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Sample records for neuropeptide y-like immunoreactivity

  1. [Changes in neuropeptide Y and substance P immunoreactive nerve fibres and immunocompetent cells in hepatitis].

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    Fehér, Erzsébet

    2015-11-22

    Neuropeptide Y and substance P were thought to play a role in the function of immune cells and in amplification or elimination of the inflammatory processes. In hepatitis the number of both neuropeptide Y and substance P immunoreactive nerve fibres are increased, where the increase of neoropeptide Y is significant. A large number of lymphocytes and mast cells are also stained for neuropeptide Y and substance P. Very close associations (less than 1 µm) were observed between neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve fibres and immune cells stained also with neuropeptide Y. Some immune cells were also found to be immunoreactive for tumor necrosis factor-α and NF-κB. Some of the SP IR immunocells were also stained for TNF-α and nuclear factor kappaB. Based on these data it is hypothesized that neuropeptid Y and substance P released from nerve fibres and immune cells play a role in inflammation and elimination of inflammation in hepatitis.

  2. Neuropeptide Y-like signalling and nutritionally mediated gene expression and behaviour in the honey bee.

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    Ament, S A; Velarde, R A; Kolodkin, M H; Moyse, D; Robinson, G E

    2011-06-01

    Previous research has led to the idea that derived traits can arise through the evolution of novel roles for conserved genes. We explored whether neuropeptide Y (NPY)-like signalling, a conserved pathway that regulates food-related behaviour, is involved in a derived, nutritionally-related trait, the division of labour in worker honey bees. Transcripts encoding two NPY-like peptides were expressed in separate populations of brain neurosecretory cells, consistent with endocrine functions. NPY-related genes were upregulated in the brains of older foragers compared with younger bees performing brood care ('nurses'). A subset of these changes can be attributed to nutrition, but neuropeptide F peptide treatments did not influence sugar intake. These results contrast with recent reports of more robust associations between division of labour and the related insulin-signalling pathway and suggest that some elements of molecular pathways associated with feeding behaviour may be more evolutionarily labile than others.

  3. Regulation of sleep by neuropeptide Y-like system in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Chunxia He

    Full Text Available Sleep is important for maintenance of normal physiology in animals. In mammals, neuropeptide Y (NPY, a homolog of Drosophila neuropeptide F (NPF, is involved in sleep regulation, with different effects in human and rat. However, the function of NPF on sleep in Drosophila melanogaster has not yet been described. In this study, we investigated the effects of NPF and its receptor-neuropeptide F receptor (NPFR1 on Drosophila sleep. Male flies over-expressing NPF or NPFR1 exhibited increased sleep during the nighttime. Further analysis demonstrated that sleep episode duration during nighttime was greatly increased and sleep latency was significantly reduced, indicating that NPF and NPFR1 promote sleep quality, and their action on sleep is not because of an impact of the NPF signal system on development. Moreover, the homeostatic regulation of flies after sleep deprivation was disrupted by altered NPF signaling, since sleep deprivation decreased transcription of NPF in control flies, and there were less sleep loss during sleep deprivation and less sleep gain after sleep deprivation in flies overexpressing NPF and NPFR1 than in control flies, suggesting that NPF system auto-regulation plays an important role in sleep homeostasis. However, these effects did not occur in females, suggesting a sex-dependent regulatory function in sleep for NPF and NPFR1. NPF in D1 brain neurons showed male-specific expression, providing the cellular locus for male-specific regulation of sleep by NPF and NPFR1. This study brings a new understanding into sleep studies of a sexually dimorphic regulatory mode in female and male flies.

  4. Functional and genetic characterization of neuropeptide Y-like receptors in Aedes aegypti.

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    Jeff Liesch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the principal vector for dengue fever, causing 50-100 million infections per year, transmitted between human and mosquito by blood feeding. Ae. aegypti host-seeking behavior is known to be inhibited for three days following a blood meal by a hemolymph-borne humoral factor. Head Peptide-I is a candidate peptide mediating this suppression, but the mechanism by which this peptide alters mosquito behavior and the receptor through which it signals are unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Head Peptide-I shows sequence similarity to short Neuropeptide-F peptides (sNPFs that have been implicated in feeding behaviors and are known to signal through Neuropeptide Y (NPY-Like Receptors (NPYLRs. We identified eight NPYLRs in the Ae. aegypti genome and screened each in a cell-based calcium imaging assay for sensitivity against a panel of peptides. Four of the Ae. aegypti NPYLRs responded to one or more peptide ligands, but only NYPLR1 responded to Head Peptide-I as well as sNPFs. Two NPYLR1 homologues identified in the genome of the Lyme disease vector, Ixodes scapularis, were also sensitive to Head Peptide-I. Injection of synthetic Head Peptide-I and sNPF-3 inhibited host-seeking behavior in non-blood-fed female mosquitoes, whereas control injections of buffer or inactive Head Peptide-I [Cys10] had no effect. To ask if NPYLR1 is necessary for blood-feeding-induced host-seeking inhibition, we used zinc-finger nucleases to generate five independent npylr1 null mutant strains and tested them for behavioral abnormalities. npylr1 mutants displayed normal behavior in locomotion, egg laying, sugar feeding, blood feeding, host seeking, and inhibition of host seeking after a blood meal. CONCLUSIONS: In this work we deorphanized four Ae. aegypti NPYLRs and identified NPYLR1 as a candidate sNPF receptor that is also sensitive to Head Peptide-I. Yet npylr1 alone is not required for host-seeking inhibition and we

  5. Morphometric characteristics of neuropeptide Y immunoreactive neurons in cortex of human inferior parietal lobule.

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    Krivokuća, Dragan; Puskas, Laslo; Puskas, Nela; Erić, Mirela

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate and precisely define the morphology of neurons immunoreactive to neuropeptide Y (NPY) in cortex of human inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Five human brains were used for immunohistochemical investigation of the shape and laminar distribution of NPY neurons in serial section in the supramarginal and angular gyrus. Immunoreactivity to NPY was detected in all six layers of the cortex of human IPL. However a great number of NPY immunoreactive neurons were found in the white matter under the IPL cortex. The following types of NPY immunoreactive neurons were found: Cajal-Retzius, pyramidal, inverted pyramidal, "double bouquet" (bitufted), rare type 6, multipolar nonspinous, bipolar, voluminous "basket", and chandelier cells. These informations about morphometric characteristics of NPY immunoreactive neurons in cortical layers, together with morphometric data taken from brains having schizophrenia or Alzheimer's-type dementia may contribute to better understanding patogenesis of these neurological diseases. The finding of Cajal-Retzius neurons immunoreactive to NPY points to the need for further investigations because of great importance of these cells in neurogenesis and involvement in mentioned diseases instead of their rarity.

  6. Plasma immunoreactive neuropeptide Y in congestive heart failure at rest and during exercise

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    Madsen, B K; Husum, D; Videbaek, R

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study described here was to study plasma immunoreactive Neuropeptide Y (NPY) at rest and during exercise in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and in healthy subjects. Thirty-five patients, mean age 64 years, with CHF in optimal treatment and with a mean ejection...... fraction of 32%, were studied at rest and during exercise. Twelve age and sex matched healthy subjects were compared for resting values. Another nine healthy subjects were studied at rest and during exercise at a constant low load of 75W and at a high load defined as 80% of their individual maximal...... and left ventricular ejection fraction. Mean maximal exercise time was on average 6.3 min. Only three patients exercised more than 10 min. At maximal exercise mean plasma immunoreactive NPY was 10.6 pmol l-1 the same as at rest. Plasma noradrenaline was increased in CHF patients compared to healthy...

  7. Distribution of Neuropeptide F-Like Immunoreactivity in the Eastern Subterranean Termite, Reticulitermes flavipes

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    Nuss, Andrew B.; Forschler, Brian T.; Crim, Joe W.; Brown, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    The nervous system and gut of worker, soldier and alate castes of the eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes Kollar (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) were examined for immunoreactivity to an antiserum to Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Leipidoptera: Noctuidae) MP-I (QAARPRF-NH2), a truncated form of neuropeptide F. More than 145 immunostained axons and cell bodies were seen in the brain and all ganglia of the ventral nerve cord. Immunoreactive axons exiting the brain projected anteriorly to the frontal ganglion and posteriorly to the corpora cardiaca and corpora allata. In the stomatogastric nervous system, immunoreactive axons were observed over the surface of the foregut, salivary glands, midgut and rectum. These axons originated in the brain and from 15–25 neurosecretory cells on the foregut. Staining patterns were consistent between castes, with the exception of immunostaining observed in the optic lobes of alates. At least 600 immunoreactive endocrine cells were evenly distributed in the midguts of all castes with higher numbers present in the worker caste. Immunostaining of cells in the nervous system and midgut was blocked by preabsorption of the antiserum with Hez MP-I but not by a peptide having only the RF-NH2 in common. This distribution suggests NPF-like peptides coordinate feeding and digestion in all castes of this termite species. PMID:20302462

  8. Long-term effects of cholinergic basal forebrain lesions on neuropeptide Y and somatostatin immunoreactivity in rat neocortex

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    Gaykema, R.P.A.; Compaan, J.C.; Nyakas, C.; Horvath, E.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of cholinergic basal forebrain lesions on immunoreactivity to somatostatin (SOM-i) and neuropeptide-Y (NPY-i) was investigated in the rat parietal cortex, 16-18 months after multiple bilateral ibotenic acid injections in the nucleus basalis complex. As a result of the lesion, the choliner

  9. The striatal mosaic in primates: patterns of neuropeptide immunoreactivity differentiate the ventral striatum from the dorsal striatum.

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    Martin, L J; Hadfield, M G; Dellovade, T L; Price, D L

    1991-01-01

    Patterns of immunoreactivity for calcium-binding protein, tyrosine hydroxylase and four neuropeptides in the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle and ventromedial parts of the caudate nucleus and putamen) were compared to patterns of these markers in the dorsal striatum (the majority of the neostriatum) in rhesus monkey. The striatal mosaic was delineated by calcium-binding protein and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivities. Both markers were found preferentially in the matrix of the dorsal striatum. The mosaic configurations of tyrosine hydroxylase, but not calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity, were similar in dorsal and ventral striatal regions. Substance P and leucine-enkephalin were not distributed homogeneously; distinct types and the prevalence of patches of substance P and leucine-enkephalin immunoreactivity distinguish the dorsal striatum from the ventral striatum and distinguish the caudate nucleus from the putamen. In the dorsal striatum, substance P and leucine-enkephalin patches consist of dense islands of immunoreactive neurons and puncta or clusters of immunoreactive neurons marginated by a dense rim of terminal-like puncta; the matrix was also enriched in leucine-enkephalin-immunoreactive neurons but contained less substance P-immunoreactive neurons. Patches were more prominent in the caudate nucleus than in the putamen. In the caudate, compartments low in tyrosine hydroxylase and calcium-binding protein immunoreactivities corresponded to cytologically identified cell islands and to patches enriched in substance P and leucine-enkephalin. These patches had a discrete infrastructure based on the location of substance P and leucine-enkephalin-immunoreactive neurons and terminals. In the ventral striatum, patches that showed low levels of substance P and leucine-enkephalin immunoreactivities were embedded in a matrix rich in immunoreactive cell bodies, fibers and terminals. In the accumbens, regions showing little tyrosine

  10. Identification of the novel bioactive peptides dRYamide-1 and dRYamide-2, ligands for a neuropeptide Y-like receptor in Drosophila.

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    Ida, Takanori; Takahashi, Tomoko; Tominaga, Hatsumi; Sato, Takahiro; Kume, Kazuhiko; Ozaki, Mamiko; Hiraguchi, Tetsutaro; Maeda, Toru; Shiotani, Hajime; Terajima, Saki; Sano, Hiroko; Mori, Kenji; Yoshida, Morikatsu; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kato, Johji; Murakami, Noboru; Kangawa, Kenji; Kojima, Masayasu

    2011-07-15

    A number of bioactive peptides are involved in regulating a wide range of animal behaviors, including food consumption. Vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent stimulator of appetitive behavior. Recently, Drosophila neuropeptide F (dNPF) and short NPF (sNPF), the Drosophila homologs of the vertebrate NPY, were identified to characterize the functions of NPFs in the feeding behaviors of this insect. Dm-NPFR1 and NPFR76F are the receptors for dNPF and sNPF, respectively; both receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Another GPCR (CG5811; NepYR) was indentified in Drosophila as a neuropeptide Y-like receptor. Here, we identified 2 ligands of CG5811, dRYamide-1 and dRYamide-2. Both peptides are derived from the same precursor (CG40733) and have no significant structural similarities to known bioactive peptides. The C-terminal sequence RYamide of dRYamides is identical to that of NPY family peptides; on the other hand, dNPF and sNPF have C-terminal RFamide. When administered to blowflies, dRYamide-1 suppressed feeding motivation. We propose that dRYamides are related to the NPY family in vertebrates, similar to dNPF and sNPF. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The distribution of neuropeptide Y and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, from birth to sexual maturity

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    Cepriano, L. M.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y and dynorphin have been localized in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, at different ages and stages of development from birth to sexual maturity. Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y was found in perikarya and tracts of the nucleus olfactoretinalis, telencephalon, ventral tegmentum and in the neurohypophysis and in the three regions of the adenohypophysis. Immunoreactive dynorphin was found in nerve tracts in the olfactory bulb and in cells of the pars intermedia and the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary gland.

  12. Morphometric characteristics of Neuropeptide Y immunoreactive neurons of human cortical amygdaloid nucleus

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    Mališ Miloš

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cortical amygdaloid nucleus belongs to the corticomedial part of the amygdaloid complex. In this nucleus there are neurons that produce neuropetide Y. This peptide has important roles in sleeping, learning, memory, gastrointestinal regulation, anxiety, epilepsy, alcoholism and depression. Material and methods We investigated morphometric characteristics (numbers of primary dendrites, longer and shorter diameters of cell bodies and maximal radius of dendritic arborization of NPY immunoreactive neurons of human cortical amygdaloid nucleus on 6 male adult human brains, aged 46 to 77 years, by immunohistochemical avidin-biotin technique. Results Our investigation has shown that in this nucleus there is a moderate number of NPY immunoreactive neurons. 67% of found neurons were nonpyramidal, while 33% were pyramidal. Among the nonpyramidal neurons the dominant groups were multipolar neurons (41% - of which 25% were multipolar irregular, and 16% multipolar oval. Among the pyramidal neurons the dominant groups were the neurons with triangular shape of cell body (21%. All found NPY immunoreactive neurons (pyramidal and nonpyramidal altogether had intervals of values of numbers of primary dendrites 2 to 6, longer diameters of cell bodies 13 to 38 µm, shorter diameters of cell bodies 9 to 20 µm and maximal radius of dendritic arborization 50 to 340 µm. More than a half of investigated neurons (57% had 3 primary dendrites. Discussion and conclusion The other researchers did not find such percentage of pyramidal immunoreactive neurons in this amygdaloid nucleus. If we compare our results with the results of the ather researchers we can conclude that all pyramidal NPY immunoreactive neurons found in this human amygdaloid nucleus belong to the class I of neurons, and that all nonpyramidal NPY immunoreactive neurons belong to the class II of neurons described by other researchers. We suppose that all found pyramidal neurons were projectional.

  13. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the guinea-pig liver: distribution and colocalization with neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide.

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    Esteban, F J; Jiménez, A; Fernández, A P; del Moral, M L; Sánchez-López, A M; Hernández, R; Garrosa, M; Pedrosa, J A; Rodrigo, J; Peinado, M A

    2001-12-01

    The innervation pattern of the guinea-pig liver is similar to that of the human liver. However, many aspects of the distribution of the neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the guinea-pig liver and its colocalization with neuropeptides remain to be elucidated. The distribution of nNOS was studied in fixed guinea-pig liver by light microscopic immunohistochemistry. Confocal analysis was used to determine its colocalization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). nNOS-immunoreactive (nNOS-IR) nerves were observed in relation to hilar and interlobar vessels and in Glisson's capsule. A few nNOS-IR ganglia were observed in the extrahepatic bile duct and close to the interlobar portal triads. In addition, nNOS-IR fibers were located in the interlobular portal triads and pervading the parenchyma. Moreover, nNOS-IR nerves were demonstrated for the first time in the larger central veins and in the hepatic vein. nNOS-NPY and nNOS-CGRP colocalizations were detected in the fibromuscular layer of the bile duct and periductal plexus, respectively. These results support the phylogenetic conservation of the nNOS-IR hepatic innervation and its possible contribution to the regulation of hepatic blood flow and certain hepatic functions.

  14. Distribution of neuropeptide FF-like immunoreactivity in the brain of the lizard Gekko gecko and its relation to catecholaminergic structures.

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    Smeets, Wilhelmus J A J; López, Jesús M; González, Agustín

    2006-09-01

    The present study provides a detailed description of the distribution of neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like immunoreactivity in the brain of the lizard Gekko gecko. NPFF is found to be involved in nociception, cardiovascular regulation, and endocrine function. Because of its known relationship with catecholamines in mammals, double staining with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) antibodies was used to corroborate this for reptiles. The present study revealed that NPFF-like-immunoreactive (NPFF-ir) cells and fibers were widely distributed throughout the brain. Major NPFF-ir cell groups were observed in the diagonal band nucleus of Broca, hypothalamus, and dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Additional cells were found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral and dorsal cortices, dorsolateral septum, and diencephalic intergeniculate leaflet formation. Dense plexuses of NPFF-ir fibers were identified in the diagonal band nucleus of Broca, septum, preoptic and hypothalamic areas, isthmic region, ventrolateral tegmentum, solitary tract nucleus, and dorsolateral funiculus of the spinal cord. Extensive fiber staining also occurred in the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain tectum. Although an intimate relationship between NPFF-ir and TH-ir structures was obvious at many places in the brain, colocalization of these two substances was not observed. In conclusion, the distribution of NPFF in the brain of Gekko shares more features with anamniotes in terms of number of cell groups, more elaborate networks of fibers, and lack of colocalization with catecholamines than with mammals, suggesting a decrease in the distribution of this peptide in the latter vertebrate group.

  15. Prolonged induction of c-fos in neuropeptide Y- and somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons of the rat dentate gyrus after electroconvulsive stimulation

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    Woldbye, D P; Greisen, M H; Bolwig, T G

    1996-01-01

    Induction of c-fos mRNA and Fos was studied in the hilus and granular layer of the dentate gyrus at various times up to 24 h after single electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. In both areas of the dentate gyrus, a prominent induction of c-fos m....... The Fos-immunoreactive NPY or SS neurons only amounted to about 50% of the total hilar population of NPY or SS neurons. The present observations suggest that a subpopulation of hilar NPY and SS neurons may be central to the actions of electroconvulsive seizures in the dentate gyrus....

  16. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIV

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    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  17. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XV

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    This publication represents an introduction to the fifteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  18. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  19. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    This publication represents an introduction to the sixteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  20. Neuropeptide Y activates urocortin 1 neurons in the nonpreganglionic Edinger-Westphal nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaszner, B.; Korosi, A.; Palkovits, M.; Roubos, E.W.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2007-01-01

    Central regulatory pathways promoting stress adaptation utilize various neurotransmitters/neuropeptides, such as urocortin 1 (Ucn1) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Ucn1 is abundantly expressed in the nonpreganglionic Edinger-Westphal nucleus (npEW), where it is codistributed with NPY-immunoreactive (ir) t

  1. Neuropeptide Y immunohistochemistry and ultrastructure of developing chromaffin tissue in the cloudy dogfish, Scyliorhinus torazame (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii).

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    Chiba, A

    2001-02-01

    Ontogenetic changes in neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) were studied in chromaffin tissue of the cloudy dogfish, Scyliorhinus torazame. In adults and post-hatching juveniles, NPY-LI was demonstrated in chromaffin cells, but not in ganglion cells and supporting cells. Immunoreactive fibers were also found in the axillary body (the major chromaffin tissue) of the adult fish. During the embryonic period, NPY-LI was found at first in chromaffin tissue in the 34-mm stage. In this stage, cells in the periphery of the tissue were positive for NPY. Afterwards, changes were not observed in the topography and relative dominance of labelled cells in the tissue. Transmission electron microscopy of chromaffin tissue of the 26-mm stage showed an early phase of histogenesis in rudimental cell clusters composed of agranular cells and a few granular cells, i.e. pheochromoblasts. In the 43-mm stage, differentiation of the chromaffin tissue enabled ultrastructural classification of adrenalin-producing cells, noradrenalin-producing cells, ganglion cells, supporting cells, and unmyelinated nerve fibers. These results suggest that in the dogfish the appearance of NPY-LI in the developing sympathoadrenal system is related to differentiation of chromaffin cells.

  2. Neuropeptides in flatworms.

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    Gustafsson, M K S; Halton, D W; Kreshchenko, N D; Movsessian, S O; Raikova, O I; Reuter, M; Terenina, N B

    2002-11-01

    The use of well-characterized antibodies raised to neuronal signal substances and their application through immunocytochemistry and confocal scanning laser microscopy has revolutionized studies of the flatworm nervous system (NS). Data about flatworm neuropeptides and the spatial relationship between neuropeptides and other neuronal signal substances and muscle fibers are presented. Neuropeptides form a large part of the flatworm NS. Neuropeptides are especially important as myoexcitatory transmitters or modulators, controlling the musculature of the attachment organs, the stomatogastric and the reproductive systems.

  3. [Physiology of the neuropeptides].

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    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez- Expósito, M J

    In the present review, the characteristics of mammalian neuropeptides have been studied. Neuropeptides are widely distributed not only in the nervous system but also in the periphery. They are synthesised by neurons as large precursor molecules (pre propeptides) which have to be cleaved and modified in order to form the mature neuropeptides. Neuropeptides may exert actions as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and/or neurohormones. In the neurons, they coexist with classic transmitters and often with other peptides. After their releasing, they bind to especific receptors to exert their action in the target cell. Most of these receptors belongs to a family of G protein coupled receptors. Finally, peptidases are the enzymes involved in the degradation of neuropeptides. Conclusions. In the last years, the number of known neuropeptides and the understanding of their functions have been increased. With these data, present investigations are looking for the treatment of different pathologies associated with alterations in the physiology of neuropeptides.

  4. Effects of gentamicin on guinea pig vestibular ganglion function and on substance P and neuropeptide Y.

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    Lin, Chi-Te; Young, Yi-Ho; Cheng, Po-Wen; Lue, June-Horng

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that following intratympanic gentamicin application in the guinea pigs, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were absent regardless of stimulation mode using either air-conducted sound (ACS) stimuli or galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS). Ultrastructurally, both type I hair cells and their calyx terminals were distorted in the saccular macula. However, little is known about the toxic effects of gentamicin on the vestibular ganglion (VG). In this study, absent ACS- and GVS-VEMPs were noted in all the gentamicin-treated ears (100%), which were confirmed by the substantial loss of sensory hair cells in the saccular macula. Moreover, dramatic up-regulation of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) expression was detected in the ipsilateral VG neurons. The mean percentage of substance P-like immunoreactive (SP-LI) neurons in the treated VG (81.8±1.9%) was significantly higher than that in the control VG (68.6±3.3%). Conversely, the mean percentage of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive (NPY-LI) neurons in the treated VG (13.7±3.8%) was dramatically lower than that in the control VG (49.0±3.8%). Double labeling results shown 82% of SP-LI and 16% of NPY-LI neurons coexpressed with GAP-43, suggested that SP accumulating coincided with NPY decreasing in regenerating VG neurons after gentamicin treatment. Overall, the changes in SP and NPY expression in VG neurons after gentamicin treatment were like to those in the superior cervical ganglion following sympathectomy.

  5. Neuropeptides, Microbiota, and Behavior.

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    Holzer, P

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota and the brain interact with each other through multiple bidirectional signaling pathways in which neuropeptides and neuroactive peptide messengers play potentially important mediator roles. Currently, six particular modes of a neuropeptide link are emerging. (i) Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters contribute to the mutual microbiota-host interaction. (ii) The synthesis of neuroactive peptides is influenced by microbial control of the availability of amino acids. (iii) The activity of neuropeptides is tempered by microbiota-dependent autoantibodies. (iv) Peptide signaling between periphery and brain is modified by a regulatory action of the gut microbiota on the blood-brain barrier. (v) Within the brain, gut hormones released under the influence of the gut microbiota turn into neuropeptides that regulate multiple aspects of brain activity. (vi) Cerebral neuropeptides participate in the molecular, behavioral, and autonomic alterations which the brain undergoes in response to signals from the gut microbiota. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuropeptides in epilepsy.

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    Kovac, Stjepana; Walker, Matthew C

    2013-12-01

    Neuropeptides play an important role in modulating seizures and epilepsy. Unlike neurotransmitters which operate on a millisecond time-scale, neuropeptides have longer half lives; this leads to modulation of neuronal and network activity over prolonged periods, so contributing to setting the seizure threshold. Most neuropeptides are stored in large dense vesicles and co-localize with inhibitory interneurons. They are released upon high frequency stimulation making them attractive targets for modulation of seizures, during which high frequency discharges occur. Numerous neuropeptides have been implicated in epilepsy; one, ACTH, is already used in clinical practice to suppress seizures. Here, we concentrate on neuropeptides that have a direct effect on seizures, and for which therapeutic interventions are being developed. We have thus reviewed the abundant reports that support a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY), galanin, ghrelin, somatostatin and dynorphin in suppressing seizures and epileptogenesis, and for tachykinins having pro-epileptic effects. Most in vitro and in vivo studies are performed in hippocampal tissue in which receptor expression is usually high, making translation to other brain areas less clear. We highlight recent therapeutic strategies to treat epilepsy with neuropeptides, which are based on viral vector technology, and outline how such interventions need to be refined in order to address human disease.

  7. Neuropeptides and hippocampal neurogenesis.

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    Zaben, M J; Gray, W P

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is important for modulating the behavioural responses to stress and for certain forms of learning and memory. The mechanisms underlying the necessary coupling of neuronal activity to neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) function remain poorly understood. Within the dentate subgranular stem cell niche, local interneurons appear to play an important part in this excitation-neurogenesis coupling via GABAergic transmission, which promotes neuronal differentiation and integration. Neuropeptides such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and galanin have emerged as important mediators for signalling local and extrinsic interneuronal activity to subgranular zone precursors. Here we review the distribution of these neuropeptides and their receptors in the neurogenic area of the hippocampus and their precise effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. We also discuss neuropeptides' potential involvement in functional aspects of hippocampal neurogenesis particularly their involvement in the modulation of learning and memory and behavior responses.

  8. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

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    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  9. Cloning, expression and processing of the CP2 neuropeptide precursor of Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilim, F S; Alexeeva, V; Moroz, L L; Li, L; Moroz, T P; Sweedler, J V; Weiss, K R

    2001-12-01

    The cDNA sequence encoding the CP2 neuropeptide precursor is identified and encodes a single copy of the neuropeptide that is flanked by appropriate processing sites. The distribution of the CP2 precursor mRNA is described and matches the CP2-like immunoreactivity described previously. Single cell RT-PCR independently confirms the presence of CP2 precursor mRNA in selected neurons. MALDI-TOF MS is used to identify additional peptides derived from the CP2 precursor in neuronal somata and nerves, suggesting that the CP2 precursor may give rise to additional bioactive neuropeptides.

  10. Neuropeptide Y in the Adult and Fetal Human Pineal Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Møller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  11. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  12. Penultimate proline in neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Matthew S; Bellinger, Earl P; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E

    2015-08-18

    A recent ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) study revealed that tryptic peptide ions containing a proline residue at the second position from the N-terminus (i.e., penultimate proline) frequently adopt multiple conformations, owing to the cis-trans isomerization of Xaa(1)-Pro(2) peptide bonds [J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 26, 444]. Here, we present a statistical analysis of a neuropeptide database that illustrates penultimate proline residues are frequently found in neuropeptides. In order to probe the effect of penultimate proline on neuropeptide conformations, IMS-MS experiments were performed on two model peptides in which penultimate proline residues were known to be important for biological activity: the N-terminal region of human neuropeptide Y (NPY1-9, Tyr(1)-Pro(2)-Ser(3)-Lys(4)-Pro(5)-Asp(6)-Asn(7)-Pro(8)-Gly(9)-NH2) and a tachykinin-related peptide (CabTRP Ia, Ala(1)-Pro(2)-Ser(3)-Gly(4)-Phe(5)-Leu(6)-Gly(7)-Met(8)-Arg(9)-NH2). From these studies, it appears that penultimate prolines allow neuropeptides to populate multiple conformations arising from the cis-trans isomerization of Xaa(1)-Pro(2) peptide bonds. Although it is commonly proposed that the role of penultimate proline residues is to protect peptides from enzymatic degradation, the present results indicate that penultimate proline residues also are an important means of increasing the conformational heterogeneity of neuropeptides.

  13. Migraine and neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajti, János; Szok, Délia; Majláth, Zsófia; Tuka, Bernadett; Csáti, Anett; Vécsei, László

    2015-08-01

    Migraine is a common disabling neurovascular primary headache disorder. The pathomechanism is not clear, but extensive preclinical and clinical studies are ongoing. The structural basis of the leading hypothesis is the trigeminovascular system, which includes the trigeminal ganglion, the meningeal vasculature, and the distinct nuclei of the brainstem, the thalamus and the somatosensory cortex. This review covers the effects of sensory (calcitonin gene-related peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and substance P), sympathetic (neuropeptide Y) and parasympathetic (vasoactive intestinal peptide) migraine-related neuropeptides and the functions of somatostatin, nociceptin and the orexins in the trigeminovascular system. These neuropeptides may take part in neurogenic inflammation (plasma protein extravasation and vasodilatation) of the intracranial vasculature and peripheral and central sensitization of the trigeminal system. The results of human clinical studies are discussed with regard to the alterations in these neuropeptides in the plasma, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid during or between migraine attacks, and the therapeutic possibilities involving migraine-related neuropeptides in the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine headache are surveyed.

  14. Neuropeptides in cnidarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J.P.; Williamson, Michael; Hansen, Georg Nørgaard

    2002-01-01

    Cnidarians are the lowest animal group having a nervous system. In the primitive nervous systems of cnidarians, peptides play important roles as neurotransmitters or neurohormones. So far, we have isolated and sequenced about 35 neuropeptides from different cnidarian classes (Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa,...

  15. Neuropeptides in cardiovascular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1984-12-01

    Neuropeptides can affect cardiovascular function in various ways. They can serve as cotransmitters in the autonomic nervous system; for example, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is released with acetylcholine and neuropeptide Y with norepinephrine from postganglionic neurons. Substance P and, presumably, other peptides can can affect cardiovascular function when released near blood vessels by antidromically conducted impulses in branches of stimulated sensory neurons. In the central nervous system, many different neuropeptides appear to function as transmitters or contransmittes in the neural pathways that regulate the cardiovascular system. In addition neuropeptides such as vasopressin and angiotensin II also circulate as hormones that are involved in cardiovascular control. Large doses of exogenous vasopressin are required to increase blood pressure in normal animals because the increase in total peripheral resistance produced by the hormones is accompanied by a decrease in cardiac output. However, studies with synthetic peptides that selectively antagonize the vasopressor action of vasopressin indicate that circulating vasopressin is important in maintaining blood pressure when animals are hypovolemic due to dehydration, haemorrhage or adrenocortical insufficiency. VIP dilates blood vessels and stimulates renin secretion by a direct action on the juxtaglomerular cells. Renin secretion is stimulated when the concentration of VIP in plasma exceeds 75 pmol/litre, and higher values are seen in a number of conditions. Neostigmine, a drug which increases the secretion of endogenous VIP, also increases renin secretion, and this increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Thus, VIP may be a physiologically significant renin stimulating hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Coexistence of neuropeptides in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1983-01-01

    Using a technique for simultaneous visualisation of two antigens in one section, oxytocin-like immunoreactivity has been found to coexist with bombesin-like immunoreactivity in neurons of the basal disk, gastric region and tentacles of hydra. Neurons with oxytocin-like immunoreactivity in peduncle...... and hypostome, on the other hand, have little or no bombesin-like material. Oxytocin-like immunoreactivity never coexists with FMRFamide-immunoreactivity. The neurons with oxytocin- and FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity, however, are often found to be closely intermingled. The results show that coexistence...

  17. Orphan neuropeptides. Novel neuropeptides modulating sleep or feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shinjae; Civelli, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Neuropeptides form the largest family of modulators of synaptic transmission. Until 1995 some 60 different neuropeptides had been found. With the recognition that all neuropeptides act by binding to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a new approach relying on the use of orphan GPCRs as targets was designed to identify novel neuropeptides. Thirteen new neuropeptide families have since been discovered. In this review we will describe the orphan GPCR-based approach that led to these discoveries and present its impact on two specific physiological responses, feeding and sleep. In particular, we will discuss the modulatory roles of the hypocretins/orexins and of neuropeptide S in sleep and awakening and those of ghrelin and melanin concentrating hormone in food intake.

  18. Role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova; Kruzliak, Peter; Rabkin, Simon W

    2014-11-01

    The role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathy-associated heart failure has been garnering more attention. Several neuropeptides--Neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and their receptors have been studied in the various types of cardiomyopathies. The data indicate associations with the strength of the association varying depending on the kind of neuropeptide and the nature of the cardiomyopathy--diabetic, ischemic, inflammatory, stress-induced or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Several neuropeptides appear to alter regulation of genes involved in heart failure. Demonstration of an association is an essential first step in proving causality or establishing a role for a factor in a disease. Understanding the complexity of neuropeptide function should be helpful in establishing new or optimal therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure in cardiomyopathies.

  19. Mapping of alpha-neo-endorphin- and neurokinin B-immunoreactivity in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Ewing; Mangas, Arturo; Salinas, Pablo; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Narváez, José Angel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the distribution of alpha-neo-endorphin- or neurokinin B-immunoreactive fibres and cell bodies in the adult human brainstem with no prior history of neurological or psychiatric disease. A low density of alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive cell bodies was only observed in the medullary central gray matter and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (gelatinosa part). Alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive fibres were moderately distributed throughout the human brainstem. A high density of alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive fibres was found only in the solitary nucleus (caudal part), in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (caudal part), and in the gelatinosa part of the latter nucleus. Neurokinin B-immunoreactive cell bodies (low density) were found in the periventricular central gray matter, the reticular formation of the pons and in the superior colliculus. The distribution of the neurokinin-immunoreactive fibres was restricted. In general, for both neuropeptides the density of the immunoreactive fibres was low. In the human brainstem, the proenkephalin system was more widely distributed than the prodynorphin system, and the preprotachykinin A system (neurokinin A) was more widely distributed than the preprotachykinin B system (neurokinin B).

  20. NPY and VGF Immunoreactivity Increased in the Arcuate Nucleus, but Decreased in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of Type-II Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Saderi; Roberto Salgado-Delgado; Rafael Avendaño-Pradel; Maria del Carmen Basualdo; Gian-Luca Ferri; Laura Chávez-Macías; Juan E Olvera Roblera; Carolina Escobar; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase i...

  1. Neuropeptides in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholis

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system, the immune system, and the cutaneous system are not independent systems, but are closely associated and use the same language of cytokines and neurotransmitters. Atopic dermatitis (AD is exacerbated by several factors, such as emotional stress, scratching and sweating. This review presents the role of neuropeptides (NP in AD. In AD, abnormalities occur in distribution of some types of neural filaments and in the associated active NP. Nerve fibre increases. Nerve fibres for substance-P (SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP are positive, The cutaneous concentration of SP decreases while vasoactive-intestinal polypeptide (VIP increases. Immunohistochemical examination has revealed neuropeptide-Y (NPY-positive dendritic epidermal cells in AD lesions but no somatostatin (SOM fibres. Neuromediators modulate functions of all cutaneous cellular types, which are all part of the neuroimmunocutaneous system (NCIS: endothelial cells, glandular cells, fibroblasts, epidermal cells and immune cells. Conclusion: during the course of AD, the NICS is destabilized. Evidence show that NP can also be responsible for the induction and maintenance of the cutaneous inflammation process and confirm an involvement in the pathogenesis of AD. Release of the NP by cutaneous nerve potentially explains the role of emotional stress, scratching and sweating in exacerbation of AD. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 197-200Keywords : neuroimmunocutaneous system, neurotransmitter, neurogenic inflammation

  2. RIC-7 promotes neuropeptide secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingsong Hao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides is mediated by exocytosis of distinct secretory organelles, synaptic vesicles (SVs and dense core vesicles (DCVs respectively. Relatively little is known about factors that differentially regulate SV and DCV secretion. Here we identify a novel protein RIC-7 that is required for neuropeptide secretion in Caenorhabditis elegans. The RIC-7 protein is expressed in all neurons and is localized to presynaptic terminals. Imaging, electrophysiology, and behavioral analysis of ric-7 mutants indicates that acetylcholine release occurs normally, while neuropeptide release is significantly decreased. These results suggest that RIC-7 promotes DCV-mediated secretion.

  3. Neuropeptides and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, B

    2000-10-01

    This review focuses on the expression, content, and release of neuropeptides and on their role in the development of obesity in animal models with single-gene mutations. The balance between neuropeptides that contribute to the control of feeding behavior is profoundly and variously altered in these models, supporting the concept of the existence of several types of obesity. The hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) systems are the networks most studied in relation to energy intake. Both receive information about the nutritional status and the level of energy storage through insulin and leptin signaling mediated by specific receptors located on POMC and NPY neurons present predominantly in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). When leptin signaling is defective, through a defect in either the receptor (Zucker fa/fa rat, cp/cp rat, and db/db mouse) or in the peptide itself (ob/ob mouse), the NPY system is upregulated as shown by mRNA overexpression and increased peptide release, whereas the content and/or release of some inhibitory peptides (neurotensin, cholecystokinin) are diminished. For the POMC system, there is a complex interaction between the tonic inhibition of food intake exerted by alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and the Agouti-related protein at the level of the type 4 melanocortin receptor. The latter peptide is coexpressed with NPY in the ARC. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the link between food intake and environmental factors. It not only inhibits food intake and prevents weight gain, likely through hypothalamic effects, but also activates the hypothalamo-pituitary axis and therefore contributes to energy storage in adipose tissue. The factors that prod the CRF system toward the hypothalamic or hypothalamo-pituitary axis system remain to be more clearly defined (comodulators, connections between limbic system and ARC, cellular location, and type of receptors, etc. ). The pathways used by all of these

  4. BDNF and NT-4 differentiate two pathways in the modulation of neuropeptide protein levels in postnatal hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, S; Onténiente, B

    1999-05-01

    Neuropeptide protein levels in hippocampal interneurons exhibit a considerable maturation in postnatal animals. This study characterizes the role of neuronal activity in determining neuropeptide protein levels in postnatal hippocampal interneurons, and the involvement of neurotrophins. In hippocampal slices from 7-day-old rats cultured for 2 weeks, treatment with the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor antagonist bicuculline increased the staining intensity and the number of neurons immunoreactive for neuropeptide Y (NPY). An opposite effect was observed when non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (non-NMDA) excitatory transmission was blocked. The effects of either treatment were reversed after return to control medium. These findings were similar to those previously obtained on the effects of activity on somatostatin immunostaining. Blockade of endogenous tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptors using K252a prevented the effects of bicuculline on NPY- and somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons. Application of exogenous neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) increased NPY and somatostatin protein levels in long-term but not short-term cultures, while nerve growth factor (NGF) had no effect. In contrast, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) did not affect equally NPY and somatostatin immunoreactivity: they mimicked the effects of bicuculline treatment on NPY-immunoreactive neurons, but exerted no conspicuous effect on somatostatin immunostaining. These results indicate that although neuronal activity plays a major role in determining neuropeptide protein levels in postnatal hippocampal interneurons, its effects on different neuropeptides might be exerted through different mechanisms, with or without the mediation of BDNF or NT-4.

  5. [Urinary albumin fragmentation and immunoreactivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Yuriko; Nishimaki, Junichi; Nakajima, Toshie; Ida, Takashi; Shiba, Kiyoko

    2009-02-01

    Urinary albumin (ALB) has been measured as a marker for the early detection of diabetic nephropathy. In 2004, Comper et al. developed a gel-filtration high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the determination of urinary ALB. They demonstrated the presence in its albumin fraction of non immunoreactive ALB with the total molecular weight of a monomeric ALB that was non-reactive with the existing anti-ALB antibody, and reported that the level of urinary non-immunoreactive ALB was higher in diabetic patients than in normal subjects. In this study, we isolated urinary ALB from diabetic patients using an anti-ALB antibody-coupled affinity column to test its immunoreactivity. In some diabetic patients, the results of HPLC and turbidimetric immunoassay for urinary ALB were discrepant. Western blot analysis showed that ALB samples from such patients were contaminated with proteins other than ALB, and contained ALB, whose molecular weight became lower using a reductive procedure. In addition, the reactivity of ALB with anti-ALB antibody differed depending on whether it was in a reduced or non-reduced state. These results indicate that ALB in such patients is susceptible to structural changes due to disease-induced urinary factors and, thus, their urine contains ALB with an altered reactivity to antibody.

  6. Localisation of the neuropeptide PACAP and its receptors in the rat parathyroid and thyroid glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-01-01

    PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide) is widely distributed neuropeptide acting via three subtypes of receptors, PAC(1), VPAC(1) and VPAC(2). Here we examined the localisation and nature of PACAP-immunoreactive nerves in the rat thyroid and parathyroid glands and defined...... the distribution of PAC(1), VPAC(1) and VPAC(2) receptor mRNA's. In the parathyroid gland a large number of nerve fibres displaying PACAP-immunoreactivity were distributed beneath the capsule, around blood vessels and close to glandular cells. Most of the PACAP-nerves were sensory, since they co-stored CGRP...... (calcitonin-gene-related peptide) and were sensitive to capsaicin-treatment. mRNA's for PAC(1) and VPAC(2) receptors occurred in the parathyroid gland, mainly located in the glandular cells. In the thyroid gland PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibres were associated with blood vessels, thyroid follicles...

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of neuropeptide Y, serotonin, substance P and β-endorphin in optic ganglia and brain of Metapenaeus ensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Haihui; Wang, Guizhong; Jin, Zhuxing; Huang, Huiyang; Li, Shaojing

    2006-12-01

    By using immunocytochemistry method of Strept Avidin-Biotin-Complex, four kinds of antisera raised against rabbits were applied to observe the immunoreactive neurons and neuropils of serotonin (5-HT), neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP) and β-Endorphin (β-Ep) in optic ganglia and brain of Metapenaeus ensis. The results showed that, the 5-HT-immunoreactive cells were located in all the four neuropils of optic ganglia. Immunoreactivity of 5-HT was detected in anterior medial protocerebrum neuropils (AMPN), and the inner and outer lateral beside olfactory lobe (OL) of deutocerebrum. The presence of NPY-immunoreactive cells was found in all the four neuropils of the optic ganglia. NPY-immunoreactivity occurred in the anterior median cell cluster, lateral cell cluster of protocerebrum, and cell cluster beside OL and AMPN. SP-immunoreactivity was found in medulla terminalis (MT) of optic ganglia, and lateral cell cluster of protocerebrum and posterior lateral cell cluster of tritocerebrum. β-Ep-immunoreactive cells were in MT only. In conclusion, these specific distribution patterns of the four immunoreactive substances can be used as morphological clues for understanding their different neurophysiological functions.

  8. Decreased orexin (hypocretin) immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus and pontine nuclei in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Waters, Karen A; Rodriguez, Michael L; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Infants at risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been shown to have dysfunctional sleep and poor arousal thresholds. In animal studies, both these attributes have been linked to impaired signalling of the neuropeptide orexin. This study examined the immunoreactivity of orexin (OxA and OxB) in the tuberal hypothalamus (n = 27) and the pons (n = 15) of infants (1-10 months) who died from SIDS compared to age-matched non-SIDS infants. The percentage of orexin immunoreactive neurons and the total number of neurons were quantified in the dorsomedial, perifornical and lateral hypothalamus at three levels of the tuberal hypothalamus. In the pons, the area of orexin immunoreactive fibres were quantified in the locus coeruleus (LC), dorsal raphe (DR), laterodorsal tegmental (LDT), medial parabrachial, dorsal tegmental (DTg) and pontine nuclei (Pn) using automated methods. OxA and OxB were co-expressed in all hypothalamic and pontine nuclei examined. In SIDS infants, orexin immunoreactivity was decreased by up to 21 % within each of the three levels of the hypothalamus compared to non-SIDS (p ≤ 0.050). In the pons, a 40-50 % decrease in OxA occurred in the all pontine nuclei, while a similar decrease in OxB immunoreactivity was observed in the LC, LDT, DTg and Pn (p ≤ 0.025). No correlations were found between the decreased orexin immunoreactivity and previously identified risk factors for SIDS, including prone sleeping position and cigarette smoke exposure. This finding of reduced orexin immunoreactivity in SIDS infants may be associated with sleep dysfunction and impaired arousal.

  9. Neuropeptides as therapeutic targets in anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, En-Ju D

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the classical neurotransmitters, neuropeptides represent an important class of modulators for affective behaviors and associated disorders, such as anxiety disorders. Many neuropeptides are abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in emotional processing and anxiety behaviors. Moreover, risk factors for anxiety disorders such as stress modulate the expression of various neuropeptides in the brain. Due to the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and yet limited treatment options, there is a clear need for more effective therapeutics. In this regard, the various neuropeptides represent exciting candidates for new therapeutic designs. In this review, I will provide an up-to-date summary on the evidences for the involvement of seven neuropeptides in anxiety: corticotropin-releasing factor, urocortins, vasopressin, oxytocin, substance P, neuropeptide Y and galanin. This review will cover the behavioral effects of these neuropeptides in animal models of anxiety by both genetic and pharmacological manipulations. Human studies indicating a role for these neuropeptides in anxiety disorders will also be discussed.

  10. Immunohistochemical evidence for the presence of a Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide, Neuropeptide Y, and Substance P, in rat adrenal cortex after acute heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović-Kosanović Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP, Neuropeptide Y (NPY, and the absence of Substance P (SP immunoreactivity in the rat adrenal cortex. VIP- and NPY-immunoreactivity were detected in nerve fibers around the small blood vessels projecting into the capsule and cortical zones surrounding blood vessels and cortical cells. After acute heat stress, VIP- and NPY-immunoreactivities in the nerve fibers were reduced, probably as a result of the release of these peptides. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173023

  11. Neuropeptide signalling systems in flatworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, P; Kimber, M J; Novozhilova, E; Day, T A

    2005-01-01

    Two distinct families of neuropeptides are known to endow platyhelminth nervous systems - the FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) and the neuropeptide Fs (NPFs). Flatworm FLPs are structurally simple, each 4-6 amino acids in length with a carboxy terminal aromatic-hydrophobic-Arg-Phe-amide motif. Thus far, four distinct flatworm FLPs have been characterized, with only one of these from a parasite. They have a widespread distribution within the central and peripheral nervous system of every flatworm examined, including neurones serving the attachment organs, the somatic musculature and the reproductive system. The only physiological role that has been identified for flatworm FLPs is myoexcitation. Flatworm NPFs are believed to be invertebrate homologues of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of peptides. Flatworm NPFs are 36-39 amino acids in length and are characterized by a caboxy terminal GRPRFamide signature and conserved tyrosine residues at positions 10 and 17 from the carboxy terminal. Like FLPs, NPF occurs throughout flatworm nervous systems, although less is known about its biological role. While there is some evidence for a myoexcitatory action in cestodes and flukes, more compelling physiological data indicate that flatworm NPF inhibits cAMP levels in a manner that is characteristic of NPY action in vertebrates. The widespread expression of these neuropeptides in flatworm parasites highlights the potential of these signalling systems to yield new targets for novel anthelmintics. Although platyhelminth FLP and NPF receptors await identification, other molecules that play pivotal roles in neuropeptide signalling have been uncovered. These enzymes, involved in the biosynthesis and processing of flatworm neuropeptides, have recently been described and offer other distinct and attractive targets for therapeutic interference.

  12. Mapping of neurons in the central nervous system of the guinea pig by use of antisera specific to the molluscan neuropeptide FMRFamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triepel, J; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1984-01-01

    Immunoreactive neurons were mapped in the central nervous system of colchicine-treated and untreated guinea pigs with the use of two antisera to the molluscan neuropeptide FMRFamide. These antisera were especially selected for their incapability to react with peptides of the pancreatic polypeptide...

  13. FMRFamide immunoreactivity in the nervous system of the medusa Polyorchis penicillatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Spencer, A N

    1984-01-01

    Three different antisera to the molluscan neuropeptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide (FMRFamide) and two different antisera to the fragment RFamide were used to stain sections or whole mounts of the hydrozoan medusa Polyorchis penicillatus. All antisera stained the same neuronal structures. Strong immuno...... with several antisera to oxytocin/vasopressin and bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide. The morphology and location of most FMRFamide-immunoreactive neurons in Polyorchis coincides with two identified neuronal systems, which have been recently discovered from neurophysiological studies....

  14. Neurones and neuropeptides in coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Ebbesen, Ditte Graff; McFarlane, I D

    1989-01-01

    The first nervous system probably evolved in coelenterates. Many neurons in coelenterates have morphological characteristics of both sensory and motor neurones, and appear to be multifunctional. Using immunocytochemistry with antisera to the sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide), RFamide-like peptides w...... that these neuropeptides play a role in neurotransmission....

  15. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuixing; Rao, Fangwen; Miramontes-Gonzalez, Jose Pablo; Hightower, C. Makena; Vaught, Brian; Chen, Yuhong; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Schork, Andrew J.; Wang, Lei; Mahata, Manjula; Stridsberg, Mats; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Biswas, Nilima; Fung, Maple M.; Waalen, Jill; Middelberg, Rita P.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.; Baker, Dewleen G.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; O’Connor, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to understand whether genetic variation at the Neuropeptide Y (NPY) locus governs secretion and stress responses in vivo as well as NPY gene expression in sympathochromaffin cells. Background The NPY is a potent pressor peptide co-released with catecholamines during stress by sympathetic axons. Genome-wide linkage on NPY secretion identified a LOD (logarithm of the odds ratio) peak spanning the NPY locus on chromosome 7p15. Methods Our approach began with genomics (linkage and polymorphism determination), extended into NPY genetic control of heritable stress traits in twin pairs, established transcriptional mechanisms in transfected chromaffin cells, and concluded with observations on blood pressure (BP) in the population. Results Systematic polymorphism tabulation at NPY (by re-sequencing across the locus: promoter, 4 exons, exon/intron borders, and untranslated regions; on 2n = 160 chromosomes of diverse biogeographic ancestries) identified 16 variants, of which 5 were common. We then studied healthy twin/sibling pairs (n = 399 individuals), typing 6 polymorphisms spanning the locus. Haplotype and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses indicated that proximal promoter variant ∇−880Δ (2-bp TG/—, Ins/Del, rs3037354) minor/Δ allele was associated with several heritable (h2) stress traits: higher NPY secretion (h2 = 73 ± 4%) as well as greater BP response to environmental (cold) stress, and higher basal systemic vascular resistance. Association of ∇−880Δ and plasma NPY was replicated in an independent sample of 361 healthy young men, with consistent allelic effects; genetic variation at NPY also associated with plasma NPY in another independent series of 2,212 individuals derived from Australia twin pairs. Effects of allele −880Δ to increase NPY expression were directionally coordinate in vivo (on human traits) and in cells (transfected NPY promoter/luciferase reporter activity). Promoter −880Δ interrupts a novel

  16. Tissue localization and partial characterization of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide in Achaea janata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Ajitha; D Muraleedharan

    2005-03-01

    Female sex pheromone production in certain moth species have been shown to be regulated by a cephalic endocrine peptidic factor: pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN), having 33 amino acid residues. Antisera against synthetic Heliothis zea-PBAN were developed. Using these polyclonals, immunoreactivity was mapped in the nervous system of Achaea janata. Three distinct groups of immunopositive secretory neurons were identified in the suboesophageal ganglion; and immunoreactivity was observed in the corpora cardiaca, thoracic and in the abdominal ganglia. From about 6000 brain sub-oesophageal ganglion complexes, the neuropeptide was isolated; and purified sequentially by Sep-pak and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatographic methods. Identity of purified PBAN fraction was confirmed with polyclonal antibody by immunoblotting. Molecular mass of the isolated peptide was determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, and was found to be 3900 Da, same as that of known H. zea-PBAN. Radiochemical bioassay confirmed the pheromonotropic effect of the isolated neuropeptide in this insect.

  17. Allatotropin: An Ancestral Myotropic Neuropeptide Involved in Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Adami, Mariana Laura; Diambra, Luis Anibal; Hernandez-Martinez, Salvador; Damborenea, Cristina; Noriega, Fernando Gabriel; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT) is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. Methods A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. Conclusions AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. Significance Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion. PMID:24143240

  18. Allatotropin: an ancestral myotropic neuropeptide involved in feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Alzugaray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. METHODS: A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. SIGNIFICANCE: Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion.

  19. Mast cell subsets and neuropeptides in leprosy reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunohistochemical identification of neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, substance P, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone quantification of mast cells and their subsets (tryptase/chymase-immunoreactive mast cells = TCMC and tryptase-immunoreactive mast cells = TMC were determined in biopsies of six patients with leprosy reactions (three patients with type I reaction and three with type II. Biopsies were compared with those taken from the same body site in the remission stage of the same patient. We found a relative increase of TMC in the inflammatory infiltrate of the reactional biopsies compared to the post-reactional biopsy. Also, the total number of mast cells and the TMC/TCMC ratio in the inflammatory infiltrate was significantly higher than in the intervening dermis of the biopsies of both periods. No significant difference was found regarding neuroptide expression in the reactional and post-reactional biopsies. The relative increase of TMC in the reactional infiltrates could implicate this mast cell subset in the reported increase of the immune response in leprosy reactions.

  20. Daphnia longicephala neuropeptides: morphological description of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and periviscerokinins in the Ctenodaphnia central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Linda C; Laforsch, Christian; Ioannidou, Ioanna; Herbert, Zsofia; Tollrian, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    The publication of the Daphnia genome has driven research in this ecologically relevant model organism in many directions. However, information on this organism's physiology and the relevant controlling factors is limited. In this regard, especially neuropeptides are important biochemical regulators that control a variety of cellular processes, which in combination influence physiological conditions and allow the adaptation of the internal physiological state to external conditions. Thus, neuropeptides are prime in understanding an organism's physiology. We here aimed to detect and describe the distribution of evolutionary conserved neuropeptides including the crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and peptides of the family periviscerokinins (PVKs) in the central nervous system and the periphery of the Daphnia longicephala head region. We were able to identify a large pair of CCAP immunoreactive cells within central nervous system. In addition, in the periphery we found CCAP immunoreactive cells in the epidermis of the head with processes indicating cuticular secretion. Furthermore, we were able to identify and describe a complex neuronal circuit of PVK neuropeptides in the central nervous system. The data obtained in this study will provide important background information for future investigations aiming to unravel the cellular, neuronal and physiological pathways in a highly adaptive organism such as Daphnia.

  1. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Neil D; Wilson, Leonie; Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G; Dalzell, Johnathan J

    2017-02-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars.

  2. Biochemical characterisation and clinical correlation of neuropeptides in neuroblastoma with emphasis on neuropeptide Y

    OpenAIRE

    Bjellerup, Per

    2000-01-01

    Neuropeptides influence cellular events involved in tumour growth and differentiation. Neuroblastoma, a malignant childhood tumour of neural crest origin, synthesises and releases monoamines and neuropeptides. The concentrations of some of these neuropeptides in plasma are correlated to clinical stage and outcome. The neuropeptides exist in various molecular forms in plasma and tumour tissue but their biochemical structure in vivo are poorly investigated. The aim of the ...

  3. Epigenetic control of cancer by neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galoian, Karina; Patel, Parthik

    2017-01-01

    Neuropeptides act as neurohormones, neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators. Neuropeptides maintain physiological homeostasis and are paramount in molecular mechanisms of disease progression and regulation, including in cancer. Neuropeptides, by their definition, originate and are secreted from the neuronal cells, they are able to signal to neighboring cells or are released into the blood flow, if they act as neurohormones. The majority of neuropeptides exert their functions through G protein-coupled receptors, with certain exceptions. Although previous studies indicate that neuropeptides function in supporting proliferation of malignant cells in many types of solid tumor, the antitumorigenic action of the neuropeptides and their receptors, for example, in gastric cancers and chondrosarcoma, were also reported. It is known that epigenetically modified chromatin regulates molecular mechanisms involved in gene expression and malignant progression. The epigenetic modifications are genetically heritable, although they do not cause changes in DNA sequence. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNA expression are subject to those modifications. While there is substantial data on epigenetic regulation of neuropeptides, the epigenetic control of cancer by neuropeptides is considered to be uncharted territory. The aim of the current review is to describe the involvement of neuropeptides in the epigenetic machinery of cancer based on data obtained from our laboratory and from other authors.

  4. Homolateral cerebrocortical changes in neuropeptide and receptor expression after minimal cortical infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bree, L; Zhang, F; Schiffmann, S N; Halleux, P; Mailleux, P; Vanderhaeghen, J J

    1995-12-01

    A cortical infarct of 2 mm diameter was obtained in the parietal cortex after a craniotomy, disruption of the dura mater and topical application of 3 M KCl. It has been shown previously that the presence of a small cortical infarct induces an increase in immediate early gene messenger RNA expression followed by an increase in neuropeptide and glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA expression. Glutamate, acting at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, is held responsible for these changes, since they are blocked by pretreatment with dizocilpine. In the present study, we have analysed the consequences of the dramatic changes in messenger RNA expression on the level of immediate early gene products c-fos and zif 268, and on that of neuropeptides by using immunohistochemistry. After just 1 h, an increase in c-fos- and zif 268-like immunoreactivity is observed in the entire cortical hemisphere homolateral to the infarct, and is no longer detected after 6 h. An increase in cholecystokinin octapeptide-, substance P-, neuropeptide Y- and somatostatin-like immunoreactivity is observed in the entire cortical hemisphere homolateral to the infarct after three days, and is no longer detected after 30 days. To investigate if these dramatic increases in neuropeptide immunoreactivities may have functional consequences, we studied the level of cholecystokinin receptors by autoradiographic binding using [125I]cholecystokinin-8S and in situ hybridization for the detection of cholecystokinin-b receptor messenger RNA. A decrease in cholecystokinin binding sites and cholecystokinin-b receptor messenger RNA is observed in the entire cortical hemisphere homolateral to the infarct after three days, and is no longer detected after nine days. This study shows that a topical stimulation has diffuse effects, reaching regions far from the site of the lesion, and some of them are still strongly present after nine days. The increase in neuropeptide messenger RNAs is followed by an increase in the

  5. Localisation of the neuropeptide PACAP and its receptors in the rat parathyroid and thyroid glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-01-01

    (calcitonin-gene-related peptide) and were sensitive to capsaicin-treatment. mRNA's for PAC(1) and VPAC(2) receptors occurred in the parathyroid gland, mainly located in the glandular cells. In the thyroid gland PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibres were associated with blood vessels, thyroid follicles...... with relation to blood vessels co-stored NPY (neuropeptide Y), whereas only a few fibres co-stored CGRP. PAC(1) and VPAC(1) receptor mRNA's occurred in follicular cells and blood vessels, whereas the expression of the VPAC(2) receptor was low. The findings suggest that PACAP plays a role in the regulation...

  6. [Morphological and laminar distribution of cholecystokinin-immunoreactive neurons in cortex of human inferior parietal lobe and their clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskas, Laslo; Draganić-Gajić, Saveta; Malobabić, Slobodan; Puskas, Nela; Krivokuća, Dragan; Stanković, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Cholecystocinine is a neuropeptide whose function in the cortex has not yet been clarified, although its relation with some psychic disorders has been noticed. Previous studies have not provided detailed data about types, or arrangement of neurons that contain those neuropeptide in the cortex of human inferior parietal lobe. The aim of this study was to examine precisely the morphology and typography of neurons containing cholecytocinine in the human cortex of inferior parietal lobule. There were five human brains on which we did the immunocystochemical research of the shape and laminar distribution of cholecystocinine immunoreactive neurons on serial sections of supramarginal gyrus and angular gyrus. The morphological analysis of cholecystocinine-immunoreactive neurons was done on frozen sections using avidin-biotin technique, by antibody to cholecystocinine diluted in the proportion 1:6000 using diamine-benzedine. Cholecystocinine immunoreactive neurons were found in the first three layers of the cortex of inferior parietal lobule, and their densest concentration was in the 2nd and 3rd layer. The following types of neurons were found: bipolar neurons, then its fusiform subtype, Cajal-Retzius neurons (in the 1st layer), reverse pyramidal (triangular) and unipolar neurons. The diameters of some types of neurons were from 15 to 35 microm, and the diameters of dendritic arborization were from 85-207 microm. A special emphasis is put on the finding of Cajal-Retzius neurons that are immunoreactive to cholecystocinine, which demands further research. Bearing in mind numerous clinical studies pointing out the role of cholecystokinine in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, the presence of a great number of cholecystokinine immunoreactive neurons in the cortex of inferior parietal lobule suggests their role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of neuropeptide Y,serotonin, substance P and β-endorphin in optic ganglia and brain of Metapenaeus ensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Haihui; WANG Guizhong; JIN Zhuxing; HUANG Huiyang; LI Shaojing

    2006-01-01

    s By using immunocytochemistry method of Strept Avidin-Biotin-Complex, four kinds of antisera raised against rabbits were applied to observe the immunoreactive neurons and neuropils of serotonin (5-HT), neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P(SP) and β-Endorphin (β-Ep) in optic ganglia and brain of Metapenaeus ensis. The results showed that, the 5-HT-immunoreactive cells were located in all the four neuropils of optic ganglia. Immunoreactivity of 5-HT was detected in anterior medial protocerebrum neuropils (AMPN), and the inner and outer lateral beside olfactory lobe (OL) of deutocerebrum. The presence of NPY-immunoreactive cells was found in all the four neuropils of the optic ganglia.NPY-immunoreactivity occurred in the anterior median cell cluster, lateral cell cluster of protocerebrum,and cell cluster beside OL and AMPN. SP-immunoreactivity was found in medulla terminalis (MT) of optic ganglia, and lateral cell cluster of protocerebrum and posterior lateral cell cluster of tritocerebrum.β-Ep-immunoreactive cells were in MT only. In conclusion, these specific distribution patterns of the four immunoreactive substances can be used as morphological clues for understanding their different neurophysiological functions.

  8. FMRFamide-Like Immunoreactivity in the Central Nervous System and Alimentary Tract of the Non-Hematophagous Blow Fly, Phormia regina, and the Hematophagous Horse Fly, Tabanus nigrovittatus

    OpenAIRE

    Haselton, Aaron T.; Yin, Chih-Ming; Stoffolano, John G.

