WorldWideScience

Sample records for neutral atom traps

  1. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  2. Traps for neutral radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sprouse, G D; Grossman, J S; Orozco, L A; Pearson, M R

    2002-01-01

    We describe several methods for efficiently injecting a small number of radioactive atoms into a laser trap. The characteristics of laser traps that make them desirable for physics experiments are discussed and several different experimental directions are described. We describe recent experiments with the alkali element Fr and point to future directions of the neutral atom trapping program.

  3. Submicrometer position control of single trapped neutral atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Dotsenko, I.; Alt, W; Khudaverdyan, M.; Kuhr, S.; Meschede, D.; Miroshnychenko, Y.; Schrader, D.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2004-01-01

    We optically detect the positions of single neutral cesium atoms stored in a standing wave dipole trap with a sub-wavelength resolution of 143 nm rms. The distance between two simultaneously trapped atoms is measured with an even higher precision of 36 nm rms. We resolve the discreteness of the interatomic distances due to the 532 nm spatial period of the standing wave potential and infer the exact number of trapping potential wells separating the atoms. Finally, combining an initial position...

  4. Neutral atom traps of rare isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Laser cooling and trapping techniques offer exquisite control of an atom's external and internal degrees of freedom. The species of interest can be selectively captured, cooled close to absolute zero temperatures, and observed with high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the atom's electronic and magnetic state populations can be precisely manipulated and interrogated. Applied in nuclear physics, these techniques are ideal for precision measurements in the fields of fundamental interactions and symmetries, nuclear structure studies, and isotopic trace analysis. In particular, they offer unique opportunities in the quest for physics beyond the standard model. I will shortly review the basics of this approach and the state of the field and then cover in more details recent results from two such efforts: the search for a permanent electric dipole moment in 225Ra and the beta-neutrino angular correlation measurement with laser trapped 6He. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. A Novel Gravito-Optical Surface Trap for Neutral Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chun-Xia; WANG Zhengling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel gravito-optical surface trap (GOST) for neutral atoms based on one-dimensional intensity gradient cooling. The surface optical trap is composed of a blue-detuned reduced semi-Gaussian laser beam (SGB), a far-blue-detuned dark hollow beam and the gravity field.

  6. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  7. Magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hong-Li; Yin Shi-Qi; Liu Kang-Kang; Qian Jun; Xu Zhen; Hong Tao; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Due to its low sensitivity to blackbody radiation,neutral mercury is a good candidate for the most accurate optical lattice clock.Here we report the observation of cold mercury atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT).Because of the high vapor pressure at room temperature,the mercury source and the cold pump were cooled down to-40 ℃ and-70 ℃,respectively,to keep the science chamber in an ultra-high vacuum of 6× 10-9 Pa.Limited by the power of the UV cooling laser,the one beam folded MOT configuration was adopted,and 1.5× 105 Hg-202 atoms were observed by fluorescence detection.

  8. Nanofiber-based optical trapping of cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, Eugen; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental techniques and results related to the optimization and characterization of our nanofiber-based atom trap [Vetsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 203603 (2010)]. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice which is created using a two-color evanescent field surrounding the optical nanofiber. For this purpose, the polarization state of the trapping light fields has to be properly adjusted. We demonstrate that this can be accomplished by analyzing the light scattered by the nanofiber. Furthermore, we show that loading the nanofiber trap from a magneto-optical trap leads to sub-Doppler temperatures of the trapped atomic ensemble and yields a sub-Poissonian distribution of the number of trapped atoms per trapping site.

  9. Ultrafast Quantum State Control of a Single Trapped Neutral Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, M P A; Ga"etan, A; Zhang, J; Messin, G; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P; Jones, Matthew P. A.; Beugnon, Jerome; Ga\\"{e}tan, Alpha; Zhang, Junxiang; Messin, Gaetan; Browaeys, Antoine; Grangier, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the initialisation, read-out and high-speed manipulation of a qubit stored in a single 87 Rb atom trapped in a submicron-size optical tweezer. Single qubit rotations are performed on a sub-100 ns time scale using two-photon Raman transitions. Using the ``spin-echo'' technique, we measure an irreversible dephasing time of 34 ms. The read-out of the single atom qubit is at the quantum projection noise limit when averaging up to 1000 individual events.

  10. Coherence preservation of a single neutral atom qubit transferred between magic-intensity optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jiaheng; Guo, Ruijun; Xu, Peng; Wang, Kunpeng; Sheng, Cheng; Liu, Min; Wang, Jin; Derevianko, Andrei; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the coherence of a single mobile atomic qubit can be well preserved during a transfer process among different optical dipole traps (ODTs). This is a prerequisite step in realizing a large-scale neutral atom quantum information processing platform. A qubit encoded in the hyperfine manifold of $^{87}$Rb atom is dynamically extracted from the static quantum register by an auxiliary moving ODT and reinserted into the static ODT. Previous experiments were limited by decoherences induced by the differential light shifts of qubit states. Here we apply a magic-intensity trapping technique which mitigates the detrimental effects of light shifts and substantially enhances the coherence time to $225 \\pm 21\\,\\mathrm{ms}$. The experimentally demonstrated magic trapping technique relies on the previously neglected hyperpolarizability contribution to the light shifts, which makes the light shift dependence on the trapping laser intensity to be parabolic. Because of the parabolic dependence, at a certain ...

  11. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  12. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  13. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  14. Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    Antihydrogen production in a neutral atom trap formed by an octupole-based magnetic field minimum is demonstrated using field-ionization of weakly bound anti-atoms. Using our unique annihilation imaging detector, we correlate antihydrogen detection by imaging and by field-ionization for the first time. We further establish how field-ionization causes radial redistribution of the antiprotons during antihydrogen formation and use this effect for the first simultaneous measurements of strongly and weakly bound antihydrogen atoms. Distinguishing between these provides critical information needed in the process of optimizing for trappable antihydrogen. These observations are of crucial importance to the ultimate goal of performing CPT tests involving antihydrogen, which likely depends upon trapping the anti-atom.

  15. Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    Antihydrogen production in a neutral atom trap formed by an octupole-based magnetic field minimum is demonstrated using field-ionization of weakly bound anti-atoms. Using our unique annihilation imaging detector, we correlate antihydrogen detection by imaging and by field-ionization for the first time. We further establish how field-ionization causes radial redistribution of the antiprotons during antihydrogen formation and use this effect for the first simultaneous measurements of strongly and weakly bound antihydrogen atoms. Distinguishing between these provides critical information needed in the process of optimizing for trappable antihydrogen. These observations are of crucial importance to the ultimate goal of performing CPT tests involving antihydrogen, which likely depends upon trapping the anti-atom.

  16. An apparatus for immersing trapped ions into an ultracold gas of neutral atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Stefan; Härter, Arne; Frisch, Albert; Hoinka, Sascha; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2012-05-01

    We describe a hybrid vacuum system in which a single ion or a well-defined small number of trapped ions (in our case Ba(+) or Rb(+)) can be immersed into a cloud of ultracold neutral atoms (in our case Rb). This apparatus allows for the study of collisions and interactions between atoms and ions in the ultracold regime. Our setup is a combination of a Bose-Einstein condensation apparatus and a linear Paul trap. The main design feature of the apparatus is to first separate the production locations for the ion and the ultracold atoms and then to bring the two species together. This scheme has advantages in terms of stability and available access to the region where the atom-ion collision experiments are carried out. The ion and the atoms are brought together using a moving one-dimensional optical lattice transport which vertically lifts the atomic sample over a distance of 30 cm from its production chamber into the center of the Paul trap in another chamber. We present techniques to detect and control the relative position between the ion and the atom cloud.

  17. Combining red- and blue-detuned optical traps to form a Lamb-Dicke trap for a single neutral atom

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiaodong; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2010-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for strongly radially confining a single neutral atom in a bichromatic far-off resonance optical dipole trap(BFORT) . BFORT is composed of a blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian $LG^1_ 0$ beam and a red-detuned Gaussian beam. The trapping radial dimension of a single atom trapped in the Gaussian FORT can be greatly compressed by imposing a blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian $LG^1_ 0$ beam with moderate potential depth. By modulating the potential depth of the Gaussian FORT we observed that the resonant and parametric excitation of the oscillatory motion of a single atom in this BFORT and obtained the oscillation frequency that well fits prediction from the theoretical model. The frequency measurement shows that effective trapping dimension can be greatly sharper than that diffraction limited of microscopic objective we used. Then we show that the excess scattering rate due to imposing blue detuned light can be eliminated when single atoms is close to ground-state theoretically. So BF...

  18. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  19. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    2017-09-01

    A nano - scale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon - atom interactions . A neutral - atom platf orm based on this microfabrication technology will be pre - aligned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano - waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  20. Cooling and trapping of neutral mercury atoms; Kuehlen und Fangen von neutralen Hg-Atomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villwock, Patrick

    2010-01-15

    Mercury offers numerous opportunities for experiments in cold atomic and molecular physics. Due to the particular energy level structure of the Hg-dimer it should be possible to efficiently populate the rovibrational ground state by employing a particular absorption-emission scheme after the dimers have been formed via photo association. Cold {sup 199}Hg-atoms in the ground state are very well suited for testing the Bell equations with atoms, because they are ideal spin-1/2-particles. Hg-dimers would be optimal for the search of a permanent electrical dipole moment, due to their mass. An optical lattice clock based on neutral mercury atoms using the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition at 265.6 nm with a natural linewidth of about 100 mHz is predicted to reach an accuracy better than 10{sup -18}. The frequency ratio of two optical clocks exhibits the opportunity to test the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant. Laser-cooled neutral Hg-atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) represent a high quality source for a focused ion beam. The isotope selectivity of a MOT offers the potential of producing pure Hg-Isotopes. Mercury has two stable fermionic and five stable bosonic isotopes. The {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination line at 253.7 nm has a saturation intensity of 10.2 {sup mW}/{sub cm{sup 2}}, with a natural linewidth of 1.27 MHz. This cooling transition is closed since the ground state is free of fine- and hyperfine structure. Consequently no additional repumping is required. Due to the relatively long lifetime of this trapping transition the Doppler limited temperature is 30 μK. This thesis presents the development and experimental setup of a magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atoms. This undertaking required the development of a commercially unavailable laser source in order to cool and trap Hg-atoms. The cooling transition sets high demands on such a cutting-edge laser, due to its relatively high saturation intensity

  1. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  2. Observation of single neutral atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; He Jun; Qiu Ying; Yang Bao-Dong; Zhao Jiang-Yan; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2008-01-01

    Single caesium atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap have been identified. The trapping of individual atoms is marked by the steps in fluorescence signal corresponding to the capture or loss of single atoms. The typical magnetic gradient is about 29 mT/cm, which evidently reduces the capture rate of magneto-optical trap.

  3. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  4. Hybrid ion, atom and light trap

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothi, S; Ram, N Bhargava; Rangwala, S A

    2013-01-01

    We present an unique experimental arrangement which permits the simultaneous trapping and cooling of ions and neutral atoms, within a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The versatility of this hybrid trap experiment enables a variety of studies with trapped mixtures. The motivations behind the production of such a hybrid trap system are explained, followed by details of how the experiment is put together. Several experiments that have been performed with this system are presented and some opportunities with this system are discussed. However the primary emphasis is focussed on the aspects that pertain to the trapped ions, in this hybrid system.

  5. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  6. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  7. Eliminating light shifts for single atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Liu, Lee R.; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2017-02-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We implement a general solution to these limitations by loading, as well as cooling and imaging the atoms with temporally alternating beams, and present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single atom tweezer loading. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, it should enable the optical tweezer platform to be extended to nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped.

  8. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Daly, Mark; Phelan, Ciarán; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140 - 200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  9. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M.; Truong, V. G.; Phelan, C. F.; Deasy, K.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2014-05-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold, neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow, rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140-200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  10. Holographic generation of micro-trap arrays for single atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Bergamini, S; Jones, M; Jacubowiez, L; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P; Bergamini, Silvia; Darquie, Benoit; Jones, Matt; Jacubowiez, Lionel; Browaeys, Antoine; Grangier, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    We have generated multiple micron-sized optical dipole traps for neutral atoms using holographic techniques with a programmable liquid crystal spatial light modulator. The setup allows the storing of a single atom per trap, and the addressing and manipulation of individual trapping sites.

  11. Detecting Neutral Atoms on an Atom Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Wilzbach, M.; Haase, A.; Schwarz, M; Heine, D.; Wicker, K.; Liu, X; Brenner, K. -H.; Groth, S.; Fernholz, Th.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Detecting single atoms (qubits) is a key requirement for implementing quantum information processing on an atom chip. The detector should ideally be integrated on the chip. Here we present and compare different methods capable of detecting neutral atoms on an atom chip. After a short introduction to fluorescence and absorption detection we discuss cavity enhanced detection of single atoms. In particular we concentrate on optical fiber based detectors such as fiber cavities and tapered fiber d...

  12. Ion-neutral chemistry at ultralow energies: Dynamics of reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ca^+ ions and Rb atoms in an ion-atom hybrid trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Felix H J; Hegi, Gregor; Raoult, Maurice; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier; Willitsch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cold chemical reactions between laser-cooled Ca^+ ions and Rb atoms were studied in an ion-atom hybrid trap. Reaction rate constants were determined in the range of collision energies /k_B = 20 mK-20 K. The lowest energies were achieved in experiments using single localized Ca^+ ions. Product branching ratios were studied using resonant-excitation mass spectrometry. The dynamics of the reactive processes in this system (non-radiative and radiative charge transfer as well as radiative association leading to the formation of CaRb^+ molecular ions) have been analyzed using high-level quantum-chemical calculations of the potential energy curves of CaRb^+ and quantum-scattering calculations for the radiative channels. For the present low-energy scattering experiments, it is shown that the energy dependence of the reaction rate constants is governed by long-range interactions in line with the classical Langevin model, but their magnitude is determined by short-range non-adiabatic and radiative couplings which only ...

  13. A New Atom Trap The Annular Shell Atom Trap (ASAT)

    CERN Document Server

    Pilloff, H S; Pilloff, Herschel S.; Horbatsch, Marko

    2002-01-01

    In the course of exploring some aspects of atom guiding in a hollow, optical fiber, a small negative potential energy well was found just in front of the repulsive or guiding barrier. This results from the optical dipole and the van der Waals potentials. The ground state for atoms bound in this negative potential well was determined by numerically solving the Schrodinger eq. and it was found that this negative well could serve as an atom trap. This trap is referred to as the Annular Shell Atom Trap or ASAT because of the geometry of the trapped atoms which are located in the locus of points defining a very thin annular shell just in front of the guiding barrier. A unique feature of the ASAT is the compression of the atoms from the entire volume to the volume of the annular shell resulting in a very high density of atoms in this trap. This trap may have applications to very low temperatures using evaporative cooling and possibly the formation of BEC. Finally, a scheme is discussed for taking advantage of the d...

  14. A new approach to entangling neutral atoms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jongmin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deutsch, Ivan H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Biedermann, Grant W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Our team has developed a new approach to entangling neutral atoms with a Rydberg-dressed interaction. Entangling neutral atoms is an essential key of quantum technologies such as quantum computation, many-body quantum simulation, and high-precision atomic sensors . The demonstrated Rydberg-dressed protocol involves adiabatically imposing a light shift on the ground state by coupling an excited Rydberg state with a tuned laser field. Using this technique, we have demonstrated a strong and tunable dipole - dipole interaction between two individually trapped atoms with energy shifts of order 1 MHz, which has been challenging to achieve in other protocols . During this program, we experimentally demonstrated Bell-state entanglement and the isomorphism to the Jaynes - Cumming model of a Rydberg-dressed two-atom system. Our theoretical calculations of a CPHASE quantum logic gate and arbitrary Dicke state quantum control in this system encourage further work.

  15. Entanglement of two ground state neutral atoms using Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Browaeys, Antoine; Evellin, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report on our recent progress in trapping and manipulation of internal states of single neutral rubidium atoms in optical tweezers. We demonstrate the creation of an entangled state between two ground state atoms trapped in separate tweezers using the effect of Rydberg blockade. The quality of...

  16. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Vuletic, Vladan; Schleier-Smith, Monika H

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  17. Optimization of the loading rate of magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atom%中性汞原子磁光阱装载率的优化∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟维; 刘亢亢; 付小虎; 赵儒臣; 孙剑芳; 徐震

    2016-01-01

    Optics lattice clock is a hot topic in the researches of frequency standard and metrology. Neutral mercury atom is one of the most promising candidates for optical lattice clock. Due to its large atomic number, mercury atom is insensitive to black body radiation, which is the severe limitation for developing the optical lattice clocks. To realize the optical lattice clock of neutral mercury atoms, the first step is to implement laser-cooling and trapping of neutral mercury atoms. The cooling transition of mercury atom is 1S0–3P1 transition. The wavelength is 253.7 nm, the line width is 1.27 MHz, and the saturation intensity is 10.2 mW/cm2. Quantum projection noise (QPN) is an important parameter that affects optical lattice clock. Increasing the loading rate of magneto-optical trap (MOT) can help lower the QPN, thereby improving the performance of optical lattice clock. In this work, we calculate the scattering force of deep UV cooling laser, which is exerted on mercury atom in our single chamber MOT, and numerically simulate the one-dimensional motion of the atom in the MOT. It gives us the capture velocity under optimized parameters of the MOT. Then we calculate the loading rate of three-dimensional MOT by a high efficient random sampling method. According to the rate equation of MOT, the loading rate is proportional to the atom number of the steady state, which is the accessible parameter in the experiment. An experimental setup of MOT is established with a high vacuum system and a frequency quadrupled semiconductor laser system. The fluorescence imaging on an EMCCD gives the atom number in the MOT. We also calibrate the vapor density of background mercury gas in the vacuum, and measure the atom number in a steady MOT. We numerically simulate and experimentally study the influences on the atom number on the parameters of MOT, such as laser intensity, laser detuning and magnetic field gradient. The calculated results are in consistent with the experimental

  18. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Nieddu, Thomas; Chormaic, Sile Nic

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed ...

  19. Boson Josephson Junction with Trapped Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S. R.

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates at T=0 in a double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. Analytic elliptic function solutions are obtained for the time evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance z(t) (related to the condensate phase difference) of the Boson Josephson junction (BJJ). Surprisingly, the neutral-atom BJJ shows (non-sinusoidal generalizations of) effects seen in charged-electron superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ). The BJJ elliptic-function behavior has a singular dependence on a GPE parameter ratio Λ at a critical ratio Λ=Λc, beyond which a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect sets in with a non-zero time-averaged imbalance ≠0.

  20. Cold atom-ion experiments in hybrid traps

    CERN Document Server

    Härter, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In the last 5 years, a novel field of physics and chemistry has developed in which cold trapped ions and ultracold atomic gases are brought into contact with each other. Combining ion traps with traps for neutral atoms yields a variety of new possibilities for research and experiments. These range from studies of cold atom-ion collisions and atom-ion chemistry to applications in quantum information science and condensed matter related research. In this article we give a brief introduction into this new field and describe some of the perspectives for its future development.

  1. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  2. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  3. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieddu, Thomas; Gokhroo, Vandna; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-05-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed and, recently, several schemes to implement optical memories have been proposed. We also discuss some possible directions where this research field may head, in particular, in relation to the use of optical nanofibres that can support higher-order modes with an associated orbital angular momentum.

  4. Construction of a single atom trap for quantum information protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Duke Physics Department Team

    2016-05-01

    The field of quantum information science addresses outstanding problems such as achieving fundamentally secure communication and solving computationally hard problems. Great progress has been made in the field, particularly using photons coupled to ions and super conducting qubits. Neutral atoms are also interesting for these applications and though the technology for control of neutrals lags behind that of trapped ions, they offer some key advantages: primarily coupling to optical frequencies closer to the telecom band than trapped ions or superconducting qubits. Here we report progress on constructing a single atom trap for 87 Rb. This system is a promising platform for studying the technical problems facing neutral atom quantum computing. For example, most protocols destroy the trap when reading out the neutral atom's state; we will investigate an alternative non-destructive state detection scheme. We detail the experimental systems involved and the challenges addressed in trapping a single atom. All of our hardware components are off the shelf and relatively inexpensive. Unlike many other systems, we place a high numerical aperture lens inside our vacuum system to increase photon collection efficiency. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the ARO through Grant # W911NF1520047.

  5. Laser trapping of 21Na atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive 21Na (t1/2 = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped 21Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of 21Na → 21Ne + β+ + ve, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, 21Na atoms were produced by bombarding 24Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The 21Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  6. Topological Quantum Information in a 3D Neutral Atom Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-02

    v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 12-23-2014 Final 12-01-2008-9-30-2014 ( DARPA ) TOPOLOGICAL QUANTUM INFORMATION IN A 3D NEUTRAL ATOM ARRAY FA9550-09...1-0041 David Weiss Penn State UP76XR0 AFOSR DARPA Approved for public release Work was performed to build core elements of a quantum computer...Hamiltonian within our trapped neutral atoms architecture. quantum computing, ultracold atoms David Weiss 814-861-3578 1 DARPA Final Report Grant

  7. Eliminating light shifts in single-atom optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Hutzler, Nicholas R; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We present a general solution to these limitations by loading, cooling, and imaging single atoms with temporally alternating beams. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, we expect it to enable the optical tweezer method to control nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped. Furthermore, we present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single ato...

  8. Magnetic Trapping of Cold Bromine Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the milliKelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br$_2$ molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are only lost by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential...

  9. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  10. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, D.S.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Pisenti, N. C.; Campbell, G. K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, int...

  11. Magneto-Optical Trap for Thulium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Chebakov, K; Akimov, A; Kanorsky, S; Kolachevsky, N; Sorokin, V

    2010-01-01

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to $7\\times10^{4}$ atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40 cm long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the MOT which varies between 0.3 -1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s$^{-1}$. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives a 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.

  12. An Atom Trap Relying on Optical Pumping

    CERN Document Server

    Bouyer, P; Dahan, M B; Michaud, A; Salomon, C; Dalibard, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a $J_{g} \\longrightarrow J_{e} = J_{g} + 1$ atomic transition with $J_{g} \\geq 1/2$. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm $J_{g} = 4 \\longrightarrow J_{e} = 5$ resonance transition. The trap contained up to $3 \\cdot 10^{7}$ atoms in a cloud of $1/\\sqrt{e}$ radius of 330 $\\mu$m.

  13. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  14. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, D S; Pisenti, N C; Campbell, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  15. Enhanced magnetic trap loading for atomic strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, D. S.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Pisenti, N. C.; Campbell, G. K.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a magneto-optical trap. This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the P31→S31 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65% for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30% for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  16. Atom Chip for Transporting and Merging Magnetically Trapped Atom Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hänsel, W; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic ``atom chip'' which transports cold trapped atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of magnetic potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve fluxes up to 10^6 /s with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this ``atomic conveyor belt'' allows the merging of magnetically trapped atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. Under suitable conditions, the clouds merge without loss of phase space density. We demonstrate this unification process experimentally.

  17. Accelerating neutral atoms on a Table top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Rajendran, Rajeev; Madhu, T.; Kpm, Rishad; Narayanan, V.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2013-05-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by super strong laser fields couple unusually large energies to charged particles. Acceleration of neutral atoms from such strongly ionized plasmas have remained elusive. A laser based neutralizer can convert laser accelerated fast ion source to fast neutral atom source. We report a scheme to generate fast Argon atoms (up to 1 MeV) from an optical-field-ionized dense nano-cluster ensemble. Intense, ultrashort pulses ionize each atom in a Ar nanocluster to 8+ and coulomb explode ions to energies up to MeV. We show that in a dense cluster ensemble, the electrons that stream out of the focal volume collisionally excited clusters in the periphery of the focus to high lying Rydberg excited states and form a sheath of electronically excited clusters. Cross sections for reducing ions by charge transfer collisions are orders of magnitude larger with the electronically exited systems. Fast ions that stream through the excited cluster sheath are reduced to neutral atoms with no change in momentum. We show that the scheme can covert ions to neutral atoms with nearly 100% efficiency, transferring 8 electrons per atom in a few mm span of the supersonic jet.

  18. Arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold atoms and their applications in atom optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印建平; 高伟建; 胡建军

    2002-01-01

    A single microscopic magnetic trap for neutral atoms using planar current-carrying wires was proposed and studiedtheoretically by Weinstein et al. In this paper, we propose three structures of composite current-carrying wires to provide1D, 2D and 3D arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold alkali atoms. The spatial distributions of magnetic fieldsgenerated by these structures are calculated and the field gradient and curvature in each single microtrap are analysed.Our study shows that arrays of microscopic magnetic traps can be used to provide 1D, 2D or 3D atomic magneticlattices, and even to realize 1D, 2D and 3D arrays of magneto-optical traps, and so on.

  19. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  20. Atomic Structure Calculations for Neutral Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Norah Alonizan; Rabia Qindeel; Nabil Ben Nessib

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels and oscillator strengths for neutral oxygen have been calculated using the Cowan (CW), SUPERSTRUCTURE (SS), and AUTOSTRUCTURE (AS) atomic structure codes. The results obtained with these atomic codes have been compared with MCHF calculations and experimental values from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database.

  1. A trapped atom interferometer with ultracold Sr atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xian; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Poli, Nicola; Tino, Guglielmo M

    2016-01-01

    We report on a trapped atom interferometer based on Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations with alkaline-earth-metal atoms. We use a Ramsey-Bord\\'e Bragg interferometer with $^{88}$Sr atoms combined with Bloch oscillations to extend the interferometer time. Thanks to a long coherence time for Bloch oscillations of $^{88}$Sr atoms, we observed interference up to 1 s evolution time in the lattice. A detailed study of decoherence sources during the Bloch phase is also presented. While still limited in sensitivity by lattice lifetime and beam inhomogeneity this result opens the way to high contrast trapped interferometers with extended interrogation time.

  2. Efficient cooling and trapping of strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, I; Quessada, A; Kovacich, R P; Zondy, J J; Landragin, A; Clairon, A; Lemonde, P

    2003-03-15

    We report the capture of cold strontium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) at a rate of 4 x 10(10) atoms/s. The MOT is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower operating with a focused laser beam. The 461-nm laser, used for both cooling and trapping, was generated by sum-frequency mixing in a KTP crystal with diode lasers at 813 nm and a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. As much as 115 mW of blue light was obtained.

  3. Laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ye XU; Wen-li WANG; Qing-hong ZHOU; Guo-hui LI; Hai-ling JIANG; Lin-fang CHEN; Jie YE; Zhi-hong ZHOU; Yin CAI; Hai-yao TANG; Min ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    The experiments on the laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms are reported, including the two-dimensional transversal cooling, longitudinal velocity Zeeman deceleration, and a magneto-optical trap with a broadband transition at a wavelength of 399 nm. The magnetic field distributions along the axis of a Zeeman slower were measured and in a good agreement with the calculated results. Cold ytterbium atoms were produced with a number of about 107 and a temperature of a few milli-Kelvin.In addition, using a 556-nm laser, the excitations of cold tterbium atoms at 1S0-3p1 transition were observed. The ytterbium atoms will be further cooled in a 556-nm magneto-optical trap and loaded into a three-dimensional optical lattice to make an ytterbium optical clock.

  4. Cold trapped atoms detected with evanescent waves

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelussen, R. A.; van Amerongen, A. H.; Wolschrijn, B. T.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.; Heuvell, H. B. van Linden van den

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the in situ detection of cold 87 Rb atoms near a dielectric surface using the absorption of a weak, resonant evanescent wave. We have used this technique in time of flight experiments determining the density of atoms falling on the surface. A quantitative understanding of the measured curve was obtained using a detailed calculation of the evanescent intensity distribution. We have also used it to detect atoms trapped near the surface in a standing-wave optical dipole potential....

  5. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Orozco, Luis A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  6. Micromotion in trapped atom-ion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Le Huy; Barrett, Murray; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2012-01-01

    We examine the validity of the harmonic approximation, where the radio-frequency ion trap is treated as a harmonic trap, in the problem regarding the controlled collision of a trapped atom and a single trapped ion. This is equivalent to studying the effect of the micromotion since this motion must be neglected for the trapped ion to be considered as a harmonic oscillator. By applying the transformation of Cook and Shankland we find that the micromotion can be represented by two periodically oscillating operators. In order to investigate the effect of the micromotion on the dynamics of a trapped atom-ion system, we calculate (i) the coupling strengths of the micromotion operators by numerical integration and (ii) the quasienergies of the system by applying the Floquet formalism --- a useful framework for studying periodic systems. It turns out that the micromotion is not negligible when the distance between the atom and the ion traps is shorter than a characteristic distance. Within this range the energy diagr...

  7. Trapped Atoms in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, H.

    2013-05-01

    I describe one-dimensional photonic crystals that support a guided mode suitable for atom trapping within a unit cell, as well as a second probe mode with strong atom-photon interactions. A new hybrid trap is analyzed that combines optical and Casimir-Polder forces to form stable traps for neutral atoms in dielectric nanostructures. By suitable design of the band structure, the atomic spontaneous emission rate into the probe mode can exceed the rate into all other modes by more than tenfold. The unprecedented single-atom reflectivity r0 ~= 0 . 9 for the guided probe field could create new scientific opportunities, including quantum many-body physics for 1 D atom chains with photon-mediated interactions and high-precision studies of vacuum forces. Towards these goals, my colleagues and I are pursuing numerical simulation, device fabrication, and cold-atom experiments with nanoscopic structures. Funding is provided by by the IQIM, an NSF PFC with support of the Moore Foundation, by the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, by the DoD NSSEFF program (HJK), and by NSF Grant PHY0652914 (HJK). DEC acknowledges funding from Fundacio Privada Cellex Barcelona.

  8. Collisional cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Sourav; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    The most generic cooling and thermalization pathway at the lowest temperatures is via elastic collisions. In hybrid ion-atom traps, ion cooling to temperatures where low partial wave collisions dominate require the collisional cooling mechanism to be well understood and controlled. There exists great uncertainty on whether cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms is possible. Here we experimentally demonstrate the cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms for the first time. We show that trapped 39K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85Rb atoms for an ion-atom mass ratio where most theoretical models predict ion heating. We demonstrate, based on detailed numerical simulation of our ion-cooling model, which is in excellent agreement with experiments, that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. Our result opens up the possibility of studying quantum collisions and chemistry in trapped atom-ion systems.

  9. Introduction to light forces, atom cooling, and atom trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Craig,

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces and reviews light forces, atom cooling and atom trapping. The emphasis is on the physics of the basic processes. In discussing conservative forces the semi-classical dressed states are used rather than the usual quantized field dressed states.

  10. Doughnut shape atom traps with arbitrary inclination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez y Masegosa, R.; Moya C, H.; Chavez C, S. [INAOE, A.P. 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Since the invention of magneto-optical trap (MOT), there have been several experimental and theoretical studies of the density distribution in these devices. To the best of our knowledge, only horizontal orbital traps have been observed, perpendicular to the coil axis. In this work we report the observation of distributions of trapped atoms in pure circular orbits without a nucleus whose orbital plane is tilted up to 90diam. with respect to the horizontal plane. We have used a stabilized time phase optical array in our experiments and conventional equipment used for MOT. (Author)

  11. Atom Trap Trace Analysis of Ca Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, S., E-mail: hoekstra@fhi-berlin.mgp.de [Fritz-Haber Institut der Max-Planck Gesellschaft (Germany); Mollema, A. K.; Morgenstern, R.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.; Hoekstra, R. [Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Atomic Physics, KVI (Netherlands)

    2005-04-15

    In our experiment we aim at the detection of the rarest, naturally occuring calcium isotope 41Ca by means of atom trap trace analysis. On basis of single-atom detection of 46Ca our present sensitivity for 41Ca is estimated to be 1 atom per hour at an abundance of 10-12. To reach a sensitivity at the level of natural abundance, which is 10-14, we need to reduce atomic beam losses. To achieve this, optical compression of the atomic beam is a promising option. We use Monte Carlo Simulations to demonstrate that optical compression of the atomic beam increases throughput of the atomic beam as well as isotope selectivity.

  12. Observation of cooperatively enhanced atomic dipole forces from NV centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Juan, M L; Besga, B; Brennen, G; Molina-Terriza, G; Volz, T

    2015-01-01

    Since the early work by Ashkin in 1970, optical trapping has become one of the most powerful tools for manipulating small particles, such as micron sized beads or single atoms. The optical trapping mechanism is based on the interaction energy of a dipole and the electric field of the laser light. In atom trapping, the dominant contribution typically comes from the allowed optical transition closest to the laser wavelength, whereas for mesoscopic particles it is given by the bulk polarizability of the material. These two different regimes of optical trapping have coexisted for decades without any direct link, resulting in two very different contexts of applications: one being the trapping of small objects mainly in biological settings, the other one being dipole traps for individual neutral atoms in the field of quantum optics. Here we show that for nanoscale diamond crystals containing artificial atoms, so-called nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers, both regimes of optical trapping can be observed at the same...

  13. Field theory for trapped atomic gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this course we give a selfcontained introduction to the quantum field theory for trapped atomic gases, using functional methods throughout. We consider both equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena. In the equilibrium case, we first derive the appropriate Hartree—Fock theory for the properties of

  14. Field theory for trapped atomic gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, H.T.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this course we give a selfcontained introduction to the quantum field theory for trapped atomic gases, using functional methods throughout. We consider both equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena. In the equilibrium case, we first derive the appropriate Hartree-Fock theory for the properties of

  15. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  16. Cooling and Trapping of Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-30

    for 5 < 0. A plot of E± is shown in Fig. 1 showing these limits near the FIG 1: A Plot of £±- The dressed states com- n = 0 plane . These bare...Lett. 96, 253001 (2006). [43] M. E. Carrera -Patio and R. S. Berry, Phys. Rev. A 34, 4728 (1986). [44] S. van Enk and G. Nienhuis, Phys. Rev. A 46, 1438 (1992).

  17. Sub-poissonian loading of single atoms in a microscopic dipole trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, N; Reymond, G; Protsenko, I; Grangier, P

    2001-06-28

    The ability to manipulate individual atoms, ions or photons allows controlled engineering of the quantum state of small sets of trapped particles; this is necessary to encode and process information at the quantum level. Recent achievements in this direction have used either trapped ions or trapped photons in cavity quantum-electrodynamical systems. A third possibility that has been studied theoretically is to use trapped neutral atoms. Such schemes would benefit greatly from the ability to trap and address individual atoms with high spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate a method for loading and detecting individual atoms in an optical dipole trap of submicrometre size. Because of the extremely small trapping volume, only one atom can be loaded at a time, so that the statistics of the number of atoms in the trap, N, are strongly sub-poissonian (DeltaN2 approximately 0.5N). We present a simple model for describing the observed behaviour, and we discuss the possibilities for trapping and addressing several atoms in separate traps, for applications in quantum information processing.

  18. Photon trap for neutralization of negative ions beams

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S S; Ivanov, A A; Kotelnikov, I A

    2015-01-01

    For effectively neutralization of the powerful negative ions beams of hydrogen and deuterium the photon target is considered in long time. The attractiveness of the traditional approach (Fabry-Perot resonators) to their creation is limited to a number of stringent technical requirements and large economic costs. In this paper we propose a new concept of non-resonant photon trap (storage) for creation more technologically simple optical neutralizers.

  19. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Holmium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, J; Stratis, G; Saffman, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate sub-Doppler laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the rare earth element Holmium. Atoms are loaded from an atomic beam source and captured in six-beam $\\sigma_+ - \\sigma_-$ molasses using a strong $J=15/2 \\leftrightarrow J=17/2$ cycling transition at $\\lambda=410.5~\\rm nm$. Due to the small difference in hyperfine splittings and Land\\'e $g$-factors in the lower and upper levels of the cooling transition the MOT is self-repumped without additional repump light, and deep sub-Doppler cooling is achieved with the magnetic trap turned on. We measure the leakage out of the cycling transition to metastable states and find a branching ratio $\\sim 10^{-5}$ which is adequate for state resolved measurements on hyperfine encoded qubits.

  20. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  1. Quasi-Magic optical traps for Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S; Saffman, M

    2011-01-01

    We propose blue-detuned optical traps that are suitable for trapping of both ground state and Rydberg excited atoms. Addition of a background compensation field or suitable choice of the trap geometry provides a magic trapping condition for ground and Rydberg atoms at the trap center. Deviations from the magic condition at finite temperature are calculated. Designs that achieve less than 200 kHz differential trap shift between Cs ground and 125s Rydberg states for 10 {\\mu}K Cs atoms are presented. Consideration of the trapping potential and photoionization rates

  2. Experimental test of Bohr's complementarity principle with single neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Tian, Yali; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Tiancai

    2016-12-01

    An experimental test of the quantum complementarity principle based on single neutral atoms trapped in a blue detuned bottle trap was here performed. A Ramsey interferometer was used to assess the wavelike behavior or particlelike behavior with second π /2 rotation on or off. The wavelike behavior or particlelike behavior is characterized by the visibility V of the interference or the predictability P of which-path information, respectively. The measured results fulfill the complementarity relation P2+V2≤1 . Imbalance losses were deliberately introduced to the system and we find the complementarity relation is then formally "violated." All the experimental results can be completely explained theoretically by quantum mechanics without considering the interference between wave and particle behaviors. This observation complements existing information concerning Bohr's complementarity principle based on wave-particle duality of a massive quantum system.

  3. Single-atom manipulations in a microscopic dipole trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Georges; Schlosser, Nicolas; Protsenko, Igor; Grangier, Philippe

    2003-07-15

    We have realized a very small optical dipole trap that is designed to store and manipulate individual atoms. Due to the very small dipole-trap volume, a 'collisional blockade' mechanism locks the average number of trapped atoms at a value of 0.5 over a large range of loading rates. Here we describe methods to characterize the motion of a single trapped atom, and we also demonstrate the possibility of trapping two atoms individually at a short distance apart. Finally, we study theoretically the possibility to perform 'conditional quantum logic' by scattering photons from two such atoms.

  4. Synthetic gauge potentials for ultracold neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic gauge fields for ultracold neutral atoms—engineered using the interaction between laser fields and the atoms’ internal ‘spin’ degrees of freedom—provide promising techniques for generating the large (synthetic) magnetic fields required to reach the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) limit in quantum gases, bosonic or fermionic alike. Because neutral atoms can move in a nearly disorder-free environment and they have extremely simple contact interactions, the resulting FQH states would be revealed in their most essential form. Moreover, bosonic FQH states represent a new frontier and have never been seen in any setting. Going beyond electromagnetism's conventional scalar gauge field, it is possible to create more general non-Abelian gauge potentials. When these are spatially uniform, they are equivalent to spin-orbit coupling familiar in material systems, and can lead to cold atom analogs of topological insulators and topological superconductors. In this tutorial, we introduce basic concepts underlying these gauge fields, making connections to the Aharonov-Bohm phase and geometric phase. We focus on the system of neutral atoms ‘dressed’ by multiple laser beams, where the eigenstates of the resulting Hamiltonian are known as dressed states. Synthetic gauge potentials arise from the unitary transformation required to express these dressed states in terms of the laser-free eigenstates. We discuss stability of laser-dressed atoms corresponding to the adiabatic condition and the probability of non-adiabatic transitions. Adopting both the semiclassical and quantum mechanical approaches, we demonstrate they agree in the suitable limit. We also analyze using both the conventional adiabatic picture and exact picture, where the kinetic energy is neglected in the former and retained in the latter picture.

  5. Tunneling of trapped-atom Bose condensates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subodh R Shenoy

    2002-02-01

    We obtain the dynamics in number and phase difference, for Bose condensates that tunnel between two wells of a double-well atomic trap, using the (nonlinear) Gross–Pitaevskii equation. The dynamical equations are of the canonical form for the two conjugate variables, and the Hamiltonian corresponds to that of a momentum-shortened pendulum, supporting a richer set of tunneling oscillation modes than for a superconductor Josephson junction, that has a fixed-length pendulum as a mechanical model. Novel modes include ‘inverted pendulum’ oscillations with an average angle of ; and oscillations about a self-maintained population imbalance that we term ‘macroscopic quantum self-trapping’. Other systems with this phase-number nonlinear dynamics include two-component (interconverting) condensates in a single harmonic trap, and He3B superfluids in two containers connected by micropores.

  6. Anisotropic optical trapping of ultracold erbium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Lepers, Maxence; Dulieu, Olivier; --,

    2013-01-01

    Ultracold atoms confined in a dipole trap are submitted to a potential whose depth is proportional to the real part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. The atoms also experience photon scattering whose rate is proportional to the imaginary part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. In this article we calculate the complex dynamic dipole polarizability of ground-state erbium, a rare-earth atom that was recently Bose-condensed. The polarizability is calculated with the sum-over-state formula inherent to second-order perturbation theory. The summation is performed on transition energies and transition dipole moments from ground-state erbium, which are computed using the Racah-Slater least-square fitting procedure provided by the Cowan codes. This allows us to predict 9 unobserved odd-parity energy levels of total angular momentum J=5, 6 and 7, in the range 25000-31000 cm-1 above the ground state. Regarding the trapping potential, we find that ground-state erbium essentially behaves like a spherically-symme...

