50°C/240min and 80°C/240min was the best and most accepted. The results derived from this study indicate that the fractional factorial design is a useful screening tool for improving industrial smoking process of Nile Perch.

  3. Neutrino telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, J

    2002-01-01

    This review presents the scientific objectives and status of Neutrino Telescope Projects. The science program of these projects covers: neutrino astronomy, dark matter searches and measurements of neutrino oscillations. The two neutrino telescopes in operation: AMANDA and BAIKAL will be described together with the ANTARES neutrino telescope being built in the Mediterranean. (18 refs).

  4. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3 -- Design Development and Prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kessler, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mullens, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rath, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research -- stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  5. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3. Design Development and Prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Kessler, B. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Mullens, M. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Rath, P. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research -- stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  6. Ground-up circular Higgs Factory ring design and cell length optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard

    2017-02-01

    A “ground-up” Higgs Factory design methodology is described. For concreteness, numerical parameter choices are drawn primarily from CEPC, the Circular Electron Positron Collider. The goals are to find: (i) optimal parameters, (ii) improved understanding , (iii) a tentative lattice design. As illustration of the method, six chromaticity-corrected lattices, with cell lengths ranging from 45 m to 280 m, all with identical βy = 2 mm or βy = 10 mm intersection region optics, are designed and their properties compared. For simplicity only a single “toy ring,” circumference (76 km), with one interaction point, and a single beam energy (120 GeV) is considered. For the cell-length optimization a figure of merit FOM (essentially integrated luminosity) is maximized consistent with a dimensionless “fine tuning penalty function” or figure of demerit FOD not being allowed to exceed a conservatively chosen upper limit. The tentative recommendation from this investigation is that the optimal CEPC route is (except for obvious changes) to simply copy LEP: 80 m cell length and two-in-one single-ring operation. The main luminosity-increasing improvements are increased radius and power, top-off-full-energy-injection, noninterleaved sextupoles, more than 100 beam bunch operation, and improved intersection region design. Local chromaticity compensation (with its inevitable intense hard X-rays incident on the detectors) is found to be unnecessary. With these changes luminosity in excess of 1034cm-2s-1 is projected to be achievable.

  7. The TRIUMF KAON Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1990-11-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of experiments in particle and nuclear physics. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various accelerator components to be built and evaluated. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed. Payment of one-third of the total cost of $708 million (Canadian) has been approved by the government of British Columbia; a further third is expected from international sources, on the basis of inter-governmental consultations. A decision on the final third is expected from the government of Canada before the end of 1990. (Author) (15 refs., 7 figs.)

  8. The TRIUMF KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1991-05-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated -fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual-frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal RF shields, an RF cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, and RF beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia (already approved) and international contributors. The federal decision is expected shortly. (Author) 29 refs., 5 figs

  9. Complete factorial design experiment for 3D load cell instrumented crank validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Valle-Casas; Rafael, Dalazen; Vinicius, Cene; Alexandre, Balbinot

    2015-08-01

    Developing of instrumentation systems for sport medicine is a promising area, that's why this research evaluates the design of a new instrumented crank arm prototype for a race bicycle projecting an experiment for indoor - outdoor comparison. This study investigated the viability of an instrumentation 3D load cell for force measurement crank, implementing a design of experiment. A Complete factorial design experiment was developed for data validation, with an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) throwing significant results for controlled factors with response variables rms, mean and variance. A software routine allowed to obtained system variables metrics for Symmetry and Cadence analysis, which came out from Effective force bilateral comparing and speed computation. Characterization allowed achieving calibration curves that were used for data conversion in force projection channels with a linearity error of 0.29% (perpendicular), 0.55% (parallel) and 0.10% (lateral). Interactions of factors resulted significant mainly for indoor tests in symmetry and cadence was significant in interactions generally for outdoor tests. Implemented system was able to generate Effective Force graph for 3D plot symmetry analysis, torque and power symmetry for specialist's analysis.

  10. Factorial design application in photocatalytic wastewater degradation from TNT industry-red water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz, Ricardo; de Moura, Cristiane; da Cunha, Mário Antônio Alves; Rodrigues, Marcio Barreto

    2017-03-01

    In trinitrotoluene (TNT) purification process, realized in industries, there are two washes carried out at the end of the procedure. The first is performed with vaporized water, from which the first effluent, called yellow water, is originated. Then, a second wash is performed using sodium sulfite, generating the red water effluent. The objective of this work was to get the best conditions for photocatalytic degradation of the second effluent, red water, in order to reduce toxicity and adjust legal parameters according to regulatory agencies for dumping these effluents into waterways. It has used a statistical evaluation for factor interaction (pH, concentration) that affects heterogeneous photocatalysis with titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ). Thus, the treatment applied in the factorial experimental design consisted of using a volume equal to 500 mL of the effluent to 0.1 % by batch treatment, which has changed TiO 2  pH and concentration, according to the design, with 20 min time for evaluation, where it was used as response to the reduction of UV-Vis absorption. According to the design responses, it has obtained optimum values for the parameters evaluated: pH = 6.5 and concentration of 100 mg/L of TiO 2 were shown to be efficient when applied to red water effluent, obtaining approximately 91 % of discoloration.

  11. Development and optimization of psychological stress model in mice using 2 level full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Manika; Shaikh, Muhammad Vaseem; Nivsarkar, Manish

    Psychological stress has long been a silent killer, impairing normal physiological functions and leading to a variety of diseased conditions. However, the existing animal models for studying psychological stress have been marred by their inherent limitations warranting further research in their development and optimization. In this study 2 5 full factorial design was utilized for the development and optimization of psychological stress model in mice by applying different stressors viz., slanted cage(X 1 ), restraint(X 2 ), no bedding(X 3 ), dirty bedding(X 4 ) and isolation(X 5 ) at two time duration levels of 30 and 60min. The development of behavioral changes like depression, anxiety and anhedonia was taken as criteria for development of stress. These responses were analyzed using Design Expert 7.1.6. (Stat-Ease, Inc., USA). The maximum effective responses obtained were taken as a criterion for optimization. The optimized model was applied to measure the change in serum cortisol level to confirm the stress development. The statistical data showed that a quadratic model was fitted to the data obtained. All the factors were found to have a significant role in the development of stress among which restraint, slanted cage and dirty bedding were found to be more causal (pstressed mice of optimized model (ppsychological stress development in mice. The study could lay a strong platform for the use of quality by design approach in the development of robust, efficient and resourceful animal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Design of experiment (DOE) study of biodegradable magnesium alloy synthesized by mechanical alloying using fractional factorial design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Emee Marina; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Hussain, Zuhailawati

    2014-06-01

    The biodegradable nature of magnesium (Mg) makes it a most highlighted and attractive to be used as implant materials. However, rapid corrosion rate of Mg alloys especially in electrolytic aqueous environment limits its performance. In this study, Mg alloy was mechanically milled by incorporating manganese (Mn) as alloying element. An attempt was made to study both effect of mechanical alloying and subsequent consolidation processes on the bulk properties of Mg-Mn alloys. 2k-2 factorial design was employed to determine the significant factors in producing Mg alloy which has properties closes to that of human bones. The design considered six factors (i.e. milling time, milling speed, weight percentage of Mn, compaction pressure, sintering temperature and sintering time). Density and hardness were chosen as the responses for assessing the most significant parameters that affected the bulk properties of Mg-Mn alloys. The experimental variables were evaluated using ANOVA and regression model. The main parameter investigated was compaction pressure.

  13. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, David Jason [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the v μ→ Vτ transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling ~2.5 x 1020 protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  14. Neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil-Botella, I.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac), of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end. (author)

  15. Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Botella, I.

    2013-06-27

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac) of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end.

  16. Design and construction of the Helium and Lead Observatory for supernova neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantz, Taylor C.

    2010-12-01

    The Helium and Lead Observatory (HALO) is a dedicated supernova neutrino detector under construction at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario. HALO will utilize 76 tonnes of lead blocks in order to take advantage of the high neutrino cross-section and low neutron absorption cross-section of lead. Charged and neutral current neutrino interactions in lead expel neutrons from the lead nuclei making a burst of detected neutrons the signature for the detection of a supernova. The focus of this thesis is three fold. The primary purpose is to determine the secondary creep characteristics of the lead blocks in HALO. The goal is to provide input to the engineering design of the lead array and its supporting superstructure. The secondary creep rate was established for four lead blocks at varying loads. The creep behaviour of lead was extrapolated beyond the test times in order to predict the behaviour over ten years. The predicted creep behaviour demonstrated that several layers in the HALO lead array required structural reinforcement in order to protect the structural integrity of the experiment and the sensitive equipment within the bores of lead. In order to mitigate the creep process steel support rings have been inserted in the bore of each block in layers 1-5. This thesis also focuses on minimizing lead contamination in the SNOLAB facilities, a class 2000 clean room. Lead is a toxic metal that can have harmful effects on almost all body systems. Lead carbonate can become suspended in air as fine particles through handling. Not only does this represent an unacceptable contaminant, the presence of lead represents a health hazard. In order to mitigate this hazard the HALO lead blocks were painted. A program to determine the optimal paint and application method was performed. It was determined that Tremclad Rust Paint in green had the optimal properties for this application. Finally, Monte Carlo studies were performed to optimize the design of the HALO experiment and determine its

  17. HPLC/DAD determination of rosmarinic acid in Salvia officinalis: sample preparation optimization by factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Karina B. de [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia; Oliveira, Bras H. de, E-mail: bho@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2013-01-15

    Sage (Salvia officinalis) contains high amounts of the biologically active rosmarinic acid (RA) and other polyphenolic compounds. RA is easily oxidized, and may undergo degradation during sample preparation for analysis. The objective of this work was to develop and validate an analytical procedure for determination of RA in sage, using factorial design of experiments for optimizing sample preparation. The statistically significant variables for improving RA extraction yield were determined initially and then used in the optimization step, using central composite design (CCD). The analytical method was then fully validated, and used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. The optimized procedure involved extraction with aqueous methanol (40%) containing an antioxidant mixture (ascorbic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)), with sonication at 45 deg C for 20 min. The samples were then injected in a system containing a C{sub 18} column, using methanol (A) and 0.1% phosphoric acid in water (B) in step gradient mode (45A:55B, 0-5 min; 80A:20B, 5-10 min) with flow rate of 1.0 mL min-1 and detection at 330 nm. Using this conditions, RA concentrations were 50% higher when compared to extractions without antioxidants (98.94 {+-} 1.07% recovery). Auto-oxidation of RA during sample extraction was prevented by the use of antioxidants resulting in more reliable analytical results. The method was then used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. (author)

  18. Design, Engineering, and Construction of Photosynthetic Microbial Cell Factories for Renewable Solar Fuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindblad, Peter; Lindberg, Pia; Stensjoe, Karin (Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Dept. of Chemistry-Aangstroem Laboratory, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)), E-mail: Peter.Lindblad@kemi.uu.se; Oliveira, Paulo (Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Porto (Portugal)); Heidorn, Thorsten (Bioforsk-Norwegian Inst. for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Aas Oslo, (Norway))

    2012-03-15

    There is an urgent need to develop sustainable solutions to convert solar energy into energy carriers used in the society. In addition to solar cells generating electricity, there are several options to generate solar fuels. This paper outlines and discusses the design and engineering of photosynthetic microbial systems for the generation of renewable solar fuels, with a focus on cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic microorganisms with the same type of photosynthesis as higher plants. Native and engineered cyanobacteria have been used by us and others as model systems to examine, demonstrate, and develop photobiological H{sub 2} production. More recently, the production of carbon-containing solar fuels like ethanol, butanol, and isoprene have been demonstrated. We are using a synthetic biology approach to develop efficient photosynthetic microbial cell factories for direct generation of biofuels from solar energy. Present progress and advances in the design, engineering, and construction of such cyanobacterial cells for the generation of a portfolio of solar fuels, e.g., hydrogen, alcohols, and isoprene, are presented and discussed. Possibilities and challenges when introducing and using synthetic biology are highlighted

  19. Assessment of the recycling potential of fresh concrete waste using a factorial design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, S L; Souza, F L; Dienstmann, G; Segadães, A M

    2009-11-01

    Recycling of industrial wastes and by-products can help reduce the cost of waste treatment prior to disposal and eventually preserve natural resources and energy. To assess the recycling potential of a given waste, it is important to select a tool capable of giving clear indications either way, with the least time and work consumption, as is the case of modelling the system properties using the results obtained from statistical design of experiments. In this work, the aggregate reclaimed from the mud that results from washout and cleaning operations of fresh concrete mixer trucks (fresh concrete waste, FCW) was recycled into new concrete with various water/cement ratios, as replacement of natural fine aggregates. A 3(2) factorial design of experiments was used to model fresh concrete consistency index and hardened concrete water absorption and 7- and 28-day compressive strength, as functions of FCW content and water/cement ratio, and the resulting regression equations and contour plots were validated with confirmation experiments. The results showed that the fresh concrete workability worsened with the increase in FCW content but the water absorption (5-10 wt.%), 7-day compressive strength (26-36 MPa) and 28-day compressive strength (32-44 MPa) remained within the specified ranges, thus demonstrating that the aggregate reclaimed from FCW can be recycled into new concrete mixtures with lower natural aggregate content.

  20. Electrodialytic desalination of brackish water: determination of optimal experimental parameters using full factorial design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmar, Soumaya; Helali, Nawel; Boubakri, Ali; Sayadi, Ilhem Ben Salah; Tlili, Mohamed; Amor, Mohamed Ben

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this work is to study the desalination of brackish water by electrodialysis (ED). A two level-three factor (23) full factorial design methodology was used to investigate the influence of different physicochemical parameters on the demineralization rate (DR) and the specific power consumption (SPC). Statistical design determines factors which have the important effects on ED performance and studies all interactions between the considered parameters. Three significant factors were used including applied potential, salt concentration and flow rate. The experimental results and statistical analysis show that applied potential and salt concentration are the main effect for DR as well as for SPC. The effect of interaction between applied potential and salt concentration was observed for SPC. A maximum value of 82.24% was obtained for DR under optimum conditions and the best value of SPC obtained was 5.64 Wh L-1. Empirical regression models were also obtained and used to predict the DR and the SPC profiles with satisfactory results. The process was applied for the treatment of real brackish water using the optimal parameters.

  1. Enhancement of peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence by copper (II) in flow-injection analysis: optimization by factorial design analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijger, O.M.; den Nieuwenboer, H.C.M.; Lingeman, H.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Holthuis, J.J.M.; Smilde, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) system with peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence (CL) detection was optimized by factorial design analysis in the absence and presence of Cu(II) ions. The carrier stream was a mixture of acetonitrile and an aqueous imidazole solution of pH 7.0. The effect of the metal ions

  2. Neutrino cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berstein, J.

    1984-01-01

    These lectures offer a self-contained review of the role of neutrinos in cosmology. The first part deals with the question 'What is a neutrino.' and describes in a historical context the theoretical ideas and experimental discoveries related to the different types of neutrinos and their properties. The basic differences between the Dirac neutrino and the Majorana neutrino are pointed out and the evidence for different neutrino 'flavours', neutrino mass, and neutrino oscillations is discussed. The second part summarizes current views on cosmology, particularly as they are affected by recent theoretical and experimental advances in high-energy particle physics. Finally, the close relationship between neutrino physics and cosmology is brought out in more detail, to show how cosmological constraints can limit the various theoretical possibilities for neutrinos and, more particularly, how increasing knowledge of neutrino properties can contribute to our understanding of the origin, history, and future of the Universe. The level is that of the beginning graduate student. (orig.)

  3. Muon-decay medium-baseline neutrino beam facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrino beam with about 300 MeV in energy, high-flux and medium baseline is considered a rational choice for measuring CP violation before the more powerful Neutrino Factory is to be built. Following this concept, a unique neutrino beam facility based on muon-decayed neutrinos is proposed. The facility adopts a continuous-wave proton linac of 1.5 GeV and 10 mA as the proton driver, which can deliver an extremely high beam power of 15 MW. Instead of pion-decayed neutrinos, unprecedentedly intense muon-decayed neutrinos are used for better background discrimination. The schematic design for the facility is presented here, including the proton driver, the assembly of a mercury-jet target and capture superconducting solenoids, a pion/muon beam transport line, a long muon decay channel of about 600 m and the detector concept. The physics prospects and the technical challenges are also discussed.

  4. Statistical optimization of dithranol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles using factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarand Suresh Gambhire

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a 3² full factorial experimental design to optimize the formulation of dithranol (DTH loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN by the pre-emulsion ultrasonication method. The variables drug: lipid ratio and sonication time were studied at three levels and arranged in a 3² factorial design to study the influence on the response variables particle size and % entrapment efficiency (%EE. From the statistical analysis of data polynomial equations were generated. The particle size and %EE for the 9 batches (R1 to R9 showed a wide variation of 219-348 nm and 51.33- 71.80 %, respectively. The physical characteristics of DTH-loaded SLN were evaluated using a particle size analyzer, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The results of the optimized formulation showed an average particle size of 219 nm and entrapment efficiency of 69.88 %. Ex-vivo drug penetration using rat skin showed about a 2-fold increase in localization of DTH in skin as compared to the marketed preparation of DTH.Este estudo descreve o planejamento factorial 3² para otimizar a formulação de nanopartículas lipídicas sólidas (SLN carregadas com ditranol (DTH pelo método da ultrassonificação pré-emulsão. As variáveis como proporção de fármaco:lipídio e o tempo de sonicação foram estudados em três níveis e arranjados em planejamento fatorial 3² para estudar a influência nas variáveis de resposta tamanho de partícula e eficiência percentual de retenção do fármaco (%EE. Pela análise estatística, geraram-se equações polinomiais. O tamanho da partícula e a %EE para os 9 lotes (R1 a R9 mostraram ampla variação, respectivamente, 219-348 nm e 51,33-71,80%. As características físicas das SLN carregadas com DTN foram avaliadas utilizando-se analisador de tamanho de partícula, calorimetria de varredura diferencial e difração de raios X. Os resultados da formulação otimizada mostraram tamanho médio de partícula de

  5. A quality by design approach to optimization of emulsions for electrospinning using factorial and D-optimal designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Mariam A; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2014-07-16

    Emulsion electrospinning is a multifactorial process used to generate nanofibers loaded with hydrophilic drugs or macromolecules for diverse biomedical applications. Emulsion electrospinnability is greatly impacted by the emulsion pharmaceutical attributes. The aim of this study was to apply a quality by design (QbD) approach based on design of experiments as a risk-based proactive approach to achieve predictable critical quality attributes (CQAs) in w/o emulsions for electrospinning. Polycaprolactone (PCL)-thickened w/o emulsions containing doxycycline HCl were formulated using a Span 60/sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) emulsifier blend. The identified emulsion CQAs (stability, viscosity and conductivity) were linked with electrospinnability using a 3(3) factorial design to optimize emulsion composition for phase stability and a D-optimal design to optimize stable emulsions for viscosity and conductivity after shifting the design space. The three independent variables, emulsifier blend composition, organic:aqueous phase ratio and polymer concentration, had a significant effect (pemulsion CQAs, the emulsifier blend composition exerting prominent main and interaction effects. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of emulsion-electrospun NFs and desirability functions allowed modeling of emulsion CQAs to predict electrospinnable formulations. A QbD approach successfully built quality in electrospinnable emulsions, allowing development of hydrophilic drug-loaded nanofibers with desired morphological characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cryogenic design and operation of liquid helium in an electron bubble chamber towards low energy solar neutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Y. L.; Dodd, J.; Galea, R.; Leltchouk, M.; Willis, W.; Jia, L. X.; Rehak, P.; Tcherniatine, V.

    2007-02-01

    We are developing a new cryogenic neutrino detector: electron bubble chamber, using liquid helium as the detecting medium, for the detection of low energy p-p reaction neutrinos (<420 keV), from the Sun. The program focuses in particular on the interactions of neutrinos scattering off atomic electrons in the detecting medium of liquid helium, resulting in recoil electrons which can be measured. We designed and constructed a small test chamber with 1.5 L active volume to start the detector R&D, and performed experimental proofs of the operation principle. The test chamber is a stainless steel cylinder equipped with five optical windows and ten high voltage cables. To shield the liquid helium chamber against the external heat loads, the chamber is made of double-walled jacket cooled by a pumped helium bath and is built into a LN 2/LHe cryostat, equipped with 80 K and 4 K radiation shields. A needle valve for vapor helium cooling was used to provide a 1.7-4.5 K low temperature environments. The cryogenic test chamber has been successfully operated to test the performance of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) in He and He + H 2 at temperatures in the range of 3-293 K. This paper will give an introduction on the cryogenic solar neutrino detector using electron bubbles in liquid helium, then present the cryogenic design and operation of liquid helium in the small test chamber. The general principles of a full-scale electron bubble detector for the detection of low energy solar neutrinos are also proposed.

  7. Resolution V fractional factorial Design for Screening of factors affecting weakly basic drugs liposomal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Helaly, Sara Nageeb; Habib, Basant A; Abd El-Rahman, Mohamed K

    2018-04-21

    This study aims to investigate factors affecting weakly basic drugs liposomal systems. Resolution V fractional factorial design (2 V 5-1 ) is used as an example of screening designs that would better be used as a wise step before proceeding with detailed factors effects or optimization studies. Five factors probable to affect liposomal systems of weakly basic drugs were investigated using Amisulpride as a model drug. Factors studied were; A: Preparation technique B: Phosphatidyl choline (PhC) amount (mg) C: Cholesterol: PhC molar ratio, D: Hydration volume (ml) and E: Sonication type. Levels investigated were; Ammonium sulphate-pH gradient technique or Transmembrane zinc chelation-pH gradient technique, 200 or 400 mg, 0 or 0.5, 10 or 20 ml and bath or probe sonication for A, B, C, D and E respectively. Responses measured were Particle size (PS) (nm), Zeta potential (ZP) (mV) and Entrapment efficiency percent (EE%). Ion selective electrode was used as a novel method for measuring unentrapped drug concentration and calculating entrapment efficiency without the need for liposomal separation. Factors mainly affecting the studied responses were Cholesterol: PhC ratio and hydration volume for PS, preparation technique for ZP and preparation technique and hydration volume for EE%. The applied 2 V 5-1 design enabled the use of only 16 trial combinations for screening the influence of five factors on weakly basic drugs liposomal systems. This clarifies the value of the use of screening experiments before extensive investigation of certain factors in detailed optimization studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Ammonia-nitrogen and Phosphate Reduction by Bio-Filter using Factorial Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmuri, Norhafezah; Ashikin Mat Damin, Nur; Omar, Megawati

    2018-02-01

    Untreated landfill leachate is known to have endangered the environment. As such new treatment must be sought to ensure its cost-effective and sustainable treatment. Thus this paper reports the effectiveness of bio-filter to remove pollutants. In this research, the reduction of nutrients concentration was evaluated in two conditions: using bio-filter and without bio-filter. Synthetic wastewater was used in the batch culture. It was conducted within 21 days in the initial mediums of 100 mg/L ammonia-nitrogen. The nitrification medium consisted of 100 mg/L of ammonia-nitrogen while the nitrite assay had none. The petri dish experiment was also conducted to observe the existence of any colony. The results showed 22% of ammonia- nitrogen reduction and 33% phosphate in the nitrification medium with the bio-filter. The outcome showed that the bio-filter was capable to reduce the concentration of pollutants by retaining the slow growing bacteria (AOB and NOB) on the plastic carrier surface. The factorial design was applied to study the effect of the initial ammonia-nitrogen concentration and duration on nitrite-nitrogen removal. Finally, a regression equation was produced to predict the rate of nitrite-nitrogen removal without conducting extended experiments and to reduce the number of trials experiment.

  9. Analysis of semi-solid processing for metal matrix composite synthesis using factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratus Ranieri

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal in this work is to conduct a quantitative analysis of the mechanical stir casting process for obtaining particulate metal matrix composites. A combined route of stirring at semi-solid state followed by stirring at liquid state is proposed. A fractional factorial design was developed to investigate the influence and interactions of factors as: time, rotation, initial fraction and particle size, on the incorporated fraction. The best incorporations were obtained with all factors at high levels, as well as that very long stirring periods have no strong influence being particle size and rotation the most important factors on the incorporated fraction. Particle wetting occurs during stirring at semi-solid state, highlighting the importance of the interactions between particles and the alloy globularized phase. The role of the alloying element Mg as a wettability-promoting agent is discussed. The shear forces resulting from the stirring system is emphasized and understood as the effect of rotation itself added to the propeller blade geometry.

  10. Optimization of cardiovascular stent against restenosis: factorial design-based statistical analysis of polymer coating conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Acharya

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to optimize the physicodynamic conditions of polymeric system as a coating substrate for drug eluting stents against restenosis. As Nitric Oxide (NO has multifunctional activities, such as regulating blood flow and pressure, and influencing thrombus formation, a continuous and spatiotemporal delivery of NO loaded in the polymer based nanoparticles could be a viable option to reduce and prevent restenosis. To identify the most suitable carrier for S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, a NO prodrug, stents were coated with various polymers, such as poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, polyethylene glycol (PEG and polycaprolactone (PCL, using solvent evaporation technique. Full factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the formulation variables in polymer-based stent coatings on the GSNO release rate and weight loss rate. The least square regression model was used for data analysis in the optimization process. The polymer-coated stents were further assessed with Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images and platelet adhesion studies. Stents coated with PCL matrix displayed more sustained and controlled drug release profiles than those coated with PLGA and PEG. Stents coated with PCL matrix showed the least platelet adhesion rate. Subsequently, stents coated with PCL matrix were subjected to the further optimization processes for improvement of surface morphology and enhancement of the drug release duration. The results of this study demonstrated that PCL matrix containing GSNO is a promising system for stent surface coating against restenosis.

  11. Optimization Of Freeze-Dried Starter For Yogurt By Full Factorial Experimental Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rapidly development of fermented milk product, it is significant for enhancing the performance of starter culture. This paper not only investigated the influence of anti-freeze factors and freeze-drying protective agents on viable count, freeze-drying survival rate and yield of Lactobacillus bulgaricus (LB and Streptococcus thermophilus (ST, but also optimized the bacteria proportion of freeze-dried starter culture for yogurt by full factorial experimental design. The results showed as following: the freeze-drying protective agents or anti-freeze factors could enhanced survival rate of LB and ST; the freeze-dried LB and ST powders containing both of anti-freeze factors and freeze-drying protective agents had higher viable count and freeze-drying survival rate that were 84.7% and 79.7% respectively; In terms of fermentation performance, the best group of freeze-dried starter for yogurt was the compound of LB3 and ST2.

  12. Enhancing biodegradation of wastewater by microbial consortia with fractional factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yuancai [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640, Guangdong (China); Lin Chejen, E-mail: Jerry.Lin@lamar.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710-0024 (United States); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006, Guangdong (China); Jones, Gavin [Texas Research Institute for Environmental Studies, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341-2506 (United States); Fu Shiyu; Zhan Huaiyu [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640, Guangdong (China)

    2009-11-15

    Batch experiments were conducted on the degradation of synthetic and municipal wastewater by six different strains, i.e., Agrobacterium sp., Bacillus sp., Enterobacter cloacae, Gordonia, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas putida. By applying a fractional factorial design (FFD) of experiments, the influence of each strain and their interactions were quantified. An empirical model predicting the treatment efficiency was built based on the results of the FFD experiments with an R{sup 2} value of 99.39%. For single strain, Enterobacter cloacae, Gordonia and P. putida (p = 0.008, 0.009 and 0.023, respectively) showed significant enhancement on organic removal in the synthetic wastewater. Positive interaction from Enterobacter cloacae, Gordonia (p = 0.046) was found, indicating that syntrophic interaction existed, and their coexistence can improve total organic carbon (TOC) degradation. Verification experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of bioaugmentation by introducing three selected strains into an activated sludge reactor for treating municipal wastewater. The removal efficiency of TOC with the bioaugmentation was increased from 67-72% to 80-84% at an influent TOC concentration of 200 mg/L. The results derived from this study indicate that the FFD is a useful screening tool for optimizing the microbial community to enhance treatment efficiency.

  13. Enhancing biodegradation of wastewater by microbial consortia with fractional factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuancai; Lin Chejen; Jones, Gavin; Fu Shiyu; Zhan Huaiyu

    2009-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted on the degradation of synthetic and municipal wastewater by six different strains, i.e., Agrobacterium sp., Bacillus sp., Enterobacter cloacae, Gordonia, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas putida. By applying a fractional factorial design (FFD) of experiments, the influence of each strain and their interactions were quantified. An empirical model predicting the treatment efficiency was built based on the results of the FFD experiments with an R 2 value of 99.39%. For single strain, Enterobacter cloacae, Gordonia and P. putida (p = 0.008, 0.009 and 0.023, respectively) showed significant enhancement on organic removal in the synthetic wastewater. Positive interaction from Enterobacter cloacae, Gordonia (p = 0.046) was found, indicating that syntrophic interaction existed, and their coexistence can improve total organic carbon (TOC) degradation. Verification experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of bioaugmentation by introducing three selected strains into an activated sludge reactor for treating municipal wastewater. The removal efficiency of TOC with the bioaugmentation was increased from 67-72% to 80-84% at an influent TOC concentration of 200 mg/L. The results derived from this study indicate that the FFD is a useful screening tool for optimizing the microbial community to enhance treatment efficiency.

  14. Benzocaine loaded biodegradable poly-(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanocapsules: factorial design and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales Moraes, Carolina; Prado de Matos, Angelica; Paula, Eneida de [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rosa, Andre Henrique [Department of Environmental Engineering, State University of Sao Paulo, Sorocaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Fernandes Fraceto, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardo@sorocaba.unesp.b [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Department of Environmental Engineering, State University of Sao Paulo, Sorocaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    Local anesthetics are able to induce pain relief since they bind to the sodium channel of excitable membranes, blocking the influx of sodium ions and the propagation of the nervous impulse. Benzocaine (BZC) is a local anesthetic that presents limited application in topical formulations due to its low water-solubility. This study aimed to develop polymeric nanocapsules as a drug delivery system for the local anesthetic benzocaine (BZC). To do so, BZC loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanocapsules were prepared using the nanoprecipitation method and were characterized. The factorial experimental design was used to study the influence of four different independent variables on response to nanocapsules drug loading. The physical characteristics of PLGA nanocapsules were evaluated by analyzing the particle size, the polydispersion index and the zeta potential, using a particle size analyzer. The results of the optimized formulation showed a size distribution with a polydispersity index of 0.12, an average diameter of 123 nm, zeta potential of -33.6 mV and a drug loading of more than 69%. The release profiles showed a significant difference in the release behavior for the pure drug in solution when compared with that containing benzocaine loaded PLGA nanocapsules. Thus, the prepared nanocapsules described here may be of clinical importance in both the processes of stabilization and delivery of benzocaine for pain treatment.

  15. Factorial design and statistical analysis of smectite clay treatment by hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. A. Gama

    Full Text Available Abstract Bentonite clays are materials composed by one or more smectite clay minerals and some accessory minerals, mainly quartz, cristobalite, mica, feldspars and other clay minerals such as kaolinite. These contaminants present in clays have a large distribution of particle sizes which severely restrict their industrial applications, with the use of hydrocyclone as a likely solution for their reduction. This study aims to analyze the treatment of smectite clays from the state of Paraíba using modeling, simulation and optimization of the variable average particle diameter in relation to various process variables related to the hydrocyclone. In this study, the average diameter of smectite clays was evaluated as a function of the factors: pressure, apex diameter and vortex diameter of the hydrocyclone. Complete factorial design and addition in the central points were used to model the hydrocycloning process. The results evidenced reduction in equivalent average particle size of approximately 19.2%. Regarding the simulations, the optimum point with the lowest value was found for the average diameter of 4.033 µm, with a pressure of 4.3 bar, apex opening of 5.3 mm, and vortex opening of 6.3 mm, all at a 95% confidence level.

  16. HPLC analysis of oxindole alkaloids in Uncaria tomentosa: sample preparation and analysis optimisation by factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Gustavo; Franco, Luzia; Oliveira, Brás Heleno de

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa ("cat's claw") is widely used for the treatment of some infectious and inflammatory diseases. Oxindole alkaloids are regarded as the most important components responsible for the biological activities attributed to the plant. Their analysis require efficient sample preparation and suitable reference standards but few are commercially available. To develop and validate a HPLC analytical method for oxindole alkaloids in Uncaria tomentosa with emphasis on sample preparation. Factorial experimental designs were used for the optimisation of both sample preparation and chromatographic separation. The optimised sample preparation involved extraction with aqueous ethanol, and the granulometry of the powdered plant material significantly influenced extraction yields. Mitraphylline was used as a calibration reference for the determination of total alkaloids. The method was fully validated and showed good selectivity, linearity (r²  ≥ 0.9996), accuracy (≥ 96%) and precision (RSD < 2.4%). Detection and quantification limits for mitraphylline were 0.8 and 2.4 ppm, respectively. The optimised chromatographic method, using organic buffer in the mobile phase, provided baseline separation of tetracyclic and pentacyclic alkaloids in the samples. Calibration using mitraphylline provided more accurate estimates of total alkaloid content when compared to other available reference alkaloids. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Evaluating the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea comorbid with insomnia disorder using an incomplete factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Megan R; Turner, Arlener D; Wyatt, James K; Fogg, Louis F; Ong, Jason C

    2016-03-01

    Chronic insomnia disorder is a prevalent condition and a significant proportion of these individuals also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). These two sleep disorders have distinct pathophysiology and are managed with different treatment approaches. High comorbidity rates have been a catalyst for emerging studies examining multidisciplinary treatment for OSA comorbid with insomnia disorder. In this article, we describe a randomized clinical trial of cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBT-I) and positive airway pressure (PAP) for OSA. Participants are randomized to receive one of three treatment combinations. Individuals randomized to treatment Arm A receive sequential treatment beginning with CBT-I followed by PAP, in treatment Arm B CBT-I and PAP are administered concurrently. These treatment arms are compared to a control condition, treatment Arm C, where individuals receive PAP alone. Adopting an incomplete factorial study design will allow us to evaluate the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatment (Arms A & B) versus standard treatment alone (Arm C). In addition, the random allocation of individuals to the two different combined treatment sequences (Arm A and Arm B) will allow us to understand the benefits of the sequential administration of CBT-I and PAP relative to concurrent treatment of PAP and CBT-I. These findings will provide evidence of the clinical benefits of treating insomnia disorder in the context of OSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. PCL/PLA Polymer Composite Filament Fabrication using Full Factorial Design (DOE) for Fused Deposition Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, R. H. A.; Khairilhijra, K. Rd.; Wahab, M. S.; Sa’ude, N.; Ibrahim, M.; Marwah, O. M. F.; Yusof, M. S.; Rahman, M. N. A.; Ariffin, A. M. T.; Hassan, M. F.; Yunos, M. Z.; Adzila, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, Polycaprolactone / Polylactice Acid (PCL/PLA) composite are used to fabricate filament wire with the specific diameter, which is in the range of 1.75 to 1.80 mm. Full factorial experimental design technique was used to study the main effects and the interaction effects between operational parameter which is (A) die temperature, (B) roller puller speed, (C) spindle speed and (D) inlet temperature. Besides that, there are two levels (-1 and +1) and the response are filament wire diameter. There are 16 numbers of runs and plus 8 centre points per blocks which makes the runs into 24 runs. From the experiment it shows that there are four factor that are significant effects on the filament wire diameter which is A, B, C and BC. The optimum parameter setting are also determined and there are 10 suggestions to achieve the target with different setting of parameter. The margin error for confirmation run is below than 15% when the parameter set at 6 Hz spindle speed, 4.99 rpm roller puller, 100.31 °C die temperature and 79.65 °C inlet temperature which can be noted that the confirmation run result is acceptable. The optimization parameter setting can use to continue in Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM). Filament wire from PCL/PLA are succesfully fabricated with acceptable diameter size and ready to be used for Fused Depotion Modelling process (FDM).