    2008-01-01

    FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) are a diverse and physiologically important class of neuropepeptides in the metazoa. In insects, FaRPs function as brain-gut neuropeptides and have been immunolocalized throughout the nervous system and alimentary tract where they have been shown to affect feeding behavior. The occurrence of FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity (FLI) was examined in the central nervous system and alimentary tract of non-hematophagous blow fly, Phormia regina Meigen (Diptera: Call...

  9. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) in the brain of zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata: Organization, interaction with neuropeptide Y, and response to changes in energy status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Omprakash; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Uday; Kumar, Vinod; Lechan, Ronald M; Singru, Praful S

    2016-10-15

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has emerged as a potent anorectic agent. CART is widely distributed in the brain of mammals, amphibians, and teleosts, but the relevant information in avian brain is not available. In birds, CART inhibits food intake, whereas neuropeptide Y (NPY), a well-known orexigenic peptide, stimulates it. How these neuropeptides interact in the brain to regulate energy balance is not known. We studied the distribution of CART-immunoreactivity in the brain of zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, its interaction with NPY, and their response to dynamic energy states. CART-immunoreactive fibers were found in the subpallium, hypothalamus, midbrain, and brainstem. Conspicuous CART-immunoreactive cells were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, hypothalamic paraventricular, supraoptic, dorsomedial, infundibular (IN), lateral hypothalamic, Edinger-Westphal, and parabrachial nuclei. Hypothalamic sections of fed, fasted, and refed animals were immunostained with cFos, NPY, and CART antisera. Fasting dramatically increased cFos- and NPY-immunoreactivity in the IN, followed by rapid reduction by 2 hours and restoration to normal fed levels 6-10 hours after refeeding. CART-immunoreactive fibers in IN showed a significant reduction during fasting and upregulation with refeeding. Within the IN, double immunofluorescence revealed that 94 ± 2.1% of NPY-immunoreactive neurons were contacted by CART-immunoreactive fibers and 96 ± 2.8% NPY-immunoreactive neurons expressed cFos during fasting. Compared to controls, superfused hypothalamic slices of fasted birds treated with CART-peptide showed a significant reduction (P CART in the brain of T. guttata may perform several functions, and has a particularly important role in the hypothalamic regulation of energy homeostasis. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3014-3041, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Antibodies against conserved amidated neuropeptide epitopes enrich the comparative neurobiology toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conzelmann Markus

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal antibodies that show immunoreactivity across a broad range of species are important tools for comparative neuroanatomy. Nonetheless, the current antibody repertoire for non-model invertebrates is limited. Currently, only antibodies against the neuropeptide RFamide and the monoamine transmitter serotonin are extensively used. These antibodies label respective neuron-populations and their axons and dendrites in a large number of species across various animal phyla. Results Several other neuropeptides also have a broad phyletic distribution among invertebrates, including DLamides, FVamides, FLamides, GWamides and RYamides. These neuropeptides show strong conservation of the two carboxy-terminal amino acids and are α-amidated at their C-termini. We generated and affinity-purified specific polyclonal antibodies against each of these conserved amidated dipeptide motifs. We thoroughly tested antibody reactivity and specificity both by peptide pre-incubation experiments and by showing a close correlation between the immunostaining signals and mRNA expression patterns of the respective precursor genes in the annelid Platynereis. We also demonstrated the usefulness of these antibodies by performing immunostainings on a broad range of invertebrate species, including cnidarians, annelids, molluscs, a bryozoan, and a crustacean. In all species, the antibodies label distinct neuronal populations and their axonal projections. In the ciliated larvae of cnidarians, annelids, molluscs and bryozoans, a subset of antibodies reveal peptidergic innervation of locomotor cilia. Conclusions We developed five specific cross-species-reactive antibodies recognizing conserved two-amino-acid amidated neuropeptide epitopes. These antibodies allow specific labelling of peptidergic neurons and their projections in a broad range of invertebrates. Our comparative survey across several marine phyla demonstrates a broad occurrence of peptidergic

  11. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and the regulation of appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptides released by hypothalamic neurons play a major role in the regulation of feeding, acting both within the hypothalamus, and at other appetite regulating centres throughout the brain. Where classical neurotransmitters signal only within synapses, neuropeptides diffuse over greater distances affecting both nearby and distant neurons expressing the relevant receptors, which are often extrasynaptic. As well as triggering a behavioural output, neuropeptides also act as neuromodulators: altering the response of neurons to both neurotransmitters and circulating signals of nutrient status. The mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides with established roles in feeding, including melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the orexins, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), agouti-gene related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y, and oxytocin, are reviewed in this article, with emphasis laid on both their effects on appetite regulating centres throughout the brain, and on examining the evidence for their physiological roles. In addition, evidence for the involvement of several putative appetite regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides is assessed including, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide W and the galanin-like peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central control of Food Intake'.

  12. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor in human dental pulp cells of noncarious and carious teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Karim, I A; Lamey, P-J; Linden, G J; Lundy, F T

    2008-10-01

    To determine the distribution of the NPY Y1 receptor in carious and noncarious human dental pulp tissue using immunohistochemistry. A subsidiary aim was to confirm the presence of the NPY Y1 protein product in membrane fractions of dental pulp tissue from carious and noncarious teeth using western blotting. Twenty two dental pulp samples were collected from carious and noncarious extracted teeth. Ten samples were processed for immunohistochemistry using a specific antibody to the NPY Y1 receptor. Twelve samples were used to obtain membrane extracts which were electrophoresed, blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with NPY Y1 receptor antibody. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance was employed to test for overall statistical differences between NPY Y1 levels in noncarious, moderately carious and grossly carious teeth. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor immunoreactivity was detected on the walls of blood vessels in pulp tissue from noncarious teeth. In carious teeth NPY Y1 immunoreactivity was observed on nerve fibres, blood vessels and inflammatory cells. Western blotting indicated the presence and confirmed the variability of NPY Y1 receptor protein expression in solubilised membrane preparations of human dental pulp tissue from carious and noncarious teeth. Neuropeptide Y Y1 is expressed in human dental pulp tissue with evidence of increased expression in carious compared with noncarious teeth, suggesting a role for NPY Y1 in modulation of caries induced pulpal inflammation.

  13. Brain neuropeptides in gastric mucosal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyires, Klára; Zádori, Zoltán S

    2014-12-01

    The centrally induced gastroprotective effect of neuropeptides has been intensively studied. Besides many similarities, however, differences can also be observed in their gastroprotective actions. The gastroprotective dose-response curve proved to be either sigmoid, or bell-shaped. Additional gastrointestinal effects of neuropeptides can contribute to their mucosal protective effect. Part of the neuropeptides induces gastroprotection by peripheral administration as well. Besides vagal nerve the sympathetic nervous system may also be involved in conveying the central effect to the periphery. Better understanding of the complex mechanism of the maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity may result in the development of new strategy to enhance gastric mucosal resistance against injury.

  14. Neuropeptides in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Eva; Scheich, Bálint; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-12-01

    Dementia conditions and memory deficits of different origins (vascular, metabolic and primary neurodegenerative such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases) are getting more common and greater clinical problems recently in the aging population. Since the presently available cognitive enhancers have very limited therapeutical applications, there is an emerging need to elucidate the complex pathophysiological mechanisms, identify key mediators and novel targets for future drug development. Neuropeptides are widely distributed in brain regions responsible for learning and memory processes with special emphasis on the hippocampus, amygdala and the basal forebrain. They form networks with each other, and also have complex interactions with the cholinergic, glutamatergic, dopaminergic and GABA-ergic pathways. This review summarizes the extensive experimental data in the well-established rat and mouse models, as well as the few clinical results regarding the expression and the roles of the tachykinin system, somatostatin and the closely related cortistatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate-cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), opioid peptides and galanin. Furthermore, the main receptorial targets, mechanisms and interactions are described in order to highlight the possible therapeutical potentials. Agents not only symptomatically improving the functional impairments, but also inhibiting the progression of the neurodegenerative processes would be breakthroughs in this area. The most promising mechanisms determined at the level of exploratory investigations in animal models of cognitive disfunctions are somatostatin sst4, NPY Y2, PACAP-VIP VPAC1, tachykinin NK3 and galanin GALR2 receptor agonisms, as well as delta opioid receptor antagonism. Potent and selective non-peptide ligands with good CNS penetration are needed for further characterization of these molecular pathways to

  15. Signaling by Drosophila capa neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Shireen-A; Cabrero, Pablo; Povsic, Manca; Johnston, Natalie R; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T

    2013-07-01

    The capa peptide family, originally identified in the tobacco hawk moth, Manduca sexta, is now known to be present in many insect families, with increasing publications on capa neuropeptides each year. The physiological actions of capa peptides vary depending on the insect species but capa peptides have key myomodulatory and osmoregulatory functions, depending on insect lifestyle, and life stage. Capa peptide signaling is thus critical for fluid homeostasis and survival, making study of this neuropeptide family attractive for novel routes for insect control. In Dipteran species, including the genetically tractable Drosophila melanogaster, capa peptide action is diuretic; via elevation of nitric oxide, cGMP and calcium in the principal cells of the Malpighian tubules. The identification of the capa receptor (capaR) in several insect species has shown this to be a canonical GPCR. In D. melanogaster, ligand-activated capaR activity occurs in a dose-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-12)M. Lower concentrations of capa peptide do not activate capaR, either in adult or larval Malpighian tubules. Use of transgenic flies in which capaR is knocked-down in only Malpighian tubule principal cells demonstrates that capaR modulates tubule fluid secretion rates and in doing so, sets the organismal response to desiccation. Thus, capa regulates a desiccation-responsive pathway in D. melanogaster, linking its role in osmoregulation and fluid homeostasis to environmental response and survival. The conservation of capa action between some Dipteran species suggests that capa's role in desiccation tolerance may not be confined to D. melanogaster.

  16. Development of neuropeptide Y-mediated heart innervation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masliukov, Petr M; Moiseev, Konstantin; Emanuilov, Andrey I; Anikina, Tatyana A; Zverev, Alexey A; Nozdrachev, Alexandr D

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a trophic role in the nervous and vascular systems and in cardiac hypertrophy. However, there is no report concerning the expression of NPY and its receptors in the heart during postnatal development. In the current study, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis was used to label NPY, and Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R receptors in the heart tissue and intramural cardiac ganglia from rats of different ages (newborn, 10 days old, 20 days old, 30 days old, 60 days old, 1 year old, and 2 years old).The obtained data suggest age-dependent changes of NPY-mediated heart innervation. The density of NPY-immunoreactive (IR) fibers was the least in newborn animals and increased in the first 20 days of life. In the atria of newborn and 10-day-old rats, NPY-IR fibers were more abundant compared with the ventricles. The vast majority of NPY-IR fibers also contained tyrosine hydroxylase, a key enzyme in catecholamine synthesis.The expression of Y1R increased between 10 and 20 days of life. Faint Y2R immunoreactivity was observed in the atria and ventricles of 20-day-old and older rats. In contrast, the highest level of the expression of Y5R was found in newborn pups comparing with more adult rats. All intramural ganglionic neurons were also Y1R-IR and Y5R-IR and Y2R-negative in all studied animals.Thus, the increasing of density of NPY-containing nerve fibers accompanies changes in relation of different subtypes of NPY receptors in the heart during development.

  17. Morphological and laminar distribution of cholescystokinine - immunoreactive neurons in cortex of human inferior parietal lobule and their clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškaš Laslo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cholecystocinine is a neuropeptide whose function in the cortex has not yet been clarified, although its relation with some psychic disorders has been noticed. Previous studies have not provided detailed data about types, or arrangement of neurons that contain those neuropeptide in the cortex of human inferior parietal lobe. The aim of this study was to examine precisely the morphology and typography of neurons containing cholecytocinine in the human cortex of inferior parietal lobule. Material and methods. There were five human brains on which we did the immunocystochemical research of the shape and laminar distribution of cholecystocinine immunoreactive neurons on serial sections of supramarginal gyrus and angular gyrus. The morphological analysis of cholecystocinine-immunoreactive neurons was done on frozen sections using avidin-biotin technique, by antibody to cholecystocinine diluted in the proportion 1:6000 using diamine-benzedine. Results. Cholecystocinine immunorective neurons were found in the first three layers of the cortex of inferior parietal lobule, and their densest concentration was in the 2nd and 3rd layer. The following types of neurons were found: bipolar neurons, then its fusiform subtype, Cajal-Retzius neurons (in the 1st layer, reverse pyramidal (triangular and unipolar neurons. The diameters of some types of neurons were from 15 to 35 µm, and the diameters of dendritic arborization were from 85-207 µm. A special emphasis is put on the finding of Cajal-Retzius neurons that are immunoreactive to cholecystocinine, which demands further research. Conclusion. Bearing in mind numerous clinical studies pointing out the role of cholecystokinine in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, the presence of a great number of cholecystokinine immunoreactive neurons in the cortex of inferior parietal lobule suggests their role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  18. Expression of immunoreactive urocortin in human tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Qing; Vicki L Clifton; CUI Ying; HUI Ning; ZHOU Xiao-ning; HE Qian; HAN Qing-feng; SHA Jin-yan; Roger Smith

    2001-01-01

    To localize where urocortin is expressed in human tissue in an attempt to study its physiological functions. Methods: Expression of immunoreactive urocortin in different human tissue was examined using a specific urocortin antibody and the immunoperoxidase staining method. Results: Immunoreactive urocortin was observed in the anterior pituitary cells, decidual stromal cells, syncytiotrophoblasts, amnion epithelium, the vascular smooth muscles of myometrium, fallopian tube and small intestine. Conclusion: The study indicates that urocortin is expressed in some specific areas of human tissue. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that urocortin is produced locally as an endocrine factor, which may act as a neural regulator and a regulator of local blood flow.

  19. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the amygdala of the pig.

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    Agnieszka Bossowska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and morphology of neurons containing somatostatin (SOM was investigated in the amygdala (CA of the pig. The SOM-immunoreactive (SOM-IR cell bodies and fibres were present in all subdivisions of the porcine CA, however, their number and density varied depending on the nucleus studied. The highest density of SOM-positive somata was observed in the layer III of the cortical nuclei, in the anterior (magnocellular part of the basomedial nucleus and in the caudal (large-celled part of the lateral nucleus. Moderate to high numbers of SOM-IR cells were also observed in the medial and basolateral nuclei. Many labeled neurons were also consistently observed in the lateral part of the central nucleus. In the remaining CA regions, the density of SOM-positive cell bodies varied from moderate to low. In any CA region studied SOM-IR neurons formed heterogeneous population consisting of small, rounded or slightly elongated cell bodies, with a few poorly branched smooth dendrites. In general, morphological features of these cells clearly resembled the non-pyramidal Golgi type II interneurons. The routine double-labeling studies with antisera directed against SOM and neuropeptide Y (NPY demonstrated that a large number of SOM-IR cell bodies and fibers in all studied CA areas contained simultaneously NPY. In contrast, co-localization of SOM and cholecystokinin (CCK or SOM and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP was never seen in cell bodies and fibres in any of nuclei studied. In conclusion, SOM-IR neurons of the porcine amygdala form large and heterogeneous subpopulation of, most probably, interneurons that often contain additionally NPY. On the other hand, CCK- and/or VIP-IR neurons belonged to another, discrete subpopulations of porcine CA neurons.

  20. Identification and quantification of neuropeptides in naïve mouse spinal cord using mass spectrometry reveals [des-Ser1]-cerebellin as a novel modulator of nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie; Sandor, Katalin; Sköld, Karl; Hökfelt, Tomas; Svensson, Camilla I; Kultima, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptide transmitters involved in nociceptive processes are more likely to be expressed in the dorsal than the ventral horn of the spinal cord. This study was designed to examine the relative distribution of neuropeptides between the dorsal and ventral spinal cord in naïve mice using liquid chromatography, high-resolution mass spectrometry. We identified and relatively quantified 36 well-characterized full-length neuropeptides and an additional 168 not previously characterized peptides. By extraction with organic solvents we identified seven additional full-length neuropeptides. The peptide [des-Ser1]-cerebellin (desCER), originating from cerebellin precursor protein 1 (CBLN1), was predominantly expressed in the dorsal horn. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of CBLN1 immunoreactivity with a punctate cytoplasmic pattern in neuronal cell bodies throughout the spinal gray matter. The signal was stronger in the dorsal compared to the ventral horn, with most CBLN1 positive cells present in outer laminae II/III, colocalizing with calbindin, a marker for excitatory interneurons. Intrathecal injection of desCER induced a dose-dependent mechanical hypersensitivity but not heat or cold hypersensitivity. This study provides evidence for involvement of desCER in nociception and provides a platform for continued exploration of involvement of novel neuropeptides in the regulation of nociceptive transmission. Neuropeptides involved in nociceptive processes are more likely to be expressed in the dorsal than the ventral horn of spinal cord. Well-characterized full-length neuropeptides as well as uncharacterized neuropeptides were quantified by mass spectrometry. The CBLN1-derived peptide [des-Ser1]-cerebellin (desCER) is predominantly expressed in the dorsal horn, and intrathecal injection of desCER induced a dose-dependent mechanical hypersensitivity.

  1. Enkephalin levels and the number of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the hippocampus are decreased in female cannabinoid-receptor 1 knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Sophie A; Kempen, Tracey A Van; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2016-05-04

    Drug addiction requires learning and memory processes that are facilitated by activation of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) and opioid receptors in the hippocampus. This involves activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that is partially regulated by endogenous opioid (enkephalin and dynorphin) and non-opioid peptides, specifically cholecystokinin, parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y, the neuropeptides present in inhibitory interneurons that co-express CB1 or selective opioid receptors. We tested the hypothesis that CB1 receptor expression is a determinant of the availability of one or more of these peptide modulators in the hippocampus. This was achieved by quantitatively analyzing the immunoperoxidase labeling for each of these neuropeptide in the dorsal hippocampus of female wild-type (CB1+/+) and cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout (CB1-/-) C57/BL6 mice. The levels of Leu(5)-enkephalin-immunoreactivity were significantly reduced in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and in stratum lucidum of CA3 in CB1-/- mice. Moreover, the numbers of neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate hilus were significantly lower in the CB1-/- compared to wild-type mice. However, CB1+/+ and CB1-/- mice did not significantly differ in expression levels of either dynorphin or cholecystokinin, and showed no differences in numbers of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid and opioid systems have a nuanced, regulatory relationship that could affect the balance of excitation and inhibition in the hippocampus and thus processes such as learning that rely on this balance.

  2. Neuropeptide Receptor Transcriptome Reveals Unidentified Neuroendocrine Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Yamamoto, Sachie; Žitňan, Dušan; Watanabe, Ken; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo; Kaneko, Yu; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT), remain undefined. In this paper, we report the comprehensive cloning of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and systematic analyses of their expression. Based on the expression patterns of orphan receptors, we identified the long-sought receptor for AT, which is thought to stimulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the corpora allata (CA). Surprisingly, however, the AT receptor was not highly expressed in the CA, but instead was predominantly transcribed in the corpora cardiaca (CC), an organ adjacent to the CA. Indeed, by using a reverse-physiological approach, we purified and characterized novel allatoregulatory peptides produced in AT receptor-expressing CC cells, which may indirectly mediate AT activity on the CA. All of the above findings confirm the effectiveness of a systematic analysis of the receptor transcriptome, not only in characterizing orphan receptors, but also in identifying novel players and hidden mechanisms in important biological processes. This work illustrates how using a combinatorial approach employing bioinformatic, molecular, biochemical and physiological methods can help solve recalcitrant problems in neuropeptide research. PMID:18725956

  3. Neuropeptide receptor transcriptome reveals unidentified neuroendocrine pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT, remain undefined. In this paper, we report the comprehensive cloning of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and systematic analyses of their expression. Based on the expression patterns of orphan receptors, we identified the long-sought receptor for AT, which is thought to stimulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the corpora allata (CA. Surprisingly, however, the AT receptor was not highly expressed in the CA, but instead was predominantly transcribed in the corpora cardiaca (CC, an organ adjacent to the CA. Indeed, by using a reverse-physiological approach, we purified and characterized novel allatoregulatory peptides produced in AT receptor-expressing CC cells, which may indirectly mediate AT activity on the CA. All of the above findings confirm the effectiveness of a systematic analysis of the receptor transcriptome, not only in characterizing orphan receptors, but also in identifying novel players and hidden mechanisms in important biological processes. This work illustrates how using a combinatorial approach employing bioinformatic, molecular, biochemical and physiological methods can help solve recalcitrant problems in neuropeptide research.

  4. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  5. Substance P immunoreactivity exhibits frequent colocalization with kisspeptin and neurokinin B in the human infundibular region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hrabovszky

    Full Text Available Neurons synthesizing neurokinin B (NKB and kisspeptin (KP in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus represent important upstream regulators of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurosecretion. In search of neuropeptides co-expressed in analogous neurons of the human infundibular nucleus (Inf, we have carried out immunohistochemical studies of the tachykinin peptide Substance P (SP in autopsy samples from men (21-78 years and postmenopausal (53-83 years women. Significantly higher numbers of SP-immunoreactive (IR neurons and darker labeling were observed in the Inf of postmenopausal women than in age-matched men. Triple-immunofluorescent studies localized SP immunoreactivity to considerable subsets of KP-IR and NKB-IR axons and perikarya in the infundibular region. In postmenopausal women, 25.1% of NKB-IR and 30.6% of KP-IR perikarya contained SP and 16.5% of all immunolabeled cell bodies were triple-labeled. Triple-, double- and single-labeled SP-IR axons innervated densely the portal capillaries of the infundibular stalk. In quadruple-labeled sections, these axons formed occasional contacts with GnRH-IR axons. Presence of SP in NKB and KP neurons increases the functional complexity of the putative pulse generator network. First, it is possible that SP modulates the effects of KP and NKB in axo-somatic and axo-dendritic afferents to GnRH neurons. Intrinsic SP may also affect the activity and/or neuropeptide release of NKB and KP neurons via autocrine/paracrine actions. In the infundibular stalk, SP may influence the KP and NKB secretory output via additional autocrine/paracrine mechanisms or regulate GnRH neurosecretion directly. Finally, possible co-release of SP with KP and NKB into the portal circulation could underlie further actions on adenohypophysial gonadotrophs.

  6. Identification of FXPRLamide Family Neuropeptides from the Japanese Oak Silkworm, Antheraea yamamai Using Immunocytochemistry Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zhao-jun; LAI Juan-hong; ZHAO Yuan

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, zooblooting, ELISA, and whole-mount immunocytochemistry methods were used to identify the FXPRLamide family neuropeptides from the Japanese oak silkworm, Antheraea yamamai. The results showed that the genomic DNA from A. yamamai showed positive bands after being hybridized with the fragment of DH-PBAN cDNA from Samia cynthia ricini, which was labeled with [α-32P]-dCTP. The SG showed highest FXPRLamide peptides titer in neural organs. Using an antiserum against Helicoverpa armigera PBAN, PBAN-like immunoreactivity was detected in the SG and TG of A. yamamai by whole-mount immunocytochemistry, and there were three cluster cells in the SG which shows positive PBAN-like immunoreactivity. The titers of FXPRLamide peptides immunoreactivity in the hemolymph were kept at a steady level. During pupation, the titer was increased promptly, but then decreased to a low level after the early pupal stage. The above-mentioned results demonstrate the existence of FXPRLamide family peptides in A. yamamai, but its function needs to be further investigated in the future.

  7. Neuropeptide Y: A stressful review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Florian; Holzer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Stress is defined as an adverse condition that disturbs the homeostasis of the body and activates adaptation responses. Among the many pathways and mediators involved, neuropeptide Y (NPY) stands out due to its unique stress-relieving, anxiolytic and neuroprotective properties. Stress exposure alters the biosynthesis of NPY in distinct brain regions, the magnitude and direction of this effect varying with the duration and type of stress. NPY is expressed in particular neurons of the brainstem, hypothalamus and limbic system, which explains why NPY has an impact on stress-related changes in emotional-affective behaviour and feeding as well as on stress coping. The biological actions of NPY in mammals are mediated by the Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5 receptors, Y1 receptor stimulation being anxiolytic whereas Y2 receptor activation is anxiogenic. Emerging evidence attributes NPY a role in stress resilience, the ability to cope with stress. Thus there is a negative correlation between stress-induced behavioural disruption and cerebral NPY expression in animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder. Exogenous NPY prevents the negative consequences of stress, and polymorphisms of the NPY gene are predictive of impaired stress processing and increased risk of neuropsychiatric diseases. Stress is also a factor contributing to, and resulting from, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, in which NPY appears to play an important neuroprotective role. This review summarizes the evidence for an implication of NPY in stress-related and neurodegenerative pathologies and addresses the cerebral NPY system as a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-granule PSA-NCAM immunoreactive neurons in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacher, Juan; Blasco-Ibáñez, José M; McEwen, Bruce S

    2002-03-15

    The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) continues to be expressed in the adult hippocampus, mainly in a subset of neurons located in the innermost portion of the granule cell layer. PSA-NCAM immunoreactive neurons have also been described outside this layer in humans, where they are severely reduced in schizophrenic brains. Given this important clinical implication, we were interested in finding whether similar neurons existed in the adult rat hippocampus and to characterize their distribution, morphology and phenotype. PSA-NCAM immunocytochemistry reveals labeled neurons in the subiculum, fimbria, alveus, hilus, and stratum oriens, lucidum and radiatum of CA3 and CA1. They are mainly distributed in the ventral hippocampus, and have polygonal or fusiform somata with multipolar or bipolar morphology. These neurons show long straight dendrites, which reach several strata and even enter the fimbria and the alveus. These dendrites are often varicose, appear devoid of excrescences and apparently do not show spines. Most of these neurons display GABA immunoreactivity and further analysis has shown that a subpopulation expresses calretinin, but not somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, parvalbumin, calbindin or NADPH diaphorase. Our study demonstrates that there is an important subpopulation of PSA-NCAM immunoreactive neurons, many of which can be considered interneurons, outside the rat granule cell layer, probably homologous to those described in the human hippocampus. The presence of the polysialylated form of NCAM in these neurons could indicate that they are undergoing continuous remodeling during adulthood and may have an important role in hippocampal structural plasticity.

  9. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of Hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Dockray, G J; Schot, L P

    1982-01-01

    FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity has been localized in different parts of the hydra nervous system. Immunoreactivity occurs in nerve perikarya and processes in the ectoderm of the lower peduncle region near the basal disk, in the ectoderm of the hypostome and in the ectoderm of the tentacles....... The immunoreactive nerve perikarya in the lower peduncle region form ganglion-like structures. Radioimmunoassays of extracts of hydra gave displacement curves parallel to standard FMRFamide and values of at least 8 pmol/gram wet weight of FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity. The immunoreactive material eluted from...

  10. Sensory neuropeptide effects in human skin.

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, R W; Conradson, T. B.; Dixon, C M; Crossman, D.C.; Barnes, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    1 Neuropeptides released from sensory nerves may account for cutaneous flare and wheal following local trauma. In 28 normal subjects we have studied the effects of four sensory neuropeptides given by intradermal injection on the forearm or back. 2 All peptides caused a flare distant from the site of injection, presumably due to an axon reflex. Substance P (SP) was the most potent (geometric mean dose causing 50% of maximum flare, 4.2 pmol). Neurokinin A (NKA) was the next most potent with neu...

  11. Neuropeptides in helminths: occurrence and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Nikki J; Maule, Aaron G

    2010-01-01

    Nematode neuropeptide systems comprise an exceptionally complex array of approximately 250 peptidic signaling molecules that operate within a structurally simple nervous system of approximately 300 neurons. A relatively complete picture of the neuropeptide complement is available for Caenorhabditis elegans, with 30 flp, 38 ins and 43 nlp genes having been documented; accumulating evidence indicates similar complexity in parasitic nematodes from clades I, III, IV and V. In contrast, the picture for parasitic platyhelminths is less clear, with the limited peptide sequence data available providing concrete evidence for only FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) and neuropeptide F (NPF) signaling systems, each of which only comprises one or two peptides. With the completion of the Schmidtea meditteranea and Schistosoma mansoni genome projects and expressed sequence tag datasets for other flatworm parasites becoming available, the time is ripe for a detailed reanalysis ofneuropeptide signalingin flatworms. Although the actual neuropeptides provide limited obvious value as targets for chemotherapeutic-based control strategies, they do highlight the signaling systems present in these helminths and provide tools for the discovery of more amenable targets such as neuropeptide receptors or neuropeptide processing enzymes. Also, they offer opportunities to evaluate the potential of their associated signaling pathways as targets through RNA interference (RNAi)-based, target validation strategies. Currently, within both helminth phyla, theflp signaling systems appear to merit further investigation as they are intrinsically linked with motor function, a proven target for successful anti-parasitics; it is clear that some nematode NLPs also play a role in motor function and could have similar appeal. At this time, it is unclear if flatworm NPF and nematode INS peptides operate in pathways that have utility for parasite control. Clearly, RNAi-based validation could be a starting point for

  12. Characterization of PDF-immunoreactive neurons in the optic lobe and cerebral lobe of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Salaheldin; Uemura, Hiroyuki; Umezaki, Yujiro; Saifullah, A S M; Shimohigashi, Miki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2008-07-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is a neuropeptide playing important roles in insect circadian systems. In this study, we morphologically and physiologically characterized PDF-immunoreactive neurons in the optic lobe and the brain of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. PDF-immunoreactivity was detected in cells located in the proximal medulla (PDFMe cells) and those in the dorsal and ventral regions of the outer chiasma (PDFLa cells). The PDFMe cells had varicose processes spread over the frontal surface of the medulla and the PDFLa cells had varicose mesh-like innervations in almost whole lamina, suggesting their modulatory role in the optic lobe. Some of PDFMe cells had a hairpin-shaped axonal process running toward the lamina then turning back to project into the brain where they terminated at various protocerebral areas. The PDFMe cells had a low frequency spontaneous spike activity that was higher during the night and was often slightly increased by light pulses. Six pairs of PDF-immunoreactive neurons were also found in the frontal ganglion. Competitive ELISA with anti-PDF antibodies revealed daily cycling of PDF both in the optic lobe and cerebral lobe with an increase during the night that persisted in constant darkness. The physiological role of PDF is discussed based on these results.

  13. Increased tissue concentration of neuropeptide Y in the duodenal mucosa in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoelund, K.; Ekman, R. (Lund Univ. (Sweden))

    1989-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is localized to intestinal nerve fibres, of which there are few in normal duodenal mucosa. In the duodenal mucosa of 10 patients with coeliac disease and in a control group of 21 patients with other gastrointestinal symptoms, but with normal function of the small intestine, we studied the frequency of such fibres by immunohistochemistry and the tissue concentration of NPY by radioimmunoassay. Patients with coeliac disease had an increased number of NPY nerve fibres and significantly elevated tissue concentrations compared with the control group. The eluted fractions obtained by high-pressure liquid chromatography of duodenal extracts showed the same immunoreactive components in the two groups. This study therefore suggested proliferation of the peptide-containing nerve system in coeliac disease. The increased NPY levels in the duodenal mucosa may be of functional significance for the disease symptoms. 24 refs.

  14. Neuropeptide receptor expression in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Willy Pascale ter

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Neuropeptides are involved in the regulation of intestinal motility, chloride secretion and inflammatory response, three processes that are disturb

  15. The evolution and diversity of SALMFamide neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, Maurice R; Achhala, Sufyan; Martynyuk, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in echinoderms. Two types of SALMFamides have been identified: L-type (e.g. the starfish neuropeptides S1 and S2) with the C-terminal motif LxFamide (x is variable) and F-type with the C-terminal motif FxFamide. In the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (class Echinoidea) there are two SALMFamide genes, one encoding L-type SALMFamides and a second encoding F-type SALMFamides, but hitherto it was not known if this applies to other echinoderms. Here we report the identification of SALMFamide genes in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (class Holothuroidea) and the starfish Patiria miniata (class Asteroidea). In both species there are two SALMFamide genes: one gene encoding L-type SALMFamides (e.g. S1 in P. miniata) and a second gene encoding F-type SALMFamides plus one or more L-type SALMFamides (e.g. S2-like peptide in P. miniata). Thus, the ancestry of the two SALMFamide gene types traces back to the common ancestor of echinoids, holothurians and asteroids, although it is not clear if the occurrence of L-type peptides in F-type SALMFamide precursors is an ancestral or derived character. The gene sequences also reveal a remarkable diversity of SALMFamide neuropeptides. Originally just two peptides (S1 and S2) were isolated from starfish but now we find that in P. miniata, for example, there are sixteen putative SALMFamide neuropeptides. Thus, the SALMFamides would be a good model system for experimental analysis of the physiological significance of neuropeptide "cocktails" derived from the same precursor protein.

  16. Neuropeptides controlling energy balance: orexins and neuromedins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Joshua P; Kotz, Catherine M; Novak, Colleen M; Billington, Charles J; Teske, Jennifer A

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the feeding and energy expenditure effects of orexin (also known as hypocretin) and neuromedin. Orexins are multifunctional neuropeptides that affect energy balance by participating in regulation of appetite, arousal, and spontaneous physical activity. Central orexin signaling for all functions originates in the lateral hypothalamus-perifornical area and is likely functionally differentiated based on site of action and on interacting neural influences. The effect of orexin on feeding is likely related to arousal in some ways but is nonetheless a separate neural process that depends on interactions with other feeding-related neuropeptides. In a pattern distinct from other neuropeptides, orexin stimulates both feeding and energy expenditure. Orexin increases in energy expenditure are mainly by increasing spontaneous physical activity, and this energy expenditure effect is more potent than the effect on feeding. Global orexin manipulations, such as in transgenic models, produce energy balance changes consistent with a dominant energy expenditure effect of orexin. Neuromedins are gut-brain peptides that reduce appetite. There are gut sources of neuromedin, but likely the key appetite-related neuromedin-producing neurons are in the hypothalamus and parallel other key anorectic neuropeptide expression in the arcuate to paraventricular hypothalamic projection. As with other hypothalamic feeding-related peptides, hindbrain sites are likely also important sources and targets of neuromedin anorectic action. Neuromedin increases physical activity in addition to reducing appetite, thus producing a consistent negative energy balance effect. Together with the other various neuropeptides, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones, neuromedin and orexin act in the appetite network to produce changes in food intake and energy expenditure, which ultimately influences the regulation of body weight.

  17. Pancreatic beta cells synthesize neuropeptide Y and can rapidly release peptide co-transmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Whim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In addition to polypeptide hormones, pancreatic endocrine cells synthesize a variety of bioactive molecules including classical transmitters and neuropeptides. While these co-transmitters are thought to play a role in regulating hormone release little is known about how their secretion is regulated. Here I investigate the synthesis and release of neuropeptide Y from pancreatic beta cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NPY appears to be an authentic co-transmitter in neonatal, but not adult, beta cells because (1 early in mouse post-natal development, many beta cells are NPY-immunoreactive whereas no staining is observed in beta cells from NPY knockout mice; (2 GFP-expressing islet cells from an NPY(GFP transgenic mouse are insulin-ir; (3 single cell RT-PCR experiments confirm that the NPY(GFP cells contain insulin mRNA, a marker of beta cells. The NPY-immunoreactivity previously reported in alpha and delta cells is therefore likely to be due to the presence of NPY-related peptides. INS-1 cells, a beta cell line, are also NPY-ir and contain NPY mRNA. Using the FMRFamide tagging technique, NPY secretion was monitored from INS-1 beta cells with high temporal resolution. Peptide release was evoked by brief depolarizations and was potentiated by activators of adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A. Following a transient depolarization, NPY-containing dense core granules fused with the cell membrane and discharged their contents within a few milliseconds. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that after birth, NPY expression in pancreatic islets is restricted to neonatal beta cells. The presence of NPY suggests that peptide co-transmitters could mediate rapid paracrine or autocrine signaling within the endocrine pancreas. The FMRFamide tagging technique may be useful in studying the release of other putative islet co-transmitters in real time.

  18. Effect of Chitosan Properties on Immunoreactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthi Ravindranathan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a widely investigated biopolymer in drug and gene delivery, tissue engineering and vaccine development. However, the immune response to chitosan is not clearly understood due to contradicting results in literature regarding its immunoreactivity. Thus, in this study, we analyzed effects of various biochemical properties, namely degree of deacetylation (DDA, viscosity/polymer length and endotoxin levels, on immune responses by antigen presenting cells (APCs. Chitosan solutions from various sources were treated with mouse and human APCs (macrophages and/or dendritic cells and the amount of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α released by the cells was used as an indicator of immunoreactivity. Our results indicate that only endotoxin content and not DDA or viscosity influenced chitosan-induced immune responses. Our data also indicate that low endotoxin chitosan (<0.01 EU/mg ranging from 20 to 600 cP and 80% to 97% DDA is essentially inert. This study emphasizes the need for more complete characterization and purification of chitosan in preclinical studies in order for this valuable biomaterial to achieve widespread clinical application.

  19. Overexpression of neuropeptide Y induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat hippocampus is long lasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, S; Vivien-Roels, B; Lê, B T; Larmet, Y; Carnahan, J; Marescaux, C; Depaulis, A

    2000-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in hippocampal neuroplasticity. In particular, BDNF upregulation in the hippocampus by epileptic seizures suggests its involvement in the neuronal rearrangements accompanying epileptogenesis. We have shown previously that chronic infusion of BDNF in the hippocampus induces a long-term delay in hippocampal kindling progression. Although BDNF has been shown to enhance the excitability of this structure upon acute application, long-term transcriptional regulations leading to increased inhibition within the hippocampus may account for its suppressive effects on epileptogenesis. Therefore, the long-term consequences of a 7-day chronic intrahippocampal infusion of BDNF (12 microg/day) were investigated up to 2 weeks after the end of the infusion, on the expression of neurotransmitters contained in inhibitory hippocampal interneurons and which display anti-epileptic properties. Our results show that BDNF does not modify levels of immunostaining for glutamic acid decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis, and somatostatin. Conversely, BDNF induces a long-lasting increase of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hippocampus, measured by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay, outlasting the end of the infusion by at least 7 days. The distribution of BDNF-induced neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity is similar to the pattern observed in animals submitted to hippocampal kindling, with the exception of mossy fibres which only become immunoreactive following seizure activity. The enduring increase of neuropeptide Y expression induced by BDNF in the hippocampus suggests that this neurotrophin can trigger long-term genomic effects, which may contribute to the neuroplasticity of this structure, in particular during epileptogenesis.

  20. Comparative Distribution of Neurons Containing FLFQPQRFamide-like (morphine-modulating) Peptide and Related Neuropeptides in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivipelto, Leena; Panula, Pertti

    1991-01-01

    FLFQPQRF-NH2 (F8Famide; morphine-modulating peptide), isolated from bovine brain, is an FMRFamide-like peptide with opioid analgesia modulating effects. In the rat brain, F8Famide is immunohistochemically localized in neurons of the medial hypothalamus and medulla oblongata. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is structurally related to F8Famide and the mammalian FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity (LI) was once thought to be due to an NPY-like peptide. We compared the anatomical distribution of F8Famide-LI with the localization of enkephalin- and NPY-LI-containing structures in the rat brain to find out if NPY or enkephalins coexist with F8Famide-LI. Cryostat sections of colchicine-treated Wistar rat brains were incubated with specific antisera against F8Famide, NPY, YGGFMRGL (Met-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Leu), or YGGFMRF (Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe) raised in rabbits. The immunoreactivity was visualized by the peroxidase - antiperoxidase or immunofluorescence method. The light microscopic mirror method was applied to study the colocalization of F8Famide and NPY. The F8Famide-immunoreactivity was concentrated in smaller areas of medial hypothalamus and nucleus of the solitary tract than that of enkephalins and NPY. In all brain areas, the distributions of F8Famide-, enkephalin- and NPY-immunoreactive neurons were distinct. F8Famide-, NPY- and enkephalin-LI-containing nerve terminals were seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and in the lateral parabrachial nucleus. These results show that the neuronal systems containing F8Famide-, enkephalin- or NPY-LI are anatomically separate in all brain regions. However, there are terminal areas in which more than one type of these immunoreactivities are detected. These results have anatomical correlation with pharmacological reports, suggesting modulatory functions for these peptides on regulation of blood pressure, feeding behaviour and endocrine functions.

  1. Mmp1 processing of the PDF neuropeptide regulates circadian structural plasticity of pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Fernández-Gamba, Agata; Gorostiza, E Axel; Herrero, Anastasia; Castaño, Eduardo M; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2014-10-01

    In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs) and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2) are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior.

  2. Mmp1 processing of the PDF neuropeptide regulates circadian structural plasticity of pacemaker neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Depetris-Chauvin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2 are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior.

  3. Distinct interneuron types express m2 muscarinic receptor immunoreactivity on their dendrites or axon terminals in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájos, N; Papp, E C; Acsády, L; Levey, A I; Freund, T F

    1998-01-01

    In previous studies m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-immunoreactive interneurons and various types of m2-positive axon terminals have been described in the hippocampal formation. The aim of the present study was to identify the types of interneurons expressing m2 receptor and to examine whether the somadendritic and axonal m2 immunostaining labels the same or distinct cell populations. In the CA1 subfield, neurons immunoreactive for m2 have horizontal dendrites, they are located at the stratum oriens/alveus border and have an axon that project to the dendritic region of pyramidal cells. In the CA3 subfield and the hilus, m2-positive neurons are multipolar and are scattered in all layers except stratum lacunosum-moleculare. In stratum pyramidale of the CA1 and CA3 regions, striking axon terminal staining for m2 was observed, surrounding the somata and axon initial segments of pyramidal cells in a basket-like manner. The co-localization of m2 with neurochemical markers and GABA was studied using the "mirror" technique and fluorescent double-immunostaining at the light microscopic level and with double-labelling using colloidal gold-conjugated antisera and immunoperoxidase reaction (diaminobenzidine) at the electron microscopic level. GABA was shown to be present in the somata of most m2-immunoreactive interneurons, as well as in the majority of m2-positive terminals in all layers. The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin was absent from practically all m2-immunoreactive cell bodies and dendrites. In contrast, many of the terminals synapsing on pyramidal cell somata and axon initial segments co-localized parvalbumin and m2, suggesting a differential distribution of m2 receptor immunoreactivity on the axonal and somadendritic membrane of parvalbumin-containing basket and axo-axonic cells. The co-existence of m2 receptors with the calcium-binding protein calbindin and the neuropeptides cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide was rare throughout the

  4. Re-purposing of histological tissue sections for corroborative western blot analysis of hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression following delineation of transactivated structures by Fos immuno-mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Ibrahim, Baher A; Briski, Karen P

    2015-04-01

    Fos immunocytochemistry is a valuable anatomical mapping tool for distinguishing cells within complex tissues that undergo genomic activation, but it is seldom paired with corroborative molecular analytical techniques. Due to preparatory requirements that include protein cross-linking for specimen sectioning, histological tissue sections are regarded as unsuitable for those methods. Our studies show that pharmacological activation of the hindbrain energy sensor AMPK by AICAR elicits estradiol (E)-dependent patterns of Fos immunolabeling of hypothalamic metabolic loci. Here, Western blotting was applied to hypothalamic tissue removed from histological sections of E- versus oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) female rat brain to measure levels of metabolic transmitters associated with Fos-positive structures. In both E and O rats, AICAR treatment elicited alterations in pro-opiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, SF-1, and orexin-A neuropeptide expression that coincided with patterns of Fos labeling of structures containing neurons that synthesize these neurotransmitters, e.g. arcuate and ventromedial nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area. O, but not E animals also exhibited parallel augmentation of tissue corticotropin-releasing hormone neuropeptide levels and paraventricular nucleus Fos staining. Data demonstrate the utility of immunoblot analysis as a follow-through technique to capitalize on Fos mapping of transactivation sites in the brain. Findings that induction of Fos immunoreactivity coincides with adjustments in hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression affirms that this functional indicator reflects changes in neurotransmission in pathways governing metabolic outflow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.

  6. The role of neuropeptides in suicidal behavior: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Gianluca; Pompili, Maurizio; Lindqvist, Daniel; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing evidence that neuropeptides may be involved in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior. A critical review of the literature was conducted to investigate the association between neuropeptides and suicidal behavior. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals were selected for the inclusion in the present review. Twenty-six articles were assessed for eligibility but only 22 studies were included. Most studies have documented an association between suicidality and some neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), VGF, cholecystokinin, substance P, and neuropeptide Y (NPY), which have been demonstrated to act as key neuromodulators of emotional processing. Significant differences in neuropeptides levels have been found in those who have attempted or completed suicide compared with healthy controls or those dying from other causes. Despite cross-sectional associations between neuropeptides levels and suicidal behavior, causality may not be inferred. The implications of the mentioned studies were discussed in this review paper.

  7. The Role of Neuropeptides in Suicidal Behavior: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Serafini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing evidence that neuropeptides may be involved in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior. A critical review of the literature was conducted to investigate the association between neuropeptides and suicidal behavior. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals were selected for the inclusion in the present review. Twenty-six articles were assessed for eligibility but only 22 studies were included. Most studies have documented an association between suicidality and some neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, VGF, cholecystokinin, substance P, and neuropeptide Y (NPY, which have been demonstrated to act as key neuromodulators of emotional processing. Significant differences in neuropeptides levels have been found in those who have attempted or completed suicide compared with healthy controls or those dying from other causes. Despite cross-sectional associations between neuropeptides levels and suicidal behavior, causality may not be inferred. The implications of the mentioned studies were discussed in this review paper.

  8. A critical examination of the occurrence of FMRFamide immunoreactivity in the brain of guinea pig and rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triepel, J; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1984-01-01

    Several reports (cf. Weber et al. (1981) Science 214:1248-1251) have described the extensive occurrence, in rat brain, of material immunologically related to the molluscan neuropeptide FMRFamide. We have reexamined these data in guinea pig and rat, using six different antisera to FMRFamide....... Immunoreactive perikarya and fibres were found to be distributed throughout the rodent brain (Table 1). This distribution was roughly similar to that found by Weber and coworkers. However, solid-phase absorption of the antisera with bovine pancreatic polypeptide, which shares an arginine and an amidated aromatic...... parts of the formatio reticularis, and spinal cord. Hence only these structures might contain material which is more related to the molluscan tetrapeptide....

  9. Effects of pirenzepine on Dai-kenchu-to-induced elevation of the plasma neuropeptide levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuhki; Inoue, Shin; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Itoh, Hiroki; Takeyama, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    Dai-kenchu-to has been used for the treatment of abdominal obstructions, including bowel obstructions and a feeling of coldness in the abdomen. We reported that Dai-kenchu-to increases plasma neuropeptide [motilin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), serotonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and substance P]-like immunoreactive substances (IS) levels and that its pharmacologic effects on the gastrointestine are due to changes in gastrointestinal mucosa-regulatory peptide levels. We examined the effects of the selective M(1) muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine on the elevation of Dai-kenchu-to-induced plasma neuropeptide (gastrin, motilin, somatostatin, VIP, CGRP, substance P)-IS levels in human volunteers and the area under the plasma neuropeptide concentration-time curve from 0 to 240 min (AUC(0-->240 min)), which were calculated from the plasma neuropeptide concentration-time curves from each volunteers. Oral pretreatment with pirenzepine reduced the Dai-kenchu-to-induced elevation of plasma motilin and VIP-IS levels and AUC(0-->240 min). Combined treatment with Dai-kenchu-to and pirenzepine increased plasma somatostatin-IS levels and decreased plasma gastrin-IS levels and had no effects on plasma CGRP- and substance P-IS levels and AUC(0-->240 min) compared with administration of Dai-kenchu-to alone. Dai-kenchu-to appeared to induce the release of motilin and VIP into plasma mainly through the activation of M(1) muscarinic receptors, and pirenzepine may affect the pharmacologic action of Dai-kenchu-to by elevation of plasma motilin and VIP levels.

  10. Akt pathway activation and increased neuropeptide Y mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus: implications for seizure blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Eduardo M; Silva, Marcelo de Paula; Perosa, Sandra R; Argañaraz, Gustavo A; Pesquero, João B; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria G; Teixeira, Vicente P C; Silva, José A

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of survival-related molecules such Akt and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) to evaluate Akt pathway activation in epileptogenesis process. Furthermore, was also investigated the mRNA expression of neuropeptide Y, a considered antiepileptic neuropeptide, in the pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Male Wistar rats were submitted to the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. Hippocampi were removed 6h (acute phase), 12h (late acute), 5d (silent) and 60d (chronic) after status epilepticus (SE) onset, and from animals that received pilocarpine but did not develop SE (partial group). Hippocampi collected were used to specify mRNA expression using Real-Time PCR. Immunohistochemistry assay was employed to place ILK distribution in the hippocampus and Western blot technique was used to determine Akt activation level. A decrease in ILK mRNA content was found during acute (0.39+/-0.03) and chronic (0.48+/-0.06) periods when compared to control group (0.87+/-0.10). Protein levels of ILK were also diminished during both periods. Partial group showed increased ILK mRNA expression (0.80+/-0.06) when compared with animals in the acute stage. Silent group had ILK mRNA and immunoreactivity similar to control group. Western blot assay showed an augmentation in Akt activation in silent period (0.52+/-0.03) in comparison with control group (0.44+/-0.01). Neuropeptide Y mRNA expression increased in the partial group (1.67+/-0.22) and in the silent phase (1.45+/-0.29) when compared to control group (0.36+/-0.12). Results suggest that neuropeptide Y (as anticonvulsant) might act in protective mechanisms occurred during epileptic phenomena. Together with ILK expression and Akt activation, these molecules could be involved in hippocampal neuroprotection in epilepsy. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Photoperiod-dependent regulation of carboxypeptidase E affects the selective processing of neuropeptides in the seasonal Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, M; Herwig, A; Heldmaier, G; Barrett, P; Mercer, J G; Klingenspor, M

    2013-02-01

    The production of bioactive peptides from biologically inactive precursors involves extensive post-translational processing, including enzymatic cleavage by proteolytic peptidases. Endoproteolytic prohormone-convertases initially cleave the precursors of many neuropeptides at specific amino acid sequences to generate intermediates with basic amino acid extensions on their C-termini. Subsequently, the related exopeptidases, carboxypeptidases D and E (CPD and CPE), are responsible for removing these amino acids before the peptides achieve biological activity. We investigated the effect of photoperiod on the processing of the neuropeptide precursor pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and its derived neuropeptides, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) and β-endorphin (END), within the hypothalamus of the seasonal Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). We thus compared hypothalamic distribution of CPD, CPE, α-MSH and β-END using immunohistochemistry and measured the enzyme activity of CPE and concentrations of C-terminally cleaved α-MSH in short-day (SD; 8 : 16 h light/dark) and long-day (LD; 16 : 8 h light/dark) acclimatised hamsters. Increased immunoreactivity (-IR) of CPE, as well as higher CPE activity, was observed in SD. This increase was accompanied by more β-END-IR cells and substantially higher levels of C- terminally cleaved α-MSH, as determined by radioimmunoassay. Our results suggest that exoproteolytic cleavage of POMC-derived neuropeptides is tightly regulated by photoperiod in the Siberian hamster. Higher levels of biological active α-MSH- and β-END in SD are consistent with the hypothesis that post-translational processing is a key event in the regulation of seasonal energy balance.

  12. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of Hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Dockray, G J; Schot, L P

    1982-01-01

    FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity has been localized in different parts of the hydra nervous system. Immunoreactivity occurs in nerve perikarya and processes in the ectoderm of the lower peduncle region near the basal disk, in the ectoderm of the hypostome and in the ectoderm of the tentacles...

  13. The novel neuropeptide phoenixin is highly co-expressed with nesfatin-1 in the rat hypothalamus, an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałasz, Artur; Rojczyk, Ewa; Bogus, Katarzyna; Worthington, John J; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-04-10

    The hypothalamus regulates a number of autonomic functions essential for homeostasis; therefore, investigations concerning hypothalamic neuropeptides and their functions and distribution are of great importance in contemporary neuroscience. Recently, novel regulatory factors expressed in the hypothalamus have been discovered, of which nesfatin-1 and phoenixin (PNX), show intriguing similarities in their brain distributions. There are currently few studies characterizing PNX expression, so it is imperative to accurately trace its localization, with particular attention to the hypothalamic nuclei and nesfatin-1 co-expression. Using fluorescence and classical immunohistochemical stainings on adult rat brain, we visualized the potential co-expression of nesfatin-1 and PNX immunoreactive cells. We have demonstrated a distinct PNX-immunoreactivity in 21-32% of cells in the arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial and lateral hypothalamus. Nesfatin-1 expression reached 45-68% of all neurons in the same sites, while co-expression was strikingly seen in the vast majority (70-86%) of PNX-immunoreactive neurons in the rat hypothalamic nuclei. Our results demonstrate for the first time, a wide distribution of PNX in the hypothalamus which could implicate a potential functional relationship with nesfatin-1, possibly in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or other autonomic functions, which require further study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Comparison of Caenorhabditis elegans NLP peptides with arthropod neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, Steven J; Lindemans, Marleen; Janssen, Tom; Schoofs, Liliane

    2009-04-01

    Neuropeptides are small messenger molecules that can be found in all metazoans, where they govern a diverse array of physiological processes. Because neuropeptides seem to be conserved among pest species, selected peptides can be considered as attractive targets for drug discovery. Much can be learned from the model system Caenorhabditis elegans because of the availability of a sequenced genome and state-of-the-art postgenomic technologies that enable characterization of endogenous peptides derived from neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) precursors. Here, we provide an overview of the NLP peptide family in C. elegans and discuss their resemblance with arthropod neuropeptides and their relevance for anthelmintic discovery.

  15. Neuropeptides in the Gonads: From Evolution to Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette L McGuire

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate gonads are the sites of synthesis and binding of many peptides that were initially classified as neuropeptides. These gonadal neuropeptide systems are neither well understood in isolation, nor in their interactions with other neuropeptide systems. Further, our knowledge of the control of these gonadal neuropeptides by peripheral hormones that bind to the gonads, and which themselves are under regulation by true neuropeptide systems from the hypothalamus, is relatively meagre. This review discusses the existence of a variety of neuropeptides and their receptors which have been discovered in vertebrate gonads, and the possible way in which such systems could have evolved. We then focus on two key neuropeptides for regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis: gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH. Comparative studies have provided us with a degree of understanding as to how a gonadal GnRH system might have evolved, and they have been responsible for the discovery of GnIH and its gonadal counterpart. We attempt to highlight what is known about these two key gonadal neuropeptides, how their actions differ from their hypothalamic counterparts, and how we might learn from comparative studies of them and other gonadal neuropeptides in terms of pharmacology, reproductive physiology and evolutionary biology.

  16. Profiling of diet-induced neuropeptide changes in rat brain by quantitative mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, C.; Boender, A.J.; Mohammed, S.; Heck, A.J.R.; Adan, R.A.H.; Altelaar, A.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides are intercellular signal transmitters that play key roles in modulation of many behavioral and physiological processes. Neuropeptide signaling in several nuclei in the hypothalamus contributes to the control of food intake. Additionally, food intake regulation involves neuropeptide

  17. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum spores on the levels of neuropeptide Y and somatostatin in brains of seizure rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kongli Zhu; Ming Lu; Shuqiu Wang; Shiling Zhang; Dixiang Sun

    2008-01-01

    rats, as well as the morphology of neurons.RESULTS: All 30 rats were involved in the result analysis, without any loss. The number of somatostatin immunoreacted positive cells in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was significantly increased in the epilepsy model group compared to the blank control group (P<0.01). The number of somatostatin immunoreacted positive cells in cerebral cortex and hippocampus was significantly decreased in the Ganoderma lucidum spore-treated group compared to the epilepsy model group (P<0.01). The contents of neuropeptide Y in cerebral cortex and hippocampus were significantly increased in the epilepsy model group compared to the blank control group (P<0.01). The contents of neuropeptide Y in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus were significantly decreased in the Ganoderma lucidum spore-treated group compared to the epilepsy model group (P<0.05). The epilepsy seizures in the Ganoderma lucidum spore-treated group were obviously reduced compared to the epilepsy model group.CONCLUSION: Ganoderma lucidum spore powder was able to reduce the somatostatin and neuropeptide Y content in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus effectively, so as to achieve an anti-epileptic function and protect neurons from being damaged.

  18. Neuropeptide Y: An Anti-Aging Player?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Mariana; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) has a role in aging and lifespan determination. In this review, we critically discuss age-related changes in NPY levels in the brain, together with recent findings concerning the contribution of NPY to, and impact on, six hallmarks of aging, specifically: loss of proteostasis, stem cell exhaustion, altered intercellular communication, deregulated nutrient sensing, cellular senescence, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Understanding how NPY contributes to, and counteracts, these hallmarks of aging will open new avenues of research on limiting damage related to aging.

  19. Mimetic analogs of three insect neuropeptide classes for pest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropeptides are potent regulators of critical life processes in insects, but are subjected to rapid degradation by peptidases in the hemolymph (blood), tissues and gut. This limitation can be overcome via replacement of peptidase susceptible portions of the insect neuropeptides to create analogs w...

  20. Mimetic analogs of pyrokinin neuropeptides for pest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropeptides are potent regulators of critical life processes in insects, but are subjected to rapid degradation by peptidases in the hemolymph (blood), tissues and gut. This limitation can be overcome via replacement of peptidase susceptible portions of the insect neuropeptides to create analogs ...

  1. The neuroendocrine genome : neuropeptides and related signaling peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, JPH

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are small proteinaceous substances which are produced, stored, and released through the regulated secretory route by neurons and act on neural substrates. They represent the most diverse group of signaling molecules in the nervous system. In mammals there are 200–300 neuropeptides know

  2. The neuroendocrine genome : neuropeptides and related signaling peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, JPH|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068420404

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are small proteinaceous substances which are produced, stored, and released through the regulated secretory route by neurons and act on neural substrates. They represent the most diverse group of signaling molecules in the nervous system. In mammals there are 200–300 neuropeptides know

  3. [Effects of neuropeptides on interferon production in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul'chikov, A E; Makarenko, A N

    2008-01-01

    The study of an interferon-inducing action of neuropeptides (a cerebrolysin model) on production of interferons by human blood leukocytes has shown that neuropeptides induce gamma-interferon production in the titer 267 IU/ml that determines one of the mechanisms of a neuroimmunocorrecting effect of cerebrolysin (Ebewe, Austria) in many neurological diseases (acute stroke, brain traumas and different neuroinfectious diseases).

  4. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

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    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  5. Expression of Neuropeptide Y in Human Pituitary Adenoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laizhao Chen; Jingjian Ma; Anchao Zheng; Honggang Zheng

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Neuropeptid e Y (NPY) acts as a neuroendocrine modulator in the anterior pituitary, and NPY mRNA and NPY-immunoreactivity have been detected in normal human anterior pituitaries. However, only a few studies of NPY expression in human pituitary adenomas have been published. Our study was conducted to determine whether or not adenomatous cells express NPY, to investigate the relationship between NPY expression and the subtypes of pituitary adenoma and to explore the clinical significance of NPY.METHODS The study included tissues from 58 patients with pituitary adenomas who underwent surgery because of their clinical diagnosis.Using a highly specific anti-NPY polyclonal antibody, immunohistochemical analysis was performed on the surgically removed pituitary adenomas. Six fresh specimens also were examined using immuno-electron microscopy. NPY was labeled with colloidal gold in order to study the distribution of NPY at the subcellular level.RESULTS The NPY expression level was significantly different among subgroups of pituitary adenomas (P<0.05). NPY was immuno-detected in 58.6% of all adenomas, in 91.7% of gonadotrophic adenomas and in 14.3% of prolactinomas. NPY expression was slightly lower in invasive pituitary adenomas compared to noninvasive adenomas, but the difference was not significant (t=1.81, P>0.05). Of particular interest was the finding that vascular endothelial cells showed positive NPY expression in some pituitary adenomas. Parts of strongly positive tumor cells were seen in channels formed without endothelial cells, but which contained some red blood cells in a formation similar to so-called vasculogenic mimicry. Immuno-electron microscopy demonstrated that 4 of the 6 fresh specimens displayed positive NPY staining with a high density of gold particles located mainly in the secretory granulas. In addition, gold particles were sparsely detected in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and cell matrix.CONCLUSION NPY exists in pituitary adenomas

  6. Involvement of the pelvic plexus and the suprarenal ganglia in the neuropeptide Y (NPY) innervation of the cervix and the uterus of the rat.

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    Serghini, R; Prud'homme, M J; Vaudry, H; Rousseau, J P

    1997-12-03

    The involvement of the pelvic plexus and suprarenal ganglia in the neuropeptide Y (NPY) innervation of the genital tract was studied in the female rat by means of denervation experiments and retrograde tracing studies. Removal of the paracervical ganglia caused a significant decrease of the NPY-immunoreactive nerve density and NPY concentration in the lower part of the genital tract: cervix, uterine body and lower part of the uterine horn. The decrease in NPY concentration in these three regions was more pronounced after lesion of the pelvic plexus. Lesion of the ovarian nerve plexus caused a depletion in the NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibres and a decrease in NPY concentration in the upper part of the uterine horn. Pelvic nerve section, inferior mesenteric ganglia excision and superior ovarian nerve section had no effect on the NPY innervation in the genital tract. Injection of fluorogold into the cervix and lower part of the uterus combined with immunohistochemistry revealed that 87.5% of labelled neurons in the pelvic plexus were NPY-immunoreactive. Following injection of fluorogold into the upper part of the uterus, 92% of labelled neurons in the suprarenal ganglia were NPY-immunoreactive. Treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine revealed that the NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibres were non-noradrenergic in the cervix, but were noradrenergic in the upper part of the uterus. In the uterine body and lower part of the uterine horn, both noradrenergic and non-noradrenergic NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibres were observed. These data demonstrate the major contribution of pelvic plexus neurons in the non-noradrenergic NPY innervation of the lower part of the genital tract, and the involvement of the suprarenal ganglia in the noradrenergic NPY innervation of the upper part of the uterus via the ovarian nerve plexus.

  7. Neuropeptides in Alzheimer's disease: from pathophysiological mechanisms to therapeutic opportunities.

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    Van Dam, Debby; Van Dijck, Annemie; Janssen, Leen; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2013-06-01

    Neuropeptides are found throughout the entire nervous system where they can act as neurotransmitter, neuromodulator or neurohormone. In those functions, they play important roles in the regulation of cognition and behavior. In brain disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD), where abnormal cognition and behavior are observed, the study of neuropeptides is particularly interesting since altered neuropeptides can function as biomarkers or as targets for new medication. In this article neuropeptides with relevance to AD are listed and their influence on cognitive and behavioral disturbances is discussed. Findings from human cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue, and AD mouse models are described and related to the pathophysiology and symptomatology of the disease. In the past, clinical trials with neuropeptides have often failed due to insufficient delivery to the brain. Therefore, new strategies to target the brain with peptide drugs are also covered.