  7. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, John; Nitz, D.; Sobeck, J.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Among the rare earth species, the spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are some of the most complex. Like other rare earth species, Ce has many lines in the visible which are suitable for elemental abundance studies. Recent work on Ce II transition probabilities [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I for future studies using such lines from astrophysical sources. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2500 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program and the Department of Defense's ASSURE program through NSF Award AST-0453442 and NSF Grant CTS0613277. [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  8. Innershell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Stolte, W C; Lindle, D W; Sant'Anna, M M; Savin, D W

    2014-01-01

    Innershell ionization of a $1s$ electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD) which results as the $1s$-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for innershell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of $403-475$~eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N$^+$, N$^{2+}$, and N$^{3+}$, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to N$^{2+}$ is so...

  9. A toroidal trap for the cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms using a rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms in a toroidal geometry using a rf-dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong radio frequency (rf) field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has minimum of the potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates the trapping in the toroidal geometry. In the experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in the quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in the rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  10. State-Insensitive Trapping of Single Atoms in Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    McKeever, J; Boozer, A D; Kuzmich, A M; Nägerl, H C; Stamper-Kurn, D M; Kimble, H J

    2002-01-01

    Single Cesium atoms are cooled and trapped inside a small optical cavity by way of a novel far-off-resonance dipole-force trap (FORT), with observed lifetimes of 2 - 3 seconds. The trapping field is provided by a TEM-00 mode of the cavity at a wavelength of 935.6 nm, and is such that the external potential for the center-of-mass motion is only weakly dependent on the atom's internal state. Continuous real time observations of single trapped atoms in a regime of strong coupling are reported, with mean duration 0.4 s and with individual events lasting ~ 1 s.

  11. Stability of Magneto-optical Traps with Large Field Gradients: Limits on the Tight Confinement of Single Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, P.; Boyd, R.; Bliss, J.; Libbrecht, K. [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, 264-33 California Institute of Physics, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    We report measurements of the stability of magneto-optical traps (MOTs) for neutral atoms in the limit of tight confinement of a single atom. For quadrupole magnetic field gradients at the trap center greater than {approximately}1kG/cm, we find that stochastic diffusion of atoms out of the trapping volume becomes the dominant particle loss mechanism, ultimately limiting the MOT size to greater than {approximately}5{mu}m. We measured and modeled the diffusive loss rate as a function of laser power, detuning, and field gradient for trapped cesium atoms. In addition, for as few as two atoms, the collisional loss rates become very high for tightly confined traps, allowing the direct observation of isolated two-body atomic collisions in a MOT. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Bottle atom trapping configuration by optical dipole forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Aldossary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bottle beam configuration is a light field created by the interference of a pair of Laguerre–Gauss light beams with zero orbital angular momentum. In this work we show the theoretical study of the bottle beam as well as the use of this beam for the creation of a novel atom optical dipole trap namely the bottle atom trap. In such a trap the resulting dark trapping region is three-dimensional and has a cylindrical symmetry. These promising results show that this trap is a nice candidate for trapping Bose–Einstein condensates and may serve as an optical tweezer mechanism potentially useful for trapping micron-sized dielectric particles.

  13. Lattices of ultracold atom traps over arrays of nano- and mesoscopic superconducting disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovsky, Vladimir; Prigozhin, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    A lattice of traps for ultracold neutral atoms is a promising tool for experimental investigation in quantum physics and quantum information processing. We consider regular arrays of thin film type-II superconducting nanodisks, with only one pinned vortex in each of them, and also arrays of mesoscopic disks, each containing many vortices whose distribution is characterized by the superconducting current density. In both cases we show theoretically that the induced magnetic field can create a 3D lattice of magnetic traps for cold atoms without any additional bias field. Applying a bias DC field parallel to the superconductor surface, one can control the depth and sizes of the traps, their heights above the chip surface, potential barriers between the traps, as well as the structure and dimension of the lattices. In the adiabatic approximation the atom cloud shape is represented by the shape of a closed iso-surface of the magnetic field magnitude chosen in accordance with the atom cloud temperature. The computed trap sizes, heights and the distances between the neighboring traps are typically from tens to hundreds nanometers for nanodisks and of the order of 1 μm for mesoscopic disks. Our calculations show that the depth of magnetic traps on mesoscopic disks is, typically, between 0.3 G and 7.6 G; for the nanodisks the depth is about 0.3 G.

  14. Estimating the hydration enthalpies of neutral alkali metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stace, A J

    2006-10-26

    Using existing data on the ionization energies of alkali metal atoms in small clusters of water, a thermodynamic cycle is proposed from which the hydration enthalpies of the neutral metal atoms can be estimated. Where comparisons are possible, the results are in reasonable agreement with those obtained using both experimental and ab initio methods. Application of the thermodynamic cycle to neutral alkali metal atoms solvated in ammonia yields solvation enthalpies that are significantly lower than those obtained for water.

  15. Trapping of molecular Oxygen together with Lithium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Akerman, Nitzan; Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous deceleration and trapping of a cold atomic and molecular mixture. This is the first step towards studies of cold atom-molecule collisions at low temperatures as well as application of sympathetic cooling. Both atoms and molecules are cooled in a supersonic expansion and are loaded into a moving magnetic trap which brings them to rest via the Zeeman interaction from an initial velocity of 375 m/s. We use a beam seeded with molecular Oxygen, and entrain it with Lithium atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading of the mixture into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate $10^9$ trapped O$_2$ molecules and $10^5$ Li atoms with background pressure limited lifetime on the order of 1 second. With further improvements to Lithium entrainment we expect that sympathetic cooling of molecules is within reach.

  16. Trapping of Molecular Oxygen together with Lithium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous deceleration and trapping of a cold atomic and molecular mixture. This is the first step towards studies of cold atom-molecule collisions at low temperatures as well as application of sympathetic cooling. Both atoms and molecules are cooled in a supersonic expansion and are loaded into a moving magnetic trap that brings them to rest via the Zeeman interaction from an initial velocity of 375 m /s . We use a beam seeded with molecular oxygen, and entrain it with lithium atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading of the mixture into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 1 09 trapped O2 molecules and 1 05 Li atoms with background pressure limited lifetime on the order of 1 sec. With further improvements to lithium entrainment we expect that sympathetic cooling of molecules is within reach.

  17. Nanomagnetic engineering of the properties of domain wall atom traps

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Thomas J; Weatherill, Kevin J; Schrefl, Thomas; Hughes, Ifan G; Allwood, Dan A

    2011-01-01

    We have used the results of micromagnetic simulations to investigate the effects of nanowire geometry and domain wall magnetization structure on the characteristic parameters of magnetic atom traps formed by domain walls in planar ferromagnetic nanowires. It is found that when traps are formed in the near-field of a domain wall both nanowire geometry and wall structure have a substantial effect on trap frequency and adiabaticity. We also show that in certain regimes a trap's depth depends only on the amplitude of an externally applied rotating magnetic field, thus allowing it to be tuned independently of the trap's other critical parameters.

  18. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Dunning, Alexander J.; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-08-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level.

  19. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Dunning, Alexander J.; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level. PMID:27511602

  20. Dynamics of atom trapping in an rf-dressed potential

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of atom trapping in a radio-frequency-dressed-state potential formed by static and radio frequency (rf) fields has been studied using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. Using the simulations, a case of formation of a toroidal trap for cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms is investigated for atoms trapped in a static quadrupole magnetic trap and exposed to an rf-field with temporally increasing amplitude and decreasing frequency. We first calculate the adiabatic rf-dressed potential for an atom interacting with these fields and then apply DSMC algorithm to simulate the motion of the atom in this time dependent adiabatic potential. In the simulations the Landau-Zener (LZ) transition probability is calculated to know if the atom is in the trappable or untrappable dressed state. The results show that, initially at lower rf-field strength, the rf-field ejects atoms from the trap and leads to evaporative cooling of the atom cloud. However at higher rf-field strength, the atoms make LZ transition to th...

  1. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser addressing the 3P1 level. For the 3P1 -->3S1 (688-nm) transition in strontium, the depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  2. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof

  3. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures thereof

  4. Trapping fermionic and bosonic helium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stas, R.J.W.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental and theoretical work performed at the Laser Centre of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam to study laser-cooled metastable triplet helium atoms. Samples containing about 3x10^8 helium atoms-either fermionic helium-3 atoms, bosonic helium-4 atoms or mixtures

  5. Efficient Direct Evaporative Cooling in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, Daniel M; Du, Shengwang; Anderson, Dana

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate direct evaporative cooling of $^{87}$Rb atoms confined in a dimple trap produced by an atom chip. By changing the two chip currents and two external bias fields, we show theoretically that the trap depth can be lowered in a controlled way with no change in the trap frequencies or the value of the field at the trap center. Experimentally, we maximized the decrease in trap depth by allowing some loosening of the trap. In total, we reduced the trap depth by a factor of 20. The geometric mean of the trap frequencies was reduced by less than a factor of 6. The measured phase space density in the final two stages increased by more than two orders of magnitude, and we estimate an increase of four orders of magnitude over the entire sequence. A subsequent rf evaporative sweep of only a few megahertz produced Bose-Einstein condensates. We also produce condensates in which raising the trap bottom pushes hotter atoms into an rf "knife" operating at a fixed frequency of 5\\,MHz.

  6. An atomic model for neutral and singly ionized uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceda, E. L.; Miley, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    A model for the atomic levels above ground state in neutral, U(0), and singly ionized, U(+), uranium is described based on identified atomic transitions. Some 168 states in U(0) and 95 in U(+) are found. A total of 1581 atomic transitions are used to complete this process. Also discussed are the atomic inverse lifetimes and line widths for the radiative transitions as well as the electron collisional cross sections.

  7. Studies of Ultracold Strontium Atoms in an Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, A. J.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We survey recent experiments with ultracold strontium performed in our group. Trapping and cooling occurs in three stages: successive magneto-optical traps (MOTs) operating on 461 nm and 689 nm transitions of strontium, respectively, are loaded to cool atoms to a temperature of 1 μK. Finally, atoms are loaded into a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (ODT). We examine the loading characteristics, thermalization, and lifetime of atoms held within the ODT. We also perform spectroscopy of atoms held within the ODT. During laser cooling, we are able to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms and shelve them into metastable states using 707 nm and 3 μm lasers. These experiments reveal interesting physics of ultracold strontium.

  8. Microtrap on a concave grating reflector for atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Tao; Yin, Ya-Ling; Li, Xing-Jia; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel scheme of optical confinement for atoms by using a concave grating reflector. The two-dimension grating structure with a concave surface shape exhibits strong focusing ability under radially polarized illumination. Especially, the light intensity at the focal point is about 100 times higher than that of the incident light. Such a focusing optical field reflected from the curved grating structure can provide a deep potential to trap cold atoms. We discuss the feasibility of the structure serving as an optical dipole trap. Our results are as follows. (i) Van der Waals attraction potential to the surface of the structure has a low effect on trapped atoms. (ii) The maximum trapping potential is ˜ 1.14 mK in the optical trap, which is high enough to trap cold 87Rb atoms from a standard magneto-optical trap with a temperature of 120 μK, and the maximum photon scattering rate is lower than 1/s. (iii) Such a microtrap array can also manipulate and control cold molecules, or microscopic particles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374100, 91536218, and 11274114) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13ZR1412800).

  9. In-trap fluorescence detection of atoms in a microscopic dipole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hilliard, A J; Sompet, P; Carpentier, A V; Andersen, M F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate fluorescence detection using a standing wave of blue-detuned light of one or more atoms held in a deep, microscopic dipole trap. The blue-detuned standing wave realizes a Sisyphus laser cooling mechanism so that an atom can scatter many photons while remaining trapped. When imaging more than one atom, the blue detuning limits loss due to inelastic light-assisted collisions. Using this standing wave probe beam, we demonstrate that we can count from one to the order of 100 atoms in the microtrap with sub-poissonian precision.

  10. A dense gas of laser-cooled atoms for hybrid atom-ion trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höltkemeier, Bastian; Glässel, Julian; López-Carrera, Henry; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We describe the realization of a dark spontaneous-force trap of rubidium atoms. The atoms are loaded from a beam provided by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap yielding a capture efficiency of 75%. The dense and cold atomic sample is characterized by saturated absorption imaging. Up to 10^9 atoms are captured with a loading rate of 3× 10^9 atoms/s into a cloud at a temperature of 250 μK with the density exceeding 10^{11} atoms/cm^3. Under steady-state conditions, more than 90% of the atoms can be prepared into the absolute atomic ground state, which provides favorable conditions for the investigation of sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

  11. Entanglement dynamics of a strongly driven trapped atom

    CERN Document Server

    Roghani, Maryam; Breuer, Heinz-Peter

    2011-01-01

    We study the entanglement between the internal electronic and the external vibrational degrees of freedom of a trapped atom which is driven by two lasers into electromagnetically-induced transparency. It is shown that basic features of the intricate entanglement dynamics can be traced to Landau-Zener splittings (avoided crossings) in the spectrum of the atom-laser field Hamiltonian. We further construct an effective Hamiltonian that describes the behavior of entanglement under dissipation induced by spontaneous emission processes. The proposed approach is applicable to a broad range of scenarios for the control of entanglement between electronic and translational degrees of freedom of trapped atoms through suitable laser fields.

  12. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Schowalter, Steven J; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to ten barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behavior as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behavior leads to limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

  13. Oscillation Frequencies for Simultaneous Trapping of Heteronuclear Alkali Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillation frequencies for simultaneous trapping of more than one type of alkali atoms in a common optical lattice. For this purpose, we present numerical results for magic trapping conditions, where the oscillation frequencies for two different kind of alkali atoms using laser lights in the wavelength range 500-1200 nm are same. These wavelengths will be of immense interest for studying static and dynamic properties of boson-boson, boson-fermion, fermion-fermion, and boson-boson-boson mixtures involving different isotopes of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs and Fr alkali atoms. In addition to this, we were also able to locate a magic wavelength around 808.1 nm where all the three Li, K, and Rb atoms are found to be suitable for oscillating at the same frequency in a common optical trap.

  14. PYRAMIDAL-HOLLOW-BEAM DIPOLE TRAP FOR ALKALI ATOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN JIAN-PING; GAO WEI-JIAN; WANG YU-ZHU; ZHU YI-FU; WANG YI-QIU

    2000-01-01

    We propose a dark gravito-optical dipole trap, for alkali atoms, consisting of a blue-detuned, pyramidal-hollow laser beam propagating upward and the gravity field. When cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap are loaded into the pyramidal-hollow beam and bounce inside the pyramidal-hollow beam, they experience efficient Sisyphus cooling and geometric cooling induced by the pyramidal-hollow beam and the weak repumping beam propagating downward. Our study shows that an ultracold and dense atomic sample with an equilibrium 3D momentum of ~ 3hk and an atomic density above the point of Bose-Einstein condensation may be obtained in this pure optical trap.

  15. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Production of antihydrogen at reduced magnetic field for anti-atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Boston, A.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Chartier, M.; Deutsch, A.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Gomberoff, K.; Hangst, J. S.; Hayano, R. S.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated production of antihydrogen in a 1 T solenoidal magnetic field. This field strength is significantly smaller than that used in the first generation experiments ATHENA (3 T) and ATRAP (5 T). The motivation for using a smaller magnetic field is to facilitate trapping of antihydrogen atoms in a neutral atom trap surrounding the production region. We report the results of measurements with the Antihydrogen Laser PHysics Apparatus (ALPHA) device, which can capture and cool antiprotons at 3 T, and then mix the antiprotons with positrons at 1 T. We infer antihydrogen production from the time structure of antiproton annihilations during mixing, using mixing with heated positrons as the null experiment, as demonstrated in ATHENA. Implications for antihydrogen trapping are discussed.

  16. Production of antihydrogen at reduced magnetic field for anti-atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated production of antihydrogen in a 1$,$T solenoidal magnetic field. This field strength is significantly smaller than that used in the first generation experiments ATHENA (3$,$T) and ATRAP (5$,$T). The motivation for using a smaller magnetic field is to facilitate trapping of antihydrogen atoms in a neutral atom trap surrounding the production region. We report the results of measurements with the ALPHA (Antihydrogen Laser PHysics Apparatus) device, which can capture and cool antiprotons at 3$,$T, and then mix the antiprotons with positrons at 1$,$T. We infer antihydrogen production from the time structure of antiproton annihilations during mixing, using mixing with heated positrons as the null experiment, as demonstrated in ATHENA. Implications for antihydrogen trapping are discussed.

  17. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral atom beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Eubank, H.P.

    1981-10-01

    We explore the utility and feasibility of neutral beams of greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, and also of D/sup 0/ formed from D/sup -/. The negative ions would be accelerated to approx. 1 to 2 MeV/AMU and neutralized, whereupon the neutral atoms would be used to heat and, perhaps, to drive current in magnetically confined plasmas. Such beams appear feasible and offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based on positive deuterium ions at approx. 150 keV.

  18. Artificial electromagnetism for neutral atoms: Escher staircase and Laughlin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2004-10-01

    We present a method for creating fields that couple to neutral atoms in the same way that electromagnetic fields couple to charged particles. We show that this technique opens the door for a range of neutral atom experiments, including probing the interplay between periodic potentials and quantum Hall effects. Furthermore, we propose, and analyze, seemingly paradoxical geometries which can be engineered through these techniques. For example, we show how to create a ring of sites where an atom continuously reduces its potential energy by moving in a clockwise direction.

  19. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  20. Observation of the Vacuum Rabi Spectrum for One Trapped Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, A.; Miller, R.; Birnbaum, K. M.; Boozer, A. D.; McKeever, J.; Kimble, H. J.

    2004-12-01

    The transmission spectrum for one atom strongly coupled to the field of a high finesse optical resonator is observed to exhibit a clearly resolved vacuum Rabi splitting characteristic of the normal modes in the eigenvalue spectrum of the atom-cavity system. A new Raman scheme for cooling atomic motion along the cavity axis enables a complete spectrum to be recorded for an individual atom trapped within the cavity mode, in contrast to all previous measurements in cavity QED that have required averaging over 103-105 atoms.

  1. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  2. Effect of energetic oxygen atoms on neutral density models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The dissociative recombination of O2(+) and NO(+) in the F region results in the production of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen with substantially greater kinetic energy than the ambient atoms. In the exosphere these energetic atoms have long free paths. They can ascend to altitudes of several thousand kilometers and can travel horizontally to distances of the order of the earth's radius. The distribution of energetic oxygen atoms is derived by means of models of the ion and neutral densities for quiet and disturbed solar conditions. A distribution technique is used to study the motion of the atoms in the collision-dominated region. Ballistic trajectories are calculated in the spherical gravitational field of the earth. The present calculations show that the number densities of energetic oxygen atoms predominate over the ambient atomic oxygen densities above 1000 km under quiet solar conditions and above 1600 km under disturbed solar conditions.

  3. Neutral atomic carbon in dense molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Goldhaber, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The 370 micron 3P2-3P1 fine-structure line of neutral carbon was detected in seven sources: OMC 1, NGC 2024, S140, W3, DR 21, M17, and W51. Simultaneous analysis of J = 2-1 data and available observations of the J = 1-0 line make it possible to deduce optical depths and excitation temperatures for these lines. These data indicate that both C I lines are likely to be optically thin, and that the ratio of C I to CO column densities in these clouds is typically about 0.1.

  4. Pair tunneling of two atoms out of a trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontani, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    A simple theory for the tunneling of two cold atoms out of a trap in the presence of an attractive contact force is developed. Two competing decay channels, for single-atom and bound-pair tunneling, respectively, contribute independently to the decay law of the mean atom number in the trap. The single-atom tunneling rate is obtained through the quasiparticle wave function formalism. For pair tunneling an effective equation for the center-of-mass motion is derived, so the calculation of the corresponding tunneling rate is again reduced to a simpler one-body problem. The predicted dependence of tunneling rates on the interaction strength qualitatively agrees with a recent measurement of the two-atom decay time [G. Zürn, A. N. Wenz, S. Murmann, T. Lompe, and S. Jochim, arXiv:1307.5153].

  5. Cold neutral atoms via charge exchange from excited state positronium: a proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Bertsche, W A; Eriksson, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for generating cold neutral atoms via charge exchange reactions between trapped ions and Rydberg positronium. The high charge exchange reaction cross section leads to efficient neutralisation of the ions and since the positronium-ion mass ratio is small, the neutrals do not gain appreciable kinetic energy in the process. When the original ions are cold the reaction produces neutrals that can be trapped or further manipulated with electromagnetic fields. Because a wide range of species can be targeted we envisage that our scheme may enable experiments at low temperature that have been hitherto intractable due to a lack of cooling methods. We present an estimate for achievable temperatures, neutral number and density in an experiment where the neutrals are formed at a milli-Kelvin temperature from either directly or sympathetically cooled ions confined on an ion chip. The neutrals may then be confined by their magnetic moment in a co-located magnetic minimum well also formed on the chip. We ...

  6. Bichromatic State-insensitive Trapping of Caesium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Metbulut, M M

    2015-01-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required wavelength of 935.6 nm is inconvenient in terms of experimental realization. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping is proposed to overcome the lack of suitable laser sources. We first consider pairs of laser wavelengths in the ratio 1:2 and 1:3, as obtained via second- and third- harmonic generation. We found that the wavelength combinations 931.8-1863.6 nm and 927.5-2782.5 nm are suitable for state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms. In addition, we examine bichromatic state-insensitive trapping produced by pairs of l...

  7. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-12-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However, this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required wavelength of 935.6 nm is inconvenient in terms of experimental realization. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping is proposed to overcome the lack of suitable laser sources. We first consider pairs of laser wavelengths in the ratio 1:2 and 1:3, as obtained via second- and third-harmonic generation. We found that the wavelength combinations 931.8-1863.6 nm and 927.5-2782.5 nm are suitable for state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms. In addition, we examine bichromatic state-insensitive trapping produced by pairs of laser wavelengths corresponding to currently available high-power lasers. These wavelength pairs were found to be in the range of 585-588 nm and 623-629 for one laser and 1064-1080 nm for the other.

  8. Trapping neutral particles endowed with a magnetic moment by an electromagnetic wave carrying orbital angular momentum: Semiclassical theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2016-01-01

    The motion of a neutral atom endowed with a magnetic moment interacting with the magnetic field is determined from the Ehrenfest-like equations of motion. These equations for the average values of the translational and spin degrees of freedom are derived from the Schr\\"odinger-Pauli wave equation and they form a set of nine coupled nonlinear evolution equations. The numerical and analytic solutions of these equations are obtained for the combination of the rotating magnetic field of a wave carrying orbital angular momentum and a static magnetic field. The running wave traps the atom only in the transverse direction while the standing wave traps the atom also in the direction of the beam.

  9. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom’s stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured1 and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and—by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen—the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state2, 3 of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave...

  10. Atomic and nuclear physics with stored particles in ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H J; Herfurth, F; Quint, W

    2002-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques play an increasingly important role in many areas of science. This review concentrates on recent applications of ion traps installed at accelerator facilities to atomic and nuclear physics such as mass spectrometry of radioactive isotopes, weak interaction studies, symmetry tests, determination of fundamental constants, laser spectroscopy, and spectroscopy of highly-charged ions. In addition, ion traps are proven to be extremely efficient devices for (radioactive) ion beam manipulation as, for example, retardation, accumulation, cooling, beam cleaning, charge-breeding, and bunching.

  11. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  12. Dispersive Optical Interface Based on Nanofiber-Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dawkins, S T; Reitz, D; Vetsch, E; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2011-01-01

    We dispersively interface an ensemble of one thousand atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding a tapered optical nanofiber. This method relies on the azimuthally-asymmetric coupling of the ensemble with the evanescent field of an off-resonant probe beam, transmitted through the nanofiber. The resulting birefringence and dispersion are significant; we observe a phase shift per atom of $\\sim$\\,1\\,mrad at a detuning of six times the natural linewidth, corresponding to an effective resonant optical density per atom of 2.7\\,%. Moreover, we utilize this strong dispersion to non-destructively determine the number of atoms.

  13. Atom trap trace analysis of {sup 39}Ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welte, Joachim

    2011-12-14

    Detection of {sup 39}Ar in natural water samples can be employed for radiometric dating on a timescale of 50 to 1000 years before present. This experimental work comprises the setup of an atomic beam and trap apparatus that captures and detects {sup 39}Ar atoms by the laser-cooling technique ''Atom Trap Trace Analysis''. With this approach, the limitations of low-level counting, regarding sample size and measurement time, could be overcome. In the course of this work, the hyperfine structure spectrum of the cooling transition 1s{sub 5}-2p{sub 9} has been experimentally determined. A high intensity, optically collimated beam of slow metastable argon atoms has been set up and fluorescence detection of individual {sup 39}Ar atoms in a magneto-optical trap is realized. {sup 39}Ar count rates of 1 atom in about 4 hours have been achieved for atmospheric argon. Recent improvements further suggest that even higher count rates of 1 atom/hour are within reach.

  14. Atomic parity violation in a single trapped radium ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, O. O., E-mail: versolato@kvi.nl; Wansbeek, L. W.; Giri, G. S.; Berg, J. E. van den; Hoek, D. J. van der; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W. L.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Sahoo, B. K.; Santra, B.; Shidling, P. D.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W. [University of Groningen, Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Atomic parity violation (APV) experiments are sensitive probes of the electroweak interaction at low energy. These experiments are competitive with and complementary to high-energy collider experiments. The APV signal is strongly enhanced in heavy atoms and it is measurable by exciting suppressed (M1, E2) transitions. The status of APV experiments and theory are reviewed as well as the prospects of an APV experiment using one single trapped Ra{sup + } ion. The predicted enhancement factor of the APV effect in Ra{sup + } is about 50 times larger than in Cs atoms. However, certain spectroscopic information on Ra{sup + } needed to constrain the required atomic many-body theory, was lacking. Using the AGOR cyclotron and the TRI{mu}P facility at KVI in Groningen, short-lived {sup 212 - 214}Ra{sup + } ions were produced and trapped. First ever excited-state laser spectroscopy was performed on the trapped ions. These measurements provide a benchmark for the atomic theory required to extract the electroweak mixing angle to sub-1% accuracy and are an important step towards an APV experiment in a single trapped Ra{sup + } ion.

  15. Cold atoms in microscopic traps from wires to chips

    CERN Document Server

    Cassettari, D

    2000-01-01

    Ioffe-Pritchard trap. In the latter we have achieved the trapping parameters required in the experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates with much reduced power consumption. In a second time we have replaced the free standing wires with an atom chip, which we have used to compress the atomic cloud in potentials with trap frequencies above 100 kHz and ground state sizes below 100 nm. Such potentials are especially interesting for quantum information proposals of performing quantum gate operations with controlled collisions between trapped atoms. Finally, by combining two wire guides we have experimentally realized an innovative kind of beam splitter for guided atoms. We have investigated the splitting potential generated by a Y-shaped wire which has one input, i.e. the central arm of the Y, and two outputs corresponding to the left and right arms of the Y. By tuning the current ratio in the two outputs we have observed atoms switching from left to right as well as symmetric splitting. This and other similar des...

  16. Single-photon superradiance and radiation trapping by atomic shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Li, Fu; Li, Hongyuan; Zhang, Xiwen; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-04-01

    The collective nature of light emission by atomic ensembles yields fascinating effects such as superradiance and radiation trapping even at the single-photon level. Light emission is influenced by virtual transitions and the collective Lamb shift which yields peculiar features in temporal evolution of the atomic system. We study how two-dimensional atomic structures collectively emit a single photon. Namely, we consider spherical, cylindrical, and spheroidal shells with two-level atoms continuously distributed on the shell surface and find exact analytical solutions for eigenstates of such systems and their collective decay rates and frequency shifts. We identify states which undergo superradiant decay and states which are trapped and investigate how size and shape of the shell affects collective light emission. Our findings could be useful for quantum information storage and the design of optical switches.

  17. Trapping of Single Atoms with Single Photons in Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Doherty, A C; Hood, C J; Kimble, H J

    2000-01-01

    Two recent experiments have reported the trapping of individual atoms inside optical resonators by the mechanical forces associated with single photons [Hood et al., Science 287, 1447 (2000) and Pinkse et al., Nature 404, 365 (2000)]. Here we analyze the trapping dynamics in these settings, focusing on two points of interest. Firstly, we investigate the extent to which light-induced forces in these experiments are distinct from their free-space counterparts. Secondly, we explore the quantitative features of the resulting atomic motion and how these dynamics are mapped onto variations of the intracavity field. Not surprisingly, qualitatively distinct atomic dynamics arise as the coupling and dissipative rates are varied. For the experiment of Hood et al., we show that atomic motion is largely conservative and is predominantly in radial orbits transverse to the cavity axis. A comparison with the free-space theory demonstrates that the fluctuations of the dipole force are suppressed by an order of magnitude. Thi...

  18. Cold atom trap with zero residual magnetic field: the ac magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Matthew; Murray, Andrew James

    2008-10-24

    A novel atom trap is described using alternating current to generate the magnetic B field, together with high speed polarization switching of the damping laser field. This combination produces a trap as effective as a standard magneto-optical trap (MOT), with the advantage that the average B field is zero. No net current is hence induced in surrounding conductive elements, and the B field produced by the ac MOT is found to switch off >300 times faster than a conventional MOT. New experiments can hence be performed, including charged particle probing or detection of the cold target ensemble.

  19. Long-Distance Quantum Communication with Neutral Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Razavi, M; Razavi, Mohsen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2005-01-01

    The architecture proposed by Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) for long-distance quantum communication with atomic ensembles is analyzed. Its fidelity and throughput in entanglement distribution, entanglement swapping, and quantum teleportation is derived within a framework that accounts for multiple excitations in the ensembles as well as loss and asymmetries in the channel. The DLCZ performance metrics that are obtained are compared to the corresponding results for the trapped-atom quantum communication architecture that has been proposed by a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Northwestern University (MIT/NU). Both systems are found to be capable of high-fidelity entanglement distribution. However, the DLCZ scheme only provides conditional teleportation and repeater operation, whereas the MIT/NU architecture affords full Bell-state measurements on its trapped atoms. Moreover, it is shown that achieving unity conditional fidelity in DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation requires...

  20. Ultratrace determination of tin by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Průša, Libor [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Hlavova 8, Prague 2, CZ 128 43 Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Sn. •A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. •Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. •Hundred percent preconcentration efficiency for tin was reached. •Routine analytical method was developed for Sn determination (LOD of 0.03 ng mL{sup −1} Sn). -- Abstract: A quartz multiatomizer with its inlet arm modified to serve as a trap (trap-and-atomizer device) was employed to trap tin hydride and subsequently to volatilize collected analyte species with atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Generation, atomization and preconcentration conditions were optimized and analytical figures of merit of both on-line atomization as well as preconcentration modes were quantified. Preconcentration efficiency of 95 ± 5% was found. The detection limits reached were 0.029 and 0.14 ng mL{sup −1} Sn, respectively, for 120 s preconcentration period and on-line atomization mode without any preconcentration. The interference extent of other hydride forming elements (As, Se, Sb and Bi) on tin determination was found negligible in both modes of operation. The applicability of the developed preconcentration method was verified by Sn determination in a certified reference material as well as by analysis of real samples.

  1. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Rushton, Jo; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This "switching-MOT" relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap's beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for $^{85}$Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  2. Radio-frequency dressed state potentials for neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hofferberth, S; Fischer, B; Verdu, J; Schmiedmayer, J

    2006-01-01

    Potentials for atoms can be created by external fields acting on properties like magnetic moment, charge, polarizability, or by oscillating fields which couple internal states. The most prominent realization of the latter is the optical dipole potential formed by coupling ground and electronically excited states of an atom with light. Here we present an experimental investigation of the remarkable properties of potentials derived from radio-frequency (RF) coupling between electronic ground states. The coupling is magnetic and the vector character allows to design state dependent potential landscapes. On atom chips this enables robust coherent atom manipulation on much smaller spatial scales than possible with static fields alone. We find no additional heating or collisional loss up to densities approaching $10^{15}$ atoms / cm$^3$ compared to static magnetic traps. We demonstrate the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates in RF potentials and investigate the difference in the interference between two independe...

  3. Two-Dimensional Arrays of Neutral Atom Quantum Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-20

    Isenhower, X. Zhang, A. Gill, T. Walker, M. Saffman. Deterministic entanglement of two neutral atoms via Rydberg blockade, Physical Review A, (09 2010...squeezing of atomic ensembles by multicolor quantum nondemolition measurements, Physical Review A, (02 2009): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.023831 10/19/2012...collective encoding in holmium atoms, Physical Review A, (07 2008): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.012336 10/19/2012 10.00 M Saffman, X L Zhang, A T

  4. Artificial electromagnetism for neutral atoms: Escher staircases and Laughlin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2004-03-01

    Cold gas experimentalists are attempting to produce analogs of solid state systems by placing neutral atoms in periodic `optical lattice' potentials. I show how lasers can manipulate the internal states of such atoms to simulate the effects of electric and magnetic fields on charged particles. Unlike similar ideas of Jaksch and Zoller [New J. Phys. 5, 56 (2003)], an external linear potential is unnecessary. Since these effective electric and magnetic fields do not obey Maxwell's equations, seemingly paradoxical geometries are possible. For example, one can construct a ring of sites where an atoms potential energy continuously decreases as it moves in a clockwise direction.

  5. Atomic Dipole Traps with Amplified Spontaneous Emission: A Proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, Jean-François; Garreau, Jean Claude; Szriftgiser, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    We propose what we believe to be a novel type of optical source for ultra-cold atomic Far Off-Resonance optical-dipole Traps (FORTs). The source is based on an Erbium Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) source that seeds a high power Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA). The main interest of this source is its very low coherence length, thus allowing an incoherent superposition of several trapping beams without any optical interference. The behavior of the superimposed beams is then a scalar sum greatly simplifying complex configurations. As an illustration, we report an estimation of the intensity noise of this source and an estimation of the atomic excess heating rate for an evaporative cooling experiment application. They are both found to be suitable for cold atoms experiments.

  6. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, D; Sayrin, C; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-06-14

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized ∼ 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time of T(2)(*) = 0.6 ms and an irreversible dephasing time of T(2)(') = 3.7 ms. By modeling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, T(2)(*) and T(2)(') are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  7. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Reitz, D; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time $T_2^\\ast=0.6$ ms and an irreversible dephasing time $T_2^\\prime=3.7$ ms. By theoretically modelling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, $T_2^\\ast$ and $T_2^\\prime$ are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  8. Optical dipole trapping of radium atoms for EDM search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, W. L.; Sulai, I. A.; Parker, R. H.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Singh, J.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing an EDM search based on laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225 (half-life = 15 d) atoms. Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be 2-3 orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. Recently, we have succeeded in transferring Ra-226 atoms from a MOT into an optical dipole trap formed by a fiber laser beam at 1550 nm. For the EDM measurement, the cold atoms will be moved into the neighboring vacuum chamber inside magnetic shields where a pair of electrodes apply a 10 kV cm-1electric field. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. A Solution to Inductive Power Coupling in a Time-Cycled Atom Trap for Beta Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Liam; Behr, John; Anholm, Melissa; McNeil, James

    2016-09-01

    The TRINAT group at TRIUMF uses lasers and magnetic fields to confine, cool, and polarize a cloud of beta-decaying neutral alkali atoms to test weak force asymmetry. To alternate between trapping and polarizing the atoms, the trapping magnetic field must be switched on and off. This time-changing magnetic field, created by a pair of co-axial coils, produces eddy currents-and consequentially resistive heating-in nearby conductors. This heating may cause undesirable effects, including damage to the delicate pellicle mirrors which are to be used in future experiments. Previously, the current waveform in the coils consisted of two periods of a sinusoid during the on time of the trapping field (this reduces leftover field from eddy currents during the polarization time). We have calculated the relative power coupled to the pellicle mirror mount for various waveforms, and determined that using half a period of a lower-frequency sinusoid couples an order of magnitude less power than the original waveform, and approximately 2 times less than a trapezoidal wave. We measured the lifetime of the trap subject to this new waveform and found it is possible to achieve a lifetime comparable to that of a continuous trap, our best result differing by less than 5 percent.

  10. Entangling two transportable neutral atoms via local spin exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Lester, B. J.; Foss-Feig, M.; Wall, M. L.; Rey, A. M.; Regal, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    To advance quantum information science, physical systems are sought that meet the stringent requirements for creating and preserving quantum entanglement. In atomic physics, robust two-qubit entanglement is typically achieved by strong, long-range interactions in the form of either Coulomb interactions between ions or dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms. Although such interactions allow fast quantum gates, the interacting atoms must overcome the associated coupling to the environment and cross-talk among qubits. Local interactions, such as those requiring substantial wavefunction overlap, can alleviate these detrimental effects; however, such interactions present a new challenge: to distribute entanglement, qubits must be transported, merged for interaction, and then isolated for storage and subsequent operations. Here we show how, using a mobile optical tweezer, it is possible to prepare and locally entangle two ultracold neutral atoms, and then separate them while preserving their entanglement. Ground-state neutral atom experiments have measured dynamics consistent with spin entanglement, and have detected entanglement with macroscopic observables; we are now able to demonstrate position-resolved two-particle coherence via application of a local gradient and parity measurements. This new entanglement-verification protocol could be applied to arbitrary spin-entangled states of spatially separated atoms. The local entangling operation is achieved via spin-exchange interactions, and quantum tunnelling is used to combine and separate atoms. These techniques provide a framework for dynamically entangling remote qubits via local operations within a large-scale quantum register.

  11. Determination of antimony by using tungsten trap atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titretir, Serap; Kendüzler, Erdal; Arslan, Yasin; Kula, İbrahim; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O. Yavuz.

    2008-08-01

    An electrically heated tungsten coil was used as a trap in the determination of antimony. The technique consists of three steps. Initially, SbH 3 is formed by hydride generation procedure; then the analyte species in vapor form are transported to W-coil trap heated at 370 °C. Following the preconcentration step, the trap is heated to 895 °C; analyte species are revolatilized and transported to the flame-heated quartz atom cell where atomization and the formation of signal take place. The experimental parameters were optimized both for trap and no-trap studies. The most important experimental parameters are concentrations of HCl and NaBH 4 solutions, H 2 and Ar gas flow rates, and collection and revolatilization temperatures of W-coil. Accuracy was tested using a certified reference material, waste water EU-L-1. Limit of detection for the system is 16 ng l - 1 using a sample of 36 ml collected in 4.0 min. Enhancement factor in sensitivity was 17.

  12. Determination of antimony by using tungsten trap atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titretir, Serap [Department of Chemistry, Inoenue University, 44065 Malatya (Turkey); Kenduezler, Erdal [Department of Primary Education, Faculty of Education, Ahi Evran University, 40100 Kirsehir (Turkey); Arslan, Yasin [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Kula, Ibrahim [Department of Chemistry, Mugla University, 48000 Mugla (Turkey); Bakirdere, Sezgin [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, 67100 Zonguldak (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    An electrically heated tungsten coil was used as a trap in the determination of antimony. The technique consists of three steps. Initially, SbH{sub 3} is formed by hydride generation procedure; then the analyte species in vapor form are transported to W-coil trap heated at 370 deg. C. Following the preconcentration step, the trap is heated to 895 deg. C; analyte species are revolatilized and transported to the flame-heated quartz atom cell where atomization and the formation of signal take place. The experimental parameters were optimized both for trap and no-trap studies. The most important experimental parameters are concentrations of HCl and NaBH{sub 4} solutions, H{sub 2} and Ar gas flow rates, and collection and revolatilization temperatures of W-coil. Accuracy was tested using a certified reference material, waste water EU-L-1. Limit of detection for the system is 16 ng l{sup -1} using a sample of 36 ml collected in 4.0 min. Enhancement factor in sensitivity was 17.

  13. Seeking to Improve Low Energy Neutral Atom Detection in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Herrero, F.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of energetic neutral atoms allows for the remote examination of the interactions between plasmas and neutral populations in space. Before these neutral atoms can be measured, they must first be converted to ions. For the low energy end of this spectrum, interaction with a conversion surface is often the most efficient method to convert neutrals into ions. It is generally thought that the most efficient surfaces are low work functions materials. However, by their very nature, these surfaces are highly reactive and unstable, and therefore are not suitable for space missions where conditions cannot be controlled as they are in a laboratory. We therefore are looking to optimize a stable surface for conversion efficiency. Conversion efficiency can be increased either by changing the incident angle of the neutral particles to be grazing incidence and using stable surfaces with high conversion efficiencies. We have examined how to increase the angle of incidence from -80 degrees to -89 degrees, while maintaining or improving the total active conversion surface area without increasing the overall volume of the instrument. We are developing a method to micro-machine silicon, which will reduce the volume to surface area ratio by a factor of 60. We have also examined the material properties that affect the conversion efficiency of the surface for stable surfaces. Some of the parameters we have examined are work function, smoothness, and bond structure. We find that for stable surfaces, the most important property is the smoothness of the surface.