  19. Design of a Low Cost Smart Dryer Temperature Measurement System for Tea Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal SARMA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a low cost smart dryer temperature measurement system for Tea Factories using K-type Thermocouple implementing linearization polynomial. The thermo emf is amplified by an instrumentation amplifier having high CMRR (106 dB and high input impedance (1012 Ohm. The analog signal is converted to digital form with the help of an SPI compatible 12-bit ADC. Data acquisition and transmission is done with an 8- bit microcontroller. As the dependence of thermo emf on temperature is not linear hence it is fitted with a polynomial. NIST data for K-type TC is taken as a standard for this fitting. The error with linear fit and polynomial fit is also presented. The digital data is corrected according to the polynomial and sent to a PC located at a remote control room for monitoring and data logging via RS232C communication. The performance of the entire system is discussed in the paper.

  20. Optimization of Chitosan Microspheres Spray Drying via 32 Full Factorial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarov, Plamen D; Pilicheva, Bissera A; Manev, Hristo M; Lukova, Paolina K; Kassarova, Margarita I

    2017-09-01

    Generally, the preparation of spray-dried microspheres is strongly affected by the process parameters. Particle size and production yield are mainly influenced by the spraying solution concentration and the pump rate of the spray dryer. The aim of this study was to assess optimum spray drying parameters - polymer concentration and pump rate required for the production of chitosan microspheres with high production yield and targeted for nasal administration particle size. Full 32 factorial design was used to study the investigated parameters. Three different concentrations of the chitosan solution were selected: a low concentration of 1%, average concentration of 1.5% and high concentration of 2%. The rate of the peristaltic pump was also varied at three levels: low rate of 10%, medium rate of 14% and high rate of 18%. Nine models of chitosan microspheres were formulated and characterized in terms of shape, surface morphology, size, particle size distribution and production yield. The particles obtained from 2% chitosan solutions, sprayed at 10% pump rate were of the highest yield (64.33%) and appropriate for nasal administration median diameter (3,434 μm). The two investigated spray-drying parameters interact with each other and their influence on the production yield and the size of the chitosan microspheres should be evaluated together, instead of one at a time. The assessed process parameters allow the production of chitosan microparticles with high yield and desirable characteristics (size, size distribution and shape) for intranasal delivery.

  1. Effect of polymer type on characteristics of buccal tablets using factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Esim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A two factor three level factorial design was used to investigate the effects of carbopol and cationic hydrophilic polymers which have a common use in buccal drug formulations. Statistical models with interaction terms were derived to evaluate influence of carbopol (X1 and chitosan (X2 on tablet disintegration (Y1 and dissolution (Y2, mechanical properties (Y3, swelling (Y4. Tablet disintegration studies were carried out using two different pH environments within buccal region pH limits and also two different commonly used dissolution methods for buccal tablets were also investigated to compare the effect of polymer type on dissolution. Polymer type and ratio affect the characteristics of the buccal tablets due to their different physicochemical behavior at buccal pH. Also significant variances between dissolution profiles for buccal tablets, using either USP Paddle or flow through cell methods were found. These results indicate that both polymer type and ratio as well as combination of them effects the drug behavior in different ways. Keywords: Buccal tablet, Hydrophilic matrix, Effect of polymer, Carbopol, Chitosan

  2. Formulation optimization of floating microbeads containing modified Chinese yam starch using factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adenike Okunlola

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release floating metformin hydrochloride microbeads were prepared and optimized using a blend of varying concentrations of freeze-dried pregelatinized Chinese yam starch (Dioscorea oppositifolia L and sodium alginate. Floating microbeads were prepared by the ionotropic gelation method using 10% w/v calcium chloride as the cross-linking agent and sodium bicarbonate as the gas releasing agent. A full 32 factorial design was used to investigate the influence of two variables: concentrations of starch (X1 and sodium bicarbonate (X2 on the swelling, floating lag time and amount of drug released after 1 hour (Q1 and 10 hours (Q10. Potential variables such as the concentrations of drug and total polymer were kept constant. The results showed that the properties of the floating microbeads were significantly (p<0.01 affected by the concentration of the modified Chinese yam starch. Buoyancy and drug release appeared to be facilitated by increased concentrations of both starch and sodium bicarbonate in the formulation. The results also show that an optimized formulation of metformin hydrochloride could be obtained with the potential for gastroretentive controlled drug delivery using a blend of freeze-dried pregelatinized Chinese yam starch and sodium alginate.

  3. Full factorial design optimization of anti-inflammatory drug release by PCL–PEG–PCL microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azouz, L' Hachemi, E-mail: azouz.chimie@gmail.com [Laboratoire des Matériaux Organiques (LMO), Faculté des Sciences Exactes, Département de Chimie, Université de Bejaia, 06000 Bejaia Algérie (Algeria); Dahmoune, Farid, E-mail: farid.dahmoune@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Biomathématiques, Biophysique, Biochimie et Scientométrie (L3BS-Bejaia), Faculté des Sciences de la Nature et de la Vie et des Sciences de la Terre, Université de Bouira 10000 Bouira (Algeria); Rezgui, Farouk, E-mail: rezgui-farouk@netcourrier.com [Laboratoire des Matériaux Organiques (LMO), Faculté de Technologie, Département de Génie des Procédés, Université de Bejaia, 06000 Bejaia (Algeria); G' Sell, Christian, E-mail: gsell.christian@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Pôle scientifique M4, Institut Jean Lamour - UMR CNRS-UL 7198, Département SI2M, 54000 Nancy (France)

    2016-01-01

    A biodegradable triblock poly(ε-caprolactone)–poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer was successfully synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone, and was characterized by intrinsic viscosimetry, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Copolymer microparticles loaded with ibuprofen were prepared by an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation process. They were carefully weighted and characterized through their zeta potential. In this work, 4 selected process parameters (shaking speed X{sub 1}, time of contact X{sub 2}, poly(vinyl alcohol) concentration X{sub 3}, and ibuprofen concentration X{sub 4}) were adjusted at 2 different values. For each of the 16 experimental conditions, repeated twice, the drug encapsulation efficiency of the microspheres was determined, according to the following definition: EE (X{sub 1}, X{sub 2}, X{sub 3}, X{sub 4}) = mass of encapsulated ibuprofen / total weight of ibuprofen. A “full factorial design method” was applied to analyze the results statistically according to a polynomial fit and to determine the optimal conditions for the microencapsulation of the ibuprofen through an accurate statistical protocol. The microparticles obtained exhibit a spherical shape as shown by electron microscopy. - Highlights: • PCEC copolymer was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone. • 2{sup 4} experimental design was used to optimize the IBF encapsulation efficiency (EE). • 88.86% of ibuprofen (IBF) was encapsulated in PCEC microspheres. • EE significantly decreases with increasing shaking speed (antagonist effect). • EE significantly increases with increasing IBF concentration (synergetic effect).

  4. Full factorial design optimization of anti-inflammatory drug release by PCL–PEG–PCL microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azouz, L'Hachemi; Dahmoune, Farid; Rezgui, Farouk; G'Sell, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A biodegradable triblock poly(ε-caprolactone)–poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer was successfully synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone, and was characterized by intrinsic viscosimetry, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Copolymer microparticles loaded with ibuprofen were prepared by an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation process. They were carefully weighted and characterized through their zeta potential. In this work, 4 selected process parameters (shaking speed X 1 , time of contact X 2 , poly(vinyl alcohol) concentration X 3 , and ibuprofen concentration X 4 ) were adjusted at 2 different values. For each of the 16 experimental conditions, repeated twice, the drug encapsulation efficiency of the microspheres was determined, according to the following definition: EE (X 1 , X 2 , X 3 , X 4 ) = mass of encapsulated ibuprofen / total weight of ibuprofen. A “full factorial design method” was applied to analyze the results statistically according to a polynomial fit and to determine the optimal conditions for the microencapsulation of the ibuprofen through an accurate statistical protocol. The microparticles obtained exhibit a spherical shape as shown by electron microscopy. - Highlights: • PCEC copolymer was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone. • 2 4 experimental design was used to optimize the IBF encapsulation efficiency (EE). • 88.86% of ibuprofen (IBF) was encapsulated in PCEC microspheres. • EE significantly decreases with increasing shaking speed (antagonist effect). • EE significantly increases with increasing IBF concentration (synergetic effect).

  5. Fractional factorial plans

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  6. Turbo-extraction of glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana using a fractional factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Martins

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni Bertoni, Asteraceae, leaf extract has recently called the attention of food industry as a proposal for natural sweetener. The sweet flavor is attributed to the glycosides, in especial stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are the plant main chemical markers. The aim of the work reported here was to optimize the turbo-extraction of stevia leaves using water, ethanol 70% and 90% (w/w as green solvents. A 25-2 factorial design was applied to study the linear effects of the drug size, solvent to drug ratio, temperature, time and also the turbolysis speed on the extraction of glycosides. The glycosides exhaustive extraction showed that ethanol 70% gave better results and was used for turbo-extraction. The stevioside and rebaudioside A contents were quantified by a validated method by high performance liquid chromatographic with photodiode array detector. The contents of stevioside and rebaudioside A in fluid extract increased with the drug size, but decreased at high shearing speeds and solvent to drug ratio, while their yields decreased at higher temperature and were not affected by turbo speed. An increase in solvent to drug ratio reduced significantly the glycosides percent in dried extract. Optimal solution for S. rebaudiana leaves turbo-extraction was determined by desirability functions. The optimal extraction condition corresponded to drug size of 780 µm, solvent to drug ratio of 10, extraction time of 18 min; temperature of 23 ºC and turbo speed of 20,000 rpm, resulting in yields of 4.98% and 2.70%, for stevioside and rebaudioside A, respectively. These yields are comparable to the ones recently published for dynamic maceration, but with the advantage of shorter extraction times. This work demonstrates that turbolysis is promising for S. rebaudiana glycosides extraction and stimulate new research on the purification of these extracts, which may become an interesting source of income for developing

  7. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08

    be upgraded to 0.2 s to reach the required repetition rate of 2.5 Hz. The required upgrade of the AGS power supply, the rf system, and other rate dependent accelerator issues is discussed. The design of the target/horn configuration is shown. The material selected for the proton target is a Carbon-Carbon composite. It is a 3-dimensional woven material that exhibits extremely low thermal expansion for temperatures up to 1000 C; for higher temperatures it responds like graphite. This property is important for greatly reducing the thermo-elastic stresses induced by the beam, thereby extending the life of the target. The target consists of a 80 cm long cylindrical rod of 12 mm diameter. The target intercepts a 2 mm rms proton beam of 10{sup 14} protons/pulse. The total energy deposited as heat in the target is 7.3 kJ with peak temperature rise of about 280 C. Heat will be removed from the target through forced convection of helium gas across its outside surface. The extracted proton beam uses an existing beamline at the AGS, but is then directed to a target station atop a constructed earthen hill. The target is followed by a downward slopping pion decay channel. This vertical arrangement keeps the target and decay pipe well above the water table in this area. The 11.3 degrees slope aims the neutrino beam at a water Cerenkov neutrino detector to be located in the Homestake mine at Lead, South Dakota. A 3-dimensional view of the beam transport line, target station, and decay tunnel is provided.

  8. Engineering microbial cell factories for the production of plant natural products: from design principles to industrial-scale production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaonan; Ding, Wentao; Jiang, Huifeng

    2017-07-19

    Plant natural products (PNPs) are widely used as pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, seasonings, pigments, etc., with a huge commercial value on the global market. However, most of these PNPs are still being extracted from plants. A resource-conserving and environment-friendly synthesis route for PNPs that utilizes microbial cell factories has attracted increasing attention since the 1940s. However, at the present only a handful of PNPs are being produced by microbial cell factories at an industrial scale, and there are still many challenges in their large-scale application. One of the challenges is that most biosynthetic pathways of PNPs are still unknown, which largely limits the number of candidate PNPs for heterologous microbial production. Another challenge is that the metabolic fluxes toward the target products in microbial hosts are often hindered by poor precursor supply, low catalytic activity of enzymes and obstructed product transport. Consequently, despite intensive studies on the metabolic engineering of microbial hosts, the fermentation costs of most heterologously produced PNPs are still too high for industrial-scale production. In this paper, we review several aspects of PNP production in microbial cell factories, including important design principles and recent progress in pathway mining and metabolic engineering. In addition, implemented cases of industrial-scale production of PNPs in microbial cell factories are also highlighted.

  9. Optimizing conditions for the development process of the sponge liquid bread mold through a factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Quintero Gil

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The bread in its many forms is one of the oldest and most widely food consumed by humanity, its appearance is not known for sure, but it is presumed that he was in the Middle East, where he began to cultivate wheat. Due to its development in different cultures have been many developments in technology and industry, however all the processes that are designed to make bread have had a common purpose and simple, the conversion of wheat four in a food spongy and appetizing. This objective has been achieved through a series of stages are common as the mixture of water and four with yeast, salt and other ingredients individuals in appropriate proportions; the generation of specific aroma and favor through fermentation and the development a structure of gluten in combination with the application of mechanical energy during the kneading and the subsequent acquisition of a fixed and final structure consistent with a nice color through the baking.To achieve this goal which is based on the fermentation of the baking industry has created the term to refer to a sponge pre whose primary function is precisely to change the favor and aroma and contribute to the development of the mass through changes in the properties rheological properties of the mixture. Among the ingredients of the sponge is drawn to the food for yeast known as (APL that has the primary role of regulating the fermentation through the right mix of ingredients both qualitatively and quantitatively.The study of this combination was raised in this paper using a factorial design of experiments with statistical treatment looking to evaluate the effects of the formulation in combination with the temperature on a response variable called gasification power which indirectly measured the development of the fermentation Liquid sponges that serve as a basis for the preparation of bread mold. The results made it possible to defne a design and the apl an optimum temperature at which the variable response

  10. A Fractional Factorial Design to Study the Effect of Process Variables on the Preparation of Hyaluronidase Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was initiated to understand the effect of PLGA concentration, PVA concentration, internal-external phase ratio, homogenization speed, and homogenization time on mean particle size, zeta potential, and percentage drug encapsulation using fractional factorial design. Using PLGA (50-50 as the carrier, hyaluronidase loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared using double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The particle size was analyzed by dynamic light scattering technique and protein content by Lowry method. The study showed that homogenization speed as an independent variable had maximum effect on particle size and zeta potential. Internal-external phase volume ratio had maximum effect on drug encapsulation. Mean particle size also had high dependency on the combined effect of PVA concentration and phase volume ratio. Using fractional factorial design particle size of <400 nm, zeta potential of <−30 mV, and percentage encapsulation of 15–18% were achieved.

  11. Application of 2k Full Factorial Design in Optimization of Solvent-Free Microwave Extraction of Ginger Essential Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Mumtaj; Garg, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    The solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from ginger was optimized using a 23 full factorial design in terms of oil yield to determine the optimum extraction conditions. Sixteen experiments were carried out with three varying parameters, extraction time, microwave power, and type of sample for two levels of each. A first order regression equation best fits the experimental data. The predicted values calculated by the regression model were in good agreement with the experimental ...

  12. Neutrino astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roulet, E.

    2001-01-01

    A general overview of neutrino physics and astrophysics is given, starting with a historical account of the development of our understanding of neutrinos and how they helped to unravel the structure of the Standard Model. We discuss why it is so important to establish if neutrinos are massive and introduce the main scenarios to provide them a mass. The present bounds and the positive indications in favor of non-zero neutrino masses are discussed, including the recent results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos. The major role that neutrinos play in astrophysics and cosmology is illustrated. (author)

  13. Neutrino physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the writeup of the lectures on neutrino physics delivered at various schools: TASI and Trieste in 2013 and the CERN-Latin American School in 2015. The topics discussed in this lecture include: general properties of neutrinos in the SM, the theory of neutrino masses and mixings (Dirac and Majorana), neutrino oscillations both in vacuum and in matter, as well as an overview of the experimental evidence for neutrino masses and of the prospects in neutrino oscillation physics. We also briefly review the relevance of neutri- nos in leptogenesis and in beyond-the-Standard-Model physics.

  14. Particle factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, Rafe

    1989-01-01

    Physicists' attention is increasingly turning to the high luminosity frontier - providing enough collisions to amass sizable numbers of rare events - to complement the traditional quest for higher energies. This month we cover three areas where projects are now being considered: Phi-factory workshop, PSI Planning for B meson factory, Tau-charm factory

  15. Design of the cryogenic systems for the Near and Far LAr-TPC detectors of the Short-Baseline Neutrino program (SBN) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geynisman, M. [Fermilab; Bremer, J. [CERN; Chalifour, M. [CERN; Delaney, M. [Fermilab; Dinnon, M. [Fermilab; Doubnik, R. [Fermilab; Hentschel, S. [Fermilab; Kim, M. J. [Fermilab; Montanari, C. [INFN, Pavia; Monatanari, D. [Fermilab; Nichols, T. [Fermilab; Norris, B. [Fermilab; Sarychev, M. [Fermilab; Schwartz, F. [Fermilab; Tillman, J. [Fermilab; Zuckerbrot, M. [Fermilab

    2017-08-31

    The Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) physics program at Fermilab and Neutrino Platform (NP) at CERN are part of the international Neutrino Program leading to the development of Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (LBNF/DUNE) science project. The SBN program consisting of three Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors positioned along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab includes an existing detector known as MicroBooNE (170-ton LAr-TPC) plus two new experiments known as SBN’s Near Detector (SBND, ~260 tons) and SBN’s Far Detector (SBN-FD, ~760 tons). All three detectors have distinctly different design of their cryostats thus defining specific requirements for the cryogenic systems. Fermilab has already built two new facilities to house SBND and SBN-FD detectors. The cryogenic systems for these detectors are in various stages of design and construction with CERN and Fermilab being responsible for delivery of specific sub-systems. This contribution presents specific design requirements and typical implementation solutions for each sub-system of the SBND and SBN-FD cryogenic systems.

  16. Design of the cryogenic systems for the Near and Far LAr-TPC detectors of the Short-Baseline Neutrino program (SBN) at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geynisman, M.; Bremer, J.; Chalifour, M.; Delaney, M.; Dinnon, M.; Doubnik, R.; Hentschel, S.; Kim, M. J.; Montanari, C.; Montanari, D.; Nichols, T.; Norris, B.; Sarychev, M.; Schwartz, F.; Tillman, J.; Zuckerbrot, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) physics program at Fermilab and Neutrino Platform (NP) at CERN are part of the international Neutrino Program leading to the development of Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (LBNF/DUNE) science project. The SBN program consisting of three Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors positioned along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab includes an existing detector known as MicroBooNE (170-ton LAr-TPC) plus two new experiments known as SBN’s Near Detector (SBND, ∼260 tons) and SBN’s Far Detector (SBN-FD, ∼760 tons). All three detectors have distinctly different design of their cryostats thus defining specific requirements for the cryogenic systems. Fermilab has already built two new facilities to house SBND and SBN-FD detectors. The cryogenic systems for these detectors are in various stages of design and construction with CERN and Fermilab being responsible for delivery of specific sub-systems. This contribution presents specific design requirements and typical implementation solutions for each sub-system of the SBND and SBN-FD cryogenic systems.

  17. Used frying oil biodiesel production: experimental factorial design and multivariate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana de Cassia de Souza Schneider

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel é derivado de fontes renováveis ereduz significativamente as emissões atmosféricas. Pode serobtido de diversos processos, como a alcoolise. Nestetrabalho, o biodiesel foi produzido através da alcoolise doóleo de fritura usado de indústrias de alimentação. Umplanejamento experimental foi utilizado e os produtos dereação foram analisados por cromatografia gasosa (CGespectroscopia na região do infravermelho com acessório dereflexão total atenuada horizontal (IV-HATR e análiseexploratória por análise de componentes principais (PCA eanálise hierárquica de grupos (HCA. De acordo com ascondições analisadas obteve-se alta conversão em ésteresmetílicos. Por IV-HATR, a conversão máxima foi observadaem condições experimentais de temperatura ( 50 e 60°C,concentração de catalisador (0,6 e 1,2% e a 1:8 de relaçãomolar entre óleo e metanol. Também foi possíveldiscriminar por análise quimiométrica, 4 grupos noplanejamento experimental e determinar as melhorescondições para a produção de biodiesel de óleo de friturausado.Abstract Biodiesel is derived from renewable sources and it significantly reduces atmospheric emissions. It can be obtained byseveral processes, such as alcoholysis. In this work, biodiesel was produced through alcoholysis of used frying oil from a cateringbusiness. An experimental factorial design was used and the reaction products were analyzed through gas chromatography (GC,horizontal attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (HATR/FT-IR spectroscopy and exploratory analysis withprincipal component analysis (PCA and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA. Under the conditions analyzed, a high degree ofconversion to methyl ester was found. As shown by HATR/FT-IR, the maximum conversion was obtained when the experimentalconditions had the temperature ( 50 e 60°C, largest catalyst concentration (0,6 e 1,2% and a 1:8 molar proportion of oil tomethanol. It was possible to discriminate

  18. Standard and nonstandard neutrino properties

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, José W F

    2003-01-01

    I review the interpretation of solar and atmospheric neutrino data in terms neutrino oscillations and describe some ways to account for the required neutrino masses and mixing angles from first principles, both within top down and bottom-up approaches. Non-oscillation phenomena such as beta beta /sub 0 nu / probe the absolute scale of neutrino mass, and if found, would reveal the Majorana nature of neutrinos. Leptonic CP violation induced by "Majorana" phases drop from oscillations but play a role in the leptogenesis scenario for the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. Direct CP tests in oscillation experiments, such as neutrino factories, will be a tough challenge, due to the hierarchical neutrino mass splittings and the smallness of theta /sub 13/ indicated by reactors. The large solar mixing angle theta /sub 12/ offers a way to probe otherwise inaccessible features of supernova physics. Finally, I note that in lowscale models of neutrino mass, one may probe all mixing angles, including the atmospheric theta ...

  19. Supernova neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Cardall, Christian Y.

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collap...

  20. Neutrino Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neutrino Oscillations: New Windows to the Particle World. General Article Volume 21 Issue 10 ... Neutrino oscillation is a quantum mechanicalphenomenon whereby a neutrino created witha specific lepton flavour (electron, muon, or tau) can later bemeasured to have a different flavour. Historical developmentof the field in ...

  1. Solar Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solar Neutrinos. Revathi Ananthakrishnan. 1. Introduction. The neutrino, which means the little neutral one in Ital- ian, is a very special elementary particle. It is a spin half, chargeless and almost . massless particle and therefore eluded detection for a long time. However, the sun is a rich source of neutrinos and physicists ...

  2. Los Neutrinos Los Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Félix

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available From all the proposals to understand the structure of matter, and the way the natural world is conformed, the one about neutrinos is the most enigmatic, abstract, and foreign to immediate experience; however, this is the one that has delved more deeply over the nearly eighty years since it was formulated by Wolfgang Pauli –in 1930- as a radical proposition to understand nucleon decay, and the decay of other particles, without the violation of the principle of conservation of energy and momentum at subatomic level. This proposition has evolved through the years, and from Pauli’s original idea only the basic elements remain.This article contains the tale of the hypothesis of neutrinos, its early history, its evolution up to present day, and the efforts done nowadays to study them. In summary, this is the physics of neutrinos. De todas las propuestas para entender la estructura de la materia, y la conformación del mundo natural, los neutrinos es la más enigmática, abstracta, y ajena a la experiencia inmediata; sin embargo, es la que más hondo ha ido calando a lo largo de los ya casi ochenta años de haber sido formulada por Wolfgang Pauli –en el año 1930- como una medida radical para entender el decaimiento de los nucleones, y otras partículas, sin que se violara el principio de la conservación de la energía y del momento a nivel subatómico. La propuesta ha evolucionado a lo largo de los años, y de la idea original de Pauli ya sólo lo básico permanece. En este artículo está el relato de la hipótesis de los neutrinos, su historia primera, su evolución hasta el presente, los esfuerzos que en la actualidad se realizan para estudiarlos. En breve, ésta es la física de los neutrinos.

  3. Sterile Neutrino Search with MINOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devan, Alena V. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    MINOS, Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the NuMI muon neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. It consists of two detectors, a near detector positioned 1 km from the source of the beam and a far detector 734 km away in Minnesota. MINOS is primarily designed to observe muon neutrino disappearance resulting from three flavor oscillations. The Standard Model of Particle Physics predicts that neutrinos oscillate between three active flavors as they propagate through space. This means that a muon-type neutrino has a certain probability to later interact as a different type of neutrino. In the standard picture, the neutrino oscillation probabilities depend only on three neutrino flavors and two mass splittings, Δm2. An anomaly was observed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments that suggests the existence of a fourth, sterile neutrino flavor that does not interact through any of the known Standard Model interactions. Oscillations into a theoretical sterile flavor may be observed by a deficit in neutral current interactions in the MINOS detectors. A distortion in the charged current energy spectrum might also be visible if oscillations into the sterile flavor are driven by a large mass-squared difference, ms2 ~ 1 eV2. The results of the 2013 sterile neutrino search are presented here.

  4. Accelerator neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autiero, D.; Declais, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the last years neutrino physics was shaken by many important experimental results bringing solid proofs in favor of neutrino oscillations. The goal of the present and future generation of experiments at accelerators is to complete the comprehension of neutrino mixing and of the pattern of neutrino masses, perform precise measurements of all these parameters and investigate CP violation in the neutrino sector. Most of these goals will be achieved with the study of ν μ → ν e oscillations, which are mainly ruled by the still unknown mixing angle Θ 13 . A multi-step experimental strategy has to be attempted, depending on the magnitude of Θ 13 . (authors)

  5. Solar neutrinos and neutrino physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltoni, Michele [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Smirnov, Alexei Yu. [Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Solar neutrino studies triggered and largely motivated the major developments in neutrino physics in the last 50 years. The theory of neutrino propagation in different media with matter and fields has been elaborated. It includes oscillations in vacuum and matter, resonance flavor conversion and resonance oscillations, spin and spin-flavor precession, etc. LMA MSW has been established as the true solution of the solar neutrino problem. Parameters θ{sub 12} and Δm{sup 2}{sub 21} have been measured; θ{sub 13} extracted from the solar data is in agreement with results from reactor experiments. Solar neutrino studies provide a sensitive way to test theory of neutrino oscillations and conversion. Characterized by long baseline, huge fluxes and low energies they are a powerful set-up to search for new physics beyond the standard 3ν paradigm: new neutrino states, sterile neutrinos, non-standard neutrino interactions, effects of violation of fundamental symmetries, new dynamics of neutrino propagation, probes of space and time. These searches allow us to get stringent, and in some cases unique bounds on new physics. We summarize the results on physics of propagation, neutrino properties and physics beyond the standard model obtained from studies of solar neutrinos. (orig.)

  6. Neutrino cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludman, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Cosmological data are reviewed, questioning whether the universe may be open and dominated by neutrinos and gravitons rather than by baryons. The thermal history of the Lepton Era is investigated incorporating the effects of neutral currents, additional neutrinos, and a small neutrino mass. In the canonical version of Big Bang cosmology (equal numbers of neutrinos and antineutrinos), and neutrino number and energy density is, like that of photons, gravitationally insignificant unless the neutrino has a small mass (approximately 10 eV). The neutrino sea can be cosmologically significant if it is degenerate (so that the net leptonic or muonic charge is nonzero) with approximately 7 x 10 5 neutrinos (or antineutrinos) per cm 3 . This density homogeneously spread out is still so low that even the most energetic cosmic ray protons will not be stopped, even if neutral currents exist with the usual weak strength. It these degenerate neutrinos have a small mass (approximately 0.5 eV), they will condense into degenerate neutrino superstars of the size and mass of galactic clusters. If neutral currents make the (eν) (eν) coupling five times greater than what it is in V - A theory, nucleosynthesis commences a little earlier than conventionally assumed. This increases the cosmological He 4 abundance predicted only slightly from Y = 0.27 to Y = 0.29. An appendix reviews the effect of neutral currents on neutrino processes in stars. (author)

  7. Preliminary design note for a direct coupled 200,000 amp neutrino horn power supply with energy recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, A.T.

    1995-03-01

    The availability of high current, (several thousand amperes) silicon controlled rectifiers and high current, low loss capacitors make it practical to design a direct coupled energy discharge power supply for the neutrino horns in the proposed NuMI facility at Fermilab. The neutrino horns require a continuous pulse train of 200,000 A and 1 msec duration at a pulse period of 1.5 seconds. This high current pulse train yields a system load current of about 9,000 A rms. Using a high power coupling transformer between the energy stored in a capacitor bank and the horns is very expensive because the transformer secondary winding would have to be rated for 9,000 A rms at about 1,400 Vpk. The transformer would also add leakage inductance to the discharge circuit, take up a substantial amount of floor space and make stored energy recovery from the horns less effective or maybe even impractical. The transformer would need a reset winding to remove the high remnant magnet field in the transformer steel which is caused by the unipolar discharge pulses. A coupling transformer is practical for high voltage loads, but the horns operate at a relatively low voltage of about 1,400 V, which makes direct coupling very attractive. This note describes a preliminary design for a direct coupled system. From the design notes the authors can conclude that direct coupling is economical, practical, relatively simple, can use energy recovery and does not require materials or equipment that is hard to obtain. The charging power supply could be two standard (Fermilab) 240 kW beamline power supplies connected in series and grounded at the midpoint. The capacitor bank, switches, transmission line and controls can be most economically assembled in house. They may conclude that it is desirable to build a direct coupled neutrino horn power supply system and to connect both horns in series

  8. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  9. Test results of distributed ion pump designs for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, M.; Holdener, F.; Peterson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    The testing facility measurement methods and results of prototype distributed ion pump (DIP) designs for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring are presented. Two basic designs with 5- or 7-anode plates were tested at LLNL with penning cell sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm. Direct comparison of 5- and 7-plate anodes with 18 mm holes shows increased pumping speed with the 7-plate design. The 5-plate, 18 mm and 7-plate, 15 mm designs both gave an average pumping speed of 135 1/s/m at 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} Torr nitrogen base pressure in a varying 0.18 T peak B-field. Comparison of the three hole sizes indicates that cells smaller than the 15 mm tested can be efficiently used to obtain higher pumping speeds for the same anode plate sizes used.

  10. Evaluation of the influence of base and alkyl bromide on synthesis of pyrazinoic acid esters through factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Joao Paulo dos Santos; Felli, Veni Maria Andres [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Farmacia

    2009-07-01

    Pyrazinoic acid esters have been synthesized as prodrugs of pyrazinoic acid. In the literature, its preparation is reported through the reaction of pyrazinoyl chloride with alcohols and the reaction with DCC/DMAP. In this work, it is reported a 22 factorial design to evaluate the preparation of these esters through the substitution of alkyl bromides with carboxylate anion. The controlled factors were alkyl chain length of bromides (ethyl and hexyl) and the used base (triethylamine and DBU). Results revealed that the used base used has significant effect on yield, and alkyl bromide used has neither significant influence, nor its interaction effect with base. (author)

  11. Evaluation of the influence of base and alkyl bromide on synthesis of pyrazinoic acid esters through factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Joao Paulo dos Santos; Felli, Veni Maria Andres

    2009-01-01

    Pyrazinoic acid esters have been synthesized as prodrugs of pyrazinoic acid. In the literature, its preparation is reported through the reaction of pyrazinoyl chloride with alcohols and the reaction with DCC/DMAP. In this work, it is reported a 22 factorial design to evaluate the preparation of these esters through the substitution of alkyl bromides with carboxylate anion. The controlled factors were alkyl chain length of bromides (ethyl and hexyl) and the used base (triethylamine and DBU). Results revealed that the used base used has significant effect on yield, and alkyl bromide used has neither significant influence, nor its interaction effect with base. (author)

  12. Neutrino optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, D.C.

    1994-10-01

    Neutrinos are produced by the in-flight decay of π and k mesons. Neutrinos are uncharged and cannot be focused directly. However, the transverse momentum of the neutrino due to the decay is typically much smaller than the transverse momentum spread of the parent meson. The focusing of the meson beam will then significantly enhance the neutrino flux at a distant detector. Neutrino beams can effectively be focused in the same manner as other charged particle beams, by means of quadrupoles and bending magnets. The bending magnets also can serve to define the momentum of the neutrino beams. Alternatively, neutrino beams can be focused by the use of magnetic horns. Both systems are described here. Proposed experiments with neutrinos to detect neutrino oscillations place the detector hundreds of kilometers away from the source. The flux of neutrinos through the detector then becomes very small. The calculation of the flux by conventional Monte Carlo or numerical integration techniques becomes prohibitively difficult. An alternate mathematical technique can be used to give results which are reliable to about 10%

  13. A new design for the CERN-Fréjus neutrino Super Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Longhin, A

    2011-01-01

    We present an optimization of the hadron focusing system for a low-energy high-intensity conventional neutrino beam (Super-Beam) proposed on the basis of the HP-SPL at CERN with a beam power of 4 MW and an energy of 4.5 GeV. The far detector would be a 440 kton Water Cherenkov detector (MEMPHYS) located at a baseline of 130 km in the Fr\\'ejus site. The neutrino fluxes simulation relies on a new GEANT4 based simulation coupled with an optimization algorithm based on the maximization of the sensitivity limit on the $\\theta_{13}$ mixing angle. A new configuration adopting a multiple horn system with solid targets is proposed which improves the sensitivity to $\\theta_{13}$ and the CP violating phase $\\delta_{CP}$.