  8. DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellows CF

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Gagliardi1, Monica Goswami1, Roberto Passera2, Charles F Bellows11Department of Surgery and Pathology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Division of Nuclear Medicine Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria San Giovanni Battista, Turin, ItalyIntroduction: Microtubule-associated doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1 (DCLK1 is a novel candidate marker for intestinal stem cells. The aim of our study was to assess DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal carcinogenesis and its correlation with prognosis.Methods: DCLK1 immunostaining was performed in colorectal tissue from 71 patients, including 18 adenomatous polyps, 40 primary adenocarcinomas, and 14 metastatic lesions. Each case was evaluated by a combined scoring method based on the intensity of staining (score 0–3 and the percentage of tissue staining positive (score 0–3. Immunoexpression for DCLK1 was considered as positive when the combined score was 2–6 and negative with a score of 0–1.Results: Overall, 14/18 (78% of polyps, 30/40 (75% of primary adenocarcinomas, and 7/14 (50% of distant metastases were positive for DCLK1. In adenomatous polyps and primary cancer there was no association between DCLK1 staining score and tumor pathology. However, after curative colorectal cancer resection, patients whose tumor had a high (≥5 combined staining score had increased cancer-specific mortality compared to patients with low (0–4 staining score (hazard ratio 5.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–28.47; P = 0.027.Conclusion: We found that DCLK1 is frequently expressed in colorectal neoplasia and may be associated with poor prognosis. Further studies are necessary to validate the use of DCLK1 as a prognostic marker.Keywords: DCLK1, DCAMKL-1, gastrointestinal stem cell, cancer stem cell, adenomatous polyps, liver metastasis, immunohistochemistry

  9. Neuropeptides as lung cancer growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Terry W; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript is written in honor of the Festschrift for Abba Kastin. I met Abba at a Society for Neuroscience meeting and learned that he was Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Peptides. I submitted manuscripts to the journal on "Neuropeptides as Growth Factors in Cancer" and subsequently was named to the Editorial Advisory Board. Over the past 30 years I have published dozens of manuscripts in Peptides and reviewed hundreds of submitted manuscripts. It was always rewarding to interact with Abba, a consummate professional. When I attended meetings in New Orleans I would sometimes go out to dinner with him at the restaurant "Commanders Palace". When I chaired the Summer Neuropeptide Conference we were honored to have him receive the Fleur Strand Award one year in Israel. I think that his biggest editorial contribution has been the "Handbook of Biologically Active Peptides." I served as a Section Editor on "Cancer/Anticancer Peptides" and again found that it was a pleasure working with him. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which bombesin-like peptides, neurotensin and vasoactive intestinal peptide regulate the growth of lung cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Neuropeptide Signaling in Crustaceans Probed by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhidan

    Neuropeptides are one of the most diverse classes of signaling molecules whose identities and functions are not yet fully understood. They have been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes, including feeding-related and motivated behaviors, and also environmental adaptations. In this work, improved mass spectrometry-based analytical platforms were developed and applied to the crustacean systems to characterize signaling molecules. This dissertation begins with a review of mass spectrometry-based neuropeptide studies from both temporal- and spatial-domains. This review is then followed by several chapters detailing a few research projects related to the crustacean neuropeptidomic characterization and comparative analysis. The neuropeptidome of crayfish, Orconectes rusticus is characterized for the first time using mass spectrometry-based tools. In vivo microdialysis sampling technique offers the capability of direct sampling from extracellular space in a time-resolved manner. It is used to investigate the secreted neuropeptide and neurotransmitter content in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, in this work. A new quantitation strategy using alternative mass spectrometry data acquisition approach is developed and applied for the first time to quantify neuropeptides. Coupling of this method with microdialysis enables the study of neuropeptide dynamics concurrent with different behaviors. Proof-of-principle experiments validating this approach have been carried out in Jonah crab, Cancer borealis to study feeding- and circadian rhythm-related neuropeptide changes using micoridialysis in a time-resolved manner. This permits a close correlation between behavioral and neurochemical changes, providing potential candidates for future validation of regulatory roles. In addition to providing spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) technique enables the characterization of signaling molecules while preserving the temporal resolution. A

  11. Neuropeptides as targets for the development of anticonvulsant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynen, Elke; Swijsen, Ann; Raijmakers, Marjolein; Hoogland, Govert; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. These seizures are due to abnormal excessive and synchronous neuronal activity in the brain caused by a disruption of the delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Neuropeptides can contribute to such misbalance by modulating the effect of classical excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. In this review, we discuss 21 different neuropeptides that have been linked to seizure disorders. These neuropeptides show an aberrant expression and/or release in animal seizure models and/or epilepsy patients. Many of these endogenous peptides, like adrenocorticotropic hormone, angiotensin, cholecystokinin, cortistatin, dynorphin, galanin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin, somatostatin, and thyrotropin-releasing hormone, are able to suppress seizures in the brain. Other neuropeptides, such as arginine-vasopressine peptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone, enkephalin, β-endorphin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and tachykinins have proconvulsive properties. For oxytocin and melanin-concentrating hormone both pro- and anticonvulsive effects have been reported, and this seems to be dose or time dependent. All these neuropeptides and their receptors are interesting targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs. Other neuropeptides such as nesfatin-1 and vasoactive intestinal peptide have been less studied in this field; however, as nesfatin-1 levels change over the course of epilepsy, this can be considered as an interesting marker to diagnose patients who have suffered a recent epileptic seizure.

  12. NeuroPep: a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Mingxia; Yin, Sanwen; Jang, Richard; Wang, Jian; Xue, Zhidong; Xu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides play a variety of roles in many physiological processes and serve as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of some nervous-system disorders. In recent years, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified neuropeptides. Therefore, we have developed NeuroPep, a comprehensive resource of neuropeptides, which holds 5949 non-redundant neuropeptide entries originating from 493 organisms belonging to 65 neuropeptide families. In NeuroPep, the number of neuropeptides in invertebrates and vertebrates is 3455 and 2406, respectively. It is currently the most complete neuropeptide database. We extracted entries deposited in UniProt, the database (www.neuropeptides.nl) and NeuroPedia, and used text mining methods to retrieve entries from the MEDLINE abstracts and full text articles. All the entries in NeuroPep have been manually checked. 2069 of the 5949 (35%) neuropeptide sequences were collected from the scientific literature. Moreover, NeuroPep contains detailed annotations for each entry, including source organisms, tissue specificity, families, names, post-translational modifications, 3D structures (if available) and literature references. Information derived from these peptide sequences such as amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, molecular weight and other physicochemical properties of peptides are also provided. A quick search feature allows users to search the database with keywords such as sequence, name, family, etc., and an advanced search page helps users to combine queries with logical operators like AND/OR. In addition, user-friendly web tools like browsing, sequence alignment and mapping are also integrated into the NeuroPep database. Database URL: http://isyslab.info/NeuroPep

  13. Neuromodulatory function of neuropeptides in the normal CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merighi, Adalberto; Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Lossi, Laura

    2011-12-01

    Neuropeptides are small protein molecules produced and released by discrete cell populations of the central and peripheral nervous systems through the regulated secretory pathway and acting on neural substrates. Inside the nerve cells, neuropeptides are selectively stored within large granular vesicles (LGVs), and commonly coexist in neurons with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, amino acids, and catecholamines). Storage in LGVs is responsible for a relatively slow response to secretion that requires enhanced or repeated stimulation. Coexistence (i.e. the concurrent presence of a neuropeptide with other messenger molecules in individual neurons), and co-storage (i.e. the localization of two or more neuropeptides within individual LGVs in neurons) give rise to a complicated series of pre- and post-synaptic functional interactions with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters. The typically slow response and action of neuropeptides as compared to fast-neurotransmitters such as excitatory/inhibitory amino acids and catecholamines is also due to the type of receptors that trigger neuropeptide actions onto target cells. Almost all neuropeptides act on G-protein coupled receptors that, upon ligand binding, activate an intracellular cascade of molecular enzymatic events, eventually leading to cellular responses. The latter occur in a time span (seconds or more) considerably longer (milliseconds) than that of low-molecular-weight fast-neurotransmitters, directly operating through ion channel receptors. As reviewed here, combined immunocytochemical visualization of neuropeptides and their receptors at the ultrastructural level and electrophysiological studies, have been fundamental to better unravel the role of neuropeptides in neuron-to-neuron communication.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of neuropeptides and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) for neuropeptides in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Noda, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2014-03-01

    The genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors were identified in the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) by transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Forty-eight candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or peptide hormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of neuropeptide-like precursor 2 (NPLP2) and trissin. The gene coding for prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) was first identified from hemimetabolous insect. A total of 57 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were identified and phylogenetic analysis showed most of them to be closely related to insect GPCRs. A notable finding was the occurrence of vertebrate hormone receptors, thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR)-like GPCR and parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR)-like GPCRs. These results suggest that N. lugens possesses the most comprehensive neuropeptide system yet found in insects. Moreover, our findings demonstrate the power of RNA-seq as a tool for analyzing the neuropeptide-related genes in the absence of whole genome sequence information.

  15. Fusion proteins containing neuropeptides as novel insect contol agents: snowdrop lectin delivers fused allatostatin to insect haemolymph following oral ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitches, Elaine; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A; Edwards, John P

    2002-12-01

    The mannose-binding lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin: GNA), when fed to insects, binds to the gut epithelium and passes into the haemolymph. The potential for GNA to act as a carrier protein to deliver an insect neuropeptide, Manduca sexta allatostatin (Manse-AS), to the haemolymph of lepidopteran larvae has been examined by expressing a GNA/Manse-AS fusion protein (FP) in Escherichia coli, and feeding purified FP to larvae of the tomato moth Lacanobia oleracea. FP, administered at 1.5 or 0.5% of dietary proteins, was found to strongly inhibit feeding and prevent growth of fifth stadium larvae, whereas neither GNA nor Manse-AS alone, nor a mixture of GNA and Manse-AS in control treatments, had deleterious effects at similar levels. Elevated levels of material reacting with anti-Manse-AS antibodies were detected in the haemolymph of insects fed diets containing FP, suggesting that transport of the peptide had occurred. Evidence for the delivery of intact FP to the haemolymph was provided by the co-elution of Manse-AS-like immunoreactivity with standard FP after size exclusion chromatography of haemolymph from FP-fed larvae. GNA/Manse-AS and similar fusion proteins offer a novel and effective strategy for delivering insect neuropeptides by oral administration, which could be used in conjunction with expression in transgenic plants to give crop protection in the field.

  16. Short neuropeptide F acts as a functional neuromodulator for olfactory memory in Kenyon cells of Drosophila mushroom bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapek, Stephan; Kahsai, Lily; Winther, Asa M E; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Nässel, Dick R

    2013-03-20

    In insects, many complex behaviors, including olfactory memory, are controlled by a paired brain structure, the so-called mushroom bodies (MB). In Drosophila, the development, neuroanatomy, and function of intrinsic neurons of the MB, the Kenyon cells, have been well characterized. Until now, several potential neurotransmitters or neuromodulators of Kenyon cells have been anatomically identified. However, whether these neuroactive substances of the Kenyon cells are functional has not been clarified yet. Here we show that a neuropeptide precursor gene encoding four types of short neuropeptide F (sNPF) is required in the Kenyon cells for appetitive olfactory memory. We found that activation of Kenyon cells by expressing a thermosensitive cation channel (dTrpA1) leads to a decrease in sNPF immunoreactivity in the MB lobes. Targeted expression of RNA interference against the sNPF precursor in Kenyon cells results in a highly significant knockdown of sNPF levels. This knockdown of sNPF in the Kenyon cells impairs sugar-rewarded olfactory memory. This impairment is not due to a defect in the reflexive sugar preference or odor response. Consistently, knockdown of sNPF receptors outside the MB causes deficits in appetitive memory. Altogether, these results suggest that sNPF is a functional neuromodulator released by Kenyon cells.

  17. Moderate long-term modulation of neuropeptide Y in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus induces energy balance alterations in adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY produced by arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons has a strong orexigenic effect on target neurons. Hypothalamic NPY levels undergo wide-ranging oscillations during the circadian cycle and in response to fasting and peripheral hormones (from 0.25 to 10-fold change. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a moderate long-term modulation of NPY within the ARC neurons on food consumption, body weight gain and hypothalamic neuropeptides. We achieved a physiological overexpression (3.6-fold increase and down-regulation (0.5-fold decrease of NPY in the rat ARC by injection of AAV vectors expressing NPY and synthetic microRNA that target the NPY, respectively. Our work shows that a moderate overexpression of NPY was sufficient to induce diurnal over-feeding, sustained body weight gain and severe obesity in adult rats. Additionally, the circulating levels of leptin were elevated but the immunoreactivity (ir of ARC neuropeptides was not in accordance (POMC-ir was unchanged and AGRP-ir increased, suggesting a disruption in the ability of ARC neurons to response to peripheral metabolic alterations. Furthermore, a dysfunction in adipocytes phenotype was observed in these obese rats. In addition, moderate down-regulation of NPY did not affect basal feeding or normal body weight gain but the response to food deprivation was compromised since fasting-induced hyperphagia was inhibited and fasting-induced decrease in locomotor activity was absent.These results highlight the importance of the physiological ARC NPY levels oscillations on feeding regulation, fasting response and body weight preservation, and are important for the design of therapeutic interventions for obesity that include the NPY.

  18. De novo discovery of neuropeptides in the genomes of parasitic flatworms using a novel comparative approach.

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    Koziol, Uriel; Koziol, Miguel; Preza, Matías; Costábile, Alicia; Brehm, Klaus; Castillo, Estela

    2016-10-01

    Neuropeptide mediated signalling is an ancient mechanism found in almost all animals and has been proposed as a promising target for the development of novel drugs against helminths. However, identification of neuropeptides from genomic data is challenging, and knowledge of the neuropeptide complement of parasitic flatworms is still fragmentary. In this work, we have developed an evolution-based strategy for the de novo discovery of neuropeptide precursors, based on the detection of localised sequence conservation between possible prohormone convertase cleavage sites. The method detected known neuropeptide precursors with good precision and specificity in the models Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, it identified novel putative neuropeptide precursors in nematodes, including the first description of allatotropin homologues in this phylum. Our search for neuropeptide precursors in the genomes of parasitic flatworms resulted in the description of 34 conserved neuropeptide precursor families, including 13 new ones, and of hundreds of new homologues of known neuropeptide precursor families. Most neuropeptide precursor families show a wide phylogenetic distribution among parasitic flatworms and show little similarity to neuropeptide precursors of other bilaterian animals. However, we could also find orthologs of some conserved bilaterian neuropeptides including pyrokinin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, myomodulin, neuropeptide-Y, neuropeptide KY and SIF-amide. Finally, we determined the expression patterns of seven putative neuropeptide precursor genes in the protoscolex of Echinococcus multilocularis. All genes were expressed in the nervous system with different patterns, indicating a hidden complexity of peptidergic signalling in cestodes.

  19. Advances in Mass Spectrometric Tools for Probing Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchberger, Amanda; Yu, Qing; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators in the functionality of the brain and other neurological organs. Because neuropeptides exist in a wide range of concentrations, appropriate characterization methods are needed to provide dynamic, chemical, and spatial information. Mass spectrometry and compatible tools have been a popular choice in analyzing neuropeptides. There have been several advances and challenges, both of which are the focus of this review. Discussions range from sample collection to bioinformatic tools, although avenues such as quantitation and imaging are included. Further development of the presented methods for neuropeptidomic mass spectrometric analysis is inevitable, which will lead to a further understanding of the complex interplay of neuropeptides and other signaling molecules in the nervous system.

  20. Protein profiles and immunoreactivities of Acanthamoeba morphological groups and genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumidonming, Wilawan; Koehsler, Martina; Leitsch, David; Walochnik, Julia

    2014-11-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protozoan found in a wide variety of habitats. A classification of Acanthamoeba into currently eighteen genotypes (T1-T18) has been established, however, data on differences between genotypes on the protein level are scarce. The aim of this study was to compare protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes. Thirteen strains, both clinical and non-clinical, from genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12, representing three morphological groups, were investigated for their protein profiles and IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities. It was shown that protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12 are clearly distinct from each other, but the banding patterns correlate to the morphological groups. Normal human sera revealed anti-Acanthamoeba antibodies against isolates of all investigated genotypes, interestingly, however only very weak IgM and virtually no IgA immunoreactivity with T7 and T9, both representing morphological group I. The strongest IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities were observed for genotypes T4, T5 and T6. Differences of both, protein and immunological patterns, between cytopathic and non-cytopathic strains, particularly within genotype T4, were not at the level of banding patterns, but rather in expression levels.

  1. Neuropeptides control the dynamic behavior of airway mucosal dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voedisch, Sabrina; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Veres, Tibor Z; Spies, Emma; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The airway mucosal epithelium is permanently exposed to airborne particles. A network of immune cells patrols at this interface to the environment. The interplay of immune cells is orchestrated by different mediators. In the current study we investigated the impact of neuronal signals on key functions of dendritic cells (DC). Using two-photon microscopic time-lapse analysis of living lung sections from CD11c-EYFP transgenic mice we studied the influence of neuropeptides on airway DC motility. Additionally, using a confocal microscopic approach, the phagocytotic capacity of CD11c(+) cells after neuropeptide stimulation was determined. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) leads to an unspecific release of neuropeptides from nerves. After EFS and treatment with the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), airway DC in living lung slices showed an altered motility. Furthermore, the EFS-mediated effect could partially be blocked by pre-treatment with the receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37). Additionally, the phagocytotic capacity of bone marrow-derived and whole lung CD11c(+) cells could be inhibited by neuropeptides CGRP, VIP, and Substance P. We then cross-linked these data with the in vivo situation by analyzing DC motility in two different OVA asthma models. Both in the acute and prolonged OVA asthma model altered neuropeptide amounts and DC motility in the airways could be measured. In summary, our data suggest that neuropeptides modulate key features motility and phagocytosis of mouse airway DC. Therefore altered neuropeptide levels in airways during allergic inflammation have impact on regulation of airway immune mechanisms and therefore might contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma.

  2. The P2Y-like receptor GPR17 as a sensor of damage and a new potential target in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Stefania; Villa, Giovanni; Genovese, Tiziana; Mazzon, Emanuela; Longhi, Renato; Rosa, Patrizia; Bramanti, Placido; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2009-08-01

    Upon central nervous system injury, the extracellular concentrations of nucleotides and cysteinyl-leukotrienes, two unrelated families of endogenous signalling molecules, are markedly increased at the site of damage, suggesting that they may act as 'danger signals' to alert responses to tissue damage and start repair. Here we show that, in non-injured spinal cord parenchyma, GPR17, a P2Y-like receptor responding to both uracil nucleotides (e.g. UDP-glucose) and cysteinyl-leukotrienes (e.g. LTD4 and LTC4), is present on a subset of neurons and of oligodendrocytes at different stages of maturation, whereas it is not expressed by astrocytes. GPR17 immunoreactivity was also found on ependymal cells lining the central canal that still retain some of the characteristics of stem/progenitor cells during adulthood. Induction of spinal cord injury (SCI) by acute compression resulted in marked cell death of GPR17+ neurons and oligodendrocytes inside the lesion followed by the appearance of proliferating GPR17+ microglia/macrophages migrating to and infiltrating into the lesioned area. Moreover, 72 h after SCI, GPR17+ ependymal cells started to proliferate and to express GFAP, suggesting their activation and 'de-differentiation' to pluripotent progenitor cells. The in vivo knock down of GPR17 by an antisense oligonucleotide strategy during SCI induction markedly reduced tissue damage and related histological and motor deficits, thus confirming the crucial role played by this receptor in the early phases of tissue damage development. Taken together, our findings suggest a dual and spatiotemporal-dependent role for GPR17 in SCI. At very early times after injury, GPR17 mediates neuronal and oligodendrocyte death inside the lesioned area. At later times, GPR17+ microglia/macrophages are recruited from distal parenchymal areas and move toward the lesioned zone, to suggest a role in orchestrating local remodelling responses. At the same time, the induction of the stem cell marker

  3. Coexpression of neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in pelvic plexus neurones innervating the uterus and cervix in the rat.

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    Houdeau, E; Boyer, P A; Rousseau, A; Rousseau, J P

    1997-05-01

    The present study investigates the distribution and coexpression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in neurones of the accessory ganglion (AG), hypogastric plexus (HP) and paracervical ganglion (PCG), which compose the pelvic plexus in the female rat. Nerve cell bodies immunoreactive for NPY and VIP represent 84% and 46% of the neurone population in the PCG, respectively, while immunoreactivity for each peptide is observed in about 90% of the AG and HP neurones. Adjacent sections immunostained for NPY and VIP, as well as the use of immunocytochemistry combined with in situ hybridization show that 92% of the VIP-containing neurones in the pelvic plexus also contain NPY. In addition, a retrograde tracing study performed in combination with immunocytochemistry demonstrates that pelvic plexus neurones project preferentially to the lower part of the uterus and to the cervix, and that about 95% of these projecting neurones contain VIP. Taken together, our findings indicate that in the female rat, neurones of the pelvic plexus projecting to the lower genital tract mainly coexpress VIP and NPY, and supply nerve fibres to the vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle in the uterocervical region. Since NPY and VIP exert distinct effects according to the target tissue, our results suggest that neurones coexpressing these peptides play important roles in the local regulation of the vascular bed and motor activity of the lower genital tract.

  4. Neuropeptides of the cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Reinhard; Russell, William K; Russell, David H; Suh, Charles P-C; Nachman, Ronald J

    2012-03-01

    The cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter), is an economically important pest of cotton, and increasing concerns over resistance, detrimental effects on beneficial insects and safety issues associated with traditional insecticide applications have led to an interest in research on novel, alternative strategies for control. One such approach requires a more basic understanding of the neurohormonal system that regulates important physiological properties of the fleahopper; e.g. the expression of specific messenger molecules such as neuropeptides. Therefore we performed a peptidomic study of neural tissues from the fleahopper which led to the first identification of the sequences of native peptide hormones. These peptide hormones include the following neuropeptides: corazonin, short neuropeptide F (sNPF), myosuppressin, CAPA-pyrokinin and CAPA-PVK peptides. The CAPA-pyrokinin, sNPF, and CAPA-PVK peptides represent novel sequences. A comparison of fleahopper neuropeptides with those of related heteropteran species indicates that they are quite different. The sNPF of P. seriatus shows, among others, a novel substitution of Leu with Phe within the C-terminal region; a modification that sets it apart from the known sNPFs of not only other Heteroptera but of other arthropod species as well. The identity of the neuropeptides native to the fleahopper can aid in the potential development of biostable, bioavailable mimetic agonists and antagonists capable of disrupting the physiological functions that these neuropeptides regulate.

  5. Discovery of multiple neuropeptide families in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Paul; Mair, Gunnar R; Atkinson, Louise; Ladurner, Peter; Zamanian, Mostafa; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Marks, Nikki J; Day, Tim A; Maule, Aaron G

    2009-09-01

    Available evidence shows that short amidated neuropeptides are widespread and have important functions within the nervous systems of all flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) examined, and could therefore represent a starting point for new lead drug compounds with which to combat parasitic helminth infections. However, only a handful of these peptides have been characterised, the rigorous exploration of the flatworm peptide signalling repertoire having been hindered by the dearth of flatworm genomic data. Through searches of both expressed sequence tags and genomic resources using the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), we describe 96 neuropeptides on 60 precursors from 10 flatworm species. Most of these (51 predicted peptides on 14 precursors) are novel and are apparently restricted to flatworms; the remainder comprise nine recognised peptide families including FMRFamide-like (FLPs), neuropeptide F (NPF)-like, myomodulin-like, buccalin-like and neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like peptides; notably, the latter have only previously been reported in vertebrates. Selected peptides were localised immunocytochemically to the Schistosoma mansoni nervous system. We also describe several novel flatworm NPFs with structural features characteristic of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) superfamily, previously unreported characteristics which support the common ancestry of flatworm NPFs with the NPY-superfamily. Our dataset provides a springboard for investigation of the functional biology and therapeutic potential of neuropeptides in flatworms, simultaneously launching flatworm neurobiology into the post-genomic era.

  6. Amygdalar neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors mediate the anxiolytic-like actions of neuropeptide Y in the social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajdyk, T J; Vandergriff, M G; Gehlert, D R

    1999-03-01

    The effects of intra-amygdalar neuropeptide Y infusions were assessed in rats using the social interaction test. Neuropeptide Y administered into the central nucleus of the amygdala did not alter behavior, while injections into the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala produced an increased social interaction time. Furthermore, the anxiolytic-like effect was antagonized by co-administration of the potent neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antagonist ((R)-N-[[4-(aminocarbonylaminomethyl)-phenyl]methyl]-N2-(diphen ylacetyl)-argininamide trifluoroacetate) 3304, but not with the inactive enantiomer ((R)-N-[[4-(aminocarbonylaminomethyl)-phenyl]methyl]-N2-(diphen ylacetyl)-argininamide trifluoroacetate) 3457. Therefore, neuropeptide Y produces an anxiolytic-like effect in the social interaction test through neuropetide Y Y1 receptors located in the basolateral amygdala.

  7. Neuropeptide Regulation of Appetite and Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Small CJ

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now recognised that appropriate regulation of reproduction, energy intake and energy expenditure, and thus maintenance of body weight and fertility, relies on complex hypothalamic neuro-circuitry. Feeding and reproductive function are closely linked. During times of under nourishment and falling body fat the reproductive axis is down regulated. Circulating factors and hypothalamic circuits co-ordinate these responses. Leptin has been described to be an important peripheral signal that indicates body fat stores to the hypothalamus and thus links nutrition and reproduction. Leptin acts by altering neuropeptide circuits in the hypothalamus, which alter gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH release and food intake. The importance of key neuropeptide systems identified in rodents is now being established in man. Notably mutations in the melanocortin MC4 receptor are found in up to 4 % of the morbidly obese whilst in a proportion of patients with anorexia nervosa mutations have been identified in the agoutirelated peptide (AgRP gene, which codes for an endogenous antagonist of this receptor. Intranasal administration of a melanocortin fragment known to activate the MC4 receptor decreases adiposity in humans. The melanocortin system has been shown to influence the reproductive axis in rodents. However, the role of the melanocortin system in the control of reproduction in humans remains to be established. Since the discovery of leptin, attention has also been focused on peripheral signals that regulate reproduction, food intake and energy expenditure, either directly or via feedback on hypothalamic circuits. Notable new discoveries in this area include the gastric hormone ghrelin. Circulating ghrelin stimulates food intake in rodents and humans although an influence on the reproductive axis is yet to be reported. Neuropeptidregulation von Appetit und Reproduktion. Mittlerweile gilt es als anerkannt, daß eine entsprechende Regulation der

  8. Can neuropeptides treat obesity? A review of neuropeptides and their potential role in the treatment of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Boughton, C K; Murphy, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major worldwide public health issue. The physiological systems that regulate body weight are thus of great interest as targets for anti-obesity agents. Peptidergic systems are critical to the regulation of energy homeostasis by key regions in the hypothalamus and brainstem. A number of neuropeptide systems have therefore been investigated as potential treatments for obesity. Blocking orexigenic peptide signals such as neuropeptide Y, melanin-concentrating hormone, orexins, relaxi...

  9. Identification of the CART neuropeptide circuitry processing TMT-induced predator stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anju; Rale, Abhishek; Utturwar, Kaweri; Ghose, Aurnab; Subhedar, Nishikant

    2014-12-01

    Abundance of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) neuropeptide in the limbic areas like the olfactory system, central nucleus of amygdala (CeA), ventral bed nucleus of stria terminalis (vBNST) and the hypothalamus suggests involvement of the peptide in emotive processing. We examined the role of CART in mediating fear, a strong emotion with profound survival value. Rats, exposed to 2,4,5-trimethyl-3-thiazoline (TMT), a predator related cue extracted from fox feces, showed significant increase in freezing, escape and risk assessment behavior, whereas grooming was reduced. Neuronal activity was up-regulated in the CeA and vBNST in terms of increased immunoreactivity in CART elements and c-Fos expression. Increased expression of both the markers was also seen in some discrete magnocellular as well as parvicellular subdivisions of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). However, CART containing mitral cells in the main or accessory olfactory bulb did not respond. CART antibody was stereotaxically injected bilaterally into the CeA to locally immunoneutralize endogenous CART. On exposure to TMT, these rats showed reduced freezing, risk assessment and escape behavior while grooming was restored to normal value. We suggest that the CART signaling in the CeA and vBNST, but not in the olfactory system, might be an important component of the innate fear processing, and expression of stereotypic behavior, while CART in the PVN subdivisions might mediate the neuroendocrine response to predator stress.

  10. Neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage; Immunocytochemistry, radioimmunoassay and pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alafaci, C.; Jansen, I. (Department of Experimental Research, Lund University, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Uddman, R. (Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Lund University, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Delgado, T.; Svendgaard, N.A. (Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Edvinsson, L. (Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Ekman, R. (Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of noradrenaline (NA), neuropeptide Y, (NPY), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), acetylcholine (ACh) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) has been examined in the late phase of spasm after an experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a rat model. Immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay of blood vessels from the circle of Willis did not show significant differences in NPY- and VIP-like immunoreactivity 2 days post SAH as compared to control vessels. The postjunctional effects of NA, NPY, 5-HT, Ach and VIP were studied two days after SAH using a sensitive in vitro system. NPY induced contractions were significantly (p<0.01) weaker (lower E{sub max}) in SAH as compared to control rats while the relaxant responses to ACh and VIP were slightly increased after SAH. These observations reveal that in a rat model of SAH, with an approximately 20% in vivo constriction at two days, dynamic changes occur in cerebral artery reactivity without any obvious change in sympathetic or parasympathetic perivascular nerve networks. (author).

  11. Differential plasma catecholamine and neuropeptide Y responses to acute stress in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukowska-Grojec, Z.; Konarska, M.; McCarty, R.

    1988-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a vasoconstrictor present in the sympatho-adrenomedullary system and may be co-released with norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) during sympathetic activation. The authors studied plasma NPY-immunoreactivity (-ir, radioimmunoassay) and catecholamine (radioenzymatic) responses during two acute stress paradigms that differ in character, intensity, and duration. The intermittent stress of footshock evoked intensity-dependent immediate increments in plasma NE and EPI, and a delayed NPY-ir response. Prolonged immobilization caused greater increases in plasma NE and EPI levels and no changes in plasma NPY-ir until the end of the stress session. Plasma NPY-ir responses correlated with those of NE but not with EPI suggesting a sympathetic origin for the release of the peptide. Relatively greater NPY-ir responses to footshock than to immobilization may be consistent with a preferential release of the peptide by a bursting but not continuous mode of sympathetic activation. However, it may also be due to a differential activation of the sympathetic nerves and adrenal medulla by these two stress situations.

  12. Changes of brain neuropeptide Y and its receptors in rats with flurazepam tolerance and dependence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-ping ZHANG; Li WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: Anticonvulsant tolerance and dependence are two obstacles that restrict the clinical use of benzodiazepines (BDZ). In order to explore the mechanism of these two adverse reactions, changes of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptors in the hippocampus of rat models, in relation to flurazepam (FZP, a member of BDZ) tolerance and dependence, were investigated. Methods: The mRNA of preproNPY and its receptors (Y1, Y2, and Y5) in the hippocampus were determined by competitive RT-PCR, and the distribution of NPY in the hippocampus was examined by immunohistochemistry. Results: A decrease of preproNPY mRNA in the hippocampus was foundin tolerant and dependent rats. The level ofpreproNPY mRNA in the hippocampus was reversely correlated with the degree of tolerance and dependence, measured by the threshold of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures.Immunohistochemistry indicated a decrease of NPY-immunoreactive material in neurons of the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus regions of both tolerant and dependent rats. The mRNA of NPY receptors Y1 and Y5 decreased in tolerant rats but did not change in dependent rats. The mRNA of NPY receptor Y2 increased in tolerant rats but decreased in dependent rats. Conclusion: A decrease of NPY in the hippocampus might be involved in anticonvulsant tolerance and dependence following long-term treatment with FZP. Y1, Y2, and Y5 mRNA were also altered in FZP tolerance and dependence.

  13. Effect of pulsed light on structure and immunoreactivity of gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panozzo, Agnese; Manzocco, Lara; Lippe, Giovanna; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulsed light (from 1.75 to 26.25Jcm(-2)) on selected properties of wheat gluten powder and aqueous suspension (absorbance, particle size and microstructure, free sulfhydryl content, protein fractions, protein electrophoretic mobility and immunoreactivity) was investigated. Gluten photoreactivity was strongly affected by hydration. While minor photo-induced structure modifications were observed in gluten powder, pulsed light induced the development of browning and promoted partial depolymerisation of hydrated gluten proteins by disulphide exchange. These changes were associated with a significant decrease in immunoreactivity, suggesting that pulsed light could be exploited to efficiently modify structure and thus functionality of gluten.

  14. Immunoreactivity to cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in the enteric nervous system of the pig and wild boar stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharko-Siembida, A; Arciszewski, M B

    2014-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a recently discovered peptide inducing strong anxiogenic-like effect. CART distribution and its role(s) at periphery are not well understood. Immunohistochemisty was utilized to investigate the distribution patterns of CART in the stomach of the pig and wild boar. Double immunohistochemisty was applied to elucidate whether CART-immunoreactive (IR) neuronal elements coexpress galanin, substance P (SP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). In the pig stomach, different proportions of CART-IR myenteric neurons were found in the antrum (42.3 ± 3.5%), corpus (18.0 ± 1.9%) and pylorus (33.2 ± 3.0%). CART-IR myeneric neurons were also found in the antrum, corpus and pylorus of the wild boar stomach (41.7 ± 3.2, 36.0 ± 2.2 and 35.8 ± 3.5%; respectively). In both species, none of gastric submucous neurons were CART-IR; however, CART-IR nerve fibres encircled submucous perikarya. In all portions of the pig and wild boar stomach, CART-IR nerve fibres were frequently found in the smooth muscle layer as well as in the lamina muscularis mucosae. In all regions of the pig and wild boar stomach, the expression of galanin and SP was found in CART-IR myenteric neurons and smooth muscle-supplying nerve fibres. CART/NPY coexpression was not found in the porcine stomach; however, in different regions of the wild boar stomach, subpopulations of CART-IR/NPY-IR myenteric neurons were noted. In conclusion, in this study, the existence and distribution patterns of CART in discrete regions of the pig and wild boar stomach were described in details. Colocalization studies revealed that in both animal species, a functional cooperation of CART with several neuropeptides is likely.

  15. Non-peptidergic primary afferents are presynaptic to neurokinin-1 receptor immunoreactive lamina I projection neurons in rat spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abeer W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain-related (nociceptive information is carried from the periphery to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord mostly by two populations of small diameter primary afferents, the peptidergic and the non-peptidergic. The peptidergic population expresses neuropeptides, such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, while the non-peptidergic fibers are devoid of neuropeptides, express the purinergic receptor P2X3, and bind the isolectin B4 (IB4. Although it has been known for some time that in rat the peptidergic afferents terminate mostly in lamina I and outer lamina II and non-peptidergic afferents in inner lamina II, the extent of the termination of the latter population in lamina I was never investigated as it was considered as very minor. Because our preliminary evidence suggested otherwise, we decided to re-examine the termination of non-peptidergic afferents in lamina I, in particular with regards to their innervation of projection neurons expressing substance P receptors (NK-1r. We used retrograde labeling of neurons from the parabrachial nucleus combined with lectin IB4 binding and immunocytochemistry. Samples were examined by confocal and electron microscopy. Results By confocal microscopy, we studied the termination of non-peptidergic afferents in lamina I using IB4 binding and P2X3 immunoreactivity as markers, in relation to CGRP immunoreactivy, a marker of peptidergic afferents. The number of IB4 or P2X3-labeled fibers in lamina I was higher than previously thought, although they were less abundant than CGRP-labeled afferents. There were very few fibers double-labeled for CGRP and either P2X3 or IB4. We found a considerable number of IB4-positive fiber varicosities in close apposition to NK-1r-positive lamina I projection neurons, which were distinct from peptidergic varicosities. Furthermore, we confirmed at the ultrastructural level that there were bona fide synapses between P2X3-immunoreactive non

  16. Co-expression patterns of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) with neuropeptides in dorsal root ganglia of the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharko-Siembida, Anna; Kulik, Paweł; Szalak, Radosław; Lalak, Roman; Arciszewski, Marcin Bartłomiej

    2014-03-01

    In the present study the neuronal distribution of CART was evaluated immunohistochemically in porcine dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). In co-localization studies the co-expression patterns of CART with SP, CGRP, galanin, CALB and LENK were investigated by means of triple immunohistochemical stainings. In porcine DRGs, the expression of CART was found in approximately 5% of primary sensory neurons. The vast majority (ca. 95%) of CART-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were small and middle sized, and only 5% were categorized as large. CART-IR neurons additionally exhibiting the presence of SP/CGRP (ca. 12%), SP/CALB (ca. 12%), SP/LENK (ca. 5%) were found. The vast majority of CART-IR/CGRP-IR neurons did not display immunoreaction to SP (ca. 60%). Subclasses of CART-IR/LENK-IR/SP-negative (ca. 5%), as well as CART-IR/CALB-IR/SP-negative neurons (ca. 10%), were also visualized. In addition, CART-IR neurons with no immunoreactivities to any of the neuropeptides studied were also shown. In porcine DRGs none of the CART-IR neurons exhibited the presence of galanin. The results obtained in the study suggest that CART may functionally modulate the activity of the porcine primary sensory neurons. It is concluded that co-expression of CART with CGRP, SP, LENK and CALB in subsets of the pig L1-L6 DRGs neurons provide anatomical evidence for a CART role in pain processing.

  17. [Leu31, Pro34]neuropeptide Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhlendorff, J; Gether, U; Aakerlund, L;

    1990-01-01

    Two types of binding sites have previously been described for 36-amino acid neuropeptide Y (NPY), called Y1 and Y2 receptors. Y2 receptors can bind long C-terminal fragments of NPY-e.g., NPY-(13-36)-peptide. In contrast, Y1 receptors have until now only been characterized as NPY receptors that do...... not bind such fragments. In the present study an NPY analog is presented, [Leu31, Pro34]NPY, which in a series of human neuroblastoma cell lines and on rat PC-12 cells can displace radiolabeled NPY only from cells that express Y1 receptors and not from those expressing Y2 receptors. The radiolabeled analog......, [125I-Tyr36] monoiodo-[Leu31, Pro34]NPY, also binds specifically only to cells with Y1 receptors. The binding of this analog to Y1 receptors on human neuroblastoma cells is associated with a transient increase in cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations similar to the response observed with NPY. [Leu31...

  18. The neuropeptide oxytocin modulates consumer brand relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Andreas; Thron, Jesko; Scheele, Dirk; Marsh, Nina; Hurlemann, René

    2015-10-09

    Each year, companies invest billions of dollars into marketing activities to embellish brands as valuable relationship partners assuming that consumer brand relationships (CBRs) and interpersonal relationships rest upon the same neurobiological underpinnings. Given the crucial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in social bonding, this study tests whether OXT-based mechanisms also determine the bond between consumers and brands. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study involving 101 subjects and analyzed the effect of intranasal OXT on consumers' attribution of relationship qualities to brands, brands paired with human celebrity endorsers, and familiar persons. OXT indeed promoted the attribution of relationship qualities not only in the case of social and semi-social stimuli, but also brands. Intriguingly, for subjects scoring high on autistic-like traits, the effect of OXT was completely reversed, evident in even lower relationship qualities across all stimulus categories. The importance of OXT in a CBR context is further corroborated by a three-fold increase in endogenous release of OXT following exposure to one's favorite brand and positive associations between baseline peripheral OXT concentrations and brand relationship qualities. Collectively, our findings indicate that OXT not only plays a fundamental role in developing interpersonal relationships, but also enables relationship formation with objects such as brands.

  19. Bombesin-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Dockray, G J; Yanaihara, N

    1981-01-01

    With immunocytochemical methods, nerve cells have been detected in Hydra attenuata containing bombesin-like immunoreactivity. These nerve cells are located in ectoderm of all body regions of the animal and are especially abundant in basal disk and tentacles. Radioimmunoassay of extracts of hydra ...

  20. Neurotensin-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Carraway, R E; Rökaeus, A

    1981-01-01

    Neurotensin-like immunoreactivity is found in nerve fibers present in all body regions of hydra. The nerve fibers are especially numerous in the ectoderm at the bases of the tentacles and in the ectoderm at a site just above the foot. Radioimmunoassays of acetic-acid extracts of hydra, using vari...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1405 - Immunoreactive insulin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoreactive insulin test system. 862.1405 Section 862.1405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  2. Bombesin-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Dockray, G J; Yanaihara, N

    1981-01-01

    With immunocytochemical methods, nerve cells have been detected in Hydra attenuata containing bombesin-like immunoreactivity. These nerve cells are located in ectoderm of all body regions of the animal and are especially abundant in basal disk and tentacles. Radioimmunoassay of extracts of hydra...

  3. Neuropeptide Y receptor binding sites in rat brain: differential autoradiographic localizations with sup 125 I-peptide YY and sup 125 I-neuropeptide Y imply receptor heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, D.R.; Walker, M.W.; Miller, R.J.; Snyder, S.H. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor binding sites have been localized in the rat brain by in vitro autoradiography using picomolar concentrations of both 125I-NPY and 125I-peptide YY (PYY) and new evidence provided for differentially localized receptor subtypes. Equilibrium binding studies using membranes indicate that rat brain contains a small population of high-affinity binding sites and a large population of moderate-affinity binding sites. 125I-PYY (10 pM) is selective for high-affinity binding sites (KD = 23 pM), whereas 10 pM 125I-NPY labels both high- and moderate-affinity sites (KD = 54 pM and 920 pM). The peptide specificity and affinity of these ligands in autoradiographic experiments match those seen in homogenates. Binding sites for 125I-PYY are most concentrated in the lateral septum, stratum oriens, and radiatum of the hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex, entorhinal cortex, several thalamic nuclei, including the reuniens and lateral posterior nuclei, and substantia nigra, pars compacta, and pars lateralis. In the brain stem, 125I-PYY sites are densest in a variety of nuclei on the floor of the fourth ventricle, including the pontine central grey, the supragenual nucleus, and the area postrema. 125I-NPY binding sites are found in similar areas, but relative levels of NPY binding and PYY binding differ regionally, suggesting differences in sites labeled by the two ligands. These receptor localizations resemble the distribution of endogenous NPY in some areas, but others, such as the hypothalamus, contain NPY immunoreactivity but few binding sites.

  4. Analysis of p53- immunoreactivity in astrocytic brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkarenko T.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available P53 is an antioncogene with the frequently occured mutations in human tumor cells, leading to corresponding protein overexpression which can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Researches dedicated to the investigation of possibilities of using this technique gave controversial results. The authors investigated features of p53 protein expression in astrocytic brain tumors with different degrees of malignancy. Analyzed the relationship of the expression level of p53 by tumor cells with clinical parameters and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI as well. Tissues were collected from 52 cases with diagnosed astrocytic brain tumors. The sections were immunohistochemically stained with p53 and Ki-67. For each marker, 1000 tumor cells were counted and the ratio of positive tumor cells was calculated using software package ImageJ 1,47v. In normal brain tissue p53- expression was not identified. p53-immunoreactive tumor cells were detected in 25% (1/4 pilocytic astrocytomas, 33.3% (2/6 of diffuse astrocytomas, 53.8% (7/13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 58.6% (17/29 glioblastomas. A high proportion of p53-immunoreactive cells (> 30% was observed only in glioblastomas. The level of p53-imunoreactivity was not related to the age, gender and Grade WHO (p> 0,05. Spearman correlation coefficient between the relative quantity of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive nuclei showed weak direct correlation (0.023, but the one was not statistically significant (p> 0,05. The level of p53-imunoreactivity is not dependent from age and sex of patients, Grade (WHO and proliferative activity (p>0,05 but the high level of p53-immunoreactive cells (>30% is found in glioblastoma specimens only, that may be due to the accumulation of mutations in DNA of tumor cells. There is insignificant weak relationship between relative quantities of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive tumor cells (p>0,05.

  5. NPY and VGF Immunoreactivity Increased in the Arcuate Nucleus, but Decreased in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of Type-II Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderi, Nadia; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Avendaño-Pradel, Rafael; Basualdo, Maria del Carmen; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Chávez-Macías, Laura; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase in human brain are localized in the same areas as in rodent brain. The similar distribution of NPY, α-MSH and VGF indicated that these neurons in the human brain may share similar functionality as in the rodent brain. The number of NPY and VGF immuno positive cells was increased in the infundibular nucleus of diabetic subjects in comparison to non-diabetic controls. In contrast, NPY and VGF were down regulated in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius of diabetic patients. These results suggest an activation of NPY producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which, according to animal experimental studies, is related to a catabolic state and might be the basis for increased hepatic glucose production in type-2 diabetes. PMID:22808091

  6. NPY and VGF immunoreactivity increased in the arcuate nucleus, but decreased in the nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of type-II diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderi, Nadia; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Avendaño-Pradel, Rafael; Basualdo, Maria del Carmen; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Chávez-Macías, Laura; Roblera, Juan E Olvera; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2012-01-01

    Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase in human brain are localized in the same areas as in rodent brain. The similar distribution of NPY, α-MSH and VGF indicated that these neurons in the human brain may share similar functionality as in the rodent brain. The number of NPY and VGF immuno positive cells was increased in the infundibular nucleus of diabetic subjects in comparison to non-diabetic controls. In contrast, NPY and VGF were down regulated in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius of diabetic patients. These results suggest an activation of NPY producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which, according to animal experimental studies, is related to a catabolic state and might be the basis for increased hepatic glucose production in type-2 diabetes.

  7. NPY and VGF immunoreactivity increased in the arcuate nucleus, but decreased in the nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, of type-II diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Saderi

    Full Text Available Ample animal studies demonstrate that neuropeptides NPY and α-MSH expressed in Arcuate Nucleus and Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius, modulate glucose homeostasis and food intake. In contrast is the absence of data validating these observations for human disease. Here we compare the post mortem immunoreactivity of the metabolic neuropeptides NPY, αMSH and VGF in the infundibular nucleus, and brainstem of 11 type-2 diabetic and 11 non-diabetic individuals. α-MSH, NPY and tyrosine hydroxylase in human brain are localized in the same areas as in rodent brain. The similar distribution of NPY, α-MSH and VGF indicated that these neurons in the human brain may share similar functionality as in the rodent brain. The number of NPY and VGF immuno positive cells was increased in the infundibular nucleus of diabetic subjects in comparison to non-diabetic controls. In contrast, NPY and VGF were down regulated in the Nucleus of the Tractus Solitarius of diabetic patients. These results suggest an activation of NPY producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which, according to animal experimental studies, is related to a catabolic state and might be the basis for increased hepatic glucose production in type-2 diabetes.

  8. Atlas of Central Nervous System and the first Neuropeptide from Fire Ant

    Science.gov (United States)

    In some insects, especially lepidopteran species, regulation of pheromone biosynthesis and production is under hormonal control. The neuropeptide hormone responsible, PBAN (Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide), is synthesized in the subesophageal ganglion (SG) and released into the hemoly...

  9. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  10. Peptidomics for the discovery and characterization of neuropeptides and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, Elena V; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of neuropeptides as signaling molecules with paracrine or hormonal regulatory functions has led to trailblazing advances in physiology and fostered the characterization of numerous neuropeptide-binding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as potential drug targets. The impact on human health has been tremendous: approximately 30% of commercial drugs act via the GPCR pathway. However, about 25% of the GPCRs encoded by the mammalian genome still lack their pharmacological identity. Searching for the orphan GPCR endogenous ligands that are likely to be neuropeptides has proved to be a formidable task. Here we describe the mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies and experimental strategies that have been successful in achieving high-throughput characterization of endogenous peptides in nervous and endocrine systems.

  11. Brain neuropeptides in central ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation in trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude eLe Mével

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many neuropeptides and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are present within the brain area involved in ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation but only a few mammalian studies have focused on the integrative physiological actions of neuropeptides on these vital cardio-respiratory regulations. Because both the central neuroanatomical substrates that govern motor ventilatory and cardiovascular output and the primary sequence of regulatory peptides and their receptors have been mostly conserved through evolution, we have developed a trout model to study the central action of native neuropeptides on cardio-ventilatory regulation. In the present review, we summarize the most recent results obtained using this non-mammalian model with a focus on PACAP, VIP, tachykinins, CRF, urotensin-1, CGRP, angiotensin-related peptides, urotensin-II, NPY, and PYY. We propose hypotheses regarding the physiological relevance of the results obtained.

  12. Role of endogenous neuropeptides in the pathomechanism of alcohol addiction

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    Urszula Rudzińska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies with endogenous neuropeptides have indicated their modulating role in the etiology of alcoholism. The role of endogenous opioids is relatively well known and there is growing evidence for a role of the appetite-regulating peptides leptin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, and orexins. It has been demonstrated that these peptides could also be involved in alcohol intake regulation and the occurrence of alcohol craving. Moreover, important significance is attached to corticotrophin-releasing factor, since an increased level of this peptide during alcohol withdrawal is responsible for the occurrence of anxiety behaviors. Knowledge of the processes tied with neuropeptides is needed in the search for more effective therapy for alcohol addiction as their actions could perhaps facilitate the search for new medicines which would adapt the therapy to the individual patient as well as contribute to increasing the effectiveness of alcohol addiction therapy.

  13. Regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides

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    Jean-Luc eDo-Rego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out to visualize the neurotransmitter- or neuropeptide-containing fibers contacting steroid-synthesizing neurons as well as the neurotransmitter, peptide hormones or neuropeptide receptors expressed in these neurons. Biochemical experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones or neuropeptides on neurosteroid biosynthesis, and to characterize the type of receptors involved. Thus, it has been found that glutamate, acting through kainate and/or AMPA receptors, rapidly inactivates P450arom, and that melatonin produced by the pineal gland and eye inhibits the biosynthesis of 7-hydroxypregnenolone (7-OH-5P, while prolactin produced by the adenohypophysis enhances the formation of 7-OH-5P. It has also been demonstrated that the biosynthesis of neurosteroids is inhibited by GABA, acting through GABAA receptors, and neuropeptide Y, acting through Y1 receptors. In contrast, it has been shown that the octadecaneuropetide ODN, acting through central-type benzodiazepine receptors, the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, acting though peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, and vasotocine, acting through V1a-like receptors, stimulate the production of neurosteroids. Since neurosteroids are implicated in the control of various neurophysiological and behavioral processes, these data suggest that some of the neurophysiological effects exerted by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides may be mediated via the regulation

  14. Neuropeptides and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter; Farzi, Aitak

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators both within the nervous system and between neurons and other cell types. Neuropeptides such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing factor are also likely to play a role in the bidirectional gut-brain communication. In this capacity they may influence the activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota and its interaction with the gut-brain axis. Current efforts in elucidating the implication of neuropeptides in the microbiota-gut-brain axis address four information carriers from the gut to the brain (vagal and spinal afferent neurons; immune mediators such as cytokines; gut hormones; gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) and four information carriers from the central nervous system to the gut (sympathetic efferent neurons; parasympathetic efferent neurons; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal medulla; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal cortex). Apart from operating as neurotransmitters, many biologically active peptides also function as gut hormones. Given that neuropeptides and gut hormones target the same cell membrane receptors (typically G protein-coupled receptors), the two messenger roles often converge in the same or similar biological implications. This is exemplified by NPY and peptide YY (PYY), two members of the PP-fold peptide family. While PYY is almost exclusively expressed by enteroendocrine cells, NPY is found at all levels of the gut-brain and brain-gut axis. The function of PYY-releasing enteroendocrine cells is directly influenced by short chain fatty acids generated by the intestinal microbiota from indigestible fibre, while NPY may control the impact of the gut microbiota on inflammatory processes, pain, brain function and behaviour. Although the impact of neuropeptides on the interaction between the gut microbiota and brain awaits to be analysed, biologically active peptides

  15. Genomics, transcriptomics, and peptidomics of Daphnia pulex neuropeptides and protein hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dircksen, Heinrich; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    We report 43 novel genes in the water flea Daphnia pulex encoding 73 predicted neuropeptide and protein hormones as partly confirmed by RT-PCR. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identified 40 neuropeptides by mass matches and 30 neuropeptides by fragmentation sequencing. Single genes encode adipokinetic...

  16. Combined gene overexpression of neuropeptide Y and its receptor Y5 in the hippocampus suppresses seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Casper René; Nikitidou, Litsa; Sørensen, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    on kainate-induced motor seizures in rats. However, combined overexpression of Y5 receptors and neuropeptide Y exerted prominent suppression of seizures. This seizure-suppressant effect of combination gene therapy with Y5 receptors and neuropeptide Y was significantly stronger as compared to neuropeptide Y...

  17. Pathogenic involvement of neuropeptides in anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Brett

    2010-06-01

    Anxiety and depression are highly prevalent disorders of mood posing significant challenges to individuals and society. Current evidence indicates no single neurobiological determinant underpins these conditions and an integrated approach in both research and treatment is expedient. Basic, behavioral, and clinical science indicates various stress-responsive neuropeptides in the neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral pathophysiology of stress-related disorders including anxiety and depression. This review draws on recent research to capture the consensus and implications of neuropeptide research concerning the pathogenesis of anxiety and depression.

  18. SALMFamide salmagundi: the biology of a neuropeptide family in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, Maurice R

    2014-09-01

    The SALMFamides are a family of neuropeptides that occur in species belonging to the phylum Echinodermata. The prototypes for this neuropeptide family (S1 and S2) were discovered in starfish but subsequently SALMFamides were identified in other echinoderms. There are two types of SALMFamides: L-type, which have the C-terminal motif SxLxFamide, and F-type, which have the C-terminal motif SxFxFamide. They are derived from two types of precursor proteins: an L-type SALMFamide precursor, which comprises only L-type or L-type-like SALMFamides and an F-type SALMFamide precursor, which contains several F-type or F-type-like SALMFamides and, typically, one or more L-type SALMFamides. Thus, SALMFamides occur as heterogeneous mixtures of neuropeptides - a SALMFamide salmagundi. SALMFamides are produced by distinct populations of neurons in echinoderm larval and adult nervous systems and are present in the innervation of neuromuscular organs. Both L-type and F-type SALMFamides cause muscle relaxation in echinoderms and, for example, in starfish this effect of SALMFamides may mediate neural control of cardiac stomach eversion in species that feed extra-orally (e.g., Asterias rubens). The SALMFamide S1 also causes inhibition of neural release of a relaxin-like gonadotropin in the starfish Asterina pectinifera. An important issue that remains to be resolved are the relationships of SALMFamides with neuropeptides that have been identified in other phyla. However, it has been noted that the C-terminal SxLxFamide motif of L-type SALMFamides is a feature of some members of a bilaterian neuropeptide family that includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in vertebrates and SIFamide-type neuropeptides in protostomes. Similarly, the C-terminal FxFamide motif of F-type SALMFamides is a feature of vertebrate QRFP (26RFa)-type neuropeptides. These sequence similarities may provide a basis for molecular identification of receptors that mediate effects of SALMFamides. Furthermore

  19. Changes in PACAP immunoreactivity in human milk and presence of PAC1 receptor in mammary gland during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csanaky, Katalin; Banki, Eszter; Szabadfi, Krisztina; Reglodi, Dora; Tarcai, Ibolya; Czegledi, Levente; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Ertl, Tibor; Gyarmati, Judit; Szanto, Zalan; Zapf, Istvan; Sipos, Erika; Shioda, Seiji; Tamas, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with widespread occurrence in the nervous system and peripheral organs, including the mammary gland. Previously, we have shown that PACAP38 is present in the human milk at higher levels than in respective blood samples. However, it is not known how PACAP levels and the expression of PAC1 receptor change during lactation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate PACAP38-like immunoreactivity (PACAP38-LI) in human colostrums and transitional and mature milk during lactation and to compare the expression of PAC1 receptors in lactating and non-lactating mammary glands. We found that PACAP38-LI was significantly higher in human colostrum samples than in the transitional and mature milk. PACAP38-LI did not show any significant changes within the first 10-month period of lactation, but a significant increase was observed thereafter, up to the examined 17th month. Weak expression of PAC1 receptors was detected in non-lactating sheep and human mammary glands, but a significant increase was observed in the lactating sheep samples. In summary, the present study is the first to show changes of PACAP levels in human milk during lactation. The presence of PACAP in the milk suggests a potential role in the development of newborn, while the increased expressions of PAC1 receptors on lactating breast may indicate a PACAP38/PAC1 interaction in the mammary gland during lactation.

  20. Distribution of Vasotocin- and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide-like Immunoreactivity in the Brain of Blue Tit (Cyanistes coeruleus

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    Catherine Monique Montagnese

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping.The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species.

  1. Fos-like immunoreactivity in Siberian hamster brain during initiation of torpor-like hypothermia induced by 2DG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Ho; Dark, John

    2007-08-01

    Systemic 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG) produces pronounced torpor-like hypothermia (notSiberian hamster. Siberian hamsters are heterothermic, naturally undergoing photoperiod-dependent torpor during winter-like photoperiods. Fos was used to identify neural structures activated during the initiation of torpor-like hypothermia induced by 2DG treatment. The Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-li) in the area postrema and nucleus of the solitary tract that predominantly characterizes other 2DG-induced responses was absent during 2DG-induced torpor in the present experiment. Fos-li was seen in a number of forebrain and hindbrain sites during entry into hypothermia, but the densest Fos-li was found in the parvocellular portion of the paraventricular nucleus. Fos-li in the medial nucleus of the amygdala and the dorsal lateral septum also distinguished 2DG-induced torpor from other 2DG-induced behaviors. The possible involvement of neuropeptide Y pathways during 2DG-induced expression of reversible hypothermia is discussed.

  2. Increased caspase-3 immunoreactivity of erythrocytes in STZ diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fırat, Uğur; Kaya, Savaş; Cim, Abdullah; Büyükbayram, Hüseyin; Gökalp, Osman; Dal, Mehmet Sinan; Tamer, Mehmet Numan

    2012-01-01

    Eryptosis is a term to define apoptosis of erythrocytes. Oxidative stress and hyperglycemia, both of which exist in the diabetic intravascular environment, can trigger eryptosis of erythrocytes. In this experimental study, it is presented that the majority of erythrocytes shows caspase-3 immunoreactivity in streptozocin- (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Besides that, caspase-3 positive erythrocytes are aggregated and attached to vascular endothelium. In conclusion, these results may start a debate that eryptosis could have a role in the diabetic complications.

  3. Modulation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase, Neuropeptide Y, Glutamate, and Substance P in Ganglia and Brain Areas Involved in Cardiovascular Control after Chronic Exposure to Nicotine

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    Merari F. R. Ferrari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering that nicotine instantly interacts with central and peripheral nervous systems promoting cardiovascular effects after tobacco smoking, we evaluated the modulation of glutamate, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, neuropeptide Y (NPY, and substance P (SP in nodose/petrosal and superior cervical ganglia, as well as TH and NPY in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN of normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR after 8 weeks of nicotine exposure. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization data demonstrated increased expression of TH in brain and ganglia related to blood pressure control, preferentially in SHR, after nicotine exposure. The alkaloid also increased NPY immunoreactivity in ganglia, NTS, and PVN of SHR, in spite of decreasing its receptor (NPY1R binding in NTS of both strains. Nicotine increased SP and glutamate in ganglia. In summary, nicotine positively modulated the studied variables in ganglia while its central effects were mainly constrained to SHR.

  4. Anxiolytic-like effect of the selective neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 in the elevated plus-maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Fabrizio; Mathé, Aleksander A; Jiménez, Patricia; Stasi, Luigi; Arban, Roberto; Gerrard, Philip; Caberlotto, Laura

    2006-12-01

    The involvement of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the pathophysiology of mood disorders has been suggested by clinical and preclinical evidence. NPY Y1 and Y2 receptors have been proposed to mediate the NPY modulation of stress responses and anxiety related behaviors. To further investigate the role of Y2 receptors in anxiety we studied the effect of BIIE0246, a selective Y2 receptor antagonist, in the elevated plus-maze test. Rats treated with 1.0 nmol BIIE0246 showed an increase in the time spent on the open arm of the maze. In addition, to study the effects of the Y2 antagonism on NPY protein level, NPY-like immunoreactivity was measured in different brain regions following treatment with BIIE0246, but no statistically significant effects were observed. These results suggest that BIIE0246 has an anxiolytic-like profile in the elevated plus-maze.

  5. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we s...

  6. Neuropeptides and social behavior of rats tested in dyadic encounters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesink, R.J.M.; Ree, J.M. van

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various neuropeptides on social behavior was studied in a test procedure in which 7-day isolated animals were tested together with non-isolated partners in dyadic encounters. The short-term isolation procedure increased the frequency and duration of social activities of the rats, but

  7. Functional roles of neuropeptides in the insect central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, D. R.

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequencing project we can begin to appreciate the extent of the complexity in the components involved in signal transfer and modulation in the nervous system of an animal with reasonably complex behavior. Of all the different classes of signaling substances utilized by the nervous system, the neuropeptides are the most diverse structurally and functionally. Thus peptidergic mechanisms of action in the central nervous system need to be analyzed in the context of the neuronal circuits in which they act and generalized traits cannot be established. By taking advantage of Drosophila molecular genetics and the presence of identifiable neurons, it has been possible to interfere with peptidergic signaling in small populations of central neurons and monitor the consequences on behavior. These studies and experiments on other insects with large identifiable neurons, permitting cellular analysis of signaling mechanisms, have outlined important principles for temporal and spatial action of neuropeptides in outputs of the circadian clock and in orchestrating molting behavior. Considering the large number of neuropeptides available in each insect species and their diverse distribution patterns, it is to be expected that different neuropeptides play roles in most aspects of insect physiology and behavior.

  8. Insight into the molecular and functional diversity of cnidarian neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Takeda, Noriyo

    2015-01-23

    Cnidarians are the most primitive animals to possess a nervous system. This phylum is composed of the classes Scyphozoa (jellyfish), Cubozoa (box jellyfish), and Hydrozoa (e.g., Hydra, Hydractinia), which make up the subphylum Medusozoa, as well as the class Anthozoa (sea anemones and corals). Neuropeptides have an early evolutionary origin and are already abundant in cnidarians. For example, from the cnidarian Hydra, a key model system for studying the peptides involved in developmental and physiological processes, we identified a wide variety of novel neuropeptides from Hydra magnipapillata (the Hydra Peptide Project). Most of these peptides act directly on muscle cells and induce contraction and relaxation. Some peptides are involved in cell differentiation and morphogenesis. In this review, we describe FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs), GLWamide-family peptides, and the neuropeptide Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide. Several hundred FLPs have been isolated from invertebrate animals such as cnidarians. GLWamide-family peptides function as signaling molecules in muscle contraction, metamorphosis, and settlement in cnidarians. Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide enhances neuronal differentiation in Hydra. Recently, GLWamide-family peptides and Hym-355; FPQSFLPRGamide were shown to trigger oocyte maturation and subsequent spawning in the hydrozoan jellyfish Cytaeis uchidae. These findings suggest the importance of these neuropeptides in both developmental and physiological processes.