  14. Focused beams of fast neutral atoms in glow discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu. A.; Metel, A. S.; Volosova, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    Glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons in a vacuum chamber allows plasma processing of conductive products in a wide pressure range of p = 0.01 - 5 Pa. To assist processing of a small dielectric product with a concentrated on its surface beam of fast neutral atoms, which do not cause charge effects, ions from the discharge plasma are accelerated towards the product and transformed into fast atoms. The beam is produced using a negatively biased cylindrical or a spherical grid immersed in the plasma. Ions accelerated by the grid turn into fast neutral atoms at p > 0.1 Pa due to charge exchange collisions with gas atoms in the space charge sheaths adjoining the grid. The atoms form a diverging neutral beam and a converging beam propagating from the grid in opposite directions. The beam propagating from the concave surface of a 0.24-m-wide cylindrical grid is focused on a target within a 10-mm-wide stripe, and the beam from the 0.24-m-diameter spherical grid is focused within a 10-mm-diameter circle. At the bias voltage U = 5 kV and p ˜ 0.1 Pa, the energy of fast argon atoms is distributed continuously from zero to eU ˜ 5 keV. The pressure increase to 1 Pa results in the tenfold growth of their equivalent current and a decrease in the mean energy by an order of magnitude, which substantially raises the efficiency of material etching. Sharpening by the beam of ceramic knife-blades proved that the new method for the generation of concentrated fast atom beams can be effectively used for the processing of dielectric materials in vacuum.

  15. Quantum Computation and Simulation Using Neutral Fermionic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-06

    State Laser Source for Laser Cooling of Lithium , 39th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics. 27-MAY-08...Prof. Lincoln Carr and Laith Haddad from the Colorado School of Mines , we have proposed a method to excite relativistic vortices in a Bose-Einstein...Savard, S. Bali, C. Freed, and J. Thomas, “Ultrastable CO2 laser trapping of lithium fermions,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4204–4207 (1999). [5] L. Carr

  16. On-chip optical trapping for atomic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximillian A.; Salim, Evan; Farkas, Daniel; Duggan, Janet; Ivory, Megan; Anderson, Dana

    2014-09-01

    To simplify applications that rely on optical trapping of cold and ultracold atoms, ColdQuanta is developing techniques to incorporate miniature optical components onto in-vacuum atom chips. The result is a hybrid atom chip that combines an in-vacuum micro-optical bench for optical control with an atom chip for magnetic control. Placing optical components on a chip inside of the vacuum system produces a compact system that can be targeted to specific experiments, in this case the generation of optical lattices. Applications that can benefit from this technology include timekeeping, inertial sensing, gravimetry, quantum information, and emulation of quantum many-body systems. ColdQuanta's GlasSi atom chip technology incorporates glass windows in the plane of a silicon atom chip. In conjunction with the in-vacuum micro-optical bench, optical lattices can be generated within a few hundred microns of an atom chip window through which single atomic lattice sites can be imaged with sub-micron spatial resolution. The result is a quantum gas microscope that allows optical lattices to be studied at the level of single lattice sites. Similar to what ColdQuanta has achieved with magneto-optical traps (MOTs) in its miniMOT system and with Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs) in its RuBECi(R) system, ColdQuanta seeks to apply the on-chip optical bench technology to studies of optical lattices in a commercially available, turnkey system. These techniques are currently being considered for lattice experiments in NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) slated for flight on the International Space Station.

  17. Creation of effective magnetic fields in optical lattices The Hofstadter butterfly for cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksch, D

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of neutral atoms in a 2D optical lattice which traps two distinct internal states of the atoms in different columns. Two Raman lasers are used to coherently transfer atoms from one internal state to the other, thereby causing hopping between the different columns. By adjusting the laser parameters appropriately we can induce a non vanishing phase of particles moving along a closed path on the lattice. This phase is proportional to the enclosed area and we thus simulate a magnetic flux through the lattice. This setup is described by a Hamiltonian identical to the one for electrons on a lattice subject to a magnetic field and thus allows us to study this equivalent situation under very well defined controllable conditions. We consider the limiting case of huge magnetic fields -- which is not experimentally accessible for electrons in metals -- where a fractal band structure, the Hofstadter butterfly, characterizes the system.

  18. Direct scattering, trapping, and desorption in atom-surface collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoqing; Manson, J R

    2008-08-08

    Maxwell is credited as the first to invoke the assumption that an impinging gas beam scatters from a surface with a direct contribution exhibiting little change in state and a trapping-desorption fraction that desorbs in equilibrium [J. C. Maxwell, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London 170, 231 (1879)]. Here a classical mechanical scattering theory is developed to describe direct scattering, trapping, and subsequent desorption of the incident beam. This theory allows a rigorous test of the Maxwell assumption and determines the conditions under which it is valid. The theory also gives quantitative explanations of important new experimental measurements [K. D. Gibson, N. Isa, and S. J. Sibener, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 13 083 (2003)] for direct and trapping-desorption scattering of Ar atoms by a self-assembled layer of 1-decanethiol on Au(111).

  19. Entangling two transportable neutral atoms via local spin exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, A M; Foss-Feig, M; Wall, M L; Rey, A M; Regal, C A

    2015-01-01

    To advance quantum information science a constant pursuit is the search for physical systems that meet the stringent requirements for creating and preserving quantum entanglement. In atomic physics, robust two-qubit entanglement is typically achieved by strong, long-range interactions in the form of Coulomb interactions between ions or dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms. While these interactions allow fast gates, atoms subject to these interactions must overcome the associated coupling to the environment and cross-talk among qubits. Local interactions, such as those requiring significant wavefunction overlap, can alleviate these detrimental effects yet present a new challenge: To distribute entanglement, qubits must be transported, merged for interaction, and then isolated for storage and subsequent operations. Here we show how, via a mobile optical tweezer, it is possible to prepare and locally entangle two ultracold neutral atoms, and then separate them while preserving their entanglement. While ult...

  20. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Tyler; Cook, Robert L.; Hankin, Aaron M.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Biedermann, Grant W.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (cz) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a σ+/σ- orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces acting on doubly excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. For reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of 133Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a cz gate in <10 μ s with error probability on the order of 10-3.

  1. Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice Sites and Atoms in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-13

    Félix Riou, Aaron Reinhard, Laura A. Zundel, David S. Weiss. Spontaneous-emission- induced transition rates between atomic states in optical lattices...complementary technique to measure the hyperfine states at each lattice site. We developed a technique to cool atoms so that they are mostly in the vibrational ...28-Feb-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice

  2. Extremely nonlocal optical nonlinearities in atoms trapped near a waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Stimming, Hans Peter; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are typically local. Here we predict the possibility of highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities for light propagating in atomic media trapped near a nano-waveguide, where long-range interactions between the atoms can be tailored. When the atoms are in an electromagnetically-induced transparency configuration, the atomic interactions are translated to long-range interactions between photons and thus to highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities. We derive and analyze the governing nonlinear propagation equation, finding a roton-like excitation spectrum for light and the emergence of long-range order in its output intensity. These predictions open the door to studies of unexplored wave dynamics and many-body physics with highly-nonlocal interactions of optical fields in one dimension.

  3. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Jo; Roy, Ritayan; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-11-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This ‘switching-MOT’ relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap’s beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for 85Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  4. Coherent Population Trapping-Ramsey Interference in Cold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi; YANG Guo-Qing; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate an experimental observation of coherent population trapping-Ramsey interference in cold 87Rb atoms by employing the time-domain separated oscillatory fields' method. The interference fringe with line width of 80Hz is obtained. We propose a novel method to measure the cold atom number. The measurement is insensitive to the pump beam intensity, the single photon detuning and even the initial state population. We use this method to normalize the interference signal and to improve the signal-to-noise ratio significantly.

  5. Secondary laser cooling and capturing of thulium atoms in traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Fedorov, S A; Vishnyakova, G A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, N N; Sorokin, V N [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    Secondary laser cooling has been realised on the weak dipole transition 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sup o})6s{sup 2}, J = 7/2, F=4 → 4f{sup 12}({sup 3}H{sub 6}) 5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2}, J' = 9/2, F' = 5 with the wavelength of 530.7 nm and natural width of 350 kHz. The temperature of the atomic cloud in a magnetooptical trap (MOT) was 30 μK at the lifetime of 2 s and the number of atoms 10{sup 5}. Approximately 1% of atoms from the MOT have been reloaded to an optical dipole trap and to one-dimensional optical lattice at the wavelength of 532 nm. The atom lifetime in the optical lattice was 320 ms. We propose to employ thulium atoms captured in an optical lattice as an optical frequency reference. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  6. A New Instrument Design for Imaging Low Energy Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John W.; Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, Dennis; Rozmarynowski, Paul; Getty, Stephanie; Cooper, John F.; Smith, Billy

    2007-01-01

    The MidSTAR-2 satellite, to be built at the US Naval Academy as a follow-on to the successful MidSTAR-1 satellite (http://web.ew.usna.edu/midstar/), will launch in 2011 and carry three Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) experiments developed under Goddard's Internal Research and Development (IRAD) program. One of these GSFC instruments, the Miniature Imager for Neutral Ionospheric atoms and Magnetospheric Electrons (MINI-ME) builds on the heritage of the Goddard-developed Low-Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager launched on the IMAGE spacecraft in 2000. MINI-ME features a Venetian-blind conversion surface assembly that improves both light rejection and conversion efficiency in a smaller and lighter package than LENA making this an highly effective instrument for viewing solar wind charge exchange with terrestrial and planetary exospheres. We will describe the MINI-ME prototyping effort and its science targets.

  7. Low energy neutral atom imaging: Remote observations of the magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.; Moore, K.R.

    1995-02-01

    Recent developments in detection of neutral atom imaging should enable imaging the global structure and dynamics of the terrestrial magnetosphere. The inherent technical challenge of imaging low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) with energy < 30 keV is their separation from the tremendous UV background, to which LENA detectors are sensitive, without loss of information of LENA trajectory and energy. Three instrument concepts for separating LENAs from the background UV are presented: LENA charge conversion via transmission through an ultrathin carbon foil and subsequent electrostatic deflection, EUV grating polarizers and attenuators, and high frequency shutters. Each of these concepts can be mated to a detector section that provides both LENA imaging capability and coincidence/time-of-flight.

  8. Exospheres and Energetic Neutral Atoms of Mars, Venus and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Smith, H. Todd; Garnier, Philippe; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Delva, Magda; Gröller, Hannes; Mura, Alessandro

    Our understanding of the upper atmosphere of unmagnetized bodies such as Mars, Venus and Titan has improved significantly in this decade. Recent observations by in situ and remote sensing instruments on board Mars Express, Venus Express and Cassini have revealed characteristics of the neutral upper atmospheres (exospheres) and of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). The ENA environment in the vicinity of the bodies is by itself a significant study field, but ENAs are also used as a diagnostic tool for the exosphere and the interaction with the upstream plasmas. Synergy between theoretical and modeling work has also improved considerably. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of our understanding of the neutral environment in the vicinity of unmagnetized planets.

  9. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High Precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on physical processes inside and outside our heliosphere. For instance, recent IBEX observations provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction this can result in a significant deflection and acceleration. In this presentation we study the impact of the gravitational effects of the Earth, Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth orbit. We show that planetary gravitational effects do not significantly affect the interstellar neutral gas parameters obtained from IBEX observations. We further study the possibility whether the He focusing cone of the Sun or Jupiter could be measured by IBEX, and whether these cones could be used as an independent measure of the interstellar He temperature. These topics are of particular importance for future missions such as IMAP, which will provide ENA images for a broader energy range and with better sensitivity and resolution.

  10. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D., E-mail: pschwin@sandia.gov; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm{sup 3} in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of {sup 171}Y b{sup +}. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10{sup −11}/τ{sup 1/2}.

  11. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abe, M; Moore, T. E; Collier, M. R; Taguchi, S

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere...

  12. Neutral tripodal receptors towards efficient trapping of oxalate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjan Dutta; Bijit Chowdhury; Purnandhu Bose; Pradyut Ghosh

    2014-09-01

    Tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) based pentafluorophenyl urea and 4-cyanophenyl thiourea receptors have shown encapsulation of oxalate (C2O$^{2−}_{4}$) in semi-aqueous environment. A single crystal X-ray study shows trapping of planar conformer of C2O$^{2−}_{4}$ in both the cases. Further solution state binding of C2O$^{2−}_{4}$ is probed by 1H-NMR titration study in semi-aqueous solvent.

  13. Microwave discharge as a remote source of neutral oxygen atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Primc

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The late flowing afterglow of an oxygen plasma was used as a remote source of neutral oxygen atoms. Plasma was created via a microwave discharge in a narrow quartz glass tube with an inner diameter of 6 mm at powers between 50 W and 300 W. The tube was connected to a wider perpendicular tube with an inner diameter of 36 mm. The density of neutral oxygen atoms was measured in the wide tube about 70 cm from the discharge using a classical nickel catalytic probe. The oxygen atom density as a function of gas pressure had a well-defined maximum. The oxygen atom density can be as large as 11 × 1020 m-3. At the lowest power tested (50 W, the maximum was obtained at a pressure of about 30 Pa. However, at higher powers, the maximum shifted to higher pressures. As a result, at 300 W the maximum appeared at 60 Pa. The results can be explained through collision phenomena in gas phase and surfaces in both discharge and flowing afterglow regions, and strong pressure gradients along the narrow tube.

  14. Communication: Neutral atom imaging using a pulsed electromagnetic lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jamie R.; Anciaux, Erik M.; Raizen, Mark G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on progress towards a neutral atom imaging device that will be used for chemically sensitive surface microscopy and nanofabrication. Our novel technique for improving refractive power and correcting chromatic aberration in atom lenses is based on a fundamental paradigm shift from continuous-beam focusing to a pulsed, three-dimensional approach. Simulations of this system suggest that it will pave the way toward the long-sought goal of true atom imaging on the nanoscale. Using a prototype lens with a supersonic beam of metastable neon, we have imaged complex patterns with lower distortion and higher resolution than has been shown in any previous experiment. Comparison with simulations corroborates the underlying theory and encourages further refinement of the process.

  15. Measurement of low-energy Na^+ -- Na total collision rate in an ion--neutral hybrid trap

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, D S; Kwolek, J M; Blümel, R; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the total elastic and resonant charge-exchange ion-atom collision rate coefficient $k_\\mathrm{ia}$ of cold sodium (\\ce{Na}) with optically-dark low energy \\ce{Na+} ions in a hybrid ion-neutral trap. To determine $k_\\mathrm{ia}$, we measured the trap loading and loss from both a \\ce{Na} magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear radio frequency quadrupole Paul trap. We found the total rate coefficient to be $7.4 \\pm 1.9 \\times 10^{-8}$ cm$^3$/s for the type I \\ce{Na} MOT immersed within an $\\approx 140$ K ion cloud and $1.10 \\pm 0.25 \\times 10^{-7}$ cm$^3$/s for the type II \\ce{Na} MOT within an $\\approx 1070$ K ion cloud. Our measurements show excellent agreement with previously reported theoretical fully quantal \\textit{ab initio} calculations. In the process of determining the total rate coefficient, we demonstrate that a MOT can be used to probe an optically dark ion cloud's spatial distribution within a hybrid trap.

  16. Adjustable microchip ring trap for cold atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Paul M; Squires, Matthew B; Scoville, James A; Carlson, Evan J; Buchwald, Walter R; Miller, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    We describe the design and function of a circular magnetic waveguide for deBroglie waves produced from wires on a microchip. The guide is a two-dimensional magnetic minimum for trapping weak-field seeking states of atoms or molecules with a magnetic dipole moment. The design consists of seven circular wires sharing a common radius. We describe the design, the time-dependent currents of the wires and show that it is possible to form a circular waveguide with adjustable height and gradient while minimizing perturbation resulting from leads or wire crossings. This maximal area geometry is suited for rotation sensing with atom interferometry via the Sagnac effect using either cold atoms, molecules and Bose-condensed systems.

  17. Intensity-modulated polarizabilities and magic trapping of alkali-metal and divalent atoms in infrared optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Turker; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Long range interactions between neutral Rydberg atoms has emerged as a potential means for implementing quantum logical gates. These experiments utilize hyperfine manifold of ground state atoms to act as a qubit basis, while exploiting the Rydberg blockade mechanism to mediate conditional quantum logic. The necessity for overcoming several sources of decoherence makes magic wavelength trapping in optical lattices an indispensable tool for gate experiments. The common wisdom is that atoms in Rydberg states see trapping potentials that are essentially that of a free electron, and can only be trapped at laser intensity minima. We show that although the polarizability of a Rydberg state is always negative, the optical potential can be both attractive or repulsive at long wavelengths (up to ~104 nm). This opens up the possibility of magic trapping Rydberg states with ground state atoms in optical lattices, thereby eliminating the necessity to turn off trapping fields during gate operations. Because the wavelengths are near the CO2 laser band, the photon scattering and the ensuing motional heating is also reduced compared to conventional traps near low lying resonances, alleviating an important source of decoherence. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. PHY-1212482.

  18. Thermally stable single-atom platinum-on-ceria catalysts via atom trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, John; Xiong, Haifeng; DelaRiva, Andrew; Peterson, Eric J.; Pham, Hien; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Qi, Gongshin; Oh, Se H.; Wiebenga, Michelle H.; Pereira Hernandez, Xavier I.; Wang, Yong; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts based on single atoms of scarce precious metals can lead to more efficient use through enhanced reactivity and selectivity. However, single atoms on catalyst supports can be mobile and aggregate into nanoparticles when heated at elevated temperatures. High temperatures are detrimental to catalyst performance unless these mobile atoms can be trapped. We used ceria powders having similar surface areas but different exposed surface facets. When mixed with a platinum/ aluminum oxide catalyst and aged in air at 800°C, the platinum transferred to the ceria and was trapped. Polyhedral ceria and nanorods were more effective than ceria cubes at anchoring the platinum. Performing synthesis at high temperatures ensures that only the most stable binding sites are occupied, yielding a sinter-resistant, atomically dispersed catalyst.

  19. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  20. Modeling Emission of Heavy Energetic Neutral Atoms from the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaczyna, Paweł; Bzowski, Maciej

    2017-09-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) are a fruitful tool for remote diagnosis of the plasma in the heliosphere and its vicinity. So far, instruments detecting ENAs from the heliosphere were configured for observations of hydrogen atoms. Here, we estimate emissions of ENAs of the heavy chemical elements helium, oxygen, nitrogen, and neon. A large portion of the heliospheric ENAs is created in the inner heliosheath from neutralized interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs). We modeled this process and calculated full-sky intensities of ENAs for energies 0.2–130 keV/nuc. We found that the largest fluxes among considered species are expected for helium, smaller for oxygen and nitrogen, and smallest for neon. The obtained intensities are 50–106 times smaller than the hydrogen ENA intensities observed by IBEX. The detection of heavy ENAs will be possible if a future ENA detector is equipped with the capability to measure the masses of observed atoms. Because of different reaction cross-sections among the different species, observations of heavy ENAs can allow for a better understanding of global structure of the heliosphere as well as the transport and energization of PUIs in the heliosphere.

  1. Accurate absolute measurement of trapped Cs atoms in a MOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talavera O, M.; Lopez R, M.; Carlos L, E. de [Division de Tiempo y Frecuencia, Centro Nacional de Metrologia, CENAM, km 4.5 Carretera a los Cues, El Marques, 76241 Queretaro (Mexico); Jimenez S, S. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del lPN, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    A Cs-133 Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) has been developed at the Time and Frequency Division of the Centro Nacional de Metrologia, CENAM, in Mexico. This MOT is part of a primary frequency standard based on ultra-cold Cs atoms, called CsF-1 clock, under development at CENAM. In this Cs MOT, we use the standard configuration ({sigma}{sup +} - {sigma}{sup -}) 4-horizontal 2-vertical laser beams 1.9 cm in diameter, with 5 mW each. We use a 852 nm, 5 mW, DBR laser as a master laser which is stabilized by saturation spectroscopy. Emission linewidth of the master laser is l MHz. In order to amplify the light of the master laser, a 50 mW, 852 nm AlGaAs laser is used as slave laser. This slave laser is stabilized by light injection technique. A 12 MHz red shift of the light is performed by two double passes through two Acusto-Optic Modulators (AOMs). The optical part of the CENAMs MOT is very robust against mechanical vibration, acoustic noise and temperature changes in our laboratory, because none of our diode lasers use an extended cavity to reduce the linewidth. In this paper, we report results of our MOT characterization as a function of several operation parameters such as the intensity of laser beams, the laser beam diameter, the red shift of light, and the gradient of the magnetic field. We also report accurate absolute measurement of the number of Cs atoms trapped in our Cs MOT. We found up to 6 x 10{sup 7} Cs atoms trapped in our MOT measured with an uncertainty no greater than 6.4%. (Author)

  2. Radiofrequency-dressed-state potentials for neutral atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofferberth, S.; Lesanovsky, Igor; Fischer, B.

    2006-01-01

    Potentials for atoms can be created by external fields acting on properties such as magnetic moment, charge, polarizability, or by oscillating fields that couple internal states. The most prominent realization of the latter is the optical dipole potential formed by coupling ground and electronica......Potentials for atoms can be created by external fields acting on properties such as magnetic moment, charge, polarizability, or by oscillating fields that couple internal states. The most prominent realization of the latter is the optical dipole potential formed by coupling ground...... and electronically excited states of an atom with light. Here, we present an extensive experimental analysis of potentials derived from radiofrequency (RF) coupling of electronic ground states. The coupling is magnetic and the vector character allows the design of versatile microscopic state-dependent potential...... landscapes. Compared with standard magnetic trapping, we find no additional heating or (collisional) loss up to densities of 1015 atoms cm-3. We demonstrate robust evaporative cooling in RF potentials, which allows easy production of Bose-Einstein condensates in complex potentials. Altogether, this makes RF...

  3. Coherent population trapping in a Raman atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Bing; Merlet, Sébastien; Santos, Franck Pereira dos

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT) in an atom inter-ferometer gravimeter based on the use of stimulated Raman transitions. We find that CPT leads to significant phase shifts, of order of a few mrad, which may compromise the accuracy of inertial measurements. We show that this effect is rejected by the k-reversal technique, which consists in averaging inertial measurements performed with two opposite orientations of the Raman wavevector k, provided that internal states at the input of the interferometer are kept identical for both configurations.

  4. Phonon-Mediated Detection of Trapped Atomic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David

    2008-03-01

    Both quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology require sensitive detection of quantum states. Using trapped atomic ions, we investigate quantum non-demolition measurements in a two-species ion chain composed of Al^+ and Be^+. By mapping information from Al^+ to a shared phonon-mode then to Be^+ and detecting repetitively we have experimentally demonstrated a fidelity for state initialization and detection of 0.9994. We have also shown an increase in measurement efficiency through an adaptive procedure. Here we apply these ideas to the detection of states of multiple Al^+ using a single Be^+ ion, and describe the preparation of entangled states through measurement.

  5. Neutral atom transport from the termination shock to 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Bzowski, M; Bzowski, Maciej; Tarnopolski, Slawomir

    2006-01-01

    Dynamics of H, D, and heavy Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) between the termination shock and 1 AU is discussed in the context of the forthcoming NASA SMEX mission IBEX. In particular, effects of the velocity-dependent radiation pressure on atomic trajectories are considered and ionization losses between TS and 1 AU are studied. It is shown, among others, that most of the dynamical effects and ionization losses are induced within a few AU from the Sun, which translates to the time domain into $\\sim 1 - 3$ solar rotations before detection. This loosens considerably time requirements for tracking the ionization and radiation pressure history to just prior 3 months. ENA seem excellent tracers of the processes within the heliospheric interface, with the transport effects between the termination shock and detector relatively mild and easy to account for.

  6. Heterogeneous recombination of neutral oxygen atoms on niobium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozetic, Miran; Zalar, Anton; Cvelbar, Uros; Poberaj, Igor

    2003-04-30

    The recombination coefficient for the reaction O+O{yields}O{sub 2} on a polycrystalline niobium surface was measured at various experimental conditions. The source of O atoms was a low pressure weakly ionized highly dissociated oxygen plasma created in a RF discharge. The electron temperature in plasma was about 5 eV and the density of positive ions between 5 and 10x10{sup 15} m{sup -3}. The density of neutral oxygen atoms was measured in the afterglow with a nickel catalytic probe and was between 2.5 and 7x10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. The recombination coefficient was measured at different temperature between 420 and 620 K, and was found to be a constant within the limits of the experimental error at the value of 0.09{+-}0.018.

  7. Synthetic dimensions for cold atoms from shaking a harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Hannah M.; Ozawa, Tomoki; Goldman, Nathan

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a simple scheme to implement synthetic dimensions in ultracold atomic gases, which only requires two basic and ubiquitous ingredients: the harmonic trap, which confines the atoms, combined with a periodic shaking. In our approach, standard harmonic oscillator eigenstates are reinterpreted as lattice sites along a synthetic dimension, while the coupling between these lattice sites is controlled by the applied time modulation. The phase of this modulation enters as a complex hopping phase, leading straightforwardly to an artificial magnetic field upon adding a second dimension. We show that this artificial gauge field has important consequences, such as the counterintuitive reduction of average energy under resonant driving, or the realization of quantum Hall physics. Our approach offers significant advantages over previous implementations of synthetic dimensions, providing an intriguing route towards higher-dimensional topological physics and strongly-correlated states.

  8. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, Joseph, E-mail: jkhoury@exogenesis.us [Exogenesis Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States); Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C. [Exogenesis Corporation, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants.

  9. Understanding Molecular Ion-Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    ions affords many of the benefits of ultracold neutral molecules, while significantly reducing experimental complexity – e.g. large trap depths, long...affords many of the benefits of ultracold neutral molecules, while significantly reducing experimental complexity – e.g. large trap depths, long trap...cooling collisions. As shown in Fig . 2, which plots the results of a photodissociative thermometry measurement, the molecular ions have

  10. Kinetic model of the bichromatic dark trap for atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    A kinetic model of atom confinement in a bichromatic dark trap (BDT) is developed with the goal of describing its dissipative properties. The operating principle of the deep BDT is based on using the combination of multiple bichromatic cosine-Gaussian optical beams (CGBs) for creating high-potential barriers, which is described in our previous work (Krasnov 2016 Laser Phys. 26 105501). In the indicated work, particle motion in the BDT is described in terms of classical trajectories. In the present study, particle motion is analyzed by means of the Wigner function (phase-space distribution function (DF)), which allows one to properly take into account the quantum fluctuations of optical forces. Besides, we consider an improved scheme of the BDT, where CGBs create, apart from plane potential barriers, a narrow cooling layer. We find an asymptotic solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for the DF and show that the DF of particles deeply trapped in a BDT with a cooling layer is the Tsallis distribution with the effective temperature, which can be considerably lower than in a BDT without a cooling layer. Moreover, it can be adjusted by slightly changing the CGBs’ radii. We also study the effect of particle escape from the trap due to the scattering of resonant photons and show that the particle lifetime in a BDT can exceed several tens of hours when it is limited by photon scattering.

  11. A Compact Microchip-Based Atomic Clock Based on Ultracold Trapped Rb Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, Daniel M; Anderson, Dana Z

    2009-01-01

    We propose a compact atomic clock based on ultracold Rb atoms that are magnetically trapped near the surface of an atom microchip. An interrogation scheme that combines electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) with Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields can achieve atomic shot-noise level performance of 10^{-13}/sqrt(tau) for 10^6 atoms. The EIT signal can be detected with a heterodyne technique that provides noiseless gain; with this technique the optical phase shift of a 100 pW probe beam can be detected at the photon shot-noise level. Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations are used to identify realistic operating parameters at which AC Stark shifts are eliminated. By considering fluctuations in these parameters, we estimate that AC Stark shifts can be canceled to a level better than 2*10^{-14}. An overview of the apparatus is presented with estimates of duty cycle and power consumption.

  12. Resonance fluorescence of a trapped three-level atom

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, M; Morigi, G; Bienert, Marc; Merkel, Wolfgang; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the spectrum of resonance fluorescence of a harmonically trapped atom, whose internal transitions are $\\Lambda$--shaped and driven at two-photon resonance by a pair of lasers, which cool the center--of--mass motion. For this configuration, photons are scattered only due to the mechanical effects of the quantum interaction between light and atom. We study the spectrum of emission in the final stage of laser--cooling, when the atomic center-of-mass dynamics is quantum mechanical and the size of the wave packet is much smaller than the laser wavelength (Lamb--Dicke limit). We use the spectral decomposition of the Liouville operator of the master equation for the atomic density matrix and apply second order perturbation theory. We find that the spectrum of resonance fluorescence is composed by two narrow sidebands -- the Stokes and anti-Stokes components of the scattered light -- while all other signals are in general orders of magnitude smaller. For very low temperatures, however, th...

  13. Holographic optical traps for atom-based topological Kondo devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccheri, F.; Bruce, G. D.; Trombettoni, A.; Cassettari, D.; Babujian, H.; Korepin, V. E.; Sodano, P.

    2016-07-01

    The topological Kondo (TK) model has been proposed in solid-state quantum devices as a way to realize non-Fermi liquid behaviors in a controllable setting. Another motivation behind the TK model proposal is the demand to demonstrate the quantum dynamical properties of Majorana fermions, which are at the heart of their potential use in topological quantum computation. Here we consider a junction of crossed Tonks-Girardeau gases arranged in a star-geometry (forming a Y-junction), and we perform a theoretical analysis of this system showing that it provides a physical realization of the TK model in the realm of cold atom systems. Using computer-generated holography, we experimentally implement a Y-junction suitable for atom trapping, with controllable and independent parameters. The junction and the transverse size of the atom waveguides are of the order of 5 μm, leading to favorable estimates for the Kondo temperature and for the coupling across the junction. Since our results show that all the required theoretical and experimental ingredients are available, this provides the demonstration of an ultracold atom device that may in principle exhibit the TK effect.

  14. Photoionization of the valence shells of the neutral tungsten atom

    CERN Document Server

    Ballance, Connor P

    2015-01-01

    Results from large-scale theoretical cross section calculations for the total photoionization of the 4f, 5s, 5p and 6s orbitals of the neutral tungsten atom using the Dirac Coulomb R-matrix approximation (DARC: Dirac-Atomic R-matrix codes) are presented. Comparisons are made with previous theoretical methods and prior experimental measurements. In previous experiments a time-resolved dual laser approach was employed for the photo-absorption of metal vapours and photo-absorption measurements on tungsten in a solid, using synchrotron radiation. The lowest ground state level of neutral tungsten is $\\rm 5p^6 5d^4 6s^2 \\; {^5}D_{\\it J}$, with $\\it J$=0, and requires only a single dipole matrix for photoionization. To make a meaningful comparison with existing experimental measurements, we statistically average the large-scale theoretical PI cross sections from the levels associated with the ground state $\\rm 5p^6 5d^4 6s^2 \\; {^5}D_{\\it J}[{\\it J}=0,1,2,3,4]$ levels and the $\\rm 5d^56s \\; ^7S_3$ excited metastable...

  15. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  16. Magnetic trapping of neutral particles Classical and Quantum-mechanical study of a Ioffe-Pritchard type trap

    CERN Document Server

    Gov, S; Thomas, H

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we developed a method for calculating the lifetime of a particle inside a magnetic trap with respect to spin flips, as a first step in our efforts to understand the quantum-mechanics of magnetic traps. The 1D toy model that was used in this study was physically unrealistic because the magnetic field was not curl-free. Here, we study, both classically and quantum-mechanically, the problem of a neutral particle with spin S, mass m and magnetic moment mu, moving in 3D in an inhomogeneous magnetic field corresponding to traps of the Ioffe-Pritchard, `clover-leaf' and `baseball' type. Defining by omega_p, omega_z and omega_r the precessional, the axial and the lateral vibrational frequencies, respectively, of the particle in the adiabatic potential, we find classically the region in the $(ømega_{r}% (omega_r -- omega_z) plane where the particle is trapped. Quantum-mechanically, we study the problem of a spin-one particle in the same field. Treating omega_r / omega_p and omega_z / omega_p as small parame...

  17. Development of a compact cold-atom atomic clock based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanshan, Eric M.

    Field-grade atomic clocks capable of primary standard performance in compact physics packages would be of significant value in a variety of applications ranging from network synchronization and secure communications to GPS hold-over and inertial navigation. A cold-atom coherent population trapping (CACPT) clock featuring laser-cooled atoms and pulsed Ramsey interrogation is a strong candidate for this technology if the principal frequency shifts can be controlled and the performance degradation associated with miniaturization can be overcome. In this thesis, research focused on the development of this type of compact atomic clock is presented. To address the low atom numbers obtained in small cold-atom sources, experiments were performed in which an atomic beam was decelerated with bichromatic stimulated laser forces and loaded into a mm-scale magneto-optical trap, increasing the atom number by a factor of 12.5. A CACPT clock using the high-contrast lin||lin optical interrogation technique was developed and achieved a stability of 7 x 10-13 after one hour of integration. Doppler shifts in the clock are explained using a simple kinematic model and canceled by interrogating the atoms with a counter-propagating CPT configuration. Finally, a thorough characterization of the AC-stark effect in lin||lin CPT was performed. Observed shifts are explained in terms of contributions from coherent CPT-generating couplings and population transfer effects caused by optical pumping from incoherent light. Measurements are compared with existing and new theoretical treatments, and a laser configuration is identified that reduces clock drift from light shifts to less than 10-14 for the current system.

  18. Optical interface created by laser-cooled atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, E; Sagué, G; Schmidt, R; Dawkins, S T; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2009-01-01

    Trapping and optically interfacing laser-cooled neutral atoms is an essential requirement for their use in advanced quantum technologies. Here we simultaneously realize both of these tasks with cesium atoms interacting with a multi-color evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber. The atoms are localized in a one-dimensional optical lattice about 200 nm above the nanofiber surface and can be efficiently interrogated with a resonant light field sent through the nanofiber. Our technique opens the route towards the direct integration of laser-cooled atomic ensembles within fiber networks, an important prerequisite for large scale quantum communication schemes. Moreover, it is ideally suited to the realization of hybrid quantum systems that combine atoms with, e.g., solid state quantum devices.

  19. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, D. N; Yu, P.; Balslev, S.;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5×106 atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  20. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Yu, Ping; Balslev, Søren;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5 x 10(6) atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  1. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, D. N; Yu, P.; Balslev, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5×106 atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  2. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Yu, Ping; Balslev, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5 x 10(6) atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  3. Features of Low Energy Classical Bremsstrahlung From Neutral Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florescu, A.; Obolensky, O. I.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    We study classical bremsstrahlung from neutral atoms and investigate the features characteristic for the low incident energy region. These features include oscillations in the energy dependence of the bremsstrahlung cross section and structures in the asymmetry parameter of radiation. We use soft-photon limit results to elucidate the physical origins of the features. We show that there is a correspondence between classical and quantum results [1]. In both cases the features result from the suppression of contributions to the radiation from certain angular momenta at certain energies. In quantum mechanics this corresponds to zeroes in certain radiation matrix elements. In the classical case the lack of contribution from some interval of angular momentum is caused by behaviors of elastic electron scattering in screened potentials. [1] A. Florescu, O. I. Obolensky, C. D. Shaffer, and R. H. Pratt 2001 AIP Conference Proceedings 576, 60-64.

  4. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  5. Accumulation and thermalization of cold atoms in a finite-depth magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chicireanu, R; Gorceix, O; Keller, J C; Laburthe-Tolra, B; Marechal, E; Porto, J V; Pouderous, A; Vernac, L

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically study the continuous accumulation of cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) into a finite depth trap, consisting in a magnetic quadrupole trap dressed by a radiofrequency (RF) field. Chromium atoms (52 isotope) in a MOT are continuously optically pumped by the MOT lasers to metastable dark states. In presence of a RF field, the temperature of the metastable atoms that remain magnetically trapped can be as low as 25 microK, with a density of 10^17 atoms.m-3, resulting in an increase of the phase-space density, still limited to 7.10^-6 by inelastic collisions. To investigate the thermalization issues in the truncated trap, we measure the free evaporation rate in the RF-truncated magnetic trap, and deduce the average elastic cross section for atoms in the 5D4 metastable states, equal to 7.0 10^-16m2.

  6. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI\\muP facility

    CERN Document Server

    Traykov, E; De, S; Dermois, O C; Huisman, L; Jungmann, K; Kruithof, W; Mol, A J; Onderwater, C J G; Rogachevskiy, A; Silva, M da Silva e; Sohani, M; Versolato, O; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2007-01-01

    The structures for the TRI$\\mu$P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides will be produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atom in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample that will allow precision measurements. The TRI$\\mu$P facility consists of a chain of several separate units: A production target followed by a magnetic separator produces fast radioactive isotopes. The separator is commissioned and is operating. Various modes to produce radioactive particles have been tested for optimal production. A thermal ionizer stops the fast products and transports the nuclides as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher. This allows one to collect and transport the ions via a drift tube and a low energy beam line into a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The ions are neutralized in the MOT chamber and will be transported to a second trap for $\\beta$...

  7. Precision Tests of the Electroweak Interaction using Trapped Atoms and Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melconian, Daniel George [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The objective of the proposed research is to study fundamental aspects of the electroweak interaction via precision measurements in beta decay to test our current understanding of fundamental particles and forces as contained in the so-called "Standard Model" of particle physics. By comparing elegant experiments to rigorous theoretical predictions, we will either confirm the Standard Model to a higher degree and rule out models which seek to extend it, or find evidence of new physics and help guide theorists in developing the New Standard Model. The use of ion and neutral atom traps at radioactive ion beam facilities has opened up a new vista in precision low-energy nuclear physics experiments. Traps provide an ideal source of decaying atoms: they can be extremely cold (~1 mK); they are compact (~1 mm^3); and perhaps most importantly, the daughter particles escape with negligible distortions to their momenta in a scattering-free, open environment. The project is taking advantage of these technologies and applying them to precision beta-decay studies at radioactive beam facilities. The program consists of two complementary efforts: 1) Ion traps are an extremely versatile tool for purifying, cooling and bunching low-energy beams of short-lived nuclei. A large-bore (210~mm) superconducting 7-Tesla solenoid is at the heart of a Penning trap system for which there is a dedicated beamline at T-REX, the upgraded radioactive beam facility at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. In addition to providing a general-purpose decay station, the flagship program for this system is measuring the ft-values and beta-neutrino correlation parameters from isospin T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton decays, complimenting and expanding the already strong program in fundamental interactions at the Institute. 2) A magneto-optical trap is being used at the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap facility to observe the (un)polarized angular distribution parameters of isotopes of potassium. We

  8. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  9. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI{mu}P facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traykov, E. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: traykov@kvi.nl; Dammalapati, U.; De, S.; Dermois, O.C.; Huisman, L.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W.; Mol, A.J.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Silva e Silva, M. da; Sohani, M.; Versolato, O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15

    The structures for the TRI{mu}P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample for precision measurements. In the TRI{mu}P facility a production target is followed by a magnetic separator, where radioactive isotopes are produced in inverse reaction kinematics. Separation up to 99.95% could be achieved for {sup 21}Na. A novel transmitting thermal ionizing device was developed to stop the energetic isotopes. Some 50% of stopped {sup 21}Na could be extracted and transported as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher with 35% transmission efficiency. The ions are transported lossless via a drift tube and a low energy electrostatic beam line into the experimental setup. Such ions can be neutralized on hot metal foils and the resulting atoms can be stored in a magneto-optical trap. The functioning of that principle was demonstrated with stable Na extracted from the thermal ionizer, radioactive beams will follow next.

  10. Photo-detection using Bose-condensed atoms in a micro trap

    OpenAIRE

    Wallentowitz, S.; Klimov, A. B.

    2008-01-01

    A model of photo-detection using a Bose--Einstein condensate in an atom-chip based micro trap is analyzed. Atoms absorb photons from the incident light field, receive part of the photon momentum and leave the trap potential. Upon counting of escaped atoms within predetermined time intervals, the photon statistics of the incident light is mapped onto the atom-count statistics. Whereas traditional photo-detection theory treats the emission centers of photo electrons as distinguishable, here the...

  11. Inner-shell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, W. C.; Jonauskas, V.; Lindle, D. W.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Savin, D. W.

    2016-02-01

    Inner-shell ionization of a 1s electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD), which results as the 1s-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for inner-shell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of 403-475 eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N+, {{{N}}}2+, and {{{N}}}3+, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to {{{N}}}2+ is somewhat reduced, that for N+ is greatly increased, and that to {{{N}}}3+, which was predicted to be zero, grows to ≈ 10% at the higher photon energies studied. This work demonstrates some of the shortcomings in the theoretical CSD data base for inner-shell ionization and points the way for the improvements needed to more reliably model the role of inner-shell ionization of cosmic plasmas.

  12. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmul Arfin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement ⟨R2⟩ exhibits a scaling with time as ⟨R2⟩ ∼ tα, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t, which follows the scaling, S(t ∼ tβ/ln (t. Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  13. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfin, Najmul; Yadav, Avinash Chand; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-01

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement ⟨R2⟩ exhibits a scaling with time as ⟨R2⟩ ˜ tα, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ˜ tβ/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  14. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arfin, Najmul [Polymer and Biophysics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Yadav, Avinash Chand [Nonlinear Dynamics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Bohidar, H. B., E-mail: bohi0700@mail.jnu.ac.in [Polymer and Biophysics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2013-11-15

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement 〈R{sup 2}〉 exhibits a scaling with time as 〈R{sup 2}〉 ∼ t{sup α}, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ∼ t{sup β}/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  15. Fast thermometry for trapped atoms using recoil-induced resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Ting; Su, Dian-Qiang; Ji, Zhong-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Shan; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2015-09-01

    We have employed recoil-induced resonance (RIR) with linewidth on the order of 10 kHz to demonstrate the fast thermometry for ultracold atoms. We theoretically calculate the absorption spectrum of RIR which agrees well with the experimental results. The temperature of the ultracold sample derived from the RIR spectrum is T = 84±4.5 μK, which is close to 85 μK that measured by the method of time-of-flight absorption imaging. To exhibit the fast measurement advantage in applying RIR to the ultracold atom thermometry, we study the dependence of ultracold sample temperature on the trapping beam frequency detuning. This method can be applied to determine the translational temperature of molecules in photoassociation dynamics. Project supported by the National Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA010801), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275209, 11304189, 61378015, and 11434007), and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in Universities of China (Grant No. IRT13076).