  14. Neutrino sunshine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: On 10 June 1992, at the Neutrino 92 meeting in Grenada, Spain, Till Kirsten of Heidelberg's Max Planck Institute reported that neutrinos from sunshine had been seen. Most of the energy pumped out by the Sun comes from the fusion of protons into alpha particles, a process which also liberates neutrinos. While it takes about a million years for radiant energy formed in the deep interior of the Sun to fight its way to the surface, the highly penetrating neutrinos emerge almost immediately. It was in 1970 that Ray Davis and his team began taking data with a tank containing 615 tons of perchloroethylene (dry cleaning fluid) 1500 metres underground in the Homestake gold mine, South Dakota. The observed signal is consistently smaller than what is expected. This 'solar neutrino problem' was confirmed by the Kamioka mine experiment in Japan, looking at the Cherenkov light released by neutrino interactions in some 700 tons of water. However these experiments are only sensitive to a tiny high energy tail of the solar neutrino spectrum, and to understand what is going on needs measurements of the primary neutrinos from proton fusion. To get at these neutrinos, two large new detectors, using gallium and sensitive to these lower energy particles, have been built and commissioned in the past few years. The detectors are SAGE ('Soviet' American Gallium Experiment) in the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the Caucasus, and Gallex, a team from France, Germany, Israel, Italy and the US in the Italian Gran Sasso underground Laboratory. At Grenada, Kirsten reported unmistakable signs of solar neutrinos of proton origin recorded in Gallex. SAGE and Gallex do not yet have enough data to unambiguously fix the level of primary solar neutrinos reaching the Earth, and the interpretation of the interim results tends to be subjective. However after 23 years of conditioning through watching the solar neutrinos' high energy tail, the prospect of a neutrino

  15. The KAON Factory at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1992-08-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million preconstruction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated -fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual-frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal rf shields, and rf cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, and rf beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia and international contributors: the first two-thirds of this sum have already been approved and negotiations for the remainder are under way. 25 refs., 7 figs

  16. The KAON factory at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1992-07-01

    The TRIUMF KAON Factory is designed to produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, other hadrons and neutrinos 100 times more intense, or cleaner, than are available now, for a broad range of particle and nuclear physics experiments. This will require a 100 μA beam of 30 GeV protons, to be produced by an interleaved sequence of two fast-cycling synchrotrons and three storage rings, with the existing TRIUMF H - cyclotron as injector. An $11-million pre-construction study has enabled the overall design to be reviewed and prototypes of various components to be built and evaluated: fast-cycling dipole and quadrupole magnets, a dual frequency magnet power supply, ceramic beam pipes with internal rf shields, an rf cavity (using perpendicular bias), an extraction kicker, an rf beam chopper, and production targets. Environmental, industrial and economic impact studies have also been completed and the cost estimates and schedule updated. The total cost of $708 million (Canadian) will be shared equally between Canada, British Columbia and international contributors; the first two-thirds of this sum have already been approved and negotiations for the remainder are under way. 26 refs., 6 figs

  17. Los Neutrinos Los Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Julián Félix

    2012-01-01

    From all the proposals to understand the structure of matter, and the way the natural world is conformed, the one about neutrinos is the most enigmatic, abstract, and foreign to immediate experience; however, this is the one that has delved more deeply over the nearly eighty years since it was formulated by Wolfgang Pauli –in 1930- as a radical proposition to understand nucleon decay, and the decay of other particles, without the violation of the principle of conservation of energy and moment...

  18. Baby Factory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... severe exploitation, such as forced labour, slavery, debt bondage, prostitution, pornography or the unlawful removal of organs”. Kalu (2011) in his report on the issue of 'baby factory' in the South East of Nigeria, described 'baby factory' as a form of child trafficking since the girls are harboured against their ...

  19. Study on light and thermal energy of illumination device for plant factory design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, A.; Moriuchi, K.; Ueda, Y.; Kinoshita, S.

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effect of illumination devices on the yield of crops cultivated in a plant factory, it is necessary to measure the actual cultivation environmental factors related to the plant growth and understand the distribution ratio of light and thermal energy to the electrical energy injected into the illumination device. Based on cultivation results, we found that light intensity greatly affected the growth of plant weight. Regarding the selection of illumination device, its spectral components also affected the morphological change. Lighting experiments using a high frequency (Hf) fluorescent lamp and a light emitting diode (LED) bulb were performed. A certain difference was found in the distribution ratio of light energy to electrical energy between Hf and LED. It was showed that by placing the safety equipment or internal circuits outside the cultivated site, the air conditioning load could be reduced.

  20. Newly designed double surface bimorph mirror for BL-15A of the photon factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Noriyuki, E-mail: noriyuki.igarashi@kek.jp; Nitani, Hiroaki; Takeichi, Yasuo; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Abe, Hitoshi; Kimura, Masao; Mori, Takeharu; Nagatani, Yasuko; Kosuge, Takashi; Kamijo, Ai; Koyama, Atsushi; Shimizu, Nobutaka [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ohta, Hiromasa [Mitsubishi Electric System & Service Co., Ltd. 20F Carrot Tower 4-1-1 Taishido, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 154-8520 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    BL-15A is a new x-ray undulator beamline at the Photon Factory. It will be dedicated to two independent research activities, simultaneous XAFS/XRF/XRD experiments, and SAXS/WAXS/GI-SAXS studies. In order to supply a choice of micro-focus, low-divergence and collimated beams, a double surface bimorph mirror was recently developed. To achieve further mirror surface optimization, the pencil beam scanning method was applied for “in-situ” beam inspection and the Inverse Matrix method was used for determination of optimal voltages on the piezoelectric actuators. The corrected beam profiles at every focal spot gave good agreement with the theoretical values and the resultant beam performance is promising for both techniques. Quick and stable switching between highly focused and intense collimated beams was established using this new mirror with the simple motorized stages.

  1. Reactor Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Bong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very recently the most precise determination of the neutrino mixing angle θ13. This paper provides an overview of the upcoming experiments and of the projects under development, including the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible use of neutrinos for society, for nonproliferation of nuclear materials, and geophysics.

  2. Supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardall, C.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism and supernova nucleosynthesis, and as a potential probe of the supernova environment and of some of the neutrino mixing parameters that remain unknown; hence a variety of approximate transport schemes have been used to obtain results with reduced dimensionality. However, none of these approximate schemes have addressed a recent challenge to the conventional wisdom that neutrino flavor mixing cannot impact the explosion mechanism or r-process nucleosynthesis

  3. Analyzing the shape parameter effects on the performance of the mixed-flow fan using CFD and Factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Uk Hee; Kim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Sung; Kim, Jin Hyuk; Choi, Young Seok

    2016-01-01

    Fans are representative turbo-machinery widely used for ventilation throughout the industrial world. Recently, as the importance of energy saving has been magnified with the fans, the demand for the fans with high efficiency and performance has been increasing. The representative method for enhancing the performance includes design optimization; in practice, fan performance can be improved by changing the shape parameters such as those of meridional plane, impeller, and diffuser. Before optimizing the efficient design, a process of screening to select important design parameters is essential. The present study aimed to analyze the effects of mixed-flow fans' shape parameters on fan performance (static pressure and fan static efficiency) and derive optimum models based on the results. In this study, the shape parameters considered in the impeller domain are as follows: tip clearance, number of blades, beta angle of Leading edge (LE) in the blade, and beta angle of Trailing edge (TE) in the blade. The shape parameters considered in the diffuser domain are as follows: meridional length of the Guide vane (GV), number of GV, beta angle of LE in the GV and beta angle of TE in the GV. The effects of individual shape parameters were analyzed using the CFD (Computational fluid dynamic) and DOE (Design of experiments) methods. The reliability of CFD was verified through the comparison between preliminary fan model's experiment results and CFD results, and screening processes were implemented through 24-1 fractional factorial design. From the analysis of DOE results, it could be seen that the tip clearance and the number of blades in the impeller domain greatly affected the fan performance, and the beta angle of TE at the GV in the diffuser domain greatly affected the fan performance. Finally, the optimum models with improved fan performance were created using linear regression equations derived from 24-1 fractional factorial design.

  4. Neutrino Oscillation Experiment at JHF

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    T2K is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to investigate how neutrinos change from one flavor to another as they travel (neutrino oscillations). An intense beam of muon neutrinos is generated at the J-PARC nuclear physics site on the East coast of Japan and directed across the country to the Super-Kamiokande neutrino detector in the mountains of western Japan. The beam is measured once before it leaves the J-PARC site, using the near detector ND280, and again at Super-K, 295 km away: the change in the measured intensity and composition of the beam is used to provide information on the properties of neutrinos. The high intensity neutrino beam is produced in an off-axis configuration. The peak neutrino energy is tuned to the oscillation maximum of ∼ 0.6 GeV to maximize the sensitivity to neutrino oscillations. The science goals of T2K can be summarized as follows: •\tsearch for CP violation in the neutrino sector •\tdiscovery of νμ → νe ( i.e. the confirmation that θ13 > 0 ) •\tprecision ...

  5. Application of two-level factorial design to investigate the effect of process parameters on the sonocrystallization of sulfathiazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Peng-Hsuan; Zhang, Bo-Cong; Su, Chie-Shaan; Liu, Jun-Jen; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2017-08-01

    In this study, cooling sonocrystallization was used to recrystallize an active pharmaceutical ingredient, sulfathiazole, using methanol as the solvent. The effects of three operating parameters-sonication intensity, sonication duration, and solution concentration-on the recrystallization were investigated by using a 2k factorial design. The solid-state properties of sulfathiazole, including the mean particle size, crystal habit, and polymorphic form, were analyzed. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of the sonication intensity, cross-interaction effect of sonication intensity/sonication duration, and cross-interaction effect of sonication intensity/solution concentration on the recrystallization were significant. The results obtained using the 2k factorial design indicated that a combination of high sonication intensity and long sonication duration is not favorable for sonocrystallization, especially at a high solution concentration. A comparison of the solid-state properties of the original and the recrystallized sulfathiazole revealed that the crystal habit of the recrystallized sulfathiazole was more regular and that its mean particle size could be reduced to approximately 10 μm. Furthermore, the analytical results obtained using the PXRD, DSC, and FTIR spectroscopy indicated that the polymorphic purity of sulfathiazole improved from the original Form III/IV mixture to Form III after sonocrystallization.

  6. Formulation, evaluation and 3(2) full factorial design-based optimization of ondansetron hydrochloride incorporated taste masked microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharb, Vandana; Saharan, Vikas Anand; Dev, Kapil; Jadhav, Hemant; Purohit, Suresh

    2014-11-01

    Masking the bitter taste of Ondansetron hydrochloride (ONS) may improve palatability, acceptance and compliance of ONS products. ONS-loaded, taste-masked microspheres were prepared with a polycationic pH-sensitive polymer and 3(2) full factorial design (FFD) was applied to optimize microsphere batches. Solvent evaporation, in acetone--methanol/liquid paraffin system, was used to prepare taste-masked ONS microspheres. The effect of varying drug/polymer (D/P) ratios on microspheres characteristics were studied by 3(2) FFD. Desirability function was used to search the optimum formulation. Microspheres were evaluated by FTIR, XRD and DSC to examine interaction and effect of microencapsulation process. In vitro taste assessment approach based on bitterness threshold and drug release was used to assess bitterness scores. Prepared ONS microspheres were spherical and surface was wrinkled. ONS was molecularly dispersed in microspheres without any incompatibility with EE100. In hydrochloric acid buffer pH 1.2, ONS released completely from microsphere in just 10 min. Contrary to this, ONS release at initial 5 min from taste-masked microspheres was less than the bitterness threshold. Full factorial design and in vitro taste assessment approach, coupled together, was successfully applied to develop and optimize batches of ONS incorporated taste-masked microspheres.

  7. Application of full 42 Factorial Design for the Development and Characterization of Insecticidal Soap from Neem Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. KOVO

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the extraction, characterization and production of insecticidal soap from Neem oil using full 42 factorial design. Soxhlet extractor was used for the extraction purpose and two solvent was chosen to determine which is better. N-hexane gives a Neem oil yield of 45.43% while ethanol gives a yield of 46.38%, confirming the earlier literature result giving ethanol as better solvent for Neem oil extraction. The basic properties of the oil were determined as follows, saponification value 215.95ml/g, acid value 1.122g/mol, unsaponifiable matter 19.66 etc. The Neem oil was found to have a colour of golden yellow due to the presence of Nimbidin.Full 42 factorial design and mathematical model was applied to the extraction process and a first order regression equation of the form:Y = 9.548 + 0.144X1 + 0.1931X2 + 0.1892 X12was obtained growing the individual effect of time and solvent type as parameter and their interaction in the entire extraction process the Neem insecticidal soap was found to be effective in insect and pest control.

  8. A systematic approach to designing statistically powerful heteroscedastic 2 × 2 factorial studies while minimizing financial costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Show-Li Jan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2 × 2 factorial design is widely used for assessing the existence of interaction and the extent of generalizability of two factors where each factor had only two levels. Accordingly, research problems associated with the main effects and interaction effects can be analyzed with the selected linear contrasts. Methods To correct for the potential heterogeneity of variance structure, the Welch-Satterthwaite test is commonly used as an alternative to the t test for detecting the substantive significance of a linear combination of mean effects. This study concerns the optimal allocation of group sizes for the Welch-Satterthwaite test in order to minimize the total cost while maintaining adequate power. The existing method suggests that the optimal ratio of sample sizes is proportional to the ratio of the population standard deviations divided by the square root of the ratio of the unit sampling costs. Instead, a systematic approach using optimization technique and screening search is presented to find the optimal solution. Results Numerical assessments revealed that the current allocation scheme generally does not give the optimal solution. Alternatively, the suggested approaches to power and sample size calculations give accurate and superior results under various treatment and cost configurations. Conclusions The proposed approach improves upon the current method in both its methodological soundness and overall performance. Supplementary algorithms are also developed to aid the usefulness and implementation of the recommended technique in planning 2 × 2 factorial designs.

  9. A systematic approach to designing statistically powerful heteroscedastic 2 × 2 factorial studies while minimizing financial costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Show-Li; Shieh, Gwowen

    2016-08-31

    The 2 × 2 factorial design is widely used for assessing the existence of interaction and the extent of generalizability of two factors where each factor had only two levels. Accordingly, research problems associated with the main effects and interaction effects can be analyzed with the selected linear contrasts. To correct for the potential heterogeneity of variance structure, the Welch-Satterthwaite test is commonly used as an alternative to the t test for detecting the substantive significance of a linear combination of mean effects. This study concerns the optimal allocation of group sizes for the Welch-Satterthwaite test in order to minimize the total cost while maintaining adequate power. The existing method suggests that the optimal ratio of sample sizes is proportional to the ratio of the population standard deviations divided by the square root of the ratio of the unit sampling costs. Instead, a systematic approach using optimization technique and screening search is presented to find the optimal solution. Numerical assessments revealed that the current allocation scheme generally does not give the optimal solution. Alternatively, the suggested approaches to power and sample size calculations give accurate and superior results under various treatment and cost configurations. The proposed approach improves upon the current method in both its methodological soundness and overall performance. Supplementary algorithms are also developed to aid the usefulness and implementation of the recommended technique in planning 2 × 2 factorial designs.

  10. Neutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed

  11. Neutrino Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzetto, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Conference Series 'Un Altro Modo di guardare il Cielo', held in Venice, started in 1988. It included 13.editions of 'Neutrino Telescopes' and four editions of 'Neutrino Oscillations in Venice'. The conference Series ideated , created and conducted by Prof. Milla Baldo Ceolin, after her guidance 'Un Altro Modo di guardare il Cielo' became one of the most important fixed appointments of thr neutrino physics and astrophysics community.

  12. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Soo-Bong; Lasserre, Thierry; Wang, Yifang

    2013-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very ...

  13. Neutrino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Postulated in the early days of quantum mechanics by Wolfgang Pauli to make energy-momentum conservation in nuclear beta decay come out right, the neutrino has never strayed far from physicists' attention. The Moriond Workshop on Massive Neutrinos in Particle Physics and Astrophysics held recently in the French Alps showed that more than half a century after Pauli's prediction, the neutrino stubbornly refuses to yield up all its secrets

  14. Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.

    1998-04-01

    We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ''tabletop'' scale is also discussed

  15. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations.

  16. Probing Neutrino Properties with Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Alysia [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-06-29

    This final report on an Early Career Award grant began in April 15, 2010 and concluded on April 14, 2015. Alysia Marino's research is focussed on making precise measurements of neutrino properties using intense accelerator-generated neutrino beams. As a part of this grant, she is collaborating on the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment, currently taking data in Japan, and on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) design effort for a future Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) in the US. She is also a member of the NA61/SHINE particle production experiment at CERN, but as that effort is supported by other funds, it will not be discussed further here. T2K was designed to search for the disappearance of muon neutrinosμ) and the appearance of electron neutrinose), using a beam of muon neutrino beam that travels 295 km across Japan towards the Super-Kamiokande detector. In 2011 T2K first reported indications of νe appearance, a previously unobserved mode of neutrino oscillations. In the past year, T2K has published a combined analysis of νμ disappearance and νe appearance, and began collecting taking data with a beam of anti-neutrinos, instead of neutrinos, to search for hints of violation of the CP symmetry of the universe. The proposed DUNE experiment has similar physics goals to T2K, but will be much more sensitive due to its more massive detectors and new higher-intensity neutrino beam. This effort will be very high-priority particle physics project in the US over the next decade.

  17. Probing Neutrino Properties with Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Alysia

    2015-01-01

    This final report on an Early Career Award grant began in April 15, 2010 and concluded on April 14, 2015. Alysia Marino's research is focussed on making precise measurements of neutrino properties using intense accelerator-generated neutrino beams. As a part of this grant, she is collaborating on the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment, currently taking data in Japan, and on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) design effort for a future Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) in the US. She is also a member of the NA61/SHINE particle production experiment at CERN, but as that effort is supported by other funds, it will not be discussed further here. T2K was designed to search for the disappearance of muon neutrinos (? ? ) and the appearance of electron neutrinos (? e ), using a beam of muon neutrino beam that travels 295 km across Japan towards the Super-Kamiokande detector. In 2011 T2K first reported indications of ? e appearance, a previously unobserved mode of neutrino oscillations. In the past year, T2K has published a combined analysis of ? ? disappearance and ? e appearance, and began collecting taking data with a beam of anti-neutrinos, instead of neutrinos, to search for hints of violation of the CP symmetry of the universe. The proposed DUNE experiment has similar physics goals to T2K, but will be much more sensitive due to its more massive detectors and new higher-intensity neutrino beam. This effort will be very high-priority particle physics project in the US over the next decade.

  18. Arsenic determination in gasoline by hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy combined with a factorial experimental design approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jemmla Meira Trindade; Aldalea Lopes Marques; Gisele Simone Lopes; Edmar Pereira Marques; Jiujun Zhang [Federal University of Maranhao UFMA, Sao Luis (Brazil). Department of Chemistry

    2006-10-15

    Three locally collected gasoline samples were analyzed for arsenic content using factorial experimental design (FED) with hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). Five factors (including the reduction agent flow, the acid flow, the sample flow, the reductor concentration and the acid concentration) in two levels (low and high) were used in this optimization process. In order to design the surface response, five levels of central composite with 15 central points were down-selected. The results were compared with those determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and a 95% confidence interval (regression procedure) was obtained. The HGAAS and GFAAS measurement sensitivities determined arsenic levels of 0.02 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.08 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. 23 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Preliminary conceptual design for a 510 MeV electron/positron injector for a UCLA φ factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlbacka, G.; Hartline, R.; Barletta, W.; Pellegrini, C.

    1991-01-01

    UCLA is proposing a compact suer conducting high luminosity (10 32-33 cm -2 sec -1 ) e + e - collider for a φ factory. To achieve the required e + e - currents, full energy injections from a linac with intermediate storage in a Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) is used. The elements of the linac are outlined with cost and future flexibility in mind. The preliminary conceptual design starts with a high current gun similar in design to those developed at SLAC and at ANL (for the APS). Four 4-section linac modules follow, each driven by a 60 MW klystron with a 1 μsec macropulse and an average current of 8.6 A. The first 4-section model is used to create positrons in a tungsten target at 186 MeV. The three remaining three modules are used to accelerate the e + e - beam to 558 MeV (no load limit) for injection into the PAR

  20. Double success for neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "The Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy is celebrating two key developments in the field of neutrino physics. Number one is the first ever detection, by the OPERA experiement, of possible tau neutrino that has switched its identity from a muon neutrino as it travelled form its origins at CERN in Switzerland to the Italian lab. Number two is the successful start-up of the ICARUS detector, which, like OPERA, is designed to study neutrinos that "oscillate" between types" (0.5 pages)

  1. Utilization of a factorial design to study the composting of hydrolyzed grape marc and vinification lees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradelo, Remigio; Moldes, Ana B; Barral, María T

    2010-03-10

    Hydrolyzed grape marc (HGM) is the solid residue generated after the acid hydrolysis of grape marc to obtain hemicellulosic sugars for biotechnological purposes. In this work, HGM containing cellulose and lignin was composted together with vinification lees to obtain plant substrates on a laboratory scale. The effects of temperature (in the range of 20-50 degrees C), concentration of vinification lees (5-100 g/100 g of hydrolyzed grape marc), and concentration of CaCO(3) on the final properties of the composted HGM were studied by means of an experimental plan with factorial structure. The interrelationship between dependent and operational variables was established by models including linear, interaction, and quadratic terms. The most influential variable on the C/N ratio and P, K and Mg contents of composted substrates was the vinification lees concentration followed by the temperature, whereas on Na content and electrical conductivity the most influential variable was the temperature followed by the vinification lees concentration. The results of the incubation experiments indicated that optimal conditions for obtaining plant substrates can be achieved by composting 1:1 mixtures of hydrolyzed grape marc and vinification lees, in the presence of 5 g of CaCO(3)/100 g of HGM. During composting the pH of the mixtures increased from 5.1-6.7 to 7.1-8.1, salinity and water-soluble carbon were reduced in most cases, and the initial phytotoxicity disappeared in all of the mixtures tested.

  2. Solar neutrinos; Les neutrinos solaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cribier, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Laboratoire astroparticule et cosmologie (APC), 75 - Paris (France); Bowles, Th. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2005-09-15

    Several decades of studies of solar neutrinos lead now to clear indications that the oscillation between {nu}{sub e} produced in the core of the Sun and other flavours ({nu}{sub {mu}} or {nu}{sub {tau}} ) is the correct explanation of the deficit observed by all experiments. This implies that neutrinos are massive, in contradiction with the minimal standard model of particle physics. Moreover, thanks to the SNO (Sudbury neutrino observatory) experiment, we know that solar models built by astrophysicists predict correctly the flux of neutrinos. (authors)

  3. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini, G.; Ianni, A.; Ranucci, G.

    2010-01-01

    Solar neutrino investigation has represented one of the most active field of particle physics over the past decade, accumulating important and sometimes unexpected achievements. After reviewing some of the most recent impressive successes, the future perspectives of this exciting area of neutrino research will be discussed.

  4. Internet factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  5. Internet Factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  6. Factory physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hopp, Wallace J.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief introductory chapter, "Factory Physics 3/e" is divided into three parts: I - The Lessons of History; II - Factory Physics; and III - Principles in Practice. The scientific approach to manufacturing and supply chain management, developed in Part II, is unique to this text. No other text or professional book provides a rigorous, principles-based foundation for manufacturing management. The Third Edition offers tighter connections between Lean Manufacturing, MRP/ERP, Six Sigma, Supply Chain Management, and Factory Physics. In addition to enhancing the historical overview of how these systems evolved, the authors show explicitly how users can achieve Lean Manufacturing objectives (faster response, less inventory) using the integration aspects of MRP/ERP/SCM systems along with the variance analysis methods of Six Sigma. Factory Physics provides the overarching framework that coordinates all of these initiatives into a single-focused strategy.

  7. Neutrino astronomy: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of France. The full design calls for 12 strings, with 25 ... The NESTOR detector [19] is a proposed deep-sea neutrino telescope located off the coast of Greece. Planned deployment will be at a depth of 4000 meters. The full detector, with an effective area of 104 m2 for ...

  8. The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna ultra-high energy neutrino detector: Design, performance, and sensitivity for 2006-2007 balloon flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorham, P. W. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Allison, P. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Beatty, J. J. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Besson, D. Z. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binns, W. R. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Chen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chen, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Clem, J. M. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Connolly, A. [Univ. College London, London (United Kingdom); Dowkontt, P. F. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); DuVernois, M. A. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Field, R. C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Goldstein, D. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Goodhue, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hast, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hebert, C. L. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Hoover, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Israel, M. H. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States). et al.

    2009-05-23

    In this article, we present a comprehensive report on the experimental details of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload, including the design philosophy and realization, physics simulations, performance of the instrument during its first Antarctic flight completed in January of 2007, and expectations for the limiting neutrino detection sensitivity.

  9. Application of 2k Full Factorial Design in Optimization of Solvent-Free Microwave Extraction of Ginger Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaj Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from ginger was optimized using a 23 full factorial design in terms of oil yield to determine the optimum extraction conditions. Sixteen experiments were carried out with three varying parameters, extraction time, microwave power, and type of sample for two levels of each. A first order regression equation best fits the experimental data. The predicted values calculated by the regression model were in good agreement with the experimental values. The results showed that the extraction time is the most prominent factor followed by microwave power level and sample type for extraction process. An average of 0.25% of ginger oil can be extracted using current setup. The optimum conditions for the ginger oil extraction using SFME were the extraction time 30 minutes, microwave power level 640 watts, and sample type, crushed sample. Solvent-free microwave extraction proves a green and promising technique for essential oil extraction.

  10. A Factorial Design Approach to Analyse the Effect of Coarse Recycled Concrete Aggregates on the Properties of Hot Mix Asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanty, Kiranbala; Mukharjee, Bibhuti Bhusan; Das, Sudhanshu Shekhar

    2018-02-01

    The present study investigates the effect of replacement of coarse fraction of natural aggregates by recycled concrete aggregates on the properties of hot mix asphalt (HMA) using general factorial design approach. For this two factors i.e. recycled coarse aggregates percentage [RCA (%)] and bitumen content percentage [BC (%)] are considered. Tests have been carried out on the HMA type bituminous concrete, prepared with varying RCA (%) and BC (%). Analysis of variance has been performed on the experimental data to determine the effect of the chosen factors on various parameters such as stability, flow, air void, void mineral aggregate, void filled with bitumen and bulk density. The study depicts that RCA (%) and BC (%) have significant effect on the selected responses as p value is less than the chosen significance level. In addition to above, the outcomes of the statistical analysis indicate that interaction between factors have significant effects on void mineral aggregate and bulk density of bituminous concrete.

  11. Calculation of stricken to mortality and incidence cancers due to beyond design basis accidents of the Esfahan Fuel Production Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydari Azar, A.; Shahshahani, M.; Roshanzamir, M.; Sabouhi, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this investigation the amount of absorbed doses by the different pathways of Cloud shine, Ground shine, deposition of radioactive materials on skin and cloths, ingestion, inhalation and the consequences of radioactive material releases due to Beyond Design Basis Accidents such as fire, sintering furnace explosion, criticality and earthquake in Esfahan Fuel Production factory by the residents are evaluated. The calculations related to atomic cloud distribution, estimation of delivered dose and decay chains are performed by PCCOSYMA dose. These computations are based on radioactive source terms, distribution height of radioactive materials. actions for reducing the absorbed dose, human body physiological characteristics, metrological condition and population distribution. Finally, the number of peoples who are stricken to mortality and morbidity cancers and risk values are calculated for 1 year and 50 years

  12. Use of fractional factorial design for selection of nutrients for culturing Paecilomyces variotii in eucalyptus hemicellulosic hydrolysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Almeida e Silva

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available A eucalyptus hemicellulose fraction was hydrolysed by treating eucalyptus wood chips with sulfuric acid. The hydrolysate was used as the substrate to grow Paecilomyces variotii IOC-3764 cultured for 72 or 96 hours. The influence of the inhibitors, nutrients and fermentation time was verified by a 28-4 and, subsequently, a 25-1 fractional factorial design. The effects of the inhibitors (acetic acid and furfural, nutrients (rice bran, urea, potassium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, magnesium sulfate and sodium phosphate and fermentation time were investigated. The highest yield (10.59 g/L of biomass was obtained when the microorganisms were cultivated for 72 hours in a medium composed of 30 g/L rice bran, 9.4 g/L ammonium sulfate (2 g/L nitrogen and 2 g/L sodium phosphate.

  13. Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howcroft, Caius Leo Frederick [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

  14. Effect of a Preoperative Preparation Program on Anxiety in School-age Children Undergoing Surgery Using a Factorial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Shoja

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery is a stressful experience in children. Therefore, the familiarization of this population with treatment processes by means of appropriate training tools and techniques can be an effective way to control their anxiety. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a preoperative preparation program on anxiety in school-age children undergoing surgery using a factorial design. Method: This clinical trial was conducted on 81 children aged 6-12 years as candidates for elective surgery at Doctor Sheikh Hospital in Mashhad, Iran, in 2016. A preparation program was implemented with two methods (i.e., displaying video tutorials with and without nurses’ explanations and on two different days (i.e., prior to and on the day of operation using a factorial design. The estimation of children’s anxiety was accomplished by using the Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale administered before training and prior to operating room admission. The data were analyzed by statistical tests in SPSS software, version 16. Results: The study groups were comparable in terms of demographic characteristics (P>0.05. There was no significant differences among the four groups regarding manifest anxiety based on the place of referral (i.e., department or clinic (P=0.22, presentation or non-presentation of explanations by nurses (P=0.12, and their interaction effects (P=0.22. Implications for Practice: No significant difference was observed among the four groups in terms of manifest anxiety. Therefore, all four training methods were effective in reducing anxiety in children. Consequently, each of these methods can be used depending on human resources and infrastructure of each department.

  15. Design Study of a 100 GeV Beam Transfer Line from the SPS for a Short Baseline Neutrino Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Kosmicki, A; Kowalska, M; Velotti, F

    2013-01-01

    A short baseline neutrino facility at CERN is presently under study. It is considered to extract a 100 GeV beam from the second long straight section of the SPS into the existing transfer channel TT20, which leads to the North Area experimental zone. A new transfer line would branch off the existing TT20 line around 600 m downstream of the extraction, followed by an S-shaped horizontal bending arc to direct the beam with the correct angle onto the defined target location. This paper describes the optimisation of the line geometry with respect to the switch regions in TT20, the integration into the existing facilities and the potential refurbishment of existing magnets. The optics design is shown, and the requirements for the magnets, power converters and instrumentation hardware are discussed.

  16. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  17. Solar neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatzman, E.

    1983-01-01

    The solar energy is produced by a series of nuclear reactions taking place in the deep interior of the sun. Some of these reactions produce neutrinos which may be detected, the proper detection system being available. The results of the Davis experiment (with 37 Cl) are given, showing a deficiency in the solar neutrino flux. The relevant explanation is either a property of the neutrino or an important change in the physics of the solar models. The prospect of a new experiment (with 71 Ga) is important as it will decide which of the two explanations is correct [fr

  18. The PEP-II Asymmetric B Factory: Design details and R ampersand D results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.; DeStaebler, H.; Dorfan, J.

    1994-06-01

    PEP-II, a 9 GeV x 3.1 GeV electron-positron collider with a design luminosity of 3 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 has now been approved for construction by SLAC, LBL and LLNL for the purpose of studying CP violation in the B bar B system. This upgrade project involves replacing the vacuum and RF systeum of PEP, which will serve as the high-energy ring (HER), along with the addition of a new low-energy ring (LER) mounted atop the HER. Designs for both rings are described, and the anticipated project construction schedule is indicated. Collider operation will begin at the end of 1998. An aggressive R ampersand D program has been carried out to validate our design choices; key results in the areas of lattice design, vacuum, RF, and multibunch feedback are summarized

  19. Sub Tenth Micron CMOS Devices - A Demonstration of the Virtual Factory Approach to New Structure Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plummer, James L

    1995-01-01

    ...'. This project is exploring the use of advanced TCAD simulation tools to design a candidate 21st century MOS device - a fully-depleted surrounding gate vertical MOSFET with self-aligned drain contact...

  20. Design of a factorial experiment with randomization restrictions to assess medical device performance on vascular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestelkamp, Wiebke S; Krane, Carissa M; Pinnell, Margaret F

    2011-05-20

    Energy-based surgical scalpels are designed to efficiently transect and seal blood vessels using thermal energy to promote protein denaturation and coagulation. Assessment and design improvement of ultrasonic scalpel performance relies on both in vivo and ex vivo testing. The objective of this work was to design and implement a robust, experimental test matrix with randomization restrictions and predictive statistical power, which allowed for identification of those experimental variables that may affect the quality of the seal obtained ex vivo. The design of the experiment included three factors: temperature (two levels); the type of solution used to perfuse the artery during transection (three types); and artery type (two types) resulting in a total of twelve possible treatment combinations. Burst pressures of porcine carotid and renal arteries sealed ex vivo were assigned as the response variable. The experimental test matrix was designed and carried out as a split-plot experiment in order to assess the contributions of several variables and their interactions while accounting for randomization restrictions present in the experimental setup. The statistical software package SAS was utilized and PROC MIXED was used to account for the randomization restrictions in the split-plot design. The combination of temperature, solution, and vessel type had a statistically significant impact on seal quality. The design and implementation of a split-plot experimental test-matrix provided a mechanism for addressing the existing technical randomization restrictions of ex vivo ultrasonic scalpel performance testing, while preserving the ability to examine the potential effects of independent factors or variables. This method for generating the experimental design and the statistical analyses of the resulting data are adaptable to a wide variety of experimental problems involving large-scale tissue-based studies of medical or experimental device efficacy and performance.