  9. The insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold stress responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Insects are so successful because of great resistance to environmental stress, yet little is known about how such responses may be mediated by the neuroendocrine system. Results: We provide evidence that the capability (capa) neuropeptide gene and peptide are critical mediators of desic...

  10. Neuropeptides and social behavior of rats tested in dyadic encounters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesink, R.J.M.; Ree, J.M. van

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various neuropeptides on social behavior was studied in a test procedure in which 7-day isolated animals were tested together with non-isolated partners in dyadic encounters. The short-term isolation procedure increased the frequency and duration of social activities of the rats, but

  11. Neuropeptides and Microglial Activation in Inflammation, Pain, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Carniglia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglial cells are responsible for immune surveillance within the CNS. They respond to noxious stimuli by releasing inflammatory mediators and mounting an effective inflammatory response. This is followed by release of anti-inflammatory mediators and resolution of the inflammatory response. Alterations to this delicate process may lead to tissue damage, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Chronic pain, such as inflammatory or neuropathic pain, is accompanied by neuroimmune activation, and the role of glial cells in the initiation and maintenance of chronic pain has been the subject of increasing research over the last two decades. Neuropeptides are small amino acidic molecules with the ability to regulate neuronal activity and thereby affect various functions such as thermoregulation, reproductive behavior, food and water intake, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides can also affect inflammatory responses and pain sensitivity by modulating the activity of glial cells. The last decade has witnessed growing interest in the study of microglial activation and its modulation by neuropeptides in the hope of developing new therapeutics for treating neurodegenerative diseases and chronic pain. This review summarizes the current literature on the way in which several neuropeptides modulate microglial activity and response to tissue damage and how this modulation may affect pain sensitivity.

  12. Neuropeptides in Alzheimer's Disease : From Pathophysiological Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, Debby; Van Dijck, Annemie; Janssen, Leen; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides are found throughout the entire nervous system where they can act as neurotransmitter, neuromodulator or neurohormone. In those functions, they play important roles in the regulation of cognition and behavior. In brain disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD), where abnormal cognition a

  13. Mice lacking neuropeptide Y show increased sensitivity to cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing data implicating neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the neurobiology of addiction. This study explored the possible role of NPY in cocaine-induced behavior using NPY knockout mice. The transgenic mice showed a hypersensitive response to cocaine in three animal models of cocaine addiction...

  14. Evolution of pigment-dispersing factor neuropeptides in Panarthropoda: Insights from Onychophora (velvet worms) and Tardigrada (water bears).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Georg; Hering, Lars; Stosch, Juliane M; Stevenson, Paul A; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2015-09-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) denotes a conserved family of homologous neuropeptides present in several invertebrate groups, including mollusks, nematodes, insects, and crustaceans (referred to here as pigment-dispersing hormone [PDH]). With regard to their encoding genes (pdf, pdh), insects possess only one, nematodes two, and decapod crustaceans up to three, but their phylogenetic relationship is unknown. To shed light on the origin and diversification of pdf/pdh homologs in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda) and other molting animals (Ecdysozoa), we analyzed the transcriptomes of five distantly related onychophorans and a representative tardigrade and searched for putative pdf homologs in publically available genomes of other protostomes. This revealed only one pdf homolog in several mollusk and annelid species; two in Onychophora, Priapulida, and Nematoda; and three in Tardigrada. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the last common ancestor of Panarthropoda possessed two pdf homologs, one of which was lost in the arthropod or arthropod/tardigrade lineage, followed by subsequent duplications of the remaining homolog in some taxa. Immunolocalization of PDF-like peptides in six onychophoran species, by using a broadly reactive antibody that recognizes PDF/PDH peptides in numerous species, revealed an elaborate system of neurons and fibers in their central and peripheral nervous systems. Large varicose projections in the heart suggest that the PDF neuropeptides functioned as both circulating hormones and locally released transmitters in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. The lack of PDF-like-immunoreactive somata associated with the onychophoran optic ganglion conforms to the hypothesis that onychophoran eyes are homologous to the arthropod median ocelli.

  15. Immunohistochemical localization of neuropeptide FF-like in the brain of the turtle: relation to catecholaminergic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, M; Smeets, W J A J; López, J M; Moreno, N; Morona, R; Domínguez, L; González, A

    2008-03-18

    A previous study in the lizard Gekko gecko has revealed that neuropeptide FF (NPFF, a neuropeptide involved in nociception, cardiovascular regulation, and endocrine function) is widely distributed throughout the brain and spinal cord. Although the distribution of NPFF immunoreactivity shares many features with that found in other vertebrates, it was noted that Gekko shared more features with anamniotes in terms of number of cell groups, more elaborate networks of fibers, and lack of colocalization with catecholamines, than with mammals. To assess the primitive or derived character of these features, NPFF and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) antibodies have been applied to the brain and spinal cord of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans, which belongs to a different radiation of reptiles. As in Gekko, major NPFF-ir cell groups were found in the diagonal band nucleus of Broca and in the hypothalamus, whereas additional cells were identified in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral and dorsal cortices, dorsal ventricular ridge, and the intergeniculate leaflet formation. Notable differences are the presence of NPFF-ir cells in the medial cortex and striatum of Pseudemys, which are lacking in Gekko. On the other hand, no NPFF-ir cells could be detected in the septal region and dorsal horn of the spinal cord in Pseudemys. Double staining with NPFF and TH antibodies revealed an intimate relationship between NPFF-ir and TH-ir structures but colocalization could not be established. In conclusion, the distribution of NPFF in the brain of Pseudemys has corroborated previous results in Gekko, but also revealed some notable species differences.

  16. Single-dose and chronic corticosterone treatment alters c-Fos or FosB immunoreactivity in the rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakács, Réka; Fazekas, Ildikó; Mihály, András; Krisztin-Péva, Beáta; Juhász, Anna; Janka, Zoltán

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of single-dose and chronic corticosterone treatment on the inducible transcription factor c-Fos and FosB, and thereby to estimate the effects of high-doses of corticosterone on calcium-dependent neuronal responses in the rat cerebral cortex. At the same time we investigated the distribution of interneurons containing calretinin (CR), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in chronically treated animals in order to collect data on the involvement of inhibitory neurons in this process. Adult male rats were injected subcutaneously with 10mg corticosterone, whereas controls received the vehicle (sesame oil). The animals were fixed by transcardial perfusion 12 and 24h following single corticosterone injection, and the brains were processed for c-Fos and FosB immunohistochemistry. To investigate the effects of repeated corticosterone administration, rats were daily treated with the same amount of corticosterone (10mg/animal, subcutaneously) for 21 days. Controls were injected with vehicle. At the end of the experiment, the rats were perfused and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the presence of the FosB protein, CR, VIP and NPY. Quantitative evaluation of immunolabelled cells was performed in the neocortex and the hippocampus. The number of immunoreactive nuclei per unit area was used as a quantitative measure of the effects of corticosterone. It was found that a single-dose administration of corticosterone resulted in a significant, time-dependent increase of c-Fos protein immunoreactivity in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, as well as in regions CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus 12 and 24h post-injection with respect to control animals. Significant enhancement of c-Fos immunoreactivity was also observed in the neocortex at 12 and 24h post-injection. Single-dose treatment did not significantly alter FosB immunolabelling. Repeated administration of corticosterone produced a complex

  17. Altered neuropeptide Y Y1 responses in mesenteric arteries in rats with congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, A; Nilsson, T; Sun, X Y;

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate if the potentiating effect of neuropeptide Y on various vasoactive agents in vitro is (1) altered in mesenteric arteries from rats with congestive heart failure and (2) mediated by the neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor. The direct vascular effects...... of the neuropeptide Y Y1 antagonist, BIBP3226 (BIBP3226¿(R)-N2-(diphenylacetyl)-N-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)methyl ]-D-arginine-amide¿). Neuropeptide Y, per se, had no vasoactive effect in the arteries. The potency of endothelin-1 was significantly decreased in congestive heart failure rats. Neuropeptide Y and neuropeptide Y......-(13-36) potentiated the endothelin-1-induced contraction in congestive heart failure mesenteric arteries. In 20% of the congestive heart failure rats, sarafotoxin 6c induced a contraction of 31+/-4%. Neuropeptide Y also potentiated U46619- and noradrenaline-induced contractions but not 5-HT...

  18. Comparison of the activation of somatostatin- and neuropeptide Y-containing neuronal populations of the rat amygdala following two different anxiogenic stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ryan K.; White, L. Casey; Frederick-Duus, Dani; Kaigler, Kris F.; Fadel, Jim R.; Wilson, Marlene A.

    2012-01-01

    Rats exposed to the odor of a predator or to the elevated plus maze express fear behaviors without a prior exposure to either stimulus. The expression of innate fear provides for an ideal model of anxiety which can aid in the elucidation of brain circuits involved in anxiety-related behaviors. The current experiments compared activation of neuropeptide-containing neuronal populations in the amygdala of rats exposed to either the elevated plus maze (EPM; 5 minutes) versus home cage controls, or predator ferret odor versus butyric acid, or no odor (30 minutes). Sections of the brains were prepared for dual-labeled immunohistochemistry and counts of c-Fos co-localized with somatostatin (SOM) or neuropeptide Y (NPY) were made in the basolateral (BLA), central (CEA), medial (MEA) nucleus of the amygdala. Ferret odor and butyric acid exposure significantly decreased the percentage of SOM–positive neurons also immunoreactive for c-Fos in the anterior BLA compared to controls, whereas EPM exposure yielded a significant increase in the activation of SOM-positive neurons versus home cage controls. In the CEA, ferret odor and butyric exposure significantly decreased the percentage of SOM-positive neurons also immunoreactive for c-Fos compared to no-odor controls whereas EPM exposure yielded no change versus controls. In the MEA, both ferret odor exposure and EPM exposure resulted in increased SOM co-localized with c-Fos compared to control groups whereas NPY co-localized with c-Fos occurred following ferret odor exposure, but not EPM exposure. These results indicate that phenotypically distinct neuronal populations of the amygdala are differentially activated following exposure to different anxiogenic stimuli. These studies further elucidate the fundamental neurocircuitry of anxiety and could possibly explain the differential behavioral effects of predator versus novelty-induced stress. PMID:22917777

  19. Study of neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers in the human penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wespes, E; Schiffmann, S; Gilloteaux, J; Schulman, C; Vierendeels, G; Menu, R; Pelletier, G; Vaudry, H; Vanderhaeghen, J J

    1988-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y 1-36 (IR-NPY) immunoreactive nerve-fiber processes have been observed in tunicae of veins and arteries and in smooth muscles of the human penis taken at autopsy or during surgery by use of light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemical techniques. Numerous IR-NPY nerve fibers were mostly concentrated in the inner part of the adventitia close to the media of the arterial and venous vessels and among the intracavernous smooth muscle cells. IR-NPY nerve fibers were less abundant in veins than in arteries. Positive somata were not observed in the penises. At the ultrastructural level, IR-NPY were localized exclusively in large, dense granules of nerve terminals by means of the postembedding immunogold technique. In the deep dorsal vein, IR-NPY nerve fibers were also located in the media formed by an outer circular and an inner longitudinal layer. In the intracavernous and dorsal arteries, they showed the highest density in the inner part of the adventitia. In the corpora cavernosa and in the corpus spongiosum, IR-NPY nerve processes were intermingled between the smooth-muscle fibers around the sinusoid spaces. IR-NPY nerve fibers were present in the cavernous nerves close to the central arteries. The urethra did not show any IR-NPY-positive nerve fibers. This peculiar distribution of IR-NPY nerve fibers suggested that they could participate in regulating arterial and venous blood flow and intracavernous smooth-muscle tone. NPY may therefore be of importance in some of the mechanisms of penile erection especially during detumescence.

  20. Photoperiodic regulation of satiety mediating neuropeptides in the brainstem of the seasonal Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, Michael; Archer, Zoë A; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Tups, Alexander; Mercer, Julian G; Klingenspor, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Central regulation of energy balance in seasonal mammals such as the Siberian hamster is dependent on the precise integration of short-term satiety information arising from the gastrointestinal tract with long-term signals on the status of available energy reserves (e.g. leptin) and prevailing photoperiod. Within the central nervous system, the brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) are major relay nuclei that transmit information from the gastrointestinal tract to higher forebrain centres. We extended studies on the seasonal programming of the hypothalamus to examine the effect of the photoperiod on neuropeptidergic circuitries of this gut-brain axis. In the NTS and PBN we performed gene expression and immunoreactivity (-ir) studies on selected satiety-related neuropeptides and receptors: alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, melanocortin-3 receptor, melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R), growth hormone secretagogue-receptor, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, preproglucagon (PPG), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY, galanin, neurotensin, and corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH). Gene expression of PPG and MC4-R, and -ir of CCK and GLP-1, in the NTS were up-regulated after 14 weeks in long-day photoperiod (16 h light:8 h dark) compared to short-days (8 h light:16 h dark), whereas CRH-ir and NT-ir were increased in short-days within the PBN. We suggest that brainstem neuroendocrine mechanisms contribute to the long-term regulation of body mass in the Siberian hamster by a photoperiod-related modulation of satiety signalling.

  1. Feeding behavior and gene expression of appetite-related neuropeptides in mice lacking for neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor subclass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Higuchi; Takeshi Nild; Tomohiro Shiiya

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent neurotransmitter for feeding. Besides NPY, orexigenic neuropeptides such as agouti-related protein (AgRP), and anorexi-genic neuropeptides such as a-melatonin stimulating hormone (MSH) and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) are also involved in central feeding regulation. During fasting, NPY and AgRP gene expres-sions are up-regulated and POMC and CART gene ex-pressions are down-regulated in hypothalamus. Based on the network of peptidergic neurons, the former are involved in positive feeding regulation, and the latter are involved in negative feeding, which exert these feeding-regulated peptides especially in paraventricular nucleus (PVN). To clarify the compensatory mecha-nism of knock-out of NPY system on feeding, change in gene expressions of appetite-related neuropeptides and the feeding behavior was studied in NPY Y5-KO mice. Food intake was increased in Y5-KO mice. Fast-ing increased the amounts of food and water intake in the KO mice more profoundly. These data indicated the compensatory phenomenon of feeding behavior in YS-KO mice. RT-PCR and [SH suggested that the compensation of feeding is due to change in gene ex-pressions of AgRP, CART and POMC in hypothalamus. Thus, these findings indicated that the compensatory mechanism involves change in POMC/CART gene ex-pression in arcuate nucleus (ARC). The POMC/CART gene expression is important for central compensatory regulation in feeding behavior.

  2. Innervation of the rat pineal gland by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-immunoreactive nerve fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, J.

    1999-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y, colocalization, trigeminal ganglion, rat (Wistar)......Calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y, colocalization, trigeminal ganglion, rat (Wistar)...

  3. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tanya J; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Milner, Teresa A

    2011-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  4. Plasticity of Y1 and Y2 receptors and neuropeptide Y fibers in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtinger, S; Pirker, S; Czech, T; Baumgartner, C; Ransmayr, G; Sperk, G

    2001-08-01

    Marked expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its Y2 receptors in hippocampal mossy fibers has been reported in animal models of epilepsy. Because NPY can suppress glutamate release by activating presynaptic Y2 receptors, these changes have been proposed as an endogenous protective mechanism. Therefore, we investigated whether similar changes in the NPY system may also take place in human epilepsy. We investigated Y1 and Y2 receptor binding and NPY immunoreactivity in hippocampal specimens that were obtained at surgery from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and in autopsy controls. Significant increases in Y2 receptor binding (by 43-48%) were observed in the dentate hilus, sectors CA1 to CA3, and subiculum of specimens with, but not in those without, hippocampal sclerosis. On the other hand, Y1 receptor binding was significantly reduced (by 62%) in the dentate molecular layer of sclerotic specimens. In the same patients, the total lengths of NPY immunoreactive (NPY-IR) fibers was markedly increased (by 115-958%) in the dentate molecular layer and hilus, in the stratum lucidum of CA3, and throughout sectors CA1 to CA3 and the subiculum, as compared with autopsies. In nonsclerotic specimens, increases in lengths of NPY-IR fibers were more moderate and statistically not significant. NPY mRNA was increased threefold in hilar interneurons of sclerotic and nonsclerotic specimens. It is suggested that abundant sprouting of NPY fibers, concomitant upregulation of Y2 receptors, and downregulation of Y1 receptors in the hippocampus of patients with Ammon's horn sclerosis may be endogenous anticonvulsant mechanisms.

  5. Neuropeptide Y Gene Polymorphism and Plasma Neuropeptide Y Level in Febrile Seizure Patients in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chang Lin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY has been shown to depress the hyperexcitability of neurons. In the present study, we investigated the association between the nucleotide (nt 5671 C/T polymorphism of the NPY gene and the plasma NPY level in patients with febrile seizures (FS. Fifty-six patients with FS and 55 control subjects were enrolled. Genotype and allele frequencies were compared. The frequencies of genotypes TT, TC and CC for the NPY gene nt 5671 C/T polymorphism were 21.4%, 28.6% and 50.0%, respectively, in patients with FS, and 14.6%, 40.0% and 45.4%, respectively, in control subjects. The frequencies of alleles T and C were 35.7% and 64.3%, respectively, in patients with FS, while those in the control group were 34.5% and 65.5%, respectively. We found no significant relationship between the NPY gene nt 5671 C/T polymorphism and FS. The plasma NPY concentrations of the FS group, the age-matched non-FS group, and subjects aged > 6 years in the non-FS group were 48.23±32.49, 55.36±23.12, and 70.10±60.31 pg/mL, respectively. These results indicate no statistical difference in plasma NPY concentration between FS patients and the non-FS group. However, plasma NPY concentration was found to increase significantly with age.

  6. Immunoreactivity examination of patients with testicular tumours treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanits, K.; Kuhn, E.; Csere, T.

    1985-02-01

    Results of the immunoreactivity study of 72 patients receiving radiotherapy are presented. Tuberculin and DNCB (2,4 dinitrochlorobenzol) reactivity tests were performed before, during and 3 years after the radiation therapy and at the time when metastases appeared. The number of positive reactions decreased slightly in both tuberculin and DNCB groups, though not significantly. Metastatic patients showed a significant decrease of reactivity against DNCB as compared with the results obtained before the treatment. In 5,6% of patients herpes zoster was registered. No other infections occured. It was found that immunosuppression caused by the radiation treatment does not influence the later fate of patients with testicular tumours. 41 refs.

  7. Modulation of Locomotion and Reproduction by FLP Neuropeptides in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yan-Jung; Burton, Tina; Ha, Lawrence; Huang, Zi; Olajubelo, Adewale; Li, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides function in animals to modulate most, if not all, complex behaviors. In invertebrates, neuropeptides can function as the primary neurotransmitter of a neuron, but more generally they co-localize with a small molecule neurotransmitter, as is commonly seen in vertebrates. Because a single neuron can express multiple neuropeptides and because neuropeptides can bind to multiple G protein-coupled receptors, neuropeptide actions increase the complexity by which the neural connectome can be activated or inhibited. Humans are estimated to have 90 plus neuropeptide genes; by contrast, nematodes, a relatively simple organism, have a slightly larger complement of neuropeptide genes. For instance, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has over 100 neuropeptide-encoding genes, of which at least 31 genes encode peptides of the FMRFamide family. To understand the function of this large FMRFamide peptide family, we isolated knockouts of different FMRFamide-encoding genes and generated transgenic animals in which the peptides are overexpressed. We assayed these animals on two basic behaviors: locomotion and reproduction. Modulating levels of different neuropeptides have strong as well as subtle effects on these behaviors. These data suggest that neuropeptides play critical roles in C. elegans to fine tune neural circuits controlling locomotion and reproduction.

  8. The evolution and variety of RFamide-type neuropeptides: insights from deuterostomian invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Richard Elphick

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Five families of neuropeptides that have a C-terminal RFamide motif have been identified in vertebrates: 1. gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH, 2. neuropeptide FF (NPFF 3. pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide (QRFP, 4. prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP and 5. Kisspeptin. Experimental demonstration of neuropeptide-receptor pairings combined with comprehensive analysis of genomic and/or transcriptomic sequence data indicate that, with the exception of the deuterostomian PrRP system, the evolutionary origins of these neuropeptides can be traced back to the common ancestor of bilaterians. Here we review the occurrence of homologs of vertebrate RFamide-type neuropeptides and their receptors in deuterostomian invertebrates - urochordates, cephalochordates, hemichordates and echinoderms. Extending analysis of the occurrence of the RFamide motif in other bilaterian neuropeptide families reveals RFamide-type peptides that have acquired modified C-terminal characteristics in the vertebrate lineage (e.g. NPY/NPF, neuropeptide families where the RFamide motif is unique to protostomian members (e.g. CCK/sulfakinins and RFamide-type peptides that have been lost in the vertebrate lineage (e.g. luqins. Furthermore, the RFamide motif is also a feature of neuropeptide families with a more restricted phylogenetic distribution (e.g. the prototypical FMRFamide-related neuropeptides in protostomes. Thus, the RFamide motif is both an ancient and a convergent feature of neuropeptides, with conservation, acquisition or loss of this motif occurring in different branches of the animal kingdom.

  9. Unique biological function of cathepsin L in secretory vesicles for biosynthesis of neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkelstein, Lydiane; Beinfeld, Margery; Minokadeh, Ardalan; Zadina, James; Hook, Vivian

    2010-12-01

    Neuropeptides are essential for cell-cell communication in the nervous and neuroendocrine systems. Production of active neuropeptides requires proteolytic processing of proneuropeptide precursors in secretory vesicles that produce, store, and release neuropeptides that regulate physiological functions. This review describes recent findings indicating the prominent role of cathepsin L in secretory vesicles for production of neuropeptides from their protein precursors. The role of cathepsin L in neuropeptide production was discovered using the strategy of activity-based probes for proenkephalin-cleaving activity for identification of the enzyme protein by mass spectrometry. The novel role of cathepsin L in secretory vesicles for neuropeptide production has been demonstrated in vivo by cathepsin L gene knockout studies, cathepsin L gene expression in neuroendocrine cells, and notably, cathepsin L localization in neuropeptide-containing secretory vesicles. Cathepsin L is involved in producing opioid neuropeptides consisting of enkephalin, β-endorphin, and dynorphin, as well as in generating the POMC-derived peptide hormones ACTH and α-MSH. In addition, NPY, CCK, and catestatin neuropeptides utilize cathepsin L for their biosynthesis. The neuropeptide-synthesizing functions of cathepsin L represent its unique activity in secretory vesicles, which contrasts with its role in lysosomes. Interesting evaluations of protease gene knockout studies in mice that lack cathepsin L compared to those lacking PC1/3 and PC2 (PC, prohormone convertase) indicate the key role of cathepsin L in neuropeptide production. Therefore, dual cathepsin L and prohormone convertase protease pathways participate in neuropeptide production. Significantly, the recent new findings indicate cathepsin L as a novel 'proprotein convertase' for production of neuropeptides that mediate cell-cell communication in health and disease.

  10. Molecular cloning of a preprohormone from sea anemones containing numerous copies of a metamorphosis-inducing neuropeptide: a likely role for dipeptidyl aminopeptidase in neuropeptide precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leviev, I; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important group of hormones mediating or modulating neuronal communication. Neuropeptides are especially abundant in evolutionarily "old" nervous systems, such as those of cnidarians, the lowest animal group having a nervous system. Cnidarians often have a life cycle includin...

  11. Tachykinins, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y in nerves of the mammalian thymus: interactions with mast cells in autonomic and sensory neuroimmunomodulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihe, E; Müller, S; Fink, T; Zentel, H J

    1989-05-22

    By the use of light microscopic (LM) immunohistochemistry the distribution of tachykinin (TK)-, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)- and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-like immunoreactivity in nerves supplying the mammalian (rat, mouse, guinea-pig, cat) thymus gland has been determined. There were no interspecies variations. Fibres staining for TK and CGRP completely overlapped indicating coexistence. They were present in the capsule, in interlobular septa and in the corticomedullary boundary and occurred in perivascular and paravascular plexus supplying arteries, veins and the microvasculature. Some TK/CGRP-immunoreactive (ir) fibres travelled between lymphoid cells and close contacts with mast cells were frequent. NPY-ir fibres were different from those staining for TK/CGRP and predominated in the perivascular plexus of arterial blood vessels. Only very rarely they coursed in the lymphoid parenchyma. Intimate contacts of NPY-ir fibres with mast cells were less frequent than those of TK/CGRP-ir fibres. We conclude that the NPY innervation is mainly sympathetic noradrenergic while thymic nerves coding for TK and CGRP are most likely of sensory origin. These pathways may play a differential neuroimmunomodulatory role in the thymus, possibly via interaction with mast cells.

  12. Increased Ki-67 immunoreactivity in the white matter in hemimegalencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Mitsutoshi; Watanabe, Mika; Otsuki, Taisuke; Itoh, Masayuki; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Saito, Yuko; Honda, Ryoko; Kure, Shigeo

    2013-08-26

    Hemimegalencephaly (HMG) is a developmental brain disorder characterized by an enlarged unilateral hemisphere with cortical malformation comprising abnormal hypertrophic cells. To address the proliferative status of HMG, Ki-67 immunoreactivity was investigated in HMG specimens obtained during epilepsy surgery. Nine HMG tissues were stained with a Ki-67 antibody and Ki-67 labeling index in the malformed cortex, and the underlying white matter was measured separately and compared with tissues from focal cortical dysplasias and normal brains from autopsy. In HMG tissues, Ki-67-positive cells were scattered in both the gray and white matter, with a significantly higher Ki-67 labeling index in the white matter compared with gray matter. No dysmorphic neuron or balloon cell was stained for Ki-67. As Ki-67 immunoreactivity overlapped with that of ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein-1, Ki-67-positive cells were identified as microglia. In HMG, microglia were activated and entered into a proliferative status with higher distribution in the white matter, implying an ongoing neuroinflammatory process involving the white matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression and immunoreactivity of HCV/HBV epitopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yu Xiong; Xiao Liu; Yuan-Ding Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop the epitope-based vaccines to prevent Hepatitis C virus (HCV)/Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections.METHODS: The HCV core epitopes C1 STNPKPQRKTKRNTNRRPQD (residuals aa2-21) and C2 VKFPGGGQIVGGVYLLPRR (residuals aa22-40), envelope epitope E GHRMAWDMMMNWSP (residuals aa315-328) and HBsAg epitope S CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNC (residuals aa124-147) were displayed in five different sites of the flock house virus capsid protein as a vector, and expressed in E. coli cells (pET-3 system).Immunoreactivity of the epitopes with anti-HCV and anti-HBV antibodies in the serum from hepatitis C and hepatitis B patients were determined.RESULTS: The expressed chimeric protein carrying the HCV epitopes C1, C2, E (two times), L3C1-I2E-L1C2-L2E could react with anti-HCV antibodies. The expressed chimeric protein carrying the HBV epitopes S, I3S could react with anti-HBs antibodies. The expressed chimeric proteins carrying the HCV epitopes C1, C2, E plus HBV epitope S, L3C1-I2E-L1C2-L2E-I3S could react with antiHCV and anti-HBs antibodies.CONCLUSION: These epitopes have highly specific and sensitive immunoreaction and are useful in the development of epitope-based vaccines.

  14. Localization of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Immunoreactivity in Rat Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam M Abdelalim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP exerts its functions through natriuretic peptide receptors. Recently, BNP has been shown to be involved in a wide range of functions. Previous studies reported BNP expression in the sensory afferent fibers in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. However, BNP expression and function in the neurons of the central nervous system are still controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated BNP expression in the rat spinal cord in detail using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR analysis showed that BNP mRNA was present in the spinal cord and DRG. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in different structures of the spinal cord, including the neuronal cell bodies and neuronal processes. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the neurons of the intermediate column and ventral horn. Double-immunolabeling showed a high level of BNP expression in the afferent fibers (laminae I-II labeled with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, suggesting BNP involvement in sensory function. In addition, BNP was co-localized with CGRP and choline acetyltransferase in the motor neurons of the ventral horn. Together, these results indicate that BNP is expressed in sensory and motor systems of the spinal cord, suggesting its involvement in several biological actions on sensory and motor neurons via its binding to NPR-A and/or NPR-B in the DRG and spinal cord.

  15. A large population of diverse neurons in the Drosophila central nervous system expresses short neuropeptide F, suggesting multiple distributed peptide functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, Dick R; Enell, Lina E; Santos, Jonathan G; Wegener, Christian; Johard, Helena AD

    2008-01-01

    Background Insect neuropeptides are distributed in stereotypic sets of neurons that commonly constitute a small fraction of the total number of neurons. However, some neuropeptide genes are expressed in larger numbers of neurons of diverse types suggesting that they are involved in a greater diversity of functions. One of these widely expressed genes, snpf, encodes the precursor of short neuropeptide F (sNPF). To unravel possible functional diversity we have mapped the distribution of transcript of the snpf gene and its peptide products in the central nervous system (CNS) of Drosophila in relation to other neuronal markers. Results There are several hundreds of neurons in the larval CNS and several thousands in the adult Drosophila brain expressing snpf transcript and sNPF peptide. Most of these neurons are intrinsic interneurons of the mushroom bodies. Additionally, sNPF is expressed in numerous small interneurons of the CNS, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) of the antennae, and in a small set of possibly neurosecretory cells innervating the corpora cardiaca and aorta. A sNPF-Gal4 line confirms most of the expression pattern. None of the sNPF immunoreactive neurons co-express a marker for the transcription factor DIMMED, suggesting that the majority are not neurosecretory cells or large interneurons involved in episodic bulk transmission. Instead a portion of the sNPF producing neurons co-express markers for classical neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, GABA and glutamate, suggesting that sNPF is a co-transmitter or local neuromodulator in ORNs and many interneurons. Interestingly, sNPF is coexpressed both with presumed excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. A few sNPF expressing neurons in the brain colocalize the peptide corazonin and a pair of dorsal neurons in the first abdominal neuromere coexpresses sNPF and insulin-like peptide 7 (ILP7). Conclusion It is likely that sNPF has multiple functions as neurohormone as well as local neuromodulator

  16. A large population of diverse neurons in the Drosophila central nervous system expresses short neuropeptide F, suggesting multiple distributed peptide functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegener Christian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect neuropeptides are distributed in stereotypic sets of neurons that commonly constitute a small fraction of the total number of neurons. However, some neuropeptide genes are expressed in larger numbers of neurons of diverse types suggesting that they are involved in a greater diversity of functions. One of these widely expressed genes, snpf, encodes the precursor of short neuropeptide F (sNPF. To unravel possible functional diversity we have mapped the distribution of transcript of the snpf gene and its peptide products in the central nervous system (CNS of Drosophila in relation to other neuronal markers. Results There are several hundreds of neurons in the larval CNS and several thousands in the adult Drosophila brain expressing snpf transcript and sNPF peptide. Most of these neurons are intrinsic interneurons of the mushroom bodies. Additionally, sNPF is expressed in numerous small interneurons of the CNS, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs of the antennae, and in a small set of possibly neurosecretory cells innervating the corpora cardiaca and aorta. A sNPF-Gal4 line confirms most of the expression pattern. None of the sNPF immunoreactive neurons co-express a marker for the transcription factor DIMMED, suggesting that the majority are not neurosecretory cells or large interneurons involved in episodic bulk transmission. Instead a portion of the sNPF producing neurons co-express markers for classical neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, GABA and glutamate, suggesting that sNPF is a co-transmitter or local neuromodulator in ORNs and many interneurons. Interestingly, sNPF is coexpressed both with presumed excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. A few sNPF expressing neurons in the brain colocalize the peptide corazonin and a pair of dorsal neurons in the first abdominal neuromere coexpresses sNPF and insulin-like peptide 7 (ILP7. Conclusion It is likely that sNPF has multiple functions as neurohormone as well as

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein and neuropeptide Y decline as early as middle age in the dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S; Shetty, Geetha A; Shetty, Ashok K

    2005-10-01

    The hippocampus is very susceptible to aging. Severely diminished dentate neurogenesis at middle age is one of the most conspicuous early changes in the aging hippocampus, which is likely linked to an early decline in the concentration of neurotrophic factors and signaling proteins that influence neurogenesis. We analyzed three proteins that are well-known to promote dentate neurogenesis and learning and memory function in the dentate gyrus and the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields of young, middle-aged and aged F344 rats. These include the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the transcription factor phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) and the neuropeptide neuropeptide Y (NPY). The BDNF was analyzed via ELISA and BDNF immunohistochemistry, the p-CREB through densitometric analysis of p-CREB immunopositive cells, and the NPY via stereological counting of NPY-immunopositive interneurons. We provide new evidence that the BDNF concentration, the p-CREB immunoreactivity and the number of NPY immunopositive interneurons decline considerably by middle age in both dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. However, both BDNF concentration and NPY immunopositive interneuron numbers exhibit no significant decrease between middle age and old age. In contrast, the p-CREB immunoreactivity diminishes further during this period, which is also associated with reduced BDNF immunoreaction within the soma of dentate granule cells and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these results suggest that severely dampened dentate neurogenesis observed at middle age is linked at least partially to reduced concentrations of BDNF, p-CREB and NPY, as each of these proteins is a positive regulator of dentate neurogenesis. Dramatically diminished CREB phosphorylation (and persistently reduced levels of BDNF and NPY) at old age may underlie the learning and memory impairments observed during senescence.

  18. Seasonal plasticity in the peptide neuronal systems: potential roles of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone, neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide in the regulation of the reproductive axis in subtropical Indian weaver birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbhi; Rastogi, A; Rani, S; Kumar, V

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments examined the expression of gonadotrophin-releasing and inhibiting hormones (GnRH-I, GnRH-II and GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in subtropical Indian weaver birds, which demonstrate relative photorefractoriness. Experiment 1 measured peptide expression levels in the form of immunoreactive (-IR) cells, percentage cell area and cell optical density in the preoptic area (GnRH-I), midbrain (GnRH-II), paraventricular nucleus (GnIH), mediobasal hypothalamus [dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), infundibular complex (INc), NPY and VIP] and lateral septal organ (VIP) during the progressive, breeding, regressive and nonbreeding phases of the annual reproductive cycle. GnRH-I was decreased in the nonbreeding and VIP was increased in INc in the breeding and regressive states. GnRH-II and NPY levels did not differ between the testicular phases. Double-labelled immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed a close association between the GnRH/GnIH, GnRH/NPY, GnRH/VIP and GnIH/NPY peptide systems, implicating them interacting and playing roles in the reproductive regulation in weaver birds. Experiment 2 further measured these peptide levels in the middle of day and night in weaver birds that were maintained under short days (8 : 16 h light /dark cycle; photosensitive), exposed to ten long days (16 : 8 h light /dark cycle; photostimulated) or maintained for approximately 2 years on a 16 : 8 h light /dark cycle (photorefractory). Reproductively immature testes in these groups precluded the possible effect of an enhanced gonadal feedback on the hypothalamic peptide expression. There were group differences in the GnRH-I (not GnRH-II), GnIH, NPY and VIP immunoreactivity, albeit with variations in immunoreactivity measures in the present study. These results, which are consistent with those reported in birds with relative photorefractoriness, show the distribution and possibly a complex interaction of key neuropeptides in the regulation of the

  19. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  20. Melatonin-induced neuropeptide release from isolated locust corpora cardiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, J; De Loof, A; Schoofs, L

    2005-01-01

    A method, based on a combination of mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography, was developed to investigate the release of neuropeptides from isolated locust corpora cardiaca. Melatonin, octopamine, trehalose and forskolin were administered to the perifused glands. The neuropeptides present in the releasates (spontaneous versus induced) were visualized by either conventional or capillary HPLC. Identification was achieved by means of MALDI-TOF MS and/or nanoflow-LC-Q-TOF MS. The observed effects of these chemicals regarding AKH release were in line with previous studies and validate the method. The most important finding of this study was that administration of melatonin stimulated the release of adipokinetic hormone precursor related peptides (APRP 1 and APRP 2), neuroparsins (NP A1, NP A2 and NP B) and diuretic peptide.

  1. Activation of Neuropeptide FF Receptors by Kisspeptin Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shinya; Misu, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kenji; Setsuda, Shohei; Masuda, Ryo; Ohno, Hiroaki; Naniwa, Yousuke; Ieda, Nahoko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-01-13

    Kisspeptin is a member of the RFamide neuropeptide family that is implicated in gonadotropin secretion. Because kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is implicated in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, GPR54 ligands represent promising therapeutic agents against endocrine secretion disorders. In the present study, the selectivity profiles of GPR54 agonist peptides were investigated for several GPCRs, including RFamide receptors. Kisspeptin-10 exhibited potent binding and activation of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR1 and NPFFR2). In contrast, short peptide agonists bound with much lower affinity to NPFFRs while showing relatively high selectivity toward GPR54. The possible localization of secondary kisspeptin targets was also demonstrated by variation in the levels of GnRH release from the median eminence and the type of GPR54 agonists used. Negligible affinity of the reported NPFFR ligands to GPR54 was observed and indicates the unidirectional cross-reactivity between both ligands.

  2. Presence and distribution of serotonin immunoreactivity in the cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Gallus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the presence and distribution of serotonin in the cyprid of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite were investigated by immunohistochemical methods. Serotonin-like immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies were detected in the central nervous system only. Various clusters of immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies are distributed in the brain (protocerebrum, deutocerebrum, optical lobes, and at least, four pairs of neuronal cell bodies were detected in the centrally positioned neuropil of the posterior ganglion. Rich plexuses of immunoreactive nerve fibers in the neuropil area were also observed. Furthermore, bundles of strongly immunoreactive nerve fibers surrounding the gut wall were localized, and immunoreactive nerve terminals in the antennules and compound eyes were observed. These data demonstrate the presence of a serotonin-like immunoreactive substance in the barnacle cyprids; furthermore, its immunolocalization in the cephalic nerve terminals allows us to postulate the involvement of this bioactive molecule in substrate recognition during the settlement process.

  3. Identification of the first neuropeptides from the Amphipoda (Arthropoda, Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E

    2014-09-15

    Despite being used as models in the field of ecotoxicology, including use in studies of endocrine disruption, little is known about the hormonal systems of amphipods, particularly their peptidergic signaling systems. Here, transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequences were used to predict the structures of the first neuropeptides from members of this crustacean order. Using a well-established workflow, BLAST searches of the extant amphipod TSA data were conducted for putative peptide-encoding transcripts. The pre/preprohormones deduced from the identified TSA sequences were then used to predict the mature structures of amphipod neuropeptides. In total, 43 putative peptide-encoding transcripts were identified from three amphipods, Echinogammarus veneris, Hyalella azteca and Melita plumulosa. Collectively, 139 distinct mature peptides (110 from E. veneris alone) were predicted from these TSA sequences. The identified peptides included members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment concentrating hormone, allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, bursicon α, bursicon β, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone, diuretic hormone 31, FLRFamide, molt-inhibiting hormone, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide F, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone (PDH), proctolin, RYamide, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin-related peptide families. Of particular note were the identifications of orcokinins possessing SFDEIDR- rather than the typical NFDEIDR- amino-termini, e.g. SFDEINRSNFGFN, a carboxyl-terminally amidated orcokinin, i.e. SFDEINRSNFGFSamide, PDHs longer than the stereotypical 18 amino acids, e.g. NSELLNTLLGSKSLAALRAAamide, and a 13 rather than 12 amino acid long SIFamide, i.e. GPYRKPPFNGSIFamide. These data not only provide the first descriptions of native amphipod neuropeptides, but also represent a new resource for initiating investigations of peptidergic signaling in the Amphipoda.

  4. Neurotrophic and antioxidant potential of neuropeptides and trace elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gromova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic therapy with brain extract-based drugs has been performed for decades. The basis for their neurotrophic activity is amino acids and neuropeptides. However, incomplete information on the composition of these drugs precludes a detailed description of mechanisms through which their pharmacological effects occur. The review considers the results of the most recent molecular pharmacological investigations and the mechanisms of therapeutic action of cerebrolysin.

  5. Inflammation and Neuropeptides: The Connection in Diabetic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Leena; Nabzdyk, Christoph; Andersen, Nicholas D.; Frank W LoGerfo; Veves, Aristidis

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the interaction between neuropeptides and inflammatory mediators as it pertains to diabetic wound healing. Abnormal wound healing is a major complication of both type I and type II diabetes and is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputation. Wound healing requires the orchestrated integration of complex biological and molecular events. Inflammation, proliferation and migration of cells followed by angiogenesis and re-epithelization ...

  6. Allatotropin: An ancestral myotropic neuropeptide involved in feeding

    OpenAIRE

    María Eugenia Alzugaray; Mariana Laura Adami; Luis Anibal Diambra; Salvador Hernandez-Martinez; Cristina Damborenea; Fernando Gabriel Noriega; Jorge Rafael Ronderos

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT) is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone s...

  7. Comparative distribution of central neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the prairie (Microtus ochrogaster) and meadow (M. pennsylvanicus) vole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Caroline M; Hitchcock, Leah N; Anacker, Allison M J; Young, Larry J; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2013-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been implicated as a modulator of social behavior, often in a species-specific manner. Comparative studies of closely related vole species are particularly useful for identifying neural systems involved in social behaviors in both voles and humans. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was performed to compare NPY-like immunoreactivity (-ir) in brain tissue of the socially monogamous prairie vole and non-monogamous meadow vole. Species differences in NPY-ir were observed in a number of regions including the cortex, extended amygdala, septal area, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and intergeniculate leaf. Meadow voles had higher NPY-ir in all these regions as compared to prairie voles. No differences were observed in the striatum or hippocampus. The extended amygdala and lateral septum are regions that play a key role in regulation of monogamous behaviors such as pair bonding and paternal care. The present study suggests NPY in these regions may be an additional modulator of these species-specific social behaviors. Meadow voles had moderately higher NPY-ir in a number of hypothalamic regions, especially in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Meadow voles also had much higher levels of NPY-ir in the intergeniculate leaflet, another key region in the regulation of circadian rhythms. Overall, species differences in NPY-ir were observed in a number of brain regions implicated in emotion, stress, circadian, and social behaviors. These findings provide additional support for a role for the NPY system in species-typical social behaviors.

  8. Receptors for the neuropeptides, myoinhibitory peptide and SIFamide, in control of the salivary glands of the blacklegged tick Ixodes scapularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, Ladislav; Koči, Juraj; Park, Yoonseong

    2013-04-01

    Tick salivary glands are important organs that enable the hematophagous feeding of the tick. We previously described the innervation of the salivary gland acini types II and III by a pair of protocerebral salivary gland neurons that produce both myoinhibitory peptide (MIP) and SIFamide (Šimo et al., 2009b). In this study we identified authentic receptors expressed in the salivary glands for these neuropeptides. Homology-based searches for these receptors in the Ixodes scapularis genome sequence were followed by gene cloning and functional expression of the receptors. Both receptors were activated by low nanomolar concentrations of their respective ligands. The temporal expression patterns of the two ligands and their respective receptors suggest that the SIFamide signaling system pre-exists in unfed salivary glands, while the MIP system is activated upon initiation of feeding. Immunoreactivity for the SIFamide receptor in the salivary gland was detected in acini types II and III, surrounding the acinar valve and extending to the basal region of the acinar lumen. The location of the SIFamide receptor in the salivary glands suggests three potential target cell types and their probable functions: myoepithelial cell that may function in the contraction of the acini and/or the control of the valve; large, basally located dopaminergic granular cells for regulation of paracrine dopamine; and neck cells that may be involved in the control of the acinar duct and its valve.

  9. Low neuropeptide Y in cerebrospinal fluid in bipolar patients is associated with previous and prospective suicide attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Johan V; Jakobsson, Joel; Pålsson, Erik; Landén, Mikael; Mathé, Aleksander A

    2014-12-01

    The attempted and accomplished suicide rates in patients with bipolar disorder are 40-50% and 15-20%, respectively. No biological markers that help predict suicide been identified. Human and experimental animal data indicate that dysregulation of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system plays a role in depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of this study was to explore if low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NPY is associated with (1) past suicide attempts, (2) future suicide attempts, and (3) trait anxiety. Lumbar puncture was performed on 120 clinically stable patients with bipolar disorder enrolled in the St Göran Bipolar Project, where the number of previous suicide attempts was documented. NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) was determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Patients were reexamined one year after the lumbar puncture and suicide attempts were recorded. NPY-LI was significantly lower in patients with a history of suicide attempt than in patients who had not attempted suicide prior to lumbar puncture. Importantly, NPY-LI was markedly lower in patients who made a suicide attempt during the follow-up period compared to patients who did not. Patients who attempted suicide during the follow-up also had markedly lower NPY-LI than those with previous suicide attempts who did not reattempt. Our results suggest that low CSF NPY-LI predicts future suicide attempts. The data are in line with the hypothesis that NPY signaling is altered in affective disorders and states of emotional dysregulation.

  10. "Neuropeptides in the brain defense against distant organ damage".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Mike Yoshio; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Cunha, Débora Maria Gomes; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2016-01-15

    Delirium, or acute confusional state, is a common manifestation in diseases that originate outside the central nervous system, affecting 30-40% of elderly hospitalized patients and up to 80% of the critically ill, even though it remains unclear if severe systemic inflammation is able or not to induce cellular disturbances and immune activation in the brain. Neuropeptides are pleotropic molecules heterogeneously distributed throughout the brain and possess a wide spectrum of functions, including regulation of the inflammatory response, so we hypothesized that they would be the major alarm system in the brain before overt microglia activation. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we induced acute pancreatitis in 8-10week old rats and collected brain tissue, 12 and 24h following pancreatic injury, to measure neuropeptide and cytokine tissue levels. We found significantly higher levels of β-endorphin, orexin and oxytocin in the brain of rats submitted to pancreatic injury, when compared to healthy controls. Interestingly, these differences were not associated with increased local cytokine levels, putting in evidence that neuropeptide release occurred independently of microglia activation and may be a pivotal alarm system to initiate neurologic reactions to distant inflammatory non-infectious aggression.

  11. A radioactive assay for the degradation of neuropeptide Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, R.; Lucius, R.; Mentlein, R. [Kiel Univ. (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian central nervous system. Like other neuropeptides, NPY is inactivated by specialized neuro-peptidases. To trace the degradation of NPY, an assay was established using biotinylated NPY. Biotinyl-NPY was radiolabeled with Na{sup 125}I by the chloramine-T method and bound to a streptavidin-agarose matrix. The amount of radiolabeling was analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. The assay was carried out with five peptidases and inhibitors to demonstrate different specific activity. Measurable amounts of radioactivity were released by treatment with endopeptidase-24.18, plasmin, and trypsin, whereas dipetidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) showed no activity in this assay. In the case of DPPIV this is due to a resistance of the assay to aminopeptidase attack. The assay is useful to study the specific degradation of NPY particularly by endopeptidases in all kinds of biological samples. (authors). 31 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhzaz, Selim; Teets, Nicholas M; Cabrero, Pablo; Henderson, Louise; Ritchie, Michael G; Nachman, Ronald J; Dow, Julian A T; Denlinger, David L; Davies, Shireen-A

    2015-03-03

    The success of insects is linked to their impressive tolerance to environmental stress, but little is known about how such responses are mediated by the neuroendocrine system. Here we show that the capability (capa) neuropeptide gene is a desiccation- and cold stress-responsive gene in diverse dipteran species. Using targeted in vivo gene silencing, physiological manipulations, stress-tolerance assays, and rationally designed neuropeptide analogs, we demonstrate that the Drosophila melanogaster capa neuropeptide gene and its encoded peptides alter desiccation and cold tolerance. Knockdown of the capa gene increases desiccation tolerance but lengthens chill coma recovery time, and injection of capa peptide analogs can reverse both phenotypes. Immunohistochemical staining suggests that capa accumulates in the capa-expressing Va neurons during desiccation and nonlethal cold stress but is not released until recovery from each stress. Our results also suggest that regulation of cellular ion and water homeostasis mediated by capa peptide signaling in the insect Malpighian (renal) tubules is a key physiological mechanism during recovery from desiccation and cold stress. This work augments our understanding of how stress tolerance is mediated by neuroendocrine signaling and illustrates the use of rationally designed peptide analogs as agents for disrupting protective stress tolerance.

  13. Toward a consensus nomenclature for insect neuropeptides and peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast, Geoffrey M; Schooley, David A

    2011-03-01

    The nomenclature currently in use for insect neuropeptide and peptide hormone families is reviewed and suggestions are made as to how it can be rationalized. Based upon this review, a number of conventions are advanced as a guide to a more rationale nomenclature. The scheme that is put forward builds upon the binomial nomenclature scheme proposed by Raina and Gäde in 1988, when just over 20 insect neuropeptides had been identified. Known neuropeptides and peptide hormones are assigned to 32 structurally distinct families, frequently with overlapping functions. The names given to these families are those that are currently in use, and describe a biological function, homology to known invertebrate/vertebrate peptides, or a conserved structural motif. Interspecific isoforms are identified using a five-letter code to indicate genus and species names, and intraspecific isoforms are identified by Roman or Arabic numerals, with the latter used to signify the order in which sequences are encoded on a prepropeptide. The proposed scheme is sufficiently flexible to allow the incorporation of novel peptides, and could be extended to other arthropods and non-arthropod invertebrates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Modification of the FF neuropeptide enhances its hypertensive effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapel'ko, V I; Bespalova, Zh D; Efremov, E E; Lakomkin, V L; Orlova, Ts R; Lakomkin, S V; Sidorova, M V; Az'muko, A A; Molokoedov, A S; Sharf, T V

    2009-05-01

    Neuropeptide FF (H-Phe-Leu-Phe-Gln-Pro-Gln-Arg-Phe-NH2) injected intravenously temporarily enhanced the arterial pressure (AP) and the heart rate (HR). However, its role in the regulation of blood circulation is obscure. To study the properties of the molecule, its analogue was synthesized, in which proline in position 7 was substituted with glycine, and leucine in the position 2 with norleucine. Modified neuropeptide FF (FFm) also temporarily and in a dose-dependent manner increased the AP and HR; however, the equal degree of increase was reached at doses of FFm being 5-7 times lesser as compared with the natural peptide. The application of the FFm at hemorrhagic shock excluded mortality of animals during the experiment, considerably increased the degree of AP and HR restoration in the remaining experiments, and improved the survival of animals in 24 hours. It has been found that the level of antibodies to the fragment of hFF1 receptor in the serum is lower in spontaneously hypertensive rats SHR as compared with Wistar rats, but it is increased in patients of cardiological profile as compared with donors. The findings suggest involvement of neuropeptide FF in the regulation of blood circulation; however, the precise mechanisms remain to be determined.

  15. Sensory neurobiological analysis of neuropeptide modulation of meal size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Gary J; Azzara, Anthony V

    2004-08-01

    Gerry Smith's emphasis on the meal as the functional unit of ingestion spurred experiments designed to (1) identify oral and postoral stimuli that affect meal size, and (2) identify peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in the processing of sensory signals generated by these stimuli. His observations that gut-brain peptides can limit meal size were important in formulating the idea that neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake modulate the peripheral and central neural processing of meal-stimulated sensory signals. This focus on meal size continues to foster the development of hypotheses and the design of experiments that characterize the sites and modes of action of feeding modulatory neuropeptides. These investigations have focused attention on the gut-brain neuraxis as a critical sensory pathway in the control of ingestive behavior, and have revealed important integrative properties of peripheral and central neurons along this axis. The neuromodulatory function of peptides that alter food intake is supported by their ability to recruit the activation of neurons at multiple central nodes of the gut-brain axis and to affect the neural processing and behavioral potency of meal-related gastrointestinal signals important in the negative feedback control of meal size. This sensory neurobiological perspective may also be applied to determine whether feeding modulatory neuropeptides affect the neural and behavioral potency of oral positive feedback signals that promote ingestion.

  16. Parasite neuropeptide biology: Seeding rational drug target selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Paul; Atkinson, Louise; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Dalzell, Johnathan J.; Sluder, Ann; Hammerland, Lance; Maule, Aaron G.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for identifying drug targets within helminth neuromuscular signalling systems is based on the premise that adequate nerve and muscle function is essential for many of the key behavioural determinants of helminth parasitism, including sensory perception/host location, invasion, locomotion/orientation, attachment, feeding and reproduction. This premise is validated by the tendency of current anthelmintics to act on classical neurotransmitter-gated ion channels present on helminth nerve and/or muscle, yielding therapeutic endpoints associated with paralysis and/or death. Supplementary to classical neurotransmitters, helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and encompass associated biosynthetic and signal transduction components – putative drug targets that remain to be exploited by anthelmintic chemotherapy. At this time, no neuropeptide system-targeting lead compounds have been reported, and given that our basic knowledge of neuropeptide biology in parasitic helminths remains inadequate, the short-term prospects for such drugs remain poor. Here, we review current knowledge of neuropeptide signalling in Nematoda and Platyhelminthes, and highlight a suite of 19 protein families that yield deleterious phenotypes in helminth reverse genetics screens. We suggest that orthologues of some of these peptidergic signalling components represent appealing therapeutic targets in parasitic helminths. PMID:24533265

  17. Insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhzaz, Selim; Teets, Nicholas M.; Cabrero, Pablo; Henderson, Louise; Ritchie, Michael G.; Nachman, Ronald J.; Dow, Julian A. T.; Denlinger, David L.; Davies, Shireen-A.

    2015-01-01

    The success of insects is linked to their impressive tolerance to environmental stress, but little is known about how such responses are mediated by the neuroendocrine system. Here we show that the capability (capa) neuropeptide gene is a desiccation- and cold stress-responsive gene in diverse dipteran species. Using targeted in vivo gene silencing, physiological manipulations, stress-tolerance assays, and rationally designed neuropeptide analogs, we demonstrate that the Drosophila melanogaster capa neuropeptide gene and its encoded peptides alter desiccation and cold tolerance. Knockdown of the capa gene increases desiccation tolerance but lengthens chill coma recovery time, and injection of capa peptide analogs can reverse both phenotypes. Immunohistochemical staining suggests that capa accumulates in the capa-expressing Va neurons during desiccation and nonlethal cold stress but is not released until recovery from each stress. Our results also suggest that regulation of cellular ion and water homeostasis mediated by capa peptide signaling in the insect Malpighian (renal) tubules is a key physiological mechanism during recovery from desiccation and cold stress. This work augments our understanding of how stress tolerance is mediated by neuroendocrine signaling and illustrates the use of rationally designed peptide analogs as agents for disrupting protective stress tolerance. PMID:25730885

  18. Neuropeptide Y gene transfection inhibits post-epileptic hippocampal synaptic reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Zhang; Wenqing Zhao; Wenling Li; Changzheng Dong; Xinying Zhang; Jiang Wu; Na Li; Chuandong Liang

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous neuropeptide Y has antiepileptic effects; however, the underlying mechanism and optimal administration method for neuropeptide Y are still unresolved. Previous studies have used intracerebroventricular injection of neuropeptide Y into animal models of epilepsy. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus expression vector carrying the neuropeptide Y gene was injected into the lateral ventricle of rats, while the ipsilateral hippocampus was injected with kainic acid to establish the epileptic model. After transfection of neuropeptide Y gene, mossy fiber sprouting in the hippocampal CA3 region of epileptic rats was significantly suppressed, hippocampal synaptophysin (p38) mRNA and protein expression were inhibited, and epileptic seizures were reduced. These experimental findings indicate that a recombinant adeno-associated virus expression vector carrying the neuropeptide Y gene reduces mossy fiber sprouting and inhibits abnormal synaptophysin expression, thereby suppressing post-epileptic synaptic reconstruction.

  19. Phenotypic alterations of neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing neurons innervating the rat temporomandibular joint during carrageenan-induced arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, J.P.; Ervolino, E.; Torres, K.R.; Batagello, D.S.; Cruz-Rizzolo, R.J.; Casatti, C.A.; Bauer, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) neurons in the autonomic and sensory ganglia, specifically neurons that innervate the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A possible variation between the percentages of these neurons in acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis was examined. Retrograde neuronal tracing was combined with indirect immunofluorescence to identify NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR) and CGRP- immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) neurons that send nerve fibers to the normal and arthritic temporomandibular joint. In normal joints, NPY-IR neurons constitute 78±3%, 77±6% and 10±4% of double-labeled nucleated neuronal profile originated from the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia, respectively. These percentages in the sympathetic ganglia were significantly decreased in acute (58±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 58±8% for stellate ganglion) and chronic (60±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 59±15% for stellate ganglion) phases of arthritis, while in the otic ganglion these percentages were significantly increased to 19±5% and 13±3%, respectively. In the trigeminal ganglion, CGRP-IR neurons innervating the joint significantly increased from 31±3% in normal animals to 54±2% and 49±3% in the acute and chronic phases of arthritis, respectively. It can be concluded that NPY neurons that send nerve fibers to the rat temporomandibular joint are located mainly in the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia. Acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis lead to an increase in the percentage of NPY-IR parasympathetic and CGRP-IR sensory neurons and to a decrease in the percentage of NPY-IR sympathetic neurons related to TMJ innervation. PMID:23027347

  20. Phenotypic alterations of neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing neurons innervating the rat temporomandibular joint during carrageenan-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Damico

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP neurons in the autonomic and sensory ganglia, specifically neurons that innervate the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ. A possible variation between the percentages of these neurons in acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis was examined. Retrograde neuronal tracing was combined with indirect immunofluorescence to identify NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR and CGRP- immunoreactive (CGRP-IR neurons that send nerve fibers to the normal and arthritic temporomandibular joint. In normal joints, NPY-IR neurons constitute 78±3%, 77±6% and 10±4% of double-labeled nucleated neuronal profile originated from the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia, respectively. These percentages in the autonomic ganglia were significantly decreased in acute (58±2% to superior cervical ganglion and 58±8% to stellate ganglion and chronic (60±2% to superior cervical ganglion and 59±15% to stellate ganglion phases of arthritis, while in the otic ganglion these percentages were significantly increased to 19±5% and 13±3%, respectively. In the trigeminal ganglion, CGRP-IR neurons innervating the joint significantly increased from 31±3% in normal animals to 54±2% and 49±3% in the acute and chronic phases of arthritis, respectively. It can be concluded that NPY neurons that send nerve fibers to the rat temporomandibular joint are located mainly in the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia. Acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis lead to an increase in the percentage of NPY-IR parasympathetic and CGRP-IR sensory neurons and decrease in the percentage of NPY-IR sympathetic neurons related to TMJ innervation.

  1. Two neuropeptides from synganglia of the hard tick,Ixodes sinensis (Acari:Ixodidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jianxu; LIU Tongguang; YANG Hailong; XU Xueqing; LIU Zhigang; LAI Ren

    2006-01-01

    Two neuropeptides were isolated from synganglia (central nervous system) of the hard tick,Ixodes sinensis. Their primary sequences were established as Leu-VaI-VaI-Tyr-Pro-Trp-Thr-Lys and TrpGlu-Lys-Leu-Gly-Ser-Met-Glu-Thr-Leu. By hot plate bioassay, neuropeptide a displayed strong antinociceptive effect in mice by a dose-dependent behavior, while neuropeptide b had some relaxant effects on the isolated rat strip. These neuropeptides might be involved in down-regulating the host's defensive reaction.

  2. Can neuropeptides treat obesity? A review of neuropeptides and their potential role in the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughton, C K; Murphy, K G

    2013-12-01

    Obesity is a major worldwide public health issue. The physiological systems that regulate body weight are thus of great interest as targets for anti-obesity agents. Peptidergic systems are critical to the regulation of energy homeostasis by key regions in the hypothalamus and brainstem. A number of neuropeptide systems have therefore been investigated as potential treatments for obesity. Blocking orexigenic peptide signals such as neuropeptide Y, melanin-concentrating hormone, orexins, relaxin-3 and galanin-like peptide or stimulating anorectic signalling pathways used by peptides such as the melanocortins, ciliary neurotrophic factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, are approaches that have shown some promise, but which have also highlighted possible concerns. Manipulation of central peptidergic systems poses a number of therapeutic problems, including brain access and side effects. Given that the homeostatic defence of body weight may limit the effectiveness of any single-target therapy developed, a combination therapy approach may offer the best hope for the effective prevention and treatment of obesity. This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Distribution and chemical coding of corticotropin-releasing factor-immunoreactive neurons in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Xiyu; Wang, Guo-Du; Fang, Xiucai; Gao, Xiang; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2006-01-01

    Immunofluorescence was used to study immunoreactivity (IR) for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the guinea pig enteric nervous system. CRF-IR was expressed in both the myenteric and the submucosal plexuses of all regions of the large and small intestine and the myenteric plexus of the stomach. CRF-IR nerve fibers were present in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, in the circular muscle coat, and surrounding submucosal arterioles. Most of the CRF-IR fibers persisted in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses after 7 days in organotypic culture. CRF-IR was not coexpressed with tyrosine hydroxylase-IR or calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR fibers. The proportions of CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus increased progressively from the stomach (0.6%) to the distal colon (2.8%). Most of the CRF-IR myenteric neurons (95%) had uniaxonal morphology; the remainder had Dogiel type II multipolar morphology. CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus of the ileum expressed IR for choline acetyltransferase (56.9%), substance P (55.0%), and nitric oxide synthase (37.9%). CRF-IR never colocalized with IR for calbindin, calretinin, neuropeptide Y, serotonin, or somatostatin in the myenteric plexus. CRF-IR cell bodies were more abundant in the submucosal plexus (29.9-38.0%) than in the myenteric plexus. All CRF-IR neurons in submucosal ganglia expressed vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR and were likely to be secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. CRF-IR neurons did not express IR for the CRF(1) receptor. CRF(1)-IR was expressed in neuronal neighbors of those with CRF-IR. Collective evidence suggests that VIPergic secretomotor neurons might provide synaptic input to neighboring cholinergic neurons.

  4. Prostaglandin H synthase immunoreactivity in human gut. An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J; Qvortrup, Klaus

    1991-01-01

    Prostaglandins exhibit a variety of actions on intestinal smooth muscle depending upon the type, dose and muscle layer studied. As the cellular origin of prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase has not been established with certainty in the human gut wall, we studied the localization of PGH synthase...... in the human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon by immunohistochemistry. PGH synthase immunoreactivity appeared to be similar in all segments of the intestine. Most smooth muscle cells seemed to contain PGH synthase; however, the reaction in the lamina muscularis mucosae was much stronger than...... in the longitudinal and circular muscle layers. Endothelial cells in capillaries and larger vessels showed a positive reaction. In addition, unidentified cells in subserosa, at the level of Auerbach's plexus and in the submucosa were stained. We concluded that the smooth muscle cells of the human gut has a rather...