  16. Sensitive Detection of Individual Neutral Atoms in a Strong Coupling Cavity QED System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng-Fei; ZHANG Yu-Chi; LI Gang; DU Jin-Jin; ZHANG Yan-Feng; GUO Yan-Qiang; WANG Jun-Min; ZHANG Tian-Cai; LI Wei-Dong

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of individual cesium atoms by using a high-finesse optical micro-cavity in a strong coupling regime.A cloud of cesium atoms is trapped in a magneto-optical trap positioned at 5 mm above the micro-cavity center.The atoms fall down freely in gravitation after shutting off the magnetooptical trap and pass through the cavity.The cavity transmission is strongly affected by the atoms in the cavity, which enables the micro-cavity to sense the atoms individually.We detect the single atom transits either in the resonance or various detunings.The single atom vacuum-Rabi splitting is directly measured to be Ω = 2π × 23.9 MHz.The average duration of atom-cavity coupling of about 110μs is obtained according to the probability distribution of the atom transits.%@@ We experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of individual cesium atoms by using a high-finesse optical micro-cavity in a strong coupling regime.A cloud of cesium atoms is trapped in a magneto-optical trap positioned at 5mm above the micro-cavity center.The atoms fall down freely in gravitation after shutting off the magnetooptical trap and pass through the cavity.The cavity transmission is strongly affected by the atoms in the cavity, which enables the micro-cavity to sense the atoms individually.We detect the single atom transits either in the resonance or various detunings.The single atom vacuum-Rabi splitting is directly measured to be Ω=2π×23.9 MHz.The average duration of atom-cavity coupling of about 110μs is obtained according to the probability distribution of the atom transits.

  17. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, E. W., E-mail: magee1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ≤10{sup −7} Torr at ≥1000 °C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  18. Trapping molecular ions formed via photo-associative ionization of ultracold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Scott T; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Chen, Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J; Hudson, Eric R

    2011-01-01

    The formation of $^{40}$Ca$_2^+$ molecular ions is observed in a hybrid $^{40}$Ca magneto-optical and ion trap system. The molecular ion formation process is determined to be two-photon photo-associative ionization of ultracold $^{40}$Ca atoms. A lower bound for the two-body, two-photon rate constant is found to be $\\bar{\\beta} \\geq 2 \\pm 1 \\times 10^{-15}$ cm$^{3}$ Hz. $\\textit{Ab initio}$ molecular potential curves are calculated for the neutral Ca$_2$ and ionic Ca$_2^+$ molecules and used in a model that identifies the photo-associative ionization pathway. As this technique does not require a separate photo-association laser, it could find use as a simple, robust method for producing ultracold, state-selected molecular ions.

  19. Trapping molecular ions formed via photo-associative ionization of ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Chen, Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J; Hudson, Eric R

    2011-11-14

    The formation of (40)Ca(2)(+) molecular ions is observed in a hybrid (40)Ca magneto-optical and ion trap system. The molecular ion formation process is determined to be photo-associative ionization of ultracold (40)Ca atoms. A lower bound for the two-body rate constant is found to be beta ≥ 2 ± 1 × 10(-15) cm(3) Hz. Ab initio molecular potential curves are calculated for the neutral Ca(2) and ionic Ca(2)(+) molecules and used in a model that identifies the photo-associative ionization pathway. As this technique does not require a separate photo-association laser, it could find use as a simple, robust method for producing ultracold molecular ions.

  20. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping of cold 133Cs-87Rb atomic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of a mixture of two different atomic species, Caesium and Rubidium. The magic wavelengths of the Caesium and Rubidium atoms are different, 935.6 and 789.9 nm respectively, thus single-frequency simultaneous state-insensitive trapping is not possible. We thus identify bichromatic trapping as a viable approach to tune the two magic wavelengths to a common value. Correspondingly, we present several common magic wavelength combinations appropriate for simultaneous state-insensitive trapping of the two atomic species.

  1. Inhomogeneous broadening of optical transitions of 87Rb atoms in an optical nanofiber trap

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J; Hoffman, J E; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate optical trapping of 87Rb atoms using a two-color evanescent field around an optical nanofiber. In our trapping geometry, a blue-detuned traveling wave whose polarization is nearly parallel to the polarization of a red-detuned standing wave produce significant vector light shifts that lead to broadening of the absorption profile of a near-resonant beam at the trapping site. A model that includes scalar, vector, and tensor light shifts of the probe transition $5S_{1/2}$-$5P_{3/2}$ from the trapping beams; weighted by the temperature-dependent position of the atoms in the trap qualitatively describe the observed asymmetric profile, and explained differences with previous experiments that used Cs atoms. The model provides a consistent way to extract the number of atoms in the trap.

  2. Detection and quantized conductance of neutral atoms near a charged carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Trygve; Goodsell, Anne; Golovchenko, J A; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2005-02-18

    We describe a novel single atom detector that uses the high electric field surrounding a charged single-walled carbon nanotube to attract and subsequently field-ionize neutral atoms. A theoretical study of the field-ionization tunneling rates for atomic trajectories in the attractive potential near a nanowire shows that a broadly applicable, high spatial resolution, low-power, neutral-atom detector with nearly 100% efficiency is realizable with present-day technology. Calculations also show that the system can provide the first opportunity to study quantized conductance phenomena when detecting cold neutral atoms with mean velocities less than 15 m/s.

  3. Double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroescu, Ion; Hume, David B.; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single-atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for quantum metrology at a precision approaching the Heisenberg limit. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for single-atom resolution in the atom number difference.

  4. Magneto-optical Trapping through a Transparent Silicon Carbide Atom Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Huet, Landry; Morvan, Erwan; Sarazin, Nicolas; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Reichel, Jakob; Guerlin, Christine; Schwartz, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of trapping about one hundred million rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap with several of the beams passing through a transparent atom chip mounted on a vacuum cell wall. The chip is made of a gold microcircuit deposited on a silicon carbide substrate, with favorable thermal conductivity. We show how a retro-reflected configuration can efficiently address the chip birefringence issues, allowing atom trapping at arbitrary distances from the chip. We also demonstrate detection through the chip, granting a large numerical aperture. This configuration is compared to other atom chip devices, and some possible applications are discussed.

  5. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jöllenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized...... distortions. Together with the loading from a high-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, we achieve a loading rate of 8.4×1010 atoms/s and maximum number of 8.7×109 captured atoms. The wire structure is placed outside of the vacuum to enable a further adaptation to new scientific objectives. Since all...

  6. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carpenter, P. T.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Escallier, J.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hurt, J. L.; Hydomako, R.; Isaac, C. A.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Marone, A.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Parker, B.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seddon, D.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  7. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  8. Recent developments in trapping and manipulation of atoms with adiabatic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraway, Barry M.; Perrin, Hélène

    2016-09-01

    A combination of static and oscillating magnetic fields can be used to ‘dress’ atoms with radio-frequency (RF), or microwave, radiation. The spatial variation of these fields can be used to create an enormous variety of traps for ultra-cold atoms and quantum gases. This article reviews the type and character of these adiabatic traps and the applications which include atom interferometry and the study of low-dimensional quantum systems. We introduce the main concepts of magnetic traps leading to adiabatic dressed traps. The concept of adiabaticity is discussed in the context of the Landau-Zener model. The first bubble trap experiment is reviewed together with the method used for loading it. Experiments based on atom chips show the production of double wells and ring traps. Dressed atom traps can be evaporatively cooled with an additional RF field, and a weak RF field can be used to probe the spectroscopy of the adiabatic potentials. Several approaches to ring traps formed from adiabatic potentials are discussed, including those based on atom chips, time-averaged adiabatic potentials and induction methods. Several proposals for adiabatic lattices with dressed atoms are also reviewed.

  9. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ˜ 6 nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  10. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Ytterbium Atoms with a 398.9 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng-Yi; XIONG Zhuan-Xian; LIANG Jie; HE Ling-Xiang; LU Bao-Long

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0 - 1P1 transition at 398.9nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower.Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock.

  11. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danet Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  12. Magnetic levitation for effective loading of cold cesium atoms in a crossed dipole trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqing; Feng, Guosheng; Xu, Rundong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Jizhou; Chen, Gang; Dai, Xingcan; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2015-05-01

    We report a detailed study of effective magnetically levitated loading of cold atoms in a crossed dipole trap: an appropriate magnetic field gradient precisely compensates for the destructive gravitational force of the atoms and an additional bias field simultaneously eliminates the antitrapping potential induced by the magnetic field gradient. The magnetic levitation is required for a large-volume crossed dipole trap to form a shallow but very effective loading potential, making it a promising method for loading and trapping more cold atoms. For cold cesium atoms in the F =3 , m F =3 state prepared by three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling, a large number of atoms ˜3.2 ×106 have been loaded into a large-volume crossed dipole trap with the help of the magnetic levitation technique. The dependence of the number of atoms loaded and trapped in the dipole trap on the magnetic field gradient and bias field, respectively, is in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. The optimum magnetic field gradient of 31.13 G/cm matches the theoretical value of 31.3 G/cm well. This method can be used to obtain more cold atoms or a large number of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms for many atomic species in high-field seeking states.

  13. Simultaneous magneto-optical trapping of lithium and ytterbium atoms towards production of ultracold polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Okano, M; Muramatsu, M; Doi, K; Uetake, S; Takasu, Y; Takahashi, Y

    2009-01-01

    We have successfully implemented the first simultaneous magneto-optical trapping (MOT) of lithium ($^6$Li) and ytterbium ($^{174}$Yb) atoms, towards production of ultracold polar molecules of LiYb. For this purpose, we developed the dual atomic oven which contains both atomic species as an atom source and successfully observed the spectra of the Li and Yb atoms in the atomic beams from the dual atomic oven. We constructed the vacuum chamber including the glass cell with the windows made of zinc selenium (ZnSe) for the CO$_2$ lasers, which are the useful light sources of optical trapping for evaporative and sympathetic cooling. Typical atom numbers and temperatures in the compressed MOT are 7$\\times10^3$ atoms, 640 $\\mu$K for $^6$Li, 7$\\times10^4$ atoms and 60 $\\mu$K for $^{174}$Yb, respectively.

  14. "Doubly magic" conditions in magic-wavelength trapping of ultracold alkali-metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-07-16

    In experiments with trapped atoms, atomic energy levels are shifted by the trapping optical and magnetic fields. Regardless of this strong perturbation, precision spectroscopy may be still carried out using specially crafted, "magic" trapping fields. Finding these conditions for particularly valuable microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms has so far remained an open challenge. Here I demonstrate that the microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms may be indeed made impervious to both trapping laser intensity and fluctuations of magnetic fields. I consider driving multiphoton transitions between the clock levels and show that these "doubly magic" conditions are realized at special values of trapping laser wavelengths and fixed values of relatively weak magnetic fields. This finding has implications for precision measurements and quantum information processing with qubits stored in hyperfine manifolds.

  15. Trapping ultracold atoms in a sub-micron-period triangular magnetic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Tran, T.; Surendran, P.; Herrera, I.; Balcytis, A.; Nissen, D.; Albrecht, M.; Sidorov, A.; Hannaford, P.

    2017-07-01

    We report the trapping of ultracold 87Rb atoms in a 0.7-μ m-period two-dimensional triangular magnetic lattice on an atom chip. The magnetic lattice is created by a lithographically patterned magnetic Co/Pd multilayer film plus bias fields. Rubidium atoms in the |F =1 , mF=-1 > low-field seeking state are trapped at estimated distances down to about 100 nm from the chip surface and with calculated mean trapping frequencies up to about 800 kHz . The measured lifetimes of the atoms trapped in the magnetic lattice are in the range 0.4-1.7 ms , depending on distance from the chip surface. Model calculations suggest the trap lifetimes are currently limited mainly by losses due to one-dimensional thermal evaporation following loading of the atoms from the Z -wire trap into the very tight magnetic lattice traps, rather than by fundamental loss processes such as surface interactions, three-body recombination, or spin flips due to Johnson magnetic noise. The trapping of atoms in a 0.7 -μ m -period magnetic lattice represents a significant step toward using magnetic lattices for quantum tunneling experiments and to simulate condensed matter and many-body phenomena in nontrivial lattice geometries.

  16. Guiding Neutral Atoms with Two Current-Carrying Wires and a Vertical Bias Field on the Atom Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Min; YAN Bo; LI Xiao-Lin; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2008-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate the guiding of neutral atoms with two parallel microfabricated current-carrying wires on the atom chip and a verticai magnetic bias field.The atoms are guided along a magnetic field minimum parallel to the current-carrying wires and confined in the other two directions.We describe in detail how the precooled atoms are efficiently loaded into the two-wire guide.

  17. A compact laser-driven plasma accelerator for megaelectronvolt-energy neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, R.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Narayanan, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2013-03-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in charged-particle acceleration using intense, ultrashort laser pulses. Accelerating neutral atoms is an important complementary technology because such particles are unaffected by electric and magnetic fields and can thus penetrate deeper into a target than ions. However, compact laser-based accelerators for neutral atoms are limited at best to millielectronvolt energies. Here, we report the generation of megaelectronvolt-energy argon atoms from an optical-field-ionized dense nanocluster ensemble. Measurements reveal that nearly every laser-accelerated ion is converted to an energetic neutral atom as a result of highly efficient electron transfer from Rydberg excited clusters, within a sheath around the laser focus. This process, although optimal in nanoclusters, is generic and adaptable to most laser-produced plasmas. Such compact laser-driven energetic neutral atom sources could have applications in fast atom lithography for surface science and tokamak diagnostics in plasma technology.

  18. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  19. A double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    CERN Document Server

    Stroescu, Ion; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for going beyond quantum metrology with spin-squeezed states. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a novel hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for the exact determination of the atom number difference.

  20. Trapping of Atoms by the Counter-Propagating Stochastic Light Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, Victor I

    2016-01-01

    We show that the field of counter-propagating stochastic light waves, one of which repeats the other, can form an one-dimension trap for atoms. The confinement of an ensemble of atoms in the trap and their simultaneous cooling can be achieved without using auxiliary fields. The temperature of the atomic ensemble depends on the autocorrelation time of the waves, their intensity and the detuning of the carrier frequency of the waves from the atomic transition frequency. The numerical simulation is carried out for sodium atoms.

  1. Simulations of Damping of Trapped Particle Asymmetry Modes in Non-Neutral Plasma Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Grant W.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2002-11-01

    Kabantsev et al.(A. A. Kabantsev, C. F. Driscoll, T. J. Hilsabeck, T. M. O'Neil and J. H.Yu, in Non-Neutral Plasma Physics IV), AIP Conference Proceedings 606, 2001, pp. 277-286 have reported experimental observations and theory for trapped particle asymmetry modes on cylindrical electron columns. In particular, the m=1; k_z=odd mode exhibits strong damping from an unknown mechanism that is conjectured by Kabantsev et al. to be either diffusive mixing of trapped and untrapped populations of particles or spatial Landau damping. We have observed similar damping within a 3-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation model does not include diffusive mixing. Spatial Landau damping is also ruled out because the mode frequencies in the simulation intersect the rotation frequency curve outside the plasma. We describe efforts to isolate the mechanism of the damping.

  2. Mapping trapped atomic gas with spin-orbit coupling to quantum Rabi-like model

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Haiping; Chen, Shu

    2013-01-01

    We construct a connection of the ultracold atomic system in a harmonic trap with Raman-induced spin-orbit coupling to the quantum Rabi-like model. By mapping the trapped atomic system to a Rabi-like model, we can get the exact solution of the Rabi-like model following the methods to solve the quantum Rabi model. The existence of such a mapping implies that we can study the basic model in quantum optics by using trapped atomic gases with spin-orbit coupling.

  3. An ultracold, optically trapped mixture of {87}Rb and metastable {4}He atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Adonis Silva; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of an ultracold (<25~muK) mixture of rubidium ({87}Rb) and metastable triplet helium ({4}He) in an optical dipole trap. Our scheme involves laser cooling in a dual-species magneto-optical trap, simultaneous MW- and RF-induced forced evaporative cooling in a quadrupole magnetic trap, and transfer to a single-beam optical dipole trap. We observe long trapping lifetimes for the doubly spin-stretched spin-state mixture and measure much shorter lifetimes for other spin-state combinations. We discuss prospects for realizing quantum degenerate mixtures of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms.

  4. Coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 3D optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yang; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a $5\\times 5\\times 5$ array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in non-targeted atoms is smaller than $3\\times 10^{-3}$ in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  5. Coherent Addressing of Individual Neutral Atoms in a 3D Optical Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 5×5×5 array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in nontargeted atoms is smaller than 3×10^{-3} in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  6. Investigations of the ground-state hyperfine atomic structure and beta decay measurement prospects of 21Na with improved laser trapping techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Mary Anderson [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which a neutral atom laser trap loaded with radioactive 21Na was improved and then used for measurements. The sodium isotope (half-life=22 sec) is produced on line at the 88 in. cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The author developed an effective magnesium oxide target system which is crucial to deliver a substantive beam of 21Na to the experiment. Efficient manipulation of the 21Na beam with lasers allowed 30,000 atoms to be contained in a magneto-optical trap. Using the cold trapped atoms, the author measured to high precision the hyperfine splitting of the atomic ground state of 21Na. She measured the 3S1/2(F=1,m=0)-3S1/2(F=2,m=0) atomic level splitting of 21Na to be 1,906,471,870±200 Hz. Additionally, she achieved initial detection of beta decay from the trap and evaluated the prospects of precision beta decay correlation studies with trapped atoms.

  7. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianlong, Gao; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Fazio, Rosario; Tosi, M. P.; Campo, V. L., Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern.

  8. Two-dimensional novel optical lattices with multi-well traps for cold atoms or molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfa Lu; Xianming Ji; Jianping Yin

    2006-01-01

    We propose some new schemes to constitute two-dimensional (2D) array of multi-well optical dipole traps for cold atoms (or molecules) by using an optical system consisting of a binary π-phase grating and a 2D array of rectangle microlens. We calculate the intensity distribution of each optical well in 2D array of multi-well traps and its geometric parameters and so on. The proposed 2D array of multi-well traps can be used to form novel 2D optical lattices with cold atoms (or molecules), and form various novel optical crystals with cold atoms (or molecules), or to perform quantum computing and quantum information processing on an atom chip, even to realize an array of all-optical multi-well atomic (or molecular) BoseEinstein condensates (BECs) on an all-optical integrated atom (or molecule) chip.

  9. Ultratrace determination of lead by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization of plumbane generation and analyte preconcentration in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz

    2012-05-15

    A compact trap-and-atomizer device and a preconcentration procedure based on hydride trapping in excess of oxygen over hydrogen in the collection step, both constructed and developed previously in our laboratory, were employed to optimize plumbane trapping in this device and to develop a routine method for ultratrace lead determination subsequently. The inherent advantage of this preconcentration approach is that 100% preconcentration efficiency for lead is reached in this device which has never been reported before using quartz or metal traps. Plumbane is completely retained in the trap-and-atomizer device at 290 Degree-Sign C in oxygen-rich atmosphere and trapped species are subsequently volatilized at 830 Degree-Sign C in hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Effect of relevant experimental parameters on plumbane trapping and lead volatilization are discussed, and possible trapping mechanisms are hypothesized. Plumbane trapping in the trap-and-atomizer device can be routinely used for lead determination at ultratrace levels reaching a detection limit of 0.21 ng ml{sup -1} Pb (30 s preconcentration, sample volume 2 ml). Further improvement of the detection limit is feasible by reducing the blank signal and increasing the trapping time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 100% preconcentration efficiency for lead was reached. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Routine analytical method was developed for Pb determination (LOD of 0.2 ng ml{sup -1} Pb).

  10. Single-atom trapping in holographic 2D arrays of microtraps with arbitrary geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Nogrette, Florence; Ravets, Sylvain; Barredo, Daniel; Béguin, Lucas; Vernier, Aline; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate single-atom trapping in two-dimensional arrays of microtraps with arbitrary geometries. We generate the arrays using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), with which we imprint an appropriate phase pattern on an optical dipole trap beam prior to focusing. We trap single $^{87}{\\rm Rb}$ atoms in the sites of arrays containing up to $\\sim100$ microtraps separated by distances as small as $3\\;\\mu$m, with complex structures such as triangular, honeycomb or kagome lattices. Using a closed-loop optimization of the uniformity of the trap depths ensures that all trapping sites are equivalent. This versatile system opens appealing applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation, e.g. for simulating frustrated quantum magnetism using Rydberg atoms.

  11. Energetic neutral atoms emitted from ice by ion bombardment under Ganymede surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Magnetospheric or solar wind ions directly interacting with a planetary surface result in backscattering or sputtering of energetic neutral atoms. One example is the solar wind interaction with the surface of the Moon, where the produced energetic neutral atoms were observed by the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer instrument (SARA) on Chandrayaan-1. At Jupiter, magnetospheric plasma interacts in a similar way with the surface of the Galilean moons. However, the emission of energetic neutral atoms from "dirty" ices as found e.g. on Ganymede's surface is poorly understood. We set up an experiment to study the ion to surface interaction under Ganymede surface environment conditions using the unique capabilities of the MEFISTO test facility at University of Bern. Ions of various species and energies up to 33 keV/q were impacted on a block of ice made from a mixture of water, NaCl and dry ice. The energetic neutral atoms produced by the interaction were detected with the prototype of the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer instrument (JNA.) JNA is proposed as part of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for ESA's JUICE mission to Jupiter and instrument is based on the Energetic Energetic Neutral Atom instrument (ENA) built for the BepiColombo Magnetospheric Orbiter. We present energy spectra for different ion beam species and energetic neutral atom species combinations. The data show high yields for energetic neutral atoms up to the upper end of the instrument energy range of 3.3 keV. The energy spectra of the neutral atom flux emitted from the ice could only partially be fitted by the Sigmund-Thompson formula. In some cases, but not all, a Maxwellian distribution provides a reasonable description of the data.

  12. Velocity selective trapping of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, V Yu

    2013-01-01

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field may suppress packet splitting for some atoms having specific velocities in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We propose that in a real experiment with cold atomic gas this effect may decrease the velocity distribution of atoms (the field traps the atoms with such specific velocities while all other atoms leave the field)

  13. Trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  14. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  15. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  16. Moment of inertia of a trapped superfluid gas of atomic fermions

    OpenAIRE

    Farine, M.; Schuck, Peter; Viñas Gausí, Xavier

    2000-01-01

    The moment of inertia of a trapped superfluid gas of atomic Fermions (6Li) is calculated as a function of two system parameters: temperature and deformation of the trap. For moderate deformations at zero temperature the moment of inertia takes on the irrotational flow value. Only for T very close to the critical temperature rigid rotation is attained. For very strong trap deformations the moment of inertia approaches its rigid body value even in the superfluid state. It is proposed that futur...

  17. Magneto-optical trapping of radioactive atoms for test of the fundamental symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu, E-mail: hirokazu.kawamura.c2@tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan); Inoue, T. [Tohoku University, Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences (Japan); Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Köhler, L.; Mathis, J.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We are planning test experiments of fundamental symmetries based on the intrinsic properties of francium. It is expected that the laser cooling and trapping of francium will produce precision measurements. The pilot experiment using rubidium was performed with the goal of francium trapping. The ion beam generated with a francium ion source was investigated using a Wien filter. Each piece of equipment still must be studied in more detail, and the equipment should be upgraded in order to trap radioactive atoms.

  18. Observation of three-level rectified dipole forces acting on trapped atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, T. T.; Duncan, B. C.; Sanchez-Villicana, V.; Gould, P. L.

    1995-06-01

    We have observed rectified dipole forces acting on three-level atoms in the cascade configuration. Laser cooled and trapped rubidium atoms are illuminated with an intense bichromatic standing wave (780 and 776 nm) tuned near resonance with the 5S1/2-->5P3/2-->5D5/2 transitions. The resulting rectified forces produce periodic potential wells (71-μm period), which localize the cold atoms. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions. These forces may be useful in atom optics and laser traps.

  19. Photoassociative Cooling and Trapping of Center-of-Mass Motion of Atom-Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Subrata; Deb, Bimalendu

    2015-01-01

    We show that it is possible to cool and trap the center-of-mass (COM) motion of atom-pairs by a lin$\\perp$lin Sisyphus-like method using counter-propagating photoassociation lasers. This method relies on the photoassociative coupling between an excited molecular bound state and a single-channel continuum of states of scattering between ground-state atoms. We demonstrate that one can generate molecular spin-dependent periodic potentials by this method for trapping the COM motion of pairs of ground-state atoms. We illustrate this with numerical calculations using fermionic $^{171}$Yb atoms as an example.

  20. Entanglement and quantum state transfer between two atoms trapped in two indirectly coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Shen, Li-Tuo; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for implementing entanglement generation and the quantum state transfer between two atomic qubits trapped in two different cavities that are not directly coupled to each other. The process is realized through engineering an effective asymmetric X-Y interaction for the two atoms involved in the gate operation and an auxiliary atom trapped in an intermediate cavity, induced by virtually manipulating the atomic excited states and photons. We study the validity of the scheme as well as the influences of the dissipation by numerical simulation and demonstrate that it is robust against decoherence.

  1. Trapping of ultra cold atoms in a 3He/4He dilution refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Jessen, F; Bell, S C; Vergien, P; Hattermann, H; Weiss, P; Rudolph, M; Reinschmidt, M; Meyer, K; Gaber, T; Cano, D; Guenther, A; Bernon, S; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R; Fortagh, J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the preparation of ultra cold atomic clouds in a dilution refrigerator. The closed cycle 3He/4He cryostat was custom made to provide optical access for laser cooling, optical manipulation and detection of atoms. We show that the cryostat meets the requirements for cold atom experiments, specifically in terms of operating a magneto-optical trap, magnetic traps and magnetic transport under ultra high vacuum conditions. The presented system is a step towards the creation of a quantum hybrid system combining ultra cold atoms and solid state quantum devices.

  2. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, A., E-mail: akirkpatrick@exogenesis.us [Exogenesis Corporation, 20 Fortune Drive, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States); Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J. [Exogenesis Corporation, 20 Fortune Drive, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  3. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

    2013-07-01

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  4. TRI mu P-trapped radioactive atoms-mu icrolaboratories for fundamental physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, K; Berg, GP; Dammalapati, U; Dendooven, P; Dermois, O; Harakeh, MN; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R; Rogachevskiy, A; Sanchez-Vega, M; Timmermans, R; Traykov, E; Willmann, L; Wilschut, HW

    2003-01-01

    At the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) in Groningen, NL, a new facility (TRImuP) is under development. Radioactive nuclei will be produced using heavy ion beams from the superconducting AGOR cyclotron. They are then slowed down and finally trapped in ion or atomic traps in order to perform

  5. Optically induced conical intersections in traps for ultracold atoms and molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallis, A.O.G.; Hutson, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We show that conical intersections can be created in laboratory coordinates by dressing a parabolic trap for ultracold atoms or molecules with a combination of optical and static magnetic fields. The resulting ring trap can support single-particle states with half-integer rotational quantization and many-particle states with persistent flow. Two well-separated atomic or molecular states are brought into near-resonance by an optical field and tuned across each other with an inhomogeneous magne...

  6. Quantum State Control of Trapped Atomic and Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seck, Christopher M.

    Full quantum control of a molecule would have a significant impact in molecular coherent control (alignment and orientation) and ultracold and quantum chemistry, quantum computing and simulation as well as hybrid quantum devices, and precision spectroscopy of importance to fundamental physics research. Precision spectroscopy of even simple diatomic molecules offers the possibility of uncovering physics beyond the standard model, specifically time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, which is currently constrained by astronomical molecular observations at the 10-16 1/yr level and laboratory atomic measurements at the 10-17 1/yr level. To achieve this level of measurement and to avoid the complications of diatomic structure on traditional spectroscopy methods, molecular quantum logic spectroscopy (mQLS) will be the spectroscopy technique of choice. We discuss development of in-house external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems and improvements to the Libbrecht-Hall circuit, which is a well-known, low-noise current driver for narrow-linewidth diode lasers. However, as the current approaches the maximum set limit, the noise in the laser current increases dramatically. This behavior is documented and simple circuit modifications to alleviate this issue are explored. We cool trapped AlH+ molecules to their ground rotational-vibrational quantum state using an electronically-exciting broadband laser to simultaneously drive cooling resonances from many different rotational levels. We demonstrate rotational cooling on the 140(20) ms timescale from room temperature to 3.8 K, with the ground state population increasing from 3% to 95.4%. Since QLS does not require the high gate fidelities usually associated with quantum computation and quantum simulation, it is possible to make simplifying choices in ion species and quantum protocols at the expense of some fidelity. We demonstrate sideband cooling and motional state detection protocols for 138Ba+ of sufficient fidelity

  7. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何军; 刘贝; 刁文婷; 王杰英; 靳刚; 王军民

    2015-01-01

    A single atom in a magneto–optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of∼100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters.

  8. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Diao, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jie-Ying; Jin, Gang; Wang, Jun-Min

    2015-04-01

    A single atom in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of ~ 100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921601) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61205215, 11274213, and 61475091).

  9. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Feng, G; Nute, J; Piano, S; Hackermuller, L; Ma, J; Xiao, L; Jia, S

    2015-01-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loading magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load $1.5 \\times 10^7$ atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 $\\mu$K to 1.7 $\\mu$K within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about $1.2 \\times 10^7$. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  10. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wu, J.; Feng, G.; Nute, J.; Piano, S.; Hackermüller, L.; Ma, J.; Xiao, L.; Jia, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load 1.5 × 107 atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 µK to 1.7 µK within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about 1.2 × 107. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  11. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented.

  12. Photodissociation of Trapped Rb2+: Implications for Simultaneous Trapping of Atoms and Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothi, S.; Ray, Tridib; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A. R.; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The direct photodissociation of trapped 85Rb2+ (rubidium) molecular ions by the cooling light for the 85Rb magneto-optical trap (MOT) is studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Vibrationally excited Rb2+ ions are created by photoionization of Rb2 molecules formed photoassociatively in the Rb MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap. The decay rate of the trapped Rb2+ ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is observed. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  13. Photodissociation of trapped Rb$^+_2$ : Implications for hybrid molecular ion-atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothi, S; Dutta, Sourav; Allouche, A R; Vexiau, Romain; Dulieu, Olivier; Rangwala, S A

    2016-01-01

    We observe direct photodissociation of trapped $^{85}$Rb$_2^+$ molecular ions in the presence of cooling light for the $^{85}$Rb magneto optical trap (MOT). Vibrationally excited Rb$_{2}^{+}$ ions are created by photoionization of Rb$_{2}$ molecules formed photoassociatively in the rubidium (Rb) MOT and are trapped in a modified spherical Paul trap co-centric with the MOT. The decay rate of the trapped Rb$_{2}^{+}$ ion signal in the presence of the MOT cooling light is measured and agreement with our calculated rates for molecular ion photodissociation is established. The photodissociation mechanism due to the MOT light is expected to be active and therefore universal for all homonuclear diatomic alkali metal molecular ions.

  14. Effect of Trapping Agent and Polystyrene Chain End Functionality on Radical Trap-Assisted Atom Transfer Radical Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Carnicom

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling reactions were performed to gauge the effect of the inclusion of a radical trap on the success of coupling reactions of monohalogenated polystyrene (PSX chains in atom transfer radical coupling (ATRC type reactions. The effect of both the specific radical trap chosen and the structure of the polymer chain end were evaluated by the extent of dimerization observed in a series of analogous coupling reactions. The commonly used radical trap 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP showed the highest amounts of dimerization for PSX (X = Br, Cl compared to coupling reactions performed in its absence or with a different radical trap. A dinitroxide coupling agent was also studied with the extent of coupling nearly matching the effectiveness of MNP in RTA (Radical trap-assisted-ATRC reactions, while N-nitroso and electron rich nitroso coupling agents were the least effective. (2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl-piperin-l-yloxyl-capped PS (PS-TEMPO, prepared by NMP, was subjected to a coupling sequence conceptually similar to RTA-ATRC, but dimerization was not observed regardless of the choice of radical trap. Kinetic experiments were performed to observe rate changes on the coupling reaction of PSBr as a result of the inclusion of MNP, with substantial rate enhancements found in the RTA-ATRC coupling sequence compared to traditional ATRC.

  15. Heliospheric Neutral Atom Spectra Between 0.01 and 6 keV fom IBEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Gloeckler, G.; Heirtzler, D.; Janzen, P.; Kubiak, M.; Kucharek, H.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Moore, T. E.; Petrinec, S. M.; Quinn, M.; Reisenfeld, D.; Saul, L. A.; Scheer, J. A.; Schwardron, N.; Trattner, K. J.; Vanderspek, R.; Wurz, P.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2008 December, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has been making detailed observations of neutrals from the boundaries of the heliosphere using two neutral atom cameras with overlapping energy ranges. The unexpected, yet defining feature discovered by IBEX is a Ribbon that extends over the energy range from about 0.2 to 6 keV. This Ribbon is superposed on a more uniform, globally distributed heliospheric neutral population. With some important exceptions, the focus of early IBEX studies has been on neutral atoms with energies greater than approx. 0.5 keV. With nearly three years of science observations, enough low-energy neutral atom measurements have been accumulated to extend IBEX observations to energies less than approx. 0.5 keV. Using the energy overlap of the sensors to identify and remove backgrounds, energy spectra over the entire IBEX energy range are produced. However, contributions by interstellar neutrals to the energy spectrum below 0.2 keV may not be completely removed. Compared with spectra at higher energies, neutral atom spectra at lower energies do not vary much from location to location in the sky, including in the direction of the IBEX Ribbon. Neutral fluxes are used to show that low energy ions contribute approximately the same thermal pressure as higher energy ions in the heliosheath. However, contributions to the dynamic pressure are very high unless there is, for example, turbulence in the heliosheath with fluctuations of the order of 50-100 km/s.

  16. Atomic clock using coherent population trapping in a cesium cell: frequency stability and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejri, Sinda; Tricot, Francois; Danet, Jean-Marie; Yun, Peter; De Clercq, Emeric; Guerandel, Stephane

    2016-06-01

    Toward the next generation of compact devices, atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT) offer a very interesting alternative. We present a review of our studies on the short and mid term stability of a compact high performance atomic clock based on CPT in view of portable applications.

  17. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.

    2012-01-01

    is capable of loading 90 of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) in less than 7 s while maintaining a low vacuum pressure of 10 -11 Torr. The transverse velocity components of the atomic beam are measured to be within typical capture velocities of a rubidium MOT. Finally, we show that the atomic beam can be turned...

  18. High-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical-trap source for cold lithium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiecke, T.G.; Gensemer, S.D.; Ludewig, A.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT) as a beam source for cold Li-6 atoms. The source is side loaded from an oven operated at temperatures in the range 600 less than or similar to T less than or similar to 700 K. The performance is analyzed by loading the atoms into a

  19. Optimization of a constrained linear monochromator design for neutral atom beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A focused ground state, neutral atom beam, exploiting its de Broglie wavelength by means of atom optics, is used for neutral atom microscopy imaging. Employing Fresnel zone plates as a lens for these beams is a well established microscopy technique. To date, even for favorable beam source conditions a minimal focus spot size of slightly below 1μm was reached. This limitation is essentially given by the intrinsic spectral purity of the beam in combination with the chromatic aberration of the diffraction based zone plate. Therefore, it is important to enhance the monochromaticity of the beam, enabling a higher spatial resolution, preferably below 100nm. We propose to increase the monochromaticity of a neutral atom beam by means of a so-called linear monochromator set-up - a Fresnel zone plate in combination with a pinhole aperture - in order to gain more than one order of magnitude in spatial resolution. This configuration is known in X-ray microscopy and has proven to be useful, but has not been applied to neutral atom beams. The main result of this work is optimal design parameters based on models for this linear monochromator set-up followed by a second zone plate for focusing. The optimization was performed for minimizing the focal spot size and maximizing the centre line intensity at the detector position for an atom beam simultaneously. The results presented in this work are for, but not limited to, a neutral helium atom beam.

  20. Entanglement of two individual neutral atoms using Rydberg blockade

    CERN Document Server

    Wilk, T; Evellin, C; Wolters, J; Miroshnychenko, Y; Grangier, P; Browaeys, A

    2009-01-01

    We report the generation of entanglement between two individual 87Rb atoms in hyperfine ground states |F=1,M=1> and |F=2,M=2> which are held in two optical tweezers separated by 4 $\\mu$m. Our scheme relies on the Rydberg blockade effect which prevents the simultaneous excitation of the two atoms to a Rydberg state. The entangled state is generated in about 200 ns using pulsed two-photon excitation. We quantify the entanglement by applying global Raman rotations on both atoms. Correcting for losses we measure a fidelity of 0.75 with respect to the target state.

  1. Cooling and trapping of three-level atoms in a bichromatic standing wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, H.; Cai, T.; Bigelow, N. P.; Grove, T. T.; Gould, P. L.

    1995-02-01

    We show that a three-level atom in the cascade configuration can be stably trapped and cooled in one dimension by an intense bichromatic standing wave. At the two-photon resonance, rectified dipole forces result in a deep potential well which can be used to localize the atoms in space. In the vicinity of the rectified potential minimum, the spatial dependence of the dressed state energies can lead to a velocity dependence of the force which produces damping of the atomic motion. Consideration of the heating effects of momentum diffusion indicates that cooling and stable trapping at low temperatures is possible in such a bichromatic field.

  2. Entanglement of two individual neutral atoms using Rydberg blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, T; Gaëtan, A; Evellin, C; Wolters, J; Miroshnychenko, Y; Grangier, P; Browaeys, A

    2010-01-08

    We report the generation of entanglement between two individual 87Rb atoms in hyperfine ground states |F=1,M=1> and |F=2,M=2> which are held in two optical tweezers separated by 4 microm. Our scheme relies on the Rydberg blockade effect which prevents the simultaneous excitation of the two atoms to a Rydberg state. The entangled state is generated in about 200 ns using pulsed two-photon excitation. We quantify the entanglement by applying global Raman rotations on both atoms. We measure that 61% of the initial pairs of atoms are still present at the end of the entangling sequence. These pairs are in the target entangled state with a fidelity of 0.75.

  3. Spectroscopy of low-energy atoms released from a solid noble-gas matrix: Proposal for a trap-loading technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambo, R.; Rodegheri, C. C.; Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the velocity distribution of chromium atoms released from a solid neon matrix at cryogenic temperatures via Doppler spectroscopy. The Ne matrix is grown by directing a small flux of gas onto a cold substrate, while Cr atoms are simultaneously implanted by laser ablation, with the resultant plume directed toward the growing matrix. The atoms are then released by a heat pulse. We have observed neutral Cr atoms at temperatures around 13K with densities close to 1012cm-3 . The released atoms have a large initial drift velocity, explained by simple kinetic theory arguments, due to the light species’ drag force. The scheme could be adapted to produce cryogenic beams of atoms, molecules, and possibly ions, for collisional studies and spectroscopy. However, our main motivation was the construction of a hydrogen trap, and here we discuss the prospects and problems of using this technique for this purpose.

  4. Design and fabrication of diffractive atom chips for laser cooling and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Cotter, J P; Griffin, P F; Rabey, I M; Docherty, K; Riis, E; Arnold, A S; Hinds, E A

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been shown that optical reflection gratings fabricated directly into an atom chip provide a simple and effective way to trap and cool substantial clouds of atoms [1,2]. In this article we describe how the gratings are designed and micro-fabricated and we characterise their optical properties, which determine their effectiveness as a cold atom source. We use simple scalar diffraction theory to understand how the morphology of the gratings determines the power in the diffracted beams.

  5. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  6. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic strontium for ultracold atom physics, high-precision spectroscopy and quantum sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sorrentino, F.; Ferrari, G.; Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; G. M. Tino

    2006-01-01

    This review describes the production of atomic strontium samples at ultra-low temperature and at high phase-space density, and their possible use for physical studies and applications. We describe the process of loading a magneto-optical trap from an atomic beam and preparing the sample for high precision measurements. Particular emphasis is given to the applications of ultracold Sr samples, spanning from optical frequency metrology to force sensing at micrometer scale.

  7. Observation of the Vacuum-Rabi Spectrum for One Trapped Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Boca, A; Birnbaum, K M; Boozer, A D; McKeever, J; Kimble, H J

    2004-01-01

    The transmission spectrum for one atom strongly coupled to the field of a high-finesse optical resonator is observed to exhibit a clearly resolved vacuum-Rabi splitting characteristic of the normal modes in the eigenvalue spectrum of the atom-cavity system. A new Raman scheme for cooling atomic motion along the cavity axis enables a complete spectrum to be recorded for an individual atom trapped within the cavity mode, in contrast to all previous measurements in cavity QED that have required averaging over many atoms.