  1. A randomized longitudinal factorial design to assess malaria vector control and disease management interventions in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Randall A; Mboera, Leonard E G; Senkoro, Kesheni; Lesser, Adriane; Shayo, Elizabeth H; Paul, Christopher J; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2014-05-16

    The optimization of malaria control strategies is complicated by constraints posed by local health systems, infrastructure, limited resources, and the complex interactions between infection, disease, and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol of a randomized factorial study designed to address this research gap. This project will evaluate two malaria control interventions in Mvomero District, Tanzania: (1) a disease management strategy involving early detection and treatment by community health workers using rapid diagnostic technology; and (2) vector control through community-supported larviciding. Six study villages were assigned to each of four groups (control, early detection and treatment, larviciding, and early detection and treatment plus larviciding). The primary endpoint of interest was change in malaria infection prevalence across the intervention groups measured during annual longitudinal cross-sectional surveys. Recurring entomological surveying, household surveying, and focus group discussions will provide additional valuable insights. At baseline, 962 households across all 24 villages participated in a household survey; 2,884 members from 720 of these households participated in subsequent malariometric surveying. The study design will allow us to estimate the effect sizes of different intervention mixtures. Careful documentation of our study protocol may also serve other researchers designing field-based intervention trials.

  2. A Randomized Longitudinal Factorial Design to Assess Malaria Vector Control and Disease Management Interventions in Rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall A. Kramer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of malaria control strategies is complicated by constraints posed by local health systems, infrastructure, limited resources, and the complex interactions between infection, disease, and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol of a randomized factorial study designed to address this research gap. This project will evaluate two malaria control interventions in Mvomero District, Tanzania: (1 a disease management strategy involving early detection and treatment by community health workers using rapid diagnostic technology; and (2 vector control through community-supported larviciding. Six study villages were assigned to each of four groups (control, early detection and treatment, larviciding, and early detection and treatment plus larviciding. The primary endpoint of interest was change in malaria infection prevalence across the intervention groups measured during annual longitudinal cross-sectional surveys. Recurring entomological surveying, household surveying, and focus group discussions will provide additional valuable insights. At baseline, 962 households across all 24 villages participated in a household survey; 2,884 members from 720 of these households participated in subsequent malariometric surveying. The study design will allow us to estimate the effect sizes of different intervention mixtures. Careful documentation of our study protocol may also serve other researchers designing field-based intervention trials.

  3. Development and application of computer-aided design methods for cell factory optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, Joao

    and machine learning. The process of creating strains with commercially relevant titers is time consuming and expensive. Computer-aided design (CAD) software can help scientists build better strains by providing models and algorithms that can be used to generate and test hypotheses before implementing them...... on metabolite targets. MARSI designs can be implemented using ALE or CSI. We used MARSI to enumerate metabolite targets in Escherichia coli that could be used to replace experimentally validated gene knockouts. Genetic variability occurs naturally in cells. However, the effects of those variations...... and machine learning tools, we explored the landscape of kcats using multiple enzyme sequences and their chemical reactions....

  4. Neutrino cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Miele, Gennaro; Pastor, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The role that neutrinos have played in the evolution of the Universe is the focus of one of the most fascinating research areas that has stemmed from the interplay between cosmology, astrophysics and particle physics. In this self-contained book, the authors bring together all aspects of the role of neutrinos in cosmology, spanning from leptogenesis to primordial nucleosynthesis, their role in CMB and structure formation, to the problem of their direct detection. The book starts by guiding the reader through aspects of fundamental neutrino physics, such as the standard cosmological model and the statistical mechanics in the expanding Universe, before discussing the history of neutrinos in chronological order from the very early stages until today. This timely book will interest graduate students and researchers in astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics, who work with either a theoretical or experimental focus.

  5. Designing optimal cell factories: integer programming couples elementary mode analysis with regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungreuthmayer Christian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elementary mode (EM analysis is ideally suited for metabolic engineering as it allows for an unbiased decomposition of metabolic networks in biologically meaningful pathways. Recently, constrained minimal cut sets (cMCS have been introduced to derive optimal design strategies for strain improvement by using the full potential of EM analysis. However, this approach does not allow for the inclusion of regulatory information. Results Here we present an alternative, novel and simple method for the prediction of cMCS, which allows to account for boolean transcriptional regulation. We use binary linear programming and show that the design of a regulated, optimal metabolic network of minimal functionality can be formulated as a standard optimization problem, where EM and regulation show up as constraints. We validated our tool by optimizing ethanol production in E. coli. Our study showed that up to 70% of the predicted cMCS contained non-enzymatic, non-annotated reactions, which are difficult to engineer. These cMCS are automatically excluded by our approach utilizing simple weight functions. Finally, due to efficient preprocessing, the binary program remains computationally feasible. Conclusions We used integer programming to predict efficient deletion strategies to metabolically engineer a production organism. Our formulation utilizes the full potential of cMCS but adds additional flexibility to the design process. In particular our method allows to integrate regulatory information into the metabolic design process and explicitly favors experimentally feasible deletions. Our method remains manageable even if millions or potentially billions of EM enter the analysis. We demonstrated that our approach is able to correctly predict the most efficient designs for ethanol production in E. coli.

  6. Designing optimal cell factories: integer programming couples elementary mode analysis with regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Zanghellini, Jürgen

    2012-08-16

    Elementary mode (EM) analysis is ideally suited for metabolic engineering as it allows for an unbiased decomposition of metabolic networks in biologically meaningful pathways. Recently, constrained minimal cut sets (cMCS) have been introduced to derive optimal design strategies for strain improvement by using the full potential of EM analysis. However, this approach does not allow for the inclusion of regulatory information. Here we present an alternative, novel and simple method for the prediction of cMCS, which allows to account for boolean transcriptional regulation. We use binary linear programming and show that the design of a regulated, optimal metabolic network of minimal functionality can be formulated as a standard optimization problem, where EM and regulation show up as constraints. We validated our tool by optimizing ethanol production in E. coli. Our study showed that up to 70% of the predicted cMCS contained non-enzymatic, non-annotated reactions, which are difficult to engineer. These cMCS are automatically excluded by our approach utilizing simple weight functions. Finally, due to efficient preprocessing, the binary program remains computationally feasible. We used integer programming to predict efficient deletion strategies to metabolically engineer a production organism. Our formulation utilizes the full potential of cMCS but adds additional flexibility to the design process. In particular our method allows to integrate regulatory information into the metabolic design process and explicitly favors experimentally feasible deletions. Our method remains manageable even if millions or potentially billions of EM enter the analysis. We demonstrated that our approach is able to correctly predict the most efficient designs for ethanol production in E. coli.

  7. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavicini, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The status of solar neutrino experiments and their implications for both nonstandard astrophysics ({\\it e.g.,} cool sun models) and nonstandard neutrino properties ({\\it e.g.,} MSW conversions) are discussed. Assuming that all of the experiments are correct, the relative rates observed by Kamiokande and Homestake are hard to account for by a purely astrophysical solution, while MSW conversions can describe all of the data. Assuming the standard solar model, there are two allowed regions for M...

  8. Solar Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Antonelli, V.; Miramonti, L.; Peña Garay, Carlos; Serenelli, A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of solar neutrinos has given since ever a fundamental contribution both to astroparticle and to elementary particle physics, offering an ideal test of solar models and offering at the same time relevant indications on the fundamental interactions among particles. After reviewing the striking results of the last two decades, which were determinant to solve the long standing solar neutrino puzzle and refine the Standard Solar Model, we focus our attention on the more recent results in...

  9. Sterile neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, J. [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Machado, P. A. N., E-mail: pedro.machado@uam.es [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Calle Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Cantoblanco E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Maltoni, M. [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Calle Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Cantoblanco E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Schwetz, T. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-06-21

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  10. Study of fish oil bleaching using the sodium bentonite through a factorial design

    OpenAIRE

    Marcia Regina Simões; Reinaldo Aparecido Bariccatti; Caio Guilherme Secco Souza; José Dilson Silva de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    This work was a experimental design in order to optimize the process of bleaching of fish oil, using the sodium bentonite as adsorbent, from the influence of variables such as weight of sodium bentonite, the temperature process, thermal activation of sodium bentonite and time of agitation. It was then possible to fit a mathematical model with the influence of each variable in the process of bleaching of the oil. The response variable was the absorbance at 444 nm.

  11. Study of fish oil bleaching using the sodium bentonite through a factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Regina Simões

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This work was a experimental design in order to optimize the process of bleaching of fish oil, using the sodium bentonite as adsorbent, from the influence of variables such as weight of sodium bentonite, the temperature process, thermal activation of sodium bentonite and time of agitation. It was then possible to fit a mathematical model with the influence of each variable in the process of bleaching of the oil. The response variable was the absorbance at 444 nm.

  12. Systems metabolic engineering: the creation of microbial cell factories by rational metabolic design and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that in order to establish sustainable societies, production processes should shift from petrochemical-based processes to bioprocesses. Because bioconversion technologies, in which biomass resources are converted to valuable materials, are preferable to processes dependent on fossil resources, the former should be further developed. The following two approaches can be adopted to improve cellular properties and obtain high productivity and production yield of target products: (1) optimization of cellular metabolic pathways involved in various bioprocesses and (2) creation of stress-tolerant cells that can be active even under severe stress conditions in the bioprocesses. Recent progress in omics analyses has facilitated the analysis of microorganisms based on bioinformatics data for molecular breeding and bioprocess development. Systems metabolic engineering is a new area of study, and it has been defined as a methodology in which metabolic engineering and systems biology are integrated to upgrade the designability of industrially useful microorganisms. This chapter discusses multi-omics analyses and rational design methods for molecular breeding. The first is an example of the rational design of metabolic networks for target production by flux balance analysis using genome-scale metabolic models. Recent progress in the development of genome-scale metabolic models and the application of these models to the design of desirable metabolic networks is also described in this example. The second is an example of evolution engineering with omics analyses for the creation of stress-tolerant microorganisms. Long-term culture experiments to obtain the desired phenotypes and omics analyses to identify the phenotypic changes are described here.

  13. Chemical treatment response to variations in non-point pollution water quality: results of a factorial design experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderscheidt, Elisangela; Leiviskä, Tiina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-03-01

    Chemical treatment of non-point derived pollution often suffers from undesirable oscillations in purification efficiency due to variations in runoff water quality. This study examined the response of the chemical purification process to variations in water quality using a 2(k) factorial design for runoff water rich in humic substances. The four k factors evaluated and the levels applied were: organic matter as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (20-70 mg/L), suspended solids (SS) (10-60 mg/L), initial water pH (4.5-7), and applied coagulant dosage (ferric sulphate) (35-100 mg/L). Indicators of purification efficiency were residual concentration of DOC, SS and total phosphorus (tot-P). Analysis of variance and factor effect calculations showed that the initial DOC concentration in raw water samples and its interactions with the coagulant dosage applied exerted the most significant influence on the chemical purification process, substantially affecting the residual concentration of DOC, SS and tot-P. The variations applied to the factors SS and pH only slightly affected purification efficiency. The results can be used in the design of purification systems with high organic matter load variation, e.g. peat extraction runoff. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancement of Solubility of Lamotrigine by Solid Dispersion and Development of Orally Disintegrating Tablets Using 32 Full Factorial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatinderpal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present investigation deals with the preparation and evaluation of orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs of lamotrigine using β-cyclodextrin and PVP-K30 as polymers for the preparation of solid dispersion which help in enhancement of aqueous solubility of this BCS CLASS-II drug and sodium starch glycolate (SSG and crospovidone as a superdisintegrating agent, to reduce disintegration time. The ODTs were prepared by direct compression method. Nine formulations were developed with different ratios of superdisintegrating agents. All the formulations were evaluated for disintegration time, weight variation, hardness, friability, drug content uniformity, wetting time, and in vitro drug release study. In vitro drug release study was performed using United States Pharmacopoeia (USP type 2 dissolution test apparatus employing paddle stirrer at 50 rpm using 900 mL of 0.1 N HCl maintained at 37°C ± 0.5°C as the dissolution medium. On the basis of evaluation parameters formulations were prepared using β-CD 1 : 1 solid dispersion. Then 32 full factorial design was applied using SSG and crospovidone in different ratios suggested by using design expert 8.0.7.1 and optimized formulation was prepared using amount of SSG and crospovidone as suggested by the software. The optimized formulation prepared had disintegrating time of 15 s, wetting time of 24 s, and % friability of 0.55.

  15. High-power RF window design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, M.; Hodgson, J.; Ng, C.; Schwarz, H.; Skarpaas, K.; Kroll, N.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the design of RF windows to transmit up to 500 kW CW to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. RF analysis of the windows using high-frequency simulation codes are described. These provide information about the power loss distribution in the ceramic and tim matching properties of the structure. Finite-element analyses of the resulting temperature distribution and thermal stresses are presented. Fabrication methods including a proposed scheme to compensate for thermal expansion s are discussed and hardware tests to validate this approach are described. The effects of surface coatings (intentional and otherwise) and the application of air cooling are considered

  16. Physics and design issues of asymmetric storage ring colliders as B-factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1989-08-01

    This paper concentrates on generic R ampersand D and design issues of asymmetric colliders via a specific example, namely a 9 GeV x 3 GeV collider based on PEP at SLAC. An asymmetric e + -e - collider at the Y(4s) and with sufficiently high luminosity (10 33 -10 34 cm -2 s -1 ) offers the possibility of studying mixing, rare decays, and CP violation in the B bar B meson system, as well as ''beautiful'' tau-charm physics, and has certain qualitative advantages from detection and machine design points of view. These include: the energy constraint; clean environment (∼25% B + B - , B 0 bar B 0 ); large cross section (1 nb); vertex reconstruction (from the time development of space-time separated B and bar B decays due to moving center-of-mass); reduced backgrounds; greatest sensitivity to CP violation in B → CP eigenstate; the possibility of using higher collision frequencies, up to 100 MHz, in a head-on colliding mode using magnetic separation. It is estimated that for B → ΨK s , an asymmetric collider has an advantage equivalent to a factor of five in luminosity relative to a symmetric one. There are, however, questions with regard to the physics of the asymmetric beam-beam coulomb interaction that may limit the intrinsic luminosity and the possibility of realizing the small beam pipes necessary to determine the vertices. 16 refs., 2 figs

  17. Neutrino astronomy with supernova neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran; Lindner, Manfred; Xu, Xun-Jie

    2018-04-01

    Modern neutrino facilities will be able to detect a large number of neutrinos from the next Galactic supernova. We investigate the viability of the triangulation method to locate a core-collapse supernova by employing the neutrino arrival time differences at various detectors. We perform detailed numerical fits in order to determine the uncertainties of these time differences for the cases when the core collapses into a neutron star or a black hole. We provide a global picture by combining all the relevant current and future neutrino detectors. Our findings indicate that in the scenario of a neutron star formation, supernova can be located with precision of 1.5 and 3.5 degrees in declination and right ascension, respectively. For the black hole scenario, sub-degree precision can be reached.

  18. Fractional Factorial Experiment Designs to Minimize Configuration Changes in Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoach, Richard; Cler, Daniel L.; Graham, Albert B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper serves as a tutorial to introduce the wind tunnel research community to configuration experiment designs that can satisfy resource constraints in a configuration study involving several variables, without arbitrarily eliminating any of them from the experiment initially. The special case of a configuration study featuring variables at two levels is examined in detail. This is the type of study in which each configuration variable has two natural states - 'on or off', 'deployed or not deployed', 'low or high', and so forth. The basic principles are illustrated by results obtained in configuration studies conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility and in the ViGYAN Low Speed Tunnel in Hampton, Virginia. The crucial role of interactions among configuration variables is highlighted with an illustration of difficulties that can be encountered when they are not properly taken into account.

  19. Optimizing flurbiprofen-loaded NLC by central composite factorial design for ocular delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Mira, E; Egea, M A; Garcia, M L [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Barcelona, Avenida Joan XXIII s/n, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Souto, E B [Faculty of Health Sciences, Fernando Pessoa University, Rua Carlos da Maia, Nr. 296, Office S.1, P-4200-150 Porto (Portugal); Calpena, A C, E-mail: eligonzalezmi@ub.edu [Department of Biopharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Avenida Joan XXIII s/n, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-28

    The purpose of this study was to design and optimize a new topical delivery system for ocular administration of flurbiprofen (FB), based on lipid nanoparticles. These particles, called nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), were composed of a fatty acid (stearic acid (SA)) as the solid lipid and a mixture of Miglyol 812 and castor oil (CO) as the liquid lipids, prepared by the hot high pressure homogenization method. After selecting the critical variables influencing the physicochemical characteristics of the NLC (the liquid lipid (i.e. oil) concentration with respect to the total lipid (cOil/L (wt%)), the surfactant and the flurbiprofen concentration, on particle size, polydispersity index and encapsulation efficiency), a three-factor five-level central rotatable composite design was employed to plan and perform the experiments. Morphological examination, crystallinity and stability studies were also performed to accomplish the optimization study. The results showed that increasing cOil/L (wt%) was followed by an enhanced tendency to produce smaller particles, but the liquid to solid lipid proportion should not exceed 30 wt% due to destabilization problems. Therefore, a 70:30 ratio of SA to oil (miglyol + CO) was selected to develop an optimal NLC formulation. The smaller particles obtained when increasing surfactant concentration led to the selection of 3.2 wt% of Tween 80 (non-ionic surfactant). The positive effect of the increase in FB concentration on the encapsulation efficiency (EE) and its total solubilization in the lipid matrix led to the selection of 0.25 wt% of FB in the formulation. The optimal NLC showed an appropriate average size for ophthalmic administration (228.3 nm) with a narrow size distribution (0.156), negatively charged surface (-33.3 mV) and high EE ({approx}90%). The in vitro experiments proved that sustained release FB was achieved using NLC as drug carriers. Optimal NLC formulation did not show toxicity on ocular tissues.

  20. Optimizing flurbiprofen-loaded NLC by central composite factorial design for ocular delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mira, E.; Egea, M. A.; Souto, E. B.; Calpena, A. C.; García, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and optimize a new topical delivery system for ocular administration of flurbiprofen (FB), based on lipid nanoparticles. These particles, called nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), were composed of a fatty acid (stearic acid (SA)) as the solid lipid and a mixture of Miglyol® 812 and castor oil (CO) as the liquid lipids, prepared by the hot high pressure homogenization method. After selecting the critical variables influencing the physicochemical characteristics of the NLC (the liquid lipid (i.e. oil) concentration with respect to the total lipid (cOil/L (wt%)), the surfactant and the flurbiprofen concentration, on particle size, polydispersity index and encapsulation efficiency), a three-factor five-level central rotatable composite design was employed to plan and perform the experiments. Morphological examination, crystallinity and stability studies were also performed to accomplish the optimization study. The results showed that increasing cOil/L (wt%) was followed by an enhanced tendency to produce smaller particles, but the liquid to solid lipid proportion should not exceed 30 wt% due to destabilization problems. Therefore, a 70:30 ratio of SA to oil (miglyol + CO) was selected to develop an optimal NLC formulation. The smaller particles obtained when increasing surfactant concentration led to the selection of 3.2 wt% of Tween® 80 (non-ionic surfactant). The positive effect of the increase in FB concentration on the encapsulation efficiency (EE) and its total solubilization in the lipid matrix led to the selection of 0.25 wt% of FB in the formulation. The optimal NLC showed an appropriate average size for ophthalmic administration (228.3 nm) with a narrow size distribution (0.156), negatively charged surface (-33.3 mV) and high EE (~90%). The in vitro experiments proved that sustained release FB was achieved using NLC as drug carriers. Optimal NLC formulation did not show toxicity on ocular tissues.

  1. Approach to improve the productivity of bioactive compounds of the cyanobacterium Anabaena oryzae using factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragaa A. Hamouda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are one of the richest sources of biomedical relevant compounds with extensive therapeutic pharmaceutical applications and are also known as producer of intracellular and extracellular metabolites with diverse biological activities. The genus Anabaena sp. is known to produce antimicrobial compounds, like phycocyanin and others. The goal of this study was to optimize the production of these bioactive compounds. The Plackett–Burman experimental design was used to screen and evaluate the important medium components that influence the production of bioactive compounds. In this present study, eight independent factors including NaNO3, K2HPO4, MgSO4·7H2O, CaCl2, citric acid, ammonium ferric citrate, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid disodium magnesium salt (EDTA-Na2Mg and Na2CO3 were surveyed and the effective variables for algal components production of Anabaena oryzae were determined using two-levels Plackett–Burman design. Results analysis showed that the best medium components were NaNO3 (2.25 g l−1; K2HPO4 (0.02 g l−1; MgSO4 (0.0375 g l−1; CaCl2 (0.018 g l−1; citric acid (0.009 g l−1; ammonium ferric citrate (0.009 g l−1 and EDTA-Na2 (0.0015 g l−1 respectively. The total chlorophyll-a, carotenoids, phenol, tannic acid and flavonoid contents in crude extract of Anabaena oryzae were determined. They were 47.7, 4.11, 0.256, 1.046 and 1.83 μg/ml, respectively. The antioxidant capacity was 62.81%.

  2. Formulation and investigation of 5-FU nanoparticles with factorial design-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkir, Asuman; Saka, Ongun Mehmet

    2005-10-01

    This study describes an orthogonal experimental design to optimize the formulation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) loaded poly D,L (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (5FU-NP) by a nanoprecipitation-solvent displacement technique. The type of surfactant, amount of acetone and molecular weight of the polymer with three levels of each factor were selected and arranged in an L18(3(5)) orthogonal experimental table. From the statistical analysis of the data polynominal equations were generated. Optimized formulations have the particle size ranging from 160 to 250 nm. Smallest nanoparticles (161+/-1.22 nm) were obtained using Resomer PLGA 755 and pluronic F-68 with 10 ml acetone amount. Under these conditions the 5-FU entrapment percentage was maximum 78.30%, suggesting 5-FU might be entrapped and adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface. In vitro release of three formulations with maximum drug entrapment efficiency and minimum particle size, were also investigated by release kinetics. According to the determined coefficients, release data fit to Higuchi's diffusion kinetics. The in vitro release of 5FU-NP in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) is suggested to be controlled by a combination of diffusion with slow and gradual erosion of the particles. Also, the antimicrobial activity was observed even on the end of seventh day with all formulations.

  3. KATRIN and sterile Neutrinos in the eV mass range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzeczek, Marc [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Lasserre, Thierry [Commissariat a l' energie atomique (France); Mertens, Susanne [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Sterile neutrinos in the eV-mass range could resolve a number of longstanding anomalies in short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The KATRIN Experiment (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino) designed to measure the mass of the active neutrino, has the potential to search for a signature of light sterile neutrinos without any hardware modification. In this talk we explore the combined sensitivity of KATRIN with CeSOX (CErium Short distance neutrino Oscillations with boreXino), an experiment dedicated to search for light sterile neutrinos via oscillations. In particular, we study the impact of sterile neutrinos on the KATRIN's active neutrino mass measurement.

  4. Fractional Factorial Design Study on the Performance of GAC-Enhanced Electrocoagulation Process Involved in Color Removal from Dye Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana Gabriela Breaban

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of main factors and interactions on the color removal performance from dye solutions using the electrocoagulation process enhanced by adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon (GAC. In this study, a mathematical approach was conducted using a two-level fractional factorial design (FFD for a given dye solution. Three textile dyes: Acid Blue 74, Basic Red 1, and Reactive Black 5 were used. Experimental factors used and their respective levels were: current density (2.73 or 27.32 A/m2, initial pH of aqueous dye solution (3 or 9, electrocoagulation time (20 or 180 min, GAC dose (0.1 or 0.5 g/L, support electrolyte (2 or 50 mM, initial dye concentration (0.05 or 0.25 g/L and current type (Direct Current—DC or Alternative Pulsed Current—APC. GAC-enhanced electrocoagulation performance was analyzed statistically in terms of removal efficiency, electrical energy, and electrode material consumptions, using modeling polynomial equations. The statistical significance of GAC dose level on the performance of GAC enhanced electrocoagulation and the experimental conditions that favor the process operation of electrocoagulation in APC regime were determined. The local optimal experimental conditions were established using a multi-objective desirability function method.

  5. Abrasive resistance of metastable V-Cr-Mn-Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons using the factorial design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Shimizu, K.; Cheiliakh, A. P.; Pastukhova, T. V.; Chabak, Yu. G.; Kusumoto, K.

    2016-06-01

    Full factorial design was used to evaluate the two-body abrasive resistance of 3wt%C-4wt%Mn-1.5wt%Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons with varying vanadium (5.0wt%-10.0wt%) and chromium (up to 9.0wt%) contents. The alloys were quenched at 920°C. The regression equation of wear rate as a function of V and Cr contents was proposed. This regression equation shows that the wear rate decreases with increasing V content because of the growth of spheroidal VC carbide amount. Cr influences the overall response in a complex manner both by reducing the wear rate owing to eutectic carbides (M7C3) and by increasing the wear rate though stabilizing austenite to deformation-induced martensite transformation. This transformation is recognized as an important factor in increasing the abrasive response of the alloys. By analyzing the regression equation, the optimal content ranges are found to be 7.5wt%-10.0wt% for V and 2.5wt%-4.5wt% for Cr, which corresponds to the alloys containing 9vol%-15vol% spheroidal VC carbides, 8vol%-16vol% M7C3, and a metastable austenite/martensite matrix. The wear resistance is 1.9-2.3 times that of the traditional 12wt% V-13wt% Mn spheroidal carbide cast iron.

  6. Formulation and Optimization of Lansoprazole Pellets Using Factorial Design Prepared by Extrusion-Spheronization Technique Using Carboxymethyl Tamarind Kernel Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, Sagar Sopanrao; Nandgude, Tanaji; Poddar, Sushilkumar

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, Lansoprazole pellets were prepared employing a novel excipient Carboxymethyl tamarind kernel powder (CMTKP) using extrusion-spheronization technique. Various research studies including patents have been carried out on this polymer. Pellet formulation was optimized for formulation parameters (concentration of microcrystalline cellulose, CMTKP, croscarmellose sodium and isopropyl alcohol). Process parameters (speed and duration of spheronization) were optimized using factorial design. The pellets were evaluated for yield, bulk and tapped density, particle size, hardness, drug content, disintegration time and drug release. The optimized batch showed 93.53% yield, 0.307 kg/cm2 hardness, 2.15 mm average particle size, 292 sec disintegration time and 90.46% drug content. Drug release of the optimized batch (2F7) and marketed formulation (LANZOL cap) was found to be 82.33% and 80.07%, respectively. An accelerated study indicated that optimized formulation was stable. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Factorial Design Evaluation of Some Experimental Factors for Phenols Oxidation using Crude Extracts from Jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cestari Antonio R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents some additional information on the alternative utilization of Jackfruit crude extracts in selective phenol oxidation reactions, using catechol and the o-, m- e p- cresols and pyrogallol substracts. The effects of pH, concentration of phosphate buffer and kinds of natural phenol extractors are evaluated. By using the conventional univariate procedure, the best enzymatic activities were obtained with the catechol substract, phosphate buffer (pH 5.0 at a concentration 0.10 mol L-1, and the commercial polymer Polyclar SB-100â as natural phenol extractor. Using a full 2³ factorial design the best catalytic results were obtained by employing phosphate buffer at pH 5.0 and it 0.050 mol L-1. However, the kind of phenol extractor was not statistically important. The best results for selective catechol oxidation were obtained by using the multivariate technique. In this way, the multivariate methodology is indicated to increase the performance of the crude extract in the selective oxidation reactions.

  8. Employment of factorial design to evaluate the organic loading and aeration of biological systems in the degradation of dairy wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélcio José Izário Filho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Among industries producing foodstuffs, the dairy industry is notable for producing great amount of wastewater and high water consumption. Organic loading treatment based on biological degradation is a preferential treatment for dairy wastewater and effluents. However, it has some limiting factors for broader application due to the organic loading variation that results in an overload and wash-out of biological treatment systems. Considering these limitations, the organic loading and oxygen supply as factors in the rated efficiency of biological treatment systems with results expressed as removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (%CODremoved were evaluated. The variables investigated were: 1 initial concentration of organic load [raw, diluted 1:1 v/v (wastewater/distilled water and diluted 1:3 v/v (wastewater/distilled water] and 2 aeration (with or without. A Doehlert factorial design type (2x3 was employed for these studies. Aerobics systems with organic loading at a 1:3 ratio (v/v dairy effluent /distillated water showed elevated efficiency in biodegradation (88.31 ± 2.16 %CODremoved. The least efficient biodegradation was observed in anaerobic system for raw dairy effluent equal to 10.42 ± 3.97 %CODremoved. This indicated that a dilution of effluent organic loading was necessary in obtaining greater efficiency from a biodegradation system and low hydraulic retention time.

  9. Antihypertensive efficacy of angiotensin receptor blockers in combination with hydrochlorothiazide: a review of the factorial-design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, C Ventika S

    2004-10-01

    Most hypertensive patients require more than one drug for adequate blood pressure (BP) control. The seventh report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends starting treatment with a thiazide diuretic or, when BP is >20/10 mm Hg above goal or in patients with diabetes, using two different antihypertensive agents. Searches of Medline, EMBASE, and BIOSIS databases identified four similarly designed, randomized, factorial studies comparing various doses of angiotensin II receptor blockers with hydrochlorothiazide as monotherapy and in combination. The methodology and results of these studies were compared. The primary efficacy end point in these studies was a decrease from baseline in mean diastolic BP after 8 weeks of therapy. All currently available angiotensin I receptor blocker/hydrochlorothiazide combinations evaluated (irbesartan, olmesartan medoxomil, telmisartan, and valsartan plus hydrochlorothiazide) produced significant systolic BP and diastolic BP reductions. Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide 40 mg/25 mg provided the largest mean reduction in absolute and placebo-corrected systolic BP/diastolic BP. For all angiotensin II receptor blocker/hydrochlorothiazide combinations evaluated, > or =63% of patients achieved a diastolic BP response (diastolic BP or =10-mm Hg reduction). In conclusion, the combination of an angiotensin II receptor blocker and hydrochlorothiazide produces more substantial BP responses than monotherapy with either component.

  10. Enhancing EPA Content in an Arctic Diatom: A Factorial Design Study to Evaluate Interactive Effects of Growth Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Steinrücken

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae with a high content of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are of great demand for microalgae-based technologies. An Arctic strain of the diatom Attheya septentrionalis was shown in previous experiments to increase its EPA content from 3.0 to 4.6% of dry weight (DW in the nutrient-replete exponential phase and nutrient-depleted stationary phase, respectively. In the present study, a factorial-design experiment was used, to investigate this effect in more detail and in combination with varying salinities and irradiances. A mathematical model revealed that both growth phase and salinity, alone and in combination, influenced the EPA content significantly. Maximum EPA values of 7.1% DW were obtained at a salinity of 22 and after 5 days in stationary phase, and might be related to a decreased silica content, an accumulation of storage lipids containing EPA, or both. However, growth rates were lower for low salinity (0.54 and 0.57 d−1 than high salinity (0.77 and 0.98 d−1 cultures.

  11. Influence of urea, isopropanol, and propylene glycol on rutin in vitro release from cosmetic semisolid systems estimated by factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Andre Rolim; Haroutiounian-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Sarruf, Fernanda Daud; Pinto, Claudineia Aparecida Sales de Oliveira; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Velasco, Maria Valeria Robles

    2009-03-01

    Rutin, one of the major flavonoids found in an assortment of plants, was reported to act as a sun protection factor booster with high anti-UVA defense, antioxidant, antiaging, and anticellulite, by improvement of the cutaneous microcirculation. This research work aimed at evaluating the rutin in vitro release from semisolid systems, in vertical diffusion cells, containing urea, isopropanol and propylene glycol, associated or not, according to the factorial design with two levels with center point. Urea (alone and in association with isopropanol and propylene glycol) and isopropanol (alone and in association with propylene glycol) influenced significant and negatively rutin liberation in diverse parameters: flux (microg/cm(2).h); apparent permeability coefficient (cm/h); rutin amount released (microg/cm(2)); and liberation enhancement factor. In accordance with the results, the presence of propylene glycol 5.0% (wt/wt) presented statistically favorable to promote rutin release from this semisolid system with flux = 105.12 +/- 8.59 microg/cm(2).h; apparent permeability coefficient = 7.01 +/- 0.572 cm/h; rutin amount released = 648.80 +/- 53.01 microg/cm(2); and liberation enhancement factor = 1.21 +/- 0.07.

  12. Synergistic Effect of Hydrotrope and Surfactant on Solubility and Dissolution of Atorvastatin Calcium: Screening Factorial Design Followed by Ratio Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V. F.; Sarai, J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of hydrotrope and surfactant on poor solubility of atorvastatin calcium. Excipients screening followed by factorial design was performed to study effect of excipients and manufacturing methods on solubility of drug. Three independent factors (carrier, surfactant and manufacturing method) were evaluated at two levels using solubility as a dependant variable. Solid-state characterisation was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Optimised complex were incorporated into orally disintegrating micro tablets and in vitro dissolution test was performed. Nicotinamide, Plasdone and sodium dodecyl sulphate were emerged as promising excipients from excipient screening. General regression analysis revealed only the type of carrier has significantly enhanced (Psolubility of drug while other factors were found to be nonsignificant. Ratio optimisation trial revealed that drug to nicotinamide ratio is more critical in enhancing the solubility of drug (40 fold increases in solubility compared to pure drug) in comparison to drug-surfactant ratio; however the presence of surfactant deemed essential. Significantly higher rate and extent of dissolution was observed from solid dispersion complex and tablets compared to dissolution of pure drug (Psolubility and dissolution of atorvastatin calcium and this can be explored further. PMID:25593381

  13. Amino-functionalization of carbon nanotubes by using a factorial design: human cardiac troponin T immunosensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Tatianny A; Mattos, Alessandra B; Silva, Bárbara V M; Dutra, Rosa F

    2014-01-01

    A simple amino-functionalization method for carbon nanotubes and its application in an electrochemical immunosensor for detection of the human cardiac troponin T are described. Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes allow oriented antibodies immobilization via their Fc regions, improving the performance of an immunosensor. Herein multiwalled carbon nanotubes were amino-functionalized by using the ethylenediamine reagent and assays were designed by fractional factorial study associated with Doehlert matrix. Structural modifications in the carbon nanotubes were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. After amino-functionalization the carbon nanotubes were attached to screen-printed carbon electrode and a sandwich-type immunoassay was performed for measuring the cardiac troponin T. The electrochemical measurements were obtained through hydrogen peroxide reaction with peroxidase conjugated to the secondary antibody. Under optimal conditions, troponin T immunosensor was evaluated in serum samples, which showed a broad linear range (0.02 to 0.32 ng mL(-1)) and a low limit of detection, 0.016 ng mL(-1). This amino platform can be properly used as clinical tool for cardiac troponin T detection in the acute myocardial infarction diagnosis.