  5. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the human claustrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinova-Palova, D V; Edelstein, L; Landzhov, B V; Braak, E; Malinova, L G; Minkov, M; Paloff, A; Ovtscharoff, W

    2014-09-01

    The morphology and distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons (PV-ir) were studied in the human claustrum. PV-ir neurons were observed throughout the claustrum, with the highest numbers noted in the central (broadest) portion as compared with the dorsal and ventral aspects. Reaction product was evident in the neuronal perikarya, dendritic processes, and spines. In the majority of these labeled neurons, the cytoplasm was devoid of lipofuscin pigment. Cell bodies varied widely in both shape and size, ranging from oval and small, to multipolar and large. PV-ir neurons were classified into two groups, primarily based on dendritic morphology: spiny neurons with long and straight dendrites, and aspiny neurons with thin and curving dendritic processes. PV-ir fibers were seen throughout the neuropil, with many immuno-positive puncta noted.

  6. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury.

  7. Intraneuronal Aβ immunoreactivity is not a predictor of brain amyloidosis-β or neurofibrillary degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegiel, Jerzy; Kuchna, Izabela; Nowicki, Krzysztof; Frackowiak, Janusz; Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Imaki, Humi; Wegiel, Jarek; Mehta, Pankaj; Silverman, Wayne; Reisberg, Barry; deLeon, Mony; Wisniewski, Thomas; Pirttilla, Tuula; Frey, Harry; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kivimäki, Tarmo; Visser, Frank; Kamphorst, Wouter; Potempska, Anna; Bolton, David; Currie, Julia; Miller, David

    2007-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) immunoreactivity in neurons was examined in brains of 32 control subjects, 31 people with Down syndrome, and 36 patients with sporadic Alzheimer’s disease to determine if intraneuronal Aβ immunoreactivity is an early manifestation of Alzheimer-type pathology leading to fibrillar pla

  8. Concordance of bioactive vs. total immunoreactive serum leptin levels in children with severe early onset obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanik, Juraj; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Landgraf, Kathrin; Scheuermann, Kathrin; Spielau, Ulrike; Gausche, Ruth; Gasperikova, Daniela; Kiess, Wieland; Körner, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Leptin secreted from adipose tissue signals peripheral energy status to the brain. Monogenic leptin deficiency results in severe early onset obesity with hyperphagia. Recently, a similar phenotype of inactivating leptin mutations but with preserved immunoreactivity and hence normal circulating immunoreactive leptin has been reported. We aimed to evaluate the proportion of bioactive leptin serum levels (compared to immunoreactive leptin) as a biomarker for the screening of leptin gene mutations causing monogenic obesity. Furthermore, we aimed to compare the immunoreactive and bioactive leptin levels associations with parameters of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in obese children and adolescents. We measured bioactive and immunoreactive leptin levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in fasting serum samples of 70 children with severe (BMI SDS >3) non-syndromic obesity with onset leptin gene was performed in probands with proportion of bioactive/immunoreactive leptin leptin were almost identical (41.1±25.2 vs. 41.1±25.4ng/mL). In three probands with the lowest bioactive leptin proportion (leptin gene. Compared to immunoreactive leptin, bioactive leptin showed similar and slightly better statistical associations with indices of insulin resistance in correlation and multivariate analyses. In our sample selected for severe early onset childhood obesity, we did not identify leptin gene mutations leading to decreased proportion of bioactive leptin. Nevertheless, the bioactive leptin levels were stronger associated with selected insulin secretion/resistance indices than the immunoreactive leptin levels.

  9. Enkephalin-immunoreactive subpopulations in the myenteric plexus of the guinea-pig fundus project primarily to the muscle and not to the mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuche, H; Reiche, D; Firzlaff, U; Sann, H; Schemann, M

    1998-10-01

    Enkephalin (ENK) immunoreactivity was localised in different neuronal subpopulations of the myenteric plexus in the guinea-pig gastric fundus using immunohistochemistry for neurone-specific enolase (NSE), ENK, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), substance P (SP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), calretinin (CALRET), and somatostatin (SOM). NADPH-diaphorase staining was used to label nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing neurones. ENK was observed in 44% of the myenteric neurones. The major ENK-positive subpopulations were ChAT/ENK (35% of ENK-positive neurones), ChAT/SP/ENK (26%), NOS/NPY/ENK (22%) and ChAT/SP/ENK/CALRET (9%). The projection pathways of these ENK-positive subpopulations to the circular muscle and the mucosa were determined using retrograde labelling with DiI in organ culture followed by immunohistochemistry. Of myenteric neurones retrogradely labelled from the mucosa and the circular muscle, 13% and 48% exhibited ENK immunoreactivity, respectively. Three major ENK-positive subpopulations innervating the mucosa or circular muscle were identified: ascending ChAT/SP/ENK (7% of all mucosa neurones; 24% of all circular muscle neurones), ascending ChAT/ENK (4%; 15%) and descending NOS/NPY/ENK (1%; 8%) neurones. Only very few CALRET- or SOM-positive neurones projected to the mucosa or circular muscle. ChAT/SP/ENK and ChAT/ENK neurones might function as ascending excitatory muscle motor neurones, whereas NOS/NPY/ENK neurones are most likely descending inhibitory muscle motor neurones. The relatively few ENK-positive mucosa neurones do not favour a major involvement of ENK-positive myenteric neurones in the control of gastric mucosa activity.

  10. Neuropeptídeos na pele Neuropeptides in the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Kalil-Gaspar

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Há evidências crescentes de que a inervação cutânea é capaz de modular uma variedade de fenômenos cutâneos agudos e crônicos, interagindo com as células da pele e seus componentes imunes. Essa forma de sinalização local entre tecido nervoso e tecido cutâneo ocorre especialmente por meio dos neuropeptídeos, uma numerosa família de neurotransmissores de natureza química comum e nomenclatura heterogênea presentes em todo o sistema nervoso e secretados pelas fibras nervosas cutâneas. São alvo desta revisão os neuropeptídeos substância P (SP, o peptídeo relacionado ao gene da calcitonina (CGRP, o peptídeo vasoativo intestinal (VIP, o peptídeo ativador da adenilato-ciclase pituitária (PACAP, o neuropeptídeo Y (NPY e a somatostatina (SOM. Serão discutidas suas ações sobre as células da pele e sistema imune, bem como estudos recentes que sugerem a participação dos neuropeptídeos nas respostas inflamatórias cutâneas, nas reações de hipersensibilidade e em dermatoses humanas, notadamente na psoríase, dermatite atópica, hanseníase e alopecia.There is increasing evidence that cutaneous nerve fibers play a modulatory role in a variety of acute and chronic skin processes. Local interactions between skin cells, skin immune components and neuronal tissues occur specially through neuropeptides, a large family of chemically-related neurotransmitters exhibiting a heterogeneous nomenclature. Neuropeptides are ubiquitous in central and peripheral nervous systems, being directly released in skin by cutaneous nerve fibers. This review is focused on the actions of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, vasointestinal peptide (VIP, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, neuropeptide Y (NPY and somatostatin (SOM. Neuropeptide-related functions on skin and immune cells are also discussed, as well as recent findings implicating nerve fibers in cutaneous inflammatory responses, hypersensitivity

  11. Effects of a skin neuropeptide (substance p) on cutaneous microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Ramdani, Yasmina; Jaouen, Thomas; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Lati, Elian; Yvergnaux, Florent; Driouich, Azzedine; Lefeuvre, Luc; Farmer, Christine; Misery, Laurent; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-01-01

    Skin is the largest human neuroendocrine organ and hosts the second most numerous microbial population but the interaction of skin neuropeptides with the microflora has never been investigated. We studied the effect of Substance P (SP), a peptide released by nerve endings in the skin on bacterial virulence. Bacillus cereus, a member of the skin transient microflora, was used as a model. Exposure to SP strongly stimulated the cytotoxicity of B. cereus (+553±3% with SP 10(-6) M) and this effect was rapid (microbiote should be another mechanism.

  12. Neuropeptide Y activity in the nucleus accumbens modulates feeding behavior and neuronal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, José K; Furman, Kara; Gumbs, Myrtille C R; Eggels, Leslie; Opland, Darren M; Land, Benjamin B; Kolk, Sharon M; S Narayanan, Nandakumar; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, A.; DiLeone, Ralph J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that plays a prominent role in feeding and energy homeostasis. Expression of the NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) is highly concentrated in the nucleus accumbens (Acb), a region important in the regulation of palatable feeding. In this study, we p

  13. Neuropeptides stimulate human osteoblast activity and promote gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenhui; Zhang, Xuemin; Shi, Shushan; Zhang, Yingze

    2013-06-01

    Neuropeptides released from the skeletal nerve fibers have neurotransmitter and immunoregulatory roles; they exert paracrine biological effects on bone cells present close to the nerve endings expressing these signaling molecules. The aims of this study were a systematic investigation of the effects of the neuropeptides substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) on the cell viability and function of the human osteoblasts, and comparing their difference in the role of regulating bone formation. Cultures of normal human osteoblasts were treated with SP, CGRP, VIP, NPY or TH at three concentrations. We found that each of the five neuropeptides induced increases in cell viability of human osteoblasts. The stimulatory action of NPY was the highest, followed by VIP, SP and TH, while CGRP had the lowest stimulatory effect. The viability index of osteoblasts was inversely associated with the concentration of neuropeptides, and positively with the time of exposure. Moreover, the five neuropeptides increased the ALP activity and osteocalcin to different extents in a dose-dependent manner. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly promoted by neuropeptides. The results demonstrated that neuropeptides released from skeletal nerve endings after a stimulus appeared to be able to induce the proliferation and activity of osteoblasts via enhancing GJIC between cells, and further influence the bone formation. These findings may contribute toward a better understanding of the neural influence on bone remodeling and improving treatments related to bone diseases.

  14. Expression of neuropeptides and their receptors in the developing retina of mammals

    OpenAIRE

    bagnoli, P; M. Dal Monte; Casini, G.

    2003-01-01

    The present review examines various aspects of the developmental expression of neuropeptides and of their receptors in mammalian retinas, emphasizing their possible roles in retinal maturation. Different peptidergic systems have been investigated with some detail during retinal development, including substance P (SP), somatostatin (SRIF), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), neuropeptide Y (NPY...

  15. Micellisation and immunoreactivities of dimeric beta-caseins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Reza; Gaudin, Jean-Charles; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Pourpak, Zahra; Moin, Mostafa; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Haertle, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Bovine beta-casein (beta-CN) is a highly amphiphilic micellising phospho-protein showing chaperone-like activity in vitro. Recently, existence of multiple sequential epitopes on beta-CN polypeptide chain in both hydrophilic-polar (psi) and hydrophobic-apolar domains (phi) has been evidenced. In order to clarify specific contribution of polar and apolar domains in micellisation process and in shaping immunoreactivity of beta-CN, its dimeric/bi-amphiphilic "quasi palindromic" forms covalently connected by a disulfide bond linking either N-terminal (C4 beta-CND) or C-terminal domain (C208 beta-CND) were produced and studied. Depending on the C- or N-terminal position of inserted cysteine, each dimeric beta-CN contains one polar/apolar region at the centre and two external hydrophobic/hydrophilic ends. Consequently, such casein dimers have radically different polarities/hydrophobicities on their outside surfaces. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements indicate that these dimeric casein molecules form micelles of different sizes depending on arrangement of polar fragments of the beta-CN mutants in their constrained dimers. Non-aggregated dimers have different hydrodynamic diameters that could be explained by their different geometries. Measurements of fluorescence showed more hydrophobic environment of Trp residues of C208 beta-CND, while in similar experimental conditions Trp residues of C4 beta-CND and native beta-CN were more exposed to the polar medium. Both fluorescence and DLS studies showed greater propensity for micellisation of the dimeric beta-CNs, suggesting that the factors inducing the formation of micelles are stronger in the bi-amphiphilic dimers. 1-anilino-naphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) binding studies showed different binding of ANS by these dimers as well as different exposition of ANS binding (hydrophobic) regions in the micellar states. The differences in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) profiles of C4 beta-CND and C208 beta-CND can

  16. Injection of adjuvant but not acidic saline into craniofacial muscle evokes nociceptive behaviors and neuropeptide expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalavanar, R; Yallampalli, C; Yallampalli, U; Dessem, D

    2007-11-09

    Craniofacial muscle pain including muscular temporomandibular disorders accounts for a substantial portion of all pain perceived in the head and neck region. In spite of its high clinical prevalence, the mechanisms of chronic craniofacial muscle pain are not well understood. Injection of acidic saline into rodent hindlimb muscles produces pathologies which resemble muscular pathologies in chronic pain patients. Here we investigated whether analogous transformations occur following repeated injections of acidic saline into the rat masseter muscle. Injection of acidic saline (pH 4) into the masseter muscle transiently lowered i.m. pH to levels comparable to those reported for rodent hindlimb muscles. Nevertheless, repeated unilateral or bilateral injections of acidic saline (pH 4) into the masseter muscle failed to alter nociceptive behavioral responses as occurs in the hindlimb. Changing the pH of injected saline to pH 3.0 or 5.0 also did not evoke nocifensive behavior. Acid sensing ion channel 3 receptors, which are implicated in transformations following acidification of hindlimb muscles, were found on trigeminal ganglion muscle afferent neurons via combined neuronal tracing and immunocytochemistry. In contrast to the acidic saline, injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the masseter muscle induced mechanical allodynia for 3 weeks, thermal hyperalgesia for 1 week and an increase in the number of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive muscle afferent neurons in the trigeminal ganglion. Although pH may alter CGRP release in primary afferent neurons, the number of CGRP-muscle afferent neurons did not change following i.m. injection of acidic saline. Further, there was no change in ganglionic iCGRP levels at 1, 4 or 12 days after i.m. injection of acidic saline. While these findings extend our earlier reports that CFA-induced muscle inflammation results in behavioral and neuropeptide changes they further suggest that i.m. acidification in

  17. Biosynthesis and metabolism of native and oxidized neuropeptide Y in the hippocampal mossy fiber system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, J B; Walker, M; Pierce, J; Camp, P; White, J D

    1998-05-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression is known to be modulated in the mossy fiber projection of hippocampal granule cells following seizure. We investigated NPY biosynthesis and metabolism in an attempt to characterize NPY biochemically as a neurotransmitter in the granule cell mossy fiber projection. NPY biosynthesis was compared in normal control animals and in animals that had experienced a single pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure. In situ hybridization analysis established the postseizure time course of preproNPY mRNA expression in the hippocampal formation, localizing the majority of increased preproNPY mRNA content to the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Radioimmunoassay analysis of the CA3/mossy fiber terminal subfield confirmed a subsequent increase in NPY peptide content. Biosynthesis of NPY peptide by granule cells and transport to the CA3/mossy fiber subfield was demonstrated by in vivo radiolabel infusion to the dentate gyrus/hilus followed by sequential HPLC purification of identified radiolabeled peptide from the CA3/mossy fiber terminal subfield. Additional in vivo radiolabeling studies revealed a postseizure increase in an unidentified NPY-like immunoreactive (NPY-LI) species. HPLC/radioimmunoassay analyses of CA3 subfield tissue extracts comparing normal control animals and pentylenetetrazole-treated animals confirmed the increased total NPY-LI, and demonstrated that the increased NPY-LI was comprised of a minor increase in native NPY and a major increase in the unknown NPY-LI. Data from subsequent and separate analyses incorporating immunoprecipitation with anti-C-terminal flanking peptide of NPY, further HPLC purification, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry support the conclusion that the unknown NPY-LI is methionine sulfoxide NPY. NPY and NPY-sulfoxide displayed differential calcium sensitivity for release from mossy fiber synaptosomes. Similar to NPY, NPY sulfoxide displayed high-affinity binding to each of the cloned

  18. Isolation of L-3-phenyllactyl-Phe-Lys-Ala-NH2 (Antho-KAamide), a novel neuropeptide from sea anemones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nothacker, H P; Rinehart, K L; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced the neuropeptide L-3-phenyllactyl-Phe-Lys-Ala-NH2 from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. This neuropeptide (named Antho-KAamide) has the unusual N-terminal L-3-phenyllactyl blocking group which has recently also been discovered in 2 other neuropeptides from...

  19. Ethological principles predict the neuropeptides co-opted to influence parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Christopher B.; Badgett, Majors J.; Meagher, Richard B.; Orlando, Ron; Moore, Allen J.

    2017-01-01

    Ethologists predicted that parental care evolves by modifying behavioural precursors in the asocial ancestor. As a corollary, we predict that the evolved mechanistic changes reside in genetic pathways underlying these traits. Here we test our hypothesis in female burying beetles, Nicrophorus vespilloides, an insect where caring adults regurgitate food to begging, dependent offspring. We quantify neuropeptide abundance in brains collected from three behavioural states: solitary virgins, individuals actively parenting or post-parenting solitary adults and quantify 133 peptides belonging to 18 neuropeptides. Eight neuropeptides differ in abundance in one or more states, with increased abundance during parenting in seven. None of these eight neuropeptides have been associated with parental care previously, but all have roles in predicted behavioural precursors for parenting. Our study supports the hypothesis that predictable traits and pathways are targets of selection during the evolution of parenting and suggests additional candidate neuropeptides to study in the context of parenting. PMID:28145404

  20. Distribution of P2Y2 receptors in the guinea pig enteric nervous system and its coexistence with P2X2 and P2X3 receptors, neuropeptide Y, nitric oxide synthase and calretinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhenghua; Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2005-11-01

    The distribution of P2Y2 receptor-immunoreactive (ir) neurons and fibers and coexistence of P2Y2 with P2X2 and P2X3 receptors, neuropeptide Y (NPY), calretinin (CR), calbindin (CB) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was investigated with immunostaining methods. The results showed that P2Y2-ir neurons and fibers were distributed widely in myenteric and submucous plexuses of the guinea pig stomach corpus, jejunum, ileum and colon. The typical morphology of P2Y2-ir neurons was a long process with strong positive staining on the same side of the cell body. The P2Y2-ir neurons could be Dogiel type 1. About 40-60% P2X3-ir neurons were immunoreactive for P2Y2 in the myenteric plexus and all the P2X3-ir neurons expressed the P2Y2 receptor in the submucosal plexus; almost all the NPY-ir neurons and the majority of CR-ir neurons were also immunoreactive for P2Y2, especially in the myenteric plexus of the small intestine; no P2Y2-ir neurons were immunoreactive for P2X2 receptors, CB and NOS. It is shown for the first time that S type/Dogiel type 1 neurons with fast P2X and slow P2Y receptor-mediated depolarizations could be those neurons expressing both P2Y2-ir and P2X3-ir and that they are widely distributed in myenteric and submucosal plexuses of guinea pig gut.

  1. ProSAAS-derived peptides are colocalized with neuropeptide Y and function as neuropeptides in the regulation of food intake.

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    Jonathan H Wardman

    Full Text Available ProSAAS is the precursor of a number of peptides that have been proposed to function as neuropeptides. Because proSAAS mRNA is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, we examined the cellular localization of several proSAAS-derived peptides in the mouse hypothalamus and found that they generally colocalized with neuropeptide Y (NPY, but not α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. However, unlike proNPY mRNA, which is upregulated by food deprivation in the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither proSAAS mRNA nor proSAAS-derived peptides were significantly altered by 1-2 days of food deprivation in wild-type mice. Furthermore, while proSAAS mRNA levels in the mediobasal hypothalamus were significantly lower in Cpe(fat/fat mice as compared to wild-type littermates, proNPY mRNA levels in the mediobasal hypothalamus and in other subregions of the hypothalamus were not significantly different between wild-type and Cpe(fat/fat mice. Intracerebroventricular injections of antibodies to two proSAAS-derived peptides (big LEN and PEN significantly reduced food intake in fasted mice, while injections of antibodies to two other proSAAS-derived peptides (little LEN and little SAAS did not. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of parvocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, a target of arcuate NPY projections, showed that big LEN produced a rapid and reversible inhibition of synaptic glutamate release that was spike independent and abolished by blocking postsynaptic G protein activity, suggesting the involvement of a postsynaptic G protein-coupled receptor and the release of a retrograde synaptic messenger. Taken together with previous studies, these findings support a role for proSAAS-derived peptides such as big LEN as neuropeptides regulating food intake.

  2. Neurocalcin-immunoreactive cells in the rat hippocampus are GABAergic interneurons.

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    Martínez-Guijarro, F J; Briñón, J G; Blasco-Ibáñez, J M; Okazaki, K; Hidaka, H; Alonso, J R

    1998-01-01

    Neurocalcin (NC) is a recently described calcium-binding protein isolated and characterized from bovine brain. NC belongs to the neural calcium-sensor proteins defined by the photoreceptor cell-specific protein recoverin that have been proposed to be involved in the regulation of calcium-dependent phosphorylation in signal transduction pathways. We analyzed the distribution and morphology of the NC-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in the rat dorsal hippocampus and the coexistence of NC with GABA and different neurochemical markers which label perisomatic inhibitory cells [parvalbumin (PV) and cholecystokinin (CCK)], mid-proximal dendritic inhibitory cells [calbindin D28k (CB)], distal dendritic inhibitory cells [somatostatin (SOM) and neuropeptide Y (NPY)], and interneurons specialized to innervate other interneurons [calretinin (CR) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)]. NC-IR cells were present in all layers of the dentate gyrus and hippocampal fields. In the dentate gyrus, NC-IR cells were concentrated in the granule cell layer, especially in the hilar border, whereas in the CA fields they were most frequently found in the stratum radiatum. NC-IR cells were morphologically heterogeneous and exhibited distinctive features of non-principal cells. In the dentate gyrus, pyramidal-like, multipolar and fusiform (horizontal and vertical) cells were found. In the CA3 region most NC-IR cells were multipolar, but vertical and horizontal fusiform cells also appeared. In the CA1 region, where NC-IR cells showed most frequently vertically arranged dendrites, multipolar, bitufted and fusiform (vertical and horizontal) cells could be distinguished. All the NC-IR cells were found to be GABA-IR in all hippocampal layers and regions, and they represented about 19% of the GABA-positive cells. NC/CB, NC/CR and NC/VIP double-labeled cells were found in all hippocampal regions, and represented 29%, 24% and 18% of the NC-IR cells, respectively. NC and CCK did not coexist in the

  3. Effects of leptin and neuropeptide Y on function of human ovarian granulosa cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Qing; Chen Xiao-yan; Cao Zuan-sun; Mao Wen-jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of leptin and neuropeptide Y on steroidogenesis of human ovarian granulosa cells in vitro. Methods: Human ovarian granulosa cells were isolated from follicular fluid obtained during oocyte retrieval of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer program and cultured for 2 days with various concentration of leptin(1,10,100 ng/ml) or neuropeptide Y (1×10-6, 1×10-7, 1×10-8 mol/L) alone or both,or with the combination of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG 0, 20 IU/L). The medium was collected for estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) measurements. Results: (1)Whether hCG existed or not, the adding of leptin did not alter estradiol and progesterone production by human granulosa cells (P>0.05).(2) Only when the concentration of neuropeptide Y was at 1×10-7mol/L,estradiol level was lower than that in the control (P<0.05).(3) The levels of estradiol in neuropeptide Y (1×10-7mol/L) plus hCG group were significantly higher than those with neuropeptide Y alone(P<0.05). (4) In the absence of hCG, the levels of estradiol in neuropeptide Y (1×10-7mol/L)plus leptin (10 ng/ml) group were significantly higher than those with neuropeptide Y(1×10-7mol/L)alone(P<0.05).Conclusions: (1)Leptin alone produced no direct effect on secretion of E2 and P from granulosa cells in vitro.(2)Neuropeptide Y alone may inhibit the secretion of E2, but the inhibition would probably be blocked with the presentation of hCG.(3)Leptin probably blocked the inhibition of neuropeptide Y on E2 secretion, and this may indicate that there were some coordination between leptin and neuropeptid Y on the level of ovarian function.

  4. Effects of exogenous neuropeptide Y and neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptor antagonist on focal cerebral ischemia in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, SH; Cheung, RTF

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effects of exogenous neuropeptide Y (NPY) and BIBP3226, an NPY-Y1 antagonist, on the infarct volume. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 280 and 380 g were anaesthetised with sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg, I.P.) to undergo reversible right-sided endovascular middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 hours. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were monitored, and rectal temperature was kept between 36.5 and 37.5 ºC throughout anesthe...

  5. Islet-1 Immunoreactivity in the Developing Retina of Xenopus laevis

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    Guadalupe Álvarez-Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Islet1 (Isl1 has been widely used as a marker of neuronal differentiation in the developing visual system of different classes of vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. In the present study, we analyzed the spatial and temporal distribution of Isl1-immunoreactive cells during Xenopus laevis retinal development and its relation to the formation of the retinal layers, and in combination with different markers of cell differentiation. The earliest Isl1 expression appeared at St29-30 in the cell nuclei of sparse differentiating neuroblasts located in the vitreal surface of the undifferentiated retina. At St35-36, abundant Isl1-positive cells accumulated at the vitreal surface of the neuroepithelium. As development proceeded and through the postmetamorphic juveniles, Isl1 expression was identified in subpopulations of ganglion cells and in subsets of amacrine, bipolar, and horizontal cells. These data together suggest a possible role for Isl1 in the early differentiation and maintenance of different retinal cell types, and Isl1 can serve as a specific molecular marker for the study of retinal cell specification in X. laevis.

  6. Deposition of immunoreactants in a cutaneous allergic drug reaction

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    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: The analysis of allergic drug reaction pathology may be difficult, especially if multiple histological reaction patterns are detected on review of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stained sections. In this case, we emphasize the value of adding immunohistochemistry (IHC and multicolor direct immunofluorescence (DIF as tools to improve the diagnosis of these complex disorders. Patient and Methods: Our patient is a twenty-year-old Caucasian female, who presented with a sudden onset of erythematous macules on the skin following administration of amoxicillin. Lesional tissue was examined by H & E and IHC, and perilesional tissue by DIF and IHC. Results: The H&E findings revealed diffuse dermal edema, and a mild, superficial, perivascular dermatitis with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate, consistent with an allergic drug eruption. The IHC and DIF studies revealed autoreactivity to sweat glands, nerves and dermal blood vessels, as well as dermal deposits of immune reactants such as fibrinogen and complement around the inflamed areas. Conclusions: Fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products have been shown in some cases of allergic disorders; thus, we encourage the effect further testing for these immunoreactants in biopsies from patients with possible allergic drug reactions.

  7. Deposition of immunoreactants in a cutaneous allergic drug reaction

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    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The analysis of allergic drug reaction pathology may be difficult, especially if multiple histological reaction patterns are detected on review of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stained sections. In this case, we emphasize the value of adding immunohistochemistry (IHC and multicolor direct immunofluorescence (DIF as tools to improve the diagnosis of these complex disorders. Patient and Methods : Our patient is a twenty-year-old Caucasian female, who presented with a sudden onset of erythematous macules on the skin following administration of amoxicillin. Lesional tissue was examined by H & E and IHC, and perilesional tissue by DIF and IHC. Results: The H&E findings revealed diffuse dermal edema, and a mild, superficial, perivascular dermatitis with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate, consistent with an allergic drug eruption. The IHC and DIF studies revealed autoreactivity to sweat glands, nerves and dermal blood vessels, as well as dermal deposits of immune reactants such as fibrinogen and complement around the inflamed areas. Conclusions : Fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products have been shown in some cases of allergic disorders; thus, we encourage the effect further testing for these immunoreactants in biopsies from patients with possible allergic drug reactions.

  8. Androgen receptor immunoreactivity in rat occipital cortex after callosotomy

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    G Lepore

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Gonadal steroidogenesis can be influenced by direct neural links between the central nervous system and the gonads. It is known that androgen receptor (AR is expressed in many areas of the rat brain involved in neuroendocrine control of reproduction, such as the cerebral cortex. It has been recently shown that the occipital cortex exerts an inhibitory effect on testicular stereoidogenesis by a pituitary-independent neural mechanism. Moreover, the complete transection of the corpus callosum leads to an increase in testosterone (T secretion of hemigonadectomized rats. The present study was undertaken to analyze the possible corticocortical influences regulating male reproductive activities. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: 1 intact animals as control; 2 rats undergoing sham callosotomy; 3 posterior callosotomy; 4 gonadectomy and posterior callosotomy. Western blot analysis showed no remarkable variations in cortical AR expression in any of the groups except in group I where a significant decrease in AR levels was found. Similarly, both immunocytochemical study and cell count estimation showed a lower AR immunoreactivity in occipital cortex of callosotomized rats than in other groups. In addition, there was no difference in serum T and LH concentration between sham-callosotomized and callosotomized rats. In conclusion, our results show that posterior callosotomy led to a reduction in AR in the right occipital cortex suggesting a putative inhibiting effect of the contralateral cortical area.

  9. Neuropeptides Y, YY, PP and their clinical significance

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    Mariola Śliwińska-Mossoń

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available peripheral nervous system. Considering the structure and evolutionary origin, neuropeptideY (NPY is a peptide of the same family as peptide YY (PYY and pancreatic polypeptide(PP. These proteins were discovered relatively recently, however, knowledge about them isdeepened. They are 36-amino acid peptide acting through G-protein coupled receptors, Y1,Y2, Y3, Y4, Y5 and Y6. The diverse structure C-terminus of the peptide and protein binding toreceptors affect the biological activity and the physiological effects on the digestive system,blood vessels, and the center of hunger and satiety in the hypothalamus. Peptides have anorexicproperties, they regulate appetite and food intake mainly through the intestinal cerebrospinalaxis and the hypothalamus. These substances represent an important potential target of newdrugs in the long-term treatment and prevention of obesity. Furthermore, neuropeptide Yaffects many processes depending on the central nervous system modifies ethanol consumption,affect circadian rhythms, memory processes, anxiety behavior. Peripherally NPY affectssmooth muscle contraction of the blood vessels, blood pressure, and atherogenic processes.Conducted more thorough research trying to define the role and participation of variousneuropeptides in the development of diseases of the pancreas and the gastrointestinal tract,cardiovascular system and use it for diagnosis.

  10. Neuropeptides Modulate Female Chemosensory Processing upon Mating in Drosophila.

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    Ashiq Hussain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A female's reproductive state influences her perception of odors and tastes along with her changed behavioral state and physiological needs. The mechanism that modulates chemosensory processing, however, remains largely elusive. Using Drosophila, we have identified a behavioral, neuronal, and genetic mechanism that adapts the senses of smell and taste, the major modalities for food quality perception, to the physiological needs of a gravid female. Pungent smelling polyamines, such as putrescine and spermidine, are essential for cell proliferation, reproduction, and embryonic development in all animals. A polyamine-rich diet increases reproductive success in many species, including flies. Using a combination of behavioral analysis and in vivo physiology, we show that polyamine attraction is modulated in gravid females through a G-protein coupled receptor, the sex peptide receptor (SPR, and its neuropeptide ligands, MIPs (myoinhibitory peptides, which act directly in the polyamine-detecting olfactory and taste neurons. This modulation is triggered by an increase of SPR expression in chemosensory neurons, which is sufficient to convert virgin to mated female olfactory choice behavior. Together, our data show that neuropeptide-mediated modulation of peripheral chemosensory neurons increases a gravid female's preference for important nutrients, thereby ensuring optimal conditions for her growing progeny.

  11. Influence of sensory neuropeptides on human cutaneous wound healing process.

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    Chéret, J; Lebonvallet, N; Buhé, V; Carre, J L; Misery, L; Le Gall-Ianotto, C

    2014-06-01

    Close interactions exist between primary sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and skin cells. The PNS may be implicated in the modulation of different skin functions as wound healing. Study the influence of sensory neurons in human cutaneous wound healing. We incubated injured human skin explants either with rat primary sensory neurons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or different neuropeptides (vasoactive intestinal peptide or VIP, calcitonin gene-related peptide or CGRP, substance P or SP) at various concentrations. Then we evaluated their effects on the proliferative and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling phases, dermal fibroblasts adhesion and differentiation into myofibroblasts. Thus, DRG and all studied neuromediators increased fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation and act on the expression ratio between collagen type I and type III in favor of collagen I, particularly between the 3rd and 7th day of culture. Furthermore, the enzymatic activities of matrix metalloprotesases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were increased in the first days of wound healing process. Finally, the adhesion of human dermal fibroblasts and their differentiation into myofibroblasts were promoted after incubation with neuromediators. Interestingly, the most potent concentrations for each tested molecules, were the lowest concentrations, corresponding to physiological concentrations. Sensory neurons and their derived-neuropeptides are able to promote skin wound healing. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vasoactive neuropeptides in clinical ophthalmology: An association with autoimmune retinopathy?

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    Donald R Staines

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Donald R Staines1,2, Ekua W Brenu2, Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik21Queensland Health, Gold Coast Population Health Unit, Southport, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Robina, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: The mammalian eye is protected against pathogens and inflammation in a relatively immune-privileged environment. Stringent mechanisms are activated that regulate external injury, infection, and autoimmunity. The eye contains a variety of cells expressing vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs, and their receptors, located in the sclera, cornea, iris, ciliary body, ciliary process, and the retina. VNs are important activators of adenylate cyclase, deriving cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP from adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Impairment of VN function would arguably impede cAMP production and impede utilization of ATP. Thus VN autoimmunity may be an etiological factor in retinopathy involving perturbations of purinergic signaling. A sound blood supply is necessary for the existence and functional properties of the retina. This paper postulates that impairments in the endothelial barriers and the blood–retinal barrier, as well as certain inflammatory responses, may arise from disruption to VN function. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors and purinergic modulators may have a role in the treatment of postulated VN autoimmune retinopathy.Keywords: retinopathy, autoimmune, vasoactive neuropeptides, phosphodiesterase inhibitors

  13. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures.

  14. The Importance of GLWamide Neuropeptides in Cnidarian Development and Physiology

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    Toshio Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The peptide-signaling molecules (<50 amino acid residues occur in a wide variety of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, playing pivotal roles in physiological, endocrine, and developmental processes. While some of these peptides display similar structures in mammals and invertebrates, others differ with respect to their structure and function in a species-specific manner. Such a conservation of basic structure and function implies that many peptide-signaling molecules arose very early in the evolutionary history of some taxa, while species-specific characteristics led us to suggest that they also acquire the ability to evolve in response to specific environmental conditions. In this paper, we describe GLWamide-family peptides that function as signaling molecules in the process of muscle contraction, metamorphosis, and settlement in cnidarians. The peptides are produced by neurons and are therefore referred to as neuropeptides. We discuss the importance of the neuropeptides in both developmental and physiological processes in a subset of hydrozoans, as well as the potential use as a seed compound in drug development and aspects related to the protection of corals.

  15. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system and alimentary tract of the non-hematophagous blow fly, Phormia regina, and the hematophagous horse fly, Tabanus nigrovittatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselton, Aaron T; Yin, Chih-Ming; Stoffolano, John G

    2008-01-01

    FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) are a diverse and physiologically important class of neuropepeptides in the metazoa. In insects, FaRPs function as brain-gut neuropeptides and have been immunolocalized throughout the nervous system and alimentary tract where they have been shown to affect feeding behavior. The occurrence of FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity (FLI) was examined in the central nervous system and alimentary tract of non-hematophagous blow fly, Phormia regina Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae), and the hematophagous horse fly, Tabanus nigrovittatus Macquart (Diptera:Tabanidae). Although the central nervous system and alimentary anatomy differ between these two dipteran species, many aspects of FLI remain similar. FLI was observed throughout the central and stomatogastric nervous systems, foregut, and midgut in both flies. In the central nervous system, cells and processes with FLI occurred in the brain, subesophageal ganglion, and ventral nerve cord. FLI was associated with neurohemal areas of the brain and ventral nerve cord. A neurohemal plexus of fibers with FLI was present on the dorsal region of the thoracic central nervous system in both species. In the gut, processes with FLI innervated the crop duct, crop and anterior midgut. Endocrine cells with FLI were present in the posterior midgut. The distribution of FLI in these two flies, in spite of their different feeding habits, further supports the role of FaRPs as important components of the braingut neurochemical axis in these insects and implicates FaRPs as regulators of insect feeding physiology among divergent insect taxa.

  16. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in ependymal cells during early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soygüder, Zafer; Karadağ, Hüseyin; Nazli, Mümtaz

    2004-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity was observed in ependymal cell layer of the central canal of spinal cord of neonatal rats (2-20 days old). Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity was present in postnatal day 2 and this immunoreactivity gradually disappeared by postnatal day 16. The progressive decrease in nNOS staining with the increasing postnatal age may suggest that nNOS staining paralleled the maturation of the central canal and may also suggest that nNOS activity plays a role in the development of the ependymal cells.

  17. [Neuropeptides and psychiatry report presented at the French-Swiss Psychiatric meeting in Bel-Air, Geneva, 4 May 1980].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taban, C H

    1981-01-01

    In this mini-review the definition, some localizations and effects of 18 neuropeptides (as known at the beginning of 1980) are recalled, as well as some of the methods used. The hypothesis that neuropeptides may modify both functions and structures is presented. After a brief comment on the neuropeptides/monoamines relations and on some pharmacological results, the possible implications of neuropeptides dysfunctions in various psychiatric disorders are discussed. Some facts leading to the suspicion that both substance P and endorphines are increased in some psychoses are mentioned. The results of therapeutic trials are discussed. The importance of neuropeptides for the maintenance of internal homeostasis and behavioural adjustments is stressed.

  18. Reduction in choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity but not muscarinic-m2 receptor immunoreactivity in the brainstem of SIDS infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallard, C; Tolcos, M; Leditschke, J; Campbell, P; Rees, S

    1999-03-01

    The cholinergic neurotransmitter system is vital for several brainstem functions including cardiorespiratory control and central chemosensitivity. This study has examined aspects of the cholinergic neurotransmitter system in the brainstem of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and control infants. The cellular localisation and the optical density of the immunoreactivity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CHAT-IR) and the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 (m2-IR) in the medulla was described in 14 SIDS and 9 control cases. There was a reduction in the number of CHAT-IR neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (control: 71.2+/-8.3% vs SIDS: 46.1+/-5.3%) and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) (control: 77.2+/-5.0% vs SIDS: 52.5+/-7.4%) and reduced optical density of CHAT-IR in the hypoglossal nucleus (control: 0.20+/-0.01 vs SIDS; 0.14+/-0.02) in SIDS infants. In contrast there were no changes in the optical density of m2-IR in the hypoglossal nucleus, the DMV, or the arcuate nucleus. Hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus was observed in one SIDS infant. These results suggest that there is a specific defect in some cholinergic motor neurons in the medulla of SIDS infants. This could lead to abnormal control of cardiovascular and respiratory function and airway patency and may be one of the contributing factors in the etiology of SIDS.

  19. TRPV1 receptor in the human trigeminal ganglion and spinal nucleus: immunohistochemical localization and comparison with the neuropeptides CGRP and SP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartu, Marina; Serra, Maria Pina; Boi, Marianna; Poddighe, Laura; Picci, Cristina; Demontis, Roberto; Del Fiacco, Marina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents new data concerning the immunohistochemical occurrence of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) receptor in the human trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal nucleus of subjects at different ontogenetic stages, from prenatal life to postnatal old age. Comparisons are made with the sensory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). TRPV1-like immunoreactive (LI) material was detected by western blot in homogenates of TG and medulla oblongata of subjects at prenatal and adult stages of life. Immunohistochemistry showed that expression of the TRPV1 receptor is mostly restricted to the small- and medium-sized TG neurons and to the caudal subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5C). The extent of the TRPV1-LI TG neuronal subpopulation was greater in subjects at early perinatal age than at late perinatal age and in postnatal life. Centrally, the TRPV1 receptor localized to fibre tracts and punctate elements, which were mainly distributed in the spinal tract, lamina I and inner lamina II of the Sp5C, whereas stained cells were rare. The TRPV1 receptor colocalized partially with CGRP and SP in the TG, and was incompletely codistributed with both neuropeptides in the spinal tract and in the superficial laminae of the Sp5C. Substantial differences were noted with respect to the distribution of the TRPV1-LI structures described in the rat Sp5C and with respect to the temporal expression of the receptor during the development of the rat spinal dorsal horn. The distinctive localization of TRPV1-LI material supports the concept of the involvement of TRPV1 receptor in the functional activity of the protopathic compartment of the human trigeminal sensory system, i.e. the processing and neurotransmission of thermal and pain stimuli.

  20. C. elegans Stress-Induced Sleep Emerges from the Collective Action of Multiple Neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ravi D; Chow, Elly S; Wang, Han; Schwarz, Erich M; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-09-26

    The genetic basis of sleep regulation remains poorly understood. In C. elegans, cellular stress induces sleep through epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent activation of the EGF receptor in the ALA neuron. The downstream mechanism by which this neuron promotes sleep is unknown. Single-cell RNA sequencing of ALA reveals that the most highly expressed, ALA-enriched genes encode neuropeptides. Here we have systematically investigated the four most highly enriched neuropeptides: flp-7, nlp-8, flp-24, and flp-13. When individually removed by null mutation, these peptides had little or no effect on stress-induced sleep. However, stress-induced sleep was abolished in nlp-8; flp-24; flp-13 triple-mutant animals, indicating that these neuropeptides work collectively in controlling stress-induced sleep. We tested the effect of overexpression of these neuropeptide genes on five behaviors modulated during sleep-pharyngeal pumping, defecation, locomotion, head movement, and avoidance response to an aversive stimulus-and we found that, if individually overexpressed, each of three neuropeptides (nlp-8, flp-24, or flp-13) induced a different suite of sleep-associated behaviors. These overexpression results raise the possibility that individual components of sleep might be specified by individual neuropeptides or combinations of neuropeptides.

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis of spatio-temporal dynamics of crustacean neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Liang, Zhidan; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides represent one of the largest classes of signaling molecules used by nervous systems to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Over the past several years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies have revolutionized the discovery of neuropeptides in numerous model organisms, especially in decapod crustaceans. Here, we focus our discussion on recent advances in the use of MS-based techniques to map neuropeptides in the spatial domain and monitoring their dynamic changes in the temporal domain. These MS-enabled investigations provide valuable information about the distribution, secretion and potential function of neuropeptides with high molecular specificity and sensitivity. In situ MS imaging and in vivo microdialysis are highlighted as key technologies for probing spatio-temporal dynamics of neuropeptides in the crustacean nervous system. This review summarizes the latest advancement in MS-based methodologies for neuropeptide analysis including typical workflow and sample preparation strategies as well as major neuropeptide families discovered in decapod crustaceans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in Neuroscience and Neurology.

  2. Neuropeptides as therapeutic targets to combat stress-associated behavioral and neuroendocrinological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2014-03-01

    Stress has become an integral part of human life and organisms are being constantly subjected to stress and the ability to cope with such stress is a crucial determinant of health and disease. Neuropeptides (bioactive peptides) play a crucial role in mediating different effects of acute and chronic stress. Some of these neuropeptides including oxytocin, urocortins, neuropeptide Y (NPY), neuropeptide S, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript, endorphins, enkephalins, ghrelin and thyrotropin-releasing hormone primarily attenuate stress and act as anxiolytic. On the other hand, neuropeptides including corticotropin releasing hormone, vasopressin, dynorphin, angiotensin, nesfatin-1, orexin and cholecystokinin primarily tend to promote stress related anxiety behavior. However, these neuropeptide tend to produce different actions depending on the type of receptors, the nature and intensity of the stressor. For example, NPY may exhibit anxiolytic effects by activating NPY1 and Y5 receptors, while pro-depressive effects are produced through NPY2 and Y4 receptors. Galanin may produce 'prodepressive' effects by activating its Gal 1 receptors and exert 'antidepressant' effects through Gal 2 receptors. The present review describes different neuropeptides as therapeutic targets to attenuate stress-induced behavioral and neuroendocrinological effects.

  3. Neuropeptides amplify and focus the monoaminergic inhibition of nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapiak, Vera; Summers, Philip; Ortega, Amanda; Law, Wen Jing; Stein, Andrew; Komuniecki, Richard

    2013-08-28

    Monoamines and neuropeptides interact to modulate most behaviors. To better understand these interactions, we have defined the roles of tyramine (TA), octopamine, and neuropeptides in the inhibition of aversive behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. TA abolishes the serotonergic sensitization of aversive behavior mediated by the two nociceptive ASH sensory neurons and requires the expression of the adrenergic-like, Gαq-coupled, TA receptor TYRA-3 on inhibitory monoaminergic and peptidergic neurons. For example, TA inhibition requires Gαq and Gαs signaling in the peptidergic ASI sensory neurons, with an array of ASI neuropeptides activating neuropeptide receptors on additional neurons involved in locomotory decision-making. The ASI neuropeptides required for tyraminergic inhibition are distinct from those required for octopaminergic inhibition, suggesting that individual monoamines stimulate the release of different subsets of ASI neuropeptides. Together, these results demonstrate that a complex humoral mix of monoamines is focused by more local, synaptic, neuropeptide release to modulate nociception and highlight the similarities between the tyraminergic/octopaminergic inhibition of nociception in C. elegans and the noradrenergic inhibition of nociception in mammals that also involves inhibitory peptidergic signaling.

  4. Presence of neuropeptide FF receptors on primary afferent fibres of the rat spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajac, J.-M. [Laboratoire de Pharmacologie et de Toxicologie Fondamentales, C.N.R.S., 205 Route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Kar, S. [Douglas Hospital Research Centre and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, 6875 LaSalle Blvd, Verdun, Quebec H4H1R3 (Canada); Gouarderes, C. [Laboratoire de Pharmacologie et de Toxicologie Fondamentales, C.N.R.S., 205 Route de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    1996-09-01

    A radioiodinated analogue of neuropeptide FF, [{sup 125}I][d.Tyr{sup 1},(NMe)Phe{sup 3}]neuropeptide FF, was used as a selective probe to label neuropeptide FF receptors in the rat spinal cord. Following neonatal capsaicin treatment, dorsal rhizotomy or sciatic nerve section, the distribution and possible alterations of spinal cord specific [{sup 125}I][d.Tyr{sup 1},(NMe)Phe{sup 3}]neuropeptide FF binding sites were evaluated using in vitro quantitative receptor autoradiography. In normal rats, the highest densities of sites were observed in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn (laminae I-II) whereas moderate to low amounts of labelling were seen in the deeper (III-VI) laminae, around the central canal, and in the ventral horn. Capsaicin-treated rats showed a bilateral decrease (47%) in [{sup 125}I][d.Tyr{sup 1},(NMe)Phe{sup 3}]neuropeptide FF binding in all spinal areas. Unilateral sciatic nerve section and unilateral dorsal rhizotomy induced significant depletions (15-27%) in [{sup 125}I][d.Tyr{sup 1},(NMe)Phe{sup 3}]neuropeptide FF labelling in the ipsilateral dorsal horn.These results suggest that a proportion of neuropeptide FF receptors is located on primary afferent terminals of the dorsal horn and could thus play a role in the modulation of nociceptive transmission. (Copyright (c) 1996 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Effects of Neuropeptides and Mechanical Loading on Bone Cell Resorption in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Min Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides such as vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP are present in nerve fibers of bone tissues and have been suggested to potentially regulate bone remodeling. Oscillatory fluid flow (OFF-induced shear stress is a potent signal in mechanotransduction that is capable of regulating both anabolic and catabolic bone remodeling. However, the interaction between neuropeptides and mechanical induction in bone remodeling is poorly understood. In this study, we attempted to quantify the effects of combined neuropeptides and mechanical stimuli on mRNA and protein expression related to bone resorption. Neuropeptides (VIP or CGRP and/or OFF-induced shear stress were applied to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells and changes in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB ligand (RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG mRNA and protein levels were quantified. Neuropeptides and OFF-induced shear stress similarly decreased RANKL and increased OPG levels compared to control. Changes were not further enhanced with combined neuropeptides and OFF-induced shear stress. These results suggest that neuropeptides CGRP and VIP have an important role in suppressing bone resorptive activities through RANKL/OPG pathway, similar to mechanical loading.

  6. Biochemical analysis of CTLA-4 immunoreactive material from human blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennert Kate

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CTLA-4 was initially described as a membrane-bound molecule that inhibited lymphocyte activation by interacting with B7.1 and B7.2 molecules on antigen presenting cells. Alternative splicing of mRNA encoding the CTLA-4 receptor leads to the production of a molecule (sCTLA-4 that lacks a membrane anchor and is therefore secreted into the extracellular space. Despite studies finding that people with autoimmune disease more frequently express high levels of sCTLA-4 in their blood than apparently healthy people, the significance of these findings is unclear. Methods Molecules isolated from blood using CTLA-4 specific antibodies were analyzed with ligand binding assays, mass spectroscopy, and biochemical fractionation in an effort to increase our understanding of CTLA-4 immunoreactive material. Results Mass spectroscopy analysis of the molecules recognized by multiple CTLA-4-specific antibodies failed to identify any CTLA-4 protein. Even though these molecules bind to the CTLA-4 receptors B7.1 and B7.2, they also exhibit properties common to immunoglobulins. Conclusion We have identified molecules in blood that are recognized by CTLA-4 specific antibodies but also exhibit properties of immunoglobulins. Our data indicates that what has been called sCTLA-4 is not a direct product of the CTLA-4 gene, and that the CTLA-4 protein is not part of this molecule. These results may explain why the relationship of sCTLA-4 to immune system activity has been difficult to elucidate.

  7. The roles of neuropeptides in Caenorhabditis elegans including their importance in the regulation of feeding and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2013-06-01

    C. elegans has 302 neurons (in the adult hermaphrodite) and this simple nervous system harbours over 250 neuropeptides. Neuropeptides are a class of signalling molecule implicated in key physiological roles and thus confer a surprising level of complexity to signalling in this nematode. Indeed, it is probable that most, if not all, sensory, motor and interneurons, in C. elegans synthesise and release at least one neuropeptide but that many neurons synthesise an array of neuropeptides. In this review neuropeptides and their receptors with specific roles in feeding, metabolism, reproduction and locomotion are discussed. It is noted that the majority of C. elegans neuropeptides do not yet have defined roles and their cognate receptors have not yet been identified. Future studies will serve to provide further fundamental insight into how neuropeptide signalling can underpin animal behaviour.

  8. A putative morphological substrate of the catecholamine-influenced neuropeptide Y (NPY) release in the human hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Laam; Rotoli, Giorgio; Grignol, George; Hu, Walter; Merchenthaler, Istvan; Dudas, Bertalan

    2011-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36 amino acid peptide, which among others, plays a pivotal role in stress response. Although previous studies confirmed that NPY release is increased by stress in several species, the exact mechanism of the stress-induced NPY release has not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we examined, with morphological means, the possibility that catecholamines directly influence NPY release in the human hypothalamus. Since the use of electron microscopic techniques is virtually impossible in immunostained human samples due to the long post mortem time, double-label immunohistochemistry was utilised in order to reveal the putative catecholaminergic-NPY associations. The present study is the first to demonstrate juxtapositions between the catecholaminergic, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)/dopamine-beta hydroxylase (DBH)-immunoreactive (IR) and NPY-IR neural elements in the human hypothalamus. These en passant type associations are most numerous in the infundibular and periventricular areas of the human diencephalon. Here, NPY-IR neurons often form several contacts with catecholaminergic fibre varicosities, without any observable gaps between the contacting elements, suggesting that these juxtapositions may represent functional synapses. The lack of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT)-NPY juxtapositions and the relatively few observed DBH-NPY associations suggest that the vast majority of the observed TH-NPY juxtapositions represent dopaminergic synapses. Since catecholamines are known to be the crucial components of the stress response, the presence of direct, catecholaminergic (primarily dopaminergic)-NPY-IR synapses may explain the increased NPY release during stress. The released NPY in turn is believed to play an active role in the responses that are directed to maintain the homeostasis during stressful conditions.

  9. Altered expression of neuropeptides in the primary somatosensory cortex of the Down syndrome model Ts65Dn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Samuel; Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Blasco-Ibáñez, José Miguel; Crespo, Carlos; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio

    2012-02-01

    Down syndrome is the most common genetic disorder associated with mental retardation. Subjects and mice models for Down syndrome (such as Ts65Dn) show defects in the formation of neuronal networks in both the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. The principal neurons display alterations in the morphology, density and distribution of dendritic spines in the cortex as well as in the hippocampus. Several evidences point to the possibility that the atrophy observed in principal neurons could be mediated by changes in their inhibitory inputs and, in fact, an imbalance between excitation and inhibition has been observed in Ts65Dn mice in these regions, which are crucial for learning and information processing. These animals have an increased density of interneurons in the primary somatosensory cortex, especially of those expressing calretinin and calbindin D-28k. Here, we have analysed the expression and distribution of several neuropeptides in the primary somatosensory cortex of Ts65Dn mice in order to investigate whether these subpopulations of interneurons are affected. We have observed an increase in the total density of somatostatin expressing interneurons and of those expressing VIP in layer IV in Ts65Dn mice. The typology of the somatostatin and VIP interneurons was unaltered as attested by the pattern of co-expression with other markers. Somatostatin immunoreactive neurons co-express mainly D-28k calbindin and VIP expressing interneurons maintain its pattern of co-expression with calcium binding proteins. These alterations, in case they were also present in subjects with Down syndrome, could be related to their impairment in cognitive profile and could be involved in the neurological defects observed in this disorder.

  10. CD34 immunoreactivity and interstitial cells of Cajal in the human and mouse gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J; De Laet, M H;

    2000-01-01

    Immunoreactivity for the tyrosine kinase receptor Kit (Kit-ir) is an established marker for the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) of the gut. Recently, the presence of CD34 immunoreactivity (CD34-ir) has been reported in Kit-ir ICC around the myenteric plexus in human small intestine. Conversely,......-localization. The ontogeny and function of CD34-ir cells in the gut, as well as the origin of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, remain unclear....

  11. Glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is present in oligodendroglia of various regions of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, F.; Eng, L. F.; Gibbs, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were identified in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord. They were mostly confined to the gray matter, particularly close to neurons and processes. The white matter showed few immunoreactive oligodendroglia. It was suggested that some type of oligodendrocytes, specially those in perineuronal location, might fulfill a functional role more akin to astrocytes than to the normally myelinating oligodendroglia.

  12. Distribution of ghrelin-ike immunoreactive cells in amphioxus, Branchiostoma belcheri- A study of immunohistochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Zhu Weng; Hai-Xia Song; Yong-Qiang Fang

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of ghrelin-like immunoreactive cells in amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) was investigated by using immunohisto-chemical staining with rabbit antiserum against synthetical mammalian ghrelin. The results showed that ghrelin-like immunoreactive cells were distributed widely in the nervous system, Hatschek's pit, wheel organ, digestive tract and gonads (ovary and testis). In nervous system, ghrelin-like immunoreactive neurons and their protrusions were distributed specifically on the dorsal side, ventral side and funnel part of brain vesicle, with a few dispersive immunoreactive nerve cells and their fibers in nerve tube. Ghrelin-like immunoreactivities were also detected in Hatschek's pit epithelial cells and wheel organ cells, with positive substance located along cell membrane. In digestive tract, ghrelin-like immunoreactive cells existed in hepatic diverticulum, anterior and posterior region of midgut, and could be classified into two types, closed- and opened-type endocrine cells. The number of positive cells was most in hepatic diverticulum, secondary in posterior region of midgut and least in anterior region of midgut. In gonads, ghrelin-like immunoreactive substance was detected in oogonia, oocytes and follicle cells in ovary at the small and large growth stages and in early spermatogenic cells and Sertoli cells in testis. The extensive distribution of ghrelin-like cells in amphioxus suggested that these kinds of cells are conservative in evolution and diversified in function. At the same time, we found for the first time that ghrelin-like immunoreactive cells existed in brain vesicle and Hatschek's pit, which provided new morphological evidence for the existence of an activation pathway between brain vesicle and Hatschek's pit for the regulation of growth hormone excretion.

  13. Neuropeptide Y inhibits hippocampal seizures and wet dog shakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, D P; Madsen, T M; Larsen, P J

    1996-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular neuropeptide Y (NPY) or somatostatin were studied upon hippocampal EEG seizures elicited by electrical stimulation of the rat dentate gyrus or subiculum. At doses of 6 and 12 nmol, the latter dose being more effective, NPY reduced the primary afterdischarge...... effects in the dentate gyrus and subiculum, but also in areas to which epileptiform EEG activity spreads before reverberating. In addition, NPY strongly reduced seizure-related 'wet dog shakes' (WDS). This is consistent with previous studies showing that the dentate gyrus is essential for the generation...... of WDS. However, NPY inhibited WDS even when 1.ADDs were evoked which did not differ from those of vehicle rats, indicating extra-dentate inhibition by NPY as well. No effects were seen with somatostatin. These results show that NPY exerts antiepileptiform effects in vivo, suggesting that increased NPY...

  14. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) as a therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Neves, Joana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system. Studies in both humans and rodent models revealed that brain NPY levels are altered in some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease. In this review, we will focus on the roles of NPY in the pathological mechanisms of these disorders, highlighting NPY as a neuroprotective agent, as a neural stem cell proliferative agent, as an agent that increases trophic support, as a stimulator of autophagy and as an inhibitor of excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. Moreover, the effect of NPY in some clinical manifestations commonly observed in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease, such as depressive symptoms and body weight loss, are also discussed. In conclusion, this review highlights NPY system as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Neuropeptide y promotes neurogenesis in murine subventricular zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agasse, Fabienne; Bernardino, Liliana; Christiansen, Søren H

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells of the subventricular zone (SVZ) represent a reliable source of neurons for cell replacement. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) promotes neurogenesis in the hippocampal subgranular layer and the olfactory epithelium and may be useful for the stimulation of SVZ dynamic in brain repair purposes. We...... describe that NPY promotes SVZ neurogenesis. NPY (1 microM) treatments increased proliferation at 48 hours and neuronal differentiation at 7 days in SVZ cell cultures. NPY proneurogenic properties are mediated via the Y1 receptor. Accordingly, Y1 receptor is a major active NPY receptor in the mouse SVZ......-Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase signal in growing axons, consistent with axonogenesis. NPY, as a promoter of SVZ neurogenesis, is a crucial factor for future development of cell-based brain therapy. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article....

  16. Neuropeptide Y induces torpor-like hypothermia in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Matthew J; Freeman, David A; Park, Jin Ho; Dark, John

    2005-09-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of neuropeptide Y (NPY) are known to decrease body temperature (Tb) of laboratory rats by 1-3 degrees C. Several NPY pathways in the brain terminate in hypothalamic structures involved in energy balance and thermoregulation. Laboratory rats are homeothermic, maintaining Tb within a narrow range. We examined the effect of ICV injected NPY on Tb in the heterothermic Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus), a species that naturally undergoes daily torpor in which Tb decreases by as much as 15-20 degrees C. Minimum effective dose was determined in preliminary testing then various doses of NPY were tested in cold-acclimated Siberian hamsters while food was withheld. NPY markedly reduced Tb in the heterothermic Siberian hamster. In addition, the reduction in Tb in 63% of the observations was sufficient to reach the criterion for daily torpor (Tb Siberian hamster. NPY treatment may be activating hypothalamic systems that normally integrate endogenous torpor-producing signals and initiate torpor.

  17. Role of neuropeptide FF in central cardiovascular and neuroendocrine regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhamandas, Jack H; Goncharuk, Valeri

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) is an octapeptide belonging to the RFamide family of peptides that have been implicated in a wide variety of physiological functions in the brain including central cardiovascular and neuroendocrine regulation. The effects of these peptides are mediated via NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors that are abundantly expressed in the rat and human brain. Herein, we review evidence for the role of NPFF in central regulation of blood pressure particularly within the brainstem and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). At a cellular level, NPFF demonstrates distinct responses in magnocellular and parvocellular neurons of the PVN, which regulate the secretion of neurohypophyseal hormones and sympathetic outflow, respectively. Finally, the presence of NPFF system in the human brain and its alterations within the hypertensive brain are discussed.

  18. Neuropeptide Y receptor gene y6: multiple deaths or resurrections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbäck, P; Wraith, A; Eriksson, H; Larhammar, D

    2000-10-14

    The neuropeptide Y family of G-protein-coupled receptors consists of five cloned members in mammals. Four genes give rise to functional receptors in all mammals investigated. The y6 gene is a pseudogene in human and pig and is absent in rat, but generates a functional receptor in rabbit and mouse and probably in the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), a distant relative of the pig family. We report here that the guinea pig y6 gene has a highly distorted nucleotide sequence with multiple frame-shift mutations. One evolutionary scenario may suggest that y6 was inactivated before the divergence of the mammalian orders and subsequently resurrected in some lineages. However, the pseudogene mutations seem to be distinct in human, pig, and guinea pig, arguing for separate inactivation events. In either case, the y6 gene has a quite unusual evolutionary history with multiple independent deaths or resurrections.

  19. Expression of neuropeptide Y in rat brain ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babović Siniša S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The immunohistochemical method was used to follow the expression of neuropeptide Y in the course of pre ischemia of the rat brain. The aim of the study was to define all the areas of expression of this protein, show their localization, their map of distribution and histological types. Material and Methods. All the sections of telencephalon, diencephalon and midbrain were studied in resistant, and transitory ischemia, which enabled us to observe the reaction of neurons to an ischemic attack or to repeated attacks. The mapping was done for all three proteins by introducing our results into the maps of rat brain atlas, George Paxinos, Charles Watson. Photographing and protein expression was done using Analysis program. Results. The results of this research show that there is a differens in reaction between the resistant and transitory ischemia groups of rats, especially in the caudoputamen, gyrus dentatus, corpus amygdaloideum, particularly in the medial nucleus. The mapping shows the reaction in caudoputamen, gyrusdentatus, corpus amygdaloideum - especially in the central nucleus, then in the sensitive and secondary auditory cortex, mostly in the laminae V/VI, but less in neuron groups CA1, CA2, CA3 of hippocampus. Discussion. The phylogenetically older parts of the brain-rhinencephalon, also showed reaction, which lead us to conclude that both newer and older brain structures reacted immunohistochemically. Histological data have shown that small neurons are most commonly found while the second most common ones are big pyramidal cells of multipolar and bipolar type, with a different body shape. Conclusion. Our findings have confirmed the results obtained in some rare studies dealing with this issue, and offered a precise and detailed map of cells expressing neuropeptide Y in the rat brain following ischemic attack.

  20. Study on development and localization of CTGF-immunoreactive cells in central nervous system of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Bing-yin; CAI Wen-qin; ZHANNG Cheng-gang; B.Perbal

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the development of connective tissue growth factor(CTGF) immunoreactive cells in the central nervous system (CNS) of E8-P300 rats. Methods: Immunocytochemistry was employed in our study. Results: No CTGF-immunoreactive cells were detected in the CNS of rats during prenatal stages. A few of CTGF-positive cells were detected in the early postnatal stage. However, the positive cells increased gradually in later stages. CTGF-immunoreactive cells widely distributed in the CNS of rats in the first 30 to 60 days postnatally, and the density of immunoreactive products was the highest in these days. The number and staining intensity of CTGF-positive cells decreased and their area of distribution diminished gradually with age. The positive cells included neurons mainly located in the cingulate cortex,striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum, and astrocytes in white matter of the spinal cord and ependymal cells of the brain. Most of CTGF-immunoreactive cells were quite big in size with a long process. Conclusion: CTGF-immunoreactive cells were found in the CNS of rats, and their numbers and positive signal decreased with the age.