  8. Generation of Entangled Bloch States for Two Atomic Samples Trapped in Separated Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2007-01-01

    A scheme is presented for the generation of entangled states for two atomic ensembles trapped in two distant cavities.In the scheme,each atomic sample is initially in a Bloch state and the cavity mode is initially in a coherent state with a small amplitude.The dispersive atom-cavity interaction leads to a photon-number dependent phase shift on the atomic system.The detection of a photon leaking from the cavities makes the two atomic samples collapse to an entangled Bloch state.

  9. Several atomic-physics issues connected with the use of neutral beams in fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, D.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Fonck, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    Energetic neutral beams are used for heating and diagnostics in present magnetic fusion experiments. They are also being considered for use in future large experiments. Atomic physics issues are important for both the production of the neutral beams and the interaction of the beams and the plasma. Interest in neutral beams based on negative hydrogen ions is growing, largely based on advances in producing high current ion sources. An extension of the negative ion approach has been the suggestion to use negative ions of Z > 1 elements, such as carbon and oxygen, to form high power neutral beams for plasma heating.

  10. Trapping of light pulses in ensembles of stationary Lambda atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Kristian Rymann; Molmer, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical description of the generation of stationary light pulses by standing wave electromagnetically induced transparency in media comprised of stationary atoms. We show that, contrary to thermal gas media, the achievable storage times are limited only by the ground state dephasing rate of the atoms, making such media ideally suited for nonlinear optical interactions between stored pulses. Furthermore, we find significant quantitative and qualitative differences bet...

  11. Aspects of 1S-2S spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Madsen, N.; Robicheaux, F.

    2017-09-01

    Antihydrogen atoms are now routinely trapped in small numbers. One of the purposes of this effort is to make precision comparisons of the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen and antihydrogen as a precision test of the CPT theorem. We investigate, through calculations and simulations, various methods by which the 1S-2S transition may be probed with only a few trapped atoms. We consider the known constraints from typical experimental geometries, detection methods, sample temperatures, laser light sources etc and we identify a viable path towards a measurement of this transition at the 10‑11 level in a realistic scenario. We also identify ways in which such a first measurement could be improved upon as a function of projected changes and improvements in antihydrogen synthesis and trapping. These calculations recently guided the first observation of the 1S-2S transition in trapped antihydrogen.

  12. Optimal transport of cold atoms by modulating the velocity of traps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Jing-Shan; Xu Xin-Ping; Zhang Hai-Chao; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    This work experimentally demonstrates a new method of optimizing the transport of cold atoms via modulating the velocity profile imposed on a magnetic quadrupole trap.The trap velocity and corresponding modulation are controlled by varying the currents of two pairs of anti-Helmholtz coils.Cold 87Rb atoms are transported in a non-adiabatic regime over 22 mm in 200 ms.For the transported atoms their final-vibration amplitude dependences of modulation period number,depth,and initial phase are investigated.With modulation period n =5,modulation depth K =0.55,and initial phase φ =0,cold atom clouds with more atom numbers,smaller final-vibration amplitude,and lower temperature are efficiently transported.Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation are also provided,which are in good agreement with experimental results.

  13. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  14. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  15. Phase Space Diagnostics of Trapped Atoms By Magnetic Ground-State Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, S. B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Shim, U.; Sleator, T.

    1997-04-01

    The in-situ measurement of the phase space distribution of atoms in a trap is important in the study of both ordinary and Bose-condensed matter. The current techniques for measuring the density distribution involve imaging the light emitted by atoms in the trap, time-of-flight measurement of the atoms as they fall through a sheet of light(C.D. Wallace, et al, JOSA B,11),703 (1994), resonant absorption imaging of the cloud(J.R. Ensher, et al, PRL 77), 4984 (1996), or off-resonant dispersive imaging. The first two techniques are in general use for imaging magneto-optical traps (MOTs) and the second two for Bose condensates. Velocity information is obtained indirectly by recording the expansion of the trap at different times following shut-off. By exploiting the magnetic field dependence of ground-state magnetic sublevel coherences, we have employed two techniques, MGE and MGFID(B. Dubetsky and P.R. Berman, Appl. Phys. B, 59), 147 (1994), to obtain atomic spatial information. This variant of atomic beam magnetic imaging(J.E. Thomas and L.J. Wang, Physics Reports 262), 311-366 (1995) also yields correlated position-velocity information by appropriate orientation of the applied magnetic field, as the detuning of the atom depends on both its position and velocity. Initial studies have given the velocity distribution and size of the MOT, and future experiments to measure correlations are proposed.

  16. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  17. Quantum information entropies of ultracold atomic gases in a harmonic trap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tutul Biswas; Tarun Kanti Ghosh

    2011-10-01

    The position and momentum space information entropies of weakly interacting trapped atomic Bose–Einstein condensates and spin-polarized trapped atomic Fermi gases at absolute zero temperature are evaluated. We find that sum of the position and momentum space information entropies of these quantum systems containing atoms confined in a $D(≤ 3)$-dimensional harmonic trap has a universal form as $S^{(D)}_t = N(a D − b ln N)$, where ∼ 2.332 and = 2 for interacting bosonic systems and a ∼ 1.982 and = 1 for ideal fermionic systems. These results obey the entropic uncertainty relation given by Beckner, Bialynicki-Birula and Myceilski.

  18. Few-body Cs Rydberg Atom Interactions in a 1064 nm Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Donald; Tallant, Jonathan; Marangoni, Bruno; Marcassa, Luis; Shaffer, James

    2011-05-01

    In studying few-body physics, the number density of atoms is an important parameter in achieving a good signal to noise ratio. We have recently improved our apparatus by implementing a crossed 1064 nm far off-resonance trap (FORT), which enables us to trap atoms at three orders of magnitude greater density than our MOT. Future directions for the apparatus, which include the study of anisotropic interactions among Rydberg atoms in the dipole trap, three-body recombination, ``trilobite-like'' molecules, and the detection of ultra-long range Rydberg macrodimers in Cs, will be described. Our presentation will focus on data on three-body recombination and long-range Rydberg ``trilobite-like'' molecules. We acknowledge funding from ARO (W911NF-08-1-0257), NSF (PHY-0855324) and NSF (OISE-0756321).

  19. Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Spin Chain of a Few Cold Atoms in a One-Dimensional Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmann, S; Deuretzbacher, F; Zürn, G; Bjerlin, J; Reimann, S M; Santos, L; Lompe, T; Jochim, S

    2015-11-20

    We report on the deterministic preparation of antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin chains consisting of up to four fermionic atoms in a one-dimensional trap. These chains are stabilized by strong repulsive interactions between the two spin components without the need for an external periodic potential. We independently characterize the spin configuration of the chains by measuring the spin orientation of the outermost particle in the trap and by projecting the spatial wave function of one spin component on single-particle trap levels. Our results are in good agreement with a spin-chain model for fermionized particles and with numerically exact diagonalizations of the full few-fermion system.

  20. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  1. Investigation of ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Rong; Ji Zhong-Hua; Yuan Jin-Peng; Yang Yan; Zhao Yan-Ting; Ma Jie; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap (MOT) are studied via depumping the cesium cold atoms into the dark hyperfine ground state.The collision rate is reduced to 0.45 s-1 and the density of the atoms is increased to 5.6 × 1011 cm-3 when the fractional population of the atoms in the bright hyperfine ground state is as low as 0.15.The vibrational spectra of the ultracold cesium molecules are also studied in a standard MOT and in a dark MOT separately.The experimental results are analyzed by using the perturbative quantum approach.

  2. Efficient scheme for entangled states and quantum information transfer with trapped atoms in a resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng-Bo; Li Fu-Li

    2011-01-01

    A protocol is proposed to generate atomic entangled states and implement quantum information transfer in a cavity quantum electrodynamics system. It utilizes Raman transitions or stimulated Raman adiabatic passages between two systems to entangle the ground states of two three-state A-type atoms trapped in a single mode cavity. It does not need the measurements on cavity field nor atomic detection and can be implemented in a deterministic fashion. Since the present protocol is insensitive to both cavity decay and atomic spontaneous emission,it may have some interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  3. Influence of the atomic-wall collision elasticity on the coherent population trapping resonance shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, G A; Matisov, B G; Romanenko, V I; Yatsenko, L P; Romanenko, A V

    2011-01-01

    We studied theoretically a coherent population trapping resonance formation in cylindrical cell without buffer gas irradiated by a narrow laser beam. We take into account non-zero probabilities of elastic ("specular") and inelastic ("sticking") collision between the atom and the cell wall. We have developed a theoretical model based on averaging over the random Ramsey pulse sequences of times that atom spent in and out of the beam. It is shown that the shape of coherent population trapping resonance line depends on the probability of elastic collision.

  4. Self-Consistent Approach to Global Charge Neutrality in Electrokinetics: A Surface Potential Trap Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Xu, Shixin; Liao, Maijia; Liu, Chun; Sheng, Ping

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we treat the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations as the basis for a consistent framework of the electrokinetic effects. The static limit of the PNP equations is shown to be the charge-conserving Poisson-Boltzmann (CCPB) equation, with guaranteed charge neutrality within the computational domain. We propose a surface potential trap model that attributes an energy cost to the interfacial charge dissociation. In conjunction with the CCPB, the surface potential trap can cause a surface-specific adsorbed charge layer σ. By defining a chemical potential μ that arises from the charge neutrality constraint, a reformulated CCPB can be reduced to the form of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, whose prediction of the Debye screening layer profile is in excellent agreement with that of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation when the channel width is much larger than the Debye length. However, important differences emerge when the channel width is small, so the Debye screening layers from the opposite sides of the channel overlap with each other. In particular, the theory automatically yields a variation of σ that is generally known as the "charge regulation" behavior, attendant with predictions of force variation as a function of nanoscale separation between two charged surfaces that are in good agreement with the experiments, with no adjustable or additional parameters. We give a generalized definition of the ζ potential that reflects the strength of the electrokinetic effect; its variations with the concentration of surface-specific and surface-nonspecific salt ions are shown to be in good agreement with the experiments. To delineate the behavior of the electro-osmotic (EO) effect, the coupled PNP and Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically under an applied electric field tangential to the fluid-solid interface. The EO effect is shown to exhibit an intrinsic time dependence that is noninertial in its origin. Under a step-function applied electric field, a

  5. Mars Express/ASPERA-3/NPI and IMAGE/LENA observations of energetic neutral atoms in Earth and Mars orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Holmstrom, M; Barabash, S; Brinkfeldt, K; Moore, T E; Simpson, D

    2007-01-01

    The low energy neutral atom imagers on Mars Express and IMAGE have revealed that the neutral atom populations in interplanetary space come from a variety of sources and challenge our current understanding of heliospheric physics. For example, both in cruise phase and at Mars, the neutral particle instrument NPD on Mars Express observed "unexplained neutral beams" unrelated to Mars which appear to be either of heliospheric or solar wind origin. Likewise, the NPI instrument on Mars Express has revealed streams of neutral atoms with different properties than those observed by NPD. Independently, IMAGE/LENA has reported neutral atom observations that may be interpreted as a "secondary stream" having different characteristics and flowing from a higher ecliptic longitude than the nominal upstream direction. Both sets of observations do not appear to fit in easily with the neutral atom environment from 1.0-1.57 AU as it is currently understood. In this paper we examine some highly suggestive similarities in the IMAG...

  6. Interaction of neutral atoms and plasma turbulence in the tokamak edge region

    OpenAIRE

    Wersal, Christoph; Ricci, Paolo; Jorge, Rogério; Morales, Jorge; Paruta, Paola; Riva, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    A novel first-principles self-consistent model that couples plasma and neutral atom physics suitable for the simulation of turbulent plasma behaviour in the tokamak edge region has been developed and implemented in the GBS code. While the plasma is modelled by the drift-reduced two fluid Braginskii equations, a kinetic model is used for the neutrals, valid in short and in long mean free path scenarios. The model includes ionization, charge-exchange, recombination, and elastic collisional proc...

  7. The influence of radiation trapping on the measurements of cross sections for excited-atom-excited-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molisch, A.F.; Oehry, B.P.; Magerl, G. [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Nachrichtentechnik und Hochfrequenztechnik

    2000-07-01

    Radiation trapping has an important influence on the measurement of the cross sections of collisions between excited atoms, like energy-pooling collisions, Penning ionization, and associative ionization. In this paper, we first set up the exact relations for computing the cross sections from measurements influenced by trapping and discuss their practical applicability. Since the observation geometry is usually not known exactly, we discuss ways to calibrate it out. In contrast to the untrapped case, no complete elimination of geometry effects is possible. The sensitivity of various experimental geometries to modelling errors is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Csub>60sub> as an Atom Trap to Capture Co Adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Dongzhe; Repain, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    C60 molecules were used to trap Co adatoms and clusters on a Au(111) surface using atomic/molecular manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. Two manipulation pathways (successive integration of single Co atoms in one molecule or direct integration of a Co cluster) were found...... to efficiently allow the formation of complexes mixing a C60 molecule with Co atoms. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals the robustness of the pi states of C60 that are preserved after Co trapping. Scanning tunneling microscopy images and density functional theory calculations reveal that dissociated Co...... clusters of up to nine atoms can be formed at the molecule-substrate interface. These results open new perspectives in the interactions between metal adatoms and molecules, for applications in metal-organic devices...

  9. Entangled Radiation through an Atomic Reservoir Controlled by Coherent Population Trapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qian; ZHONG Wen-Xue; HU Xiang-Ming

    2008-01-01

    We show that it is possible to generate Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entangled radiation using an atomic reservoir controlled by coherent population trapping. A beam of three-level atoms is initially prepared in nearcoherent population trapping (CPT) state and acts as a long-lived coherence-controlled reservoir. Four-wave mixing leads to amplification of cavity modes resonant with Rabi sidebands of the atomic dipole transitions. The cavity modes evolve into an EPR state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensities and the frequencies of the driving fields. This scheme uses the long-lived CPT coherence and is robust against spontaneous emission of the atomic beam. At the same time, this scheme is implemented in a one-step procedure, not in a two-step procedure as was required in Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 240401.

  10. Solar ions in the heliosheath: a possible new source of heavy neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Grzedzielski, S; Bzowski, M; Izmodenov, V

    2006-01-01

    We show that multiply ionized coronal C, N, O, Mg, Si, S ions carried by the solar wind and neutralized by consecutive electron captures from neutral interstellar atoms constitute an important new source of neutral atoms in the inner heliosheath, with energies up to ~ 1 keV/n. In the model we developed, the heavy ions are treated as test particles carried by hydrodynamic plasma flow (with a Monte-Carlo description of interstellar neutrals) and undergoing all relevant atomic processes determining the evolution of all charge-states of considered species (radiative and dielectronic recombination, charge exchange, photo-, and electron impact ionization). The total strength of the source is from ~10^6 g/s for S to ~10^8 g/s for O, deposited as neutrals below the heliopause. These atoms should provide, as they drift to supersonic wind region, important sources of PUIs and eventually ACRs, especially for species that are excluded from entering the heliosphere because of their ionization in the LISM. The expected cor...

  11. Microtraps for neutral atoms using superconducting structures in the critical state

    CERN Document Server

    Emmert, Andreas; Brune, Michel; Raimond, Jean-Michel; Haroche, Serge; Nogues, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    Recently demonstrated superconducting atom-chips provide a platform for trapping atoms and coupling them to solid-state quantum systems. Controlling these devices requires a full understanding of the supercurrent distribution in the trapping structures. For type-II superconductors, this distribution is hysteretic in the critical state due to the partial penetration of the magnetic field in the thin superconducting film through pinned vortices. We report here an experimental observation of this memory effect. Our results are in good agreement with the redictions of the Bean model of the critical state without adjustable parameters. The memory effect allows to write and store permanent currents in micron-sized superconducting structures and paves the way towards new types of engineered trapping potentials.

  12. Microtraps for neutral atoms using superconducting structures in the critical state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, A.; Lupaşcu, A.; Brune, M.; Raimond, J.-M.; Haroche, S.; Nogues, G.

    2009-12-01

    Recently demonstrated superconducting atom chips provide a platform for trapping atoms and coupling them to solid-state quantum systems. Controlling these devices requires a full understanding of the supercurrent distribution in the trapping structures. For type-II superconductors, this distribution is hysteretic in the critical state due to the partial penetration of the magnetic field in the thin superconducting film through pinned vortices. We report here an experimental observation of this memory effect. Our results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Bean model of the critical state without adjustable parameters. The memory effect allows to write and store permanent currents in micron-sized superconducting structures and paves the way toward engineered trapping potentials.

  13. A compact microchip atomic clock based on all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold trapped Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D. M.; Zozulya, A.; Anderson, D. Z.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a compact atomic clock that uses all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold Rb atoms that are magnetically trapped near the surface of an atom microchip. The interrogation scheme, which combines electromagnetically induced transparency with Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields, can achieve an atomic shot-noise-level performance better than 10^{-13}/sqrt{tau} for 106 atoms. A two-color Mach-Zehnder interferometer can detect a 100-pW probe beam at the optical shot-noise level using conventional photodetectors. This measurement scheme is nondestructive and therefore can be used to increase the operational duty cycle by reusing the trapped atoms for multiple clock cycles. Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations are used to identify realistic operating parameters at which AC Stark shifts are eliminated. By considering fluctuations in these parameters, we estimate that AC Stark shifts can be canceled to a level better than 2×10-14. An overview of the apparatus is presented with estimates of cycle time and power consumption.

  14. All-optical production and trapping of metastable noble gas atoms down to the single atom regime

    CERN Document Server

    Kohler, M; Sahling, P; Sieveke, C; Jerschabek, N; Kalinowski, M B; Becker, C; Sengstock, K

    2014-01-01

    The determination of isotope ratios of noble gas atoms has many applications e.g. in physics, nuclear arms control, and earth sciences. For several applications, the concentration of specific noble gas isotopes (e.g. Kr and Ar) is so low that single atom detection is highly desirable for a precise determination of the concentration. As an important step in this direction, we demonstrate operation of a krypton Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) setup based on a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable Kr atoms excited by all-optical means. Compared to other state-of-the-art techniques for preparing metastable noble gas atoms, all-optical production is capable of overcoming limitations regarding minimal probe volume and avoiding cross-contamination of the samples. In addition, it allows for a compact and reliable setup. We identify optimal parameters of our experimental setup by employing the most abundant isotope Kr-84, and demonstrate single atom detection within a 3D MOT.

  15. Laser cooling a neutral atom to the three-dimensional vibrational ground state of an optical tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, Adam M; Regal, Cindy A

    2012-01-01

    We report three-dimensional ground state cooling of a single neutral atom in an optical tweezer. After employing Raman sideband cooling for 33 ms, we measure via sideband spectroscopy a three-dimensional ground state occupation of ~90%. Ground state neutral atoms in optical tweezers will be instrumental in numerous quantum logic applications and for nanophotonic interfaces that require a versatile platform for storing, moving, and manipulating ultracold single neutral atoms.

  16. Nanowire photonic crystal waveguides for single-atom trapping and strong light-matter interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, S -P; Muniz, J A; Martin, M J; Norte, Richard; Hung, C -L; Meenehan, Seán M; Cohen, Justin D; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H J

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of dispersion-engineered nanowire photonic crystal waveguides suitable for experiments in quantum optics and atomic physics with optically trapped atoms. Detailed design methodology and specifications are provided, as are the processing steps used to create silicon nitride waveguides of low optical loss in the near-IR. Measurements of the waveguide optical properties and power-handling capability are also presented.

  17. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Barklem, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical method for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen atom system, is presented. The calculation of potentials and non-adiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multi-channel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wavefunctions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H, Na+H, and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20000 K.

  18. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  19. de Haas-van Alphen oscillations for neutral atoms in electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, B.; Furtado, C.

    2016-07-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect is well known as an oscillatory variation of the magnetization of conductors as a function of the inverse magnetic field and the frequency is proportional to the area of the Fermi surface. Here, we show that an analogous effect can occur for neutral atoms with a nonvanishing magnetic moment interacting with an electric field. Under an appropriate field-dipole configuration, the neutral atoms subject to a synthetic magnetic field arrange themselves in Landau levels. Using the Landau-Aharonov-Casher (LAC) theory, we obtain the energy eigenfunctions and eigenvalues as well as the degeneracy of the system. In a strong effective magnetic field regime we present the quantum oscillations in the energy and effective magnetization of a two-dimensional (2D) atomic gas. From the dHvA period we determine the area of the Fermi circle of the atomic cloud.

  20. Site Specificity in Femtosecond Laser Desorption of Neutral H Atoms from Graphite(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigge, R.; Hoger, T.; Siemer, B.;

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond laser excitation and density functional theory reveal site and vibrational state specificity in neutral atomic hydrogen desorption from graphite induced by multiple electronic transitions. Multimodal velocity distributions witness the participation of ortho and para pair states...... of chemisorbed hydrogen in the desorption process. Very slow velocities of 700 and 400  ms-1 for H and D atoms are associated with the desorption out of the highest vibrational state of a barrierless potential....

  1. Cross-sections for neutral atoms and molecules collisions with charged spherical nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents cross sections for collisions of neutral atoms/molecules with a charged nanoparticle, which is the source of the dipole potential. The accuracy of the orbital limited motion (OLM) approximation is estimated. It is shown that simple analytical formulas for the atoms/molecules and heat fluxes, obtained in the OLM approximation, give an error of not more than 15%, and are applicable in all reasonable range of nanoparticles and weakly ionized plasma parameters.

  2. Collisions of trapped ions with ultracold atoms in the [YbRb]$^+$ system

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, H D L; Goold, J; Wells, N; Lane, I

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the ultracold elastic scattering for the quasi-molecular ion of ytterbium and rubidium system, based on {\\it ab initio} calculations, including both asymptotic ionic channels. This structure has an important role in the design of hybrid ion-atom traps and quantum control of charge transfer processes. The dissociation energies and molecular constants for the lowest electronic states were calculated along with the long-range dispersion forces in order to estimate the scattering lengths. The separated-atom ionization potentials and atomic polarizability of the ytterbium atom ($\\alpha_d=128.5$ atomic units) are in good agreement with experiment and previous calculations. Using phase shift analysis and the semiclassical approximation, for the Rb$^+$ channel the scattering length is $a_s \\approx +2815\\ a_{0}$. With the Yb$^+$ ion colliding with the Rb atom we have the complications of singlet/triplet and the presence of nearly-degenerate charge transfer states introducing uncertainty. For the triplet...

  3. Continuously transferring cold atoms in caesium double magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2006-01-01

    We have established a caesium double magneto-optical trap (MOT) system for cavity-QED experiment, and demonstrated the continuous transfer of cold caesium atoms from the vapour-cell MOT with a pressure of ~ 1 × 10-6 Pa to the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) MOT with a pressure of ~ 8 × 10-8 Pa via a focused continuous-wave transfer laser beam. The effect of frequency detuning as well as the intensity of the transfer beam is systematically investigated, which makes the transverse cooling adequate before the atoms leak out of the vapour-cell MOT to reduce divergence of the cold atomic beam. The typical cold atomic flux got from vapour-cell MOT is ~ 2 × 107 atoms/s. About 5 × 106 caesium atoms are recaptured in the UHV MOT.

  4. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI mu P facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traykov, E.; Dammalapati, U.; De, S.; Dermois, O. C.; Huisman, L.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W.; Mol, A. J.; Onderwater, C. T. G.; Rogachevskiy, A; da Silva e Silva, M.; Sohani, M.; Versolato, O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2008-01-01

    The structures for the TRI mu P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sampl

  5. An Atom Trap Trace Analysis System for Measuring Krypton Contamination in Xenon Dark Matter Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Loose, Andre; Goetzke, Luke W; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) system to measure Kr in Xe at the part per trillion (ppt) level, a prerequisite for the sensitivity achievable with liquid xenon dark matter detectors beyond the current generation. Since Ar and Kr have similar laser cooling wavelengths, the apparatus has been tested with Ar to avoid contamination prior to measuring Xe samples. A radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge generates a beam of metastable Ar which is optically collimated, slowed, and trapped using standard magneto-optical techniques. We detect the fluorescence of single trapped $^{40}$Ar atoms with a signal to noise ratio of 5. The measured system efficiency of $3 \\times 10^{-9}$ for Ar corresponds to an expected Kr in Xe sensitivity at the ppt level.

  6. Quantum phases and dynamics of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Mueller, Erich

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by experiments performed by R. Landig et al. (arXiv:1511.00007), we theoretically explore the behavior of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity in the presence of a two-dimensional optical lattice. As explained by arXiv:1511.00007, Rayleigh scattering of light from the lattice-inducing beams into the cavity produces infinite-range cavity-mediated interactions between the atoms, leading to competition between superfluid, supersolid, Mott insulating and charge density wave phases. We calculate the phase diagram for a uniform trap using a variation of the Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also calculate the spatial distribution of the different phases in the gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We explore hysteretic behavior when parameters of the system are changed.

  7. Breakdown of Atomic Hyperfine Coupling in a Deep Optical-Dipole Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Neuzner, Andreas; Dürr, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the breakdown of hyperfine coupling for an atom in a deep optical-dipole trap. One-color laser spectroscopy is performed at the resonance lines of a single $^{87}$Rb atom for a trap wavelength of 1064 nm. Evidence of hyperfine breakdown comes from three observations, namely a nonlinear dependence of the transition frequencies on the trap intensity, a splitting of lines which are degenerate for small intensities, and the ability to drive transitions which would be forbidden by selection rules in the absence of hyperfine breakdown. From the data, we infer the hyperfine interval of the $5P_{1/2}$ state and the scalar and tensor polarizabilities for the $5P_{3/2}$ state.

  8. Direct observation of individual hydrogen atoms at trapping sites in a ferritic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.-S.; Haley, D.; Gerstl, S. S. A.; London, A. J.; Sweeney, F.; Wepf, R. A.; Rainforth, W. M.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Moody, M. P.

    2017-03-01

    The design of atomic-scale microstructural traps to limit the diffusion of hydrogen is one key strategy in the development of hydrogen-embrittlement-resistant materials. In the case of bearing steels, an effective trapping mechanism may be the incorporation of finely dispersed V-Mo-Nb carbides in a ferrite matrix. First, we charged a ferritic steel with deuterium by means of electrolytic loading to achieve a high hydrogen concentration. We then immobilized it in the microstructure with a cryogenic transfer protocol before atom probe tomography (APT) analysis. Using APT, we show trapping of hydrogen within the core of these carbides with quantitative composition profiles. Furthermore, with this method the experiment can be feasibly replicated in any APT-equipped laboratory by using a simple cold chain.

  9. Intrinsic electron traps in atomic-layer deposited HfO{sub 2} insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerbu, F.; Madia, O.; Afanas' ev, V. V.; Houssa, M.; Stesmans, A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Andreev, D. V. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Bauman Moscow State Technical University—Kaluga Branch, 248000 Kaluga, Moscow obl. (Russian Federation); Fadida, S.; Eizenberg, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Breuil, L. [imec, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lisoni, J. G. [imec, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Kittl, J. A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Advanced Logic Lab, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc., Austin, 78754 Texas (United States); Strand, J.; Shluger, A. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-30

    Analysis of photodepopulation of electron traps in HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition is shown to provide the trap energy distribution across the entire oxide bandgap. The presence is revealed of two kinds of deep electron traps energetically distributed at around E{sub t} ≈ 2.0 eV and E{sub t} ≈ 3.0 eV below the oxide conduction band. Comparison of the trapped electron energy distributions in HfO{sub 2} layers prepared using different precursors or subjected to thermal treatment suggests that these centers are intrinsic in origin. However, the common assumption that these would implicate O vacancies cannot explain the charging behavior of HfO{sub 2}, suggesting that alternative defect models should be considered.

  10. Trapping of Weak Signal Pulses by Soliton and Trajectory Control in a Coherent Atomic Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for trapping weak signal pulses by soliton and realizing its trajectory control via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The system we consider is a cold, coherent atomic gas with a tripod or multipod level configuration. We show that, due to the giant enhancement of Kerr nonlinearity contributed by EIT, several weak signal pulses can be effectively trapped by a soliton and cotravel stably with ultraslow propagating velocity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the trajectories of the soliton and the trapped signal pulses can be manipulated by using a Stern-Gerlach gradient magnetic field. As a result, the soliton and the trapped signal pulses display a Stern-Gerlach deflection and both of them can bypass an obstacle together. The results predicted here may be used to design all-optical switching at very low light level.

  11. Establishment of Entanglement for Two Atoms Trapped in Two Distant Bad Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Dao-Ming; ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2007-01-01

    A scheme is presented for generation of entangled states for two atoms trapped in two distant bad cavities.The scheme can work with bad cavities with the coupling strength smaller than the cavity decay rate, which is important from the viewpoint of experiment. In the scheme the atoms have no probability of being populated in the excited state and thus the atomic spontaneous emission is suppressed, which increases the probability of success. The fidelity of the entangled state is not affected by the detection efficiency. Furthermore, the scheme does not require the detection of the left-polarized photon and right-polarized photon at the same time.

  12. Robust Generation of Three-Particle W State with Atoms Trapped in Separate Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛斌; 贾仁需; 郑亦庄

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme for generating three-particle W state of remote atoms trapped in leaky cavities.The scheme uses cavity decay to inject photons into a setup of optical devices which consist of a series of beam splitters and photon detectors.Photon detection on the output mode projects the atomic state into the W state.In the condition of “weakly driven approach”,it shows that the scheme is robust and has high fidelity.It also points out that the scheme is scalable to generate multi-atomic W state.

  13. Trigonometric protocols for shortcuts to adiabatic transport of cold atoms in anharmonic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Xi

    2017-10-01

    Shortcuts to adiabaticity have been proposed to speed up the ;slow; adiabatic transport of ultracold atoms. Their realizations, using inverse engineering protocols, provide families of trajectories with appropriate boundary conditions. These trajectories can be optimized with respect to the operation time and the energy input. In this paper we propose trigonometric protocols for fast and robust atomic transport, taking into account cubic or quartic anharmonicities of the trapping potential. Numerical analysis demonstrates that this choice of the trajectory minimizes the final residual energy efficiently, and shows extraordinary robustness against anharmonic parameters. These results might be of interest for the state-of-the-art experiments on ultracold atoms and ions.

  14. Interaction of neutral atoms and plasma turbulence in the tokamak edge region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wersal, Christoph; Ricci, Paolo; Jorge, Rogerio; Morales, Jorge; Paruta, Paola; Riva, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    A novel first-principles self-consistent model that couples plasma and neutral atom physics suitable for the simulation of turbulent plasma behaviour in the tokamak edge region has been developed and implemented in the GBS code. While the plasma is modelled by the drift-reduced two fluid Braginskii equations, a kinetic model is used for the neutrals, valid in short and in long mean free path scenarios. The model includes ionization, charge-exchange, recombination, and elastic collisional processes. The model was used to study the transition form the sheath to the conduction limited regime, to include gas puffs in the simulations, and to investigate the interplay between neutral atoms and plasma turbulence.

  15. Can IBEX Identify Variations in the Galactic Environment of the Sun using Energetic Neutral Atom (ENAs)?

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, P C; Pogorelov, N V; DeMajistre, B; Crew, G B; Funsten, H O; Janzen, P; McComas, D J; Moebius, E; Mueller, H -R; Reisenfeld, D B; Schwadron, N A; Slavin, J D; Zank, G P

    2010-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft is providing the first all-sky maps of the energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced by charge-exchange between interstellar neutral \\HI\\ atoms and heliospheric solar wind and pickup ions in the heliosphere boundary regions. The 'edge' of the interstellar cloud presently surrounding the heliosphere extends less than 0.1 pc in the upwind direction, terminating at an unknown distance, indicating that the outer boundary conditions of the heliosphere could change during the lifetime of the IBEX satellite. Using reasonable values for future outer heliosphere boundary conditions, ENA fluxes are predicted for one possible source of ENAs coming from outside of the heliopause. The ENA production simulations use three-dimensional MHD plasma models of the heliosphere that include a kinetic description of neutrals and a Lorentzian distribution for ions. Based on this ENA production model, it is then shown that the sensitivities of the IBEX 1.1 keV skymaps are sufficient ...

  16. Quantum states of neutral atoms bound in the magnetic field of a Kepler-guide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ming; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-sheng

    2003-01-01

    The spectrum and the wave function of neutral atoms in the magnetic field of a Kepler-guide are presented by reducing a two-dimensional stationary Schrdinger equation to a one-dimensional hydrogen atom in Rydberg states. In addition, we set the scale for the atomic orbits and binding energy i n the quantum regime, and compare it with the outcome of the experiment. At the same time, we find that reducing the current and radius of the wire properly wil l increase the loading efficiency of the Kepler-guide.

  17. Universal gates based on targeted phase shifts in a 3D neutral atom array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aishwarya; Wang, Yang; Wu, Tsung-Yao; Weiss, David

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new approach to making targeted single qubit gates using Cesium atoms in a 5x5x5 3D neutral atom array. It combines targeted AC Zeeman phase shifts with global microwave pulses to produce arbitrary single qubit gates. Non-targeted atoms are left virtually untouched by the gates. We have addressed 48 sites, targeted individually, in a 40% full array. We have also performed Randomized Benchmarking to characterize the fidelity and crosstalk errors of this gate. These gates are highly insensitive to addressing beam imperfections and can be applied to other systems and geometries. Supported by NSF.

  18. Electrostatic trapping and in situ detection of Rydberg atoms above chip-based transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancuba, P.; Hogan, S. D.

    2016-04-01

    Beams of helium atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n = 48 and electric dipole moments of 4600 D have been decelerated from a mean initial longitudinal speed of 2000 m s-1 to zero velocity in the laboratory-fixed frame-of-reference in the continuously moving electric traps of a transmission-line decelerator. In this process accelerations up to -1.3× {10}7 m s-2 were applied, and changes in kinetic energy of {{Δ }}{E}{kin}=1.3× {10}-20 J ({{Δ }}{E}{kin}/e=83 meV) per atom were achieved. Guided and decelerated atoms, and those confined in stationary electrostatic traps, were detected in situ by pulsed electric field ionisation. The results of numerical calculations of particle trajectories within the decelerator have been used to characterise the observed deceleration efficiencies, and aid in the interpretation of the experimental data.

  19. Electrostatic trapping and in situ detection of Rydberg atoms above chip-based transmission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Lancuba, P

    2016-01-01

    Beams of helium atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number $n=48$ and electric dipole moments of 4600~D have been decelerated from a mean initial longitudinal speed of 2000~m/s to zero velocity in the laboratory-fixed frame-of-reference in the continuously moving electric traps of a transmission-line decelerator. In this process accelerations up to $-1.3\\times10^{7}$~m/s$^2$ were applied, and changes in kinetic energy of $\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}=1.3\\times10^{-20}$~J ($\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}/e = 83$~meV) per atom were achieved. Guided and decelerated atoms, and those confined in stationary electrostatic traps, were detected in situ by pulsed electric field ionisation. The results of numerical calculations of particle trajectories within the decelerator have been used to characterise the observed deceleration efficiencies, and aid in the interpretation of the experimental data.

  20. Narrow-line magneto-optical trap for erbium: Simple approach for a complex atom

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, A; Mark, M; Rietzler, A; Schindler, J; Zupanic, E; Grimm, R; Ferlaino, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on the experimental realization of a robust and efficient magneto-optical trap for erbium atoms, based on a narrow cooling transition at 583nm. We observe up to $N=2 \\times 10^{8}$ atoms at a temperature of about $T=15 \\mu K$. This simple scheme provides better starting conditions for direct loading of dipole traps as compared to approaches based on the strong cooling transition alone, or on a combination of a strong and a narrow kHz transition. Our results on Er point to a general, simple and efficient approach to laser cool samples of other lanthanide atoms (Ho, Dy, and Tm) for the production of quantum-degenerate samples.

  1. Transport of ultracold atoms between concentric traps via spatial adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Polo, Joan; Busch, Thomas; Ahufinger, Verònica; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage processes for ultracold atoms trapped in tunnel-coupled cylindrically symmetric concentric potentials are investigated. Specifically, we discuss the matter-wave analogue of the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) technique for a high fidelity and robust loading of a single atom into a harmonic ring potential from a harmonic trap, and for its transport between two concentric rings. We also consider a system of three concentric rings and investigate the transport of a single atom between the innermost and the outermost rings making use of the matter-wave analogue of the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique. We describe the RAP-like and STIRAP-like dynamics by means of a two- and a three-state models, respectively, obtaining good agreement with the numerical simulations of the corresponding two-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation.

  2. Hybrid Quantum System of a Nanofiber Mode Coupled to Two Chains of Optically Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zoubi, Hashem

    2010-01-01

    A tapered optical nanofiber simultaneously used to trap and optically interface of cold atoms through evanescent fields constitutes a new and well controllable hybrid quantum system. The atoms are trapped in two parallel 1D optical lattices generated by suitable far blue and red detuned evanescent field modes very close to opposite sides of the nanofiber surface. Collective electronic excitations (excitons) of each of the optical lattices are resonantly coupled to the second lattice forming symmetric and antisymmetric common excitons. In contrast to the inverse cube dependence of the individual atomic dipole-dipole interaction, we analytically find an exponentially decaying coupling strength with distance between the lattices. The resulting symmetric (bright) excitons strongly interact with the resonant nanofiber photons to form fiber polaritons, which can be observed through linear optical spectra. For large enough wave vectors the polariton decay rate to free space is strongly reduced, which should render t...

  3. The Effect of Multipole-Enhanced Diffusion on the Joule Heating of a Cold Non-Neutral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Steven Francis

    One proposed technique for trapping anti-atoms is to superimpose a Ioffe-Pritchard style magnetic-minimum neutral trap on a standard Penning trap used to trap the charged atomic constituents. Adding a magnetic multipole field in this way removes the azimuthal symmetry of the ideal Penning trap and introduces a new avenue for radial diffusion. Enhanced diffusion will lead to increased Joule heating of a non-neutral plasma, potentially adversely affecting the formation rate of anti-atoms and increasing the required trap depth. We present a model of this effect, along with an approach to minimizing it, with comparison to measurements from an intended anti-atom trap.

  4. A neutral atom frequency reference in the deep UV with 10^(-15) range uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    McFerran, J J; Mejri, S; Di Manno, S; Zhang, W; Guéna, J; Coq, Y Le; Bize, S

    2012-01-01

    We present an assessment of the (6s^{2})1S0 -> (6s7s)3P0 clock transition frequency in 199Hg with an uncertainty reduction of nearly three orders of magnitude and demonstrate an atomic quality factor, Q, of ~10^(14). The 199Hg atoms are confined in a vertical lattice trap with light at the newly determined magic wavelength of 362.5697 +/-0.0011 nm and at a lattice depth of 20Er. The atoms are loaded from a single stage magneto-optical trap with cooling light at 253.7 nm. The high Q factor is obtained with an 80 ms Rabi pulse at 265.6 nm. The frequency of the clock transition is found to be 1 128 575 290 808 162.0 +/-6.4 (sys.) +/-0.3 (stat.) Hz (fractional uncertainty = 5.7x10^(-15)). Neither an atom number nor second order Zeeman dependence have yet to be detected. Only three laser wavelengths are used for the cooling, lattice trapping, probing and detection.

  5. Beta-asymmetry studies on polarized {sup 82}Rb atoms in a TOP trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, M. [Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: hausmann@LANL.GOV; Vieira, D.J. [Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wu, J. [Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhao, X. [Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Boulay, M.G. [Neutron Science and Technology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hime, A. [Neutron Science and Technology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-12-27

    Atoms of {sup 82}Rb (t{sub 1/2} = 76 s) confined in a time-orbiting-potential (TOP) magnetic trap make a favorable source for {beta}-asymmetry studies by providing an essentially massless source of highly polarized atoms. An offline mass separator is coupled to a double magneto-optical trap (MOT) and TOP trap system. Once in the TOP trap the magnetic trap's rotating bias field defines the polarization axis and allows one to measure the correlation between the nuclear spin direction and the {beta} emission direction using a single positron detector. A proof-of-principle experiment using this method has demonstrated that the parity violating ({beta}->-bar J->) correlation can be studied. Here we outline improvements to the experiment with the goal of a 1% measurement of the {beta}-asymmetry correlation parameter A in the Gamow-Teller decay of {sup 82}Rb which in the semi-leptonic sector would pose a competitive test of the Standard Model.

  6. Quantum logic operations on two distant atoms trapped in two optical-fibre-connected cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ying-Qiao; Zhang Shou; Yeon Kyu-Hwang; Yu Seong-Cho

    2011-01-01

    Based on the coupling of two distant three-level atoms in two separate optical cavities connected with two optical fibres,schemes on the generation of several two-qubit logic gates are discussed under the conditions of △ =δ -2v cos πk/2 (》) g/2 and (v~ g).Discussion and analysis of the fidelity,gate time and experimental setups show that our schemes are feasible with current optical cavity,atomic trap and optical fibre techniques.Moreover,the atom-cavityfibre coupling can be used to generate an N-qubit nonlocal entanglement and transfer quantum information among N distant atoms by arranging N atom-cavity assemblages in a line and connecting each two adjacent cavities with two optical fibres.