  14. The Optimization of the Oiling Bath Cosmetic Composition Containing Rapeseed Phospholipids and Grapeseed Oil by the Full Factorial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Górecki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The proper condition of hydrolipid mantle and the stratum corneum intercellular matrix determines effective protection against transepidermal water loss (TEWL. Some chemicals, improper use of cosmetics, poor hygiene, old age and some diseases causes disorder in the mentioned structures and leads to TEWL increase. The aim of this study was to obtain the optimal formulation composition of an oiling bath cosmetic based on rapeseed phospholipids and vegetable oil with high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In this work, the composition of oiling bath form was calculated and the degree of oil dispersion after mixing the bath preparation with water was selected as the objective function in the optimizing procedure. The full factorial design 23 in the study was used. The concentrations of rapeseed lecithin ethanol soluble fraction (LESF, alcohol (E and non-ionic emulsifier (P were optimized. Based on the calculations from our results, the optimal composition of oiling bath cosmetic was: L (LESF 5.0 g, E (anhydrous ethanol 20.0 g and P (Polysorbate 85 1.5 g. The optimization procedure used in the study allowed to obtain the oiling bath cosmetic which gives above 60% higher emulsion dispersion degree 5.001 × 10−5 cm−1 compared to the initial formulation composition with the 3.096 × 10−5 cm−1.

  15. The increase of surface area of a Brazilian palygorskite clay activated with sulfuric acid solutions using a factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Palygorskite is fibrous clay in which the structural tetrahedral and octahedral layers are organized in a way that structural channels are formed, leading to high surface area. However, impurities inside the channels and aggregated ones considerably reduce the available area. In order to increase the surface area, an activation treatment can be considered useful. The goal of this work is the activation of palygorskite from Guadalupe, Piauí, via sulfuric acid treatment using a two-level factorial design. The influence of three parameters (solution molarity, temperature and time on BET surface area was determined. Moreover, samples were characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD and fluorescence (XRF, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The largest surface area (282 m²/g without considerable changes in clay structure and morphology was found in a sample treated with 5M H2SO4 at 70°C for 1h. The main parameters that favored the improvement of the surface area were the solution's molarity, temperature and their interaction.

  16. Synergistic effect of hydrotrope and surfactant on solubility and dissolution of atorvastatin calcium: screening factorial design followed by ratio optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V F; Sarai, J

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of hydrotrope and surfactant on poor solubility of atorvastatin calcium. Excipients screening followed by factorial design was performed to study effect of excipients and manufacturing methods on solubility of drug. Three independent factors (carrier, surfactant and manufacturing method) were evaluated at two levels using solubility as a dependant variable. Solid-state characterisation was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Optimised complex were incorporated into orally disintegrating micro tablets and in vitro dissolution test was performed. Nicotinamide, Plasdone and sodium dodecyl sulphate were emerged as promising excipients from excipient screening. General regression analysis revealed only the type of carrier has significantly enhanced (P<0.05) the solubility of drug while other factors were found to be nonsignificant. Ratio optimisation trial revealed that drug to nicotinamide ratio is more critical in enhancing the solubility of drug (40 fold increases in solubility compared to pure drug) in comparison to drug-surfactant ratio; however the presence of surfactant deemed essential. Significantly higher rate and extent of dissolution was observed from solid dispersion complex and tablets compared to dissolution of pure drug (P<0.05). Study revealed hydrotrope and surfactant have synergistic effect on solubility and dissolution of atorvastatin calcium and this can be explored further.

  17. A Factorial Design to Numerically Study the Effects of Brake Pad Properties on Friction and Wear Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Wahlström

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne particulate emissions originating from the wear of pads and rotors of disc brakes contribute up to 50% of the total road emissions in Europe. The wear process that takes place on a mesoscopic length scale in the contact interfaces between the pads and rotors can be explained by the creation and destruction of contact plateaus. Due to this complex contact situation, it is hard to predict how changes in the wear and material parameters of the pad friction material will affect the friction and wear emissions. This paper reports on an investigation of the effect of different parameters of the pad friction material on the coefficient of friction and wear emissions. A full factorial design is developed using a simplified version of a previously developed cellular automaton approach to investigate the effect of four factors on the coefficient of friction and wear emission. The simulated result indicates that a stable third body, a high specific wear, and a relatively high amount of metal fibres yield a high and stable mean coefficient of friction, while a stable third body, a low specific wear, a stable resin, and a relatively high amount of metal fibres give low wear emissions.

  18. Development of hydroethanolic extract of Ipomoea pes-caprae using factorial design followed by antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Vieira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ipomoea pes-caprae (L. R. Br., Convolvulaceae, is a medicinal plant that grows abundantly as a pan-tropical stand plant. The 3² (two factors and three levels factorial design, was applied to determine the best time and drug/solvent proportion to maximize the flavonoid content in the hydroethanolic extract by maceration process. The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects were studied at 5-20 mg/kg, i.p., using the writhing test and carrageenan-induced pleurisy models in mice. The optimized extract was able to inhibit more than 50% of abdominal writhing at 20 mg/kg, with 55.88%±2.4 of maximum inhibition. Indomethacin, used as positive control, inhibited 64.86% at 10 mg/kg. In the pleurisy model, the extract produced dose-dependent inhibition of the first phase of inflammation (4 h in the pleural cavity induced by injection of carrageenan (1% in mice. It inhibited 50%±0.82 (p<0.01 of exudation induced by carrageenan, and 60.88%±0.14 (p<0.01 of leukocyte migration to the pleural cavity. In conclusion, the results validate the technological conditions of the maceration process to produce an optimized bioactive herb extract for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory phytopharmaceuticals using 70 ºGL ethanol, a plant to solvent ratio of 12.5% (w/v, and ten days of maceration.

  19. Spray drying of budesonide, formoterol fumarate and their composites-II. Statistical factorial design and in vitro deposition properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajber, L; Corrigan, O I; Healy, A M

    2009-02-09

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changing spray drying parameters on the production of a budesonide/formoterol fumarate 100:6 (w/w) composite. The systems were spray dried as solutions from 95% ethanol/5% water (v/v) using a Büchi 191-Mini Spray Dryer. A 2(5-1) factorial design study was undertaken to assess the consequence of altering spray drying processing variables on particle characteristics. The processing parameters that were studied were inlet temperature, spray drier airflow rate, pump rate, aspirator setting and feed concentration. Each batch of the resulting powder was characterised in terms of thermal and micromeritic properties as well as an in vitro deposition by twin impinger analysis. Overall, the parameter that had the greatest influence on each response investigated was production yield - airflow (higher airflow giving greater yields), median particle size - airflow (higher airflow giving smaller particle sizes) and Carr's compressibility index - feed concentration (lower feed concentration giving smaller Carr's indices). A six- to seven-fold difference in respirable fraction can be observed by changing the spray drying process parameters. The co-spray dried composite system which displayed best in vitro deposition characteristics, showed a 2.6-fold increase in respirable fraction in the twin impinger experiments and better dose uniformity compared with the physical mix of micronised powders.

  20. Full factorial experimental design applied to oxalic acid photocatalytic degradation in TiO2 aqueous suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Barka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Full factorial experimental design technique was used to study the main effects and the interaction effects between operational parameters in the photocatalytic degradation of oxalic acid in a batch photo-reactor using TiO2 aqueous suspension. The important parameters which affect the removal efficiency of oxalic acid such as agitation, initial concentration, volume of the solution and TiO2 dosage were investigated. The parameters were coded as X1, X2, X3 and X4, consecutively, and were investigated at two levels (−1 and +1. The effects of individual variables and their interaction effects for dependent variables, namely, photocatalytic degradation efficiency (% were determined. From the statistical analysis, the most effective parameters in the photocatalytic degradation efficiency were initial concentration and volume of solution. The interaction between initial concentration, volume of solution and TiO2 dosage was the most influencing interaction. However, the interaction between agitation, initial concentration and volume of solution was the least influencing parameter.

  1. Reactor Neutrino Experiments: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, L. J.; Cao, J.; Wang, Y. F.

    2017-10-01

    Reactor neutrinos have been an important tool for both discovery and precision measurement in the history of neutrino studies. Since the first generation of reactor neutrino experiments in the 1950s, the detector technology has advanced greatly. New ideas, new knowledge, and modern software have also enhanced the power of the experiments. The current reactor neutrino experiments, Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO, have led neutrino physics into the precision era. In this article, we review these developments and advances, address the key issues in designing a state-of-the-art reactor neutrino experiment, and explain how the challenging requirements of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy with the next-generation experiment JUNO could be realized in the near future.

  2. Neutrino Oscillation Results from NOvA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    NOvA is an accelerator long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment optimised to measure electron neutrino appearance in a high-purity beam of muon neutrinos from Fermilab. The exciting discovery of the theta13 neutrino mixing angle in 2012 has opened a door to making multiple new measurements of neutrinos. These include leptonic CP violation, the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of theta23. NOvA with its 810km baseline and higher energy beam has about triple the matter effect of T2K which opens a new window on the neutrino mass ordering. With about 20% of our design beam exposure and significant analysis improvements we have recently released updated results. I will present both our disappearance and appearance measurements.

  3. Nanoemulsions containing a synthetic chalcone as an alternative for treating cutaneous leshmaniasis: optimization using a full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos, Cristiane Bastos; Argenta, Débora Fretes; Melchiades, Gabriela de Lima; Cordeiro, Marlon Norberto Sechini; Tonini, Maiko Luis; Moraes, Milene Hoehr; Weber, Tanara Beatriz; Roman, Silvane Souza; Nunes, Ricardo José; Teixeira, Helder Ferreira; Steindel, Mário; Koester, Letícia Scherer

    2015-01-01

    Nanoemulsions are drug delivery systems that may increase the penetration of lipophilic compounds through the skin, enhancing their topical effect. Chalcones are compounds of low water solubility that have been described as promising molecules for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). In this context, the aim of this work was to optimize the development of a nanoemulsion containing a synthetic chalcone for CL treatment using a 2(2) full factorial design. The formulations were prepared by spontaneous emulsification and the experimental design studied the influence of two independent variables (type of surfactant - soybean lecithin or sorbitan monooleate and type of co-surfactants - polysorbate 20 or polysorbate 80) on the physicochemical characteristics of the nanoemulsions, as well as on the skin permeation/retention of the synthetic chalcone in porcine skin. In order to evaluate the stability of the systems, the antileishmanial assay was performed against Leishmania amazonensis 24 hours and 60 days after the preparation of the nanoemulsions. The formulation composed of soybean lecithin and polysorbate 20 presented suitable physicochemical characteristics (droplet size 171.9 nm; polydispersity index 0.14; zeta potential -39.43 mV; pH 5.16; and viscosity 2.00 cP), drug content (91.09%) and the highest retention in dermis (3.03 µg·g(-1)) - the main response of interest - confirmed by confocal microscopy. This formulation also presented better stability of leishmanicidal activity in vitro against L. amazonensis amastigote forms (half maximal inhibitory concentration value 0.32±0.05 µM), which confirmed the potential of the nanoemulsion soybean lecithin and polysorbate 20 for CL treatment.

  4. Neutrino Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelin Baldo, Milla

    2009-01-01

    The present volume contains the proceedings of the 13. International Workshop on 'Neutrino Telescope', 17. of the series 'Un altro modo di guardare il cielo', held in Venice at the 'Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti' from March 10 to March 13, 2009. This series started in Venice 21 years ago, in 1988, motivated by the growing interest in the exciting field of the neutrino physics and astrophysics, with the aim to bring together experimentalists and theorists and encourage discussion on the most recent results and to chart the direction of future researchers.

  5. Neutrino clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson Jr, G.J.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the possibility that neutrinos are coupled very weakly to an extremely light scalar boson. We first analyze the simple problem of one generation of neutrino and show that, for ranges of parameters that are allowed by existing data, such a system can have serious consequences for the evolution of stars and could impact precision laboratory measurements. We discuss the extension to more generations and show that the general conclusion remains viable. Finally, we note that, should such a scalar field be present, experiments give information about effective masses, not the masses that arise in unified field theories. (authors). 23 refs., 9 figs

  6. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino

  7. Antihypertensive efficacy of olmesartan medoxomil or valsartan in combination with amlodipine: a review of factorial-design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, C Venkata S

    2009-01-01

    Most patients with hypertension require more than one drug to attain recommended blood pressure (BP) targets. Initiating therapy with two agents is recommended for patients at high risk of a cardiovascular event or with a BP > 20/10 mmHg above goal. Combination therapy is effective when comprised of agents with complementary mechanisms of action, such as calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and angiotensin II-receptor blockers (ARBs). Two fixed-dose CCB/ARB combinations are approved in the US: amlodipine/valsartan (AML/VAL) and amlodipine/olmesartan medoxomil (AML/OM). To review and describe the efficacy of AML/VAL and AML/OM combinations by discussing similarly designed clinical trials. Three 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group factorial-design studies were examined (two AML/VAL; one AML/OM). The study endpoints presented in this review were: change from baseline in least-squares mean seated diastolic BP (SeDBP) and least-squares mean seated systolic BP (SeSBP). In addition to the efficacies of AML/VAL and AML/OM combinations, the efficacies of AML, VAL and OM administered as monotherapy are presented. Placebo-subtracted BP reductions were calculated for this review. Patient demographics were similar but mean baseline SeBP was higher in the OM study (163.8/101.6 mmHg) than in the VAL studies (152.8/99.3 and 156.7/99.1 mmHg), possibly suggesting that the OM study included a more difficult-to-treat patient population. AML/ARB combinations consistently produced greater mean SeBP reductions than monotherapy. Least squares (LS) mean SeDBP reductions were 19.4 mmHg (AML/OM 10/40 mg; placebo-corrected: 15.9 mmHg) and 18.6 mmHg (AML/VAL 10/320 mg; placebo-corrected: 9.8 mmHg). LS mean SeSBP reductions were 28.5 mmHg (AML/OM 10/40 mg; placebo-corrected: 25.7 mmHg) and 28.4 mmHg (AML/VAL 10/320 mg; placebo-corrected: 15.5 mmHg). This review of published factorial-design studies showed that the maximal marketed doses of an amlodipine

  8. Peer support for family carers of people with dementia, alone or in combination with group reminiscence in a factorial design: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenborn Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peer support interventions can improve carer wellbeing and interventions that engage both the carer and person with dementia can have significant mutual benefits. Existing research has been criticised for inadequate rigour of design or reporting. This paper describes the protocol for a complex trial that evaluates one-to-one peer support and a group reminiscence programme, both separately and together, in a factorial design. Design A 2 × 2 factorial multi-site randomised controlled trial of individual peer support and group reminiscence interventions for family carers and people with dementia in community settings in England, addressing both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Discussion The methods described in this protocol have implications for research into psychosocial interventions, particularly complex interventions seeking to test both individual and group approaches. Trial Registration ISRCTN37956201

  9. Photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, J.; Huke, K.; Chikawa, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Photon Factory (PF) was established on April 1, 1978 at KEK. The PF is a synchrotron radiation facility, which has a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring fully dedicated to the SR usage and a 2.5 GeV electron linac supplying electrons and positrons to the PF ring and the accumulation ring of TRISTAN (30 GeV electron-positron colliding machine). The PF consists of three departments, injector linac, light source, and instrumentation department. The facility is described

  10. Particle Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amol Dighe

    Energy spectra of neutrino sources. ASPERA ... Neutrinos that displayed oscillations. 2. Neutrinos from a core collapse supernova. 3. Neutrinos with extremely large / small energies. 4. Exploring the universe in ... Produced due to natural radioactivity in the Earth's crust. Recently confirmed, after separating reactor neutrinos.

  11. Ibuprofen nanocrystals developed by 22 factorial design experiment: A new approach for poorly water-soluble drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Fernandes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of the particle size of drugs of pharmaceutical interest down to the nano-sized range has dramatically changed their physicochemical properties. The greatest disadvantage of nanocrystals is their inherent instability, due to the risk of crystal growth. Thus, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer is crucial to obtain long-term physicochemically stable nanocrystals. High pressure homogenization has enormous advantages, including the possibility of scaling up, lack of organic solvents and the production of small particles diameter with low polydispersity index. The sequential use of high shear homogenization followed by high pressure homogenization, can modulate nanoparticles’ size for different administration routes. The present study focuses on the optimization of the production process of two formulations composed of different surfactants produced by High Shear Homogenization followed by hot High Pressure Homogenization. To build up the surface response charts, a 22 full factorial design experiment, based on 2 independent variables, was used to develop optimized formulations. The effects of the production process on the mean particle size and polydispersity index were evaluated. The best ibuprofen nanocrystal formulations were obtained using 0.20% Tween 80 and 1.20% PVP K30 (F1 and 0.20% Tween 80 and 1.20% Span 80 (F2. The estimation of the long-term stability of the aqueous suspensions of ibuprofen nanocrystals was studied using the LUMISizer. The calculated instability index suggests that F1 was more stable when stored at 4 °C and 22 °C, whereas F2 was shown to be more stable when freshly prepared.

  12. Screening of ionically crosslinked chitosan-tripolyphosphate microspheres using Plackett-Burman factorial design for the treatment of intrapocket infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sarita Kumari; Khan, Gayasuddin; Bansal, Monika; Vardhan, Harsh; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2017-11-01

    Application of Plackett-Burman factorial design to investigate the effect of processing factors in the fabrication of ionically crosslinked chitosan-tripolyphosphate (CS-TPP) microspheres. Microspheres were screened and optimized to provide maximum process yield (PY), encapsulation efficiency (EE), and time for 80% drug release (T 80% ) and minimum burst and particles size (PS), for successful application in periodontitis. Processing factors viz. method of preparation (MOP), CS, TPP, crosslinking time (CT), agitation (AS), and drying technique (DT) were selected. Solid state characterization was performed by Fourier-Transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mucoadhesion, cytocompatibility, and stability of microspheres were also evaluated. Pareto analysis and analysis of variance, screened most significantly (p < .05) impacting process factors on selected responses. The optimized microspheres demonstrated: o/w emulsification method, CS (2.5%), TPP (5%), CT (120 min), AS (2000 rpm), and DT (freeze-dried), and provided PY- 95.67%, PS- 168.45%, EEOZ- 85.56%, EEDX- 91.34%, BOZ- 15.26%, BDX- 12.91%, TOZ- 47.09 and TDX- 67.95 minutes. FTIR illustrated compatibility between excipients and complexation of CS and TPP. XRD and DSC showed loss of crystallinity of entrapped drugs in microspheres. Biphasic drug release was observed for four days with non-Fickian kinetics. Furthermore, microspheres exhibited good mucoadhesivity (82.51%), antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, cytocompatibility for L929 cells, and long-term stability. Therefore, CS-TPP microspheres were found mucoadhesive, safe, stable and provided controlled and prolonged release of drugs. These properties confirmed its high potential and applicability in chronic periodontitis.

  13. Parameters Studies on Surface Initiated Rolling Contact Fatigue of Turnout Rails by Three-Level Unreplicated Saturated Factorial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochuan Ma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface initiated rolling contact fatigue (RCF, mainly characterized by cracks and material stripping, is a common type of damage to turnout rails, which can not only shorten service life of turnout but also lead to poor running safety of vehicle. The rail surface initiated RCF of turnouts is caused by a long-term accumulation, the size and distribution of which are related to the dynamic parameters of the complicated vehicle-turnout system. In order to simulate the accumulation of rail damage, some random samples of dynamic parameters significantly influencing it should be input. Based on the three-level unreplicated saturated factorial design, according to the evaluation methods of H, P and B statistic values, six dynamic parameters that influence the rail surface initiated RCF in turnouts, namely running speed of vehicle, axle load, wheel-rail profiles, integral vertical track stiffness and wheel-rail friction coefficient, are obtained by selecting 13 dynamic parameters significantly influencing the dynamic vehicle-turnout interaction as the analysis factors, considering four dynamic response results, i.e., the normal wheel-rail contact force, longitudinal creep force, lateral creep force and wheel-rail contact patch area as the observed parameters. In addition, the rail surface initiated RCF behavior in turnouts under different wheel-rail creep conditions is analyzed, considering the relative motion of stock/switch rails. The results show that the rail surface initiated RCF is mainly caused by the tangential stress being high under small creep conditions, the normal and tangential stresses being high under large creep conditions, and the normal stress being high under pure spin creep conditions.

  14. Factorial experimental design for the optimization of catalytic degradation of malachite green dye in aqueous solution by Fenton process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Elhalil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the optimization of the catalytic degradation of malachite green dye (MG by Fenton process “Fe2+/H2O2”. A 24 full factorial experimental design was used to evaluate the effects of four factors considered in the optimization of the oxidative process: concentration of MG (X1, concentration of Fe2+ (X2, concentration of H2O2 (X3 and temperature (X4. Individual and interaction effects of the factors that influenced the percentage of dye degradation were tested. The effect of interactions between the four parameters shows that there is a dependency between concentration of MG and concentration of Fe2+; concentration of Fe2+ and concentration of H2O2, expressed by the great values of the coefficient of interaction. The analysis of variance proved that, the concentration of MG, the concentration of Fe2+ and the concentration of H2O2 have an influence on the catalytic degradation while it is not the case for the temperature. In the optimization, the great dependence between observed and predicted degradation efficiency, the correlation coefficient for the model (R2=0.986 and the important value of F-ratio proved the validity of the model. The optimum degradation efficiency of malachite green was 93.83%, when the operational parameters were malachite green concentration of 10 mg/L, Fe2+ concentration of 10 mM, H2O2 concentration of 25.6 mM and temperature of 40 °C.

  15. Test results of pre-production prototype distributed ion pump design for the PEP-II Asymmetric B-Factory collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdener, F.R.; Behne, D.; Hathaway, D. [and others

    1995-04-24

    We have built and tested a plate-type pre-production distributed Ion Pump (DIP) for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring (HER). The design has been an earlier design to use less materials and to costs. Penning cell hole sizes of 15, 18, and 21 mm have been tested in a uniform magnetic field of 0.18 T to optimize pumping speed. The resulting final DIP design consisting of a 7-plate, 15 mm basic cell size anode was magnetic field of the HER dipole. A description of the final optimized DIP design will be presented along with the test results of the pumping speed measurements.

  16. Neutrino cave

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Here the end of the underground decay tunnel, its window and beam stopper. On the left one sees the end of the last quadrupole of the neutrino narrow-band beam, and the detectors measuring the beam profile. Further downstream one sees two Beam Current Transformers (BCT, see photo 7801005) measuring the beam intensity, and a Cerenkov counter.

  17. Neutrino horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    View of the new neutrino horn installed in its blockhouse from the target end. Protons pass through the 2mm hole in the centre of the small fluorescent screen, hitting the target immediately behind it. The circular tubes carry pressurized cooling water.

  18. Solar Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ance of S Umasankar. I thank my guide and S H Patil for their guidance and encouragement throughout the project. I would also like to thank STELAB, Nagoya University, Japan for giving me permission to use their computer facilities to prepare the final manuscript. Suggested Reading. [1] J N Bahcall,Neutrino Astrophysics, ...

  19. Neutrino Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to two physicists-Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B McDonald, whose teams discoveredthat neutrinos, which come in three flavours, changefrom one flavour to another. This discovery is a major milestonein particle physics as it gives a clear evidence of physicsbeyond the Standard ...

  20. Neutrino Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    could sensibly bear that name [4], E Fermi proposed the term neutrino instead of neutron for Pauli's mysterious particle, also concluding. E Fermi proposed the ... In June 1956, just two years prior to Pauli's death, Reines and Cowan could send a telegram informing Pauli about their dis- covery. The discovery quoting the ...

  1. Smart Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilberg, Arne; Radziwon, Agnieszka; Grube Hansen, David

    2017-01-01

    A large part of Danish Industry is based on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), which account for –99% of the companies in Denmark and about two third of the job positions (source: statistikbanken.dk) . That is why, it is so important also to focus research and development at SMEs, and to ......A large part of Danish Industry is based on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs), which account for –99% of the companies in Denmark and about two third of the job positions (source: statistikbanken.dk) . That is why, it is so important also to focus research and development at SMEs......, and to target their challenges and ensure sustainable growth and business in these enterprises. Therefore the focus of the Smart Factory project was to support the growth and sustainable development of the small and medium sized manufacturing industry in Denmark. The project focused on SMEs and how to improve...... their innovation and competitive advantage by focusing at their competences, strengths and opportunities. The project suggests innovative solutions and business models through collaboration and use of new technologies. In the Smart Factory, SMEs should be able to collaborate on new products, markets and production...

  2. Neutrino Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamyshkov, Yuri [Univ. of Tennesse, Knoxville, TN (United States); Handler, Thomas [Univ. of Tennesse, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-24

    The neutrino group of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville was involved from 05/01/2013 to 04/30/2015 in the neutrino physics research funded by DOE-HEP grant DE-SC0009861. Contributions were made to the Double Chooz nuclear reactor experiment in France where second detector was commissioned during this period and final series of measurements has been started. Although Double Chooz was smaller experimental effort than competitive Daya Bay and RENO experiments, its several advantages make it valuable for understanding of systematic errors in measurements of neutrino oscillations. Double Chooz was the first experiment among competing three that produced initial result for neutrino angle θ13 measurement, giving other experiments the chance to improve measured value statistically. Graduate student Ben Rybolt defended his PhD thesis on the results of Double Chooz experiment in 2015. UT group has fulfilled all the construction and analysis commitments to Double Chooz experiment, and has withdrawn from the collaboration by the end of the mentioned period to start another experiment. Larger effort of UT neutrino group during this period was devoted to the participation in another DOE-HEP project - NOvA experiment. The 14,000-ton "FAR" neutrino detector was commissioned in northern Minnesota in 2014 together with 300-ton "NEAR" detector located at Fermilab. Following that, the physics measurement program has started when Fermilab accelerator complex produced the high-intensity neutrino beam propagating through Earth to detector in MInnessota. UT group contributed to NOvA detector construction and developments in several aspects. Our Research Associate Athanasios Hatzikoutelis was managing (Level 3 manager) the construction of the Detector Control System. This work was successfully accomplished in time with the commissioning of the detectors. Group was involved in the development of the on-line software and study of the signatures of the cosmic ray backgrounds

  3. Neutrino Oscillations and Non-standard Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Farzan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Current neutrino experiments are measuring the neutrino mixing parameters with an unprecedented accuracy. The upcoming generation of neutrino experiments will be sensitive to subdominant neutrino oscillation effects that can in principle give information on the yet-unknown neutrino parameters: the Dirac CP-violating phase in the PMNS mixing matrix, the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of θ23. Determining the exact values of neutrino mass and mixing parameters is crucial to test various neutrino models and flavor symmetries that are designed to predict these neutrino parameters. In the first part of this review, we summarize the current status of the neutrino oscillation parameter determination. We consider the most recent data from all solar neutrino experiments and the atmospheric neutrino data from Super-Kamiokande, IceCube, and ANTARES. We also implement the data from the reactor neutrino experiments KamLAND, Daya Bay, RENO, and Double Chooz as well as the long baseline neutrino data from MINOS, T2K, and NOνA. If in addition to the standard interactions, neutrinos have subdominant yet-unknown Non-Standard Interactions (NSI with matter fields, extracting the values of these parameters will suffer from new degeneracies and ambiguities. We review such effects and formulate the conditions on the NSI parameters under which the precision measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters can be distorted. Like standard weak interactions, the non-standard interaction can be categorized into two groups: Charged Current (CC NSI and Neutral Current (NC NSI. Our focus will be mainly on neutral current NSI because it is possible to build a class of models that give rise to sizeable NC NSI with discernible effects on neutrino oscillation. These models are based on new U(1 gauge symmetry with a gauge boson of mass ≲ 10 MeV. The UV complete model should be of course electroweak invariant which in general implies that along with neutrinos, charged

  4. Global Status of Neutrino Oscillation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    monojit

    2014-11-08

    Outline of talk. Neutrino Oscillations: the context. Solar and geo neutrino physics. Reactor neutrino physics. Atmospheric and long-baseline neutrino physics. Atmospheric neutrinos and INO. Nov 8, 2014, IASc Annual Meeting, IIT-Madras, Chennai – p. 2 ...

  5. Nuclear physics at the KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitching, R.

    1989-05-01

    The author surveys the range of nuclear physics issues which can be addressed with a high intensity hadron facility such as the KAON factory. He discusses hadron spectroscopy, kaon scattering, hypernuclear physics, spin physics, and nuclear physics with neutrinos. Nuclear Physics is defined rather broadly, encompassing the study of strongly interacting systems, and including the structure of individual hadrons, hadron-hadron interactions, hadronic weak and electromagnetic currents (in nuclei too), conventional nuclear structure, and exotic nuclei. The basic theme is how the KAON Factory can shed light on non-perturbative QCD and its relation to conventional nuclear physics

  6. Measuring neutrino mass without neutrinos!

    CERN Multimedia

    Peach, Kenneth J

    2004-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay offers the most precise (if challenging) way of measuring the absolute mass of the neutrino. Particle Physics met at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory last autumn to discuss wether the UK should take a lead in setting up such an experiment

  7. Design of a Communication Scheme in a Modern Factory in Accordance with the Standard of Industry 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halenár, Igor; Juhásová, Bohuslava; Juhás, Martin

    2016-12-01

    This article first describes the current state of the problem in the area of communication in modern factories. Next in the article is given a summary of the requirements that must be implemented for the possibility of establishing a compatible and safe communication system. In the final part of the article is given a proposal of communication model suitable for the implementation.

  8. ANTARES: The first undersea neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Arnaud, K.; Aslanides, E.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Becherini, Y.; Beltramelli, J.; Bersani, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Bogazzi, C.; de Botton, N.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Boudahef, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Caillat, L.; Calzas, A.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Carton, P. H.; Cassano, B.; Castorina, E.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Chaleil, Th.; Charvis, Ph.; Chauchot, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Compère, C.; Coniglione, R.; Coppolani, X.; Cosquer, A.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Curtil, C.; D'Amato, C.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; de Bonis, G.; Decock, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Delagnes, E.; Desages-Ardellier, F.; Deschamps, A.; Destelle, J.-J.; di Maria, F.; Dinkespiler, B.; Distefano, C.; Dominique, J.-L.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drogou, J.-F.; Drouhin, D.; Druillole, F.; Durand, D.; Durand, R.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Engelen, J. J.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Falchini, E.; Favard, S.; Fehr, F.; Feinstein, F.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatá, S.; Galeotti, S.; Gay, P.; Gensolen, F.; Giacomelli, G.; Gojak, C.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Goret, Ph.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A. J.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, M.; Jourde, D.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karkar, S.; Karolak, M.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kestener, P.; Kok, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kruijer, A.; Kuch, S.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lahonde-Hamdoun, C.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Languillat, J.-C.; Larosa, G.; Lavalle, J.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Levansuu, A.; Lefèvre, D.; Legou, T.; Lelaizant, G.; Lévéque, C.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Magnier, P.; Mangano, S.; Marcel, A.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Masullo, R.; Mazéas, F.; Mazure, A.; Meli, A.; Melissas, M.; Migneco, E.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann, C.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Neff, M.; Niess, V.; Nooren, G. J. L.; Oberski, J. E. J.; Olivetto, C.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Palioselitis, D.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Peek, H.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Piret, Y.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Prono, G.; Racca, C.; Raia, G.; van Randwijk, J.; Real, D.; Reed, C.; Réthoré, F.; Rewiersma, P.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Ricol, J. S.; Rigaud, V.; Roca, V.; Roensch, K.; Rolin, J.-F.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rottura, A.; Roux, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Salomon, K.; Sapienza, P.; Schmitt, F.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciliberto, D.; Shanidze, R.; Shirokov, E.; Simeone, F.; Sottoriva, A.; Spies, A.; Spona, T.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Streeb, K.; Sulak, L.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tao, C.; Tasca, L.; Terreni, G.; Tezier, D.; Toscano, S.; Urbano, F.; Valdy, P.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Venekamp, G.; Verlaat, B.; Vernin, P.; Virique, E.; de Vries, G.; van Wijk, R.; Wijnker, G.; Wobbe, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yakovenko, Y.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2011-11-01

    The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope was completed in May 2008 and is the first operational Neutrino Telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The main purpose of the detector is to perform neutrino astronomy and the apparatus also offers facilities for marine and Earth sciences. This paper describes the design, the construction and the installation of the telescope in the deep sea, offshore from Toulon in France. An illustration of the detector performance is given.

  9. Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

  10. Neutrinos: Theory and Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, Stephen

    2013-10-22

    The theory and phenomenology of neutrinos will be addressed, especially that relating to the observation of neutrino flavor transformations. The current status and implications for future experiments will be discussed with special emphasis on the experiments that will determine the neutrino mass ordering, the dominant flavor content of the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest electron neutrino content and the size of CP violation in the neutrino sector. Beyond the neutrino Standard Model, the evidence for and a possible definitive experiment to confirm or refute the existence of light sterile neutrinos will be briefly discussed.