  1. Immunoreactivity of lactic acid-treated mare's milk after simulated digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotschki, Joanna; Szyc, Anna; Wróblewska, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    The similarity of mare's milk to breast milk makes it an interesting substrate for the creation of dairy beverages. The aim of this study was to determine the immunoreactivity of the digested mare's milk products carried out by lactic acid fermentation with Lactobacillus casei LCY, Streptococcus thermophilus MK10 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bi30. Simulation of digestion with saliva, pepsin and pancreatin/bile salts was carried out. The immunoreactivity of the milk proteins was assessed by competitive ELISA. The separation of proteins was studied using a tricine SDS-PAGE method. It has been demonstrated that lactic acid fermentation significantly decreases the immunoreactivity of β-lactoglobulin, β-casein, κ-casein and bovine serum albumin. The level of reduction was connected to the type of bacterial strain. The simulated digestion processes caused the decline of immunoreactivity, and the decreases obtained in the experiment were as follows: lactoferrin: 95%, β-lactoglobulin: 94%, β-casein: 93%, α-lactalbumin: 82%, α-casein: 82%, bovine serum albumin: 76% and κ-casein: 37%. The results of the study indicated that microbial fermentation with tested strains is a valuable method for reducing the immunoreactivity of mare's milk proteins. However, further studies with other bacterial strains are needed to gain a higher level of elimination or total reduction of mare's milk immunoreactivity to possibly introduce fermented mare's milk into the diet of patients with immune-mediated digestive problems.

  2. Postnatal development of parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k immunoreactivities in the canine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S P; Chung, Y Y; Chang, I Y; Kim, J J; Moon, J S; Kim, H S

    2000-07-01

    The calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k, are markers of different classes of GABAergic interneurons and display different functions. The present study was attempted to determine immunoreactivities and colocalization of the parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k in the developing canine hippocampus by immunohistochemistry. The calcium-binding protein-containing neurons showed different developmental patterns. The first appearance of parvalbumin immunoreactive nonpyramidal cells was observed at P7. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity was elicited by the sequence from CA3 to CA1 to reach an adult-like distribution pattern, which was reached at P60, while calbindin D-28k immunoreactivity appeared from P0, including pyramidal and nonpyramidal cells. The characteristic distribution of calbindin D-28k immunoreactive pyramidal cells was clarified by P28, and an adult-like distribution pattern was reached by the end of the second postnatal month. Double-labeled nonpyramidal cells were frequently seen in the subareas, CA3 of P14/CA1-CA2 of P28, where parvalbumin immunoreactive nonpyramidal cells were emerging. These data suggest that the colocalization of the two calcium-binding proteins during development is related closely to the area-specific maturation of parvalbumin expression, although either prenatal expression of calbindin D-28k or parvalbumin was not determined.

  3. Calretinin and FMRFamide immunoreactivity in the nervus terminalis of prenatal tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malz, Cordula Renate; Kuhn, Hans-Jürg

    2002-04-30

    The distribution and development of FMRFamide- and calretinin-immunoreactive neurons were investigated in the nervus terminalis of prenatal tree shrews from gestation day 19 onwards. The first FMRFamide-immunoreactive cells were observed medially in the olfactory epithelium on gestation day 20. From gestation day 23 onwards, the migrating nervus terminalis ganglion cells showed FMRFamide calretinin immunoreactivity. The distribution pattern of FMRFamide- and calretinin-immunoreactive cells was similar along the migratory route and in the ganglion of the terminal nerve. However, most probably calretinin and FMRFamide were expressed in separate neuronal populations. For the first time in a mammal, FMRFamide and calretinin are reported to occur in the migrating perikarya and neuronal processes of the nervus terminalis during prenatal development. The results suggest (i) an early activation of the rostral FMRFamide-immunoreactive migratory stream comparable to that described for the GnRH-immunoreactive part of the terminal nerve in other mammals and possibly (ii) an involvement of calretinin in mechanisms of cell migration and outgrowth of neuronal processes in the terminal nerve during the studied period.

  4. A combined electrophysiological and morphological study of neuropeptide Y-expressing inhibitory interneurons in the spinal dorsal horn of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwagaki, Noboru; Ganley, Robert P; Dickie, Allen C; Polgár, Erika; Hughes, David I; Del Rio, Patricia; Revina, Yulia; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J; Riddell, John S

    2016-03-01

    The spinal dorsal horn contains numerous inhibitory interneurons that control transmission of somatosensory information. Although these cells have important roles in modulating pain, we still have limited information about how they are incorporated into neuronal circuits, and this is partly due to difficulty in assigning them to functional populations. Around 15% of inhibitory interneurons in laminae I-III express neuropeptide Y (NPY), but little is known about this population. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological/morphological approach to investigate these cells in mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the NPY promoter. We show that GFP is largely restricted to NPY-immunoreactive cells, although it is only expressed by a third of those in lamina I-II. Reconstructions of recorded neurons revealed that they were morphologically heterogeneous, but never islet cells. Many NPY-GFP cells (including cells in lamina III) appeared to be innervated by C fibres that lack transient receptor potential vanilloid-1, and consistent with this, we found that some lamina III NPY-immunoreactive cells were activated by mechanical noxious stimuli. Projection neurons in lamina III are densely innervated by NPY-containing axons. Our results suggest that this input originates from a small subset of NPY-expressing interneurons, with the projection cells representing only a minority of their output. Taken together with results of previous studies, our findings indicate that somatodendritic morphology is of limited value in classifying functional populations among inhibitory interneurons in the dorsal horn. Because many NPY-expressing cells respond to noxious stimuli, these are likely to have a role in attenuating pain and limiting its spread.

  5. Interaction between neuropeptide Y (NPY) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in NPY-mediated neuroprotection against excitotoxicity: a role for microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapelli, S; Bernardino, L; Ferreira, R; Grade, S; Silva, A P; Salgado, J R; Cavadas, C; Grouzmann, E; Poulsen, F R; Jakobsen, B; Oliveira, C R; Zimmer, J; Malva, J O

    2008-04-01

    The neuroprotective effect of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor activation was investigated in organotypic mouse hippocampal slice cultures exposed to the glutamate receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA). Exposure of 2-week-old slice cultures, derived from 7-day-old C57BL/6 mice, to 8 microm AMPA, for 24 h, induced degeneration of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells, as measured by cellular uptake of propidium iodide (PI). A significant neuroprotection, with a reduction of PI uptake in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers, was observed after incubation with a Y(2) receptor agonist [NPY(13-36), 300 nm]. This effect was sensitive to the presence of the selective Y(2) receptor antagonist (BIIE0246, 1 microm), but was not affected by addition of TrkB-Fc or by a neutralizing antibody against brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Moreover, addition of a Y(1) receptor antagonist (BIBP3226, 1 microm) or a NPY-neutralizing antibody helped to disclose a neuroprotective role of endogenous NPY in CA1 region. Cultures exposed to 8 microm AMPA for 24 h, displayed, as measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a significant increase in BDNF. In such cultures there was an up-regulation of neuronal TrkB immunoreactivity, as well as the presence of BDNF-immunoreactive microglial cells at sites of injury. Thus, an increase of AMPA-receptor mediated neurodegeneration, in the mouse hippocampus, was prevented by neuroprotective pathways activated by NPY receptors (Y(1) and Y(2)), which can be affected by BDNF released by microglia and neurons.

  6. Genomics, transcriptomics, and peptidomics of neuropeptides and protein hormones in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Predel, Reinhard; Neupert, Susanne;

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides and protein hormones are ancient molecules that mediate cell-to-cell communication. The whole genome sequence from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, along with those from other insect species, provides an opportunity to study the evolution of the genes encoding neuropeptide...... and protein hormones. We identified 41 of these genes in the Tribolium genome by using a combination of bioinformatic and peptidomic approaches. These genes encode >80 mature neuropeptides and protein hormones, 49 peptides of which were experimentally identified by peptidomics of the central nervous system...... with a sequenced genome. The presence of many additional osmoregulatory peptides in Tribolium agrees well with its ability to live in very dry surroundings. In contrast to these extra genes, there are at least nine neuropeptide genes missing in Tribolium, including the genes encoding the prepropeptides...

  7. Anti-epileptic effects of neuropeptide Y gene transfection into the rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changzheng Dong; Wenqing Zhao; Wenling Li; Peiyuan Lv; Xiufang Dong

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y gene transfection into normal rat brain tissue can provide gene overexpression, which can attenuate the severity of kainic acid-induced seizures. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying the neuropeptide Y gene was transfected into brain tissue of rats with kainic acid-induced epilepsy through stereotactic methods. Following these transfections, we verified overexpression of the neuropeptide Y gene in the epileptic brain. Electroencephalograms showed that seizure severity was significantly inhibited and seizure latency was significantly prolonged up to 4 weeks after gene transfection. Moreover, quantitative fluorescent PCR and western blot assays revealed that the mRNA and protein expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, and NR2B was inhibited in the hippocampus of epileptic rats. These findings indicate that neuropeptide Y may inhibit seizures via down-regulation of the functional expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

  8. Analytic framework for peptidomics applied to large-scale neuropeptide identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Kelstrup, Christian D; Conde-Frieboes, Kilian W;

    2016-01-01

    was integrated with publically available databases. We developed and applied an algorithm that reduces the peptide complexity for identification of biologically relevant peptides. The developed pipeline was applied to rat hypothalamus and identifies thousands of neuropeptides and their post...

  9. Methamphetamine-induced changes in the mice hippocampal neuropeptide Y system: implications for memory impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, J; Baptista, S; Olesen, MV

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant drug that causes irreversible brain damage leading to several neurological and psychiatric abnormalities, including cognitive deficits. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abundant in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and has several important functions...

  10. Neuropeptide exocytosis involving synaptotagmin-4 and oxytocin in hypothalamic programming of body weight and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Hai; Dean, Camin; Wu, Qiang; Li, Juxue; Guariglia, Sara; Meng, Qingyuan; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-02-10

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play essential roles in regulating energy and body weight balance. Energy imbalance and obesity have been linked to hypothalamic signaling defects in regulating neuropeptide genes; however, it is unknown whether dysregulation of neuropeptide exocytosis could be critically involved. This study discovered that synaptotagmin-4, an atypical modulator of synaptic exocytosis, is expressed most abundantly in oxytocin neurons of the hypothalamus. Synaptotagmin-4 negatively regulates oxytocin exocytosis, and dietary obesity is associated with increased vesicle binding of synaptotagmin-4 and thus enhanced negative regulation of oxytocin release. Overexpressing synaptotagmin-4 in hypothalamic oxytocin neurons and centrally antagonizing oxytocin in mice are similarly obesogenic. Synaptotagmin-4 inhibition prevents against dietary obesity by normalizing oxytocin release and energy balance under chronic nutritional excess. In conclusion, the negative regulation of synaptotagmin-4 on oxytocin release represents a hypothalamic basis of neuropeptide exocytosis in controlling obesity and related diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Manipulation of neuropeptide biosynthesis through the expression of antisense RNA for peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mains, R E; Bloomquist, B T; Eipper, B A

    1991-02-01

    Stable cell lines with significantly elevated or diminished levels of a key neuropeptide processing enzyme, peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), were generated by transfection of a mouse pituitary cell line with expression vectors containing PAM cDNA in the sense or antisense orientation. By evaluating the ability of these cell lines to alpha-amidate endogenous neuropeptides, a rate-limiting role for PAM in neuropeptide alpha-amidation was demonstrated. Overexpression of either the full-length PAM precursor with its trans-membrane domain or a soluble protein containing only the monooxygenase domain of PAM led to increased alpha-amidation of endogenous neuropeptides. Overexpression of the full-length PAM led to an unexpected decrease in the endoproteolytic processing of endogenous prohormone; conversely, underexpression of PAM led to significantly enhanced endoproteolytic processing of endogenous prohormone. These data suggest that PAM may have additional functions in peptide processing.

  12. Localization of Neuropeptide Gene Expression in Larvae of an Echinoderm, the Starfish Asterias rubens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorova, Tatiana D.; Tian, Shi; Cai, Weigang; Semmens, Dean C.; Odekunle, Esther A.; Zandawala, Meet; Badi, Yusef; Rowe, Matthew L.; Egertová, Michaela; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an ancient class of neuronal signaling molecules that regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral processes in animals. The life cycle of many animals includes a larval stage(s) that precedes metamorphic transition to a reproductively active adult stage but, with the exception of Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, research on neuropeptide signaling has hitherto largely focused on adult animals. However, recent advances in genome/transcriptome sequencing have facilitated investigation of neuropeptide expression/function in the larvae of protostomian (e.g., the annelid Platynereis dumerilii) and deuterostomian (e.g., the urochordate Ciona intestinalis) invertebrates. Accordingly, here we report the first multi-gene investigation of larval neuropeptide precursor expression in a species belonging to the phylum Echinodermata—the starfish Asterias rubens. Whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization was used to visualize in bipinnaria and brachiolaria stage larvae the expression of eight neuropeptide precursors: L-type SALMFamide (S1), F-type SALMFamide (S2), vasopressin/oxytocin-type, NGFFYamide, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type. Expression of only three of the precursors (S1, S2, NGFFYamide) was observed in bipinnaria larvae but by the brachiolaria stage expression of all eight precursors was detected. An evolutionarily conserved feature of larval nervous systems is the apical organ and in starfish larvae this comprises the bilaterally symmetrical lateral ganglia, but only the S1 and S2 precursors were found to be expressed in these ganglia. A prominent feature of brachiolaria larvae is the attachment complex, comprising the brachia and adhesive disk, which mediates larval attachment to a substratum prior to metamorphosis. Interestingly, all of the neuropeptide precursors examined here are expressed in the attachment complex, with distinctive

  13. Localization of neuropeptide gene expression in larvae of an echinoderm, the starfish Asterias rubens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana D Mayorova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are an ancient class of neuronal signaling molecules that regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral processes in animals. The life cycle of many animals includes a larval stage(s that precedes metamorphic transition to a reproductively active adult stage but, with the exception of Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, research on neuropeptide signaling has hitherto largely focused on adult animals. However, recent advances in genome/transcriptome sequencing have facilitated investigation of neuropeptide expression/function in the larvae of protostomian (e.g. the annelid Platynereis dumerilii and deuterostomian (e.g. the urochordate Ciona intestinalis invertebrates. Accordingly, here we report the first multi-gene investigation of larval neuropeptide precursor expression in a species belonging to the phylum Echinodermata - the starfish Asterias rubens. Whole-mount mRNA in situ hybridization was used to visualize in bipinnaria and brachiolaria stage larvae the expression of eight neuropeptide precursors: L-type SALMFamide (S1, F-type SALMFamide (S2, vasopressin/oxytocin-type, NGFFYamide, thyrotropin-releasing hormone-type, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-type, calcitonin-type and corticotropin-releasing hormone-type. Expression of only three of the precursors (S1, S2, NGFFYamide was observed in bipinnaria larvae but by the brachiolaria stage expression of all eight precursors was detected. An evolutionarily conserved feature of larval nervous systems is the apical organ and in starfish larvae this comprises the bilaterally symmetrical lateral ganglia, but only the S1 and S2 precursors were found to be expressed in these ganglia. A prominent feature of brachiolaria larvae is the attachment complex, comprising the brachia and adhesive disk, which mediates larval attachment to a substratum prior to metamorphosis. Interestingly, all of the neuropeptide precursors examined here are expressed in the attachment complex, with

  14. Neuropeptides and central control of sexual behaviour from the past to the present: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiolas, Antonio; Melis, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Of the numerous neuropeptides identified in the central nervous system, only a few are involved in the control of sexual behaviour. Among these, the most studied are oxytocin, adrenocorticotropin, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone and opioid peptides. While opioid peptides inhibit sexual performance, the others facilitate sexual behaviour in most of the species studied so far (rats, mice, monkeys and humans). However, evidence for a sexual role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, galanin and galanin-like peptide, cholecystokinin, substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, vasopressin, angiotensin II, hypocretins/orexins and VGF-derived peptides are also available. Corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, vasopressin and angiotensin II inhibit, while substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, hypocretins/orexins and some VGF-derived peptide facilitate sexual behaviour. Neuropeptides influence sexual behaviour by acting mainly in the hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., lateral hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial nucleus, arcuate nucleus), in the medial preoptic area and in the spinal cord. However, it is often unclear whether neuropeptides influence the anticipatory phase (sexual arousal and/or motivation) or the consummatory phase (performance) of sexual behaviour, except in a few cases (e.g., opioid peptides and oxytocin). Unfortunately, scarce information has been added in the last 15 years on the neural mechanisms by which neuropeptides influence sexual behaviour, most studied neuropeptides apart. This may be due to a decreased interest of researchers on neuropeptides and sexual behaviour or on sexual behaviour in general. Such a decrease may be related to the discovery of orally effective, locally acting type V phosphodiesterase inhibitors for the therapy of erectile dysfunction.

  15. Control of planula migration by LWamide and RFamide neuropeptides in Hydractinia echinata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsukura, Yuki; Ando, Hiroshi; David, Charles N.;

    2004-01-01

    ). This pattern of periodic migration is regulated by LWamide and RFamide neuropeptides. LWamide (10-8 mol l-1) stimulates migration primarily by making the active periods longer, whereas RFamide (10-7 mol l-1) inhibits migration by blocking the initiation and also shortening the length of the active periods....... Since sensory neurons containing LWamides and RFamides are present in planula larvae, it appears likely that planula migration is regulated by the release of endogenous neuropeptides in response to environmental cues....

  16. Cloned human neuropeptide Y receptor couples to two different second messenger systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Herzog, H.; Hort, Y J; Ball, H J; Hayes, G; Shine, J; Selbie, L A

    1992-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian nervous system and exhibits a diverse range of important physiological activities, including effects on psychomotor activity, food intake, regulation of central endocrine secretion, and potent vasoactive effects on the cardiovascular system. Two major subtypes of NPY receptor (Y1 and Y2) have been defined by pharmacological criteria. We report here the molecular cloning of a cDNA sequence encoding a human NPY rece...

  17. Quantitative Neuropeptidome Analysis Reveals Neuropeptides Are Correlated with Social Behavior Regulation of the Honeybee Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Hu, Han; Qi, Yuping; Huo, Xinmei; Meng, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianke

    2015-10-01

    Neuropeptides play vital roles in orchestrating neural communication and physiological modulation in organisms, acting as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. The highly evolved social structure of honeybees is a good system for understanding how neuropeptides regulate social behaviors; however, much knowledge on neuropeptidomic variation in the age-related division of labor remains unknown. An in-depth comparison of the brain neuropeptidomic dynamics over four time points of age-related polyethism was performed on two strains of honeybees, the Italian bee (Apis mellifera ligustica, ITb) and the high royal jelly producing bee (RJb, selected for increasing royal jelly production for almost four decades from the ITb in China). Among the 158 identified nonredundant neuropeptides, 77 were previously unreported, significantly expanding the coverage of the honeybee neuropeptidome. The fact that 14 identical neuropeptide precursors changed their expression levels during the division of labor in both the ITb and RJb indicates they are highly related to task transition of honeybee workers. These observations further suggest the two lines of bees employ a similar neuropeptidome modification to tune their respective physiology of age polyethism via regulating excretory system, circadian clock system, and so forth. Noticeably, the enhanced level of neuropeptides implicated in regulating water homeostasis, brood pheromone recognition, foraging capacity, and pollen collection in RJb signify the fact that neuropeptides are also involved in the regulation of RJ secretion. These findings gain novel understanding of honeybee neuropeptidome correlated with social behavior regulation, which is potentially important in neurobiology for honeybees and other insects.

  18. Rapid Preconcentration for Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Assay of Trace Level Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of neuropeptides in the brain through in vivo microdialysis sampling provides direct correlation between neuropeptide concentration and brain function. Capillary liquid chromatography-multistage mass spectrometry (CLC-MSn) has proven to be effective at measuring endogenous neuropeptides in microdialysis samples. In the method, microliter samples are concentrated onto nanoliter volume packed beds before ionization and mass spectrometry analysis. The long times required for extensive preconcentration present a barrier to routine use because of the many samples that must be analyzed and instability of neuropeptides. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of 75 μm inner diameter (i.d.) capillary column packed with 10 μm reversed phase particles for increasing the throughput in CLC-MSn based neuropeptide measurement. Coupling a high injection flow rate for fast sample loading/desalting with a low elution flow rate to maintain detection sensitivity, this column has reduced analysis time from ˜30 min to 3.8 min for 5 μL sample, with 3 pM limit of detection (LOD) for enkephalins and 10 pM LOD for dynorphin A1-8 in 5 μL sample. The use of isotope-labeled internal standard lowered peptide signal variation to less than 5 %. This method was validated for in vivo detection of Leu and Met enkephalin with microdialysate collected from rat globus pallidus. The improvement in speed and stability makes CLC-MSn measurement of neuropeptides in vivo more practical.

  19. The endoparasitoid, Cotesia vestalis, regulates host physiology by reprogramming the neuropeptide transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Min; Dong, Shuai; Li, Ming-tian; Yang, Yan-yan; Stanley, David; Chen, Xue-xin

    2015-02-02

    Endoparasitoids develop inside another insect by regulating host immunity and development via maternal factors injected into hosts during oviposition. Prior results have provided insights into parasitism-induced immunosuppression, including the neuropeptide accumulation in parasitized insects. Nonetheless, our understanding of neuropeptide influence on host development and behavior is not yet complete. We posed the hypothesis that parasitization alters expression of genes encoding pro-neuropeptides and used larvae of Plutella xylostella and its endoparasitoid, Cotesia vestalis to test our hypothesis. We prepared transcriptomes from the larval P. xylostella brain-CC-CA complex and identified transcripts encoding 19 neuropeptides. All corresponding cDNAs were confirmed by RACE. Our results demonstrate that parasitism significantly down-regulated, or delayed, expression of genes encoding pro-neuropeptides within 48 h post-parasitization. Changing expression of these genes may account for the previously reported decreased feeding behavior, reduced growth rates and aborted development in the host larvae. In effect, parasitization may operate at the molecular level within the CNS to create global changes in larval host biology. The significance of our finding is that, in addition to the known effects on immunity, parasitoids influence host pro-neuropeptide gene transcription. This finding reveals a new mechanism operating in host-parasitoid relationships to the advantage of the parasitoid.

  20. Effects of aging on the human ovary: the secretion of immunoreactive alpha-inhibin and progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, A; Marí, M; de los Santos, M J; Simón, C; Remohí, J; Tarín, J J

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the changes induced by age in the function and secretory pattern of the human ovary. Immunoreactive alpha-inhibin, E2, and P secretion in vivo and in vitro have been compared in two different populations. Prospective study. Women undergoing IVF-ET were divided into two groups according to age: group 1 (32.0 +/- 0.7 years; mean +/- SEM) and group 2 (40.3 +/- 0.3 years). In vitro fertilization program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. A total of 33 infertile women with regular menses, undergoing IVF-ET. Follicle aspiration performed by transvaginal ultrasound. Four follicles per patient were aspirated in individual plastic tubes. Granulosa-luteal cells isolated with Percoll columns and cultured in vitro up to 4 days in the presence of hCG. In vitro fertilization parameters, serum levels of E2, immunoreactive alpha-inhibin, and P, as well as the secretion of immunoreactive alpha-inhibin and P by the cultured granulosa-luteal cells. Serum immunoreactive alpha-inhibin levels the day of ovum pick-up were significantly lower in group 2 compared with group 1. Incubation of cells for 96 hours showed a significantly higher ability to accumulate immunoreactive alpha-inhibin in group 1 than 2. Human chorionic gonadotropin stimulated immunoreactive alpha-inhibin production after 96 hours. Cells from younger women displayed a significantly higher ability to secrete P than cells from older women. Human chorionic gonadotropin was able to significantly stimulate P production in group 1. These results confirm previous observations showing a reduced production of immunoreactive alpha-inhibin and steroids of ovaries from older women and suggest that a reduced cellular function, rather than a decrease in the follicular population, is the main mechanism by which these changes are produced.

  1. Oestradiol Regulates Neuropeptide Y Release and Gene Coupling with the GABAergic and Glutamatergic Synapses in the Adult Female Rat Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velíšková, J; Iacobas, D; Iacobas, S; Sidyelyeva, G; Chachua, T; Velíšek, L

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an endogenous modulator of neuronal activity affecting both GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission. Previously, we found that oestradiol modifies the number of NPY immunoreactive neurones in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the present study, we investigated which oestrogen receptor type is responsible for these changes in the number of NPY-positive neurones. Furthermore, we determined the effects of oestrogen receptor activation on NPY release. Finally, we examined the contribution of oestrogen toward the remodelling of the GABAergic and glutamatergic gene networks in terms of coupling with Npy gene expression in ovariectomised rats. We found that activation of either oestrogen receptor type (ERα or ERβ) increases the number of NPY-immunopositive neurones and enhances NPY release in the dentate gyrus. We also found that, compared to oestrogen-lacking ovariectomised rats, oestrogen replacement increases the probability of synergistic/antagonistic coupling between the Npy and GABAergic synapse genes, whereas the glutamatergic synapse genes are less likely to be coupled with Npy under similar conditions. The data together suggest that oestrogens play a critical role in the regulation of NPY system activity and are also involved in the coupling/uncoupling of the Npy gene with the GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses in the female rat dentate gyrus. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  2. Enhanced neuropeptide Y synthesis during intermittent hypoxia in the rat adrenal medulla: role of reactive oxygen species-dependent alterations in precursor peptide processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Kalari, Apeksha; Dhingra, Rishi; Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Kumar, Ganesh K

    2011-04-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with recurrent apneas often leads to cardiovascular abnormalities. Previously, we showed that IH treatment elevates blood pressure and increases plasma catecholamines (CAs) in rats via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent enhanced synthesis and secretion from the adrenal medulla (AM). Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a sympathetic neurotransmitter that colocalizes with CA in the AM, has been implicated in blood pressure regulation during persistent stress. Here, we investigated whether IH facilitates NPY synthesis in the rat AM and assessed the role of ROS signaling. IH increased NPY-like immunoreactivity in many dopamine-β-hydroxylase-expressing chromaffin cells with a parallel increase in preproNPY mRNA and protein. IH increased the activities of proNPY-processing enzymes, which were due, in part, to elevated protein expression and increased proteolytic processing. IH increased ROS generation, and antioxidants reversed IH-induced increases in ROS, preproNPY, and its processing to bioactive NPY in the AM. IH treatment increased blood pressure and antioxidants and inhibition of NPY amidation prevented this response. These findings suggest that IH-induced elevation in NPY expression in the rat AM is mediated by ROS-dependent augmentation of preproNPY mRNA expression and proNPY-processing enzyme activities and contributes to IH-induced elevation of blood pressure.

  3. Studies on porcine pancreatic elastase activity. II. Immunoreactive elastase level during acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Y; Matsuno, S; Noto, N; Saitoh, Y; Sato, T

    1980-06-01

    Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis was produced in pig to study serum concentration of elastase and its physiological role. Pancreatitis was induced in two groups of young pigs by the injection of autologous bile. One group was injected with autologous bile (0.5 ml/kg) at high pressure, and the second group was injected as low pressure (100 cm H2O). Then femoral blood, portal blood and thoracic lymph were sampled at scheduled time intervals. The control level of immunoreactive elastase was around 90 ng/ml in each site, which significantly increased beginning 15 min after bile injection; the level of immunoreactive elastase was higher in the thoracic lymph duct than in the femoral and portal vein. The total and free elastase of both groups in pancreatic tissue were significantly decreased in pancreatitis, and an abundance of immunoreactive elastase was found in the ascites. The increasing pattern of immunoreactive elastase and amylase after bile injection was very similar. Therefore, the level of immunoreactive elastase was considered to be inadequate to determine the grade of severity of pancreatitis as well as the level of amylase which is already known.

  4. Temperature dependence of immunoreactions using shear horizontal surface acoustic wave immunosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogai, Takashi; Yatsuda, Hiromi; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, which are antibody-antigen reactions, on a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) immunosensor is described. The immunosensor is based on a reflection-type delay line on a 36° Y-cut 90° X-propagation quartz substrate, where the delay line is composed of a floating electrode unidirectional transducer (FEUDT), a grating reflector, and a sensing area between them. In order to evaluate the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, human serum albumin (HSA) antigen-antibody reactions are investigated. The SH-SAW immunosensor chip is placed in a thermostatic chamber and the changes in the SH-SAW velocity resulting from the immunoreactions are measured at different temperatures. As a result, it is observed that the HSA immunoreactions are influenced by the ambient temperature and that higher temperatures provide more active reactions. In order to analyze the immunoreactions, an analytical approach using an exponential fitting method for changes in SH-SAW velocity is employed.

  5. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the respiratory tract of the frog, Rana temporaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegas, M E; Villaro, A C; Montuenga, L M; Moncada, S; Riveros-Moreno, V; Sesma, P

    1995-10-01

    Physiological and histochemical studies have recently supported the notion that nitric oxide (NO) is the transduction signal responsible for the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic relaxation of the vasculature as well as the airways of the mammalian lung. We report the presence of immunoreactivity to NO synthase (NOS) in nerve cell bodies and nerve fibres in the neural plexus of the buccal cavity and lungs of the frog, Rana temporaria, using the indirect immunocytochemical technique of avidin-biotin and the NADPH-diaphorase technique. The neural ganglia located next to the muscle layer and within the connective tissue of the buccal cavity were partially immunoreactive for NOS. In the lungs, NOS immunoreactivity occurred in nerve cell bodies, as well as in both myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres. Fine nerve fibres immunoreactive to NOS were observed within the muscle fibre bundles and next to the respiratory epithelium. Both the presence of NOS immunoreactivity and the positive histochemical reaction for NADPH-diaphorase in the neural plexus of amphibian respiratory tract suggests a broad evolutionary role for NO as a peripheral neurotransmitter.

  6. Central alpha 2-adrenergic stimulation increases neurointermediate lobe immunoreactive beta-endorphin in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kanayama, Y; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Kawarabayashi, T; Takeda, T

    1987-06-01

    A possible influence of the central alpha 2-adrenergic system on beta-endorphin was examined in rat anterior pituitary, neurointermediate lobe, and plasma. The concentration of beta-endorphin in anterior pituitary, neurointermediate lobe, and plasma was determined by radioimmunoassay 15 minutes after subcutaneous injection of clonidine in 14-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Clonidine reduced the concentration of the plasma beta-endorphinlike immunoreactivity in SHR and to a lesser extent in WKY. No significant changes in the concentration of beta-endorphinlike immunoreactivity were observed in anterior pituitary. Clonidine increased the concentration of neurointermediate lobe beta-endorphinlike immunoreactivity in SHR in a dose-related manner but did not affect the concentration in WKY. Administration of yohimbine (1 mg/kg) completely blocked the clonidine-induced increase of neurointermediate lobe beta-endorphinlike immunoreactivity in SHR, while prazosin (1 mg/kg) had no effect. These data suggest that the central alpha 2-adrenergic activation increases the neurointermediate lobe concentration of beta-endorphinlike immunoreactivity in SHR by suppressing beta-endorphin release from the neurointermediate lobe into the circulation.

  7. Study on Correlation between Neuropeptide and Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓燕; 吕淑兰; 曹缵孙; 毛文军; 宋青

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between neuropeptide and functional hypothalam ic amenorrhea (FHA)Materials & Methods The basic and GnRH-stimulated levels of serum FSH, LH and plasma β-endorphin (β-EP), somatostatin (SS) in 33 patients with FHA and 17 women with normal menstrual cycles were tested by RIA.Results β-EP level in FHA group was significantly higher than that in control group and had a negative correlation with FSH and LH. The basic SS level in FHA group had no significant difference compared with the control group, but it had negative correlation with LH and no correlation with FSH. β-EP level in FHA group decreased after being stimulated with GnRH, and reached its minimum value after 15 min, then gradually rose back to the basic level. β-EP level in control group had no regular changes. SS level in both group did not change obviously.Conclusion The increased level of β-EP may play an important role in FHA. GnRH can inhibit β-EP level to some extent, while the effect of SS on FHA deserve further research.

  8. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M; Fröhlich, Esther E; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-06-16

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for "enviromimetics", therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation.

  9. Neuropeptide Y system in the retina: From localization to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Carvalho, Ana; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-07-01

    The retina is a highly complex structure where several types of cells communicate through countless different molecules to codify visual information. Each type of cells plays unique roles in the retina, presenting a singular expression of neurotransmitters. Some neurotransmitter systems in the retina are well understood, while others need to be better explored to unravel the intricate signaling system involved. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a 36 amino acid peptide, is one of the most common peptide neurotransmitter in the CNS and a highly conserved peptide among species. We review the localization of NPY and NPY receptors (mainly NPY Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5) in retinal cells. Common features of the expression of NPY and NPY receptors in mammalian and non-mammalian species indicate universal roles of this system in the retina. In the present review, we highlight the putative roles of NPY receptor activation in the retina, discussing, in particular, their involvement in retinal development, neurotransmitter release modulation, neuroprotection, microglia and Muller cells function, retinal pigmented epithelium changes, retinal endothelial physiology and proliferation of retinal progenitor cells. Further studies are needed to confirm that targeting the NPY system might be a potential therapeutic strategy for retinal degenerative diseases.

  10. Microbial symbionts accelerate wound healing via the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilos Poutahidis

    Full Text Available Wound healing capability is inextricably linked with diverse aspects of physical fitness ranging from recovery after minor injuries and surgery to diabetes and some types of cancer. Impact of the microbiome upon the mammalian wound healing process is poorly understood. We discover that supplementing the gut microbiome with lactic acid microbes in drinking water accelerates the wound-healing process to occur in half the time required for matched control animals. Further, we find that Lactobacillus reuteri enhances wound-healing properties through up-regulation of the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin, a factor integral in social bonding and reproduction, by a vagus nerve-mediated pathway. Bacteria-triggered oxytocin serves to activate host CD4+Foxp3+CD25+ immune T regulatory cells conveying transplantable wound healing capacity to naive Rag2-deficient animals. This study determined oxytocin to be a novel component of a multi-directional gut microbe-brain-immune axis, with wound-healing capability as a previously unrecognized output of this axis. We also provide experimental evidence to support long-standing medical traditions associating diet, social practices, and the immune system with efficient recovery after injury, sustained good health, and longevity.

  11. Dcf1 regulates neuropeptide expression and maintains energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Yu; Li, Qian; Wu, Liang; Wen, Tieqiao

    2017-05-22

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain that plays a pivotal role in food intake and energy storage. Although many studies have focused on these functions, the regulation of NPY expression remains unclear. Here we showed that dendritic cell factor 1 (Dcf1) regulates NPY expression and maintains energy balance. We found that NPY expression is significantly reduced in the hypothalamus of Dcf1 knockout (Dcf1(-/-), KO) mice. In contrast, Dcf1 overexpression significantly increases NPY expression in the cell line. We also found that Dcf1 acts upstream of the NPY gene to regulate NPY expression and modulates the NPY-NPY receptor 1-GABA signal. Notably, we observed a significant increase in the ATP concentration in Dcf1(-/-) mice, suggesting a greater demand for energy in the absence of Dcf1. We studied the relationship between Dcf1 and NPY and revealed that Dcf1 plays a critical role in energy balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluorescent ligands for studying neuropeptide receptors by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudet A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of confocal microscopy as it pertains to the identification of G-protein coupled receptors and the study of their dynamic properties in cell cultures and in mammalian brain following their tagging with specific fluorescent ligands. Principles that should guide the choice of suitable ligands and fluorophores are discussed. Examples are provided from the work carried out in the authors' laboratory using custom synthetized fluoresceinylated or BODIPY-tagged bioactive peptides. The results show that confocal microscopic detection of specifically bound fluorescent ligands permits high resolution appraisal of neuropeptide receptor distribution both in cell culture and in brain sections. Within the framework of time course experiments, it also allows for a dynamic assessment of the internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking of bound fluorescent molecules. Thus, it was found that neurotensin, somatostatin and mu- and delta-selective opioid peptides are internalized in a receptor-dependent fashion and according to receptor-specific patterns into their target cells. In the case of neurotensin, this internalization process was found to be clathrin-mediated, to proceed through classical endosomal pathways and, in neurons, to result in a mobilization of newly formed endosomes from neural processes to nerve cell bodies and from the periphery of cell bodies towards the perinuclear zone. These mechanisms are likely to play an important role for ligand inactivation, receptor regulation and perhaps also transmembrane signaling.

  13. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-06-29

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors.

  14. Regulation of hypothalamic neuropeptides gene expression in diet induced obesity resistant rats: possible targets for obesity prediction?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cifani, Carlo; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria V; Pucci, Mariangela; Giusepponi, Maria E; Romano, Adele; Di Francesco, Andrea; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    .... To investigate the individual sensitivity to weight gain/resistance, we here studied gene transcription regulation of several hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the control of energy balance...

  15. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species.

  16. Effects of different fixatives on the TrkB-immunoreactivity in rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富兴; 黎振航; 李金莲; 岑国欣; 陈应城

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To find out an effective fixative in immunohistochemistry for high-affinity neurotrophin receptor-tyrosine kinase (Trk) B. Methods: Comparing the results from four groups of adult rats which were fixed by different fixatives before the brain sections were processed for TrkB immunohistochemistry. Results: In the four groups, TrkB immunoreactive cells were observed throughout the whole brain, but the intensity of immunoreactive cells and the background staining exhibited a marked difference among the groups. Conclusion: Using 0.3%-0.5% paraformaldehyde in 75% saturated picric acid 0.1 mol/L di-sodium hydrogen phosphate buffer as the fixative may yield the best quality of TrkB immunoreactivity.

  17. Distribution of GABA-like immunoreactivity in the rat amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitecka, L; Ben-Ari, Y

    1987-12-01

    The distribution of GABA-like (GABA-Li) immunoreactivity in the rat amygdaloid complex was studied by using an anti-GABA antibody. GABA-Li positive neurons and processes were present in every nucleus of the complex. Three patterns of immunoreactivity were revealed: (1) the intercalated masses and the lateral olfactory tract nucleus exhibited the most intense staining of the neuropil, and virtually every neuron was labeled, (2) the central and medial nuclei contained intensely labeled neuropil and moderately labeled neurons, and (3) in the remaining nuclei, the neuropil was weakly labeled, and relatively numerous GABA-Li neurons were present. Our results suggest that: (1) the intercalated masses and lateral olfactory tract nucleus consist of large aggregates of GABA-Li immunoreactive neurons, and (2) the lateral, basal dorsal, and the posterior cortical nuclei may constitute a significant source of GABAergic connections to other amygdaloid nuclei, in particular to the medial and central nuclei.

  18. Changes in RFamide related peptide-1 (RFRP-1)-immunoreactivity during postnatal development and the estrous cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sara Rubek; Andersen, Mille Dahl; Overgaard, Agnete;

    2014-01-01

    in hypothalamic neurons that innervate and inhibit GnRH neurons. The RFRP precursor is processed into two mature peptides RFRP-1 and RFRP-3. These are characterized by a conserved C-terminal motif Arg-Phe-NH2 but display highly different N-terminals. Even though the two peptides are equally potent in vitro......, little is known about their relative distribution and their distinct roles in vivo. In this study, we raised an antiserum selective for RFRP-1 and defined the distribution of RFRP-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Next, we analyzed the level of RFRP-1-immunoreactivity during postnatal...... in between, the dorsomedial hypothalamic, ventromedial hypothalamic, and arcuate nuclei. The number of RFRP-1-ir neurons and the density of cellular immunoreactivity were unchanged from juvenile to adulthood in male rats during the postnatal development. However, both parameters were significantly increased...

  19. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) immunoreactivity in the ependymal cells of the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, K; Lee, W T

    1988-12-19

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) was demonstrated immunohistochemically in the entire ependymal and subependymal cells in all levels (cervical: C, thoracic: T, lumbar: L and sacral: S) of normal adult rat spinal cord. The VIP-immunoreactive basal processes from the apical ependymal cells coursed dorsally or ventrally along the median plane and reached the pia mater of the dorsal and ventral median septa. Many VIP-immunoreactive basal processes terminated on the blood vessels in the neuropil around the central canal. A few microvilli of the ependymal cells that project into the central canal also demonstrated intense VIP immunoreactivity. These observations suggest that ependymal cells may be involved in the modulation of VIP levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and regulation of vascular tone of the blood vessels in the spinal cord.

  20. Somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and fibers in the medulla oblongata et spinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forssmann, W G; Burnweit, C; Shehab, T; Triepel, J

    1979-10-01

    Complete serial sectioning of the medulla oblongata in monkey, cat, guinea pig, and japanese dancing mouse and incubation for somatostatin-immunoreaction was carried out. Numerous regions of the medulla oblongata such as the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, nucleus cuneatus et gracillis, nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus tractus solitarius, nucleus vestibularis, and parts of the oliva contain dense networks of somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve fibers. Cell bodies were seen in the nucleus reticularis medullae oblongatae. In the spinal cord the sections from each segment were analyzed, showing the highest concentrations of somatostatinergic fibers in the substantia gelantinosa of the columna dorsalis. Cell bodies were seen in the zona intermedia centralis, especially in the upper cervical segments. Many positive fibers were also seen in the entire zona intermedia and the columna ventralis. Especially prominent was the immunoreactivity in the zona intermediolateralis of the thoracic segments and the columna ventralis of the lower lumbar and sacral segments.

  1. Mapping of Neuropeptides in the Crustacean Stomatogastric Nervous System by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Hui, Limei; Kellersberger, Katherine; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) with great emphasis on comprehensive analysis and mapping distribution of its diverse neuropeptide complement. Previously, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been applied to this endeavor, yet with identification accuracy and throughput compromised. Therefore, molecular imaging methods are pursued to unequivocally determine the identity and location of the neuropeptides at a high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a novel, multi-faceted mass spectrometric strategy combining profiling and imaging techniques to characterize and map neuropeptides from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus STNS at the network level. In total, 55 neuropeptides from 10 families were identified from the major ganglia in the C. sapidus STNS for the first time, including the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), the paired commissural ganglia (CoG), the esophageal ganglion (OG), and the connecting nerve stomatogastric nerve ( stn) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and the MS/MS capability of this technique. In addition, the locations of multiple neuropeptides were documented at a spatial resolution of 25 μm in the STG and upstream nerve using MALDI-TOF/TOF and high-mass-resolution and high-mass-accuracy MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instrument. Furthermore, distributions of neuropeptides in the whole C. sapidus STNS were examined by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Different isoforms from the same family were simultaneously and unambiguously mapped, facilitating the functional exploration of neuropeptides present in the crustacean STNS and exemplifying the revolutionary role of this novel platform in neuronal network studies.

  2. Expression of neuropeptide receptor mRNA during osteoblastic differentiation of mouse iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Satomi; Goto, Tetsuya; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Joujima, Takaaki; Egusa, Hiroshi; Yatani, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Maki, Kenshi

    2014-12-01

    Various studies have shown a relationship between nerves and bones. Recent evidence suggests that both sensory and sympathetic nerves affect bone metabolism; however, little is known about how neuropeptides are involved in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into osteoblastic (OB) cells. To evaluate the putative effects of neuropeptides during the differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into calcified tissue-forming OB cells, we investigated the expression patterns of neuropeptide receptors at each differentiation stage. Mouse iPS cells were seeded onto feeder cells and then transferred to low-attachment culture dishes to form embryoid bodies (EBs). EBs were cultured for 4 weeks in osteoblastic differentiation medium. The expression of α1-adrenergic receptor (AR), α2-AR, β2-AR, neuropeptide Y1 receptor (NPY1-R), neuropeptide Y2 receptor (NPY2-R), calcitonin gene-related protein receptor (CGRP-R), and neurokinin 1-R (NK1-R) was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. Among these neuropeptide receptors, CGRP-R and β2-AR were expressed at all stages of cell differentiation, including the iPS cell stage, with peak expression occurring at the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. Another sensory nervous system receptor, NK1-R, was expressed mainly in the late osteoblastic differentiation stage. Furthermore, CGRP-R mRNA showed an additional small peak corresponding to EBs cultured for 3 days, suggesting that EBs may be affected by serum CGRP. These data suggest that the sensory nervous system receptor CGRP-R and the sympathetic nervous system receptor β2-AR may be involved in the differentiation of iPS cells into the osteoblastic lineage. It follows from these findings that CGRP and β2-AR may regulate cell differentiation in the iPS and EB stages, and that each neuropeptide has an optimal period of influence during the differentiation process.

  3. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity in the prefrontal cortex: Comparison of schizophrenia and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggan, Stephen M; Stoyak, Samuel R; Verrico, Christopher D; Lewis, David A

    2010-09-01

    We recently showed that measures of cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) mRNA and protein were significantly reduced in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area 9 in schizophrenia subjects relative to matched normal comparison subjects. However, other studies have reported unaltered or higher measures of CB1R levels in schizophrenia. To determine whether these discrepancies reflect differences across brain regions or across subject groups (eg, presence of depression, cannabis exposure, etc), we used immunocytochemical techniques to determine whether lower levels of CB1R immunoreactivity are (1) present in another DLPFC region, area 46, in the same subjects with schizophrenia, (2) present in area 46 in a new cohort of schizophrenia subjects, (3) present in major depressive disorder (MDD) subjects, or (4) attributable to factors other than a diagnosis of schizophrenia, including prior cannabis use. CB1R immunoreactivity levels in area 46 were significantly 19% lower in schizophrenia subjects relative to matched normal comparison subjects, a deficit similar to that observed in area 9 in the same subjects. In a new cohort of subjects, CB1R immunoreactivity levels were significantly 20 and 23% lower in schizophrenia subjects relative to matched comparison and MDD subjects, respectively. The lower levels of CB1R immunoreactivity in schizophrenia subjects were not explained by other factors such as cannabis use, suicide, or pharmacological treatment. In addition, CB1R immunoreactivity levels were not altered in monkeys chronically exposed to haloperidol. Thus, the lower levels of CB1R immunoreactivity may be common in schizophrenia, conserved across DLPFC regions, not present in MDD, and not attributable to other factors, and thus a reflection of the underlying disease process.

  4. Distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the monkey temporal lobe: the hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, A; Amaral, D G

    1993-05-01

    The distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the various fields of the hippocampal formation was studied in the macaque monkey. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons had aspiny or sparsely spiny dendrites that often had a beaded appearance; most resembled classically identified interneurons. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive fibers and terminals were confined to certain laminae in each field and generally had a pericellular distribution. In the dentate gyrus, there was a dense pericellular plexus of immunoreactive terminals in the granule cell layer. Except for a narrow supragranular zone, there was a marked paucity of terminals in the molecular and polymorphic cell layers. Immunoreactive neurons were mainly located immediately subjacent to the granule cell layer and comprised a variety of morphological cell types. The three fields of the hippocampus proper (CA3, CA2, and CA1) demonstrated differences in their parvalbumin staining characteristics. In CA3, there was a prominent pericellular terminal plexus in the pyramidal cell layer that was densest distally (closer to CA2). Immunoreactive cells were located either in the pyramidal cell layer, where many had a pyramidal shape and prominent apical and basal dendrites, or in stratum oriens. CA2 had a staining pattern similar to that in CA3, though both the number of labeled cells and the density of the pericellular terminal plexus were greater in CA2. In CA1, there was a markedly lower number of parvalbumin-labeled cells than in CA3 and CA2 and the cells tended to be located in the deep part of the pyramidal cell layer or in stratum oriens. The pyramidal cell layer of CA1 contained a pericellular terminal plexus that was substantially less dense than in CA3 and CA2. At the border between CA1 and the subiculum there was a marked increase in the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The positive cells were scattered throughout the pyramidal cell layer of the subiculum and comprised a variety of

  5. Ultrastructure of the surface structures and electron immunogold labeling of peptide immunoreactivity in the nervous system of Pseudothoracocotyla indica (Polyopisthocotylea: Monogenea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, G P; Ramasamy, P

    1996-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope studies of the tegument of the tropical marine fish monogenean parasite Pseudothoracocotyla indica describe surface specialisations and detail the ultrastructure of the tegument and the haptor. The tegument consists of a syncytium, numerous electron-dense granules, electron-lucent vesicles and large multivesicular bodies. The posterior tegumental syncytium is infolded to form tegumental ridges that are present on both the ventral and dorsal surfaces. A thin coat of glycocalyx is present on the tegument surface. In contrast, the tegumental syncytium of the haptor is relatively thin, containing electron-dense granules and various-sized electron-lucent vesicles. Exocytosis of the electron-dense and electron-lucent vesicles apparently occurs in the syncytium of the haptor and general body surface. Tegumental damage was observed on the dorsal surface in the mid-body region and may possibly have been due to natural mechanical forces. The haptor consists of electron-dense clamp sclerites embedded within a matrix covered by the tegumental syncytium. The sclerites are connected to each other and to the basal lamina by radially oriented muscle fibres. The haptor is richly supplied with non-myelinated nerve axons. Both uniciliated and non-ciliated presumed sensory structures are present on the body surface and haptor. Uniciliated sensory structures were found mainly around the oral sucker. Groups of neurons and nerve processes containing neurosecretory vesicles were frequently observed in the vicinity of the clamps. Electron immunogold labelling studies demonstrated that neuropeptide F [NPF (Moniezia expansa)] immunoreactivity was confined to electron-dense-cored neurosecretory vesicles in nerve fibres from the posterior and haptor regions of the fluke.

  6. A multi-scale strategy for discovery of novel endogenous neuropeptides in the crustacean nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chenxi; Lietz, Christopher B; Ye, Hui; Hui, Limei; Yu, Qing; Yoo, Sujin; Li, Lingjun

    2013-10-08

    The conventional mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategy is often inadequate for the comprehensive characterization of various size neuropeptides without the assistance of genomic information. This study evaluated sequence coverage of different size neuropeptides in two crustacean species, blue crab Callinectes sapidus and Jonah crab Cancer borealis using conventional MS methodologies and revealed limitations to mid- and large-size peptide analysis. Herein we attempt to establish a multi-scale strategy for simultaneous and confident sequence elucidation of various sizes of peptides in the crustacean nervous system. Nine novel neuropeptides spanning a wide range of molecular weights (0.9-8.2kDa) were fully sequenced from a major neuroendocrine organ, the sinus gland of the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus. These novel neuropeptides included seven allatostatin (A- and B-type) peptides, one crustacean hyperglycemic hormone precursor-related peptide, and one crustacean hyperglycemic hormone. Highly accurate multi-scale characterization of a collection of varied size neuropeptides was achieved by integrating traditional data-dependent tandem MS, improved bottom-up sequencing, multiple fragmentation technique-enabled top-down sequencing, chemical derivatization, and in silico homology search. Collectively, the ability to characterize a neuropeptidome with vastly differing molecule sizes from a neural tissue extract could find great utility in unraveling complex signaling peptide mixtures employed by other biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based neuropeptidomics aims to completely characterize the neuropeptides in a target organism as an important first step toward a better understanding of the structure and function of these complex signaling molecules. Although liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with data-dependent acquisition is a powerful tool in peptidomic research, it often lacks the capability for de novo sequencing of

  7. Effects of loratadine and cetirizine on serum levels of neuropeptides in patients with chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başak, Pinar Y; Vural, Huseyin; Kazanoglu, Oya O; Erturan, Ijlal; Buyukbayram, Halil I

    2014-12-01

    H1-receptor inhibiting drugs, namely loratadine and cetirizine, were frequently used in treatment of chronic urticaria. Urticarial weal and flare reactions, a neurogenic reflex due to neuropeptides, were reported to be more effectively inhibited by cetirizine than loratadine. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the effects of systemic loratadine and cetirizine treatments on serum levels of selected neuropeptides in chronic urticaria. Treatment groups of either systemic loratadine or cetirizine (10 mg/d), consisting of 16 and 22 patients, respectively, were included. Serum levels of stem cell factor (SCF), neuropeptide Y (NPY), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nerve growth factor (NGF), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P (SP) were detected before and after one week of treatment with antihistamines. Serum NPY and VIP levels were significantly decreased when compared before and after treatment with antihistamines (P neuropeptides. Systemic loratadine and cetirizine treatments in patients with chronic urticaria precisely caused variations in serum levels of neuropeptides. The predominant effect of cetirizine compared to loratadine on reducing serum SCF levels might be explained with anti-inflammatory properties of cetirizine.

  8. Neuropeptide Y protects cerebral cortical neurons by regulating microglial immune function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qijun Li; Changzheng Dong; Wenling Li; Wei Bu; Jiang Wu; Wenqing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y has been shown to inhibit the immunological activity of reactive microglia in the rat cerebral cortex, to reduce N-methyl-D-aspartate current (INMDA) in cortical neurons, and protect neurons. In this study, after primary cultured microglia from the cerebral cortex of rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the cell culture medium increased, and mRNA expression of these cytokines also increased. After primary cultured cortical neurons were incubated with the lipopolysaccharide-treated microg-lial conditioned medium, peak INMDA in neurons increased. These effects of lipopolysaccharide were suppressed by neuropeptide Y. After addition of the neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antago-nist BIBP3226, the effects of neuropeptide Y completely disappeared. These results suggest that neuropeptide Y prevents excessive production of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α by inhibiting microglial reactivity. This reduces INMDA in rat cortical neurons, preventing excitotoxic-ity, thereby protecting neurons.

  9. Gene expression and pharmacology of nematode NLP-12 neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Paul; Leech, Suzie; Marks, Nikki J; Geary, Timothy G; Maule, Aaron G

    2006-05-31

    This study examines the biology of NLP-12 neuropeptides in Caenorhabditis elegans, and in the parasitic nematodes Ascaris suum and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. DYRPLQFamide (1 nM-10 microM; n > or =6) produced contraction of innervated dorsal and ventral Ascaris body wall muscle preparations (10 microM, 6.8+/-1.9 g; 1 microM, 4.6+/-1.8 g; 0.1 microM, 4.1+/-2.0 g; 10 nM, 3.8+/-2.0 g; n > or =6), and also caused a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively lower contractile response (10 microM, 4.0+/-1.5 g, n=6) on denervated muscle strips. Ovijector muscle displayed no measurable response (10 microM, n=5). nlp-12 cDNAs were characterised from A. suum (As-nlp-12) and T. colubriformis (Tc-nlp-12), both of which show sequence similarity to C. elegans nlp-12, in that they encode multiple copies of -LQFamide peptides. In C. elegans, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis showed that nlp-12 was transcribed throughout the life cycle, suggesting that DYRPLQFamide plays a constitutive role in the nervous system of this nematode. Transcription was also identified in both L3 and adult stages of T. colubriformis, in which Tc-nlp-12 is expressed in a single tail neurone. Conversely, As-nlp-12 is expressed in both head and tail tissue of adult female A. suum, suggesting species-specific differences in the transcription pattern of this gene.

  10. Neuropeptides of the VIP family inhibit glioblastoma cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochaud, Stéphanie; Meunier, Annie-Claire; Monvoisin, Arnaud; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2015-03-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) are neuropeptides acting through VPAC1, VPAC2 and PAC1 receptors (referred here as the VIP-receptor system). In the central nervous system, VIP and PACAP are involved in neurogenesis, cell differentiation and migration, suggesting that they could be implicated in the development of glioblastoma (GBM). The infiltrative nature of GBM remains a major problem for the therapy of these tumors. We previously demonstrated that the VIP-receptor system regulated cell migration of the human cell lines M059J and M059K, derived from a single human GBM. Here, we evaluated the involvement of the VIP-receptor system in GBM cell invasion. In Matrigel invasion assays, M059K cells that express more the VIP-receptor system than M059J cells were less invasive. Invasion assays performed in the presence of agonists, antagonists or anti-PACAP antibodies as well as experiments with transfected M059J cells overexpressing the VPAC1 receptor indicated that the more the VIP-receptor system was expressed and activated, the less the cells were able to invade. Western immunoblotting experiments revealed that the VIP-receptor system inactivated the signaling protein AKT. Invasion assays carried out in the presence of an AKT inhibitor demonstrated the involvement of this signaling kinase in the regulation of cell invasion by the VIP-receptor system in M059K cells. The inhibition by VIP of invasion and AKT was also observed in U87 cells. In conclusion, VIP and PACAP act as anti-invasive factors in different GBM cell lines, a function mediated by VPAC1 inhibition of AKT signaling in M059K cells.

  11. Role of sympathetic nervous system and neuropeptides in obesity hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Hall

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is the most common cause of human essential hypertension in most industrialized countries. Although the precise mechanisms of obesity hypertension are not fully understood, considerable evidence suggests that excess renal sodium reabsorption and a hypertensive shift of pressure natriuresis play a major role. Sympathetic activation appears to mediate at least part of the obesity-induced sodium retention and hypertension since adrenergic blockade or renal denervation markedly attenuates these changes. Recent observations suggest that leptin and its multiple interactions with neuropeptides in the hypothalamus may link excess weight gain with increased sympathetic activity. Leptin is produced mainly in adipocytes and is believed to regulate energy balance by acting on the hypothalamus to reduce food intake and to increase energy expenditure via sympathetic activation. Short-term administration of leptin into the cerebral ventricles increases renal sympathetic activity, and long-term leptin infusion at rates that mimic plasma concentrations found in obesity raises arterial pressure and heart rate via adrenergic activation in non-obese rodents. Transgenic mice overexpressing leptin also develop hypertension. Acute studies suggest that the renal sympathetic effects of leptin may depend on interactions with other neurochemical pathways in the hypothalamus, including the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R. However, the role of this pathway in mediating the long-term effects of leptin on blood pressure is unclear. Also, it is uncertain whether there is resistance to the chronic renal sympathetic and blood pressure effects of leptin in obese subjects. In addition, leptin also has other cardiovascular and renal actions, such as stimulation of nitric oxide formation and improvement of insulin sensitivity, which may tend to reduce blood pressure in some conditions. Although the role of these mechanisms in human obesity has not been elucidated, this

  12. A neuropeptide speeds circadian entrainment by reducing intercellular synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sungwon; Harang, Rich; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Tsai, Connie A; Mazuski, Cristina; Kim, Jihee; Doyle, Francis J; Petzold, Linda R; Herzog, Erik D

    2013-11-12

    Shift work or transmeridian travel can desynchronize the body's circadian rhythms from local light-dark cycles. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates and entrains daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Paradoxically, we found that vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide implicated in synchrony among SCN cells, can also desynchronize them. The degree and duration of desynchronization among SCN neurons depended on both the phase and the dose of VIP. A model of the SCN consisting of coupled stochastic cells predicted both the phase- and the dose-dependent response to VIP and that the transient phase desynchronization, or "phase tumbling", could arise from intrinsic, stochastic noise in small populations of key molecules (notably, Period mRNA near its daily minimum). The model also predicted that phase tumbling following brief VIP treatment would accelerate entrainment to shifted environmental cycles. We tested this using a prepulse of VIP during the day before a shift in either a light cycle in vivo or a temperature cycle in vitro. Although VIP during the day does not shift circadian rhythms, the VIP pretreatment approximately halved the time required for mice to reentrain to an 8-h shifted light schedule and for SCN cultures to reentrain to a 10-h shifted temperature cycle. We conclude that VIP below 100 nM synchronizes SCN cells and above 100 nM reduces synchrony in the SCN. We show that exploiting these mechanisms that transiently reduce cellular synchrony before a large shift in the schedule of daily environmental cues has the potential to reduce jet lag.

  13. Effects of a skin neuropeptide (substance p on cutaneous microflora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Mijouin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Skin is the largest human neuroendocrine organ and hosts the second most numerous microbial population but the interaction of skin neuropeptides with the microflora has never been investigated. We studied the effect of Substance P (SP, a peptide released by nerve endings in the skin on bacterial virulence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bacillus cereus, a member of the skin transient microflora, was used as a model. Exposure to SP strongly stimulated the cytotoxicity of B. cereus (+553±3% with SP 10(-6 M and this effect was rapid (<5 min. Infection of keratinocytes with SP treated B. cereus led to a rise in caspase1 and morphological alterations of the actin cytoskeleton. Secretome analysis revealed that SP stimulated the release of collagenase and superoxide dismutase. Moreover, we also noted a shift in the surface polarity of the bacteria linked to a peel-off of the S-layer and the release of S-layer proteins. Meanwhile, the biofilm formation activity of B. cereus was increased. The Thermo unstable ribosomal Elongation factor (Ef-Tu was identified as the SP binding site in B. cereus. Other Gram positive skin bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis also reacted to SP by an increase of virulence. Thermal water from Uriage-les-Bains and an artificial polysaccharide (Teflose® were capable to antagonize the effect of SP on bacterial virulence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SP is released in sweat during stress and is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of numerous skin diseases through neurogenic inflammation. Our study suggests that a direct effect of SP on the skin microbiote should be another mechanism.

  14. Hippocampal synaptophysin immunoreactivity is reduced during natural hypothermia in ground squirrels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkstra, AM; Hut, RA; de Wilde, MC; Stieler, J; Van der Zee, EA; Wilde, Martijn C. de

    2003-01-01

    Natural hypothermia during hibernation results in physiological and behavioral deficits. These changes may be traced at the level of hippocampal signal transduction. We investigated synaptophysin immunoreactivity (SYN-ir) in the hippocampus after short and long periods of hypothermia and short and l

  15. Distribution of presumptive chemosensory afferents with FMRFamide- or substance P-like immunoreactivity in decapod crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M

    1997-01-23

    In five species of decapod crustaceans--Cherax destructor (crayfish), Carcinus maenas (crab), Homarus americanus (clawed lobster), Eriocheir sinensis (crab), Macrobrachium rosenbergii (shrimp)--immunocytochemical stainings revealed the presence of sensory afferents with FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system. These afferents were extremely thin, very numerous, and innervated all sensory neuropils except the optic and olfactory lobes. In their target neuropils they gave rise to condensed net- or ball-like terminal structures. Only in Homarus americanus but not in any other studied species immunocytochemistry revealed a separate, non-overlapping class of sensory afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity. Also the afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity were very thin and numerous, innervated all sensory neuropils except optic and olfactory lobes, and gave rise to condensed terminal structures. From their morphological characteristics it can be concluded that likely both classes of afferents are chemosensory. The substance P-like immunoreactivity suggests a link with the nociceptor afferents of vertebrates, with which both classes of afferents share several other morphological features.