  7. Universal nonmonotonic structure in the saturation curves of magneto-optical-trap-loaded Na+ ions stored in an ion-neutral hybrid trap: Prediction and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümel, R.; Wells, J. E.; Goodman, D. S.; Kwolek, J. M.; Smith, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    We predict that the maximal, steady-state ion capacity Ns(λ ) of radio-frequency (rf) traps, loaded at a rate of λ particles per rf cycle, shows universal, nonlinear, nonmonotonic behavior as a function of loading rate λ . The shape of Ns(λ ) , characterized by four dynamical regimes, is universal; i.e., it is predicted to manifest itself in all types of rf traps independent of the details of their construction and independent of particle species loaded. For λ ≪ 1 (region I), as expected, Ns(λ ) increases monotonically with λ . However, contrary to intuition, at intermediate λ ˜1 (region II), Ns(λ ) reaches a maximum, followed by a local minimum of Ns(λ ) (region III). For λ ≫1 (region IV), Ns(λ ) again rises monotonically. In region IV, numerical simulations, analytical calculations, and experiments show Ns(λ ) ˜λ2 /3 . We confirm our predictions both experimentally with magneto-optical-trap-loaded Na+ ions stored in a hybrid ion-neutral trap and numerically with the help of detailed ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations.

  8. Single Cs Atoms as Collisional Probes in a large Rb Magneto-Optical Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Claudia; Spethmann, Nicolas; Meschede, Dieter; Widera, Artur

    2010-01-01

    We study cold inter-species collisions of Caesium and Rubidium in a strongly imbalanced system with single and few Cs atoms. Observation of the single atom fuorescence dynamics yields insight into light-induced loss mechanisms, while both subsystems can remain in steady-state. This significantly simplifies the analysis of the dynamics, as Cs-Cs collisions are effectively absent and the majority component remains unaffected, allowing us to extract a precise value of the Rb-Cs collision parameter. Extending our results to ground state collisions would allow to use single neutral atoms as coherent probes for larger quantum systems.

  9. Absorption spectroscopy of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Tao; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Peng Kun-Chi; Wang Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap are measured around D2 line at 852nm with a weak probe beam. Absorption reduction dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)effect induced by the cooling/trapping field in a V-type three-level system and a gain peak near the cycling transition are clearly observed. Several mechanisms mixed with EIT effect in a normal V-type three-level system are briefly discussed. A simple theoretical analysis based on a dressed-state model is presented for interpretation of the absorption spectra.

  10. An unexplained 10-40° shift in the location of some diverse neutral atom data at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Moore, Thomas E.; Simpson, David; Roberts, Aaron; Szabo, Adam; Fuselier, Stephen; Wurz, Peter; Lee, Martin A.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2004-01-01

    Four different data sets pertaining to the neutral atom environment at 1 AU are presented and discussed. These data sets include neutral solar wind and interstellar neutral atom data from IMAGE/LENA, energetic hydrogen atom data from SOHO/HSTOF and plasma wave data from the magnetometer on ISEE-3. Surprisingly, these data sets are centered between 262° and 292° ecliptic longitude, ˜10-40° from the upstream interstellar neutral (ISN) flow direction at 254° resulting from the motion of the Sun relative to the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Some possible explanations for this offset, none of which is completely satisfactory, are discussed.

  11. An Unexplained 10 Degree - 40 Degree Shift in the Location of Some Diverse Neutral Atom Data at 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, M; Simpson, D; Roberts, A; Szabo, A P; Fuselier, S; Wurz, P; Lee, M A; Tsurutani, B T; Collier, Michael R.; Moore, Thomas E.; Simpson, David; Roberts, Aaron; Szabo, Adam; Fuselier, Stephen; Wurz, Peter; Lee, Martin A.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2003-01-01

    Four different data sets pertaining to the neutral atom environment at 1 AU are presented and discussed. These data sets include neutral solar wind and interstellar neutral atom data from IMAGE/LENA, energetic hydrogen atom data from SOHO/HSTOF and plasma wave data from the magnetometer on ISEE-3. Surprisingly, these data sets are centered between 262 degrees and 292 degrees ecliptic longitude, about 10 degrees - 40 degrees from the upstream interstellar neutral flow direction at 254 degrees resulting from the motion of the Sun relative to the local interstellar cloud. Some possible explanations for this offset, none of which is completely satisfactory, are discussed.

  12. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  13. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a ``hairline'' solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  14. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A W; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-08

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a "hairline" solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  15. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  16. ELENA MCP detector: absolute efficiency measurement for low energy neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-04-01

    MicroChannel plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission to Mercury to be launched in 2014. ELENA is a TOF sensor, based on a novel concept ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section)which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop section. It is aimed to detect neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 70° FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the environment and the planet, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles release from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. MCP absolute detection efficiency for very low energy neutral atoms (EMEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different type of MCPs coating have been performed providing the behaviors of MCP detection efficiency in the range 10eV-1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are here discussed.

  17. Magneto-Optical Trapping of 88Sr atoms with 689 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; LIN Bai-Ke; ZHAO Yang; LI Ye; WANG Shao-Kai; WANG Min-Ming; ZANG Er-Jun; LI Tian-Chu; FANG Zhan-Jun

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of strontium magneto-optical trap(MOT) operating on the intercombination transition lSo-3 P1 at 689nm, namely red MOT. A 689nm laser used for cooling and trapping is injection locked to a master laser, whose linewidth is narrowed to 150 Hz by locking to a high finesse optical reference cavity.88 Sr atoms pre-cooled and trapped by the broad 1SO-1 Pl transition at 461 nm are transferred to the red MOT with the help of a time sequence controller. The transfer ratio is about 20% and the red MOT's temperature is estimated to be less than 20 μK by the time-of-flight(TOF) image analysis.

  18. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  19. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  20. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine by derivative flame atomic absorption spectrometry using the atom trapping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han-wen, Sun; De-qiang, Zhang; Li-li, Yang; Jian-min, Sun

    1997-06-01

    A method is described for the determinations of cadmium and lead in urine by derivative flame atomic absorption spectrometry with a modified water-cooled stainless steel atom trapping tube. The effects of the trap position, the flame conditions, the coolant flow rates, and the collection time were studied. With a 1 min collection time, the characteristic concentrations (derivative absorbance of 0.0044) for cadmium and lead were 0.028 and 1.4 μg L -1, the detection limits (3σ) were 0.02 and 0.27 μg L -1, respectively. The detection limits and sensitivities of the proposed method were 2 and 3 orders of magnitude higher for 1-3 min collection time than those of conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium and lead, respectively. Urine samples from a small population of normal individuals have been analyzed for cadmium and lead by the proposed method. Satisfactory recoveries of 91-110% and 91-106%, for Cd and Pb were obtained with these urine samples.

  1. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Anderson, Sarah E; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-20

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes the multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is not often employed. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. Here we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants underlying physics. The spatial resolution of ponderomotive spectroscopy is orders of magnitude better than the transition frequency would suggest, promising single-site addressability in dense particle arrays for quantum computing applications.

  2. Control of light trapping in a large atomic system by a static magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Skipetrov, S E; Havey, M D

    2016-01-01

    We propose to control light trapping in a large ensemble of cold atoms by an external, static magnetic field. For an appropriate choice of frequency and polarization of the exciting pulse, the field is expected to speed up the fluorescence of a dilute atomic system but can significantly slow it down in a dense ensemble. The slowing down of fluorescence is due to the excitation of spatially localized collective atomic states that appear only under a strong magnetic field and have exponentially long lifetimes. The control of fluorescence by the magnetic field may be of interest for use in future quantum-information processing devices. It also paves a way towards the experimental observation of the disorder-induced localization of light in cold atomic systems.

  3. Control of light trapping in a large atomic system by a static magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Sokolov, I. M.; Havey, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose to control light trapping in a large ensemble of cold atoms by an external, static magnetic field. For an appropriate choice of frequency and polarization of the exciting pulse, the field is expected to speed up the fluorescence of a dilute atomic system. In a dense ensemble, the field does not affect the early-time superradiant signal but amplifies intensity oscillations at intermediate times and induces a very slow, nonexponential long-time decay. The slowing down of fluorescence is due to the excitation of spatially localized collective atomic states that appear only under a strong magnetic field and have exponentially long lifetimes. Our results therefore pave a way towards experimental observation of the disorder-induced localization of light in cold atomic systems.

  4. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, A.; Perea-Ortiz, M.; Winch, J.; Briggs, J.; Freer, S.; Moustoukas, D.; Powell-Gill, S.; Squire, C.; Lamb, A.; Rammeloo, C.; Stray, B.; Voulazeris, G.; Zhu, L.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Rodgers, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Boddice, D.; Plant, S. R.; Tuckwell, G. W.; Bongs, K.; Metje, N.; Holynski, M.

    2017-06-01

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 107 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  5. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Raithel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes a multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is often neglected. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. For the first time, we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light at a microwave frequency, and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This new ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants un...

  6. Microfabricated cells for chip-scale atomic clock based on coherent population trapping: Fabrication and investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Ermak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A universal method for fabrication of miniature cells for frequency standards and quantum magnetometers containing 87Rb atoms in the atmosphere of inert gas neon based on integrated technologies is considered. The results of experimental studies of coherent population trapping signals observed for a series of cells which provided recovery of vapors of an alkali metal from the rubidium dichromate salt with the help of laser radiation are presented. The coherent population trapping signals with a typical linewidth of 2–3 kHz and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in the 1-Hz bandwidth were observed, which allows one to provide a relative frequency stability of atomic clock of 10−11 at 100 s.

  7. Tensorial depolarization of alkali atoms by isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, Moncef

    2012-01-01

    Results. We consider the problem of isotropic collisions between an alkali atom and neutral hydrogen. We calculate the collisional tensorial components of general p and s-states, characterized by their effective principal quantum number $n^{*}$. It is found that the behaviour of the tensorial components obey simple power laws allowing quick calculations of the depolarizing collisional rates. As application, our results should allow a rigorous treatment of the atomic polarization profiles of the D1 -D2 lines of alkali atoms. Conclusions. Close coupling treatments of atomic collisions are needed to decipher the information encoded in the polarized radiation from the Sun. Important problems remain unresolved like the role of collisions in the Paschen-Back conditions.

  8. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Michael, E-mail: m.block@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The X. international workshop on “Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research” took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  9. Virtual-photon-induced quantum phase gates for two distant atoms trapped in separate cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2012-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing quantum gates for two atoms trapped in distant cavities connected by an optical fiber. The effective long-distance coupling between the two distributed qubits is achieved without excitation and transportation of photons through the optical fiber. Since the cavity modes and fiber mode are never populated and the atoms undergo no transitions, the gate operation is insensitive to the decoherence effect when the thermal photons in the environment are negligible. The scheme opens promising perspectives for networking quantum information processors and implementing distributed and scalable quantum computation.

  10. Cavity cooling of a trapped atom using Electromagnetically-Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, Marc

    2011-01-01

    A cooling scheme for trapped atoms is proposed, which combines cavity-enhanced scattering and electromagnetically induced transparency. The cooling dynamics exploits a three-photon resonance, which combines laser and cavity excitations. It is shown that relatively fast ground-state cooling can be achieved in the Lamb-Dicke regime and for large cooperativity. Efficient ground-state cooling is found for parameters of ongoing experiments.

  11. Quantum-enhanced protocols with mixed states using cold atoms in dipole traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, K.; Copley-May, M.; Romain, R.; MacCormick, C.; Bergamini, S.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the use of cold atoms in dipole traps to demonstrate experimentally a particular class of protocols for computation and metrology based on mixed states. Modelling of the system shows that, for a specific class of problems (tracing, phase estimation), a quantum advantage can be achieved over classical algorithms for very realistic conditions and strong decoherence. We discuss the results of the models and the experimental implementation.

  12. Co-Designing a Scalable Quantum Computer with Trapped Atomic Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, K. R.; KIM, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-01-01

    The first generation of quantum computers are on the horizon, fabricated from quantum hardware platforms that may soon be able to tackle certain tasks that cannot be performed or modelled with conventional computers. These quantum devices will not likely be universal or fully programmable, but special-purpose processors whose hardware will be tightly co-designed with particular target applications. Trapped atomic ions are a leading platform for first generation quantum computers, but are also...

  13. Detecting atoms trapped in an optical lattice using a tapered optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, T; Busch, Th

    2014-12-29

    Optical detection of structures with dimensions smaller than an optical wavelength requires devices that work on scales beyond the diffraction limit. Here we present the possibility of using a tapered optical nanofiber as a detector to resolve individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice in the Mott insulator phase. We show that the small size of the fiber combined with an enhanced photon collection rate can allow for the attainment of large and reliable measurement signals.

  14. Empirical model for electron impact ionization cross sections of neutral atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukder, M.R.; Bose, S. [Rajshahi Univ., Dept. of Applied Physics and Electronic Engineering (Bangladesh); Patoary, M.A.R.; Haque, A.K.F.; Uddin, M.A.; Basak, A.K. [Rajshahi Univ., Dept. of Physics (Bangladesh); Kando, M. [Shizuoka Univ., Graduate School of Electronic Science and Technology (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    A simple empirical formula is proposed for the rapid calculation of electron impact total ionization cross sections both for the open- and closed-shell neutral atoms considered in the range 1 {<=} Z {<=} 92 and the incident electron energies from threshold to about 10{sup 4} eV. The results of the present analysis are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. The proposed model provides a fast method for calculating fairly accurate electron impact total ionization cross sections of atoms. This model may be a prudent choice, for the practitioners in the field of applied sciences e.g. in plasma modeling, due to its simple inherent structure. (authors)

  15. Extremely high reflection of solar wind protons as neutral hydrogen atoms from regolith in space

    CERN Document Server

    Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Holmström, Mats; Bhardwaj, Anil; Sridharan, R; Dhanya, MB; Wurz, Peter; Schaufelberger, Audrey; Asamura, Kazushi; 10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.012

    2010-01-01

    We report on measurements of extremely high reflection rates of solar wind particles from regolith-covered lunar surfaces. Measurements by the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) instrument on the Indian Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft in orbit around the Moon show that up to 20% of the impinging solar wind protons are reflected from the lunar surface back to space as neutral hydrogen atoms. This finding, generally applicable to regolith-covered atmosphereless bodies, invalidates the widely accepted assumption that regolith almost completely absorbs the impinging solar wind.

  16. Towards hybrid quantum systems: Trapping a single atom near a nanoscale solid-state structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiecke T.G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe and demonstrate a method to deterministically trap single atoms near nanoscale solid-state objects. The trap is formed by the interference of an optical tweezer and its reflection from the nano object, creating a one-dimensional optical lattice where the first lattice site is at z0 ∼ λ/4 from the surface. Using a tapered optical fiber as the nanoscopic object, we characterize the loading into different lattice sites by means of the AC-Stark shift induced by a guided fiber mode. We demonstrate a loading efficiency of 94(6% into the first lattice site, and measure the cooperativity for the emission of the atom into the guided mode of the nanofiber. We show that by tailoring the dimensions of the nanofiber the distance of the trap to the surface can be adjusted. This method is applicable to a large variety of nanostructures and represents a promising starting point for interfacing single atoms with arbitrary nanoscale solid-state systems.

  17. Radiation trapping in atomic absorption spectroscopy at lead determination in different matricies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gohary, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt)]. E-mail: zhelgohary@yahoo.com

    2005-08-15

    The determination of lead by flame atomic absorption analysis in the presence of Sn and Fe atoms and different matrices such as OH and SO{sub 3} was investigated with the objective of understanding the spectral interference processes at the analytical lines 283.31 nm for a wide range of concentration. The radiation trapping factor was interpreted and evaluated assuming Voigt distribution of the atomic and rotational lines in the flame. The radiation trapping factor was increased by increasing the number density (plasma of the absorbing medium is optically thick). In plasma, there is a certain point of equilibrium between the trapping and the escaping of radiation, which is relevant to 50% of absorption. The spectral background interference can cause a variation of the number density at equilibrium point as a result of the degree of overlap with the analytical line. The spectral background interference can be easily avoided by using another resonance absorption line for the analysis. The chemical modification of the matrix is applied to minimize the interference effect. Nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and magnesium nitrate are most commonly recommended as matrix modifiers.

  18. Radiation trapping in atomic absorption spectroscopy at lead determination in different matricies

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gohary, Z.

    2005-08-01

    The determination of lead by flame atomic absorption analysis in the presence of Sn and Fe atoms and different matrices such as OH and SO3 was investigated with the objective of understanding the spectral interference processes at the analytical lines 283.31 nm for a wide range of concentration. The radiation trapping factor was interpreted and evaluated assuming Voigt distribution of the atomic and rotational lines in the flame. The radiation trapping factor was increased by increasing the number density (plasma of the absorbing medium is optically thick). In plasma, there is a certain point of equilibrium between the trapping and the escaping of radiation, which is relevant to 50% of absorption. The spectral background interference can cause a variation of the number density at equilibrium point as a result of the degree of overlap with the analytical line. The spectral background interference can be easily avoided by using another resonance absorption line for the analysis. The chemical modification of the matrix is applied to minimize the interference effect. Nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and magnesium nitrate are most commonly recommended as matrix modifiers.

  19. All-optical atom trap trace analysis for rare krypton isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woelk, Pablo; Kohler, Markus; Sieveke, Carsten; Hebel, Simon; Sahling, Peter [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker Centre for Science and Peace Research, University of Hamburg (Germany); Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope Krypton-85 is an excellent indicator for the detection of nuclear reprocessing activities. However, for the analysis of atmospheric air samples, sensitive measuring methods down to the single atom level are required because of the small concentrations. Furthermore, for a practical and effective detection of clandestine reprocessing, small sample sizes and a high sample throughput rate are desirable. Established methods using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) allow high sensitivity but have a limited throughput of about 200 samples per year, since the vacuum chambers have to be flushed for several hours after each measurement to avoid cross contamination due to the RF-driven excitation of metastable states. Here we present an enhanced ATTA apparatus, which in contrast to the established methods, produces metastable Kr all-optically. This avoids cross contamination, therefore allowing a much higher throughput rate. The apparatus is based on a self-made VUV-lamp and a 2D-3D magneto-optical trap setup. In the 2D trap metastable krypton is produced and a beam of atoms is formed by Doppler-cooling simultaneously.

  20. A=225 implantation for $^{221}$Fr source for TRIUMF atom trap

    CERN Multimedia

    The FrPNC Collaboration is mounting an atom trap for parity violation experiments and precision spectroscopy on francium atoms at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We would like to use ISOLDE's capability of simultaneously implanting A=225 (while another experiment runs online) to make a long-lived source feeding $^{221}$Fr for tests of the trap. $^{225}$Ra $\\beta$-decays to $^{225}$Ac, which then $\\alpha$-decays, producing 100 keV $^{221}$Fr t$_{1/2}$= 4.8 minute recoils. The implanted A=225 source would be shipped to TRIUMF, where it would be held for several minutes at a time a few mm from the same yttrium foil that normally receives the ISAC beam. SRIM calculations imply that 20% of the $^{221}$Fr will be implanted in a 1 cm diameter spot on the yttrium. Then the yttrium foil is moved to the trap and heated to release the Fr atoms, just as in normal ISAC online operation. A test implantation will be done at 10$^{7}$/sec production for 1 day, testing whether carbon cracking on the implantation foil in the mass separ...

  1. Relativistic calculations of the non-resonant two-photon ionization of neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hofbrucker, Jiri; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The non-resonant two-photon one-electron ionization of neutral atoms is studied theoretically in the framework of relativistic second-order perturbation theory and independent particle approximation. In particular, the importance of relativistic and screening effects in the total two-photon ionization cross section is investigated. Detailed computations have been carried out for the K-shell ionization of neutral Ne, Ge, Xe, and U atoms. The relativistic effects significantly decrease the total cross section, for the case of U, for example, they reduce the total cross section by a factor of two. Moreover, we have found that the account for the screening effects of the remaining electrons leads to occurrence of an unexpected minimum in the total cross section at the total photon energies equal to the ionization threshold, for the case of Ne, for example, the cross section drops there by a factor of three.

  2. High concentration effects of neutral-potential-well interface traps on recombination dc current-voltage lineshape in metal-oxide-silicon transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zuhui; Jie, Bin B.; Sah, Chih-Tang

    2008-11-01

    Steady-state Shockley-Read-Hall kinetics is employed to explore the high concentration effect of neutral-potential-well interface traps on the electron-hole recombination direct-current current-voltage (R-DCIV) properties in metal-oxide-silicon field-effect transistors. Extensive calculations include device parameter variations in neutral-trapping-potential-well electron interface-trap density NET (charge states 0 and -1), dopant impurity concentration PIM, oxide thickness Xox, forward source/drain junction bias VPN, and transistor temperature T. It shows significant distortion of the R-DCIV lineshape by the high concentrations of the interface traps. The result suggests that the lineshape distortion observed in past experiments, previously attributed to spatial variation in surface impurity concentration and energy distribution of interface traps in the silicon energy gap, can also arise from interface-trap concentration along surface channel region.

  3. IMPACT OF PLANETARY GRAVITATION ON HIGH-PRECISION NEUTRAL ATOM MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucharek, H.; Möbius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Schwadron, N. A [University of New Hampshire, 8 College Road, Durham, NH, 03824 (United States); Galli, A.; Wurz, P. [Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on the physical processes inside and outside of our heliosphere. For instance, recent Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations have provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare, and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction, this can result in significant deflection and acceleration. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the gravitational effects of Earth, the Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth’s orbit. The results show that current analysis of the interstellar neutral parameters by IBEX is not significantly affected by planetary gravitational effects. We further studied the possibility of whether or not the Helium focusing cone of the Sun and Jupiter could be measured by IBEX and whether or not these cones could be used as an independent measure of the temperature of interstellar Helium.

  4. Potential merits for substorm research from imaging of charge-exchange neutral atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Daglis

    Full Text Available The in situ observations of the Earth magnetosphere performed over the past decades of space research have provided a rather good understanding of many partial localized processes of the magnetospheric substorm. The continuing lack of global observations inhibits the construction of a coherent picture of the substorm as a whole, which is actually determined by the coupling of the partial processes. In this context the importance of global observations for the advancement of magnetospheric substorm studies is critical. This paper presents briefly a promising technique of global observations, namely the imaging of charge exchange neutral atoms, or neutral atom imaging (NAI of the magnetosphere. Model and theoretical estimates of charge-exchange neutral atom fluxes, as well as appropriate spacecraft orbit and instrumentation requirements are presented and discussed for specific regions of interest and vantage points. The potential merits of NAI for substorm research are presented along with possible combinations with other types of observational methods. Substorm issues that would benefit from NAI should include among others the assessment of the ionospheric contribution to the hot magnetospheric plasma, the relative importance of various ionospheric ion source regions, the resolution of spatial and temporal characteristics of substorm ion injections. NAI observations can be precious complements to local observations and lead to the understanding of how local processes, many of which are resolved quite well today, combine to form the global process of the magnetospheric substorm.

  5. State-insensitive dichromatic optical-dipole trap for rubidium atoms: calculation and the dicromatic laser's realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmin; Guo, Shanlong; Ge, Yulong; Cheng, Yongjie; Yang, Baodong; He, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Magic wavelength optical-dipole trap (ODT) allows confinement of neutral atoms and cancellation of the position-dependent spatially inhomogeneous differential light shift for a desired atomic transition. The light shift of the 87Rb 5P3/2 state can be expediently tailored to be equal to that of the 87Rb 5S1/2 state by employing dicromatic (λ1 + λ2 (here λ2 = 2λ1 ˜ 1.5 µm)) linearly polarized ODT lasers. In our calculation, two sets of state-insensitive dichromatic (784.3 + 1568.6 nm and 806.4 + 1612.8 nm) are obtained for the 87Rb 5S1/2 (F = 2) - 5P3/2 (F‧ = 3) transition. Further, 784.3 + 1568.6 nm dicromatic laser system with a moderate output power has been realized experimentally by marrying efficient second-harmonic generation using a PPMgO:LN bulk crystal with a fibre-amplified 1.5 µm telecom laser.

  6. Precipitation of energetic neutral atoms and induced non-thermal escape fluxes from the Martian atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms, produced through charge exchange collisions between solar wind ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated for the Martian atmosphere. Connections between parameters of precipitating fast ions and resulting escape fluxes, altitude-dependent energy distributions of fast atoms and their coefficients of reflection from the Mars atmosphere, are established using accurate cross sections in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Distributions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules, induced by precipitating particles, have been obtained and applied for computations of the non-thermal escape fluxes. A new collisional database on accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections, required for description of the energy-momentum transfer in collisions of precipitating particles and production of non-thermal atmospheric atoms and molecules, is reported with analytic fitting equations. Three-dimensional MC simulations with accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections have been carried out to track large ensembles of energetic atoms in a time-dependent manner as they propagate into the Martian atmosphere and transfer their energy to the ambient atoms and molecules. Results of the MC simulations on the energy-deposition altitude profiles, reflection coefficients, and time-dependent atmospheric heating, obtained for the isotropic hard sphere and anisotropic quantum cross sections, are compared. Atmospheric heating rates, thermalization depths, altitude profiles of production rates, energy distributions of SH atoms and molecules, and induced escape fluxes have been determined.

  7. Trapping of hydrogen atoms inside small beryllium clusters and their ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumkin, F. Y.; Wales, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    Structure, stability and electronic properties are evaluated computationally for small Ben (n = 5-9) cluster cages accommodating atomic H inside and forming core-shell species. These parameters are predicted to vary significantly upon insertion of H, for ionic derivatives, and with the system size. In particular, the energy barrier for H-atom exit from the cage changes significantly for ions compared to the neutral counterparts. The corresponding effects predicted for cage assemblies suggest the possibility of efficient charge-control of hydrogen release. This, together with a high capacity for storing hydrogen in extended such assemblies might indicate a possible way towards feasible hydrogen-storage solutions.

  8. Measurement of Absolute Atomic Collision Cross Section with Helium Using 87Rb Atoms Confined in Magneto-Optic and Magnetic Traps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-Cheng; ZHOU Ke-Ya; WANG Yue-Yuan; LIAO Qing-Hong; LIU Shu-Tian

    2011-01-01

    We present the measurements and calculations of the absolute total collision cross sections for a room-temperature gas of helium using 87 Rb atoms confined in either a magneto-optic or a magnetic quadrupole trap. The loss rates from the magneto-optic trap and the pure magnetic trap are compared and show significant differences. The collision cross sections as a function of trap depth for helium gas are obtained. These findings are significant for extracting the information about the different cross sections when the trap depth is changed.%@@ We present the measurements and calculations of the absolute total collision cross sections for a room-temperature gas of helium using 87Rb atoms confined in either a magneto-optic or a magnetic quadrupole trap.The loss rates from the magneto-optic trap and the pure magnetic trap are compared and show significant differences.The collision cross sections as a function of trap depth for helium gas are obtained.These findings are significant for extracting the information about the different cross sections when the trap depth is changed.

  9. Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers and Interstellar Boundary Explorer energetic neutral atom imaging of the 5 April 2010 substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, D. J.; Buzulukova, N.; Connors, M. G.; Dayeh, M. A.; Goldstein, J.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S.; Schwadron, N. A.; Valek, P.

    2012-03-01

    This study is the first to combine energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) and Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Here we examine the arrival of an interplanetary shock and the subsequent geomagnetically effective substorm on 5 April 2010, which was associated with the Galaxy 15 communications satellite anomaly. IBEX shows sharply enhanced ENA emissions immediately upon compression of the dayside magnetosphere at 08:26:17+/-9 s UT. The compression drove a markedly different spectral shape for the dayside emissions, with a strong enhancement at energies >1 keV, which persisted for hours after the shock arrival, consistent with the higher solar wind speed, density, and dynamic pressure (˜10 nPa) after the shock. TWINS ENA observations indicate a slower response of the ring current and precipitation of ring current ions as low-altitude emissions ˜15 min later, with the >50 keV ion precipitation leading the internal magnetospheric processes are occurring after compression of the magnetosphere and before the ring current ions end up in the loss cone and precipitate into the ionosphere. We also compare MHD simulation results with both the TWINS and IBEX ENA observations; while the overall fluxes and distributions of emissions were generally similar, there were significant quantitative differences. Such differences emphasize the complexity of the magnetospheric system and importance of the global perspective for macroscopic magnetospheric studies. Finally, Appendix A documents important details of the TWINS data processing, including improved binning procedures, smoothing of images to a given level of statistical accuracy, and differential background subtraction.

  10. Opto-mechanical measurement of micro-trap on atom chip via nonlinear cavity enhanced Raman scattering spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    High-gain resonant nonlinear Raman scattering on trapped cold atoms within a high-fineness ring optical cavity is simply explained under a nonlinear opto-mechanical mechanism, and a proposal using it to detect frequency of micro-trap on atom chip is presented. The enhancement of scattering spectrum is due to coherent Raman conversion between two different cavity modes mediated by collective vibrations of atoms through nonlinear opto-mechanical couplings. The physical conditions of this technique are roughly estimated on Rubidium atoms, and a simple quantum analysis as well as a multi-body semiclassical simulation on this nonlinear Raman process is conducted.

  11. State-insensitive trapping of Rb atoms: linearly versus circularly polarized lights

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Bindiya

    2012-01-01

    We study the cancellation of differential ac Stark shifts in the 5s and 5p states of rubidium atom using the linearly and circularly polarized lights by calculating their dynamic polarizabilities. Matrix elements were calculated using a relativistic coupled-cluster method at the single, double and important valence triple excitations approximation including all possible non-linear correlation terms. Some of the important matrix elements were further optimized using the experimental results available for the lifetimes and static polarizabilities of atomic states. "Magic wavelengths" are determined from the differential Stark shifts and results for the linearly polarized light are compared with the previously available results. Possible scope of facilitating state-insensitive optical trapping schemes using the magic wavelengths for circularly polarized light are discussed. Using the optimized matrix elements, the lifetimes of the 4d and 6s states of this atom are ameliorated.

  12. Divalent Rydberg atoms in optical lattices: intensity landscape and magic trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Topcu, Turker

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theoretical understanding of trapping divalent Rydberg atoms in optical lattices. Because the size of the Rydberg electron cloud can be comparable to the scale of spatial variations of laser intensity, we pay special attention to averaging optical fields over the atomic wavefunctions. Optical potential is proportional to the ac Stark polarizability. We find that in the independent particle approximation for the valence electrons, this polarizability breaks into two contributions: the singly ionized core polarizability and the contribution from the Rydberg electron. Unlike the usually employed free electron polarizability, the Rydberg contribution depends both on laser intensity profile and the rotational symmetry of the total electronic wavefunction. We focus on the $J=0$ Rydberg states of Sr and evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the 5s$n$s($^1S_0$) and 5s$n$p($^3P_0$) Rydberg states. We specifically choose Sr atom for its optical lattice clock applications. We find that there are several ...

  13. Atom trapping and guiding with a subwavelength-diameter optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Balykin, V I; Le Kien, F; Liang, J Q; Morinaga, M; Kien, Fam Le

    2004-01-01

    We suggest using an evanescent wave around a thin fiber to trap atoms. We show that the gradient force of a red-detuned evanescent-wave field in the fundamental mode of a silica fiber can balance the centrifugal force when the fiber diameter is about two times smaller than the wavelength of the light and the component of the angular momentum of the atoms along the fiber axis is in an appropriate range. As an example, the system should be realizable for Cesium atoms at a temperature of less than 0.29 mK using a silica fiber with a radius of 0.2 $\\mu$m and a 1.3-$\\mu$m-wavelength light with a power of about 27 mW.

  14. Ultracold, radiative charge transfer in hybrid Yb ion - Rb atom traps

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, B M; Lane, I C; McCann, J F

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold hybrid ion-atom traps offer the possibility of microscopic manipulation of quantum coherences in the gas using the ion as a probe. However, inelastic processes, particularly charge transfer can be a significant process of ion loss and has been measured experimentally for the Yb$^{+}$ ion immersed in a Rb vapour. We use first-principles quantum chemistry codes to obtain the potential energy curves and dipole moments for the lowest-lying energy states of this complex. Calculations for the radiative decay processes cross sections and rate coefficients are presented for the total decay processes. Comparing the semi-classical Langevin approximation with the quantum approach, we find it provides a very good estimate of the background at higher energies. The results demonstrate that radiative decay mechanisms are important over the energy and temperature region considered. In fact, the Langevin process of ion-atom collisions dominates cold ion-atom collisions. For spin dependent processes \\cite{kohl13} the...

  15. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser trapped alkali atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, E; Sprouse, G D; Orozco, L A; De Mille, D P

    2004-01-01

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent parity violating electromagnetic moment; the anapole moment. In heavy nuclei, the anapole moment is the dominant contribution to spin-dependent atomic parity violation. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the anti-node of a standing wave driving the anapole-induced E1 transiton. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  16. Large Bragg Reflection from One-Dimensional Chains of Trapped Atoms Near a Nanoscale Waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Corzo, N V; Chandra, A; Goban, A; Sheremet, A S; Kupriyanov, D V; Laurat, J

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental observations of large Bragg reflection from arrays of cold atoms trapped near a one-dimensional nanoscale waveguide. By using an optical lattice in the evanescent field surrounding a nanofiber with a period close to commensurate with the resonant wavelength, we observe a reflectance up to 75% for the guided mode. Each atom behaves as a partially-reflecting mirror and an ordered chain of about 2000 atoms is sufficient to realize an efficient Bragg mirror. Measurements of the reflection spectra as a function of the lattice period and the probe polarization are reported. The latter shows the effect of the chiral character of nanoscale waveguides on this reflection. The ability to control photon transport in 1D waveguides coupled to spin systems would allow for novel quantum network capabilities and many-body effects emerging from long-range interactions.

  17. Large Bragg Reflection from One-Dimensional Chains of Trapped Atoms Near a Nanoscale Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo, Neil V.; Gouraud, Baptiste; Chandra, Aveek; Goban, Akihisa; Sheremet, Alexandra S.; Kupriyanov, Dmitriy V.; Laurat, Julien

    2016-09-01

    We report experimental observations of a large Bragg reflection from arrays of cold atoms trapped near a one-dimensional nanoscale waveguide. By using an optical lattice in the evanescent field surrounding a nanofiber with a period nearly commensurate with the resonant wavelength, we observe a reflectance of up to 75% for the guided mode. Each atom behaves as a partially reflecting mirror and an ordered chain of about 2000 atoms is sufficient to realize an efficient Bragg mirror. Measurements of the reflection spectra as a function of the lattice period and the probe polarization are reported. The latter shows the effect of the chiral character of nanoscale waveguides on this reflection. The ability to control photon transport in 1D waveguides coupled to spin systems would enable novel quantum network capabilities and the study of many-body effects emerging from long-range interactions.

  18. Frequency Stability of Atomic Clocks Based on Coherent Population Trapping Resonance in 85Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lu; GUO Tao; DENG Ke; LIU Xin-Yuan; CHEN Xu-Zong; WANG Zhong

    2007-01-01

    An atomic clock system based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance in 85Rb is reported, while most past works about the CPT clock are in 87Rb. A new modulation method (full-hyperfine-frequency-splitting modulation) is presented to reduce the effect of light shift to improve the frequency stability of the CPT clock in 85Rb. The experimental results show that the short-term frequency stability of the CPT clock in 85Rb is in the order of 10-10/s and the long-term frequency stability can achieve 1.5 × 10-11 /80000s, which performs as well as 87Rb in CPT resonance. This very good frequency stability performance associated with the low-cost and low-power properties of 85Rb indicates that an atomic clock based on CPT in 85 Rb should be a promising candidate for making the chip scale atomic clock.

  19. Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Induced Non-Thermal Escape Fluxes from the Martian Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Lewkow, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced through charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar wind (SW) ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated. Subsequent induced non-thermal escape fluxes have been carried out for the Martian atmosphere. Detailed modeling of the ENA energy input and determination of connections between parameters of precipitating ENAs and resulting escape fluxes, reflection coefficients of fast atoms from the Mars atmosphere, and altitude dependent ENA energy distributions are established using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the precipitation process with accurate quantum mechanical (QM) cross sections. Detailed descriptions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules induced by ENAs have been obtained for a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for atmospheric escape and evolution. The effects of using isotropic hard sphere (HS) cross sections as compared to realistic, anisotropic quantum cross sections are examined for energy-deposition profil...

  20. ELENA MCP detector: absolute detection efficiency for low-energy neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J. A.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-09-01

    Microchannel Plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission of ESA to Mercury to be launched in 2015. ELENA is a Time of Flight (TOF) sensor, based on a novel concept using an ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section), which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop detector. The scientific objective of ELENA is to detect energetic neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 76° FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the plasma environment and the planet’s surface, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles released from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (MEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of the University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different types of MCP (with and without coating) have been performed providing the detection efficiencies in the energy range 10eV - 1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are discussed here.

  1. Relativistic calculations of screening parameters and atomic radii of neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M.; Amaro, P.; Santos, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2017-09-01

    Calculations of the effective nuclear charge for elements with 1 ≤ Z ≤ 118 have been performed in a Dirac-Fock approach including all relativistic effects as well as contributions from quantum electrodynamics. Maximum charge density for every subshell of every element in the periodic table was also computed in the same framework as well as atomic radii based on the total charge density. Results were compared with the extensively cited works of Clementi et al., obtained in the 1960s with Roothan's self-consistent-field method.

  2. Magic-wavelength optical dipole trap of cesium and rubidium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmin; Cheng, Yongjie; Guo, Shanlong; Yang, Baodong; He, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Optical dipole traps (ODT) with far-off-resonance laser are important tools in more and more present cold-atom experiments, which allow confinement of laser-cooled atoms with a long storage time. Particularly, the magic wavelength ODT can cancel the position-dependent spatially inhomogeneous light shift of desired atomic transition, which is introduced by the ODT laser beam. Now it plays an important role in the state-insensitive quantum engineering and the atomic optical clock. To verify the magic wavelength or the magic wavelength combination for D2 line transition of cesium (Cs) and rubidium (Rb) atoms, we calculated and analyzed the light shift of the 133Cs 6S1/2 - 6P3/2 transition for a monochromatic ODT, and also the 87Rb 5S1/2 - 5P3/2 transition for a dichromatic ODT with a laser frequency ratio of 2:1. Also a dichromatic magic-wavelength ODT laser system for 87Rb atoms is proposed and experimentally realized by employing the quasi-phase-matched frequency doubling technique with telecom laser and fiber amplifier.

  3. Optical cooling and trapping of highly magnetic atoms: the benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreon, Davide; Sidorenkov, Leonid A.; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern–Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically 3× {10}8 atoms at a temperature of 15 μK. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, which allows for a simple model accounting for our measurements. We also measure the rate of density-dependent atom losses, finding good agreement with a model based on light-induced Van der Waals forces. A minimal two-body loss rate β ∼ 2× {10}-11 cm3 s–1 is reached in the spin-polarized regime. Our results constitute a benchmark for the experimental study of ultracold gases of magnetic lanthanide atoms.

  4. Chemical Reaction of Ultracold Atoms and Ions in a Hybrid Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Rellergert, Wade G; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Petrov, Alexander; Chen, Kuang; Schowalter, Steven J; Hudson, Eric R

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between cold ions and atoms have been proposed for use in implementing quantum gates\\cite{Idziaszek2007}, probing quantum gases\\cite{Sherkunov2009}, observing novel charge-transport dynamics\\cite{Cote2000}, and sympathetically cooling atomic and molecular systems which cannot be laser cooled\\cite{Smith2005,Hudson2009}. Furthermore, the chemistry between cold ions and atoms is foundational to issues in modern astrophysics, including the formation of stars, planets, and interstellar clouds\\cite{Smith1992}, the diffuse interstellar bands\\cite{Reddy2010}, and the post-recombination epoch of the early universe\\cite{Stancil1996b}. However, as pointed out in refs 9 and 10, both experimental data and a theoretical description of the ion-atom interaction at low temperatures, reached in these modern atomic physics experiments and the interstellar environment, are still largely missing. Here we observe a chemical reaction between ultracold $^{174}$Yb$^+$ ions and $^{40}$Ca atoms held in a hybrid trap. We me...

  5. Neutral gas sympathetic cooling of an ion in a Paul trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kuang; Hudson, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    A single ion immersed in a neutral buffer gas is studied. An analytical model is developed that gives a complete description of the dynamics and steady-state properties of the ions. An extension of this model, using techniques borrowed from the mathematics of finance, is used to explain the recent observation of non-Maxwellian statistics for these systems. Taken together, these results offer an explanation of the longstanding issues associated with sympathetic cooling of an ion by a neutral buffer gas.

  6. Antimatter Plasmas in a Multipole Trap for Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Telle, H H; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated storage of plasmas of the charged constituents of the antihydrogen atom, antiprotons and positrons, in a Penning trap surrounded by a minimum-B magnetic trap designed for holding neutral antiatoms. The neutral trap comprises a superconducting octupole and two superconducting, solenoidal mirror coils. We have measured the storage lifetimes of antiproton and positron plasmas in the combined Penning-neutral trap, and compared these to lifetimes without the neutral trap fields. The magnetic well depth was 0.6 T, deep enough to trap ground state antihydrogen atoms of up to about 0.4 K in temperature. We have demonstrated that both particle species can be stored for times long enough to permit antihydrogen production and trapping studies.