  11. A Group-Based Mobile Application to Increase Adherence in Exercise and Nutrition Programs: A Factorial Design Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Youngblood, Gregory Michael; Ram, Ashwin; Pirolli, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Novel methods of promoting self-monitoring and social support are needed to ensure long-term maintenance of behavior change. In this paper, we directly investigate the effects of group support in an exercise and nutrition program delivered by an mHealth application called Fittle. Objective Our first specific study aim was to explore whether social support improved adherence in wellness programs. Our second specific study aim was to assess whether media types (ePaper vs mobile) were associated with different levels of compliance and adherence to wellness programs. The third aim was to assess whether the use of an mHealth application led to positive changes to participants’ eating behavior, physical activity, and stress level, compared to traditional paper-based programs. Methods A 2 × 2 (eg, Media: Mobile vs ePaper × Group Type: Team vs Solo) factorial design feasibility study was conducted. A sample of 124 volunteers who were interested in improving eating behavior, increasing physical activity, or reducing stress participated in this study. The study duration was 8 weeks. All groups were self-directed with no ongoing human input from the research team. Results Participants in ePaper conditions had higher attrition rates compared to participants in Mobile conditions, χ3 2=9.96, P=.02 (N=124). Participants in Mobile conditions reported their compliance with a much higher frequency closer to the time of challenge activity completion (2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test comparing distributions was highly significant—KS=0.33, PMobile conditions—χ1 2=25.25, Pmobile app allowed a more accurate method to report and track health behaviors over a longer period than traditional ePaper-based diaries or log books. There was a significant difference in the overall compliance score for Mobile-Solo (Mean [SD] 0.30 [0.39]) and Mobile-Team (Mean [SD] 0.49 [0.35]) conditions (t 50.82=1.94, P=.05). This suggests that working in a team increased participants

  12. Treatment of Terasil Red R and Cibacron Red R wastewater using extracted aluminum from red earth: factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkarkhi, Abbas F M; Lim, Han Khim; Yusup, Yusri; Teng, Tjoon Tow; Abu Bakar, Mohd Azri; Cheah, Khai Siean

    2013-06-15

    The ability of aluminum coagulant extracted from red earth to treat Terasil Red R (disperse) and Cibacron Red R (reactive) synthetic dye wastewater was studied. The effects of extractant concentration, soil-to-volume of extractant ratio, and the types of extracting agents (NaOH vs. KCl) on the concentration of aluminum extracted were also investigated. In addition, the efficiency of extracted aluminum was compared with aluminum sulfate, in terms of its capability to reduce the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and to remove synthetic color. Factorial design was applied to determine the effect of selected factors on the amount of aluminum extracted from red earth (i.e., pH, dose of coagulant, type of coagulant on COD reduction, and color removal). It was found that only selected factors exhibited a significant effect on the amount of aluminum extracted from red earth. It was also determined that all factors and their interactions exhibited a significant effect on COD reduction and color removal when applying the extracted aluminum in a standard coagulation process. The results were also compared to aluminum sulfate. Furthermore, NaOH was found to be a better extractant of aluminum in red earth than KCl. Therefore, the best extracting conditions for both extractants were as follows: 2 M NaOH and in a 1:5 (soil/volume of extractant) ratio; 1 M KCl and 1:5 ratio. In treating synthetic dye wastewater, the extracted coagulant showed comparable treatment efficiency to the commercial coagulant. The extracted coagulant was able to reduce the COD of the dispersed dye by 85% and to remove 99% of the color of the dispersed dye, whereas the commercial coagulant reduced 90% of the COD and removed 99% of the color of the dispersed dye. Additionally, the extracted coagulant was able to reduce the COD of the reactive dye by 73% and to remove 99% of the color of the reactive dye. However, the commercial coagulant managed to reduce the COD of the reactive dye by 94% and to remove 96% of

  13. Application of general multilevel factorial design with formulation of fast disintegrating tablets containing croscaremellose sodium and Disintequick MCC-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaiman, Amanda; Suliman, Ammar Said; Shinde, Swapnil; Naz, Sidra; Elkordy, Amal Ali

    2016-03-30

    Despite the popularity of orally fast disintegrating tablets (FDTs), their formulation can sometimes be challenging, producing tablets with either poor mechanical properties or high disintegration times. The aim of this research was to enhance the properties of FDTs produced by direct compression to have both sufficient hardness to withstand manual handling, and rapid disintegration time. General multilevel factorial design was applied to optimise and evaluate main and interaction effects of independent variables (i) disintegrant concentration, (ii) % filler (Disintequick MCC-25) to mannitol on the responses hardness, tensile strength and disintegration time. In this experiment mannitol was used as a diluent, Disintequick MCC-25 (to best of our knowledge there is no publication available yet for its use with FDTs) was termed in this study as a filler and croscaremellose sodium was used as the superdisintegrant. Seven formulations were prepared following a progressive two-stage approach. Each stage involved the change in the ratio of excipients (Mannitol:Filler) (1:0), (1:0.25), (1:0.50), (1:1), (0.50:1), (0.25:1), (0:1) w/w and concentration of superdisintegrant (1%, 3%, 5%, 7%, 10% w/w). All FDTs were tested for different parameters such as diameter, hardness, tensile strength, thickness, friability and disintegration time. The results of multiple linear regression analysis show a good degree of correlation between experimental (R(2):0.84, 0.94, 0.91) and predicted response (R(2):0.83, 0.96, 0.95) for hardness, tensile strength and disintegration time respectively. The optimum formulations (regarding disintegration time with acceptable hardness and friability properties) consisted of: (i) 5% w/w disintegrant and 20% w/w filler to mannitol, showing a disintegration time of 30s, a hardness of 66.6N (6.8 kg/cm(2)) and friability of 2.2%; (ii) 7% or 10% w/w disintegrant with 33.33% w/w filler to mannitol, showing disintegration time of 84 s (for 7% disintegrant) and

  14. Supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In the first part of his in-depth article on the 1987 supernova, David Schramm of the University of Chicago and the NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Centre reviewed the background to supernovae, the composition of massive stars and the optical history of SN 1987A, and speculated on what the 1987 remnant might be. In such a Type II supernova, gravitational pressure crushes the atoms of the star's interior producing neutron matter, or even a black hole, and releasing an intense burst of neutrinos. 1987 was the first time that physicists were equipped (but not entirely ready!) to intercept these particles, and in the second part of his article, David Schramm covers the remarkable new insights from the science of supernova neutrino astronomy, born on 23 February 1987

  15. The removal of an anionic red dye from aqueous solutions using chitosan beads-The role of experimental factors on adsorption using a full factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cestari, Antonio R.; Vieira, Eunice F.S.; Mota, Jackeline A.

    2008-01-01

    A factorial design was employed to evaluate the quantitative removal of an anionic red dye from aqueous solutions on epichlorohydrin-cross-linked chitosan. The experimental factors and their respective levels studied were the initial dye concentration in solution (25 or 600 mg L -1 ), the absence or the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) and the adsorption temperature (25 or 55 deg. C). The adsorption parameters were analyzed statistically using modeling polynomial equations. The results indicated that increasing the dye concentration from 25 to 600 mg L -1 increases the dye adsorption whereas the presence of DBS increases it. The principal effect of temperature did not show a high statistical significance. The factorial results also demonstrate the existence of statistically significant binary interactions of the experimental factors. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters, namely Δ ads H, Δ ads G and Δ ads S, were determined for all the factorial design results. Exothermic and endothermic values were found in relation to the Δ ads H. The positive Δ ads S values indicate that entropy is a driving force for adsorption. The Δ ads G values are significantly affected by an important synergistic effect of the factors and not by the temperature changes alone

  16. The removal of the indigo carmine dye from aqueous solutions using cross-linked chitosan-Evaluation of adsorption thermodynamics using a full factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cestari, Antonio R.; Vieira, Eunice F.S.; Tavares, Andrea M.G.; Bruns, Roy E.

    2008-01-01

    A 2 3 factorial design was employed to evaluate the quantitative removal of the indigo carmine (IC) dye from aqueous solutions on glutaraldehyde cross-linked chitosan. The variables were chitosan masses of 100 and 300 mg, IC concentrations of 2.0 and 5.0 x 10 -5 mol L -1 and temperatures of 25 and 35 deg. C. The quantitative and energetic adsorption parameters were analyzed statistically using modeling with bilinear equations. The results indicated that increasing the chitosan mass from 100 to 300 mg decreases the IC adsorption/mass ratio (mol g -1 ) whereas a temperature increase of 25-35 deg. C increases it. The principal effect of the IC concentration did not show statistical significance. The factorial experiments demonstrate the existence of a significant antagonistic interaction effect between the chitosan mass and temperature. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters, namely Δ ads H, Δ ads G, and Δ ads S, were determined for all the factorial design results. Endothermic values were found in relation to the Δ ads H. The positive Δ ads S values indicate that entropy is a driving force for adsorption. The Δ ads G values are also significantly affected by important antagonistic and synergistic effects involving all principal and interactive factors. It is concluded that the thermodynamical spontaneity of the IC adsorption parameters are greatly influenced by the interactive factors and not by the temperature changes alone

  17. The removal of the indigo carmine dye from aqueous solutions using cross-linked chitosan: evaluation of adsorption thermodynamics using a full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, Antonio R; Vieira, Eunice F S; Tavares, Andréa M G; Bruns, Roy E

    2008-05-01

    A 2(3) factorial design was employed to evaluate the quantitative removal of the indigo carmine (IC) dye from aqueous solutions on glutaraldehyde cross-linked chitosan. The variables were chitosan masses of 100 and 300 mg, IC concentrations of 2.0 and 5.0 x 10(-5) mol L(-1) and temperatures of 25 and 35 degrees C. The quantitative and energetic adsorption parameters were analyzed statistically using modeling with bilinear equations. The results indicated that increasing the chitosan mass from 100 to 300 mg decreases the IC adsorption/mass ratio (mol g(-1)) whereas a temperature increase of 25-35 degrees C increases it. The principal effect of the IC concentration did not show statistical significance. The factorial experiments demonstrate the existence of a significant antagonistic interaction effect between the chitosan mass and temperature. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters, namely Delta(ads)H, Delta(ads)G, and Delta(ads)S, were determined for all the factorial design results. Endothermic values were found in relation to the Delta(ads)H. The positive Delta(ads)S values indicate that entropy is a driving force for adsorption. The Delta(ads)G values are also significantly affected by important antagonistic and synergistic effects involving all principal and interactive factors. It is concluded that the thermodynamical spontaneity of the IC adsorption parameters are greatly influenced by the interactive factors and not by the temperature changes alone.

  18. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Alysia Diane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ~2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)±$0.065\\atop{0.068}$(sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)±$0.12\\atop{0.11}$(sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)±$0.31\\atop{0.37}$(sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1. The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation.

  19. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Alysia Diane

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ∼2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)± 0.068 0.065 (sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 10 6 cm -2 s -1 , via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)± 0.12 0.11 (sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 10 6 cm -2 s -1 , and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)± 0.37 0.31 (sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 10 6 cm -2 s -1 . The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation

  20. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  1. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  2. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Alonso, J. R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ankowski, A. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Asaadi, J. A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Ashenfelter, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Axani, S. N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Babu, K [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Backhouse, C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Band, H. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Barbeau, P. S. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Barros, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betancourt, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blucher, E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Bouffard, J. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brice, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryan, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Camilleri, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cao, J. [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Carlson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, R. E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chatterjee, A. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Chen, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chen, S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Chiu, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Church, E. D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collar, J. I. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Collin, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Convery, M. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cooper, R. L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Cowen, D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Davoudiasl, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouvea, A. D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Descamps, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeYoung, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Diwan, M. V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dolinski, M. J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolph, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Donnelly, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dwyer, D. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Efremenko, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Everett, L. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fava, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Friedland, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fujikawa, B. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gaisser, T. K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Galeazzi, M. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Galehouse, DC [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautam, S. [Tribhuvan Univ., Kirtipur (Nepal); Gilje, K. E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gonzalez-Garcia, M. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Goodman, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gordon, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gramellini, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Green, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guglielmi, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Hackenburg, R. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hackenburg, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Halzen, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Han, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harris, D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heeger, K. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Holin, A. [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Huber, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jaffe, D. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnson, R. A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Joshi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karagiorgi, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kaufman, L. J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Kayser, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kettell, S. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Klein, J. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Kolomensky, Y. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kriske, R. M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lane, C. E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Langford, T. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lankford, A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lau, K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ling, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Link, J. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lissauer, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littlejohn, B. R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lockwitz, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lokajicek, M. [Inst. of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luk, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lykken, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maricic, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caicedo, D. A. M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McCluskey, E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); McKeen, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McKeown, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mills, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocioiu, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Monreal, B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mooney, M. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morfin, J. G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mumm, P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Napolitano, J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, J. K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Nessi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Norcini, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Nova, F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Nygren, D. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Gann, GDO [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Palamara, O. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Patterson, R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Paul, P. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Pocar, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Qian, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ranucci, G. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Milano (Italy); Ray, H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Reyna, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rich, G. C. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Rodrigues, P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Romero, E. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rosero, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rountree, S. D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rybolt, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sanchez, M. C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Santucci, G. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Schmitz, D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Scholberg, K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Seckel, D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Shaevitz, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Shrock, R. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Smy, M. B. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sonzogni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sousa, A. B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); John, J. M. S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Stewart, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Strait, J. B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sullivan, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Svoboda, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Szelc, A. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Tayloe, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomson, M. A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Toups, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vacheret, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Vagins, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Water, R. G. V. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, R. B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Weber, M. [Bern (Switzerland); Weng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wetstein, M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); White, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Whittington, D. W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Wilking, M. J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Wilson, R. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wilson, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Winklehner, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Winn, D. R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Yeh, M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yokley, Z. W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yoo, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  3. Neutrino problems proliferate (Neutrino 94 conference report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Fraser

    1994-01-01

    The enigma of the neutrino continues. More than sixty years after its hesitant prediction by Pauli and forty years after its discovery by Reines and Cowan, the neutrino still refuses to give up all its secrets. The longer we travel down the neutrino road and the more we find out about these particles, the more problems we uncover en route. The present state of the neutrino mystery was highlighted at the Neutrino 94 meeting in Eilat, Israel, from 29 May to 3 June. It was a distinguished meeting, with the first morning including one session chaired by neutrino co-discoverer Fred Reines, and an introductory talk by muon-neutrino co-discoverer Leon Lederman. One figurehead neutrino personality conspicuously absent this time was Bruno Pontecorvo, who died last year and had attended the previous conference in the series, in Grenada, Spain, in 1992

  4. Design of a Communication Scheme in a Modern Factory in Accordance with the Standard of Industry 4.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halenár Igor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article first describes the current state of the problem in the area of communication in modern factories. Next in the article is given a summary of the requirements that must be implemented for the possibility of establishing a compatible and safe communication system. In the final part of the article is given a proposal of communication model suitable for the implementation.

  5. ANTARES: An Undersea Neutrino telescope

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ANTARES (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and ${Abyss}$ environmental RESearch) deep-sea neutrino telescope is designed to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origin. Neutrinos are unique probes of the high energy universe; being neutral they are not deflected by magnetic fields and interacting weakly they can readily escape from the densest regions of the universe. Potential sources of neutrino are galactic (e.g supernova remnants, micro-quasars) and extra-galactic (e.g active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursters). Annihilation of dark matter particles in the Sun or Galactic Centre is another well motivated potential source of extra terrestrial neutrinos. The ANTARES detector is located 40 km off the coast of Toulon (France) at a depth of 2475m in the Mediterranean Sea. Being located in the Northern hemisphere it studies the Southern sky and in particular has the Galactic Centre in its field of view. Since 2006, the detector has operated continuously in a partial configuration. The detector was compl...

  6. Neutrino 2004: Collection of Presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The scientific program covers the latest developments in neutrino physics, astrophysics and related topics through a set of invited talks and 2 poster sessions. The following issues are addressed: - solar neutrinos, - atmospheric neutrinos, - short and long baseline experiments, - neutrino oscillations, - double beta decay, - direct neutrino mass limits, - theory for neutrino masses, neutrino telescopes and ultra-high energy neutrinos, - dark matter searches, - neutrino in astrophysics and cosmology, and - future projects beams and experiments.

  7. Neutrino 2004: Collection of Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The scientific program covers the latest developments in neutrino physics, astrophysics and related topics through a set of invited talks and 2 poster sessions. The following issues are addressed: - solar neutrinos, - atmospheric neutrinos, - short and long baseline experiments, - neutrino oscillations, - double beta decay, - direct neutrino mass limits, - theory for neutrino masses, neutrino telescopes and ultra-high energy neutrinos, - dark matter searches, - neutrino in astrophysics and cosmology, and - future projects beams and experiments

  8. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P. [et al.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  9. ABSOLUTE NEUTRINO MASSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schechter, J.; Shahid, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos.......We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos....

  10. The World of Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neutrinos from the big bang. Cosmic microwave background: 400 photons/ cm3. Temperature: ∼ 3 K. Cosmic neutrino background: 300 neutrinos / cm3. Temperature: ∼ 2 K. The “relic” neutrinos. The second-most abundant particles in the universe. Detection still far in future. (unless someone has a brilliant idea) ...

  11. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, Bob [bmck@jlab.org

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  12. Introduction to massive neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss the theoretical ideas which make it natural to expect that neutrinos do indeed have mass. Then we focus on the physical consequences of neutrino mass, including neutrino oscillation and other phenomena whose observation would be very interesting, and would serve to demonstrate that neutrinos are indeed massive. We comment on the legitimacy of comparing results from different types of experiments. Finally, we consider the question of whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles. We explain what this question means, discuss the nature of a neutrino which is its own antiparticles, and consider how one might determine experimentally whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles or not

  13. The solar neutrinos epopee

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 year has been fruitful for the neutrino physics. First, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment has shown that the electron neutrinos nu sub e emitted by the sun are converted into muon neutrinos (nu submu) and tau neutrinos (nu subtau), thus closing the 30 years old problem of solar neutrinos deficit. This discovery validates the model of nuclear energy production inside the sun but it shakes the theory describing the weak interactions between the fundamental constituents of matter. This theory considers the neutrinos (and the photons) as massless particles, while the taste conversion phenomenon necessarily implies that neutrinos have a mass. In October 2000, the Universe exploration by the cosmic neutrinos is jointly recognized by R. Davis (USA) and M. Koshiba (Japan) who received the Nobel price of physics. Finally, in December 2000, the KamLAND experiment quantitatively demonstrated the neutrinos metamorphosis by detecting a deficit in the flux of electron antineutrinos coming from the ...

  14. 50 years of neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Goldhaber, M

    1980-01-01

    On December 4 1930, Wolfgang Pauli addressed an "open letter" to Lise Meitner and others attending a physics meeting, suggesting the neutrino as a way out of the difficulties confronted in beta rays research, especially by the existence of a continuous beta spectrum. He proposed a new particle later called the neutrino. The prehistory leading up to Pauli's letter will be reviewed, as well as the later discovery of the electron-neutrino followed by the muon-neutrino. There are now believed to be three different types of neutrino and their anti-particles. Neutrinos have a spin 1/2; but only one spin component has been found in nature: neutrinos go forward as "left-handed" screws and anti-neutrinos as "right-handed" ones. A question still not convincingly resolved today is wether neutrinos have a mass different from zero and, if they do, what consequences this would have for the behaviour of neutrinos and for cosmology.

  15. Developments in Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric and solar neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. We review the phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter. We present the existing evidence from solar and atmospheric neutrinos as well as the results from laboratory searches, including the final status of the LSND experiment. We describe the theoretical inputs that are used to interpret the experimental results in terms of neutrino oscillations. We derive the allowed ranges for the mass and mixing parameters in three frameworks: First, each set of observations is analyzed separately in a two-neutrino framework; Second, the data from solar and atmospheric neutrinos are analyzed in a three active neutrino framework; Third, the LSND results are added, and the status of accommodating all three signals in the framework of three active and one sterile light neutrinos is presented. We review the theoretical implications ...

  16. Statistical analysis of weld bead geometry in Ti6Al4V laser cladding. Comparison of central composite design and five step full factorial test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marko, Angelina [Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany); Graf, Benjamin; Rethmeier, Michael [Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany). Dept. for Joining and Coating Technology

    2017-11-01

    The process of laser cladding has become more important during recent years because of its broad application for cladding, repair or additive manufacturing. In the field of mechanical engineering, one use is the repair of turbine blades. For high quality and reliability of the repaired components, it is necessary to adjust the weld bead geometry to the specific repair task. The bead geometry influences the metallurgical bonding and the degree of dilution as well as the formation of defects like pores or cracks. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of the different parameters on the welding bead. A valuable tool to meet this industrial challenge is the design of experiments (DoE). In this context, the user can choose between a huge number of test plans. Greater profit of information is expected by a larger test range. In order to confirm the acceptance, a five-step full factorial test plan is compared to a central composite design in this paper. Moreover, the limits of the experimental range are indicated and restrictions can be derived. As the results show, the essential effects are detected with a full factorial test plan as well as with a central composite design. Merely the effect strength could not always be specified unambiguously. On this account and in consideration of cost efficiency, the use of central compound design is recommended in industrial applications.

  17. Workshop: Neutrino telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Despite being the most elusive of the known particles, neutrinos provide vital new physics insights. Most neutrino knowledge so far has come from studies using beams from reactors and accelerators, but in recent years important new contributions have resulted from investigation of natural neutrinos from cosmic rays, nearby stars (the sun), or distant sources, such as the 1987 supernova. The supernova observations marked the start of a new era in neutrino astronomy, but neutrino telescopes were anyway assured of an important ongoing role

  18. Climatic and basin factors affecting the flood frequency curve: PART II – A full sensitivity analysis based on the continuous simulation approach combined with a factorial experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Franchini

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity analysis described in Hashemi et al. (2000 is based on one-at-a-time perturbations to the model parameters. This type of analysis cannot highlight the presence of parameter interactions which might indeed affect the characteristics of the flood frequency curve (ffc even more than the individual parameters. For this reason, the effects of the parameters of the rainfall, rainfall runoff models and of the potential evapotranspiration demand on the ffc are investigated here through an analysis of the results obtained from a factorial experimental design, where all the parameters are allowed to vary simultaneously. This latter, more complex, analysis confirms the results obtained in Hashemi et al. (2000 thus making the conclusions drawn there of wider validity and not related strictly to the reference set selected. However, it is shown that two-factor interactions are present not only between different pairs of parameters of an individual model, but also between pairs of parameters of different models, such as rainfall and rainfall-runoff models, thus demonstrating the complex interaction between climate and basin characteristics affecting the ffc and in particular its curvature. Furthermore, the wider range of climatic regime behaviour produced within the factorial experimental design shows that the probability distribution of soil moisture content at the storm arrival time is no longer sufficient to explain the link between the perturbations to the parameters and their effects on the ffc, as was suggested in Hashemi et al. (2000. Other factors have to be considered, such as the probability distribution of the soil moisture capacity, and the rainfall regime, expressed through the annual maximum rainfalls over different durations. Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation; factorial experimental design; analysis of variance (ANOVA

  19. Computer experimental analysis of the CHP performance of a 100 kW e SOFC Field Unit by a factorial design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, M.; Santarelli, M. G. L.; Leone, P.

    Gas Turbine Technologies (GTT) and Politecnico di Torino, both located in Torino (Italy), have been involved in the design and installation of a SOFC laboratory in order to analyse the operation, in cogenerative configuration, of the CHP 100 kW e SOFC Field Unit, built by Siemens-Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC), which is at present (May 2005) starting its operation and which will supply electric and thermal power to the GTT factory. In order to take the better advantage from the analysis of the on-site operation, and especially to correctly design the scheduled experimental tests on the system, we developed a mathematical model and run a simulated experimental campaign, applying a rigorous statistical approach to the analysis of the results. The aim of this work is the computer experimental analysis, through a statistical methodology (2 k factorial experiments), of the CHP 100 performance. First, the mathematical model has been calibrated with the results acquired during the first CHP100 demonstration at EDB/ELSAM in Westerwoort. After, the simulated tests have been performed in the form of computer experimental session, and the measurement uncertainties have been simulated with perturbation imposed to the model independent variables. The statistical methodology used for the computer experimental analysis is the factorial design (Yates' Technique): using the ANOVA technique the effect of the main independent variables (air utilization factor U ox, fuel utilization factor U F, internal fuel and air preheating and anodic recycling flow rate) has been investigated in a rigorous manner. Analysis accounts for the effects of parameters on stack electric power, thermal recovered power, single cell voltage, cell operative temperature, consumed fuel flow and steam to carbon ratio. Each main effect and interaction effect of parameters is shown with particular attention on generated electric power and stack heat recovered.

  20. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  1. Neutrino physics with SHIP

    CERN Document Server

    van Herwijnen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    SHIP is a new general purpose fixed target facility, whose Technical Proposal has been recently reviewed by the CERN SPS Committee. It recommended that the experiment proceed further to a Comprehensive Design phase. In its initial phase, the 400 GeV proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating 2×1020 POT (Protons On Target) in 5 years. A dedicated detector, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below O(10) GeV/c 2 . The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals. The sensitivity to Heavy Neutrinos will allow to probe for the first time the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, and a range of couplings for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained. Another dedicated detector will allow the study of neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions. ντ ...

  2. Tamarind seed gum-hydrolyzed polymethacrylamide-g-gellan beads for extended release of diclofenac sodium using 32full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Gouranga; Nandi, Amit Kumar; Khan, Najim Sarif; Pal, Souvik; Dey, Sibasish

    2018-03-19

    Development of tamarind seed gum (TSG)-hydrolyzed polymethacrylamide-g-gellan (h-Pmaa-g-GG) composite beads for extended release of diclofenac sodium using 3 2 full factorial design is the main purpose of this study. The ratio of h-Pmaa-g-GG and TSG and concentration of cross-linker CaCl 2 were taken as independent factors with three different levels of each. Effects of polymer ratio and CaCl 2 on drug entrapment efficiency (DEE), drug release, bead size and swelling were investigated. Responses such as DEE and different drug release parameters were statistically analyzed by 3 2 full factorial design using Design-Expert software and finally the formulation factors were optimized to obtain USP-reference release profile. Drug release rate was found to decrease with decrease in the ratio of h-Pmaa-g-GG:TSG and increase in the concentration of Ca 2+ ions in cross-linking medium. The optimized formulation showed DEE of 93.25% and an extended drug release profile over a period of 10h with f 2 =80.13. Kinetic modeling unveiled case-I-Fickian diffusion based drug release mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and Validation of HPLC-DAD and UHPLC-DAD Methods for the Simultaneous Determination of Guanylhydrazone Derivatives Employing a Factorial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo de Brito, Wanessa; Gomes Dantas, Monique; Andrade Nogueira, Fernando Henrique; Ferreira da Silva-Júnior, Edeildo; Xavier de Araújo-Júnior, João; Aquino, Thiago Mendonça de; Adélia Nogueira Ribeiro, Êurica; da Silva Solon, Lilian Grace; Soares Aragão, Cícero Flávio; Barreto Gomes, Ana Paula

    2017-08-30

    Guanylhydrazones are molecules with great pharmacological potential in various therapeutic areas, including antitumoral activity. Factorial design is an excellent tool in the optimization of a chromatographic method, because it is possible quickly change factors such as temperature, mobile phase composition, mobile phase pH, column length, among others to establish the optimal conditions of analysis. The aim of the present work was to develop and validate a HPLC and UHPLC methods for the simultaneous determination of guanylhydrazones with anticancer activity employing experimental design. Precise, exact, linear and robust HPLC and UHPLC methods were developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of the guanylhydrazones LQM10, LQM14, and LQM17. The UHPLC method was more economic, with a four times less solvent consumption, and 20 times less injection volume, what allowed better column performance. Comparing the empirical approach employed in the HPLC method development to the DoE approach employed in the UHPLC method development, we can conclude that the factorial design made the method development faster, more practical and rational. This resulted in methods that can be employed in the analysis, evaluation and quality control of these new synthetic guanylhydrazones.

  4. New CP Violation in Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Gusso, A.; Nir, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of CP-violating observables in neutrino oscillation experiments have been studied in the literature as a way to determine the CP-violating phase in the mixing matrix for leptons. Here we show that such observables also probe new neutrino interactions in the production or detection processes. Genuine CP violation and fake CP violation due to matter effects are sensitive to the imaginary and real parts of new couplings. The dependence of the CP asymmetry on source-detector distance is different from the standard one and, in particular, enhanced at short distances. We estimate that future neutrino factories will be able to probe in this way new interactions that are up to four orders of magnitude weaker than the weak interactions. We discuss the possible implications for models of new physics.

  5. The removal of the indigo carmine dye from aqueous solutions using cross-linked chitosan-Evaluation of adsorption thermodynamics using a full factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cestari, Antonio R. [Laboratory of Materials and Calorimetry, Departamento de Quimica/CCET, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, CEP 49100-000, Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil)], E-mail: cestari@ufs.br; Vieira, Eunice F.S.; Tavares, Andrea M.G. [Laboratory of Materials and Calorimetry, Departamento de Quimica/CCET, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, CEP 49100-000, Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Bruns, Roy E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Quimica, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-05-01

    A 2{sup 3} factorial design was employed to evaluate the quantitative removal of the indigo carmine (IC) dye from aqueous solutions on glutaraldehyde cross-linked chitosan. The variables were chitosan masses of 100 and 300 mg, IC concentrations of 2.0 and 5.0 x 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1} and temperatures of 25 and 35 deg. C. The quantitative and energetic adsorption parameters were analyzed statistically using modeling with bilinear equations. The results indicated that increasing the chitosan mass from 100 to 300 mg decreases the IC adsorption/mass ratio (mol g{sup -1}) whereas a temperature increase of 25-35 deg. C increases it. The principal effect of the IC concentration did not show statistical significance. The factorial experiments demonstrate the existence of a significant antagonistic interaction effect between the chitosan mass and temperature. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters, namely {delta}{sub ads}H, {delta}{sub ads}G, and {delta}{sub ads}S, were determined for all the factorial design results. Endothermic values were found in relation to the {delta}{sub ads}H. The positive {delta}{sub ads}S values indicate that entropy is a driving force for adsorption. The {delta}{sub ads}G values are also significantly affected by important antagonistic and synergistic effects involving all principal and interactive factors. It is concluded that the thermodynamical spontaneity of the IC adsorption parameters are greatly influenced by the interactive factors and not by the temperature changes alone.

  6. Neutrino Pair Cerenkov Radiation for Tachyonic Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich D. Jentschura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission of a charged light lepton pair by a superluminal neutrino has been identified as a major factor in the energy loss of highly energetic neutrinos. The observation of PeV neutrinos by IceCube implies their stability against lepton pair Cerenkov radiation. Under the assumption of a Lorentz-violating dispersion relation for highly energetic superluminal neutrinos, one may thus constrain the Lorentz-violating parameters. A kinematically different situation arises when one assumes a Lorentz-covariant, space-like dispersion relation for hypothetical tachyonic neutrinos, as an alternative to Lorentz-violating theories. We here discuss a hitherto neglected decay process, where a highly energetic tachyonic neutrino may emit other (space-like, tachyonic neutrino pairs. We find that the space-like dispersion relation implies the absence of a q2 threshold for the production of a tachyonic neutrino-antineutrino pair, thus leading to the dominant additional energy loss mechanism for an oncoming tachyonic neutrino in the medium-energy domain. Surprisingly, the small absolute values of the decay rate and energy loss rate in the tachyonic model imply that these models, in contrast to the Lorentz-violating theories, are not pressured by the cosmic PeV neutrinos registered by the IceCube collaboration.

  7. Molybdenum solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, K.; Cowan, G.A.; Bryant, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of the molybdenum solar neutrino experiment is to deduce the 8 B solar neutrino flux, averaged over the past several million years, from the concentration of 98 Tc in a deeply buried molybdenum deposit. The experiment is important to an understanding of stellar processes because it will shed light on the reason for the discrepancy between theory and observation of the chlorine solar neutrino experiment. Possible reasons for the discrepancy may lie in the properties of neutrinos (neutrino oscillations or massive neutrinos) or in deficiencies of the standard solar model. The chlorine experiment only measures the 8 B neutrino flux in current times and does not address possible temporal variations in the interior of the sun, which are also not considered in the standard model. In the molybdenum experiment, we plan to measure 98 Tc (4.2 Myr), also produced by 8 B neutrinos, and possibly 97 Tc (2.6 Myr), produced by lower energy neutrinos

  8. The physics of neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, Vernon D; Whisnant, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    The physics of neutrinos- uncharged elementary particles that are key to helping us better understand the nature of our universe - is one of the most exciting frontiers of modern science. This book provides a comprehensive overview of neutrino physics today and explores promising new avenues of inquiry that could lead to future breakthroughs. The Physics of Neutrinos begins with a concise history of the field and a tutorial on the fundamental properties of neutrinos, and goes on to discuss how the three neutrino types interchange identities as they propagate from their sources to detectors. The book shows how studies of neutrinos produced by such phenomena as cosmic rays in the atmosphere and nuclear reactions in the solar interior provide striking evidence that neutrinos have mass, and it traces our astounding progress in deciphering the baffling experimental findings involving neutrinos. The discovery of neutrino mass offers the first indication of a new kind of physics that goes beyond the Standard Model ...

  9. Sterile neutrinos in cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.

    2017-11-01

    Sterile neutrinos are natural extensions to the standard model of particle physics in neutrino mass generation mechanisms. If they are relatively light, less than approximately 10 keV, they can alter cosmology significantly, from the early Universe to the matter and radiation energy density today. Here, we review the cosmological role such light sterile neutrinos can play from the early Universe, including production of keV-scale sterile neutrinos as dark matter candidates, and dynamics of light eV-scale sterile neutrinos during the weakly-coupled active neutrino era. We review proposed signatures of light sterile neutrinos in cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data. We also discuss keV-scale sterile neutrino dark matter decay signatures in X-ray observations, including recent candidate ∼3.5 keV X-ray line detections consistent with the decay of a ∼7 keV sterile neutrino dark matter particle.

  10. Neutrino properties and fundamental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There are two components to this work. The first is a development of a new detection scheme for neutrinos. The observed deficit of neutrinos from the Sun may be due to either a lack of understanding of physical processes in the Sun or may be due to neutrinos oscillating from one type to another during their transit from the Sun to the Earth. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is designed to use a water Cerenkov detector employing one thousand tonnes of heavy water to resolve this question. The ability to distinguish muon and tau neutrinos from electron neutrinos is crucial in order to carry out a model-independent test of neutrino oscillations. We describe a developmental exploration of a novel technique to do this using 3 He proportional counters. Such a method offers considerable advantages over the initially proposed method of using Cerenkov light from capture on NaCl in the SNO. The second component of this work is an exploration of optimal detector geometry for a time-reversal invariance experiment. The question of why time moves only in the forward direction is one of the most puzzling problems in modern physics. We know from particle physics measurements of the decay of kaons that there is a charge-parity symmetry that is violated in nature, implying time-reversal invariance violation. Yet, we do not understand the origin of the violation of this symmetry. To promote such an understanding, we are developing concepts and prototype apparatus for a new, highly sensitive technique to search for time-reversal-invariance violation in the beta decay of the free neutron. The optimized detector geometry is seven times more sensitive than that in previous experiments. 15 refs

  11. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    NAKAHATA, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the “solar neutrino problem”. Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consis...

  12. Optimization and influence of parameter affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate: using full factorial design approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Thulasirajan; Purushothaman, Revathi

    2017-07-01

    There are several parameters that influence the properties of geopolymer concrete, which contains recycled concrete aggregate as the coarse aggregate. In the present study, the vital parameters affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate are analyzedby varying four parameters with two levels using full factorial design in statistical software Minitab® 17. The objective of the present work is to gain an idea on the optimization, main parameter effects, their interactions and the predicted response of the model generated using factorial design. The parameters such as molarity of sodium hydroxide (8M and 12M), curing time (6hrs and 24 hrs), curing temperature (60°C and 90°C) and percentage of recycled concrete aggregate (0% and 100%) are considered. The results show that the curing time, molarity of sodium hydroxide and curing temperature were the orderly significant parameters and the percentage of Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was statistically insignificant in the production of geopolymer concrete. Thus, it may be noticeable that the RCA content had negligible effect on the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. The expected responses from the generated model showed a satisfactory and rational agreement to the experimental data with the R2 value of 97.70%. Thus, geopolymer concrete comprising recycled concrete aggregate can solve the major social and environmental concerns such as the depletion of the naturally available aggregate sources and disposal of construction and demolition waste into the landfill.