  16. The effect of steroid treatment on lipocortin immunoreactivity of rat brain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Go, K G; Haar, J G Ter; de Leij, Louis; Zuiderveen, F; Parente, L; Solito, E; Molenaar, W M

    1994-01-01

    Lipocortin-1, lipocortin-2 and lipocortin-5 were immunohistochemically assessed in rats. Apart from animals receiving no treatment, other animals received pretreatment with methylprednisolone, or the 21-aminosteroid U-74389F. Whereas Hpocortin immunoreactivity was absent in the greater part of the b

  17. Localization of FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the brain of the viviparous skink (Chalcides chalcides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aniello, B; Fiorentin, M; Pinelli, C; Guarino, F M; Angelini, F; Rastogi, R K

    2001-01-01

    Neuroanatomical distribution of FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity was investigated in the brain and olfactory system of the viviparous skink, Chalcides chalcides. In the adult brain FMRFamide immunoreactive (ir) perikarya were observed in the diagonal band of Broca, medial septal nucleus, accumbens nucleus, bed nucleus of the anterior commissure, periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, lateral forebrain bundle, and lateral preoptic, subcommissural, suprachiasmatic and lateral hypothalamic areas. This pattern was seen in both male and female brains. Though all major brain areas showed FMRFamide-ir innervation, the densest ir fiber network was observed in the hypothalamus. During development, ir elements were observed for the first time in embryos at mid-pregnancy. FMRFamide perikarya were located along the ventral surface of the vomeronasal nerve, in the olfactory peduncle mediobasally, as well as in the anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory tubercle. Furthermore, some ir neurons were observed in the rhombencephalic reticular substance; however, the ir fiber network was poorly developed. Later in development FMRFamide-ir neurons appeared also in the bed nucleus of the anterior commissure as well as the rhombencephalic nucleus of solitary tract and the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus nerve. In juveniles, the distribution profile of FMRFamide immunoreactivity was substantially similar to that of the adults, with a less widespread neuronal distribution and a more developed fiber network. Ontogenetic presence of FMRFamide immunoreactivity in the nasal area has been linked to the presence of a nervus terminalis in this reptile.

  18. Impact of Maillard Reaction on Immunoreactivity and Allergenicity of the Hazelnut Allergen Cor a 11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iwan, M.; Vissers, Y.M.; Fiedorowicz, E.; Kostyra, H.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies exist on the influence of processing methods on structural changes and allergenic potential of hazelnut proteins. This study focused on the effect of glycation (Maillard reaction) on the immunoreactivity and degranulation capacity of the purified hazelnut 7S globulin, Cor a 11. After hea

  19. Increased immunoreactivity of c‑Fos in the spinal cord of the aged mouse and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Shin, Myoung Chul; Park, Joon Ha; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae-Chul; Yan, Bing Chun; Hwang, In Koo; Moon, Seung Myung; Ahn, Ji Yun; Ohk, Taek Geun; Lee, Tae Hun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Shin, Hyung-Cheul; Won, Moo-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Expression of c‑Fos in the spinal cord following nociceptive stimulation is considered to be a neurotoxic biomarker. In the present study, the immunoreactivity of c‑Fos in the spinal cord was compared between young adult (2‑3 years in dogs and 6 months in mice) and aged (10‑12 years in dogs and 24 months in mice) Beagle dogs and C57BL/6J mice. In addition, changes to neuronal distribution and damage to the spinal cord were also investigated. There were no significant differences in neuronal loss or degeneration of the spinal neurons observed in either the aged dogs or mice. Weak c‑Fos immunoreactivity was observed in the spinal neurons of the young adult animals; however, c‑Fos immunoreactivity was markedly increased in the nuclei of spinal neurons in the aged dogs and mice, as compared with that of the young adults. In conclusion, c‑Fos immunoreactivity was significantly increased without any accompanying neuronal loss in the aged spinal cord of mice and dogs, as compared with the spinal cords of the young adult animals.

  20. Gastrin/CCK-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Sundler, F; Rehfeld, J F

    1980-01-01

    Using immunocytochemistry, gastrin/CCK-like immunoreactivity is found in sensory nerve cells in the ectoderm of the mouth region of hydra and in nerve cells in the endoderm of all body regions of the sea anemone tealia. These results are corroborated by radioimmunoassay: One hydra contains at lea...

  1. Endocan immunoreactivity in the mouse brain: method for identifying nonfunctional blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Krystle A.; Nash, Connor P.; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Endocan is a secreted proteoglycan that has been shown to indicate angiogenic activity: remodeling in several tumor types in humans and mice. Serum endocan levels also indicate prognosis and has been proposed as a biomarker for certain cancers. Recently, monoclonal antibodies directed against mouse endocan have been developed allowing for further characterization of endocan function and potentially as a marker for angiogenesis through immunoreactivity in endothelial tip cells. The results of the current study show that endocan immunoreactivity in the mouse brain is present in blood vascular networks including but not limited to the cortex, hippocampus and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus in C57BL/6J and FVB/N mice. Endocan immunoreactivity did not vary during postnatal development or by sex. Interestingly, after vascular perfusion with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), endothelial cells positive for FITC were immunonegative for endocan suggesting FITC interference with the immunohistochemistry. A small number of FITC-negative blood vessels were endocan immunoreactive suggesting the identification of new blood vessels that are not yet functional. The current study shows that endocan is normally present in the mouse brain and prior vascular perfusion with FITC may provide a useful tool for identify newly forming blood vessels. PMID:24055127

  2. Detection of 2 immunoreactive antigens in the cell wall of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Hernández-Mendoza, Gustavo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Toriello, Conchita; López-Romero, Everardo; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    The cell wall of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex contains highly antigenic molecules which are potentially useful for the diagnosis and treatment of sporotrichosis. In this study, 2 immunoreactive antigens of 60 (Gp60) and 70 kDa (Gp70) were detected in the cell wall of the yeast morphotypes of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

  3. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity in brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri (Cyclostomata)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jirikowski, G; Erhart, G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1984-01-01

    the hypothalamus to the olfactory system and caudally to the medulla oblongata. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity was also found in cells of the adenohypophysis. These observations suggest that the hagfish possesses a brain FMRF-amide-like transmitter system and pituitary cells containing FMRF-amide-like material...

  4. Serotonin-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of two Ixodid tick species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunocytochemistry was used to detect the presence of serotonin-like immunoreactive (5HT-IR) neurons and neuronal processes in the central nervous system (CNS), the synganglion, of two Ixodid tick species; the winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus and the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. Seroto...

  5. Influence of resting tension on immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiebinger, R.J.; Linden, J.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is a potent diuretic hormone secreted by the atria in response to volume expansion. We examined the effect of resting tension on atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro. Left atria were hooked between an electrode and force transducer and superfused with medium 199. The atria were studied at a pacing frequency of 0 or 3 Hz. Atrial natriuretic peptide content of the superfusate was measured by radioimmunoassay. In nonpaced and paced atria, increasing resting tension three- to five-fold caused immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion to increase by 35 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM, n = 6, p less than 0.01) and 30 +/- 3% (n = 4, p less than 0.01), respectively. Lowering resting tension by 50% in nonpaced and paced atria lowered immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by 30 +/- 3% (n = 7, p less than 0.01) and 24 +/- 3% (n = 6, p less than 0.01), respectively. To exclude the possibility that release of norepinephrine or acetylcholine from endogenous nerve endings was mediating this effect, the atria were superfused with the combination of propranolol 0.1 microM, phentolamine 1.0 microM, and atropine 10 microM. These concentrations of the antagonists were 125-fold or higher than their Kd for binding to their respective receptors. The antagonists did not block the rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion; neither did they inhibit an established rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion induced by increasing the resting tension.

  6. FMRFamide immunoreactivity is generally occurring in the nervous systems of coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1983-01-01

    Abundant FMRFamide immunoreactivity has been found in the nervous systems of all hydrozoan, anthozoan, scyphozoan and ctenophoran species that were looked upon. This general and abundant occurrence shows that FMRFamide-like material must play a crucial role in the functioning of primitive nervous...

  7. Distinct localization and target specificity of galanin-immunoreactive sympathetic preganglionic neurons of a teleost, the filefish Stephanolepis cirrhifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, K; Kadota, T; Atobe, Y; Nakano, M; Hibiya, K; Goris, R C; Kishida, R

    2000-03-15

    Immunoreactivity for galanin was examined in the sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the spinal cord, adrenal glands, sympathetic ganglia, and some sensory ganglia of the filefish Stephanolepis cirrhifer. Galanin-immunoreactive neurons were found only in the rostral part, but not in the caudal part of the central autonomic nucleus (a column of sympathetic preganglionic neurons of teleosts). Many galanin-immunoreactive nerve terminals were found in contact with neurons in the celiac ganglia and the cranial sympathetic ganglia on both sides of the body. Most neurons encircled by galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers were negative for tyrosine hydroxylase. Galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers were very sparse in the spinal sympathetic paravertebral ganglia. No galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers were found in the adrenal glands. No sensory neurons of the trigeminal, vagal, or spinal dorsal root ganglia were positive for galanin-immunoreactivity. These results suggest that galanin-immunoreactive sympathetic preganglionic neurons have distinct segmental localization and might project specifically to a population of non-adrenergic sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the celiac and cranial sympathetic ganglia.

  8. Lipid-Conjugation of Endogenous Neuropeptides: Improved Biotherapy against Human Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Lepetre, Sinda; Maksimenko, Andrei; Mura, Simona; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Neuropeptides are small neuronal signaling molecules that act as neuromodulators for a variety of neural functions including analgesia, reproduction, social behavior, learning, and memory. One of the endogenous neuropeptides-Met-Enkephalin (Met-Enk), has been shown to display an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, a novel lipid-modification approach is shown to create a small library of neuropeptides that will allow increased bioavailability and plasma stability after systemic administration. It is demonstrated, on an experimental model of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, that lipid conjugation of Met-Enk enhances its tumor suppression efficacy compared to its nonlipidated counterparts, both in vitro and in vivo. More strikingly, the in vivo studies show that a combination therapy with a reduced concentration of Gemcitabine has suppressed the tumor growth considerably even three weeks after the last treatment.

  9. The Neuropeptides FLP-2 and PDF-1 Act in Concert To Arouse Caenorhabditis elegans Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Didi; Taylor, Kelsey P; Hall, Qi; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2016-11-01

    During larval molts, Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a sleep-like state (termed lethargus) that is characterized by the absence of feeding and profound locomotion quiescence. The rhythmic pattern of locomotion quiescence and arousal linked to the molting cycle is mediated by reciprocal changes in sensory responsiveness, whereby arousal is associated with increased responsiveness. Sensory neurons arouse locomotion via release of a neuropeptide (PDF-1) and glutamate. Here we identify a second arousing neuropeptide (FLP-2). We show that FLP-2 acts via an orexin-like receptor (FRPR-18), and that FLP-2 and PDF-1 secretion are regulated by reciprocal positive feedback. These results suggest that the aroused behavioral state is stabilized by positive feedback between two neuropeptides. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bueno

    Full Text Available Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the

  11. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M.; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  12. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  13. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  14. Settlement induction of Acropora palmata planulae by a GLW-amide neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, P. M.; Szmant, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Complex environmental cues dictate the settlement of coral planulae in situ; however, simple artificial cues may be all that is required to induce settlement of ex situ larval cultures for reef re-seeding and restoration projects. Neuropeptides that transmit settlement signals and initiate the metamorphic cascade have been isolated from hydrozoan taxa and shown to induce metamorphosis of reef-building Acropora spp. in the Indo-Pacific, providing a reliable and efficient settlement cue. Here, the metamorphic activity of six GLW-amide cnidarian neuropeptides was tested on larvae of the Caribbean corals Acropora palmata, Montastraea faveolata and Favia fragum. A. palmata planulae were induced to settle by the exogenous application of the neuropeptide Hym-248 (concentrations ≥1 × 10-6 M), achieving 40-80% attachment and 100% metamorphosis of competent planulae (≥6 days post-fertilization) during two spawning seasons; the remaining neuropeptides exhibited no activity. Hym-248 exposure rapidly altered larval swimming behavior (96% metamorphosis after 6 h. In contrast , M. faveolata and F. fragum planulae did not respond to any GLW-amides tested, suggesting a high specificity of neuropeptide activators on lower taxonomic scales in corals. Subsequent experiments for A. palmata revealed that (1) the presence of a biofilm did not enhance attachment efficiency when coupled with Hym-248 treatment, (2) neuropeptide-induced settlement had no negative effects on early life-history developmental processes: zooxanthellae acquisition and skeletal secretion occurred within 12 days, colonial growth occurred within 36 days, and (3) Hym-248 solutions maintained metamorphic activity following storage at room temperature (10 days), indicating its utility in remote field settings. These results corroborate previous studies on Indo-Pacific Acropora spp. and extend the known metamorphic activity of Hym-248 to Caribbean acroporids. Hym-248 allows for directed and reliable settlement of

  15. Neuropeptides: metabolism to bioactive fragments and the pharmacology of their receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Mathias

    2015-05-01

    The proteolytic processing of neuropeptides has an important regulatory function and the peptide fragments resulting from the enzymatic degradation often exert essential physiological roles. The proteolytic processing generates, not only biologically inactive fragments, but also bioactive fragments that modulate or even counteract the response of their parent peptides. Frequently, these peptide fragments interact with receptors that are not recognized by the parent peptides. This review discusses tachykinins, opioid peptides, angiotensins, bradykinins, and neuropeptide Y that are present in the central nervous system and their processing to bioactive degradation products. These well-known neuropeptide systems have been selected since they provide illustrative examples that proteolytic degradation of parent peptides can lead to bioactive metabolites with different biological activities as compared to their parent peptides. For example, substance P, dynorphin A, angiotensin I and II, bradykinin, and neuropeptide Y are all degraded to bioactive fragments with pharmacological profiles that differ considerably from those of the parent peptides. The review discusses a selection of the large number of drug-like molecules that act as agonists or antagonists at receptors of neuropeptides. It focuses in particular on the efforts to identify selective drug-like agonists and antagonists mimicking the effects of the endogenous peptide fragments formed. As exemplified in this review, many common neuropeptides are degraded to a variety of smaller fragments but many of the fragments generated have not yet been examined in detail with regard to their potential biological activities. Since these bioactive fragments contain a small number of amino acid residues, they provide an ideal starting point for the development of drug-like substances with ability to mimic the effects of the degradation products. Thus, these substances could provide a rich source of new pharmaceuticals

  16. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  17. Limited hydrolysis combined with controlled Maillard-induced glycation does not reduce immunoreactivity of soy protein for all sera tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Jordan; Greenberg, Yana; Sriramarao, P; Ismail, Baraem P

    2016-12-15

    Combining proteolysis and Maillard-induced glycation was investigated to reduce the immunoreactivity of soy protein. Soy protein was hydrolyzed by Alcalase following response surface methodology utilizing three variables, temperature, time, and enzyme:substrate ratio, with the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and percent reduction in immunoreactivity as response variables. Western blots and ELISA were used to evaluate immunoreactivity using human sera. Data were fitted to appropriate models and prediction equations were generated to determine optimal hydrolysis conditions. The hydrolysate produced under optimized conditions was subjected to glycation with dextran. Hydrolysate produced under optimal conditions had 7.8% DH and a percent reduction in immunoreactivity ranging from 20% to 52%, depending on the sera used. Upon glycation, immunoreactivity was further reduced only when using serum that had the highest soy-specific IgE. This work revealed limitations and provided premises for future studies intended to prove the potency of the combined modification approach to produce a hypoallergenic protein ingredient.

  18. Neuropeptide S reduces mouse aggressiveness in the resident/intruder test through selective activation of the neuropeptide S receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzza, Chiara; Asth, Laila; Guerrini, Remo; Trapella, Claudio; Gavioli, Elaine C

    2015-10-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptor (NPSR). In particular NPS evokes robust anxiolytic-like effects in rodents together with a stimulant and arousal promoting action. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of NPS on the aggressiveness of mice subjected to the resident/intruder test. Moreover the putative role played by the endogenous NPS/NPSR system in regulating mice aggressiveness was investigating using mice lacking the NPSR receptor (NPSR(-/-)) and the NPSR selective antagonists [(t)Bu-D-Gly(5)]NPS and SHA 68. NPS (0.01-1 nmol, icv) reduced, in a dose dependent manner, both the time that resident mice spent attacking the intruder mice and their number of attacks, producing pharmacological effects similar to those elicited by the standard anti-aggressive drug valproate (300 mg/kg, ip). This NPS effect was evident in NPSR wild type (NPSR(+/+)) mice but completely disappeared in NPSR(-/-) mice. Moreover, NPSR(-/-) mice displayed a significantly higher time spent attacking than NPSR(+/+) mice. [(t)Bu-D-Gly(5)]NPS (10 nmol, icv) did not change the behavior of mice in the resident/intruder test but completely counteracted NPS effects. SHA 68 (50 mg/kg, ip) was inactive per se and against NPS. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that NPS produces anti-aggressive effects in mice through the selective activation of NPSR and that the endogenous NPS/NPSR system can exert a role in the control of aggressiveness levels under the present experimental conditions.

  19. Loss of nonphosphorylated neurofilament immunoreactivity in temporal cortical areas in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, R; Sahu, S K; Van Hoesen, G W; Zaheer, A

    2009-05-05

    The distribution of immunoreactive neurons with nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI32) was studied in temporal cortical areas in normal subjects and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). SMI32 immunopositive neurons were localized mainly in cortical layers II, III, V and VI, and were medium to large-sized pyramidal neurons. Patients with AD had prominent degeneration of SMI32 positive neurons in layers III and V of Brodmann areas 38, 36, 35 and 20; in layers II and IV of the entorhinal cortex (Brodmann area 28); and hippocampal neurons. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) were stained with Thioflavin-S and with an antibody (AT8) against hyperphosphorylated tau. The NFT distribution was compared to that of the neuronal cytoskeletal marker SMI32 in these temporal cortical regions. The results showed that the loss of SMI32 immunoreactivity in temporal cortical regions of AD brain is paralleled by an increase in NFTs and AT8 immunoreactivity in neurons. The SMI32 immunoreactivity was drastically reduced in the cortical layers where tangle-bearing neurons are localized. A strong SMI32 immunoreactivity was observed in numerous neurons containing NFTs by double-immunolabeling with SMI32 and AT8. However, few neurons were labeled by AT8 and SMI32. These results suggest that the development of NFTs in some neurons results from some alteration in SMI32 expression, but does not account for all, particularly, early NFT-related changes. Also, there is a clear correlation of NFTs with selective population of pyramidal neurons in the temporal cortical areas and these pyramidal cells are specifically prone to formation of paired helical filaments. Furthermore, these pyramidal neurons might represent a significant portion of the neurons of origin of long corticocortical connection, and consequently contribute to the destruction of memory-related input to the hippocampal formation.

  20. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive axon terminals enriched in the pontine nuclei of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, T; Houtani, T; Toida, K; Kase, M; Yamashita, T; Ishimura, K; Sugimoto, T

    2007-06-08

    Information to the cerebellum enters via many afferent sources collectively known as precerebellar nuclei. We investigated the distribution of cholinergic terminal-like structures in the mouse precerebellar nuclei by immunohistochemistry for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). VAChT is involved in acetylcholine transport into synaptic vesicles and is regarded as a reliable marker for cholinergic terminals and preterminal axons. In adult male mice, brains were perfusion-fixed. Polyclonal antibodies for VAChT, immunoglobulin G-peroxidase and diaminobenzidine were used for immunostaining. In the mouse brain, immunoreactivity was seen in almost all major cholinergic cell groups including brainstem motoneurons. In precerebellar nuclei, the signal could be detected as diffusely beaded terminal-like structures. It was seen heaviest in the pontine nuclei and moderate in the pontine reticulotegmental nucleus; however, it was seen less in the medial solitary nucleus, red nucleus, lateral reticular nucleus, inferior olivary nucleus, external cuneate nucleus and vestibular nuclear complex. In particular, VAChT-immunoreactive varicose fibers were so dense in the pontine nuclei that detailed distribution was studied using three-dimensional reconstruction of the pontine nuclei. VAChT-like immunoreactivity clustered predominantly in the medial and ventral regions suggesting a unique regional difference of the cholinergic input. Electron microscopic observation in the pontine nuclei disclosed ultrastructural features of VAChT-immunoreactive varicosities. The labeled bouton makes a symmetrical synapse with unlabeled dendrites and contains pleomorphic synaptic vesicles. To clarify the neurons of origin of VAChT-immunoreactive terminals, VAChT immunostaining combined with wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase retrograde labeling was conducted by injecting a retrograde tracer into the right pontine nuclei. Double-labeled neurons were seen bilaterally in the

  1. Adeno-associated viral vector-induced overexpression of neuropeptide Y Y2 receptors in the hippocampus suppresses seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, David Paul Drucker; Ängehagen, Mikael; Gøtzsche, Casper René;

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure...... suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is predominantly mediated by Y2 receptors, which, together with neuropeptide Y, are upregulated after seizures as a compensatory mechanism. To explore whether such upregulation could prevent seizures, we overexpressed Y2 receptors in the hippocampus using...... and neuropeptide Y had a more pronounced seizure-suppressant effect. These results demonstrate that overexpression of Y2 receptors (alone or in combination with neuropeptide Y) could be an alternative strategy for epilepsy treatment....

  2. Three different prohormones yield a variety of Hydra-RFamide (Arg-Phe-NH2) neuropeptides in Hydra magnipapillata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darmer, D; Hauser, F; Nothacker, H P;

    1998-01-01

    from H. magnipapillata, each of which gives rise to a variety of RFamide neuropeptides. Preprohormone A contains one copy of unprocessed Hydra-RFamide I (QWLGGRFG), II (QWFNGRFG), III/IV [(KP)HLRGRFG] and two putative neuropeptide sequences (QLMSGRFG and QLMRGRFG). Preprohormone B has the same general...... organization as preprohormone A, but instead of unprocessed Hydra-RFamide III/IV it contains a slightly different neuropeptide sequence [(KP)HYRGRFG]. Preprohormone C contains one copy of unprocessed Hydra-RFamide I and seven additional putative neuropeptide sequences (with the common N-terminal sequence QWF....../LSGRFGL). The two Hydra-RFamide II copies (in preprohormones A and B) are preceded by Thr residues, and the single Hydra-RFamide III/IV copy (in preprohormone A) is preceded by an Asn residue, confirming that cnidarians use unconventional processing signals to generate neuropeptides from their precursor proteins...

  3. Identifying neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors in Drosophila melanogaster by exploiting genomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Williamson, Michael; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    insect genome, that of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, was sequenced in 2000, and about 200 GPCRs have been annnotated in this model insect. About 50 of these receptors were predicted to have neuropeptides or protein hormones as their ligands. Since 2000, the cDNAs of most of these candidate...... receptors have been cloned and for many receptors the endogenous ligand has been identified. In this review, we will give an update about the current knowledge of all Drosophila neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors, and discuss their phylogenetic relationships. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Feb...

  4. Anorexia in human and experimental animal models: physiological aspects related to neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia, a loss of appetite for food, can be caused by various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, firstly, clinical aspects of anorexia nervosa are summarized in brief. Secondly, hypothalamic neuropeptides responsible for feeding regulation in each hypothalamic nucleus are discussed. Finally, three different types of anorexigenic animal models; dehydration-induced anorexia, cisplatin-induced anorexia and cancer anorexia-cachexia, are introduced. In conclusion, hypothalamic neuropeptides may give us novel insight to understand and find effective therapeutics strategy essential for various kinds of anorexia.

  5. Strong evolutionary conservation of neuropeptide Y: sequences of chicken, goldfish, and Torpedo marmorata DNA clones.

    OpenAIRE

    Blomqvist, A. G.; Söderberg, C; Lundell, I; Milner, R J; Larhammar, D

    1992-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an abundant and widespread neuropeptide in the nervous system of mammals. NPY belongs to a family of 36-amino acid peptides that also includes pancreatic polypeptide and the endocrine gut peptide YY as well as the fish pancreatic peptide Y. To study the evolution of this peptide family, we have isolated clones encoding NPY from central nervous system cDNA libraries of chicken, goldfish, and the ray Torpedo marmorata, as well as from a chicken genomic library. The predi...

  6. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden))

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  7. The effect of oral 5-HTP administration on 5-HTP and 5-HT immunoreactivity in monoaminergic brain regions of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn-Bullock, Christina P; Welshhans, Kristy; Pallas, Sarah L; Katz, Paul S

    2004-05-01

    5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), which is the rate-limiting precursor in serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) biosynthesis, is used as an oral supplement to enhance serotonin levels in humans. To evaluate its effects on serotonin levels and localization, 5-hydroxytryptophan was administered to Sprague-Dawley rats either orally or via intraperitoneal injection. 5-Hydroxytryptophan-immunoreactivity was co-localized with serotonin-immunoreactivity in the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus of control animals and this was not changed in animals given 5-hydroxytryptophan. Oral 5-HTP administration increased the intensity of both 5-HTP and serotonin immunoreactivity in raphe neurons. However, 5-HTP treatment also caused ectopic 5-hydroxytryptophan-immunoreactivity and serotonin-immunoreactivity in normally dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra par compacta. Serotonin-immunoreactivity was confined to neurons that also displayed amino acid decarboxylase immunoreactivity, but in a small percentage of substantia nigra neurons, serotonin immunoreactivity was not co-localized with tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity. The intensity of the immunoreactivity to serotonin and 5-hydroxytryptophan in the substantia nigra was maximal within 2h of 5-hydroxytryptophan administration and returned to control levels by 24h. This time course mirrored changes in HPLC measurements of 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, and the metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the urine. 5-Hydroxytryptophan administration did not cause ectopic appearance of either serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptophan in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus. These results suggest that a single oral dose of 5-HTP increases the 5-HTP and serotonin content of serotonergic neurons and causes the transient ectopic appearance of serotonin in some normally non-serotonergic neurons.

  8. Neuropeptide complexity in the crustacean central olfactory pathway: immunolocalization of A-type allatostatins and RFamide-like peptides in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In the olfactory system of malacostracan crustaceans, axonal input from olfactory receptor neurons associated with aesthetascs on the animal’s first pair of antennae target primary processing centers in the median brain, the olfactory lobes. The olfactory lobes are divided into cone-shaped synaptic areas, the olfactory glomeruli where afferents interact with local olfactory interneurons and olfactory projection neurons. The local olfactory interneurons display a large diversity of neurotransmitter phenotypes including biogenic amines and neuropeptides. Furthermore, the malacostracan olfactory glomeruli are regionalized into cap, subcap, and base regions and these compartments are defined by the projection patterns of the afferent olfactory receptor neurons, the local olfactory interneurons, and the olfactory projection neurons. We wanted to know how neurons expressing A-type allatostatins (A-ASTs; synonym dip-allatostatins) integrate into this system, a large family of neuropeptides that share the C-terminal motif –YXFGLamide. Results We used an antiserum that was raised against the A-type Diploptera punctata (Dip)-allatostatin I to analyse the distribution of this peptide in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae). Allatostatin A-like immunoreactivity (ASTir) was widely distributed in the animal’s brain, including the visual system, central complex and olfactory system. We focussed our analysis on the central olfactory pathway in which ASTir was abundant in the primary processing centers, the olfactory lobes, and also in the secondary centers, the hemiellipsoid bodies. In the olfactory lobes, we further explored the spatial relationship of olfactory interneurons with ASTir to interneurons that synthesize RFamide-like peptides. We found that these two peptides are present in distinct populations of local olfactory interneurons and that their synaptic fields within the olfactory glomeruli are also mostly

  9. Neuropeptide complexity in the crustacean central olfactory pathway: immunolocalization of A-type allatostatins and RFamide-like peptides in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polanska Marta A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the olfactory system of malacostracan crustaceans, axonal input from olfactory receptor neurons associated with aesthetascs on the animal’s first pair of antennae target primary processing centers in the median brain, the olfactory lobes. The olfactory lobes are divided into cone-shaped synaptic areas, the olfactory glomeruli where afferents interact with local olfactory interneurons and olfactory projection neurons. The local olfactory interneurons display a large diversity of neurotransmitter phenotypes including biogenic amines and neuropeptides. Furthermore, the malacostracan olfactory glomeruli are regionalized into cap, subcap, and base regions and these compartments are defined by the projection patterns of the afferent olfactory receptor neurons, the local olfactory interneurons, and the olfactory projection neurons. We wanted to know how neurons expressing A-type allatostatins (A-ASTs; synonym dip-allatostatins integrate into this system, a large family of neuropeptides that share the C-terminal motif –YXFGLamide. Results We used an antiserum that was raised against the A-type Diploptera punctata (Dip-allatostatin I to analyse the distribution of this peptide in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae. Allatostatin A-like immunoreactivity (ASTir was widely distributed in the animal’s brain, including the visual system, central complex and olfactory system. We focussed our analysis on the central olfactory pathway in which ASTir was abundant in the primary processing centers, the olfactory lobes, and also in the secondary centers, the hemiellipsoid bodies. In the olfactory lobes, we further explored the spatial relationship of olfactory interneurons with ASTir to interneurons that synthesize RFamide-like peptides. We found that these two peptides are present in distinct populations of local olfactory interneurons and that their synaptic fields within the olfactory

  10. Immunoreactivity reduction of soybean meal by fermentation, effect on amino acid composition and antigenicity of commercial soy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y-S; Frias, J; Martinez-Villaluenga, C; Vidal-Valdeverde, C; de Mejia, E Gonzalez

    2008-05-15

    Food allergy has become a public health problem that continues to challenge both the consumer and the food industry. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reduction of immunoreactivity by natural and induced fermentation of soybean meal (SBM) with Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium lactis, Saccharomyces cereviseae, and to assess the effect on amino acid concentration. Immunoreactivity of commercially available fermented soybean products and ingredients was also evaluated. ELISA and western blot were used to measure IgE immunoreactivity using plasma from soy sensitive individuals. Commercial soy products included tempeh, miso and yogurt. Fermented SBM showed reduced immunoreactivity to human plasma, particularly if proteins were <20kDa. S. cereviseae and naturally fermented SBM showed the highest reduction in IgE immunoreactivity, up to 89% and 88%, respectively, against human pooled plasma. When SBM was subjected to fermentation with different microorganisms, most of the total amino acids increased significantly (p<0.05) and only few of them suffered a decrease depending on the type of fermentation. All commercial soy containing products tested showed very low immunoreactivity. Thus, fermentation can decrease soy immunoreactivity and can be optimized to develop nutritious hypoallergenic soy products. However, the clinical relevance of these findings needs to be determined by human challenge studies.

  11. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  12. Feed intake of gilts following intracerebroventicular injection of the novel hypothalamic RFamide (RFa) neuropeptide, 26RFa

    Science.gov (United States)

    RFamide (RFa) peptides have been implicated in a broad spectrum of biological processes including energy expenditure and feed intake. 26RFa is a recently discovered hypothalamic neuropeptide that altered the release of pituitary hormones and stimulated feed intake via a NPY-specific mechanism in rat...

  13. Development of mimetic analogs of pyrokinin-like neuropeptides to disrupt pest insect physiology/behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrokinin (FXPRLamide) neuropeptides regulate a variety of critical processes and behaviors in insects, though they are unsuitable as tools to arthropod endocrinologists and/or as pest management agents due to sub-optimal biostability and/or bioavailability characteristics. Peptidomimetic analogs c...

  14. Transgenic n-3 PUFAs enrichment leads to weight loss via modulating neuropeptides in hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuangshuang; Ge, Yinlin; Gai, Xiaoying; Xue, Meilan; Li, Ning; Kang, Jingxuan; Wan, Jianbo; Zhang, Jinyu

    2016-01-12

    Body weight is related to fat mass, which is associated with obesity. Our study explored the effect of fat-1 gene on body weight in fat-1 transgenic mice. In present study, we observed that the weight/length ratio of fat-1 transgenic mice was lower than that of wild-type mice. The serum levels of triglycerides (TG), cholesterol (CT), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and blood glucose (BG) in fat-1 transgenic mice were all decreased. The weights of peri-bowels fat, perirenal fat and peri-testicular fat in fat-1 transgenic mice were reduced. We hypothesized that increase of n-3 PUFAs might alter the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptide genes and lead to loss of body weight in fat-1 transgenic mice. Therefore, we measured mRNA levels of appetite neuropeptides, Neuropeptide Y (NPY), Agouti-related peptides (AgRP), Proopiomelanocortin (POMC), Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), ghrelin and nesfatin-1 in hypothalamus by real-time PCR. Compared with wild-type mice, the mRNA levels of CART, POMC and ghrelin were higher, while the mRNA levels of NPY, AgRP and nesfatin-1 were lower in fat-1 transgenic mice. The results indicate that fat-1 gene or n-3 PUFAs participates in regulation of body weight, and the mechanism of this phenomenon involves the expression of appetite neuropeptides and lipoproteins in fat-1 transgenic mice.

  15. Inhibition of hypothalamic MCT1 expression increases food intake and alters orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptide expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortés-Campos, Christian; Barahona, María José; Carril, Claudio; Ordenes, Patricio; Salgado, Magdiel; Oyarce, Karina; García-Robles, María de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic glucosensing, which involves the detection of glucose concentration changes by brain cells and subsequent release of orexigenic or anorexigenic neuropeptides, is a crucial process that regulates feeding behavior. Arcuate nucleus (AN) neurons are classically thought to be responsible for hypothalamic glucosensing through a direct sensing mechanism; however, recent data has shown a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and AN neurons through lactate that may also be contributing to this process. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) is the main isoform expressed by tanycytes, which could facilitate lactate release to hypothalamic AN neurons. We hypothesize that MCT1 inhibition could alter the metabolic coupling between tanycytes and AN neurons, altering feeding behavior. To test this, we inhibited MCT1 expression using adenovirus-mediated transfection of a shRNA into the third ventricle, transducing ependymal wall cells and tanycytes. Neuropeptide expression and feeding behavior were measured in MCT1-inhibited animals after intracerebroventricular glucose administration following a fasting period. Results showed a loss in glucose regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides and an abnormal expression of anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to fasting. This was accompanied by an increase in food intake and in body weight gain. Taken together, these results indicate that MCT1 expression in tanycytes plays a role in feeding behavior regulation. PMID:27677351

  16. Circulating levels of neuropeptides (CGRP, VIP, NPY) in patients with fulminant hepatic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strauss, Gitte Irene; Edvinsson, Lars; Larsen, Fin Stolze;

    2001-01-01

    The present study investigated the circulating levels and cerebral fluxes of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and their relation to cerebral blood flow (CBF) during normoventilation and hyperventilation in patients with fulminant...

  17. The neuropeptide allatostatin A regulates metabolism and feeding decisions in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentze, Julie Lilith; Carlsson, Mikael A.; Kondo, Shu;

    2015-01-01

    and energy mobilization are regulated by the glucagon-related adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs). Here, we provide evidence that the Drosophila neuropeptide Allatostatin A (AstA) regulates AKH and DILP signaling. The AstA receptor gene, Dar-2, is expressed in both...

  18. Differential Effect of Neuropeptides on Excitatory Synaptic Transmission in Human Epileptic Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledri, Marco; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Madsen, Marita G.;

    2015-01-01

    antiepileptic actions in human epileptic tissue as well, we applied these neuropeptides directly to human hippocampal slices in vitro. NPY strongly decreased stimulation-induced EPSPs in dentate gyrus and CA1 (up to 30 and 55%, respectively) via Y2 receptors, while galanin had no significant effect. Receptor...

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid prohormone processing and neuropeptides stimulating feed intake of dairy cows during early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhla, Björn; Laeger, Thomas; Husi, Holger; Mullen, William

    2015-02-01

    After parturition, feed intake of dairy cows increases within the first weeks of lactation, but the molecular mechanisms stimulating or delaying the slope of increase are poorly understood. Some of the molecules controlling feed intake are neuropeptides that are synthesized as propeptides and subsequently processed before they bind to specific receptors in feeding centers of the brain. Cerebrospinal fluid surrounds most of the feed intake regulatory centers and contains numerous neuropeptides. In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to analyze the neuropeptide concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid taken from dairy cows between day -18 and -10, and between day +10 and +20 relative to parturition. We found 13 proteins which were only present in samples taken before parturition, 13 proteins which were only present in samples taken after parturition, and 25 proteins which were commonly present, before and after parturition. Among them, differences in pro-neuropeptide Y, proenkephalin-A, neuroendocrine convertase-2, neurosecretory protein VGF, chromogranin-A, and secretogranin-1 and -3 concentrations relative to parturition highlight propeptides and prohormone processings involved in the control of feed intake and energy homeostasis. Scaffold analysis further emphasized an increased tone of endogenous opioids associated with the postparturient increase of feed intake.

  20. Role of neuropeptides in anxiety, stress, and depression: from animals to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos, Viktória; Gaszner, Balázs

    2013-12-01

    Major depression, with its strikingly high prevalence, is the most common cause of disability in communities of Western type, according to data of the World Health Organization. Stress-related mood disorders, besides their deleterious effects on the patient itself, also challenge the healthcare systems with their great social and economic impact. Our knowledge on the neurobiology of these conditions is less than sufficient as exemplified by the high proportion of patients who do not respond to currently available medications targeting monoaminergic systems. The search for new therapeutical strategies became therefore a "hot topic" in neuroscience, and there is a large body of evidence suggesting that brain neuropeptides not only participate is stress physiology, but they may also have clinical relevance. Based on data obtained in animal studies, neuropeptides and their receptors might be targeted by new candidate neuropharmacons with the hope that they will become important and effective tools in the management of stress related mood disorders. In this review, we attempt to summarize the latest evidence obtained using animal models for mood disorders, genetically modified rodent models for anxiety and depression, and we will pay some attention to previously published clinical data on corticotropin releasing factor, urocortin 1, urocortin 2, urocortin 3, arginine-vasopressin, neuropeptide Y, pituitary adenylate-cyclase activating polypeptide, neuropeptide S, oxytocin, substance P and galanin fields of stress research.

  1. Neuropeptide-like precursor 4 is uniquely expressed during pupal diapause in the flesh fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppression subtractive hybridization comparing brains from diapausing and nondiapausing pupae of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis, suggested that the gene encoding neuropeptide-like precursor 4 (Nplp4) was uniquely expressed during diapause. We have sequenced the full-length cDNA encoding Npl...

  2. Peripheral site of action of levodropropizine in experimentally-induced cough: role of sensory neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzo, A; Melillo, G; Clavenna, G; Omini, C

    1992-06-01

    The mechanism of action of levodropropizine has been investigated in different models of experimentally-induced cough in guinea-pigs. In particular it has been demonstrated that the antitussive drug has a peripheral site of action by injecting the drug intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). In these experiments levodropropizine (40 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) did not prevent electrically-induced cough. On the other hand, codeine (5 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) markedly prevented coughing. A difference in the potency ratio of levodropropizine and codeine has been demonstrated in capsaicin-induced cough; after oral administration, codeine was about two to three times more potent than levodropropizine. However, after aerosol administration the two compounds were equipotent. These data might suggest a peripheral site of action for levodropropizine which is related to sensory neuropeptides. Further support for the role of sensory neuropeptides in the mechanism of action of levodropropizine comes from the results obtained in capsaicin-desensitized animals. In this experimental model levodropropizine failed to prevent the vagally elicited cough in neuropeptide-depleted animals, whereas codeine did not differentiate between control and capsaicin-treated animals. In conclusion, our results support the suggestion that levodropropizine has a peripheral site of action. In addition, the interference with the sensory neuropeptide system may explain, at least in part, its activity in experimentally-induced cough.

  3. A phosphoproteomics approach to elucidate neuropeptide signal transduction controlling insect metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim F; Larsen, Martin R; Lobner-Olesen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    In insects, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) stimulates production of ecdysone (E) in the prothoracic glands (PGs). E is the precursor of the principal steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), that is responsible for eliciting molting and metamorphosis. In this study, we used ...

  4. Limbic substrates of the effects of neuropeptide Y on intake of and motivation for palatable food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, R.; Luijendijk, M.C.; Vanderschuren, L.J.M.J.; la Fleur, S.E.; Adan, R.A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Neuropeptide Y (NPY), given centrally augments food intake and the motivation to work for palatable food. Here, the brain regions were identified through which NPY increases food intake and motivation. Methods: NPY was infused into three brain regions implicated in food intake and motivat

  5. Differential roles for neuropeptide Y Y1 and Y5 receptors in anxiety and sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Camilla; Wörtwein, Gitta; Bolwig, Tom G

    2004-01-01

    Central administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY) causes both anxiolysis and sedation. Previous studies suggest that both effects are mediated via NPY Y1 receptors. However, most of these studies were carried out before the advent of specific NPY receptor ligands. Therefore, a potential role for oth...

  6. A neuromedin-pyrokinin-like neuropeptide signaling system in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemans, Marleen; Janssen, Tom; Husson, Steven J; Meelkop, Ellen; Temmerman, Liesbet; Clynen, Elke; Mertens, Inge; Schoofs, Liliane

    2009-02-13

    Neuromedin U (NMU) in vertebrates is a structurally highly conserved neuropeptide of which highest levels are found in the pituitary and gastrointestinal tract. In Drosophila, two neuropeptide genes encoding pyrokinins (PKs), capability (capa) and hugin, are possible insect homologs of vertebrate NMU. Here, the ligand for an orphan G protein-coupled receptor in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce-PK-R) was found using a bioinformatics approach. After cloning and expressing Ce-PK-R in HEK293T cells, we found that it was activated by a neuropeptide from the C. elegans NLP-44 precursor (EC(50)=18nM). This neuropeptide precursor is reminiscent of insect CAPA precursors since it encodes a PK-like peptide and two periviscerokinin-like peptides (PVKs). Analogous to CAPA peptides in insects and NMUs in vertebrates, whole mount immunostaining in C. elegans revealed that the CAPA precursor is expressed in the nervous system. The present data also suggest that the ancestral CAPA precursor was already present in the common ancestor of Protostomians and Deuterostomians and that it might have been duplicated into CAPA and HUGIN in insects. In vertebrates, NMU is the putative homolog of a protostomian CAPA-PK.

  7. Intracerebroventricular administration of neuropeptide Y induces hepatic insulin resistance via sympathetic innervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, A.M. van den; Heijningen, C. van; Schröder - Elst, J.P. van der; Ouwens, D.M.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.; Kalsbeek, A.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-We recently showed that intracerebroventricular infusion of neuropeptide Y (NPY) hampers inhibition of endogenous glucose production (EGP) by insulin in mice. The down stream mechanisms responsible for these effects of NPY remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to es

  8. Limbic substrates of the effects of neuropeptide Y on intake of and motivation for palatable food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, R.; Luijendijk, M.C.; Vanderschuren, L.J.M.J.; la Fleur, S.E.; Adan, R.A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Neuropeptide Y (NPY), given centrally augments food intake and the motivation to work for palatable food. Here, the brain regions were identified through which NPY increases food intake and motivation. Methods: NPY was infused into three brain regions implicated in food intake and

  9. Interactions of Circadian Rhythmicity, Stress and Orexigenic Neuropeptide Systems: Implications for Food Intake Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Anna; Gundlach, Andrew L.; Hess, Grzegorz; Lewandowski, Marian H.

    2017-01-01

    Many physiological processes fluctuate throughout the day/night and daily fluctuations are observed in brain and peripheral levels of several hormones, neuropeptides and transmitters. In turn, mediators under the “control” of the “master biological clock” reciprocally influence its function. Dysregulation in the rhythmicity of hormone release as well as hormone receptor sensitivity and availability in different tissues, is a common risk-factor for multiple clinical conditions, including psychiatric and metabolic disorders. At the same time circadian rhythms remain in a strong, reciprocal interaction with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Recent findings point to a role of circadian disturbances and excessive stress in the development of obesity and related food consumption and metabolism abnormalities, which constitute a major health problem worldwide. Appetite, food intake and energy balance are under the influence of several brain neuropeptides, including the orexigenic agouti-related peptide, neuropeptide Y, orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone and relaxin-3. Importantly, orexigenic neuropeptide neurons remain under the control of the circadian timing system and are highly sensitive to various stressors, therefore the potential neuronal mechanisms through which disturbances in the daily rhythmicity and stress-related mediator levels contribute to food intake abnormalities rely on reciprocal interactions between these elements. PMID:28373831

  10. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a Drosophila receptor for the neuropeptides capa-1 and -2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Annette; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae (58% amino acid residue identities; 76% conserved residues; and 5 introns at identical positions within the two insect genes). Because capa-1 and -2 and related insect neuropeptides stimulate fluid secretion in insect Malpighian (renal) tubules, the identification...

  11. Genomics and peptidomics of neuropeptides and protein hormones present in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Neupert, Susanne; Williamson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    neuropeptide gene in Nasonia, coding for peptides containing the C-terminal sequence RYamide. This gene has orthologs in nearly all arthropods with a sequenced genome, and its expression in mosquitoes was confirmed by mass spectrometry. No precursor could be identified for N-terminally extended FMRFamides...

  12. Differential suppression of seizures via Y2 and Y5 neuropeptide Y receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, David P D; Nanobashvili, Avtandil; Sørensen, Andreas Vehus

    2005-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) prominently inhibits epileptic seizures in different animal models. The NPY receptors mediating this effect remain controversial partially due to lack of highly selective agonists and antagonists. To circumvent this problem, we used various NPY receptor knockout mice with the...

  13. Identification of a novel starfish neuropeptide that acts as a muscle relaxant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Go, Hye-Jin; Oh, Hye Young; Lin, Ming; Elphick, Maurice R; Park, Nam Gyu

    2016-04-01

    Neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants have been identified in chordates and protostomian invertebrates but little is known about the molecular identity of neuropeptides that act as muscle relaxants in deuterostomian invertebrates (e.g. echinoderms) that are 'evolutionary intermediates' of chordates and protostomes. Here, we have used the apical muscle of the starfish Patiria pectinifera to assay for myorelaxants in extracts of this species. A hexadecapeptide with the amino acid sequence Phe-Gly-Lys-Gly-Gly-Ala-Tyr-Asp-Pro-Leu-Ser-Ala-Gly-Phe-Thr-Asp was identified and designated starfish myorelaxant peptide (SMP). Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the SMP precursor protein revealed that it comprises 12 copies of SMP as well as 3 peptides (7 copies in total) that are structurally related to SMP. Analysis of the expression of SMP precursor transcripts in P. pectinifera using qPCR revealed the highest expression in the radial nerve cords and lower expression levels in a range of neuromuscular tissues, including the apical muscle, tube feet and cardiac stomach. Consistent with these findings, SMP also caused relaxation of tube foot and cardiac stomach preparations. Furthermore, SMP caused relaxation of apical muscle preparations from another starfish species - Asterias amurensis. Collectively, these data indicate that SMP has a general physiological role as a muscle relaxant in starfish. Interestingly, comparison of the sequence of the SMP precursor with known neuropeptide precursors revealed that SMP belongs to a bilaterian family of neuropeptides that include molluscan pedal peptides (PP) and arthropodan orcokinins (OK). This is the first study to determine the function of a PP/OK-type peptide in a deuterostome. Pedal peptide/orcokinin (PP/OK)-type peptides are a family of structurally related neuropeptides that were first identified and functionally characterised in protostomian invertebrates. Here, we report the discovery of starfish myorelaxant

  14. Neuropeptide FF, but not prolactin-releasing peptide, mRNA is differentially regulated in the hypothalamic and medullary neurons after salt loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliomäki, M-L; Panula, P

    2004-01-01

    Hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei are involved in the body fluid homeostasis. Especially vasopressin peptide and mRNA levels are regulated by hypo- and hyperosmolar stimuli. Other neuropeptides such as dynorphin, galanin and neuropeptide FF are coregulated with vasopressin. In this study neuropeptide FF and another RF-amide peptide, the prolactin-releasing peptide mRNA levels were studied by quantitative in situ hybridization after chronic salt loading, a laboratory model of chronic dehydration. The neuropeptide FF mRNA expressing cells virtually disappeared from the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei after salt loading, suggesting that hyperosmolar stress downregulated the NPFF gene transcription. The neuropeptide FF mRNA signal levels were returned to control levels after the rehydration period of 7 days. No changes were observed in those medullary nuclei that express neuropeptide FF mRNA. No significant changes were observed in the hypothalamic or medullary prolactin-releasing peptide mRNA levels. Neuropeptide FF mRNA is drastically downregulated in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurons after salt loading. Other neuropeptides studied in this model are concomitantly coregulated with vasopressin: i.e. their peptide levels are downregulated and mRNA levels are upregulated which is in contrast to neuropeptide FF regulation. It can thus be concluded that neuropeptide FF is not regulated through the vasopressin regulatory system but via an independent pathway. The detailed mechanisms underlying the downregulation of neuropeptide FF mRNA in neurons remain to be clarified.

  15. Immunoreactive insulin in diabetes mellitus patient sera detected by ultrasensitive ELISA with thio-NAD cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Etsuro; Kaneda, Mugiho; Kodama, Hiromi; Morikawa, Mika; Tai, Momoko; Aoki, Kana; Watabe, Satoshi; Nakaishi, Kazunari; Hashida, Seiichi; Tada, Satoshi; Kuroda, Noriyuki; Imachi, Hitomi; Murao, Koji; Yamashita, Masakane; Yoshimura, Teruki; Miura, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    To minimize patient suffering, the smallest possible volume of blood should be collected for diagnosis and disease monitoring. When estimating insulin secretion capacity and resistance to insulin in diabetes mellitus (DM), increasing insulin assay immunosensitivity would reduce the blood sample volume required for testing. Here we present an ultrasensitive ELISA coupled with thio-NAD cycling to measure immunoreactive insulin in blood serum. Only 5 μL of serum was required for testing, with a limit of detection (LOD) for the assay of 10(-16) moles/assay. Additional recovery tests confirmed this method can detect insulin in sera. Comparisons between a commercially available immunoreactive insulin kit and our ultrasensitive ELISA using the same commercially available reference demonstrated good data correlation, providing further evidence of assay accuracy. Together, these results demonstrate our ultrasensitive ELISA could be a powerful tool in the diagnosis and treatment of not only DM but also many other diseases in the future.

  16. Mapping of serotonin-immunoreactive neurons of Anastrepha obliqua Macquart larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Boleli

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin-immunoreactive neurons were identified in the central nervous system (CNS of Anastrepha obliqua Macquart, 1835 wandering stage larvae. The PAP immunocytochemical method was applied to the entire CNS (whole mounts. About 90 neurons were visualized in the CNS (20 in the brain and 70 in the ventral ganglion. Both somata and axons were strongly stained. These neurons showed a segmental arrangement and bilateral symmetry. All processes presented a basic projection pattern, in which the major fibres travel contralaterally. Comparison of these neurons with serotonergic neurons described in other insects suggests order-specific traits such as cerebral clusters and presence of only one 5-HT immunoreactive neuron in the 8th abdominal neuromere as well.

  17. Immunoreactive proteins of Acanthocheilonema viteae (Nematoda: Filarioidea) adults: solubilization in various detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, S; Singh, D P; Fatma, N; Chatterjee, R K

    1993-01-01

    For optimal solubilization of immunoreactive proteins of filarial parasites, adult worms of Acanthocheilonema viteae were extracted in different detergents including anionic, cationic, nonionic and zwitterionic agents under varying incubation periods. Each preparation was then analysed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using pooled sera from Mastomys natalensis infected with A. viteae. Amongst the detergents used, maximum immunoreactive proteins were exposed by sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS), closely followed by sodium deoxycholate (DOC). Nevertheless, a few additional protein bands were recognized by infected sera in DOC preparations, but not in SDS, and vice versa. Most of the proteins were completely or partially dissolved within 2 hrs extraction time. It is felt that DOC may be used in place of SDS because of the strong denaturing character of the latter.

  18. Different pattern of haemagglutinin immunoreactivity of equine influenza virus strains isolated in Poland

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    Kwaśnik Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The immunoreactivity of haemagglutinin (HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus was compared among the strains isolated in Poland, using H3 monoclonal antibody. A stronger signal in immunoblot reaction was observed for A/equi/Pulawy/2008 HA polypeptides compared to A/equi/Pulawy/2006, despite the fact that both strains are phylogenetically closely related and belong to Florida clade 2 of American lineage. The strongest signal, observed in the case of A/equi/Pulawy/2008, seemed to be connected with the presence of G135, I213, E379, and/or V530 instead of R135, M213, G379, and I530 present in A/equi/Pulawy/2006 HA sequence. This implies that point mutations within amino acid sequences of HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus may change their immunoreactivity even when they are not located within five basic antigenic sites.

  19. Immunoreactivity of specific epitopes of PrPSc is enhanced by pretreatment in a hydrated autoclave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T; Momotani, E; Kimura, K; Yuasa, N

    1996-01-01

    An abnormal protein (PrPSc) accumulates in animals affected with scrapie. Immunoblotting procedures have been used widely to detect PrPSc. Blotted membranes were subjected to pretreatment in a hydrated autoclave, and the subsequent immunoreactivity of PrPSc was examined. The immunoreactivity of PrPSc to antisera against the synthetic peptides of the mouse PrP amino acid sequences 199 to 208 and 213 to 226 was enhanced by the pretreatment. However, the reactivity to antisera of peptide sequences 100 to 115 and 165 to 174 was not affected. The antibody-binding ability of the specific epitopes which are located close to the C-terminal end of PrP27-30 the proteinase-resistant portion of PrPSc, was enhanced by pretreatment in a hydrated autoclave. This pretreatment increased the sensitivity of PrPSc, and it would be useful for diagnosis of scrapie. PMID:8807215

  20. Immunohistochemical study on localization of serotonin immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract of the European catfish (Silurus glanis, L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köprücü, S; Yaman, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, it was aimed to identify the distribution of serotonin immunoreactive cells within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of European catfish (Silurus glanis). For this purpose, the tissue samples were taken from the stomach (cardia, fundus and pylorus region) and intestine (anterior, middle and posterior region). They were examined by applying the avidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase method. The serotonin containing immunoreactive cells are presented in all regions of the GIT. It was determined to be localized generally in different distribution within the stomachs and intestines of S. glanis. It was found that the most intensive regions of immunoreactive cells were the cardia stomach and posterior of intestine.

  1. Coadsorption of IgG and BSA onto sulfonated polystyrene latex: II. Colloidal stability and immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peula, J M; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R; de las Nieves, F J

    1995-01-01

    The present work deals with the study of the colloidal stability and immunoreactivity of sulfonated polystyrene latex particles covered by different amounts of m-BSA and IgG/a-CRP. These proteins have been previously adsorbed onto a sulfonated latex by sequential and competitive coadsorption experiments and it was possible to obtain latex-protein particles with different degrees of coverage by each protein. The latex particles, fully or partially covered by each protein (termed latex-protein complexes), were resuspended under several conditions (different pH and ionic strength values) and their colloidal stability, vs the addition of the electrolyte was studied using turbidity measurements. This stability appeared at a high degree of coverage by BSA and at a pH in which the BSA was negatively charged. At a high degree of coverage by IgG, the latex particles were unstable at all pHs. As a final part of this work, the immunoreactivity of several complexes was studied following the changes in the turbidity after the addition of CRP antigen. Only the complexes which were colloidally stable gave detectable reactivity. However, the complexes with a relatively low degree of coverage by IgG/a-CRP gave good immunoreactivity. Therefore, the latex-protein complex properties depended on the percentage of BSA or IgG adsorbed and on the electric state of the proteins at the redispersion pH. Under specific incubation conditions, sulfonated latex covered by significant IgG/BSA percentages was obtained, which showed a high colloidal stability and good immunoreactivity.

  2. Mammaglobin and S-100 immunoreactivity in salivary gland carcinomas other than mammary analogue secretory carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kalyani R; Solomon, Isaac H; El-Mofty, Samir K; Lewis, James S; Chernock, Rebecca D

    2013-11-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor that has morphologic features similar to secretory carcinoma of the breast and that also harbors the same ETV6 translocation. Diffuse mammaglobin and S-100 immunoreactivity are used to differentiate MASC from its morphologic mimics, especially acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. However, the combination of mammaglobin and S-100 immunoreactivity has not been well studied in other types of salivary gland carcinomas that may have focal areas reminiscent of MASC. Here we evaluated mammaglobin and S-100 immunoreactivity in 15 cases each of polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and also in 2 cases of adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified, and 1 mucinous adenocarcinoma. Cases with significant co-expression of mammaglobin and S-100 (moderate or strong immunoreactivity in >25% of tumor cells) were further analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization using the ETV6 (12p13) break-apart probe. Nine cases (60%) of polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma and two (13.3%) of adenoid cystic carcinoma met the criteria for significant co-expression of mammaglobin and S-100. All were negative for the ETV6 translocation by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Although mammaglobin and S-100 positivity was seen in the majority of polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas and a minority of adenoid cystic carcinomas, none were positive for the ETV6 translocation characteristic of MASC. This indicates a need for caution in the use of immunohistochemistry for diagnosing MASC, especially in the absence of cytogenetic confirmation.

  3. Opioid Tolerance and Physical Dependence: Role of Spinal Neuropeptides, Excitatory Amino Acids and Their Messengers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khem Jhamandas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic opioid treatment results in the development of tolerance and physical dependence. The mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance and/or physical dependence are unclear. Recent studies suggest that opioid receptor or nociceptive, neural network-based adaptations contribute to this phenomenon. At the spinal level, the genesis of tolerance and physical dependence is associated with increased excitatory amino acid activity expressed through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the dorsal horn. However, recent evidence also implicates spinal neuropeptide transmitters such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and  substance P in the development of opioid tolerance. Long term spinal morphine treatment increases CGRP-like immunostaining in the dorsal horn, and coadministration of morphine with CGRP8-37, a competitive CGRP1 receptor antagonist, prevents this response as well as loss of the analgesic potency. CGRP8-37, like N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, has the potential to restore morphine potency in experimental animals who are already tolerant to the opioid agonist. Recent evidence suggests that the effects of excitatory amino acid and neuropeptide receptor activity may be expressed through the generation of messengers such as nitric oxide and prostanoids. Agents that inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids have the potential to inhibit and reverse spinal opioid tolerance, suggesting that this phenomenon may be expressed through the activity of these mediators. Nociceptive transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord also involves activity of a number of other mediators including morphine modulatory neuropeptides, neuropeptide FF  and neuropeptide SF. The role of these mediators and their relationship with other factors implicated in tolerance remain to be determined.

  4. Hypothalamic neuropeptide expression following chronic food restriction in sedentary and wheel-running rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rijke, C E; Hillebrand, J J G; Verhagen, L A W; Roeling, T A P; Adan, R A H

    2005-10-01

    When rats are given access to a running-wheel in combination with food restriction, they will become hyperactive and decrease their food intake, a paradoxical phenomenon known as activity-based anorexia (ABA). Little is known about the regulation of the hypothalamic neuropeptides that are involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance during the development of ABA. Therefore, rats were killed during the development of ABA, before they entered a state of severe starvation. Neuropeptide mRNA expression levels were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR on punches of separate hypothalamic nuclei. As is expected in a state of negative energy balance, expression levels of agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were increased 5-fold in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of food-restricted running ABA rats vs 2-fold in sedentary food-restricted controls. The co-regulated expression of AgRP and NPY strongly correlated with relative body weight and white adipose tissue mass. Arcuate expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) was reduced 2-fold in the ABA group. In second-order neurons of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) mRNA expression was upregulated 2-fold in food-restricted running rats, but not in food-restricted sedentary controls. Prepro-orexin, CART and corticotropin-releasing hormone expression levels in the LHA and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were unchanged in both food-restricted groups. From this study it was concluded that during the development of ABA, neuropeptides in first-order neurons in the ARC and MCH in the LHA are regulated in an adequate response to negative energy balance, whereas expression levels of the other studied neuropeptides in secondary neurons of the LHA and PVN are unchanged and are probably regulated by factors other than energy status alone.

  5. Role of neuropeptides in appetite regulation and obesity--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sarika; Anubhuti

    2006-12-01

    Obesity represents the most prevalent nutritional problem worldwide which in the long run predisposes to development of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, endometrial carcinoma, osteoarthritis, gall stones and cardiovascular diseases. Despite significant reductions in dietary fat consumption, the prevalence of obesity is on a rise and is taking on pandemic proportions. Obesity develops when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over time. Recently, a close evolutionary relationship between the peripheral and hypothalamic neuropeptides has become apparent. The hypothalamus being the central feeding organ mediates regulation of short-term and long-term dietary intake via synthesis of various orexigenic and anorectic neuropeptides. The structure and function of many hypothalamic peptides (neuropeptide Y (NPY), melanocortins, agouti-related peptide (AGRP), cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), melanin concentrating hormone (MCH), orexins have been characterized in rodent models The peripheral neuropeptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY3-36), amylin, bombesin regulate important gastrointestinal functions such as motility, secretion, absorption, provide feedback to the central nervous system on availability of nutrients and may play a part in regulating food intake. The pharmacological potential of several endogenous peripheral peptides released prior to, during and/or after feeding are being explored. Long-term regulation is provided by the main circulating hormones leptin and insulin. These systems implicated in hypothalamic appetite regulation provide potential targets for treatment of obesity which could potentially pass into clinical development in the next 5 years. This review summarizes various effects and interrelationship of these central and peripheral neuropeptides in metabolism, obesity and their potential role as targets for treatment of obesity.

  6. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-05-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  7. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara M Stawicki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf, that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf. The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance.

  8. Neuropeptide release from airways of young and fully-grown rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gary L; Fratelli, Cori; Loader, Joan; Kang, June-Ku Brian; Dakhama, Azzeddine

    2006-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), a neurotrophin that regulates neuronal development, enhances production of neuropeptides that control airway caliber including substance P (SP). Little is known about the developmental interplay between neurotrophins and neuropeptides. Our goal was to assess release of NGF, SP, and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) from tracheal segments of young (2-week-old) and fully-grown (13-week-old) rabbits, and ascertain location of neuropeptides in airways with mechanical denudation of epithelium and immunohistochemistry. After electrical field stimulation of nerves, bath solutions were collected and immunoassays performed to quantify NGF, SP, and VIP release. There were significant decreases in NGF, SP, and VIP release from airways in 13- versus 2-week-old rabbits. There were also significant decreases in SP and VIP release from denuded versus normal tissues at 2 weeks of age. A similar pattern for SP was seen in 13-week-old rabbits. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased neuropeptides in airways from younger rabbits. Although SP was seen in the epithelium and submucosal nerves in the younger group, it was localized to the latter location in fully-grown rabbits. VIP was seen in only submucosal nerves at both ages. Thus, release of NGF, SP, and VIP with neural stimulation decreases in rabbit tracheal segments with age. Decreases in SP with maturation and epithelial denudation appear related in part to decreases in epithelial SP with growth. However, decreases in VIP that occur normally and with epithelial denudation are not explained by location of VIP within the epithelium. The epithelium may be a source of factors that inhibit release of neuropeptides.