  7. Hg-201 (+) CO-Magnetometer for HG-199(+) Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Taghavi, Shervin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Local magnetic field strength in a trapped ion atomic clock is measured in real time, with high accuracy and without degrading clock performance, and the measurement is used to compensate for ambient magnetic field perturbations. First and second isotopes of an element are co-located within the linear ion trap. The first isotope has a resonant microwave transition between two hyperfine energy states, and the second isotope has a resonant Zeeman transition. Optical sources emit ultraviolet light that optically pump both isotopes. A microwave radiation source simultaneously emits microwave fields resonant with the first isotope's clock transition and the second isotope's Zeeman transition, and an optical detector measures the fluorescence from optically pumping both isotopes. The second isotope's Zeeman transition provides the measure of magnetic field strength, and the measurement is used to compensate the first isotope's clock transition or to adjust the applied C-field to reduce the effects of ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  8. Quantum interference between two single photons emitted by independently trapped atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugnon, J; Jones, M P A; Dingjan, J; Darquié, B; Messin, G; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P

    2006-04-06

    When two indistinguishable single photons are fed into the two input ports of a beam splitter, the photons will coalesce and leave together from the same output port. This is a quantum interference effect, which occurs because two possible paths-in which the photons leave by different output ports-interfere destructively. This effect was first observed in parametric downconversion (in which a nonlinear crystal splits a single photon into two photons of lower energy), then from two separate downconversion crystals, as well as with single photons produced one after the other by the same quantum emitter. With the recent developments in quantum information research, much attention has been devoted to this interference effect as a resource for quantum data processing using linear optics techniques. To ensure the scalability of schemes based on these ideas, it is crucial that indistinguishable photons are emitted by a collection of synchronized, but otherwise independent sources. Here we demonstrate the quantum interference of two single photons emitted by two independently trapped single atoms, bridging the gap towards the simultaneous emission of many indistinguishable single photons by different emitters. Our data analysis shows that the observed coalescence is mainly limited by wavefront matching of the light emitted by the two atoms, and to a lesser extent by the motion of each atom in its own trap.

  9. Controlled photon emission and Raman transition experiments with a single trapped atom

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, M P A; Beugnon, J; Browaeys, A; Darquié, B; Dingjan, J; Grangier, P; Messin, G; Sortais, Y

    2005-01-01

    We present recent results on the coherent control of an optical transition in a single rubidium atom, trapped in an optical tweezer. We excite the atom using resonant light pulses that are short (4 ns) compared with the lifetime of the excited state (26 ns). By varying the intensity of the laser pulses, we can observe an adjustable number of Rabi oscillations, followed by free decay once the light is switched off. To generate the pulses we have developed a novel laser system based on frequency doubling a telecoms laser diode at 1560 nm. By setting the laser intensity to make a pi-pulse, we use this coherent control to make a high quality triggered source of single photons. We obtain an average single photon rate of 9600 s-1 at the detector. Measurements of the second-order temporal correlation function show almost perfect antibunching at zero delay. In addition, we present preliminary results on the use of Raman transitions to couple the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of our trapped atom. This will ...

  10. Low energy neutral atom imaging on the Moon with the SARA instrument aboard Chandrayaan-1 mission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Bhardwaj; Stas Barabash; Yoshifumi Futaana; Yoichi Kazama; Kazushi Asamura; David McCann; R Sridharan; Mats Holmstrom; Peter Wurz; Rickard Lundin

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports on the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA)experiment that will be flown on the first Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1.The SARA is a low energy neutral atom (LENA)imaging mass spectrometer,which will perform remote sensing of the lunar surface via detection of neutral atoms in the energy range from 10 eV to 3 keV from a 100 km polar orbit.In this report we present the basic design of the SARA experiment and discuss various scientific issues that will be addressed.The SARA instrument consists of three major subsystems:a LENA sensor (CENA),a solar wind monitor (SWIM),and a digital processing unit (DPU).SARA will be used to image the solar wind –surface interaction to study primarily the surface composition and surface magnetic anomalies and associated mini-magnetospheres.Studies of lunar exosphere sources and space weathering on the Moon will also be attempted.SARA is the first LENA imaging mass spectrometer of its kind to be flown on a space mission.A replica of SARA is planned to fly to Mercury onboard the BepiColombo mission.

  11. Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, Carsten; Zopes, Jonathan; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    We create low-entropy states of neutral atoms by utilizing a conceptually new optical-lattice technique that relies on a high-precision, high-bandwidth synthesis of light polarization. Polarization-synthesized optical lattices provide two fully controllable optical lattice potentials, each of them confining only atoms in either one of the two long-lived hyperfine states. By employing one lattice as the storage register and the other one as the shift register, we provide a proof of concept using four atoms that selected regions of the periodic potential can be filled with one particle per site. We expect that our results can be scaled up to thousands of atoms by employing an atom-sorting algorithm with logarithmic complexity, which is enabled by polarization-synthesized optical lattices. Vibrational entropy is subsequently removed by sideband cooling methods. Our results pave the way for a bottom-up approach to creating ultralow-entropy states of a many-body system.

  12. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A. P.; Grussie, F.; Bruhns, H.; de Ruette, N.; Koenning, T. P.; Miller, K. A.; Savin, D. W.; Stützel, J.; Urbain, X.; Kreckel, H.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of ˜7.4% for H- at a beam energy of 10 keV and ˜3.7% for C- at 28 keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975 nm and 808 nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2 kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table.

  13. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; de Ruette, N; Stützel, J; Savin, D W; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of $\\sim$7.4\\% for H$^-$ at a beam energy of 10\\,keV and $\\sim$3.7\\% for C$^-$ at 28\\,keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975\\,nm and 808\\,nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2\\,kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table.

  14. Progress towards precision measurements of beta-decay correlation parameters using atom and ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Melconian, D; Fenker, B; Mehlman, M; Shidling, P D; Anholm, M; Ashery, D; Behr, J A; Gorelov, A; Gwinner, G; Olchankski, K; Smale, S

    2014-01-01

    The correlations of the decay products following the beta decay of nuclei have a long history of providing a low-energy probe of the fundamental symmetries of our universe. Over half a century ago, the correlation of the electrons following the decay of polarized 60Co demonstrated that parity is not conserved in weak interactions. Today, the same basic idea continues to be applied to search for physics beyond the standard model: make precision measurements of correlation parameters and look for deviations compared to their standard model predictions. Efforts to measure these parameters to the 0.1% level utilizing atom and ion trapping techniques are described.

  15. Atomic parity violation in one single trapped radium ion as a probe of electroweak running

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wansbeek, Lotje; Versolato, Oscar; Willmann, Lorenz; Timmermans, Rob; Jungmann, Klaus [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    In a single trapped and laser cooled radium ion we investigate atomic parity violation by probing the differential splitting (*light shifts*) of the 7S and 6D Zeeman levels, which is caused by the interaction of the ion with an off-resonant laser light field. This experiment serves as a low-energy test of the electroweak Standard Model of particle physics. With precision RF spectroscopy and subsequent monitoring of quantum jumps, this splitting can be determined to sub-Hertz accuracy. A proof-of-principle has recently been given for the barium ion, and crucial ideas are being extended to Ra{sup +} which is a superior candidate.

  16. Spin Diffusion in Trapped Clouds of Cold Atoms with Resonant Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg Morten; Pethick, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: (a) Fick’s law for diffusion mus...... be modified to allow for the trapping potential; (b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud; and (c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts of the cloud, where the mean free path is long....

  17. Universal Two-Body Spectra of Ultracold Harmonically Trapped Atoms in Two and Three Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We consider the spectrum of two ultracold harmonically trapped atoms interacting via short-range interactions. The Green's function approach is used to unify the two and three dimensional cases. We derive criteria for the universality of the spectrum, i.e. its independence of the details...... experimentally available. In the two-dimensional case we discuss the p-wave channel in detail and demonstrate how the non-universality of the spectrum arises within the Green's function approach. We then show that the spectrum is not particularly sensitive to the short-distance details in the case when the two...

  18. Sympathetic cooling in an optically trapped mixture of alkali and spin-singlet atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladyslav V; Khramov, Alexander; Hansen, Anders H; Dowd, William H; Münchow, Frank; Jamison, Alan O; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2011-04-15

    We report on the realization of a stable mixture of ultracold lithium and ytterbium atoms confined in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap. We observe sympathetic cooling of 6Li by 174Yb and extract the s-wave scattering length magnitude |a(6Li-174Yb)|=(13±3)a0 from the rate of interspecies thermalization. Using forced evaporative cooling of 174Yb, we achieve reduction of the 6Li temperature to below the Fermi temperature, purely through interspecies sympathetic cooling.

  19. Quantum Degenerate Fermi-Bose Mixtures of 40K and 87Rb Atoms in a Quadrupole-Ioffe Configuration Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG De-Zhi; CHEN Hai-Xia; WANG Peng-Jun; YU Xu-Dong; GAO Feng; ZHANG Jing

    2008-01-01

    @@ We report on the attainment of quantum degeneracy of 40K by means of efficient thermal collisions with the evaporatively cooled 87Rb atoms.In a quadrupole-Ioffe configuration trap,potassium atoms are cooled to 0.5 times the Fermi temperature.We obtain up to 7.59 × 105 degenerate fermions 40K.

  20. Neutral gas sympathetic cooling of an ion in a Paul trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T; Hudson, Eric R

    2014-04-11

    A single ion immersed in a neutral buffer gas is studied. An analytical model is developed that gives a complete description of the dynamics and steady-state properties of the ions. An extension of this model, using techniques employed in the mathematics of economics and finance, is used to explain the recent observation of non-Maxwellian statistics for these systems. Taken together, these results offer an explanation of the long-standing issues associated with sympathetic cooling of an ion by a neutral buffer gas.

  1. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  2. Neutral atomic absorption lines and far-UV extinction: Possible implications for depletions and grain parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers examine nine lines of sight within the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) for which data on both neutral atomic absorption lines (Snow 1984; White 1986; Welty, Hobbs, and York 1989) and far UV extinction (Bless and Savage 1972; Jenkins, Savage, and Spitzer 1986) are available, in order to test the assumption that variations in gamma/alpha will cancel in taking ratios of the ionization balance equation, and to try to determine to what extent that assumption has affected the aforementioned studies of depletions and grain properties.

  3. Analysis of non-Markovian coupling of a lattice-trapped atom to free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael; Krinner, Ludwig; Pazmiño, Arturo; Schneble, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Behavior analogous to that of spontaneous emission in photonic band-gap materials has been predicted for an atom-optical system consisting of an atom confined in a well of a state-dependent optical lattice that is coupled to free space through an internal-state transition [de Vega et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 260404 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.260404]. Using the Weisskopf-Wigner approach and considering a one-dimensional geometry, we analyze the properties of this system in detail, including the evolution of the lattice-trapped population, the momentum distribution of emitted matter waves, and the detailed structure of an evanescent matter-wave state below the continuum boundary. We compare and contrast our findings for the transition from Markovian to non-Markovian behaviors to those previously obtained for three dimensions.

  4. Neutral oxygen atom density in the MESOX air plasma solar furnace facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balat-Pichelin, Marianne; Vesel, Alenka

    2006-08-01

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms in the MESOX set-up, one device of the PROMES-CNRS solar facilities, was determined by a fiber-optics catalytic probe (FOCP). Plasma was created in a flowing air within a quartz tube with the outer diameter of 5 cm by a 2.45 GHz microwave generator with the output power up to 1000 W. The flow of air was varied between 4 and 20 l/h. The O-atom density was found to increase monotonously with the increasing discharge power, and it decreased with the increasing flow rate. The degree of dissociation of oxygen molecules in the plasma column depended largely on the flow rate. At the air flow of 4 l/h it was about 80% but it decreased to about 20% at the flow of 20 l/h.

  5. Neutral oxygen atom density in the MESOX air plasma solar furnace facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balat-Pichelin, Marianne [CNRS-PROMES, Laboratoire Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR 8521, 7 rue du four solaire, F-66120 Font Romeu, Odeillo (France)], E-mail: balat@promes.cnrs.fr; Vesel, Alenka [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-08-21

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms in the MESOX set-up, one device of the PROMES-CNRS solar facilities, was determined by a fiber-optics catalytic probe (FOCP). Plasma was created in a flowing air within a quartz tube with the outer diameter of 5 cm by a 2.45 GHz microwave generator with the output power up to 1000 W. The flow of air was varied between 4 and 20 l/h. The O-atom density was found to increase monotonously with the increasing discharge power, and it decreased with the increasing flow rate. The degree of dissociation of oxygen molecules in the plasma column depended largely on the flow rate. At the air flow of 4 l/h it was about 80% but it decreased to about 20% at the flow of 20 l/h.

  6. Determination of the neutral oxygen atom density in a plasma reactor loaded with metal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: miran.mozetic@ijs.si

    2009-08-15

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms was determined during processing of metal samples in a plasma reactor. The reactor was a Pyrex tube with an inner diameter of 11 cm and a length of 30 cm. Plasma was created by an inductively coupled radiofrequency generator operating at a frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power up to 500 W. The O density was measured at the edge of the glass tube with a copper fiber optics catalytic probe. The O atom density in the empty tube depended on pressure and was between 4 and 7 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. The maximum O density was at a pressure of about 150 Pa, while the dissociation fraction of O{sub 2} molecules was maximal at the lowest pressure and decreased with increasing pressure. At about 300 Pa it dropped below 10%. The measurements were repeated in the chamber loaded with different metallic samples. In these cases, the density of oxygen atoms was lower than that in the empty chamber. The results were explained by a drain of O atoms caused by heterogeneous recombination on the samples.

  7. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  8. Optical cooling and trapping highly magnetic atoms: The benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Dreon, Davide; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell Lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line Dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern-Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically $3\\times 10^8$ atoms at a temperature of 20$\\,\\mu$K. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, whi...

  9. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea-Ortiz, M.; Winch, J.; Briggs, J.; Freer, S.; Moustoukas, D.; Powell-Gill, S.; Squire, C.; Lamb, A.; Rammeloo, C.; Stray, B.; Voulazeris, G.; Zhu, L.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Rodgers, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Boddice, D.; Plant, S. R.; Tuckwell, G. W.; Bongs, K.; Metje, N.; Holynski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 107 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantum technology for the 21st century’. PMID:28652493

  10. Commissioning of the Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Tandecki, M; Collister, R; Aubin, S; Behr, J A; Gomez, E; Gwinner, G; Orozco, L A; Pearson, M R

    2013-01-01

    We report on the successful commissioning of the Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF. Large laser-cooled samples of francium are produced from a francium ion beam delivered by the ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. The ion beam is neutralized on an yttrium foil, which is subsequently heated to transfer the atoms into the magneto-optical trapping region. We have successfully trapped $^{207}$Fr, $^{209}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr, with a maximum of $2.5 \\times 10^5$ $^{209}$Fr atoms. The neutral cold atoms will be used in studies of the weak interaction through measurements of atomic parity non-conservation.

  11. Time-of-flight mass spectrographs—From ions to neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, E.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Kucharek, H.; Popecki, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    After their introduction to space physics in the mid 1980s time-of-flight (TOF) spectrographs have become a main staple in spaceborne mass spectrometry. They have largely replaced magnetic spectrometers, except when extremely high mass resolution is required to identify complex molecules, for example, in the vicinity of comets or in planetary atmospheres. In combination with electrostatic analyzers and often solid state detectors, TOF spectrographs have become key instruments to diagnose space plasma velocity distributions, mass, and ionic charge composition. With a variety of implementation schemes that also include isochronous electric field configurations, TOF spectrographs can respond to diverse science requirements. This includes a wide range in mass resolution to allow the separation of medium heavy isotopes or to simply provide distributions of the major species, such as H, He, and O, to obtain information on source tracers or mass fluxes. With a top-hat analyzer at the front end, or in combination with deflectors for three-axis stabilized spacecraft, the distribution function of ions can be obtained with good time resolution. Most recently, the reach of TOF ion mass spectrographs has been extended to include energetic neutral atoms. After selecting the arrival direction with mechanical collimation, followed by conversion to ions, adapted TOF sensors form a new branch of the spectrograph family tree. We review the requirements, challenges, and implementation schemes for ion and neutral atom spectrographs, including potential directions for the future, while largely avoiding overlap with complementary contributions in this special issue.

  12. Ion heating during geomagnetic storms measured using energetic neutral atom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesee, Amy; Elfritz, Justin; Katus, Roxanne; Scime, Earl

    2015-11-01

    Energy from the solar wind is deposited into the magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms. Much of this energy is deposited into the plasma sheet, driving phenomena that leads to heating. The plasma sheet ions are then injected to the inner magnetosphere, driving the ring current. While ions can undergo adiabatic heating during typical drift motion, collisional and wave-particle interactions can also lead to ion heating. A technique to measure ion temperatures using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data has been developed using ENA data from the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission global maps of ion temperature during the evolution of geomagnetic storms are made. These maps exhibit the location and characteristics of regions of ion heating and during which storm phase they occur. Superposed epoch analyses of such maps have demonstrated typical characteristics of ion heating during storms driven by coronal mass ejections as compared to those driven by high speed solar wind streams. The temperatures have been used to establish boundary conditions for modeling of the inner magnetosphere. We will give an overview of recent studies using TWINS ion temperature maps. Work supported by NNX10AN08A and AGS-1113478.

  13. Assessment of energetic neutral He atom intensities expected from the IBEX Ribbon

    CERN Document Server

    Swaczyna, P; Bzowski, M

    2014-01-01

    Full sky maps of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) obtained with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer revealed a bright, arc-like Ribbon. We compare possible, thought as yet undetected, He ENA emission in two models of the Ribbon origin. The models were originally developed for hydrogen ENA. In the first one, ENA are produced outside the heliopause from the ionized neutral solar wind in the direction where the local interstellar magnetic field is perpendicular to the line-of-sight. The second model proposes production at the interface between the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) and the Local Bubble (LB). The models are redesigned to helium using relevant interactions between atoms and ions. Resulting intensities are compared with possible emission of helium ENA from the heliosheath. In the first model, expected intensity is ~ 0.014 (cm^2 s sr keV)^-1, i.e., of the order of the He emission from the heliosheath, whereas in the second, the LIC/LB interface model, the intensity is ~ (2 - 7) (cm^2 s sr keV)^-1, i.e., a f...

  14. Observations and Interpretations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. f.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. c.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss recently reported observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from an X9 solar flare/coronal mass ejection event on 5 December 2006, located at E79. The observations were made by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. Taking into account ENA losses, we find that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances > or equal to 2 solar radii. Although there are no CME images from this event, it is shown that CME-shock-accelerated protons can, in principle, produce a time-history consistent with the observations.

  15. STEREO Observations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms during the 5 December 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms emitted during the X9 solar event of December 5, 2006. Beginning 1 hour following the onset of this E79 flare, the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on both the STEREO A and B spacecraft observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons beginning hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within 10 of the Sun, consistent with the measurement resolution. The derived emission profile at the Sun had onset and peak times remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile and continued for more than an hour. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events less than 5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs). To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. Possible origins for the production of ENAs in a large solar event are considered. We conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona and that charge-transfer reactions between accelerated protons and partially-stripped coronal ions are an important source of ENAs in solar events.

  16. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  17. Near-Atomic Resolution Structure of a Highly Neutralizing Fab Bound to Canine Parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organtini, Lindsey J; Lee, Hyunwook; Iketani, Sho; Huang, Kai; Ashley, Robert E; Makhov, Alexander M; Conway, James F; Parrish, Colin R; Hafenstein, Susan

    2016-11-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious pathogen that causes severe disease in dogs and wildlife. Previously, a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) raised against CPV was characterized. An antibody fragment (Fab) of MAb E was found to neutralize the virus at low molar ratios. Using recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we determined the structure of CPV in complex with Fab E to 4.1 Å resolution, which allowed de novo building of the Fab structure. The footprint identified was significantly different from the footprint obtained previously from models fitted into lower-resolution maps. Using single-chain variable fragments, we tested antibody residues that control capsid binding. The near-atomic structure also revealed that Fab binding had caused capsid destabilization in regions containing key residues conferring receptor binding and tropism, which suggests a mechanism for efficient virus neutralization by antibody. Furthermore, a general technical approach to solving the structures of small molecules is demonstrated, as binding the Fab to the capsid allowed us to determine the 50-kDa Fab structure by cryo-EM.

  18. Nuclear spin dependent atomic parity violation, nuclear anapole moments, and the hadronic axial neutral current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A. (Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique)

    1991-01-01

    Left-right symmetries in atomic transitions, depending upon the nuclear spin, could be a source of information on the neutral hadronic axial current. We show that the relevant electroweak parameter can be extracted from experiment by measuring hyperfine component ratios which do not involve the knowledge of the atomic wave function. In the standard electroweak model, the parity violating electron-nucleus interaction associated with the hadronic axial neutral current is accidently suppressed and, as a consequence, dominated by the electron interaction with the nuclear anapole moment, which describes the effect of the parity violating nuclear forces on the nucleus electromagnetic current. One of our objectives was to identify the various physical mechanisms which determine the size of the nuclear anapole moments. As an important step, we have established a simple relation between the anapole moment and the nuclear spin magnetization. From this relation it follows that the computation of the anapole moment can be reduced to that of one-body operators. The basic tool is a unitary transformation W which eliminates the one-body parity violating potential from the nuclear hamiltonian. A particular attention was paid to nuclear correlation effects. They are treated semi-empirically in the independent pair approximation. The nuclear anapole moments of {sup 85}Rb, {sup 133}Cs, and {sup 209}Bi have been evaluated for three sets of parity violating meson-nucleon coupling constants, taking into account configuration mixing effects in a semi-empirical way. We suggest a possible strategy to disentangle the axial neutral current from the anapole moment contribution. (orig.).

  19. Optical trapping of ultracold dysprosium atoms: transition probabilities, dynamic dipole polarizabilities and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Dulieu, Olivier; Nascimbene, Sylvain; Lepers, Maxence

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of optical trapping of ultracold atoms depend on the atomic dynamic dipole polarizability governing the atom-field interaction. In this article, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic dipole polarizability of dysprosium in the ground and first excited level. Due to the high electronic angular momentum of those two states, the polarizabilities possess scalar, vector and tensor contributions that we have computed, on a wide range of trapping wavelengths, using the sum-over-state formula. Using the same formalism, we have also calculated the $C_6$ coefficients characterizing the van der Waals interaction between two dysprosium atoms in the two lowest levels. We have computed the energies of excited states and the transition probabilities appearing in the sums, using a combination of \\textit{ab initio} and least-square-fitting techniques provided by the Cowan codes and extended in our group. Regarding the real part of the polarizability, for field frequencies far from atomic...

  20. One- and Two-Dimensional Arrays of Double-Well Optical Traps for Cold Atoms or Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Xian-Ming; YIN Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel scheme to form one- and two-dimensional arrays of double-well optical dipole traps for cold atoms (or molecules) by using an optical system composed of a binary π-phase grating and a lens illuminated by a plane light wave, and study the relationship between the maximum intensity Imax of each optical well (or the maximum trapping potential Umax for 85Rb atoms) and the relative apertureβ (= a/f) of the lens. We also calculate the intensity gradients of each optical well and their curvatures, and estimate the spontaneous photon-scattering rate of trapped atom in each well, including Rayleigh and Raman scattering rates. Our study shows that the proposed 1D and 2D arrays of double-well traps can be used to prepare 1D and 2D novel optical lattices with cold atoms (or molecules), or form an all-optically integrated atom optical chip, or even to realize an array of all-optical double-well atomic (or molecular) Bose-Einstein condensates by optical-potential evaporative cooling, and so on.

  1. Collisional Cooling of Light Ions by Cotrapped Heavy Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-03-17

    We experimentally demonstrate cooling of trapped ions by collisions with cotrapped, higher-mass neutral atoms. It is shown that the lighter ^{39}K^{+} ions, created by ionizing ^{39}K atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), when trapped in an ion trap and subsequently allowed to cool by collisions with ultracold, heavier ^{85}Rb atoms in a MOT, exhibit a longer trap lifetime than without the localized ^{85}Rb MOT atoms. A similar cooling of trapped ^{85}Rb^{+} ions by ultracold ^{133}Cs atoms in a MOT is also demonstrated in a different experimental configuration to validate this mechanism of ion cooling by localized and centered ultracold neutral atoms. Our results suggest that the cooling of ions by localized cold atoms holds for any mass ratio, thereby enabling studies on a wider class of atom-ion systems irrespective of their masses.

  2. Solder self-assembled, surface micromachined MEMS for micromirror applications and atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Brian

    Solder self-assembly can be used to expand the versatility of a commercial foundry, like MEMSCAP's PolyMUMPs process. These foundries are attractive for prototyping MEMS as they can offer consistent, low cost fabrication runs by sticking to a single process and integrating multiple customers on each wafer. However, this standardization limits the utility of the process for a given application. Solder self-assembly gives back some of this versatility and expands the envelope of surface micromachining capability in the form of a simple post-process step. Here it is used to create novel micromirrors and micromirror arrays as well as to delve into the field of ultracold atom optics where the utility of MEMS as an enabling technology for atom control is explored. Two types of torsional, electrostatic micromirrors are demonstrated, both of which can achieve +/-10° of rotation. The first is a novel out-of-plane micromirror that can be rotated to a desired angle from the substrate. This integrated, on-chip assembly allows much simpler packaging technology to be used for devices that require a laser beam to be steered off-chip. Planar micromirror arrays that use solder self-assembly to tailor the electrode gap height are also demonstrated. With these designs, no special fabrication techniques are required to achieve large gap heights, and micromirrors with a variety of gap heights can even be fabricated on the same chip. Finally, solder self-assembly is used to explore how complex micro-scale structures can be used to control ultracold atoms. For this study, a MEMS version of a magneto-optical trap, the basis for most ultracold atomic systems, is used to control Rb atoms. In doing so, it provides a path for the successful integration of a number of MEMS devices in these types of systems.

  3. Axial heating and temperature of RF-excited non-neutral plasmas in Penning-Malmberg traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maero, G.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Ikram, M.

    2016-09-01

    Electro-magnetostatic traps have been used for decades to provide long-term storage of charged particle samples or non-neutral plasmas. The dynamics and equilibrium states of these ideally simple systems can be strongly diverted from the usual working conditions (i.e. single-species, quiescent samples) in the presence of oppositely charged particles or external electric field perturbations. Both these conditions occur when the plasma is generated by means of a radio-frequency (RF) excitation continuously applied on a trap electrode. The application of RF drives of some volts over periods larger than typical collisional time scales leads to residual-gas ionization and to the accumulation of an electron plasma, a process that has previously been exploited as an alternative to thermionic or photoemission electron sources. The analysis of the axial energy distribution shows a deviation of the continuously excited final state from maxwellianity dependent on the radial position and the subsequent relaxation to equilibrium after the interruption of the drive. Systematic measurements also indicate the high sensitivity to the residual gas pressure of both the total confined charge and of the attainable densities and plasma profiles. The results are compared to the information obtained from a very simple one-dimensional electron heating model and show the validity of its most basic features together with its shortcomings.

  4. Coherence in Microchip Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Treutlein, P; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J; Treutlein, Philipp; Hommelhoff, Peter; Steinmetz, Tilo; H\\"ansch, Theodor W.; Reichel, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    We report the coherent manipulation of internal states of neutral atoms in a magnetic microchip trap. Coherence lifetimes exceeding 1 s are observed with atoms at distances of $4-130 \\mu$m from the microchip surface. The coherence lifetime in the microtrap is independent of atom-surface distance and agrees well with the results of similar measurements in macroscopic magnetic traps. Due to the absence of surface-induced decoherence, a miniaturized atomic clock with a relative stability in the $10^{-13}$ range can be realized. For applications in quantum information processing, we propose to use microwave near-fields in the proximity of chip wires to create potentials that depend on the internal state of the atoms.

  5. Coherent population trapping resonances at lower atomic levels of Doppler broadened optical lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Şahin, E; Hamid, R; Çelik, M [National Metrology Institute of Turkey, Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Özen, G [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Engineering Physics Department Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Izmailov, A Ch [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, H. Javid av. 33, Baku, Az-1143 (Azerbaijan)

    2014-11-30

    We have detected and analysed narrow high-contrast coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances, which are induced in absorption of a weak monochromatic probe light beam by counterpropagating two-frequency pump radiation in a cell with rarefied caesium vapour. The experimental investigations have been performed by the example of nonclosed three level Λ-systems formed by spectral components of the D{sub 2} line of caesium atoms. The applied method allows one to analyse features of the CPT phenomenon directly at a given low long-lived level of the selected Λ-system even in sufficiently complicated spectra of atomic gases with large Doppler broadening. We have established that CPT resonances in transmission of the probe beam exhibit not only a higher contrast but also a much lesser width in comparison with well- known CPT resonances in transmission of the corresponding two-frequency pump radiation. The results obtained can be used in selective photophysics, photochemistry and ultra-high resolution atomic (molecular) spectroscopy. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Dispersive response of atoms trapped near the surface of an optical nanofiber with applications to QND measurement and spin squeezing

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Xiaodong; Jessen, Poul S; Deutsch, Ivan H

    2015-01-01

    We study the strong coupling between photons and atoms that can be achieved in an optical nanofiber geometry when the interaction is dispersive. While the Purcell enhancement factor for spontaneous emission into the guided mode does not reach the strong-coupling regime for individual atoms, one can obtain high cooperativity for ensembles of a few thousand atoms due to the tight confinement of the guided modes and constructive interference over the entire chain of trapped atoms. We calculate the dyadic Green's function, which determines the scattering of light by atoms in the presence of the fiber, and thus the phase shift and polarization rotation induced on the guided light by the trapped atoms. The Green's function is related to a full Heisenberg-Langevin treatment of the dispersive response of the quantized field to tensor polarizable atoms. We apply our formalism to quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of the atoms via polarimetry. We study shot-noise-limited detection of atom number for atoms in a com...

  7. Quantum interference between two single photons emitted by independently trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Beugnon, J; Dingjan, J; Darquié, B; Messin, G; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P; Beugnon, Jerome; Jones, Matthew; Dingjan, Jos; Darqui\\'{e}, Benoit; Messin, Gaetan; Browaeys, Antoine; Grangier, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    When two indistinguishable single photons are fed into the two input ports of a beam splitter, the photons will coalesce and leave together from the same output port. This is a quantum interference effect, which occurs because the two possible paths where the photons leave in different output ports interfere destructively. This effect was first observed in parametric downconversion by Hong, Ou and Mandel, and then with single photons produced one after the other by the same quantum emitter. With the recent development of quantum information, a lot of attention has been devoted to this coalescence effect as a resource for quantum data processing using linear optics techniques. To ensure the scalability of schemes based on these ideas, it is crucial that indistinguishable photons are emitted by a collection of synchronized, but otherwise independent sources. In this paper, we demonstrate the quantum interference of two single photons emitted by two independently trapped single atoms, bridging the gap towards th...

  8. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Humberto Da; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca + , Sr + , Ba +) and Yb + are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions are also calculated, showing that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level.

  9. Competition between Spin Echo and Spin Self-Rephasing in a Trapped Atom Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Solaro, Cyrille; Combes, Frédéric; Lopez, Matthias; Alauze, Xavier; Fuchs, Jean-Noël; Piéchon, Frédéric; Santos, Franck Pereira dos

    2016-01-01

    We perform Ramsey interferometry on an ultracold 87Rb ensemble confined in an optical dipole trap. We use a $\\pi$-pulse set at the middle of the interferometer to restore the coherence of the spin ensemble by canceling out phase inhomogeneities and creating a spin echo in the contrast. However, for high atomic densities, we observe the opposite behavior: the $\\pi$-pulse accelerates the dephasing of the spin ensemble leading to a faster contrast decay of the interferometer. We understand this phenomenon as a competition between the spin-echo technique and an exchange-interaction driven spin self-rephasing mechanism based on the identical spin rotation effect (ISRE). Our experimental data is well reproduced by a numerical model.

  10. Heavy coronal ions in the heliosphere. II. Expected fluxes of energetic neutral He atoms from the heliosheath

    CERN Document Server

    Grzedzielski, S; Bzowski, M

    2012-01-01

    Aims. A model of heliosheath density and energy spectra of alpha-particles and He+ ions carried by the solar wind is developed. Neutralization of heliosheath He+ ions, mainly by charge exchange (CX) with neutral interstellar H and He atoms, gives rise to ~0.2 - ~100 keV fluxes of energetic neutral He atoms (He ENA). Such fluxes, if observed, would give information about plasmas in the heliosheath and heliospheric tail. Methods. Helium ions crossing the termination shock (TS) constitute suprathermal (test) particles convected by (locally also diffusing through) hydrodynamically calculated background plasma flows (three versions of flows are employed). The He ions proceed from the TS towards heliopause (HP) and finally to the heliospheric tail (HT). Calculations of the evolution of alpha- and He+ particle densities and energy spectra include binary interactions with background plasma and interstellar atoms, adiabatic heating (cooling) resulting from flow compression (rarefaction), and Coulomb scattering on back...

  11. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  12. On how the optical depth tunes the effects of ISM neutral atom flow on debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Marzari, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The flux of ISM neutral atoms surrounding stars and their environment affects the motion of dust particles in debris disks, causing a significant dynamical evolution. Large values of eccentricity and inclination can be excited and strong correlations settle in among the orbital angles. This dynamical behaviour, in particular for bound dust grains, can potentially cause significant asymmetries in dusty disks around solar type stars which might be detected by observations. However, the amount of orbital changes due to this non--gravitational perturbation is strongly limited by the collisional lifetime of dust particles. We show that for large values of the disk's optical depth the influence of ISM flow on the disk shape is almost negligible because the grains are collisionally destroyed before they can accumulate enough orbital changes due to the ISM perturbations. On the other hand, for values smaller than $10^{-3}$, peculiar asymmetric patterns appear in the density profile of the disk when we consider 1-10 m...

  13. Weyl spin-orbit-coupling-induced interactions in uniform and trapped atomic quantum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Reena; Singh, G. S.; Bosse, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    We establish through analytical and numerical studies of thermodynamic quantities for noninteracting atomic gases that the isotropic three-dimensional spin-orbit coupling, the Weyl coupling, induces interaction which counters “effective” attraction (repulsion) of the exchange symmetry present in zero-coupling Bose (Fermi) gas. The exact analytical expressions for the grand potential and hence for several thermodynamic quantities have been obtained for this purpose in both uniform and trapped cases. It is enunciated that many interesting features of spin-orbit-coupled systems revealed theoretically can be understood in terms of coupling-induced modifications in statistical interparticle potential. The temperature dependence of the chemical potential, specific heat, and isothermal compressibility for a uniform Bose gas is found to have signature of the incipient Bose-Einstein condensation in the very weak coupling regime although the system does not really go in the Bose-condensed phase. The transition temperature in the harmonically trapped case decreases with an increase of coupling strength consistent with the weakening of the statistical attractive interaction. Anomalous behavior of some thermodynamic quantities, partly akin to that in dimensions less than two, appears for uniform fermions as soon as the Fermi level goes down the Dirac point on increasing the coupling strength. It is suggested that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be utilized to verify anomalous behaviors from studies of long-wavelength fluctuations in bunching and antibunching effects.

  14. Two Azimuthally Separated Regions of Cusp Ion Injection Observed via Energetic Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M.; Taguchi, S.; Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imager on the IMAGE spacecraft can detect energetic neutral atoms produced by ion injection into the cusp through a charge exchange with the Earth's hydrogen exosphere. We examined the occurrence of the LENA cusp signal during positive IMF B(sub z) in terms of the arrival direction and the IMF clock angle theta(sub CA). Results of statistical analyses show that the occurrence frequency is high on the postnoon side when theta(sub CA) is between approximately 20 degrees and approximately 50 degrees. This is ascribed to ion injection caused by cusp reconnection typical of positive IMF B(sub z). Our results also show that there is another situation of high occurrence frequency, which can be identified with theta(sub CA) of approximately 30 degrees to approximately 80 degrees. When theta(sub CA) is relatively large (60 degrees - 80 degrees), occurrence frequencies are high at relatively low latitudes over a wide extent spanning both prenoon and postnoon sectors. This feature suggests that the ion injection is caused by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Its postnoon side boundary shifts toward the prenoon as theta(sub CA) decreases. When theta(sub CA) is less than approximately 50 degrees, the high occurrence frequency exists well inside the prenoon sector, which is azimuthally separated from the postnoon region ascribed to cusp reconnection. The prenoon region, which is thought due to ion injection caused by dayside reconnection, may explain the recent report that proton aurora brightening occurs in the unanticipated prenoon sector of the northern high-latitude ionosphere for IMF B(sub y) greater than 0 and B(sub z) greater than 0.

  15. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) Movies and Other Cool Data from Cassini's Magnetosphere Imaging Instrument (MIMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusterer, M. B.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Vandegriff, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Having been at Saturn for over a decade, the MIMI instrument on Cassini has created a rich dataset containing many details about Saturn's magnetosphere. In particular, the images of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) taken by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) offer a global perspective on Saturn's plasma environment. The MIMI team is now regularly making movies (in MP4 format) consisting of consecutive ENA images. The movies correct for spacecraft attitude changes by projecting the images (whose viewing angles can substantially vary from one image to the next) into a fixed inertial frame that makes it easy to view spatial features evolving in time. These movies are now being delivered to the PDS and are also available at the MIMI team web site. Several other higher order products are now also available, including 20-day energy-time spectrograms for the Charge-Energy-Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) sensor, and daily energy-time spectrograms for the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurements system (LEMMS) sensor. All spectrograms are available as plots or digital data in ASCII format. For all MIMI sensors, a Data User Guide is also available. This paper presents details and examples covering the specifics of MIMI higher order data products. URL: http://cassini-mimi.jhuapl.edu/

  16. Scattering characteristics and imaging of energetic neutral atoms from the Moon in the terrestrial magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Charles; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Saito, Yoshifumi; Nishino, Masaki; Wieser, Martin; Asamura, Kazushi; Bhardwaj, Anil; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We study hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the lunar surface, when the Moon is inside the terrestrial magnetosheath. The ENAs are generated by neutralization and backscattering of incident protons of solar wind origin. First, we model the effect of the increased ion temperature in the magnetosheath (>10 times larger than that in the undisturbed solar wind) on the ENA scattering characteristics. Then, we apply these models to ENA measurements by Chandrayaan-1 and simultaneous ion measurements by Kaguya at the Moon, in the magnetosheath. We produce maps of the ENA scattering fraction, covering a region at the lunar near-side that includes mare and highland surfaces and several lunar magnetic anomalies. We see clear signatures of plasma shielding by the magnetic anomalies. The maps are made at different lunar local times, and the results indicate an extended influence and altered morphology of the magnetic anomalies at shallower incidence angles of the magnetosheath protons. The scattering fraction from the unmagnetized regions remains consistent with that in the undisturbed solar wind (10%-20%). Moreover, the observed ENA energy spectra are well reproduced by our temperature-dependent model. We conclude that the ENA scattering process is unchanged in the magnetosheath. Similarly to the undisturbed solar wind case, it is only magnetic anomalies that provide contrast in the ENA maps, not any selenomorphological features such as mare and highland regions.

  17. Energetic neutral atoms measured by the interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): Evidence for multiple heliosheath populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokół, J. M. [Space Research Centre, PAS, Warsaw (Poland); Funsten, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, NM 87545 (United States); Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J. [The Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Schwadron, N. A., E-mail: mdesai@swri.edu [Department of Physics and Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our results show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ∼0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ∼0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. We discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. These results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.

  18. Spectral narrowing of coherent population trapping resonance in laser-cooled and room-temperature atomic gas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pradhan; S Mishra; R Behera; N Kawade; A K Das

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated coherent population trapping (CPT) in laser-cooled as well as room-temperature (with and without buffer gas) rubidium atoms. The characteristic broad signal profile emerging from the two-photon Raman resonance for room-temperature atomic vapour is consistent with the theoretical calculation incorporating associated thermal averaging. The spectral width of the dark resonance obtained with cold atoms is found to be broadened, compared to roomtemperature vapour cell, due to the feeble role played by thermal averaging, although the cold atomic sample significantly overcomes the limitation of the transit time broadening. An alternative way to improve transit time is to use a buffer gas, with which we demonstrate that the coherent population trapping signal width is reduced to < 540 Hz.

  19. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  20. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Prof.S. Chu presents "the manipulation of atoms and bio-molecules by laser light" : a brief history of the laser cooling and trapping of atoms developed over the past 15 years will be presented. The cooling and trapping technology is already being applied in numerous areas of science and engineering. Applications to be discussed include atomic clocks, atom interferometers, as well as studies in polymer dynamics and protein motion.