  13. The Use of a Fractional Factorial Design to Determine the Factors That Impact 1,3-Propanediol Production from Glycerol by Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Kalia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, biodiesel, a substitute for fossil fuels, has led to the excessive production of crude glycerol. The resulting crude glycerol can possess a high concentration of salts and an alkaline pH. Moreover, current crude glycerol purification methods are expensive, rendering this former commodity a waste product. However, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, a haloalkaliphilic bacterium, possesses the metabolic capability to convert glycerol into 1,3-propanediol, a valuable commodity compound, without the need for salt dilution or adjusting pH when grown on this waste. Experiments were performed with different combinations of 24 medium components to determine their impact on the production of 1,3-propanediol by using a fractional factorial design. Tested medium components were selected based on data from the organism’s genome. Analysis of HPLC data revealed enhanced production of 1,3-propanediol with additional glycerol, pH, vitamin B12, ammonium ions, sodium sulfide, cysteine, iron, and cobalt. However, other selected components; nitrate ions, phosphate ions, sulfate ions, sodium:potassium ratio, chloride, calcium, magnesium, silicon, manganese, zinc, borate, nickel, molybdenum, tungstate, copper and aluminum, did not enhance 1,3-propanediol production. The use of a fractional factorial design enabled the quick and efficient assessment of the impact of 24 different medium components on 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol from a haloalkaliphilic bacterium.

  14. The removal of Cu(II) and Co(II) from aqueous solutions using cross-linked chitosan-Evaluation by the factorial design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cestari, Antonio R.; Vieira, Eunice F.S.; Oliveira, Iataanderson A. de; Bruns, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    A 2 3 factorial design was employed to evaluate the quantitative removal of Cu(II) and Co(II) on glutaraldehyde-cross-linked chitosan from kinetic isotherms, using chitosan masses of 100 and 300 mg and temperatures of 25 and 35 deg. C. The adsorption parameters were analyzed statistically using modeling polynomial equations and a cumulative normal probability plot. The results indicated the higher quantitative preference of the chitosan for Cu(II) in relation to Co(II). Increasing the chitosan mass decreases the adsorption/mass ratio (mol g -1 ) for both metals. The principal effect of the temperature did not show statistical importance. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters, namely Δ ads H, Δ ads G and Δ ads S, were determined. Exothermic and endothermic results were found in relation to a specific factorial design experiment. A comparison of Δ ads H values was made in relation to some metal-adsorbent interactions in literature. It is suggested that the adsorption thermodynamic parameters are determined by the influence of the principal and interactive experimental parameters and not by the temperature changes alone

  15. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  16. Neutrino mass, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental approaches to neutrino mass include kinematic mass measurements, neutrino oscillation searches at rectors and accelerators, solar neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and single and double beta decay. The solar neutrino results yield fairly strong and consistent indications that neutrino oscillations are occurring. Other evidence for new physics is less consistent and convincing

  17. Neutrinos from Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborra, Irene; Murase, Kohta

    2018-02-01

    Neutrinos are fundamental particles in the collapse of massive stars. Because of their weakly interacting nature, neutrinos can travel undisturbed through the stellar core and be direct probes of the still uncertain and fascinating supernova mechanism. Intriguing recent developments on the role of neutrinos during the stellar collapse are reviewed, as well as our current understanding of the flavor conversions in the stellar envelope. The detection perspectives of the next burst and of the diffuse supernova background will be also outlined. High-energy neutrinos in the GeV-PeV range can follow the MeV neutrino emission. Various scenarios concerning the production of high-energy neutrinos are discussed.

  18. The neutrino mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannucci, F.

    2003-09-01

    The neutrino is not an elementary particle like others, it is the most stunning of all: the neutrino is undetectable by itself, we have only indirect evidences of its existence, but the neutrino is essential to explain the weak interaction, to understand why matter triumphed over anti-matter just after the Big-bang, or to solve the riddle of the hidden mass of the universe. This book is a popular work dedicated to the neutrino from its discovery in beta decays to the most recent theories such as neutrino oscillations, and via the worldwide experiments dedicated to the study of the neutrinos. (A.C.)

  19. Evidence and Search for Sterile Neutrinos at Accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Louis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The LSND short-baseline neutrino experiment has published evidence for antineutrino oscillations at a mass scale of ~1 eV2. The MiniBooNE experiment, designed to test this evidence for oscillations at an order of magnitude higher neutrino energy and distance, observes excesses of events in both neutrino mode and antineutrino mode. While the MiniBooNE neutrino excess has a neutrino energy spectrum that is softer than expected from LSND, the MiniBooNE antineutrino excess is consistent with neutrino oscillations and with the LSND oscillation signal. When combined with oscillation measurements at the solar and atmospheric mass scales, assuming that the LSND and MiniBooNE signals are due to neutrino oscillations, these experiments imply the existence of more than three neutrino mass states and, therefore, one or more sterile neutrinos. Such sterile neutrinos, if proven to exist, would have a big impact on particle physics, nuclear physics, and astrophysics and would contribute to the dark matter of the universe. Future experiments under construction or proposed at Fermilab, ORNL, CERN, and in Japan will provide a definitive test of short-baseline neutrino oscillations and will have the capability of proving the existence of sterile neutrinos.

  20. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, J; Hover, J; Love, P; Stewart, G A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  1. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J.; Hover, J.; Love, P.; Stewart, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  2. Neutrino particle astrophysics: status and outlook

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of astrophysical neutrinos at high energy by IceCube raises a host of questions: What are the sources? Is there a Galactic as well as an extragalactic component? How does the astrophysical spectrum continue to lower energy where the dominant signal is from atmospheric neutrinos? Is there a measureable flux of cosmogenic neutrinos at higher energy? What is the connection to cosmic rays? At what level and in what energy region should we expect to see evidence of the π0 decay photons that must accompany the neutrinos at production? Such questions are stimulating much theoretical activity and many multi-wavelength follow-up observations as well as driving plans for new detectors. My goal in this presentation will be to connect the neutrino data and their possible interpretations to ongoing multi-messenger observations and to the design of future detectors.

  3. Unbinned likelihood maximisation framework for neutrino clustering in Python

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coenders, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Albeit having detected an astrophysical neutrino flux with IceCube, sources of astrophysical neutrinos remain hidden up to now. A detection of a neutrino point source is a smoking gun for hadronic processes and acceleration of cosmic rays. The search for neutrino sources has many degrees of freedom, for example steady versus transient, point-like versus extended sources, et cetera. Here, we introduce a Python framework designed for unbinned likelihood maximisations as used in searches for neutrino point sources by IceCube. Implementing source scenarios in a modular way, likelihood searches on various kinds can be implemented in a user-friendly way, without sacrificing speed and memory management.

  4. Neutrino Physics at Drexel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Charles [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolinski, Michelle [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, Russell [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Our primary goal is to improve the understanding of the properties and interactions of neutrinos. We are pursuing this by means of the DUNE long-baseline and PROSPECT short-baseline neutrino experiments. For DUNE, a neutrino beam from Fermilab will be detected at the SURF facility in South Dakota, with the aim of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy (the mass ordering of neutrino flavors), and a measurement or limit on CP-violation via neutrinos. Our near-term experimental goal is to improve the characterization of the neutrino beam by measurements of muons produced as a byproduct of neutrino beam generation, to quantify the beam composition and flux. The short-range neutrino program has the aim of using the HFIR reactor at Oak Ridge as a neutrino source, with a detector placed nearby to find if there are short-distance oscillations to sterile neutrino flavors, and to resolve the 'reactor neutrino spectral anomaly' which has shown up as an unexplained 'bump' in the neutrino energy spectrum in recent experiments.

  5. Neutrino physics in the spotlight

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Following on from the Council recommendation made in Lisbon in 2006 and responding to the needs of a large community of scientists, CERN will organize the European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics workshop on 1-3 October. One of the main goals of the workshop is to start establishing a roadmap for the coherent participation of Europe in neutrino physics."The format of the workshop will consist of invited talks to present the current situation and future possibilities; unlike other workshops, 30% of the time will be reserved for discussion", explains Ewa Rondio from the organising committee. "Resources for future neutrino experiments will be difficult to acquire. A coordinated approach and the participation of a large community of interested scientists are undoubtedly crucial factors". The workshop will be the opportunity to highlight the areas where substantial research and development activities are required in order to design the facilities of the next decade. "The w...

  6. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, A J

    2001-01-01

    Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are presented from preliminary analyses. Based on energy, direction and location, the data in the region of interest appear to be dominated by sup 8 B solar neutrinos, detected by the charged current reaction on deuterium and elastic scattering from electrons, with very little background. Measurements of radioactive backgrounds indicate that the measurement of all active neutrino types via the neutral current reaction on deuterium will be possible with small systematic uncertainties. Results for the fluxes observed with these reactions will be provided when further calibrations have been completed.

  7. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Stephen James [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting Δm232 = (2.32-0.08+0.12) x 10-3 eV2/c4 and the mixing angle sin2(2θ32) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2σ and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0σ.

  8. Interim Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S.; Goswami, S.; Berg, J.S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Souchlas, N.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Benedetto, E.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Martini, M.; Prior, G.; Ballett, P.; Pascoli, S.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; Neuffer, D.; Parke, S.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Blondel, A.; Dufour, F.; Laing, A.; Soler, F.J.P; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Dornan, P.; Eccleston, R.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Bogacz, A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Bhattacharya, S.; Majumdar, D.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Zisman, M.; Cline, D.; Stratakis, D.; Ding, X.; Coloma, P.; Donini, A.; Gavela, B.; Lopez Pavon, J.; Maltoni, M.; Bromberg, C.; Bonesini, M.; Hart, T.; Kudenko, Y.; Mondal, N.; Antusch, S.; Blennow, M.; Ota, T.; Abrams, R.J.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Beard, K.B.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; Migliozzi, P.; Palladino, V.; de Gouvea, A.; Graves, V.B.; Kuno, Y.; Peltoniemi, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Witte, H.; Mezzetto, M.; Rigolin, S.; McDonald, K.T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.; Snopok, P.; Tortora, L.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, R.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Thomason, J.W.G.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Samulyak, R.; Mishra, S.R.; Petti, R.; Dracos, M.; Yasuda, O.; Agarwalla, S.K.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hernandez, P.; Li, T.; Martin-Albo, J.; Huber, P.; Back, J.; Barker, G.; Harrison, P.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.

    2011-01-01

    The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) was established by the community at the ninth "International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, super-beams, and beta- beams" which was held in Okayama in August 2007. The IDS-NF mandate is to deliver the Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility on the timescale of 2012/13. In addition, the mandate for the study [3] requires an Interim Design Report to be delivered midway through the project as a step on the way to the RDR. This document, the IDR, has two functions: it marks the point in the IDS-NF at which the emphasis turns to the engineering studies required to deliver the RDR and it documents baseline concepts for the accelerator complex, the neutrino detectors, and the instrumentation systems. The IDS-NF is, in essence, a site-independent study. Example sites, CERN, FNAL, and RAL, have been identified to allow site-specific issues to be addressed in the cost analysis that will be presented in the RDR. The choice of example sites shou...

  9. Electromagnetic Properties of Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Broggini

    2012-01-01

    theoretical predictions. We discuss also the phenomenology of a neutrino charge radius and radiative decay. Finally, we describe the theory of neutrino spin and spin-flavor precession in a transverse magnetic field and we summarize its phenomenological applications.

  10. Ghost basis for neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novello, M.

    1976-07-01

    A class of solutions of DIRAC'S equation in gravitational fields for ghost neutrinos is given. Comments are restricted to the neutrino cosmological model recently found by M. Novello e I.D. Soares [pt

  11. The Neutrinos Saga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Souchere, Marie-Christine de; Moran, John

    2009-04-01

    The author proposes a history of the discovery and study of neutrinos. This history starts shortly after the discovery of radioactivity in 1896 with the observation of an inhomogeneous deceleration of electrons in the radioactive source which raised an issue of shortage of energy. Pauli then introduced the idea of a ghost particle which could preserve the principle of energy conservation and also the issue of statistics related to the laws of quantum mechanics. Works by the Joliot-Curies and Chadwick resulted in the identification of a neutral particle, first called a neutron, and then neutrino. The author then reports experiments performed to highlight neutrinos, and to identify different forms of neutrinos: muon, tau, lepton. She also addresses questions raised by solar neutrinos, experiments proving the metamorphosis of electron neutrinos into muon neutrinos. She discusses the interest of neutrino as cosmic messengers as they are emitted by various cosmic events, and also as a way to study dark matter

  12. Neutrino Physics and JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednyakov, V.A.; Naumov, D.V.; Smirnov, O.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The current status of neutrino physics is briefly reviewed, the basic properties of the neutrino are discussed, and the currently most challenging problems in this rapidly developing field are described. Written to mark the anniversary of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, this paper highlights JINR's contributions to the development of the neutrino physics and places special emphasis on the prospects of the JINR neutrino program. [ru

  13. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understa...

  14. Again on neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilenky, S.M.; Pontecorvo, B.

    1976-01-01

    The general case is treated of a weak interaction theory in which a term violating lepton charges is present. In such a scheme the particles with definite masses are Majorana neutrinos (2N if in the weak interaction participate N four-component neutrinos). Neutrino oscillations are discussed and it is shown that the minimum average intensity at the earth of solar neutrinos is 1/2N of the intensity expected when oscillations are absent

  15. Polymeric nanoparticles loaded with the 3,5,3´-triiodothyroacetic acid (Triac, a thyroid hormone: factorial design, characterization, and release kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dos Santos KC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Karen C dos Santos,1 Maria Fatima GF da Silva,1 Edenir R Pereira-Filho,1 Joao B Fernandes,1 Igor Polikarpov,2 Moacir R Forim11Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, 2Physics Institute of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo, BrazilAbstract: This present investigation deals with the development and optimization of polymeric nanoparticle systems loaded with 3,5,3´-triiodothyroacetic acid (Triac. A 211–6 fractional factorial design and another 22 factorial design were used to study the contrasts on particle size distribution, morphology, surface charge, drug content, entrapment efficiency, and in vitro drug release profiles. The independent variables were the concentration of Triac, type and quantity of both polymer and oil, quantity of Span™ 60 and Tween® 80, volume of solvent and water, and velocity of both magnetic stirring and the transfer of the organic phase into the aqueous solution. The results of optimized formulations showed a narrow size distribution with a polydispersity index lower than 0.200. The particle sizes were on average 159.6 nm and 285.6 nm for nanospheres and nanocapsules, respectively. The zeta potential was higher than 20 mV (in module and the entrapment efficiency was nearly 100%. A high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed, validated, and efficiently applied to Triac quantification in colloidal suspension. The main independent variables were the type and quantity of the polymer and oil. In vitro drug release profile depicted several features to sustain Triac release. Different formulations showed various release rates indicating an interaction between Triac and other formulation compounds such as polymer and/or oil quantity. Two different models were identified (biexponential and monoexponential that allowed the control of both the release rate and Triac concentration. Thus, the prepared nanoparticles described here may be of clinical importance

  16. Technology Development for a Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory

  17. Results from atmospheric neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the super-Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino anomaly moved from a possible indication for neutrino oscillations to an apparently inescapable fact. The evidence is reviewed, and new ...

  18. The Tau neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugge, Lars; Ould-Saada, Faris

    2001-01-01

    In the summer 2000 the first direct demonstration of the Tau neutrino was announced. After describing some Physical history lines emphasizing the development of the Neutrino Physics, the article describes the experiment which lead to the direct discovery of the Tau neutrino

  19. Solar neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    The special properties of solar neutrinos that render this flux so uniquely important in searches for neutrino masses and flavor mixing are reviewed. The effects of matter, including density fluctuations and turbulence, on solar neutrino oscillations are explained through analogies with more familiar atomic physics phenomena

  20. Results from atmospheric neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the super-Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino anomaly moved from a possible indication for neutrino oscillations to an apparently inescapable fact. The evidence is reviewed, and new indications ...

  1. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Q. R. Ahmad, R. C. Allen, T. C. Andersen, J. D. Anglin, G. Bühler, J. C. Barton, E. W. Beier, M. Bercovitch, J. Bigu, S. Biller, R. A. Black, I. Blevis, R. J. Boardman, J. Boger, E. Bonvin, M. G. Boulay, M. G. Bowler, T. J. Bowles, S. J. Brice, M. C. Browne, T. V. Bullard, T. H. Burritt, K. Cameron, J. Cameron, Y. D. Chan, M. Chen, H. H. Chen, X. Chen, M. C. Chon, B. T. Cleveland, E. T. H. Clifford, J. H. M. Cowan, D. F. Cowen, G. A. Cox, Y. Dai, X. Dai, F. Dalnoki-Veress, W. F. Davidson, P. J. Doe, G. Doucas, M. R. Dragowsky, C. A. Duba, F. A. Duncan, J. Dunmore, E. D. Earle, S. R. Elliott, H. C. Evans, G. T. Ewan, J. Farine, H. Fergani, A. P. Ferraris, R. J. Ford, M. M. Fowler, K. Frame, E. D. Frank, W. Frati, J. V. Germani, S. Gil, A. Goldschmidt, D. R. Grant, R. L. Hahn, A. L. Hallin, E. D. Hallman, A. Hamer, A. A. Hamian, R. U. Haq, C. K. Hargrove, P. J. Harvey, R. Hazama, R. Heaton, K. M. Heeger, W. J. Heintzelman, J. Heise, R. L. Helmer, J. D. Hepburn, H. Heron, J. Hewett, A. Hime, M. Howe, J. G. Hykawy, M. C. P. Isaac, P. Jagam, N. A. Jelley, C. Jillings, G. Jonkmans, J. Karn, P. T. Keener, K. Kirch, J. R. Klein, A. B. Knox, R. J. Komar, R. Kouzes, T. Kutter, C. C. M. Kyba, J. Law, I. T. Lawson, M. Lay, H. W. Lee, K. T. Lesko, J. R. Leslie, I. Levine, W. Locke, M. M. Lowry, S. Luoma, J. Lyon, S. Majerus, H. B. Mak, A. D. Marino, N. McCauley, A. B. McDonald, D. S. McDonald, K. McFarlane, G. McGregor, W. McLatchie, R. Meijer Drees, H. Mes, C. Mifflin, G. G. Miller, G. Milton, B. A. Moffat, M. Moorhead, C. W. Nally, M. S. Neubauer, F. M. Newcomer, H. S. Ng, A. J. Noble, E. B. Norman, V. M. Novikov, M. O'Neill, C. E. Okada, R. W. Ollerhead, M. Omori, J. L. Orrell, S. M. Oser, A. W. P. Poon, T. J. Radcliffe, A. Roberge, B. C. Robertson, R. G. H. Robertson, J. K. Rowley, V. L. Rusu, E. Saettler, K. K. Schaffer, A. Schuelke, M. H. Schwendener, H. Seifert, M. Shatkay, J. J. Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, A. R. Smith, M. W. E. Smith, N. Starinsky, T. D. Steiger, R. G. Stokstad, R. S. Storey, B. Sur, R. Tafirout, N. Tagg, N. W. Tanner, R. K. Taplin, M. Thorman, P. Thornewell, P. T. Trent, Y. I. Tserkovnyak, R. Van Berg, R. G. Van de Water, C. J. Virtue, C. E. Waltham, J.-X. Wang, D. L. Wark, N. West, J. B. Wilhelmy, J. F. Wilkerson, J. Wilson, P. Wittich, J. M. Wouters, and M. Yeh

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  2. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Q.R.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen, T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Buhler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Clifford, E.T.H.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar, R.J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A.D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, D.S.; McDonald, A.B.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer, R.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, G.G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B.A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; Newcomer, F.M.; Ng, H.S.; Noble, A.J.; Norman, E.B.; Novikov, V.M.; O'Neill, M.; Okada, C.E.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J.L.; Oser, S.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Radcliffe, T.J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rosendahl, S.S.E.; Rowley, J.K.; Rusu, V.L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K.K.; Schwendener, M.H.; Schulke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J.J.; Sims, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D 2 O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar ν e flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of 8 B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to ν e , the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to ν μ and ν τ . In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from 8 B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The ν e flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3σ. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to ν e , in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active 8 B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions

  3. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Q.R.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen, T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Barton,J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler,M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Buhler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Clifford, E.T.H.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky,M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac,M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar, R.J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter,T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A.D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,D.S.; McDonald, A.B.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer, R.; Mifflin,C.; Miller, G.G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B.A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; Newcomer, F.M.; Ng, H.S.; Noble, A.J.; Norman, E.B.; Novikov, V.M.; O' Neill, M.; Okada, C.E.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J.L.; Oser, S.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Radcliffe, T.J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rosendahl, S.S.E.; Rowley, J.K.; Rusu, V.L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K.K.; Schwendener,M.H.; Schulke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J.J.; Sims, C.J.; et al.

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  4. Detectors and flux instrumentation for future neutrino facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Ankowski, A.; Badertscher, A.; Battistoni, G.; Blondel, A.; Bouchez, J.; Bross, A.; Bueno, A.; Camilleri, L.; Campagne, Jean-Eric; Cazes, A.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; De Lellis, G.; Di Capua, F.; Ellis, Malcolm; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Fukushima, C.; Gschwendtner, E.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Iwasaki, M.; Kaneyuki, K.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kashikhin, V.; Kawai, Y.; Komatsu, M.; Kozlovskaya, E.; Kudenko, Y.; Kusaka, A.; Kyushima, H.; Longhin, A.; Marchionni, A.; Marotta, A.; McGrew, C.; Menary, S.; Meregaglia, A.; Mezzeto, M.; Migliozzi, P.; Mondal, N.K.; Montanari, C.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakumo, H.; Nakayama, H.; Nelson, J.; Nowak, J.; Ogawa, S.; Peltoniemi, J.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Rubbia, A.; Sanchez, F.; Sarkamo, J.; Sato, O.; Selvi, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shozawa, M.; Sobczyk, J.; Soler, F.J.P.; Strolin, Paolo Emilio; Suyama, M.; Tanak, M.; Terranova, F.; Tsenov, R.; Uchida, Y.; Weber, A.; Zlobin, A.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarises the conclusions from the detector group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and Super-Beam neutrino facility. The baseline detector options for each possible neutrino beam are defined as follows: 1. A very massive (Megaton) water Cherenkov detector is the baseline option for a sub-GeV Beta Beam and Super Beam facility. 2. There are a number of possibilities for either a Beta Beam or Super Beam (SB) medium energy facility between 1-5 GeV. These include a totally active scintillating detector (TASD), a liquid argon TPC or a water Cherenkov detector. 3. A 100 kton magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND) is the baseline to detect the wrong sign muon final states (golden channel) at a high energy (20-50 GeV) neutrino factory from muon decay. A 10 kton hybrid neutrino magnetic emulsion cloud chamber detector for wrong sign tau detection (silver channel) is a possible complement to MIND, if one needs to resolve degeneracies that appear in the $\\delta$-$\\theta_{13}$...

  5. Frontiers in neutrino physics - Transparencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedov, E.; Balantekin, B.; Conrad, J.; Engel, J.; Fogli, G.; Giunti, C.; Espinoza, C.; Lasserre, T.; Lazauskas, R.; Lhuiller, D.; Lindner, M.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Martini, M.; McLaughlin, G.; Mirizzi, A.; Pehlivan, Y.; Petcov, S.; Qian, Y.; Serenelli, A.; Stancu, I.; Surman, R.; Vaananen, D.; Vissani, F.; Vogel, P.

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the presentations. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the last advances in neutrino physics. The presentations dealt with: -) the measurement of the neutrino velocity, -) neutrino oscillations, -) anomaly in solar models and neutrinos, -) double beta decay, -) self refraction of neutrinos, -) cosmic neutrinos, -) antineutrino spectra from reactors, and -) some aspects of neutrino physics with radioactive ion beams. (A.C.)

  6. The construction and uses of factorial designs in the preparation of solid dosage forms. Part 2: Granulation in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodnichev, V I; El-Banna, H M; Andreev, B V

    1981-04-01

    With the help of a factorial design of experiments, the optimum conditions for preparing aminophenazone granules in a fluidized bed were established by which high quality tablets were obtained with a minimum energy expenditure. Granules with given technological properties could be prepared by controlling the regime of the granulation process. By varying the experimental conditions, a reproducible correlation was found between the parameters of optimization (mean granule diameter and work of compression) and the factors controlling the granulation process (pressure of compressed air, velocity and temperature of fluidizing air and binder concentration). The effect of the granule quality on tablet physical properties was discussed. Recommendations were given for the exploitation of fluidized bed units in the practice of granulation and tableting.

  7. Process of chemical recycling of post-consumer PET using a factorial design; Processo de reciclagem quimica do PET pos-consumo empregando o planejamento fatorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Carlos Eduardo de O.; Almeida, Yeda Medeiros B. de; Vinhas, Gloria M., E-mail: carlos.olacerda@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated important variables in the depolymerization reaction of post-consumer poly (ethylene terephthalate) - PET via alkaline hydrolysis. Through this reaction is obtained terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer, which when purified, is used for the production of PET resin. The study was based on a 2{sup 2} factorial design in which the independent variables were the concentration of NaOH solution and the reaction time, and the dependent variable was the yield of PTA obtained. The experiments that generated the best results, 100 % of yield, were obtained with the higher values of the independent variables. Statistical analysis showed that the concentration of NaOH solution is the variable that most influences in the process. The PTA obtained was analyzed by NMR ¹H technique, confirming the strong resemblance to commercial PTA obtained by petrochemical way. (author)

  8. Study of castor oil polyurethane - poly(methyl methacrylate semi-interpenetrating polymer network (SIPN reaction parameters using a 2³ factorial experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Oliveira Vieira da Cunha

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work was employed a 2³ factorial experiment design to evaluate the castor oil polyurethane-poly(methyl methacrylate semi-IPN synthesis. The reaction parameters used as independent variables were NCO/OH molar ratio, polyurethane polymerization time and methyl methacrylate (MMA content. The semi-IPNs were cured over 28 h using two thermal treatments. The polymers were characterized by infrared and Raman spectroscopy, thermal analysis and swelling profiles in n-hexane. The glass transition temperature (Tg and the swelling were more affect by the NCO/OH molar ratio variation. The semi-IPNs showed Tg from - 27 to - 6 °C and the swelling range was from 3 to 22%, according to the crosslink density. The IPN mechanical properties were dependent on the cure temperature and MMA content in it. Lower elastic modulus values were observed in IPNs cured at room temperature.

  9. Quadrados latinos obtidos por meio de técnicas de confundimento em ensaios fatoriais Latin squares obtained by confounding techiniques in factorial designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Stolf Nogueira

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Os esquemas em quadrado latino tem se mostrado muito úteis na experimentação agronômica e zootécnica. O modo de obtenção dos quadrados latinos em geral segue regras algébricas de construção a partir de operações básicas sobre o conjunto de números inteiros positivos, mais especificamente, sobre as classes de resto módulo (m. Da mesma forma, considerando um ensaio instalado em esquema fatorial, ao se usar a técnica do confundimento, formam-se tantos quadrados latinos ortogonais quantos forem os níveis de tratamento. Tais esquemas conduzem a repetições ortogonais de quadrados latinos. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho é abordar a aplicação desta técnica de modo a facilitar o planejamento. É apresentado um exemplo de um ensaio fatorial 3 x 3 x 3 sem repetições.Latin square designs have been very useful in agriculture and animal sciences. They are, in general, obtained following algebrical rules from basic operations for positive integers and the m-modular number system. In this way, from an experiment installed in a factorial scheme, it is possible to obtain as many latin squares as the levels of treatments, through the use of a confounding technique. These schemes lead to orthogonal replications of latin squares. The aim of this work was to evaluate this technique in order to facilitate plannings. An example of a 3 x 3 x 3 factorial design without replications is presented.

  10. Factorial experimental design for the culture of human embryonic stem cells as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors reveals the potential for interaction effects between bioprocess parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Megan M; Meng, Guoliang; Rancourt, Derrick E; Gates, Ian D; Kallos, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Traditional optimization of culture parameters for the large-scale culture of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as aggregates is carried out in a stepwise manner whereby the effect of varying each culture parameter is investigated individually. However, as evidenced by the wide range of published protocols and culture performance indicators (growth rates, pluripotency marker expression, etc.), there is a lack of systematic investigation into the true effect of varying culture parameters especially with respect to potential interactions between culture variables. Here we describe the design and execution of a two-parameter, three-level (3(2)) factorial experiment resulting in nine conditions that were run in duplicate 125-mL stirred suspension bioreactors. The two parameters investigated here were inoculation density and agitation rate, which are easily controlled, but currently, poorly characterized. Cell readouts analyzed included fold expansion, maximum density, and exponential growth rate. Our results reveal that the choice of best case culture parameters was dependent on which cell property was chosen as the primary output variable. Subsequent statistical analyses via two-way analysis of variance indicated significant interaction effects between inoculation density and agitation rate specifically in the case of exponential growth rates. Results indicate that stepwise optimization has the potential to miss out on the true optimal case. In addition, choosing an optimum condition for a culture output of interest from the factorial design yielded similar results when repeated with the same cell line indicating reproducibility. We finally validated that human ESCs remain pluripotent in suspension culture as aggregates under our optimal conditions and maintain their differentiation capabilities as well as a stable karyotype and strong expression levels of specific human ESC markers over several passages in suspension bioreactors.

  11. Influence of the Formulation Parameters on the Particle Size and Encapsulation Efficiency of Resveratrol in PLA and PLA-PEG Blend Nanoparticles: A Factorial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Gabriela da Rocha; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Khalil, Najeh Maissar; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara

    2015-12-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles are colloidal systems that promote protection and modification of physicochemical characteristics of a drug and that also ensure controlled and extended drug release. This paper reports a 2(3) factorial design study to optimize poly(lactide) (PLA) and poly(lactide)-polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG) blend nanoparticles containing resveratrol (RVT) for prolonged release. The independent variables analyzed were solvent composition, surfactant concentration and ratio of aqueous to organic phase (two levels each factor). Mean particle size and RVT encapsulation efficiency were set as the dependent variables. The selected optimized parameters were set as organic phase comprised of a mixture of dichloromethane and ethyl acetate, 1% of surfactant polyvinyl alcohol and a 3:1 ratio of aqueous to organic phase, for both PLA and PLA-PEG blend nanoparticles. This formulation originated nanoparticles with size of 228 ± 10 nm and 185 ± 70 nm and RVT encapsulation efficiency of 82 ± 10% and 76 ± 7% for PLA and PLA-PEG blend nanoparticles, respectively. The in vitro release study showed a biphasic pattern with prolonged RVT release and PEG did not influence the RVT release. The in vitro release data were in favor of Higuchi-diffusion kinetics for both nanoformulations and the Kossmeyer-Peppas coefficient indicated that anomalous transport was the main release mechanism of RVT. PLA and PLA-PEG blend nanoparticles produced with single emulsion-solvent evaporation technology were found to be a promising approach for the incorporation of RVT and promoted its controlled release. The factorial design is a tool of great value in choosing formulations with optimized parameters.

  12. High energy neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Masip, M.

    2018-01-01

    We describe several components in the diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos reaching the Earth and discuss whether they could explain IceCube's observations. Then we focus on TeV neutrinos from the Sun. We show that this solar neutrino flux is correlated with the cosmic-ray shadow of the Sun measured by HAWC, and we find that it is much larger than the flux of atmospheric neutrinos. Stars like our Sun provide neutrinos with a very steep spectrum and no associated gammas. We argue that this is...

  13. Geo-neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    L. Ludhova

    2012-01-01

    Geo-neutrinos, electron anti-neutrinos produced in β-decays of naturally occurring radioactive isotopes in the Earth, are a unique direct probe of our planet's interior. After a brief introduction about the Earth (mostly for physicists) and the very basics about the neutrinos and anti-neutrinos (mostly for geologists), I describe the geo-neutrinos' properties and the main aims of their study. An overview of the latest experimental results obtained by KamLand and Borexino experiments is provid...

  14. Neutrinos (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The neutrino, the lightest and most weakly interacting particle of the Standard Model has revealed itself as the messenger of very exciting news in particle physics: there is Physics Beyond the Standard Model. All this thanks to the quantum-mechanical phenomenon of flavour oscillations which is intrinsically connected to the question of neutrino mass and which has been observed in neutrinos produced in natural sources, like the Sun and the Earth's atmosphere, as well as with human made neutrino beams at accelerator and reactors. The purpose of these lectures is to overview some aspects of the phenomenology of massive neutrinos. I will present the simplest extensions for adding neutrino masses to the SM, and then I will describe the phenomenology associated with neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter and its present signatures.

  15. Properties of neutrinos: Recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in experimental determinations of the properties of neutrinos is summarized. In particular, the extensive work on direct kinematic measurements of neutrino mass, on neutrino counting and on neutrino oscillations is highlighted. It is concluded that there may already be sufficient information to fix the masses of the neutrinos, but the evidence is still far from convincing. 63 refs., 13 figs

  16. Neutrino physics with JUNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Buizza Avanzini, Margherita; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Hervé; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cécile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Möllenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M.; McDonough, William F.; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Björn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frédéric; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2016-03-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) as a primary physics goal. The excellent energy resolution and the large fiducial volume anticipated for the JUNO detector offer exciting opportunities for addressing many important topics in neutrino and astro-particle physics. In this document, we present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. Following an introduction summarizing the current status and open issues in neutrino physics, we discuss how the detection of antineutrinos generated by a cluster of nuclear power plants allows the determination of the neutrino MH at a 3-4σ significance with six years of running of JUNO. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum with excellent energy resolution will also lead to the precise determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters {{sin}}2{θ }12, {{Δ }}{m}212, and | {{Δ }}{m}{ee}2| to an accuracy of better than 1%, which will play a crucial role in the future unitarity test of the MNSP matrix. The JUNO detector is capable of observing not only antineutrinos from the power plants, but also neutrinos/antineutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and solar neutrinos. As a result of JUNO's large size, excellent energy resolution, and vertex reconstruction capability, interesting new data on these topics can be collected. For example, a neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at a distance of 10 kpc would lead to ˜5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ˜2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton ES events in JUNO, which are of crucial importance for understanding the mechanism of supernova explosion and for exploring novel phenomena such as collective neutrino oscillations

  17. The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martineau-Huynh, Olivier; Bustamante, Mauricio; Carvalho, Washington

    2017-01-01

    The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND) is a planned array of ~200 000 radio antennas deployed over ~200 000 km2 in a mountainous site. It aims primarly at detecting high-energy neutrinos via the observation of extensive air showers induced by the decay in the atmosphere of taus prod...... per year are expected for the standard models. The instrument will also detect UHECRs and possibly FRBs. Here we show how our preliminary design should enable us to reach our sensitivity goals, and discuss the steps to be taken to achieve GRAND.......The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND) is a planned array of ~200 000 radio antennas deployed over ~200 000 km2 in a mountainous site. It aims primarly at detecting high-energy neutrinos via the observation of extensive air showers induced by the decay in the atmosphere of taus...... produced by the interaction of cosmic neutrinos under the Earth surface. GRAND aims at reaching a neutrino sensitivity of 5.10$^{11}$ E$^{-2}$ GeV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$sr$^{-1}$ above 3.10$^{16}$ eV. This ensures the detection of cosmogenic neutrinos in the most pessimistic source models, and ~50 events...