  1. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  2. Energetic neutral helium atoms as a tool to study the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaczyna, Pawel; Grzedzielski, Stan; Bzowski, Maciej

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the utility of helium energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in the studies of the outer heliosphere, its boundary region, and the nearby interstellar medium, and to assess the requirements for future instruments to enable them to observe He ENA fluxes. Presently, studying these regions is rendered possible mostly by combining the in-situ measurements by the plasma and cosmic-ray instruments on Voyagers and the remote-sensing observations of H ENA from IBEX. Helium as the second most abundant species in the universe could potentially enable further extension of our knowledge about nearest surroundings of the Sun. We assessed the expected emission of the heliospheric He ENA and of He ENA from the nearby interstellar medium. To estimate the heliospheric emission of He ENA we used a simple model of the heliosphere and performed numerical simulations to determine the distribution of various populations of helium ions in the inner heliosphere. Based on this model, we calculated fluxes of He ENA created by charge exchange between helium ions and neutral atoms over a wide energy range from 0.5 keV/nuc up to 1 MeV/nuc. We included binary interactions between various combinations of hydrogen and helium ions and atoms. We also included the signal from the vicinity of the heliosphere produced via the secondary ENA mechanism, which is most likely the source for the observed IBEX Ribbon. The mean free path against ionization of He ENA in the local interstellar medium reaches about 8000 AU for atoms with an energy of a few keV. This is about 10 times more than the mean free path against ionization for hydrogen atoms at the same energy. Thus emission of helium ENA from hypothetic extraheliospheric sources could be detectable from larger distances than the hydrogen atoms. This could provide a novel method of sounding the sources of suprathermal ions that might operate in the surrounding of the heliosphere. The He ENA produced by charge-exchange could

  3. Sensing the Heliosheath from Inner Heliosphere via Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA): a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, L. Wang, R. P. Lin, D. E. Larson and J. G. Luhmann reported the detection of 4-20 keV energetic neutral atoms (ENA), most likely H atoms, coming from the frontal lobe of the heliosphere (Nature, Vol. 454, p. 81-83, 3 July 2008). The detection was performed by the suprathermal electron (STE) sensor on the STEREO A and B spacecraft from June to October 2007. The report showed the ENA flux peaking at about 5 and 20 degrees in ecliptic longitude, respectively, on either side of the Apex, the direction of Sun's motion relative to the local interstellar medium. Each peak has a full-width at half-maximum of about 20 degrees, with the one at the lower ecliptic longitude having a peak flux about three times that of the peak at the higher ecliptic longitude. The same report also derived the spectral shape of the shock-accelerated pick-up ions in the heliosheath to be two power-law spectra with a knee at about 11 keV. Assuming a healiosheath thickness of 40 AU at Voyager 2's crossing of the termination shock, the extrapolation of this proton spectrum into higher energy meets the extrapolation of the ion spectrum measured by Voyager 1 at about 25 keV. These results, especially the double peaking in the ENA flux, appear puzzling to some theorists and modelers of the heliosphere. This talk shall review the analysis of the STE/STEREO data, and go on to discuss the interpretation of the data and its consequences concerning the thickness and shape of the heliosheath as well as the variation of the availability of shock-accelerated ions in the frontal portion of the termination shock. We also compare this most recent ENA observation and implication on the heliosheath with the earlier observation of heliospheric neutral H atoms by SOHO in the energy interval 55-88 keV and the information on the heliosheath deduced from it. If we accept the analysis by Wang et al., then the STE/STEREO observation not only confirms that ion populations in the remotest regions of our

  4. The Trapping and Cooling of Alkalis Metal Atoms%碱金属原子的囚禁与冷却

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓海明; 李璋

    2012-01-01

      描述了如何利用激光以及磁场构建光学粘胶、激光阱、磁阱、磁光阱等实现对碱金属的囚禁与冷却,旨在明晰的呈现BEC实验实现的关键技术、物理原理以及各种装置的优缺点。%  This essay describes how to use laser and magnetic field to construct optical molasses ,laser trap ,mag-netic trap and magneto -optical trap to trap and cool alkali-metal atoms .It presents clearly the key experimental technologies of Bose-Einstein condensate ,the physical principle and the relative advantages and disadvantages of different equipments .

  5. Detection of a coherent population trapping resonance in a beam of 87Rb atoms by the Ramsey method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, I. M.

    2015-10-01

    Formation of a coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance is studied in the interaction of a beam of 87Rb atoms with two spatially separated domains of the dichromatic field. Various resonance excitation schemes are compared depending on the choice of operation transitions and type of the polarisation scheme. In the case of a single-velocity atomic beam, the dependence of the CPT resonance profile is studied as a function of principal parameters of the system: beam velocity, distance between optical fields, laser beam dimensions and intensities, and applied permanent magnetic field. Influence of the atomic beam angular divergence and residual beam velocity spread on the resonance quality parameter is estimated.

  6. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Lunar Poles and Night-Side

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorburger, Audrey; Wurz, Peter; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Bhardwaj, Anil; Dhanya, Mb; Asamura, Kazushi

    2016-04-01

    So far all reported scientific results derived from measurements of the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer (CENA) on board the Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 focused on the sun-lit part of the Moon. Here, for the first time, we present the analysis of the Moon - solar wind interaction in Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) from measurements over the poles and the night-side of the Moon. The Moon, not being protected by a global magnetic field or an atmosphere, is constantly bombarded by solar wind ions. Until recently, it was tacitly assumed that the solar wind ions that impinge onto the lunar surface are almost completely absorbed ( ENA sensors of NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer and by Chandrayaan-1/CENA showed an average global energetic neutral atom (ENA) albedo of 10% - 20% (e.g. McComas et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2009], Wieser et al. [Planet. Space Sci., 2009], Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2013]). In the past 6 years, several studies have closely investigated this solar wind - lunar surface interaction from various viewpoints. The main findings of these studies include (1) the dependency of the hydrogen reflection ratio on the local crustal magnetic fields (e.g., Wieser et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. ,2010] and Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]), (2) the determination of the energy spectra of backscattered neutralized solar wind protons (Futaana et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]) (3) the use of the spectra shape to remotely define an electric potential above a lunar magnetic anomaly (Futaana et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2012]), (4) the favouring of backscattering over forward-scattering of impinging solar wind hydrogen particles (Vorburger et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 2011]), (5) the first-ever measurements of sputtered lunar oxygen (Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]), (6) the first-ever observation of backscattered solar wind helium (Vorburger et al. [J. Geophys. Res., 2012]), and (7) the determination of the scattering

  7. Measurement of magic-wavelength optical dipole trap by using the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of trapped single cesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei; Jin, Gang; Sun, Rui; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2017-07-01

    Based on the multi-level model, we have calculated light shifts for Zeeman states of hyperfine levels of cesium (Cs) 6S1/2 ground state and 6P3/2 excited state.The magic-wavelength linearly-polarized optical dipole trap (ODT) for Cs 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 - 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 transition is experimentally constructed and characterized by using the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of trapped single Cs atoms. The magic wavelength is 937.7 nm which produces almost the same light shift for 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 ground state and 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 excited state with linearly-polarized ODT laser beam. Compared to undisturbed Cs 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 - 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 transition frequency in free space, the differential light shift is less than 0.7 MHz in a linearly-polarized 937.7 nm ODT, which is less than 1.2% of the trap depth. We also discussed influence of the trap depth and the bias magnetic field on the measurement results.

  8. A dark-line two-dimensional magneto-optical trap of 85Rb atoms with high optical depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanchao; Chen, J F; Liu, Chang; Zhou, Shuyu; Loy, M M T; Wong, G K L; Du, Shengwang

    2012-07-01

    We describe the apparatus of a dark-line two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical trap (MOT) of (85)Rb cold atoms with high optical depth (OD). Different from the conventional configuration, two (of three) pairs of trapping laser beams in our 2D MOT setup do not follow the symmetry axes of the quadrupole magnetic field: they are aligned with 45° angles to the longitudinal axis. Two orthogonal repumping laser beams have a dark-line volume in the longitudinal axis at their cross over. With a total trapping laser power of 40 mW and repumping laser power of 18 mW, we obtain an atomic OD up to 160 in an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) scheme, which corresponds to an atomic-density-length product NL = 2.05 × 10(15) m(-2). In a closed two-state system, the OD can become as large as more than 600. Our 2D MOT configuration allows full optical access of the atoms in its longitudinal direction without interfering with the trapping and repumping laser beams spatially. Moreover, the zero magnetic field along the longitudinal axis allows the cold atoms maintain a long ground-state coherence time without switching off the MOT magnetic field, which makes it possible to operate the MOT at a high repetition rate and a high duty cycle. Our 2D MOT is ideal for atomic-ensemble-based quantum optics applications, such as EIT, entangled photon pair generation, optical quantum memory, and quantum information processing.

  9. Investigating Global Ion and Neutral Atom Populations with IBEX and Voyager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinski, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to investigate pickup ion (PUI) production in the solar wind and heliosheath (the region between the termination shock and the heliopause) and compute the distributed energetic neutral atom fluxes throughout the helioshpere. The simulations were constrained by comparing the model output against observations from Ulysses, New Horizons, Voyager 1 and 2, and IBEX space probes. As evidenced by the number of peer reviewed journal publications resulting from the project (13 plus three submitted) and their citation rate (156 citations over three years), the project has made a lasting contribution to the field. The outcome is a significant improvement of our understanding of the pickup ion production and distribution in the distant heliosphere. The team has accomplished the entire set of tasks A-H set forth in the proposal. Namely, the transport modeling framework has been augmented with two populations of pickup ions (PUIs), the boundary conditions for the plasma and interstellar neutral hydrogen were verified against Ulysses and New Horizons PUI and an optimal set of velocity diffusion parameters established. The multi-component fluxes of PUIs were computed and isotropic velocity distributions generated for each cell in the computer simulation that covered the heliosphere from 1.5 AU to the heliopause. The distributions were carefully compared with in situ measurements at 3 AU (Ulysses), 12 AU (New Horizons), and 80-90 AU (Voyager 1 and 2) as well as those inferred from ENA fluxes measured by Cassini and IBEX (Wu et al., 2016). Some examples of modeldata comparison are shown in Figure 1. We have used coupled MHD-plasma and kinetic-neutral code to investigate the likely range of plasma and magnetic field parameters in the local interstellar medium (LISM), based on the assumption that the shape of the IBEX ribbon could be used to determine the orientation of the interstellar magnetic field. While the magnetic field is believed to be

  10. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  11. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Shih, A. Y.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event. The observations were made during the December 5, 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on the STEREO A and B spacecraft. Within 1-2 hours of the flare onset, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons arriving hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within +-10 degrees of the Sun. The derived emission profile at the Sun lasted for more than an hour and had a profile remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events atoms that were stripped of their electrons upon entering the LET sensor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. We discuss possible origins for the production of ENAs in solar events, including charge-transfer reactions involving both flare and shock-accelerated protons. Assuming isotropic emission, we find that 2 x 10E28 ENAs escaped from the Sun in the upper hemisphere. Based on the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray emission observed by RHESSI in this event, and using measured and theoretical cross sections, we estimate that 3 x 10E31 ENAs with 1.8 - 5 MeV could be produced by protons accelerated in the flare. CME-driven shock acceleration is also a possible ENA source, but unfortunately there were no CME observations available from this event. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances 1.6 solar radii.

  12. Lifetime determination of the 5d$^{2}$~$^{3}$F$_{2}$ state in barium using trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    De, S; Willmann, L

    2015-01-01

    Magneto-optically trapped atoms enable the determination of lifetimes of metastable states and higher lying excited states like the $\\rm{5d^{2}~^{3}F_{2}}$ state in barium. The state is efficiently populated by driving strong transitions from metastable states within the cooling cycle of the barium MOT. The lifetime is inferred from the increase of MOT fluorescence after the transfer of up to $30\\,\\%$ of the trapped atoms to this state. The radiative decay of the $\\rm{5d^{2}~^{3}F_{2}}$ state cascades to the cooling cycle of the MOT with a probability of $96.0(7)\\,\\%$ corresponding to a trap loss of $4.0(7)\\,\\%$ and its lifetime is determined to $\\rm{160(10)~\\mu s}$. This is in good agreement with the theoretically calculated lifetime of $\\rm{190~\\mu s}$ [J. Phys. B, {\\bf 40}, 227 (2007)]. The determined loss of $4.0(7)\\,\\%$ from the cooling cycle is compared with the theoretically calculated branching ratios. This measurement extends the efficacy of trapped atoms to measure lifetimes of higher, long-lived st...

  13. Theory of cooperative fluorescence from products of reactions or collisions: Identical neutral atomic fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurizki, Gershon; Ben-Reuven, Abraham

    1987-07-01

    The time-resolved cooperative emission from a system of correlated neutral dissociation fragments, or molecular collision products in beams, is investigated. The investigation is focused on emission at large fragment separations (between 1 nm and a few emission wavelengths), exceeding the domain of short-range interactions within the reactive or collisional molecular complex. A master-equation approach is used to obtain a general expression for the cooperative emission rate, which consists of nonexponential decay factors multiplied by temporal ringing patterns. These features result from the time-dependent radiative coupling between the receding fragments; they depend in an essential manner on the initial electronic state of the parent molecular complex and its symmetry which determine the correlations between the fragments. In the model system of a pair of identical two-level fragments two cases are considered separately. (a) A single photon shared by the fragments, where the emission is initially superradiant or subradiant (radiation trapping), depending on the spin and inversion symmetry of the parent molecular system and of the nascent fragments. The ringing pattern depends on the electronic angular momentum state of the parent molecule and on the polarization of the emitted light. (Such a ringing has been observed recently by Grangier, Aspect, and Vigué [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 418 (1985)] in the emission of photodissociated Ca2.) (b) Two initially excited fragments, where the ringing pattern is of smaller amplitude, and is weakly dependent on the electronic angular momentum of the parent molecule. All the aforementioned cooperative features generally last until the fragments recede several radiation wavelengths away from each other. The application of this time-resolved analysis to various diagnostic problems is discussed, especially with regard to the identification of excited electronic states of the parent molecular complex, and the stereospecificity of the

  14. Feasibility of detecting single atoms using photonic bandgap cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Lev, Benjamin; Srinivasan, Kartik; Barclay, Paul; Painter, Oskar; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    We propose an atom-cavity chip that combines laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms with magnetic microtraps and waveguides to deliver a cold atom to the mode of a fiber taper coupled photonic bandgap (PBG) cavity. The feasibility of this device for detecting single atoms is analyzed using both a semi-classical treatment and an unconditional master equation approach. Single-atom detection seems achievable in an initial experiment involving the non-deterministic delivery of weakly trapped...

  15. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX): Tracing the Interaction between the Heliosphere and Surrounding Interstellar Material with Energetic Neutral Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Priscilla C

    2010-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission is exploring the frontiers of the heliosphere where energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) are formed from charge exchange between interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms and solar wind ions and pickup ions. The geography of this frontier is dominated by an unexpected nearly complete arc of ENA emission, now known as the IBEX 'Ribbon'. While there is no consensus agreement on the Ribbon formation mechanism, it seems certain this feature is seen for sightlines that are perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field as it drapes over the heliosphere. At the lowest energies, IBEX also measures the flow of interstellar H, He, and O atoms through the inner heliosphere. The asymmetric helium profile suggests that a secondary flow of helium is present, such as would be expected if some fraction of helium is lost through charge exchange in the heliosheath regions. The detailed spectra characterized by the ENAs provide time-tagged samples of the energy distributions of the under...

  16. Analytical expression for K- and L-shell cross sections of neutral atoms near ionization threshold by electron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, C S [Instituto de Geociencias, Centro de Pesquisa em Geologia e GeofIsica, Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), 40170-290 Salvador (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M A Z [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Trincavelli, J C [Facultad de Matematica, AstronomIa y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000, Cordoba (Argentina); Segui, S [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de EnergIa Atomica, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, RIo Negro (Argentina)

    2007-10-14

    An analytical expression is proposed to describe the K- and L-shell ionization cross sections of neutral atoms by electron impact over a wide range of atomic numbers (4 {<=} Z {<=} 79) and over voltages U < 10. This study is based on the analysis of a calculated ionization cross section database using the distorted-wave first-order Born approximation (DWBA). The expression proposed for cross sections relative to their maximum height involves only two parameters for each atomic shell, with no dependence on the atomic number. On the other hand, it is verified that these parameters exhibit a monotonic behaviour with the atomic number for the absolute ionization cross sections, which allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the latter.

  17. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging with the POLAR CEPPAD/ IPS Instrument : Initial Forward Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Moore, K. R.; Spence, H. E.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Roelof, E. C.

    1999-01-01

    Although the primary function of the CEPPAD/IPS instrument on Polar is the measurement of energetic ions in-situ, it has also proven to be a very capable Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imager. Raw ENA images are currently being constructed on a routine basis with a temporal resolution of minutes during both active and quiet times. However, while analyses of these images by themselves provide much information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of the energetic ion population in the ring current. detailed modeling is required to extract the actual ion distributions. In this paper. we present the initial results of forward modeling an IPS ENA image obtained during a small geo-magnetic storm on June 9, 1997. The equatorial ion distribution inferred with this technique reproduces the expected large noon/midnight and dawn/dusk asymmetries. The limitations of the model are discussed and a number of modifications to the basic forward modeling technique are proposed which should significantly improve its performance in future studies.

  18. Latitude, Energy, and Time Variations of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral indices Measured by IBEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mihir; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; McComas, David; Funsten, Herbert; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zank, Gary; Schwadron, Nathan; Fuselier, Stephen; Allegrini, Frederic; Dayeh, Maher A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the latitude, energy, and time variations of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 5 years of the mission. Our previous results based on the first 3 years of IBEX observations showed that the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ˜2.29 and ˜3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur within ±30° of the equator. While these results confirmed the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere, we also showed that, unlike previous reports, the ˜0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could not be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, and that they depend on energy and latitude. In this paper we extend the above results to include years 4 and 5 of IBEX observations and investigate if the spectral indices vary as a function of time. Finally, we discuss implications of our results on models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  19. SYMMETRY OF THE IBEX RIBBON OF ENHANCED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM (ENA) FLUX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funsten, H. O.; Cai, D. M.; Higdon, D. M.; Larsen, B. A., E-mail: hfunsten@lanl.gov, E-mail: dmc@lanl.gov, E-mail: dhigdon@lanl.gov, E-mail: balarsen@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); and others

    2015-01-20

    The circular ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission remains a critical signature for understanding the interaction between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. We study the symmetry of the ribbon flux and find strong, spectrally dependent reflection symmetry throughout the energy range 0.7-4.3 keV. The distribution of ENA flux around the ribbon is predominantly unimodal at 0.7 and 1.1 keV, distinctly bimodal at 2.7 and 4.3 keV, and a mixture of both at 1.7 keV. The bimodal flux distribution consists of partially opposing bilateral flux lobes, located at highest and lowest heliographic latitude extents of the ribbon. The vector between the ribbon center and heliospheric nose (which defines the so-called BV plane) appears to play an organizing role in the spectral dependence of the symmetry axis locations as well as asymmetric contributions to the ribbon flux. The symmetry planes at 2.7 and 4.3 keV, derived by projecting the symmetry axes to a great circle in the sky, are equivalent to tilting the heliographic equatorial plane to the ribbon center, suggesting a global heliospheric ordering. The presence and energy dependence of symmetric unilateral and bilateral flux distributions suggest strong spectral filtration from processes encountered by an ion along its journey from the source plasma to its eventual detection at IBEX.

  20. Are the sungrazing comets the inner source of pickup ions and energetic neutral atoms?

    CERN Document Server

    Bzowski, M

    2004-01-01

    We show arguments that at least part of the inner source of pickup ions and energetic neutral atoms (~ 1 keV) might be the material released by sungrazing comets.Based on the monthly apparition statistics we postulate that the actual number of sungrazing comets may be even higher than observed. We point out that an overwhelming majority of the observed sungrazers belong to the Kreutz group of comets which follow tightly clumped orbits and break up at $\\sim 40 - 4$ solar radii in a well defined region. The material released from these comets should be (after ionization) at least an important portion of the inner source of pickup ions. We suggest that PUI from the cometary source should be accompanied by an increased level of ENA of similar energy. We indicate time intervals during the year when the cometary PUI should be observed from a spacecraft at Earth's orbit (basically, from the end of July till the end of the year) and show three time intervals, when they should be observable by Ulysses (since launch ti...

  1. Far-IR detection of neutral atomic oxygen toward the Horsehead Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Goicoechea, Javier R; Habart, Emilie

    2009-01-01

    We present the first detection of neutral atomic oxygen (3P_1-3P_2 fine structure line at ~63um) toward the Horsehead photodissociation region (PDR). The cloud has been mapped with the Spitzer Space Telescope at far-IR (FIR) wavelengths using MIPS in the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) mode. The [OI]63um line peaks at the illuminated edge of the cloud at AV~0.1-0.5 (inwards the gas becomes too cold and outwards the gas density drops). The luminosity carried by the [OI]63um line represents a significant fraction of the total FIR dust luminosity (I_63/I_FIR~4x10^-3). We analyze the dust continuum emission and the nonlocal OI excitation and radiative transfer in detail. The observations are reproduced with a gas density of n_H~10^4 cm^-3 and gas and dust temperatures of T_k~100 K and T_d~30 K. We conclude that the determination of the OI 3P_J level populations and emergent line intensities at such ``low'' densities is a complex non-LTE problem. FIR radiative pumping, [OI]63um subthermal emission, [OI]145um su...

  2. Separation of the Interstellar Boundary Explorer Ribbon from Globally Distributed Energetic Neutral Atom Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Christian, E. R.; Crew, G. B.; Dayeh, M.; DeMajistre, R.; Frisch, P.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Goodrich, K.; Gruntman, M.; Janzen, P.; Kucharek, H.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Prested, C.; Reisenfeld, D.; Reno, M.; Roelof, E.; Siegel, J.; Vanderspek, R.

    2011-04-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon, which has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux over a narrow region ~20° wide, a factor of 2-3 higher than the more globally distributed ENA flux. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the distributed flux by applying a transparency mask over the ribbon and regions of high emissions, and then solve for the distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum shows a knee between ~1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the distributed flux does not show a clear knee and more closely conforms to a power law over much of the sky. Consistent with previous analyses, the slope of the power law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. The knee in the energy spectrum of the ribbon suggests that its source plasma population is generated via a distinct physical process. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. The heliotail may be identified in maps of globally distributed flux as a broad region of low flux centered ~44°W of the interstellar downwind direction, suggesting heliotail deflection by the interstellar magnetic field.

  3. A theoretical analysis of parity violation induced by neutral currents in atomic cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C. A.; Pignon, D.

    1983-07-01

    In this paper we give a theoretical analysis of the parity violation phenomena in nS - n'S transitions in atomic cesium induced by the electron-nucleus neutral-current interaction. The actual observation of parity violation consists in the measurement of an interference between the p.v. electric dipole amplitude Elpv with the electric amplitude induced by a static electric field. Our theoretical work must then include a calculation of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the states of atomic cesium. We have used a one-electron model proposed by Norcross which incorporates some many-body effects like the electric screening induced by the core polarization in a semi-empirical way. Our calculated values of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the nS states are in good agreement with the existing measurements; this confirms the already well-established success of the model in predicting the radiative transitions in cesium. We present theoretical arguments supported by detailed numerical computations showing that the one-particle matrix element of the parity-violating electron-nucleus interaction and the parity-violating electric dipole amplitude Elpv itself weakly depend on the shape of the one-electron potential provided the binding energies of the valence states are reproduced accurately. Furthermore it turns out that because of a compensation mechanism, the parity-violating transition is induced by the radiation field outside the ion core region where the screening can be described simply in terms of the measurable cesium ion polarizability. Our results are then used to extract, from the Ecole Normale Supérieure experiment, a value of the weak charge Qw = -57.1 ± 9.4 (r.m.s. statistical deviation) ± 4.7 (systematic uncertainty). This number is to be compared with the prediction of the Weinberg-Salam model with electro-weak radiative corrections: Qw = -68.6 ± 3.0. A general discussion of the uncertainties of the atomic physics

  4. State-resolved study of keV sputtered neutral atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, C.; Postawa, Z.; Rosencrance, S.; Chatterjee, R.; Garrison, B.J.; Winograd, N. [Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We have performed simultaneous measurements of energy-, and angle-resolved distributions of Ni atoms desorbed from a single crystal Ni{l_brace}100{r_brace} surface bombarded by 5 keV Ar{sup +} ions. Ground state and six low-lying excited states from the {ital a}{sup 3}{ital F}{sub {ital J}} ({ital J}=4,3,2) and {ital a}{sup 3}{ital D}{sub {ital J}} ({ital J}=3,2,1) manifolds as well as {ital a}{sup 1}{ital D}{sub 2} have been investigated along different azimuths. Both {ital a}{sup 3}{ital F}{sub {ital J}} and {ital a}{sup 1}{ital D}{sub 2} states have closed shell electronic structure, 3{ital d}{sup 8}4{ital s}{sup 2}, while the {ital a}{sup 3}{ital D}{sub {ital J}} states are open shell electronic states, 3{ital d}{sup 9}4{ital s}{sup 1}. Angle-integrated energy distributions demonstrate a strong dependence on the electronic structure while the magnitude of the excitation energy does not significantly alter the results. This is the first conclusive evidence that electronic structure rather than excitation energy is the primary factor in determining kinetic energy distributions of sputtered neutral species. Population distribution among the seven electronic states are obtained through two sets of measurements performed on two experimental apparati: one measures the energy- and angle-integrated resonance ionization signal intensities of the sputtered Ni; the other measures the resonance ionization signal intensities of thermally evaporated Ni atoms with a known heating temperature. The experiment results show that the population distribution is very different from Boltzman-type distribution with {ital a}{sup 3}{ital D}{sub 3} and {ital a}{sup 3}{ital D}{sub 2} states more intensely populated. The work also illustrates the power of RIS to perform quantum state specific measurements on fast moving atoms. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  5. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers.

  6. Self-Trapping State and Atomic Tunnelling Current of an Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate Interacting with a Laser Field in a Double-Well Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; JIAO Zhi-Yong

    2002-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensation interacting witha single-mode quantized travelling-wave laser field in a double-well potential. When the atom-field system is initiallyin a coherent state, expressions for the energy exchange between atoms and photons are derived. It is revealed thatatoms in the two wells can be in a self-trapping state when the tunnelling frequency satisfies two specific conditions,in which the resonant and far off-resonant cases are included. It is found that there is an alternating current with twodifferent sinusoidal oscillations between the two wells, but no dc characteristic of the atomic tunnelling current occurs.It should be emphasized that when without the laser field, both the population difference and the atomic tunnellingcurrent are only a single oscillation. But they will respectively become a superposition of two oscillations with differentoscillatory frequencies in the presence of the laser field. For the two oscillations of the population difference, one alwayshas an increment in the oscillatory frequency, the other can have an increment or a decrease under different cases. Theseconclusions are also suitable to those of the atomic tunnelling current. As a possible application, by measurement of theatomic tunnelling current between the two wells, the number of Bose-condensed atoms can be evaluated. lBy properlyselecting the laser field, the expected atomic tunnelling current can be obtained too.

  7. Understanding Molecular-Ion Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-03

    the center of the vacuum chamber, denoted by the blue arrow, is 40Ca magneto - optical trap (MOT) co- located with a linear quadrupole radio- frequency...ion trap (LQT) system. The 40Ca MOT laser beams (blue) are evidenced by scattered light from the optics . The necessary computer and laser controls...cold molecules ,” Nature 495, 490 (2012)]. Construction of the next generation MOTION trap : Using what was learned in the sympatehtic cooling

  8. The dynamics of triple-well trapped Bose-Einstein condensates with atoms feeding and loss effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Ai-Xia; Zhou Xiao-Yan; Xue Ju-Kui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the macroscopic quantum tunnelling and self-trapping phenomena of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with three-body recombination losses and atoms feeding from thermal cloud in triple-well potential.Using the three-mode approximation, three coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs), which describe the dynamics of the system, are obtained. The corresponding numerical results reveal some interesting characteristics of BECs for different scattering lengths. The self-trapping and quantum tunnelling both are found in zero-phase and π-pbaso modes.Furthermore, we observe the quantum beating phenomenon and the resonance character during the self-trapping and quantum tunnelling. It is also shown that the initial phase has a significant effect on the dynamics of the system.

  9. Solute and solvent dynamics in confined equal-sized aqueous environments of charged and neutral reverse micelles: a combined dynamic fluorescence and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Biswas, Ranjit; Ghorai, Pradip K

    2013-03-28

    Here a combined dynamic fluorescence and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study of aqueous pool-size dependent solvation energy and rotational relaxations of a neutral dipolar solute, C153, trapped in AOT (charged) and IGPAL (neutral) reverse micelles (RMs) at 298 K, is described. RMs in simulations have been represented by a reduced model where SPC/E water molecules interact with a trapped C153 that possesses realistic charge distributions for both ground and excited states. In large aqueous pools, measured average solvation and rotation rates are smaller for the neutral RMs than those in charged ones. Interestingly, while the measured average solvation and rotation rates increase with pool size for the charged RMs, the average rotation rates for the neutral RMs exhibit a reverse dependence. Simulations have qualitatively reproduced this experimental trend and suggested interfacial location for the solute for all cases. The origin for the subnanosecond Stokes shift dynamics has been investigated and solute-interface interaction contribution quantified. Simulated layer-wise translational and rotational diffusions of water molecules re-examine the validity of the core-shell model and provide a resolution to a debate regarding the origin of the subnanosecond solvation component in dynamic Stokes shift measurements with aqueous RMs but not detected in ultrafast IR measurements.

  10. Detection of a coherent population trapping resonance in a beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms by the Ramsey method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, I M [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    Formation of a coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance is studied in the interaction of a beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms with two spatially separated domains of the dichromatic field. Various resonance excitation schemes are compared depending on the choice of operation transitions and type of the polarisation scheme. In the case of a single-velocity atomic beam, the dependence of the CPT resonance profile is studied as a function of principal parameters of the system: beam velocity, distance between optical fields, laser beam dimensions and intensities, and applied permanent magnetic field. Influence of the atomic beam angular divergence and residual beam velocity spread on the resonance quality parameter is estimated. (atomic beams)

  11. Trapping ions with lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Cormick, Cecilia; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    This work theoretically addresses the trapping an ionized atom with a single valence electron by means of lasers, analyzing qualitatively and quantitatively the consequences of the net charge of the particle. In our model, the coupling between the ion and the electromagnetic field includes the charge monopole and the internal dipole, within a multipolar expansion of the interaction Hamiltonian. Specifically, we perform a Power-Zienau-Woolley transformation, taking into account the motion of the center of mass. The net charge produces a correction in the atomic dipole which is of order $m_e/M$ with $m_e$ the electron mass and $M$ the total mass of the ion. With respect to neutral atoms, there is also an extra coupling to the laser field which can be approximated by that of the monopole located at the position of the center of mass. These additional effects, however, are shown to be very small compared to the dominant dipolar trapping term.

  12. Optical Guiding of Trapped Atoms by a Blue-Detuned Hollow Laser Beam in the Horizontal Direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Kai-Jun; LI Ke; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical guiding of 85 Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) by a blue-detuned horizontal hollow laser beam is demonstrated experimentally. The guiding efficiency and the velocity distribution of the guided atoms are found to have strong dependence on the detuning of the guiding laser. In particular, the optimum guiding occurs when the blue detuning of the hollow laser beam is approximately equal to the hyperfine structure splitting of the 85Rb ground states, in good agreement with the theoretical analysis based on a three-level model.

  13. Optical trapping of ultracold dysprosium atoms: transition probabilities, dynamic dipole polarizabilities and van der Waals C 6 coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wyart, J.-F.; Dulieu, O.; Nascimbène, S.; Lepers, M.

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency of the optical trapping of ultracold atoms depends on the atomic dynamic dipole polarizability governing the atom-field interaction. In this article, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic dipole polarizability of dysprosium in the ground and first excited levels. Due to the high electronic angular momentum of those two states, the polarizabilities possess scalar, vector and tensor contributions that we have computed, on a wide range of trapping wavelengths, using the sum-over-state formula. Using the same formalism, we have also calculated the C 6 coefficients characterizing the van der Waals interaction between two dysprosium atoms in the two lowest levels. We have computed the energies of excited states and the transition probabilities appearing in the sums, using a combination of ab initio and least-square-fitting techniques provided by the Cowan codes and extended in our group. Regarding the real part of the polarizability, for field frequencies far from atomic resonances, the vector and tensor contributions are two-orders-of-magnitude smaller than the scalar contribution, whereas for the imaginary part, the vector and tensor contributions represent a noticeable fraction of the scalar contribution. Finally, our anisotropic C 6 coefficients are much smaller than those published in the literature.

  14. Theoretical analysis of parity violation induced by neutral currents in atomic cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchiat, C.; Piketty, C.A.; Pignon, D. (Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique)

    1983-07-04

    In this paper we give a theoretical analysis of the parity violation phenomena in nS-n'S transitions in atomic cesium induced by the electron-nucleus neutral-current interaction. The actual observation of parity violation consists in the measurement of an interference between the p.v. electric dipole amplitude E/sub 1/sup(pv) with the electric amplitude induced by a static electric field. Our theoretical work must then include a calculation of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the states of atomic cesium. We have used a one-electron model proposed by Norcross which incorporates some many-body effects like the electric screening induced by the core polarization in a semi-empirical way. Our calculated values of the diagonal and non-diagonal polarizabilities of the nS states are in good agreement with the existing measurements; this confirms the already well-established success of the model in predicting the radiative transitions in cesium. We present theoretical arguments supported by detailed numerical computations showing that the one-particle matrix element of the parity-violating electron-nucleus interaction and the parity-violating electric dipole amplitude E/sub 1/sup(pv) itself weakly depend on the shape of the one-electron potential provided the binding energies of the valence states are reproduced accurately. Furthermore it turns out that because of a compensation mechanism, the parity-violating transition is induced by the radiation field outside the ion core region where the screening can be described simply in terms of the measurable cesium ion polarizability. Our results are then used to extract, from the Ecole Normale Superieure experiment, a value of the weak charge Qsub(w)= -57.1+-9.4 (r.m.s. statistical deviation) +-4.7 (systematic uncertainty). This number is to be compared with the prediction of the Weinberg-Salam model with electro-weak radiative corrections: Qsub(w)=-68.6+-3.0.

  15. Two-dimensional array of microtraps with atomic shift register on a chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitlock, S.; Gerritsma, R.; Fernholz, T.; Spreeuw, R.J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Arrays of trapped atoms are the ideal starting points for developing registers comprising large numbers of physical qubits for storing and processing quantum information. One very promising approach involves neutral atom traps produced on microfabricated devices known as atom chips, as almost

  16. Measurement of the parity nonconserving neutral weak interaction in atomic thallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucksbaum, P.H.

    1980-11-01

    This thesis describes an experiment to measure parity nonconservation in atomic thallium. A frequency doubled, flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser is used to excite the 6P/sub 1/2/(F = 0) ..-->.. 7P/sub 1/2/(F = 1) transition at 292.7 nm, with circularly polarized light. An electrostatic field E of 100 to 300 V/cm causes this transition to occur via Stark induced electric dipole. Two field free transitions may also occur: a highly forbidden magnetic dipole M, and a parity nonconserving electric dipole epsilon/sub P/. The latter is presumed to be due to the presence of a weak neutral current interaction between the 6p valence electron and the nucleus, as predicted by gauge theories which unite the electromagnetic and weak interactions. Both M and epsilon/sub P/ interfere with the Stark amplitude ..beta..E to produce a polarization of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state. This is measured with a circularly polarized infrared laser beam probe, tuned to the 7P/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 8S/sub 1/2/ transition. This selectively excites m/sub F/ = +1 or -1 components of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state, and the polarization is seen as an asymmetry in 8S ..-->.. 6P/sub 3/2/ fluorescence when the probe helicity is reversed. The polarization due to M is ..delta../sub M/ = -2M/(BETAE). It is used to calibrate the analyzing efficiency. The polarization due to epsilon/sub P/ is ..delta../sub P/ = 2i epsilon/sub P//(..beta..E), and can be distinguished from ..delta../sub M/ by its properties under reversal of the 292.7 nm photon helicity and reversal of the laser direction. A preliminary measurement yielded a parity violation in agreement with the gauge theory of Weinberg and Salam.

  17. Imaging the heliosphere using neutral atoms from solar wind energy down to 15 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, A.; Wurz, P. [Physics Institute, University of Bern, Bern 3012 (Switzerland); Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw 00-716 (Poland); Möbius, E. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We study the spatial and temporal distribution of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the heliosheath observed with the IBEX-Lo sensor of the Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) from solar wind energies down to the lowest available energy (15 eV). All available IBEX-Lo data from 2009 January until 2013 June were included. The sky regions imaged when the spacecraft was outside of Earth's magnetosphere and when the Earth was moving toward the direction of observation offer a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio even at very low energies. We find that the ENA ribbon—a 20° wide region of high ENA intensities—is most prominent at solar wind energies whereas it fades at lower energies. The maximum emission in the ribbon is located near the poles for 2 keV and closer to the ecliptic plane for energies below 1 keV. This shift is an evidence that the ENA ribbon originates from the solar wind. Below 0.1 keV, the ribbon can no longer be identified against the globally distributed ENA signal. The ENA measurements in the downwind direction are affected by magnetospheric contamination below 0.5 keV, but a region of very low ENA intensities can be identified from 0.1 keV to 2 keV. The energy spectra of heliospheric ENAs follow a uniform power law down to 0.1 keV. Below this energy, they seem to become flatter, which is consistent with predictions. Due to the subtraction of local background, the ENA intensities measured with IBEX agree with the upper limit derived from Lyα observations.

  18. Energetic neutral atom and interstellar flow observations with IBEX: Implications for the global heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Christian, E. R.; Desai, M. I.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Moebius, E.; Reno, M.; Scherrer, J.; Zirnstein, E.

    2016-03-01

    Since launch in Oct. 2008, IBEX, with its two energetic neutral atom (ENA) cameras, has provided humankind with the first-ever global images of the complex boundary separating the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM). IBEX's energy-resolved all-sky maps, collected every six months, are yielding remarkable new insights into the heliospheres structure as it is shaped by the combined forces of the local interstellar flow, the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), and the evolving solar wind. IBEX has also acquired the first images of ENAs backscattered from the surface of the moon as well as global images of the magnetospheric response to solar wind disturbances. IBEX thus addresses all three Heliophysics science objectives set forth in the 2014 Science Plan for NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) as well as the goals in the recent Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey (NRC 2012). In addition, with the information it provides on the properties of the LISM and the LISMF, IBEX represents a unique bridge between heliophysics and astrophysics, and fills in critical knowledge for understanding the habitability of exoplanetary systems and the future habitability of Earth and the solar system. Because of the few-year time lag due to solar wind and ENA transport, IBEX observed the solar wind/ LISM interaction characteristic of declining phase/solar minimum conditions. In the continuing mission, IBEX captures the response of the interstellar boundaries to the changing structure of the solar wind in its transition toward the "mini" solar maximum and possibly the decline into the next solar minimum. The continuing IBEX mission affords never-to-be-repeated opportunities to coordinate global imaging of the heliospheric boundary with in-situ measurements by the Voyagers as they pass beyond the heliopause and start to directly sample the LISM.

  19. Separation of the IBEX Ribbon from the Globally Distributed Energetic Neutral Atom Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Christian, E. R.; Crew, G. B.; Dayeh, M. A.; Demajistre, R.; Frisch, P. C.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Goodrich, K. A.; Gruntman, M.; Janzen, P. H.; Kucharek, H.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Prested, C. L.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Reno, M. L.; Roelof, E. C.; Siegel, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Mission observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon. This very narrow ~20° wide feature has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux ~2-3 times the ENA flux that is globally distributed over other portions of the IBEX maps. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the globally distributed flux by applying a mask over the ribbon and regions where ENAs are produced from sources other than the heliosphere. We then solve for the globally distributed flux using two distinct methods: (1) an interpolation scheme and (2) a decomposition based on real-valued spherical harmonics. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and the spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum exhibits a knee between ~1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution transverse to the ribbon is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the globally distributed flux does not show a clear knee, and more closely conforms to a power-law over much of the sky. The slope of the power-law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the globally distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. Thus, we develop several methods to separate the ribbon from the globally distributed ENA flux in the maps observed by IBEX. Our analysis shows that the IBEX ribbon is distinct not only in its spatial distribution, but also its energy distribution, which suggests that the source plasma populations of the ribbon and globally distributed flux are produced via a distinct physical process.

  20. Self—Trapping State and Atomic Tunnelling Current of an Atomic Bose—Einstein Condensate Interacting with a Laser Field in a Double—Well Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUZhao-Xian; JIAOZhi-Yong

    2002-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensation interacting with a single-mode quantized travelling-wave laser field in a double-well potential.When the atom-field system is initially in a coherent state,expressions for the energy exchange between atoms and photons are derived.It is revealed that atoms in the two wells can be in a self-trapping state when the tunnelling frequency satisfies two specific conditions,in which the resonant and far off-resonant cases are included.It is found that there is an alternating current with two different sinusoidal oscillations between the two wells,but no dc characteristic of the atomic tunnelling current occurs.It should be emphasized that when without the laser field,both the population difference and the atomic tunnelling current are only a single oscillation.But they will respectively become a superposition of two oscillations with different oscillatory frequencies in the presence of the laser field.For the two oscillations of the population difference,one always has an increment in the oscillatory frequency,the other can have an increment or a decrease under different cases.These conclusions are also suitable to those of the atomic tunnelling current.As a possible application,by measurement of the atomic tunnelling current between the two wells,the number of Bose-condensed atoms can be evaluated.By poperly selecting the laser field,the expected atomic tunnelling current can be obtained too.