  18. Looking for Exotica at the B Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Gagan B.

    2007-01-25

    Current experiments at the B factories, designed to perform precision measurements of matter-antimatter asymmetry in the B meson system, have a much broader physics reach especially in the sector of quarkonium spectroscopy. Here we present a minireview on the new charmonium-like states observed at the B factories including the X(3872) and Y(4260).

  19. Factorial design for the evaluation of the interaction effect between particle size and heating rate in the kinetic energy of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Ivonete; Silva, Eugenio A.G.; Mortari, Daniela A.; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Milioli, Fernando E. [University of Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Engineering School. Group of Thermal and Fluids Engineering], Emails: iavila@sc.usp.br, eugenio.silva@usp.br, paulam@sc.usp.br, milioli@sc.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper evaluates the behavior of kinetic energy for different heating rates ({alpha}) and particle sizes of the material in the study of the coal combustion process. It aims to obtain a response surface in a large range of particle size, using heating rates between the minimum and maximum values allowed by the equipment. Therefore it searches for a model to evaluate the interaction effect between particle size and the heating rate and to predict the activation energy of the process studied. The activation energy of the process was determined using the isoconversional model Model Free Kinetics. In this model, the activation energy (E{sub {alpha}}) is obtained as a function of the reaction extent ({alpha}). The subscript in E{sub {alpha}} designates the values related to a given value of conversion ({alpha}). All experiments were conducted in thermogravimetric balance using samples of a Brazilian coal (EC4500) witch average particle size between 163 to 650 {mu}m and heating rates between 10 and 40 deg C min{sup -1} in dynamic atmosphere of air. A central rotatable composite design was applied for the 2{sup 2} factorial design including 4 tests under the axial conditions and 3 repetitions in the central point. As expected, the results show that both the particle size and the heating rate affected significantly the values of activation energy of the coal combustion process obtained by the model used. (author)

  20. Study on effects of E-glass fiber hybrid composites enhanced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes under tensile load using full factorial design of experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musthak, Md.; Madhavi, M.; Ahsanullah, F. M.

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are attracting scientific and industrial interest by virtue of their outstanding characteristics. The present research problem deals with the fabrication and characterization of E-glass fiber composites enhanced by carbon nanotubes. In the present study, three factors with two levels are considered. Hence, the design is called 23 full factorial design of experiment. The process parameters considered for the present problem are weight of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, process to disperse nano-particles in resin, and orientation of woven fabric. In addition, their levels considered for the experiment are higher level (+1) and lower level (-1). Fabrication of E-glass fiber composites was carried out according to design, and the specimens were prepared with respect to the ASTM standards D3039-76 and tensile testing was performed. The results show that the nano-particulated composite plate can be manufactured by considering lower level nano-particles stirred with probe sonicator and plied-up with hybrid orientation.

  1. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical 37 Cl and 71 Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun

  2. Future perspectives in neutrino physics: The Laguna-LBNO case

    CERN Document Server

    Buizza Avanzini, M

    2013-01-01

    LAGUNA-LBNO is a Design Study funded by the European Commission to develop the de- sign of a deep underground neutrino observatory; its physics program involves the study of neutrino oscillations at long baselines, the investigation of the Grand Unication of elemen- tary forces and the detection of neutrinos from known and unknown astrophysical sources. Building on the successful format and on the ndings of the previous LAGUNA Design Study, LAGUNA-LBNO is more focused and is specically considering Long Baseline Neutrino Oscil- lations (LBNO) with neutrino beams from CERN. Two sites, Frejus (in France at 130 km) and Pyhasalmi (in Finland at 2300 km), are being considered. Three dierent detector technolo- gies are being studied: Water Cherenkov, Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Argon. Recently the LAGUNA-LBNO consortium has submitted an Expression of Interest for a very long baseline neutrino experiment, selecting as a rst priority the option of a Liquid Argon detector at Pyhasalmi.

  3. Transmission of neutrinos through matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Neutrinos travel through matter with negligible absorption except in very extreme situations. However, the index of refraction of neutrinos can play an important role in the oscillation of one type of neutrino to another when passing through matter.

  4. RELOCATION OF HOME APPLIANCES FACTORY BY USING SYSTEMATICAL LAYOUT PLANNING (SLP COMBINED WITH FLOW ANALYSIS AND ASSEMBLY PROCESS DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Adji Baskoro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Every manufacturing company must have experiencing building a layout. Fred.E Meyers has stated that only death and taxes are certain, there exist a third certainty-a plant layout will change, thus many methods to generate layout are established and each has its own purposes and benefits. This research focused on the design of manufacturing facilities supported by in-depth analysis of Assembly process design with a high stresses on the Systematical Layout Planning ( SLP and Flow Analysis method to facilitate an outcome of layout accordingly to the system needs. This is a real case study conducts with an objective of generating a recommendation layout for Home Appliances Company specifically for television plant

  5. Using ProModel as a simulation tools to assist plant layout design and planning: Case study plastic packaging factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochamarn Tearwattanarattikal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is about the application of a Simulation Model to assist decision making on expanding capacity and plant layout design and planning. The plant layout design concept is performed first to create the physical layouts then the simulation model used to test the capability of plant to meet various demand forecast scena. The study employed ProModel package as a tool, using the model to compare the performances in term of % utilization, characteristics of WIP and ability to meet due date. The verification and validation stages were perform before running the scenarios. The model runs daily production and then the capacity constraint resources defined by % utilization. The expanding capacity policy can be extra shift-working hours or increasing the number of machines. After expanding capacity solutions are found, the physical layout is selected based on the criterion of space available for WIP and easy flow of material.

  6. Neutrinos and dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrempp, L.

    2008-02-15

    From the observed late-time acceleration of cosmic expansion arises the quest for the nature of Dark Energy. As has been widely discussed, the cosmic neutrino background naturally qualifies for a connection with the Dark Energy sector and as a result could play a key role for the origin of cosmic acceleration. In this thesis we explore various theoretical aspects and phenomenological consequences arising from non-standard neutrino interactions, which dynamically link the cosmic neutrino background and a slowly-evolving scalar field of the dark sector. In the considered scenario, known as Neutrino Dark Energy, the complex interplay between the neutrinos and the scalar field not only allows to explain cosmic acceleration, but intriguingly, as a distinct signature, also gives rise to dynamical, time-dependent neutrino masses. In a first analysis, we thoroughly investigate an astrophysical high energy neutrino process which is sensitive to neutrino masses. We work out, both semi-analytically and numerically, the generic clear-cut signatures arising from a possible time variation of neutrino masses which we compare to the corresponding results for constant neutrino masses. Finally, we demonstrate that even for the lowest possible neutrino mass scale, it is feasible for the radio telescope LOFAR to reveal a variation of neutrino masses and therefore to probe the nature of Dark Energy within the next decade. A second independent analysis deals with the recently challenged stability of Neutrino Dark Energy against the strong growth of hydrodynamic perturbations, driven by the new scalar force felt between neutrinos. Within the framework of linear cosmological perturbation theory, we derive the equation of motion of the neutrino perturbations in a model-independent way. This equation allows to deduce an analytical stability condition which translates into a comfortable upper bound on the scalar-neutrino coupling which is determined by the ratio of the densities in cold dark

  7. Charged Particle Optics in Circular Higgs Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-26

    Similar to a super B-factory, a circular Higgs factory will require strong focusing systems near the interaction points and a low-emittance lattice in arcs to achieve a factory luminosity. At electron beam energy of 120 GeV, beamstrahlung effects during the collision pose an additional challenge to the collider design. In particular, a large momentum acceptance at 2 percent level is necessary to retain an adequate beam lifetime. This turns out to be the most challenging aspect in the design of circular Higgs factory. In this paper, an example will be provided to illustrate the beam dynamics in circular Higgs factory, emphasizing on the chromatic optics. Basic optical modules and advanced analysis will be presented. Most important, we will show that 2% momentum aperture is achievable

  8. Next generation of nucleon decay and neutrino detectors. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogli, G.L.; Covi, L.; Shiozawa, M.; Dighe, A.; Ando, S.A.; Schwetz, Th.; Nakamura, K.; Nakahata, T.; Kajita, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Jung, C.K.; Bouchez, J.; Rubbia, A.; Vagins, M.; Mondal, L.N.; Oberauer, L.; Giomataris, I.; Ianni, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Bishai, M.; Bishai, M.; Ray, R.; Lindroos, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Palladino, V.; Andreopoulos, C.; Dunmore, J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Aihara, H.; Ferenc, D.; Pouthas, J.; Birkel, M.A.; Marmonier, C.; Mosca, L.; Gerbier, G.; Jung, C.K.; Nakagawa, T.; Levy, M.; Duffaut, P.; Nakamura, K.

    2005-01-01

    This document gathers the transparencies presented at the workshop, they are divided into 5 topics: 1) physics motivation, 2) underground projects, 3) present and future neutrino beams, 4) background studies and photo-detection, and 5) large cavities and vessels. The neutrino oscillation picture is still missing 3 fundamental ingredients: the mixing angle θ 13 , the mass pattern and the CP phase δ. Future neutrino beams of conventional and novel design aimed at megaton type detector could give access to these parameters

  9. Charged Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachelrieß, M.

    2013-04-15

    High-energy neutrino astronomy has grown up, with IceCube as one of its main experiments having sufficient sensitivity to test “vanilla” models of astrophysical neutrinos. I review predictions of neutrino fluxes as well as the status of cosmic ray physics. I comment also briefly on an improvement of the Fermi-LAT limit for cosmogenic neutrinos and on the two neutrino events presented by IceCube first at “Neutrino 2012”.

  10. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  11. Factorial design optimization of experimental variables in preconcentration of carbamates pesticides in water samples using solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography-electrospray-mass spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrous El Atrache, Latifa; Ben Sghaier, Rafika; Bejaoui Kefi, Bochra; Haldys, Violette; Dachraoui, Mohamed; Tortajada, Jeanine

    2013-12-15

    An experimental design was applied for the optimization of extraction process of carbamates pesticides from surface water samples. Solid phase extraction (SPE) of carbamates compounds and their determination by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry detector were considered. A two level full factorial design 2(k) was used for selecting the variables which affected the extraction procedure. Eluent and sample volumes were statistically the most significant parameters. These significant variables were optimized using Doehlert matrix. The developed SPE method included 200mg of C-18 sorbent, 143.5 mL of water sample and 5.5 mL of acetonitrile in the elution step. For validation of the technique, accuracy, precision, detection and quantification limits, linearity, sensibility and selectivity were evaluated. Extraction recovery percentages of all the carbamates were above 90% with relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) in the range of 3-11%. The extraction method was selective and the detection and quantification limits were between 0.1 and 0.5 µg L(-1), and 1 and 3 µg L(-1), respectively. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A review of the efficacy of fixed-dose combinations olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide and amlodipine besylate/benazepril in factorial design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Allen; Chavanu, Kathleen; Merkel, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    In order to adequately control hypertension, the majority of patients will require treatment with more than one antihypertensive agent. Fixed-dose combination therapy offers several advantages, including improved efficacy, tolerability, and treatment compliance. Certain combinations have benefits in specific patient populations, such as the elderly or those with comorbidities. In this review, we evaluate the BP-lowering efficacy of olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and amlodipine besylate/benazepril in similarly designed, randomized, placebo-controlled studies in similar patient populations. This indirect comparison showed that both combinations significantly improve both systolic and diastolic BP compared with monotherapy with the individual agents or placebo; it also demonstrated that the combinations were well tolerated. Both combination therapies significantly improved response rates, but olmesartan medoxomil/HCTZ achieved the highest control rates compared with the individual agents. On the basis of an indirect comparison of published factorial design studies, olmesartan medoxomil/HCTZ appears to be at least as effective as amlodipine besylate/benazepril and may provide quantitatively greater reductions in diastolic BP at commonly used dosages. A randomized clinical trial comparing the two combinations is needed to confirm these findings.

  13. Factorial design optimization of experimental variables in the on-line separation/preconcentration of copper in water samples using solid phase extraction and ICP-OES determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Luis A; Cerutti, S; Olsina, R A; Salonia, J A; Gasquez, J A

    2010-11-15

    An on-line preconcentration procedure using solid phase extraction (SPE) for the determination of copper in different water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is proposed. The copper was retained on a minicolumn filled with ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA) at pH 8.0 without using any complexing reagent. The experimental optimization step was performed using a two-level full factorial design. The results showed that pH, sample loading flow rate, and their interaction (at the tested levels) were statistically significant. In order to determine the best conditions for preconcentration and determination of copper, a final optimization of the significant factors was carried out using a central composite design (CCD). The calibration graph was linear with a regression coefficient of 0.995 at levels near the detection limit up to at least 300 μg L(-1). An enrichment factor (EF) of 54 with a preconcentration time of 187.5 s was obtained. The limit of detection (3σ) was 0.26 μg L(-1). The sampling frequency for the developed methodology was about 15 samples/h. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicates containing 50 μg L(-1) of copper was 3.76%. The methodology was successfully applied to the determination of Cu in tap, mineral, river water samples, and in a certified VKI standard reference material. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell Factory Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies......-review provides general strategy guides for the broad range of applications of rational engineering of cell factories....

  15. Virtual patients design and its effect on clinical reasoning and student experience: a protocol for a randomised factorial multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, James; Allen, Maggie E; Kidd, Jane; Parsons, Nick; Davies, David

    2012-08-01

    Virtual Patients (VPs) are web-based representations of realistic clinical cases. They are proposed as being an optimal method for teaching clinical reasoning skills. International standards exist which define precisely what constitutes a VP. There are multiple design possibilities for VPs, however there is little formal evidence to support individual design features. The purpose of this trial is to explore the effect of two different potentially important design features on clinical reasoning skills and the student experience. These are the branching case pathways (present or absent) and structured clinical reasoning feedback (present or absent). This is a multi-centre randomised 2 x 2 factorial design study evaluating two independent variables of VP design, branching (present or absent), and structured clinical reasoning feedback (present or absent).The study will be carried out in medical student volunteers in one year group from three university medical schools in the United Kingdom, Warwick, Keele and Birmingham. There are four core musculoskeletal topics. Each case can be designed in four different ways, equating to 16 VPs required for the research. Students will be randomised to four groups, completing the four VP topics in the same order, but with each group exposed to a different VP design sequentially. All students will be exposed to the four designs. Primary outcomes are performance for each case design in a standardized fifteen item clinical reasoning assessment, integrated into each VP, which is identical for each topic. Additionally a 15-item self-reported evaluation is completed for each VP, based on a widely used EViP tool. Student patterns of use of the VPs will be recorded.In one centre, formative clinical and examination performance will be recorded, along with a self reported pre and post-intervention reasoning score, the DTI. Our power calculations indicate a sample size of 112 is required for both primary outcomes. This trial will provide

  16. Application of Factorial Designs and Simplex Optimisation in the Development of Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Procedures as Demonstrated for the Determination of Trace Levels of Germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilligsøe, Bo; Hansen, Elo Harald

    1997-01-01

    The optimisation of a volume-based FI-HG-GFAAS procedure is described for the trace determination of Ge, comprising in situ collection of the generated germane in the graphite furnace. The response function is the peak area readout (A*s). Based on a preliminary study, where factorial designs were...

  17. THE USE OF A FACTORIAL DESIGN TO EVALUATE THE PHYSICAL STABILITY OF TABLETS PREPARED BY DIRECT COMPRESSION .1. A NEW APPROACH BASED ON THE RELATIVE CHANGE IN TABLET PARAMETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, C. E.; BOLHUIS, G. K.; LERK, C. F.; de Boer, J. H.; DUINEVELD, C. A. A.; Smilde, A. K.; Doornbos, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    A factorial design has been used to study the influence of disintegrant concentration and compression force as well as storage temperature and relative humidity on the physical stability during storage of alpha-lactose monohydrate/rice starch tablets prepared by direct compression. The tablet

  18. CERN: Neutrino facelift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    With the termination this summer of the CHARM II neutrino experiment at the SPS proton synchrotron, CERN's 30- year tradition of neutrino physics came to a temporary halt. However with these enigmatic particles playing a vital role in today's Standard Model but continually reluctant to give up all their secrets, neutrino physics will continue to be in the forefront of this research

  19. Neutrino mass anarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall; Murayama; Weiner

    2000-03-20

    What is the form of the neutrino mass matrix which governs the oscillations of the atmospheric and solar neutrinos? Features of the data have led to a dominant viewpoint where the mass matrix has an ordered, regulated pattern, perhaps dictated by a flavor symmetry. We challenge this viewpoint and demonstrate that the data are well accounted for by a neutrino mass matrix which appears to have random entries.

  20. Neutrino Mass Anarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lawrence; Murayama, Hitoshi; Weiner, Neal

    2000-03-01

    What is the form of the neutrino mass matrix which governs the oscillations of the atmospheric and solar neutrinos? Features of the data have led to a dominant viewpoint where the mass matrix has an ordered, regulated pattern, perhaps dictated by a flavor symmetry. We challenge this viewpoint and demonstrate that the data are well accounted for by a neutrino mass matrix which appears to have random entries.

  1. The AMANDA Neutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischnewski, R.; Andres, E.; Askebjer, P.; Barwick, S.; Bay, R.; Bergstroem, L.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, M.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Cowen, D.; Costa, C.; Dalberg, E.; Deyoung, T.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstroem, P.; Goobar, A.; Gray, L.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hardtke, R.; He, Y.; Hill, G.; Hulth, P.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kandhadai, V.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liss, T.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; LOwder, D.; Marciniewski, P.; Miller, T.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.; Morse, R.; Newcomer, M.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.; Przybylski, G.; Rhode, W.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Rubinstein, H.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, E.; Schwarz, R.; Schwendicke, U.; Smoot, G.; Solarz, M.; Sorin, V.; Spiering, C.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.; Streicher, O.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Wiebusch, C.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S

    1999-03-01

    The first stage of the AMANDA High Energy Neutrino Detector at the South Pole, the 302 PMT array AMANDA-B with an expected effective area for TeV neutrinos of {approx} 10{sup 4} m{sup 2}, has been taking data since 1997. Progress with calibration, investigation of ice properties, as well as muon and neutrino data analysis are described. The next stage 20-string detector AMANDA-II with {approx}800 PMTs will be completed in spring 2000.

  2. The AMANDA Neutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischnewski, R.; Andres, E.; Askebjer, P.; Barwick, S.; Bay, R.; Bergstrom, L.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, M.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Cowen, D.; Costa, C.; Dalberg,E.; Deyoung, T.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Goobar, A.; Gray, L.; Hallgren,A.; Halzen, F.; Hardtke, R.; He, Y.; Hill, G.; Hulth, P.; Hundertmark,S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kandhadai, V.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Leich, H.; Leuthold,M.; Lindahl, P.; Liss, T.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.; Marciniewski, P.; Miller, T.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.; Morse, R.; Newcomer, M.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.; de, los, Heros, CP.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.; Przybylski, G.; Rhode, W.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Rubinstein, H.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, E.; Schwarz, R.; Schwendicke, U.; Smoot, G.; Solarz, M.; Sorin, V.; Spiering,C.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.; Streicher, O.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Wiebusch, C.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    1999-08-23

    The first stage of the AMANDA High Energy Neutrino Detectorat the South Pole, the 302 PMT array AMANDA-B with an expected effectivearea for TeV neutrinos of similar to 10(4) m(2), has been taking datasince 1997. Progress with calibration, investigation of ice properties,as well as muon and neutrino data analysis are described. The next stage20-string detector AMANDA-II with similar to 800 PMTs will be completedin spring 2000.

  3. Astrophysical and atmospheric neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.

    1986-01-01

    The low energy ( 1 TeV) astrophysical neutrino flux by a nearly model-independent analytic method for estimate the ultra-high energy neutrino flux from active astrophysical compact objects by comparison with the observed gamma ray flux at comparable energies. Applied to several known gamma ray sources, the calculation shows the neutrino flux from them to be only marginally detectable by DUMAND-size underwater detectors

  4. Syngas Production from Catalytic CO2 Reforming of CH4 over CaFe2O4 Supported Ni and Co Catalysts: Full Factorial Design Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anwar Hossain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the potential of dry reforming reaction over CaFe2O4 supported Ni and Co catalysts were investigated. The Co/CaFe2O4 and Ni/CaFe2O4 catalysts were synthesized using wet impregnation method by varying the metal loading from 5-15 %. The synthesized catalysts were tested in methane dry reforming reaction at atmospheric pressure and reaction temperature ranged 700-800 oC. The catalytic performance of the catalysts based on the initial screening is ranked as 5%Co/CaFe2O4 < 10%Co/CaFe2O4 < 5%Ni/CaFe2O4 < 10%Ni/CaFe2O4 according to their performance. The Ni/CaFe2O4 catalyst was selected for further investigation using full factorial design of experiment. The interaction effects of three factors namely metal loading (5-15 %, feed ratio (0.4-1.0, and reaction temperature (700-800 oC were evaluated on the catalytic activity in terms of CH4 and CO2 conversion as well as H2 and CO yield. The interaction between the factors showed significant effects on the catalyst performance at metal loading, feed ratio and reaction temperature of 15 %, 1.0, and 800 oC. respectively. The 15 wt% Ni/CaFe2O4 was subsequently characterized by Thermogravimetric (TGA, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, N2-physisorption, Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD-NH3, TPD-CO2, and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR to ascertain its physiochemical properties.  This study demonstrated that the CaFe2O4 supported Ni catalyst has a good potential to be used for syngas production via methane dry reforming. Copyright © 2018 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 5th May 2017; Revised: 8th August 2017; Accepted: 9th August 2017; Available online: 22nd January 2018; Published regularly: 2nd April 2018 How to Cite: Hossain, M.A., Ayodele, B.V., Cheng, C.K., Khan, M.R. (2018. Syngas Production from Catalytic CO2 Reforming of CH4 over CaFe2O4 Supported

  5. The GENIE neutrino Monte Carlo generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreopoulos, C.; Bell, A.; Bhattacharya, D.; Cavanna, F.; Dobson, J.; Dytman, S.; Gallagher, H.; Guzowski, P.; Hatcher, R.; Kehayias, P.; Meregaglia, A.; Naples, D.; Pearce, G.; Rubbia, A.; Whalley, M.; Yang, T.

    2010-01-01

    GENIE is a new neutrino event generator for the experimental neutrino physics community. The goal of the project is to develop a 'canonical' neutrino interaction physics Monte Carlo whose validity extends to all nuclear targets and neutrino flavors from MeV to PeV energy scales. Currently, emphasis is on the few-GeV energy range, the challenging boundary between the non-perturbative and perturbative regimes, which is relevant for the current and near future long-baseline precision neutrino experiments using accelerator-made beams. The design of the package addresses many challenges unique to neutrino simulations and supports the full life-cycle of simulation and generator-related analysis tasks. GENIE is a large-scale software system, consisting of ∼120000 lines of C++ code, featuring a modern object-oriented design and extensively validated physics content. The first official physics release of GENIE was made available in August 2007, and at the time of the writing of this article, the latest available version was v2.4.4.

  6. Design of Photovoltaic System with Electric network shot installed at small factories for the production of construction materials at Maisi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parúas Cuza, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The project was developed in the Mini-industry of local production of materials of the construction belonging to the community of Tip of Maisi, County Guantanamo, with the objective of allowing the energy self-sufficiency in a sustainable way starting from the installation from a Photovoltaic System of Injection to Net, as catalyst of these productions, contributing to the development of the renewable sources of form energy decentralized for the local development, and the conservation from the environment when diminishing the emissions of polluting gases. Leaving of the solar resource of this area, the photovoltaic system was designed so that the capacity of the system to settle the consumption outline maintained by the mini-industry (45 kWh / day), avoiding the unnecessary deliveries to the electric external net, and in that way to shorten the period of recovery of this technology. (author)

  7. Neutrinos in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    1980-01-01

    The amount of 4He synthesised in the "big bang" is sensitive to the early particle content and to the expansion rate. If there was indeed a "big bang", surprisingly strong conclusions can be drawn about the number of species of neutrinos, and about the possibility that such particles have non-zero rest mass. The dynamics of supernovae are sensitive to the det~ils of neutrino physics; such explosions would yield IO L-1053 ergs of -v IO Mev neutrinos, in a burst lasting a few milliseconds. Galactic nuclei, cosmic ray sources and other high energy cosmic phenomena could yield a low background of~ 10 Gev neutrinos.

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kayser, Boris

    2014-04-10

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures.

  9. The Baikal Neutrino Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aynutdinov, V. M.; Balkanov, V. A.; Belolaptikov, I. A.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Borschev, D. A.; Budnev, N. M.; Burmistrov, K. V.; Danilchenko, I. A.; Davidov, Ya. I.; Domogatsky, G. V.; Doroshenko, A. A.; Dyachok, A. N.; Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. M.; Fialkovsky, S. V.; Gaponenko, O. N.; Golubkov, K. V.; Gress, O. A.; Gress, T. I.; Grishin, O. V.; Klabukov, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    We review the present status of the Baikal Neutrino Experiment and present results of a search for upward-going atmospheric neutrinos and magnetic monopoles obtained with the detector NT200. The results of a search for very high energy neutrinos are presented and an upper limit on the extraterrestrial diffuse neutrino flux is obtained. We describe the strategy of upgrading the NT200 to NT200+ and creating a detector on the Gigaton scale at Lake Baikal. The first results obtained with the new NT200+ detector as a basic cell of a future Gigaton detector are presented

  10. Neutrino properties from cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannestad, S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years precision cosmology has become an increasingly powerful probe of particle physics. Perhaps the prime example of this is the very stringent cosmological upper bound on the neutrino mass. However, other aspects of neutrino physics, such as their decoupling history and possible non......-standard interactions, can also be probed using observations of cosmic structure. Here, I review the current status of cosmological bounds on neutrino properties and discuss the potential of future observations, for example by the recently approved EUCLID mission, to precisely measure neutrino properties....

  11. Solar neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The present status of experimental solar neutrino research is reviewed. Updated results from the Homestake, Kamiokande, GALLEX and SAGE detectors all show a deficit when compared to recent standard solar model calculations. Two of these detectors, GALLEX and SAGE, have recently been checked with artificial {sup 51}Cr neutrino sources. It is shown that astrophysical scenarios to solve the solar neutrino problems are not favoured by the data. There is hope that the results of forthcoming solar neutrino experiments can provide the answers to the open questions. (author) 6 figs., 3 tabs., 36 refs.

  12. Muons and neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanev, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first generation of large and precise detectors, some initially dedicated to search for nucleon decay has accumulated significant statistics on neutrinos and high-energy muons. A second generation of even better and bigger detectors are already in operation or in advanced construction stage. The present set of experimental data on muon groups and neutrinos is qualitatively better than several years ago and the expectations for the following years are high. Composition studies with underground muon groups, neutrino detection, and expected extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes are discussed.

  13. Neutrinos: Fast & Curious

    CERN Document Server

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The Standard Model has been effective way beyond expectations in foreseeing the result of almost all the experimental tests done up so far. In it, neutrinos are massless. Nonetheless, in recent years we have collected solid proofs indicating little but non zero masses for the neutrinos (when contrasted with those of the charged leptons). These masses permit neutrinos to change their flavor and oscillate, indeed a unique treat. In these lectures, I discuss the properties and the amazing potential of neutrinos in and beyond the Standard Model.

  14. A 4 GHz phase locked loop design in 65 nm CMOS for the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkalian, N.; Robens, M.; Grewing, C.; Christ, V.; Kruth, A.; Liebau, D.; Muralidharan, P.; Nielinger, D.; Roth, C.; Yegin, U.; Zambanini, A.; van Waasen, S.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a 4 GHz phase locked loop (PLL), which is implemented in a 65 nm standard CMOS process to provide low noise and high frequency sampling clocks for readout electronics to be used in the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) experiment. Based on the application requirements the target of the design is to find the best compromise between power consumption, area and phase noise for a highly reliable topology. The design implements a novel method for the charge pump that suppresses current mismatch when the PLL is locked. This reduces static phase offset at the inputs of the phase-frequency detector (PFD) that otherwise would introduce spurs at the PLL output. In addition, a technique of amplitude regulation for the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is presented to provide low noise and reliable operation. The combination of thin and thick oxide varactor transistors ensures optimum tuning range and linearity over process as well as temperature changes for the VCO without additional calibration steps. The current mismatch at the output of the charge pump for the control voltage at about half the 1 V supply voltage is below 0.3% and static phase offset down to 0.25% is reached. The total PLL consumes 18.5 mW power at 1.8 V supply for the VCO and 1 V supply for the other parts.

  15. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

    2012-06-01

    The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

  16. Optimization of the formulation for preparing Lactobacillus casei loaded whey protein-Ca-alginate microparticles using full-factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilkov, Katarina; Petreska Ivanovska, Tanja; Petrushevska Tozi, Lidija; Petkovska, Rumenka; Hadjieva, Jasmina; Popovski, Emil; Stafilov, Trajce; Grozdanov, Anita; Mladenovska, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    This article presents specific approach for microencapsulation of Lactobacillus casei using emulsion method followed by additional coating with whey protein. Experimental design was employed using polynomial regression model at 2nd level with three independent variables, concentrations of alginate, whey protein and CaCl2. Physicochemical, biopharmaceutical and biological properties were investigated. In 11 series generated, negatively charged microparticles were obtained, with size 6.99-9.88 µm, Ca-content 0.29-0.47 mg per 10 mg microparticles, and viability of the probiotic 9.30-10.87 log10CFU/g. The viability after 24 hours in simulated gastrointestinal conditions was between 3.60 and 8.32 log10CFU/g. Optimal formulation of the microparticles that ensures survival of the probiotic and achieves controlled delivery was determined: 2.5% (w/w) alginate, 3% (w/w) CaCl2 and 3% (w/w) whey protein. The advantageous properties of the L. casei-loaded microparticles make them suitable for incorporation in functional food and/or pharmaceutical products.

  17. Evaluation and simultaneous optimization of bio-hydrogen production using 3{sup 2} factorial design and the desirability function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuetos, M.J.; Gomez, X.; Escapa, A.; Moran, A. [Institute of Natural Resources, University of Leon, Avda. de Portugal 41, 24071 Leon (Spain)

    2007-06-10

    Various mixtures incorporating a simulated organic fraction of municipal solid wastes and blood from a poultry slaughterhouse were used as substrate in a dark fermentation process for the production of hydrogen. The individual and interactive effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), solid content in the feed (%TS) and proportion of residues (%Blood) on bio-hydrogen production were studied in this work. A central composite design and response surface methodology were employed to determine the optimum conditions for the hydrogen production process. Experimental results were approximated to a second-order model with the principal effects of the three factors considered being statistically significant (P < 0.05). The production of hydrogen obtained from the experimental point at conditions close to best operability was 0.97 L Lr{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Moreover, a desirability function was employed in order to optimize the process when a second, methanogenic, phase is coupled with it. In this last case, the optimum conditions lead to a reduction in the production of hydrogen when the optimization process involves the maximization of intermediary products. (author)

  18. Physics with Reactor Neutrinos: The Show has Begun!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Lindley

    2012-03-01

    The next generation of reactor neutrino experiments started with the first Double Chooz result earlier this year and will continue with the RENO and Daya Bay experiments. The main goal of these experiments is the search for the last unknown mixing angle governing neutrino oscillations θ13. The results of these experiments will complete our picture of neutrino oscillations and are key for planning searches for CP violation. Along the way, they may teach us something about sterile neutrinos and the application of neutrinos to issues of nuclear non-proliferation. The physics and design of reactor neutrino experiments will be discussed, especially as it relates to the Double Chooz measurement of θ13.

  19. Box-Behnken factorial design to obtain a phenolic-rich extract from the aerial parts of Chelidonium majus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Clara; Ferreres, Federico; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Valentão, Patrícia; Sampaio, Maria; Lima, Júlio; Andrade, Paula B

    2014-12-01

    A Box-Behnken design (BBD) was developed to study the influence of four parameters (X1: % methanol; X2: extraction time; X3: extraction temperature; X4: solid/solvent ratio) on two responses, namely extraction yield and phenolics content of the aerial parts of Chelidonium majus L. The model presented a good fit to the experimental results for the extraction yield, being significantly influenced by X1 and X4. On the other hand a parameter reduction was necessary to run the model for phenolics content, showing that only X1 and X2 had great influence on the response. Two best extraction conditions were defined: X1=76.8% MeOH, X2=150.0 min, X3=60.0°C and X4=1:100 and X1=69.2%, X2=150 min, X3=42.5°C and X4=1:100. Moreover, the HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n) analysis conducted with the center point sample revealed the presence of 15 alkaloids and 15 phenolic compounds, from which the 9 flavonoids and 3 hydroxycinnamic acids are described for the first time. Only phenolic compounds were quantified by a validated HPLC-DAD method, the pair quercetin-3-O-rutinoside+quercetin-3-O-glucoside dominating all the 29 extracts. This study is of great importance for future works that seek to apply the phenolic profile to the quality control of C. majus samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benziger, Jay B.; Calaprice, Frank P. [Princeton University Princeton, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors are capable of providing spectral yields of the low energy solar neutrinos. These detectors require > 100 tons of liquid scintillator with high optical and radiopurity. In this paper requirements for low-energy neutrino detection by liquid scintillation are specified and the procedures to achieve low backgrounds in large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos are reviewed. The designs, operations and achievements of Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ in measuring the low-energy solar neutrino fluxes are reviewed. (orig.)