  9. Identification of high immunoreactive proteins from Streptococcus agalactiae isolates recognized by human serum antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzychczy-Wloch, Monika; Gorska, Sabina; Brzozowska, Ewa; Gamian, Andrzej; Heczko, Piotr B; Bulanda, Malgorzata

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the studies was to identify immunogenic proteins of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS) isolates. Investigation of the immunoreactivity with human sera allowed us to determine major immunogenic proteins which might be potential candidates for the development of vaccine. For the study, we have selected 60 genetically different, well-characterized GBS clinical isolates. The proteins immunoreactivity with 24 human sera from patients with GBS infections, carriers, and control group without GBS was detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. As a result, some major immunogenic proteins were identified, of which four proteins with molecular masses of about 45 to 50 kDa, which exhibited the highest immunoreactivity features, were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The proteins were identified by comparative analysis of peptides masses using MASCOT and statistical analysis. The results showed known molecules such as enolase (47.4 kDa), aldehyde dehydrogenase (50.6 kDa), and ones not previously described such as trigger factor (47 kDa) and elongation factor Tu (44 kDa). The preliminary results indicated that some GBS proteins that elicit protective immunity hold promise not only as components in a vaccine as antigens but also as carriers or adjuvants in polysaccharide conjugate vaccines, but more studies are needed.

  10. Autophosphorylation, electrophoretic mobility and immunoreaction of oat phototropin 1 under UV and blue Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knieb, Elke; Salomon, Michael; Rüdiger, Wolfhart

    2005-01-01

    Phototropins are UV-A/blue light photoreceptors containing two flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding domains, light, oxygen and voltage (LOV)1 and LOV2, of which LOV2 is more sensitive toward light and more important for the physiological response compared with LOV1. Some physiological responses are plant phototropism, chloroplast migration and stomatal opening. Oat phototropin 1 together with light-dependent autophosphorylation shows a reduced electrophoretic mobility and reduced immunoreaction against a heterologous antiserum; both effects were suggested to be caused by phosphorylation at the same sites (M. Salomon, E. Knieb, T. von Zeppelin and W. Rudiger [2003] Biochemistry 42, 4217-4225). In this study, we show that both effects can be separated from each other: at low temperature, reduced immunoreaction preceded the mobility shift, and irradiation with UV-C light led to the mobility shift without the loss of immunoreactivity. We demonstrated that UV-C light at 280 nm, which does not match any absorption maximum of FMN, leads to autophosphorylation of phototropin. It is hypothesized that UV-C light causes differential activation of the LOV domains via energy transfer from aromatic amino acids.

  11. Immunoreactivity of thymosin beta 4 in human foetal and adult genitourinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemolato, S.; Cabras, T.; Fanari, M.U.; Cau, F.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Manconi, B.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) is a member of the beta-thymosins family, a family of peptides playing essential roles in many cellular functions. Our recent studies suggested Tβ4 plays a key role in the development of human salivary glands and the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to analyse the presence of Tβ4 in the human adult and foetal genitourinary tract. Immunolocalization of Tβ4 was studied in autoptic samples of kidney, bladder, uterus, ovary, testicle and prostate obtained from four human foetuses and four adults. Presence of the peptide was observed in cells of different origin: in surface epithelium, in gland epithelial cells and in the interstitial cells. Tβ4 was mainly found in adult and foetal bladder in the transitional epithelial cells; in the adult endometrium, glands and stromal cells were immunoreactive for the peptide; Tβ4 was mainly localized in the glands of foetal prostate while, in the adults a weak Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the stroma. In adult and foetal kidney, Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to ducts and tubules with completely spared glomeruli; a weak positivity was observed in adult and foetal oocytes; immunoreactivity was mainly localized in the interstitial cells of foetal and adult testis. In this study, we confirm that Tβ4 could play a relevant role during human development, even in the genitourinary tract, and reveal that immunoreactivity for this peptide may change during postnatal and adult life. PMID:21263742

  12. Simultaneous detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii based on microsphere immunoreaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Jinfeng; Zou, Mingqiang; Chen, Yan; Wang, Yanfei; Qi, Xiaohua

    2013-04-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis (Cmn) and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pss) are two plant pathogens that can cause tremendous agricultural economic losses. This novel method based on microsphere immunoreaction was developed for the simultaneous detection of Cmn and Pss in maize. This multiplex method was constructed based on microsphere immunodetection with fluorescent labels such as quantum dots (QDs) and R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) for the detection of Cmn and Pss. Captured QDs and R-PE serve as signal reporters for fluorescent readout. The principle of this method is based on a sandwich immunoreaction. Cmn and Pss captured by the microspheres were detected using flow cytometry. The limit of detection of this method was 10 times lower than the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and its analysis time (1 h) was much shorter compared with ELISA (6-8 h). The method, which has been proven to be an effective approach to multiplex detection of plant bacteria (Cmn and Pss as models), not only increased the varieties but also improved the sensitivity. The microsphere immunoreaction provides a universal method for the multiplex determination of microbes because of its high sensitivity, specificity, and speed. In the future, the method will be more fully validated in vivo to detect diversiform bacteria.

  13. Postnatal development of calcium-binding proteins immunoreactivity (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin) in the human entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grateron, L; Cebada-Sanchez, S; Marcos, P; Mohedano-Moriano, A; Insausti, A M; Muñoz, M; Arroyo-Jimenez, M M; Martinez-Marcos, A; Artacho-Perula, E; Blaizot, X; Insausti, R

    2003-12-01

    The entorhinal cortex is an essential component in the organization of the human hippocampal formation related to cortical activity. It transfers, neocortical information (ultimately distributed to the dentate gyrus and hippocampus) and receives most of the hippocampal output directed to neocortex. At birth, the human entorhinal cortex presents similar layer organization as in adults, although layer II (cell islands) and upper layer III have a protracted maturation. The presence of interneurons expressing calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin-D28K (calbindin) and calretinin) is well documented in the adult human entorhinal cortex. In many of them the calcium binding is co-localized with GABA. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers were virtually absent at birth, their presence increasing gradually in deep layer III, mostly in the lateral and caudal portions of the entorhinal cortex from the 5th month onwards. Calbindin immunoreactive cells and fibers were present at birth, mainly in layers II and upper III; mostly at rostral and lateral portions of the entorhinal cortex, increasing in number and extending to deep layers from the 5th month onwards. Calretinin immunoreactivity was present at birth, homogeneously distributed over layers I, II and upper V, throughout the entorhinal cortex. A substantial increase in the number of calretinin neurons in layer V was observed at the 5th month. The postnatal development of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin may have an important role in the functional maturation of the entorhinal cortex through the control of hippocampal, cortical and subcortical information.

  14. Gene expression and immunoreactivity of elastolytic enzymes in the uterosacral ligaments from women with uterine prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ching-Chung; Huang, Hong-Yuan; Chang, Shuenn-Dhy

    2012-04-01

    Altered elastin metabolism has been documented in pelvic tissues from women with pelvic floor dysfunction. This study was conducted to quantify the expression of elastolytic enzymes in uterine cervix and uterosacral ligaments from women with uterine prolapse compared to asymptomatic normal controls. Paired tissues of uterosacral ligament and cervical tissues were obtained from 27 women with uterine prolapse and 14 normal controls. Steady state of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), neutrophil elastase, α-1 antitrypsin immunoreactivity, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. When compared with controls, women with uterine prolapse had a significantly greater level of MMP-2 immunoreactivity and mRNA expression, but less TIMP-2 and α-1 antitrypsin immunoreactivity and mRNA expression in their uterosacral ligaments. However, neutrophil elastase mRNA expression was similar between uterine prolapse and control tissue. Our results showed that there was a close relationship between expressions of MMP-2, TIMP-2, and α-1 antitrypsin in uterosacral ligament and the occurrence of uterine prolapse.

  15. Changes in estrogen-alpha receptor immunoreactivity during the estrous cycle in lactating dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eerdenburg, F J; Daemen, I A; van der Beek, E M; van Leeuwen, F W

    2000-10-13

    Estradiol is one of the most important hormones in the regulation of estrous behavior, which is at a very low level of expression in the modern dairy cow. In the present study the neuroanatomical distribution of estrogen receptors of the alpha-subtype (ER-alpha) in the bovine hypothalamic area is determined with immunocytochemical methods, at various stages of the estrous cycle. During the luteal phase of the cycle, ER-alpha immunoreactive cells were found in most of the nuclei that are known to express ER-alpha immunoreactivity in other species, like the Bed nucleus of the Stria terminalis, Medial preoptic area, Ventromedial hypothalamus and Arcuate nucleus. During estrus and metestrus, however, no ER-alpha immunoreactive cells could be detected in those areas, except for a few in the caudal Arcuate nucleus. The results from the present study indicate that there is a coherent regulation and timing of physiological and behavioral events around ovulation, in which estradiol and its receptor play a key role.

  16. Oenanthe javanica extract increases immunoreactivities of antioxidant enzymes in the rat kidney

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun-Jin Tae; Joon Ha Park; Jeong-Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Jae Chul Lee; Jong-Dai Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background Oenanthe javanica is an aquatic perennial herb originated from East Asia.Nowadays,the effects of Oenanthe javanica have been proven in various disease models.Studies regarding the antioxidant effect of Oenanthe javanica in the kidney are still unclear.Methods This study was therefore performed to investigate the effect of the Oenanthe javanica extract (OJE) in the rat kidney using immunohistochemistry for antioxidant enzymes,copper,zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1),manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2),catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx).Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups:(1) normal diet fed-group (normal-group),(2) diet containing ascorbic acid (AA)-fed group (AA-group) as a positive control,(3) diet containing OJE-fed group (OJE-group).AA and OJE were supplied during 28 days.Results The side-effects were not observed in all the groups.Immunoreactivities of SOD1,SOD2,CAT and GPx were easily detected in the distal tubules of the kidney,and their immunoreactivities in the AA-and OJE-groups were increased to about 1.4-1.5 times and 2 times,respectively,compared with those in the normal-group.Conclusion OJE significantly increased expressions of SOD1 & 2,CAT and GPx immunoreactivities in the distal tubules of the rat kidney,and this finding suggests that significant enhancements of endogenous enzymatic antioxidants by OJE treatment may be a legitimate strategy for decreasing oxidative stresses in the kidney.

  17. Effects of chronic alcohol consumption, withdrawal and nerve growth factor on neuropeptide Y expression and cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Pedro A; Rocha, João P; Cardoso, Armando; Vilela, Manuel; Sousa, Sérgio; Madeira, M Dulce

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the vulnerability of the hippocampal formation (HF) to chronic alcohol consumption and withdrawal. Among the brain systems that appear to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of these conditions are the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic and the cholinergic systems. Because these two systems seem to closely interact in the HF, we sought to study the effects of chronic alcohol consumption (6months) and subsequent withdrawal (2months) on the expression of NPY and on the cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus. As such, we have estimated the areal density and the somatic volume of NPY-immunoreactive neurons, and the density of the cholinergic varicosities. In addition, because alcohol consumption and withdrawal are associated with impaired nerve growth factor (NGF) trophic support and the administration of exogenous NGF alters the effects of those conditions on various cholinergic markers, we have also estimated the same morphological parameters in withdrawn rats infused intracerebroventricularly with NGF. NPY expression increased after withdrawal and returned to control values after NGF treatment. Conversely, the somatic volume of these neurons did not differ among all groups. On other hand, the expression of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was reduced by 24% in ethanol-treated rats and by 46% in withdrawn rats. The administration of NGF to withdrawn rats increased the VAChT expression to values above control levels. These results show that the effects of prolonged alcohol intake and protracted withdrawal on the hilar NPY expression differ from those induced by shorter exposures to ethanol and by abrupt withdrawal. They also suggest that the normalizing effect of NGF on NPY expression might rely on the NGF-induced improvement of cholinergic neurotransmission in the dentate hilus.

  18. Detection of pantothenic acid-immunoreactive neurons in the rat lateral septal nucleus by a newly developed antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Arturo; Yajeya, Javier; Gonzalez, Noelia; Husson, Marianne; Geffard, Michel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The available immunohistochemical techniques have documented restricted distribution of vitamins in the mammalian brain. The aim of the study was to develop a highly specific antiserum directed against pantothenic acid to explore the presence of this vitamin in the mammalian brain. According to ELISA tests, the anti-pantothenic acid antiserum used showed a good affinity (10-8 M) and specificity. The antiserum was raised in rabbits. Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the mapping of pantothenic acid-immunoreactive structures was carried out in the rat brain. Pantothenic acid-immunoreactive perikarya were exclusively found in the intermediate part of the lateral septal nucleus. These cells were generally small, round, fusiform or pyramidal and showed 2-3 long (50-100 μm) immunoreactive dendrites. Any immunoreactive axons containing pantothenic acid were detected. The very restricted anatomical distribution of the pantothenic acid suggests that this vitamin could be involved in some specific neurophysiological mechanisms.

  19. Immunohistochemical Study on the PCNA-Immunoreactivity in the Uterus of Rats Ovariectomized or Treated With Antiestrogen Clomiphene Citrate

    OpenAIRE

    CANPOLAT, Leyla

    2014-01-01

    PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) immunoreactivity in the uterus of mature rats was investigated after long term administration of clomiphene citrate and ovariectomy. In the luminal epithelium and glandular epithelium and endometrial stroma regions, few PCNA-immunoreactive cells were observed. PCNA reactivity was estimated for the luminal and glandular epithelium and for the stromal cells. Treatment of clomiphene citrate decreased the proliferation of the luminal epithelial cell and...

  20. Immunohistochemical Study on the PCNA-Immunoreactivity in the Uterus of Rats Ovariectomized or Treated With Antiestrogen Clomiphene Citrate

    OpenAIRE

    CANPOLAT, Leyla

    1999-01-01

    PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) immunoreactivity in the uterus of mature rats was investigated after long term administration of clomiphene citrate and ovariectomy. In the luminal epithelium and glandular epithelium and endometrial stroma regions, few PCNA-immunoreactive cells were observed. PCNA reactivity was estimated for the luminal and glandular epithelium and for the stromal cells. Treatment of clomiphene citrate decreased the proliferation of the luminal epithelial cell and...

  1. Distribution of obestatin and ghrelin in human tissues: immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and mammary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönberg, Malin; Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Magnusson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Obestatin and ghrelin are two peptides derived from the same prohormone. It is well established that ghrelin is produced by endocrine cells in the gastric mucosa. However, the distribution of human obestatin immunoreactive cells is not thoroughly characterized. A polyclonal antibody...... that specifically recognizes human obestatin was produced. Using this antibody and a commercial antibody vs ghrelin, the distribution of obestatin and ghrelin immunoreactive cells was determined in a panel of human tissues using immunohistochemistry. The two peptides were detected in the mucosa...

  2. Distribution of amylin-immunoreactive neurons in the monkey hypothalamus and their relationships with the histaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Este, L; Wimalawansa, S J; Renda, T G

    2001-08-01

    Amylin (AMY) is a 37 amino acid peptide of pancreatic origin that has been localized in peripheral and central nervous structures. Both peripheral and central injection of the peptide causes various effects, including anorectic behavior in rats. Prompted by previous reports showing that the anorectic effect of AMY is mediated by histamine release, we immunohistochemically investigated possible relationships between these two systems at the light microscopical level. Monkey (Macaca fuscata japonica) hypothalamus specimens were submitted to immunohistochemical double staining procedures using AMY and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) antisera. AMY-immunoreactive neurons were found widely distributed in several nuclei of the monkey hypothalamus including the supraoptic, paraventricular, perifornical, periventricular, ventromedial, arcuate, and tuberomammillary nuclei. We detected AMY-immunoreactive nerve fibers throughout the hypothalamus, the median eminence and hypothalamus-neurohypophysial tract. Although AMY- and HDC-immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies occupied distinct hypothalamic zones, many HDC-immunoreactive cell bodies and dendrites, particularly those in the periventricular, arcuate, and rostral tuberomammillary regions, were surrounded by numerous AMY-immunoreactive nerve fiber varicosities. These findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of a discrete number of AMY-immunoreactive neurons in the monkey hypothalamus and add morphological support to the experimental data demonstrating that AMY probably exerts its influence on food intake via the histaminergic system.

  3. [Serotonin and neuropeptide FMRFamide in the nervous system of Opisthioglyphe ranae (Trematoda: Plagiorchiidae). an immunocytochemical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenina, N B; Kreshchenko, N D; Chilyuta, N V; Zaripova, F F

    2015-01-01

    The presence and localization of the serotoninergic and FMRFamidergic structures in the nervous system of the trematode Opisthioglyphe ranae, the marsh frog intestinal parasite, was studied using immunocytochemistry. The serotonin-immunoreactive nerve cells and fibers were revealed in the head ganglia, circular commissure, longitudinal nerve cords and their connective commissures, as well as around the oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and genital pore. FMRF-specific immunoreactivity was observed in the head ganglia, longitudinal nerve cords and terminal parts of the reproductive system. The results obtained are discussed in light of the available data on the presence and functional significance of the above-mentioned neurotransmitters in trematodes.

  4. Neuropeptide imaging on an LTQ with vMALDI source: The complete `all-in-one' peptidome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaert, Peter D.; Conaway, Maria C. Prieto; Pekar, Tonya M.; Miller, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Direct tissue imaging was performed on dissected insect tissue using a MALDI ion trap to visualize endogenous neuropeptides. Coupling tissue imaging to tandem MSn allows for the identification of previously known species and the ability to identify new ones by de novo sequencing, as searchable databases for insects are sparse. Direct tissue imaging is an attractive technique for the study of neuropeptides as minimal sample preparation is required prior to mass spectrometry. We successfully identified neuropeptides present in the corpora cardiaca and allata of Acheta domesticus (the house cricket). Diagnostic fragments at low m/z were used to distinguish between lipids and neuropeptides. The distribution of peptides appears to be more differentially localized than that of phospholipids, which seem to be more evenly distributed within the tissue.

  5. Food intake regulating-neuropeptides are expressed and regulated through pregnancy and following food restriction in rat placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cepeda Libia A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropeptide Y (NPY, agouti related peptide (AgRP, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART and melanocortins, the products of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC, are hypothalamic peptides involved in feeding regulation and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence has demonstrated their expression in rat and human placenta. Methods In the current study, we have investigated the expression of those neuropeptides in the rat placenta by real-time PCR using a model of maternal food restriction. Results Our results showed that placental-derived neuropeptides were regulated through pregnancy and following food restriction. Conclusion These data could indicate that placental-derived neuropeptides represent a local regulatory circuit that may fine-tune control of energy balance during pregnancy.

  6. A pdf Neuropeptide Gene Mutation and Ablation of PDF Neurons Each Cause Severe Abnormalities of Behavioral Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renn, Susan C.P; Park, Jae H; Rosbash, Michael; Hall, Jeffrey C; Taghert, Paul H

    1999-01-01

    .... Here, we define two critical features of that mechanism in Drosophila. We first describe animals mutant for the pdf neuropeptide gene, which is expressed by most of the candidate pacemakers (LNv neurons...

  7. Neuropeptide Y (NPY): genetic variation in the human promoter alters glucocorticoid signaling, yielding increased NPY secretion and stress responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Kuixing; Rao, Fangwen; Miramontes-Gonzalez, Jose Pablo; Hightower, C Makena; Vaught, Brian; Chen, Yuhong; Greenwood, Tiffany A; Schork, Andrew J; Wang, Lei; Mahata, Manjula; Stridsberg, Mats; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Biswas, Nilima; Fung, Maple M; Waalen, Jill; Middelberg, Rita P; Heath, Andrew C; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Whitfield, John B; Baker, Dewleen G; Schork, Nicholas J; Nievergelt, Caroline M; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to understand whether genetic variation at the Neuropeptide Y (NPY) locus governs secretion and stress responses in vivo as well as NPY gene expression in sympathochromaffin cells...

  8. Diet-Induced Neuropeptide Expression : Feasibility of Quantifying Extended and Highly Charged Endogenous Peptide Sequences by Selected Reaction Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidlin, Thierry; Boender, Arjen J.; Frese, Christian K.; Heck, Albert J R; Adan, Roger A H; Altelaar, A. F Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Understanding regulation and action of endogenous peptides, especially neuropeptides, which serve as inter- and intracellular signal transmitters, is key in understanding a variety of functional processes, such as energy balance, memory, circadian rhythm, drug addiction, etc. Therefore, accurate and

  9. Effects of clozapine and haloperidol on body weight,neuropeptide Y and leptin in patients with schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋梓祥

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of neuropeptide Y(NPY) ,leptin,body weight and their relationship in schizophrenics with clozapine and haloperidol treatment. Methods Thirty schizophrenic patients treated

  10. Neuropeptides in Heteroptera: Identification of allatotropin-related peptide and tachykinin-related peptides using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, the peptidomic analysis of neuropeptides from the retrocerebral complex and abdominal perisympathetic organs of polyphagous stinkbugs (Pentatomidae) revealed the group-specific sequences of pyrokinins, CAPA peptides (CAPA-periviscerokinins/PVKs and CAPA-pyrokinin), myosuppressin, corazonin...

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Cheng Yan

    Full Text Available The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in

  13. Transcriptome and peptidome characterisation of the main neuropeptides and peptidic hormones of a euphausiid: the Ice Krill, Euphausia crystallorophias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves Toullec

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ice krill, Euphausia crystallorophias is one of the species at the base of the Southern Ocean food chain. Given their significant contribution to the biomass of the Southern Ocean, it is vitally important to gain a better understanding of their physiology and, in particular, anticipate their responses to climate change effects in the warming seas around Antarctica. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Illumina sequencing was used to produce a transcriptome of the ice krill. Analysis of the assembled contigs via two different methods, produced 36 new pre-pro-peptides, coding for 61 neuropeptides or peptide hormones belonging to the following families: Allatostatins (A, B et C, Bursicon (α and β, Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormones (CHH and MIH/VIHs, Crustacean Cardioactive Peptide (CCAP, Corazonin, Diuretic Hormones (DH, the Eclosion Hormone (EH, Neuroparsin, Neuropeptide F (NPF, small Neuropeptide F (sNPF, Pigment Dispersing Hormone (PDH, Red Pigment Concentrating Hormone (RPCH and finally Tachykinin. LC/MS/MS proteomics was also carried out on eyestalk extracts, which are the major site of neuropeptide synthesis in decapod crustaceans. Results confirmed the presence of six neuropeptides and six precursor-related peptides previously identified in the transcriptome analyses. CONCLUSIONS: This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of neuropeptide hormones in a Eucarida non-decapod Malacostraca, several of which are described for the first time in a non-decapod crustacean. Additionally, there is a potential expansion of PDH and Neuropeptide F family members, which may reflect certain life history traits such as circadian rhythms associated with diurnal migrations and also the confirmation via mass spectrometry of several novel pre-pro-peptides, of unknown function. Knowledge of these essential hormones provides a vital framework for understanding the physiological response of this key Southern Ocean species to climate change

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Xing-Cheng

    2012-10-02

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  15. Expression and distribution of neuropeptides in the nervous system of the crab Carcinus maenas and their roles in environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhuo; Buchberger, Amanda; Muthuvel, Gajanthan; Li, Lingjun

    2015-12-01

    Environmental fluctuations, such as salinity, impose serious challenges to marine animal survival. Neuropeptides, signaling molecules involved in the regulation process, and the dynamic changes of their full complement in the stress response have yet to be investigated. Here, a MALDI-MS-based stable isotope labeling quantitation strategy was used to investigate the relationship between neuropeptide expression and adaptability of Carcinus maenas to various salinity levels, including high (60 parts per thousand [p.p.t.]) and low (0 p.p.t.) salinity, in both the crustacean pericardial organ (PO) and brain. Moreover, a high salinity stress time course study was conducted. MS imaging (MSI) of neuropeptide localization in C. maenas PO was also performed. As a result of salinity stress, multiple neuropeptide families exhibited changes in their relative abundances, including RFamides (e.g. APQGNFLRFamide), RYamides (e.g. SSFRVGGSRYamide), B-type allatostatins (AST-B; e.g. VPNDWAHFRGSWamide), and orcokinins (e.g. NFDEIDRSSFGFV). The MSI data revealed distribution differences in several neuropeptides (e.g. SGFYANRYamide) between color morphs, but salinity stress appeared to not have a major effect on the localization of the neuropeptides.

  16. Neuropeptides in the cerebral ganglia of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain: transcriptomic analysis and expression profiles during vitellogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chenchang; Yang, Yanan; Huang, Huiyang; Ye, Haihui

    2015-11-23

    Neuropeptides play a critical role in regulating animal reproduction. In vertebrates, GnRH, GnIH and kisspeptin are the key neuropeptide hormones of the reproductive axis, however, the reproductive axis for invertebrates is vague. Knowledge on ovarian development of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, is critical for aquaculture and resources management of the commercially important species. This study employed Illumina sequencing, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and quantitative real-time PCR techniques to identify neuropeptides that may be involved in ovarian development of S. paramamosain. A total of 32 neuropeptide transcripts from two dozen neuropeptide families, 100 distinct mature peptides were predicted from the transcriptome data of female S. paramamosain cerebral ganglia. Among them, two families, i.e. GSEFLamide and WXXXRamide, were first identified from the cerebral ganglia of crustaceans. Of these neuropeptides, 21 transcripts of interest were selected for further confirmation and all of them were detected in the cerebral ganglia, as well as in other nervous tissues and the ovary. Most of them also had differential expression in the cerebral ganglia during various vitellogenic stages, suggesting their likely involvement in regulating vitellogenesis and ovarian maturation. Overall, these findings provide an important basis for subsequent studies on peptide function in reproduction of S. paramamosain.

  17. Neuropeptidome of the Cephalopod Sepia officinalis: Identification, Tissue Mapping, and Expression Pattern of Neuropeptides and Neurohormones during Egg Laying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatylny-Gaudin, Céline; Cornet, Valérie; Leduc, Alexandre; Zanuttini, Bruno; Corre, Erwan; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Bernay, Benoît; Garderes, Johan; Kraut, Alexandra; Couté, Yohan; Henry, Joël

    2016-01-01

    Cephalopods exhibit a wide variety of behaviors such as prey capture, communication, camouflage, and reproduction thanks to a complex central nervous system (CNS) divided into several functional lobes that express a wide range of neuropeptides involved in the modulation of behaviors and physiological mechanisms associated with the main stages of their life cycle. This work focuses on the neuropeptidome expressed during egg-laying through de novo construction of the CNS transcriptome using an RNAseq approach (Illumina sequencing). Then, we completed the in silico analysis of the transcriptome by characterizing and tissue-mapping neuropeptides by mass spectrometry. To identify neuropeptides involved in the egg-laying process, we determined (1) the neuropeptide contents of the neurohemal area, hemolymph (blood), and nerve endings in mature females and (2) the expression levels of these peptides. Among the 38 neuropeptide families identified from 55 transcripts, 30 were described for the first time in Sepia officinalis, 5 were described for the first time in the animal kingdom, and 14 were strongly overexpressed in egg-laying females as compared with mature males. Mass spectrometry screening of hemolymph and nerve ending contents allowed us to clarify the status of many neuropeptides, that is, to determine whether they were neuromodulators or neurohormones.

  18. Towards understanding the free and receptor bound conformation of neuropeptide Y by fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Michael; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2009-06-01

    Despite a considerable sequence identity of the three mammalian hormones of the neuropeptide Y family, namely neuropeptide Y, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide, their structure in solution is described to be different. A so-called pancreatic polypeptide-fold has been identified for pancreatic polypeptide, whereas the structure of the N-terminal segment of neuropeptide Y is unknown. This element is important for the binding of neuropeptide Y to two of its relevant receptors, Y(1) and Y(5), but not to the Y(2) receptor subtype. In this study now, three doubly fluorescent-labeled analogs of neuropeptide Y have been synthesized that still bind to the Y(5) receptor with high affinity to investigate the conformation in solution and, for the first time, to probe the conformational changes upon binding of the ligand to its receptor in cell membrane preparations. The results obtained from the fluorescence resonance energy transfer investigations clearly show considerable differences in transfer efficiency that depend both on the solvent as well as on the peptide concentration. However, the studies do not support a pancreatic polypeptide-like folding of neuropeptide Y in the presence of membranes that express the human Y(5) receptor subtype.

  19. CD and 31P NMR studies of tachykinin and MSH neuropeptides in SDS and DPC micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sydney C.; Brown, Taylor C.; Gonzalez, Javier D.; Levonyak, Nicholas S.; Rush, Lydia A.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary structural characteristics of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide (α-MSH), γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH, and melittin were evaluated with circular dichroism in phosphite buffer, DPC micelles, and SDS micelles. CD spectral properties of γ1-MSH and γ2-MSH as well as 31P NMR of DPC micelles with all the peptides are reported for the first time. Although, a trend in the neuropeptide/micelle CD data appears to show increased α-helix content for the tachykinin peptides (SP, NKA, NKB) and increased β-sheet content for the MSH peptides (α-MSH, γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH) with increasing peptide charge, the lack of perturbed 31P NMR signals for all neuropeptides could suggest that the reported antimicrobial activity of SP and α-MSH might not be related to a membrane disruption mode of action.

  20. Sensory Neurons Arouse C. elegans Locomotion via Both Glutamate and Neuropeptide Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Choi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available C. elegans undergoes periods of behavioral quiescence during larval molts (termed lethargus and as adults. Little is known about the circuit mechanisms that establish these quiescent states. Lethargus and adult locomotion quiescence is dramatically reduced in mutants lacking the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1. Here, we show that the aroused locomotion of npr-1 mutants results from the exaggerated activity in multiple classes of sensory neurons, including nociceptive (ASH, touch sensitive (ALM and PLM, and stretch sensing (DVA neurons. These sensory neurons accelerate locomotion via both neuropeptide and glutamate release. The relative contribution of these sensory neurons to arousal differs between larval molts and adults. Our results suggest that a broad network of sensory neurons dictates transitions between aroused and quiescent behavioral states.

  1. Functional properties of Pfr(Tic)amide and BIBP3226 at human neuropeptide FF2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Mia; Wurster, Siegfried; Savola, Juha-Matti; Panula, Pertti

    2003-12-01

    The functional characteristics of two putative neuropeptide FF (NPFF) antagonists, BIBP3226 and PFR(Tic)amide, on the human neuropeptide FF receptor subtype 2 (hNPFF2) were investigated. Surprisingly, PFR(Tic)amide was shown to exhibit agonist properties in the [35S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding assay. The efficacy of PFR(Tic)amide was significantly greater than that of (1DMe)Y8Fa, a stable analog of NPFF, and PFR(Tic)amide can therefore be classified as a 'super-agonist'. BIBP3226 did act as a reversible competitive antagonist on the hNPFF2 receptor. However, high concentrations of BIBP3226 also non-specifically increased [35S]GTP-gammaS binding. The usefulness of BIBP3226 as an antagonist tool on the NPFF receptor is thus limited.

  2. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a Drosophila receptor for the neuropeptides capa-1 and -2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Annette; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael; Hauser, Frank; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2002-12-13

    The Drosophila Genome Project website contains an annotated gene (CG14575) for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned this receptor and found that the cloned cDNA did not correspond to the annotated gene; it partly contained different exons and additional exons located at the 5(')-end of the annotated gene. We expressed the coding part of the cloned cDNA in Chinese hamster ovary cells and found that the receptor was activated by two neuropeptides, capa-1 and -2, encoded by the Drosophila capability gene. Database searches led to the identification of a similar receptor in the genome from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae (58% amino acid residue identities; 76% conserved residues; and 5 introns at identical positions within the two insect genes). Because capa-1 and -2 and related insect neuropeptides stimulate fluid secretion in insect Malpighian (renal) tubules, the identification of this first insect capa receptor will advance our knowledge on insect renal function.

  3. [Neuropeptides, Cytokines and Thymus Peptides as Effectors of Interactions Between Thymus and Neuroendocrine System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkhovskaya, T I; Belova, O V; Zimina, I V; Kryuchkova, A V; Moskvina, S N; Bystrova, O V; Arion, V Ya; Sergienko, V I

    2015-01-01

    The review presents data on mutual influence of nervous system and thymus, realized through the neuroendocrine-immune interactions. The pres- ence of adrenergic and peptidergic nerves in thymus creates conditions for implementation of the effect of neuropeptides secreted by them. These neuropeptides induce activation of thymus cells receptors and influence on the main processes in thymus, including T-lymphocyte maturation, cytokine and hormones production. In turn, thymuspeptides and/or cytokines, controlled by them, enter the brain and exert influence on neuro- nalfunction, which creates the basis for changes of behavior and homeostasis maintenance in response to infection. Ageing and some infectious, autoimmune, neurodegenerative and cancer diseases are accompanied by distortion of interactions between thymus and central nervous system. Mechanisms of signaling pathways, which determine these interactions, are not revealed yet, and their understanding will promote the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  4. In vitro Leishmania major promastigote-induced macrophage migration is modulated by sensory and autonomic neuropeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, A A; Wahbi, A; Nordlind, K

    1998-01-01

    the chemotactic activities of live, killed and sonicated Leishmania major promastigotes and of the promastigote culture supernatant as well as the L. major surface protease gp63 towards a murine macrophage cell line, Raw 264.7, were investigated, using the Boyden technique. The sensory neuropeptides SOM, CGRP...... and SP, and the autonomic neuropeptides VIP and NPY, were also investigated for possible modulatory effects on this chemotaxis, using the living promastigotes. Living promastigotes were the most efficient attractants for macrophages compared with other forms of the parasites. Prior incubation...... of the macrophages with the parasites completely abolished the chemotactic activity. This might indicate that the living promastigote chemotaxis is a receptor-mediated process. On the other hand, paraformaldehyde-killed promastigotes not only failed to induce macrophage chemotaxis but also inhibited it in comparison...

  5. Neuropeptide Y and leptin receptor expression in the hypothalamus of rats with chronic immobilization stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoxian Wang; Jiaxu Chen; Guangxin Yue; Minghua Bai; Meijing Kou; Zhongye Jin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were immobilized to a frame for 3 hours a day for 21 days to establish a model of chronic immobilization stress. The body weight and food intake of rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress were significantly decreased compared with the control group. Dual-labeling immunofluorescence revealed that the expression of leptin receptor and the co-localization coeffient in these leptic receptor neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus were both upregulated, while the number of neuropeptide Y neurons was decreased. Chronic immobilization stress induced high expression of leptin receptor in the arcuate nucleus and suppressed the synthesis and secretion of neuropeptide Y, thereby disrupting the pathways in the arcuate nucleus that regulate feeding behavior, resulting in diminished food intake and reduced body weight.

  6. Does either the gastrointestinal peptide PYY or the neuropeptide NPY bind aluminium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchazhkina, Olga V; Ashcroft, Alison E; Croom, James; Exley, Christopher

    2003-04-01

    Peptide YY and neuropeptide Y are common peptides with a high degree of primary and tertiary structural homology. They are multifunctional and participate in a diverse array of distinct activities including regulation of gastrointestinal function and neural regulation of satiety. Recently both have been implicated in aluminium chemistry in vivo although their modus opperandi have not been determined. We have used molecular fluorescence, RP-HPLC, ESMS and equilibrium dialysis to identify if either peptide YY or neuropeptide Y will bind aluminium in vitro under near-physiological conditions. We were unable to demonstrate any direct interaction between either peptide and aluminium although we have speculated upon an in vivo mechanism whereby PYY, in particular, might form a stable complex with aluminium.

  7. Immunohistochemical distribution of Calbindin D-28K immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of adult cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; LI Jin-lian; XIONG Kang-hui; LI Ji-shuo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: In order to get more information about the possible functions of Calbindin D-28K in the central nervous system of adult cat, the distribution of Calbindin D-28K in the central nervous system of adult cat was examined. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining techniques were used, and immunostained sections were observed under a light microscopy. Results: A high density of both immunoreactive perikarya and fibers were observed in the basal ganglia, amygdaloid complex, nucleus of the fields of Forel, subthalamic nucleus, paracentral nucleus, pulvinar nucleus, subthalamus, dorsal hypothalamic area, lateral hypothalamic area, anterior hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, superior colliculus, inferior colliculus, oculomo-tor nucleus, superior olivary complex, marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, vestibular nuclei, the spinal trigeminal nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, cuneate nucleus, inferior olivary complex, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum and in the laminae Ⅱ of the spinal cord, whereas the dentate gyrus, the central medial nucleus of the thalamus, the paracentral and central lateral nucleus of the thalamus, the lateral dorsal nucleus of the thalamus,the ventrolateral complex of the thalamus, the medioventral nucleus of the thalamus, the posterior hypothalamic area, the dorsal hypothalamic area, the infundibular nucleus, the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus and the interfascicular nucleus had just a high density of immunoreactive perikarya, and no positive fibres were detected in these areas. Conclusion: The present results showed that Calbindin D-28K-like immunoreactivity was widely distributed throughout the central nervous system of adult cat and might play an important role in the activities of the neurons in the central nervous system of adult cat.

  8. The Spectrum of Hormone Immunoreactivity in Typical and Atypical Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim ERTAN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to assess the spectrum of hormone immunoreactivity in our pituitary adenoma cases and discuss the diagnostic parameters of atypical pituitary adenomas.Material and Methods: A total of 166 pituitary adenoma cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2008 in our department were included in the present study. Hematoxylin-eosin stained and immunohistochemistry performed slides (ACTH, PRL, GH, TSH, FSH, LH, Ki-67, and p53 were evaluated. Cases having more than two mitoses on 10 high power fields besides more than 3% Ki-67 index were accepted in the atypical group.Results: Histologically, 159 cases were typical pituitary adenoma and 7 were atypical pituitary adenoma. Of the atypical pituitary adenoma cases, one case was ACTH, one GH and one both GH and prolactin hormone immunoreactive pituitary adenomas. Four cases were hormone immunonegative adenomas. Of the typical pituitary adenoma cases, 39 cases were GH, 19 ACTH, 17 prolactin, 10 FSH, 8 LH and one TSH immunreactive pituitary adenomas. Fourty-seven cases were hormone immunonegative adenomas.Twenty-two of the all pitutary adenoma cases had recurrence. Of these cases, 18 were typical adenoma and four were atypical adenoma.Conclusion: The ratio of prolactin immunoreactive pituitary adenoma cases in the surgical material of neuropathology is decreasing due to medical therapy. Atypical pituitary adenomas are not the sole factor affecting the recurrence mechanism but these tumors have higher recurrence rate compared with typical pituitary adenomas and we think the proliferation index might be the principal approach in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  9. Endotoxemia-induced muscle wasting is associated with the change of hypothalamic neuropeptides in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Kaipeng; Yu, Wenkui; Lin, Zhiliang; Tan, Shanjun; Bai, Xiaowu; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    In critical patients, sepsis-induced muscle wasting is considered to be an important contributor to complications and mortality. Previous work mainly focuses on the peripheral molecular mechanism of muscle degradation, however little evidence exists for the role of central nervous system in the process. In the present study, we, for the first time, characterized the relationship between muscle wasting and central neuropeptide changes in a septic model. Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. Twelve, 24 and 48 hrs after injection, skeletal muscle and hypothalamus tissues were harvested. Muscle wasting was measured by the mRNA expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), as well as 3-methyl-histidine (3-MH) and tyrosine release. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and inflammatory marker expressions were also measured in three time points. LPS injection caused an increase expression of MuRF-1 and MAFbx, and a significant higher release of 3-MH and tyrosine. Hypothalamic neuropeptides, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) presented a dynamic change after LPS injection. Also, hypothalamic inflammatory markers, interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) increased substantially after LPS administration. Importantly, the expressions of POMC, AgRP and CART were well correlated with muscle atrophy gene, MuRF-1 expression. These findings suggest hypothalamic peptides and inflammation may participate in the sepsis-induced muscle wasting, but the exact mechanism needs further study.

  10. Glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Silva, Lilian Eslaine C M; de Castro, Margaret; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Elias, Lucila L K

    2012-06-01

    Glucocorticoid deficiency is associated with a decrease of food intake. Orexigenic peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti related protein (AgRP), and the anorexigenic peptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC), expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), are regulated by meal-induced signals. Orexigenic neuropeptides, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin, expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), also control food intake. Thus, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glucocorticoids are required for changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides induced by feeding. Male Wistar rats (230-280 g) were subjected to ADX or sham surgery. ADX animals received 0.9% NaCl in the drinking water, and half of them received corticosterone in the drinking water (B: 25 mg/L, ADX+B). Six days after surgery, animals were fasted for 16 h and they were decapitated before or 2 h after refeeding for brain tissue and blood collections. Adrenalectomy decreased NPY/AgRP and POMC expression in the ARC in fasted and refed animals, respectively. Refeeding decreased NPY/AgRP and increased POMC mRNA expression in the ARC of sham and ADX+B groups, with no effects in ADX animals. The expression of MCH and orexin mRNA expression in the LHA was increased in ADX and ADX+B groups in fasted condition, however there was no effect of refeeding on the expression of MCH and orexin in the LHA in the three experimental groups. Refeeding increased plasma leptin and insulin levels in sham and ADX+B animals, with no changes in leptin concentrations in ADX group, and insulin response to feeding was lower in this group. Taken together, these data demonstrated that circulating glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in NPY, AgRP and POMC mRNA expression in the ARC. The lower leptin and insulin responses to feeding may contribute to the altered hypothalamic neuropeptide expression after adrenalectomy.

  11. Relative Quantitation of Neuropeptides over a Thousand-fold Concentration Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaowen; Xie, Fang; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-12-01

    Neuropeptides are essential cell-to-cell signaling molecules that influence diverse regulatory and behavioral functions within biological systems. Differing in their amino acid sequences and post-translational modifications, hundreds of neuropeptides are produced via a series of enzymatic processing steps, and their levels vary with location, time, and physiological condition. Due to their wide range of endogenous concentrations and inherent chemical complexity, using mass spectrometry (MS) to accurately quantify changes in peptide levels can be challenging. Here we evaluate three different MS systems for their ability to accurately measure neuropeptide levels: capillary liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap (CapLC-ESI-IT) MS, ultraperformance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight (UPLC-LC-ESI-Q-TOF) MS, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS. Specifically, eight sample mixtures composed of five neuropeptide standards, with four technical replicates of each, were labeled with H4/D4-succinic anhydride, followed by relative peptide quantitation using the three MS platforms. For these samples, the CapLC-ESI-IT MS platform offered the most robust ability to accurately quantify peptides over a concentration range of 1200-fold, although it required larger sample sizes than the other two platforms. Both the UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS and the MALDI-TOF MS systems had lower limits of quantification, with the MALDI-TOF having the lowest. By implementing several data acquisition schemes and optimizing the data analysis approaches, we were able to accurately quantify peptides over a three orders of magnitude concentration range using either the UPLC or MALDI-TOF platforms. Overall these results increase our understanding of both the capabilities and limits of using MS-based approaches to measure peptides.

  12. Coexpression analysis of nine neuropeptides in the neurosecretory preoptic area of larval zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich eHerget

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paraventricular nucleus (PVN of the hypothalamus in mammals coordinates neuroendocrine, autonomic and behavioral responses pivotal for homeostasis and the stress response. A large amount of studies in rodents has documented that the PVN contains diverse neuronal cell types which can be identified by the expression of distinct secretory neuropeptides. Interestingly, PVN cell types often coexpress multiple neuropeptides whose relative coexpression level are subject to environment-induced plasticity.Due to their small size and transparency, zebrafish larvae offer the possibility to comprehensively study the development and plasticity of the PVN in large groups of intact animals, yet important anatomical information about the larval zebrafish PVN-homologous region has been missing. Therefore we recently defined the location and borders of the larval neurosecretory preoptic area (NPO as the PVN-homologous region in larval zebrafish based on transcription factor expression and cell type clustering. To identify distinct cell types present in the larval NPO, we also generated a comprehensive 3D map of 9 zebrafish homologs of typical neuropeptides found in the mammalian PVN (arginine vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone, proenkephalin a/b, neurotensin, oxytocin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, cholecystokinin, and somatostatin. Here we extend this chemoarchitectural map to include the degrees of coexpression of two neuropeptides in the same cell by performing systematic pairwise comparisons. Our results allowed the subclassification of NPO cell types, and differences in variability of coexpression profiles suggest potential targets of biochemical plasticity. Thus, this work provides an important basis for the analysis of the development, function, and plasticity of the primary neuroendocrine brain region in larval zebrafish.

  13. Interaction of Mimetic Analogs of Insect Kinin Neuropeptides with Arthropod Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    associated with the regulation of such diverse processes as hindgut contraction, diuresis and the release of digestive enzymes. In this chapter, the chemical...inhibition of diuresis in the housefly. Strategies for the modification of insect neuropeptide structures for the enhancement of the topical and oral...contraction, diuresis and the release of digestive enzymes. In this chapter, the chemical, conformational and stereochemical aspects of the activity

  14. Neuropeptide Y secretion increases in the paraventricular nucleus in association with increased appetite for food.

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, S P; Dube, M G; Sahu, A; Phelps, C P; Kalra, P S

    1991-01-01

    Feeding in mammals is a periodic behavior; however, knowledge of how the brain signals an intermittent eating pattern is scanty. Recent indirect evidence indicates that one of the signals encoded in the structure of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is to stimulate robust feeding. Therefore, two series of experiments were undertaken to characterize NPY secretion within the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in association with eating behavior in the rat. Dynamic changes in NPY concentration in several hypothal...

  15. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Neuropeptide Y Induces Hepatic Insulin Resistance via Sympathetic Innervation

    OpenAIRE

    Anita M van den Hoek; Van Heijningen, Caroline; Schröder-van der Elst, Janny P.; Ouwens, D. Margriet; Havekes, Louis M.; Johannes A Romijn; Kalsbeek, Andries; Pijl, Hanno

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—We recently showed that intracerebroventricular infusion of neuropeptide Y (NPY) hampers inhibition of endogenous glucose production (EGP) by insulin in mice. The downstream mechanisms responsible for these effects of NPY remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish whether intracerebroventricular NPY administration modulates the suppressive action of insulin on EGP via hepatic sympathetic or parasympathetic innervation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The ...

  16. Neuropeptide and sigma receptors as novel therapeutic targets for the pharmacotherapy of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Konstantinos A; Veletza, Stavroula; Chatzaki, Ekaterini

    2009-09-01

    Among the most prevalent of mental illnesses, depression is increasing in incidence in the Western world. It presents with a wide variety of symptoms that involve both the CNS and the periphery. Multiple pharmacological observations led to the development of the monoamine theory as a biological basis for depression, according to which diminished neurotransmission within the CNS, including that of the dopamine, noradrenaline (norepinephrine) and serotonin systems, is the leading cause of the disorder. Current conventional pharmacological antidepressant therapies, using selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, aim to enhance monoaminergic neurotransmission. However, the use of these agents presents severe disadvantages, including a delay in the alleviation of depressive symptoms, significant adverse effects and high frequencies of non-responding patients. Neuroendocrinological data of recent decades reveal that depression and anxiety disorders may occur simultaneously due to hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity. As a result, the stress-diathesis model was developed, which attempts to associate genetic and environmental influences in the aetiology of depression. The amygdala and the hippocampus control the activity of the HPA axis in a counter-balancing way, and a plethora of regulatory neuropeptide signalling pathways are involved. Intervention at these molecular targets may lead to alternative antidepressant therapeutic solutions that are expected to overcome the limitations of existing antidepressants. This prospect is based on preclinical evidence from pharmacological and genetic modifications of the action of neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor, substance P, galanin, vasopressin and neuropeptide Y. The recent synthesis of orally potent non-peptide micromolecules that can selectively bind to various neuropeptide receptors permits the onset of clinical trials to evaluate

  17. Genomic and peptidomic analyses of the neuropeptides from the emerging pest, Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Neil; Down, Rachel E; Isaac, R Elwyn

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii is a highly polyphagous invasive pest which has been recently introduced into Europe and North America, where it is causing severe economic losses through larval infestations of stone and berry fruits. The peptidome of the selected nervous tissues of adult D. suzukii was investigated as a first step in identifying potential targets for the development of novel insecticides. Through in silico analyses of the D. suzukii genome databases 28 neuropeptide families, comprising more than 70 predicted peptides were identified. Using a combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of tissue extracts, 33 predicted peptides, representing 15 different peptide families were identified by their molecular masses and a total of 17 peptide sequences were confirmed by ion fragmentation. A comparison between the peptides and precursors of D. suzukii and D. melanogaster shows they are highly conserved, with differences only identified in the amino acid sequences of the peptides encoded in the FMRFamide, hugin and ecydysis triggering hormone precursors. All other peptides predicted and identified from D. suzukii appear to be identical to those previously characterized from D. melanogaster. Adipokinetic hormone was only identified in the corpus cardiacum, other peptides present included short neuropeptide F, a pyrokinin and myosuppressin, the latter of which was the only peptide identified from the crop nerve bundle. Peptides present in extracts of the brain and/or thoracico-abdominal ganglion included allatostatins, cardioacceleratory peptide 2b, corazonin, extended FMRFamides, pyrokinins, myoinihibitory peptides, neuropeptide-like precursor 1, SIFamide, short neuropeptide F, kinin, sulfakinins and tachykinin related peptides. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Control of sleep-to-wake transitions via fast aminoacid and slow neuropeptide transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueiro, Thiago; de Lecea, Luis; Huerta, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    The Locus Coeruleus (LC) modulates cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, brainstem and spinal cord circuits and it expresses receptors for neuromodulators that operate in a time scale of several seconds. Evidences from anatomical, electrophysiological and optogenetic experiments have shown that LC neurons receive input from a group of neurons called Hypocretins (HCRTs) that release a neuropeptide called hypocretin. It is less known how these two groups of neurons can be coregulated using GABAergic neurons. Since the time scales of GABAA inhibition is several orders of magnitude faster than the hypocretin neuropeptide effect, we investigate the limits of circuit activity regulation using a realistic model of neurons. Our investigation shows that GABAA inhibition is insufficient to control the activity levels of the LCs. Despite slower forms of GABAA can in principle work, there is not much plausibility due to the low probability of the presence of slow GABAA and lack of robust stability at the maximum firing frequencies. The best possible control mechanism predicted by our modeling analysis is the presence of inhibitory neuropeptides that exert effects in a similar time scale as the hypocretin/orexin. Although the nature of these inhibitory neuropeptides has not been identified yet, it provides the most efficient mechanism in the modeling analysis. Finally, we present a reduced mean-field model that perfectly captures the dynamics and the phenomena generated by this circuit. This investigation shows that brain communication involving multiple time scales can be better controlled by employing orthogonal mechanisms of neural transmission to decrease interference between cognitive processes and hypothalamic functions. PMID:25598695

  19. [Subpopulation of calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons in the dorsal horn of the mice spinal cord].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porseva, V V; Shilkin, V V; Strelkov, A A; Masliukov, P M

    2014-01-01

    In the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in the plates I-IV on the thoracic and lumbar levels different subpopulations of interneurons immunoreactive for calbindin 28 kDa (CAB IR), which are specific to each plate. In the area of the medial edge of the dorsal horn, we have found a special subpopulation of CAB IR interneurons whose morphometric characteristics differ from CAB IR interneurons subpopulations of said plates. The number of CAB IR interneurons was maximal in the plate II at all levels of the spinal cord. Leveled differences are more CAB IR interneurons and larger area of the cross sections at the lumbar level.

  20. Expression and Immunoreactivity of a Human Group A Rotavirus Vp4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Rotavirus capsid protein Vp4 plays an important role in the virus adhering and entering the cells. In this study, a Vp4 gene cloned from a rotavirus strain TB-Chen was highly expressed in E.coli BL21 (DE3). The results of the Western blot showed that the protein possesses specific immuno-reactivities and can be specifically recognized by guinea pig antibodies against rotavirus strain SA11 or Wa. Some Vp4 dimers were formed during renaturation. These data obtained from this study provide a strong basis for further study on the structure and function of the Vp4.

  1. A fibroblast-associated antigen: Characterization in fibroblasts and immunoreactivity in smooth muscle differentiated stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Celis, Julio E.; van Deurs, Bo

    1992-01-01

    Fibroblasts with smooth muscle differentiation are frequently derived from human breast tissue. Immunofluorescence cytochemistry of a fibroblast-associated antigen recognized by a monoclonal antibody (MAb), 1B10, was analyzed with a view to discriminating smooth muscle differentiated fibroblasts...... from vascular smooth muscle cells. The antigen was detected on the cell surface and in cathepsin D-positive and acridine orange-accumulating vesicular compartments of fibroblasts. Ultrastructurally, the antigen was revealed in coated pits and in endosomal and lysosomal structures. 1B10 recognized three...... immunoreactivity was specific to fibroblasts and smooth muscle differentiated fibroblasts within the context of vascular smooth muscle cells....

  2. Co-expression pattern of dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) within sympathetic innervation of ovary and umbilical cord of the European bison (Bison bonasus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skobowiat, Cezary; Panasiewicz, Grzegorz; Gizejewski, Zygmunt; Szafranska, Bozena

    2013-12-01

    Co-expression of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) has never been examined in ovary (OV) and umbilical cord (UC) of the European bison (Eb), the endangered wild species. The OV and UC samples were harvested from seasonally eliminated Eb females (45-120 days post coitum). Frozen histological sections were examined by double fluorescent immunohistochemistry (dF-IHC), using the primary mouse anti-DβH monoclonals and rabbit anti-NPY polyclonals and then the immunocomplexes were visualized with FITC and CY3 fluorophores, respectively. Numerous DβH immunoreactive nerve fibers (DβH-IRs) and a little less frequent NPY-IRs were found in the bundle-like structures, innervating mainly perivascular regions of the OV. The NPY-IRs constantly co-expressed DβH, while some DβH-IRs did not express NPY. This specific pattern of innervation was observed both in the stromal and cortical regions of the OV. The simultaneous co-expression of DβH and NPY were also detected in the UC, in which specific single or bundle-like structures ran along the smooth muscles of blood vessels. The spatial-specific co-expression of DβH and NPY in OV and UC, may suggest that these markers are involved in the control of vascularization that regulates nourishing blood circulation required for proper pregnancy maintenance and efficient embryo/fetus development in the Eb.

  3. NPY/neuropeptide Y enhances autophagy in the hypothalamus: a mechanism to delay aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveleira, Célia A; Botelho, Mariana; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Aging was recently described as a life event programmed by the hypothalamus, a key brain region that is crucial for the neuroendocrine interaction between the central nervous system and the periphery. Autophagy impairment is a hallmark of aging, contributing to the aging phenotype and to the aggravation of age-related diseases. Since hypothalamic autophagy decreases with age, strategies to promote autophagy in the hypothalamus may be relevant for control of the aging process. NPY (neuropeptide Y) is an endogenous neuropeptide mainly produced by the hypothalamus. We recently reported, for the first time, that NPY stimulates autophagy in rodent hypothalamus and mediates caloric restriction-induced autophagy in hypothalamic neurons. Moreover, we observed that NPY acts through NPY1R (neuropeptide Y receptor Y1) or NPY5R activation involving a concerted action of different signaling pathways. Since both hypothalamic autophagy and NPY levels decrease with age, modulation of NPY levels could provide new putative therapeutic tools to ameliorate age-related deteriorations and extend longevity.

  4. MALDI imaging analysis of neuropeptides in the Africanized honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain: effect of ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratavieira, Marcel; da Silva Menegasso, Anally Ribeiro; Garcia, Ana Maria Caviquioli; Dos Santos, Diego Simões; Gomes, Paulo Cesar; Malaspina, Osmar; Palma, Mario Sergio

    2014-06-01

    The occurrence and spatial distribution of the neuropeptides AmTRP-5 and AST-1 in the honeybee brain were monitored via MALDI spectral imaging according to the ontogeny of Africanized Apis mellifera. The levels of these peptides increased in the brains of 0-15 day old honeybees, and this increase was accompanied by an increase in the number of in-hive activities performed by the nurse bees, followed by a decrease in the period from 15 to 25 days of age, in which the workers began to perform activities outside the nest (guarding and foraging). The results obtained in the present investigation suggest that AmTRP-5 acts in the upper region of both pedunculi of young workers, possibly regulating the cell cleaning and brood capping activities. Meanwhile, the localized occurrence of AmTRP-5 and AST-1 in the antennal lobes, subesophageal ganglion, upper region of the medulla, both lobula, and α- and β-lobes of both brain hemispheres in 20 to 25 day old workers suggest that the action of both neuropeptides in these regions may be related to their localized actions in these regions, regulating foraging and guarding activities. Thus, these neuropeptides appear to have some functions in the honeybee brain that are specifically related to the age-related division of labor.

  5. Oxygen sensing neurons and neuropeptides regulate survival after anoxia in developing C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flibotte, John J; Jablonski, Angela M; Kalb, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic brain injury remains a major source of neurodevelopmental impairment for both term and preterm infants. The perinatal period is a time of rapid transition in oxygen environments and developmental resetting of oxygen sensing. The relationship between neural oxygen sensing ability and hypoxic injury has not been studied. The oxygen sensing circuitry in the model organism C. elegans is well understood. We leveraged this information to investigate the effects of impairments in oxygen sensing on survival after anoxia. There was a significant survival advantage in developing worms specifically unable to sense oxygen shifts below their preferred physiologic range via genetic ablation of BAG neurons, which appear important for conferring sensitivity to anoxia. Oxygen sensing that is mediated through guanylate cyclases (gcy-31, 33, 35) is unlikely to be involved in conferring this sensitivity. Additionally, animals unable to process or elaborate neuropeptides displayed a survival advantage after anoxia. Based on these data, we hypothesized that elaboration of neuropeptides by BAG neurons sensitized animals to anoxia, but further experiments indicate that this is unlikely to be true. Instead, it seems that neuropeptides and signaling from oxygen sensing neurons operate through independent mechanisms, each conferring sensitivity to anoxia in wild type animals.

  6. Les neuropeptides gastro-intestinaux cibles des effets des rayonnements ionisants : altérations fonctionnelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linard, C.; Esposito, V.; Wysocki, J.; Griffiths, N. M.

    1998-04-01

    The symptoms associated with exposure to ionizing radiation are nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea. The response of the gut is complex involving modifications of motility and fluid and electrolyte transport. Gastrointestinal regulatory peptides have an important role in these functions. This study showed that radiation-induced tissue variations of neuropeptides have some repercussions on intestinal biological activity of these peptides soon after irradiation. In addition such modifications are also seen a few years after irradiation. Les symptômes associés à l'exposition aux rayonnements ionisants sont des nausées, vomissements et diarrhées. La réponse du système digestif est complexe, impliquant des modifications de la motilité et du transport d'eau et d'électrolytes. les neuropeptides gastro-intestinaux ont un rôle important dans ces fonctions. Cette étude montre que les variations tissulaires de ces neuropeptides induites par l'irradiation ont des répercussions sur l'activité biologique intestinale pour des temps précoces mais que ces perturbations sont encore visibles quelques années après l'irradiation.

  7. Crustose coralline algae and a cnidarian neuropeptide trigger larval settlement in two coral reef sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Whalan

    Full Text Available In sessile marine invertebrates, larval settlement is fundamental to population maintenance and persistence. Cues contributing to the settlement choices and metamorphosis of larvae have important implications for the success of individuals and populations, but cues mediating larval settlement for many marine invertebrates are largely unknown. This study assessed larval settlement in two common Great Barrier Reef sponges, Coscinoderma matthewsi and Rhopaloeides odorabile, to cues that enhance settlement and metamorphosis in various species of scleractinian coral larvae. Methanol extracts of the crustose coralline algae (CCA, Porolithon onkodes, corresponding to a range of concentrations, were used to determine the settlement responses of sponge larvae. Cnidarian neuropeptides (GLW-amide neuropeptides were also tested as a settlement cue. Settlement in both sponge species was approximately two-fold higher in response to live chips of CCA and optimum concentrations of CCA extract compared to 0.2 µm filtered sea water controls. Metamorphosis also increased when larvae were exposed to GLW-amide neuropeptides; R. odorabile mean metamorphosis reached 42.0±5.8% compared to 16.0±2.4% in seawater controls and in C. matthewsi mean metamorphosis reached 68.3±5.4% compared to 36.7±3.3% in seawater controls. These results demonstrate the contributing role chemosensory communication plays in the ability of sponge larvae to identify suitable habitat for successful recruitment. It also raises the possibility that larvae from distinct phyla may share signal transduction pathways involved in metamorphosis.

  8. Crustose coralline algae and a cnidarian neuropeptide trigger larval settlement in two coral reef sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalan, Steve; Webster, Nicole S; Negri, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    In sessile marine invertebrates, larval settlement is fundamental to population maintenance and persistence. Cues contributing to the settlement choices and metamorphosis of larvae have important implications for the success of individuals and populations, but cues mediating larval settlement for many marine invertebrates are largely unknown. This study assessed larval settlement in two common Great Barrier Reef sponges, Coscinoderma matthewsi and Rhopaloeides odorabile, to cues that enhance settlement and metamorphosis in various species of scleractinian coral larvae. Methanol extracts of the crustose coralline algae (CCA), Porolithon onkodes, corresponding to a range of concentrations, were used to determine the settlement responses of sponge larvae. Cnidarian neuropeptides (GLW-amide neuropeptides) were also tested as a settlement cue. Settlement in both sponge species was approximately two-fold higher in response to live chips of CCA and optimum concentrations of CCA extract compared to 0.2 µm filtered sea water controls. Metamorphosis also increased when larvae were exposed to GLW-amide neuropeptides; R. odorabile mean metamorphosis reached 42.0±5.8% compared to 16.0±2.4% in seawater controls and in C. matthewsi mean metamorphosis reached 68.3±5.4% compared to 36.7±3.3% in seawater controls. These results demonstrate the contributing role chemosensory communication plays in the ability of sponge larvae to identify suitable habitat for successful recruitment. It also raises the possibility that larvae from distinct phyla may share signal transduction pathways involved in metamorphosis.

  9. Oxytocin and Vasopressin: Linking Pituitary Neuropeptides and their Receptors to Social Neurocircuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Andrea Baribeau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin and vasopressin are pituitary neuropeptides that have been shown to affect social processes in mammals. There is growing interest in these molecules and their receptors as potential precipitants of, and/or treatments for, social deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder. Numerous behavioral-genetic studies suggest that there is an association between these peptides and individual social abilities; however, an explanatory model that links hormonal activity at the receptor level to complex human behavior remains elusive. The following review summarizes the known associations between the oxytocin and vasopressin neuropeptide systems and social neurocircuits in the brain. Following a micro- to macro- level trajectory, current literature on the synthesis and secretion of these peptides, and the structure, function and distribution of their respective receptors is first surveyed. Next, current models regarding the mechanism of action of these peptides on microcircuitry and other neurotransmitter systems are discussed. Functional neuroimaging evidence on the acute effects of exogenous administration of these peptides on brain activity is then reviewed. Overall, a model in which the local neuromodulatory effects of pituitary neuropeptides on brainstem and basal forebrain regions strengthen signaling within social neurocircuits proves appealing. However, these findings are derived from animal models; more research is needed to clarify the relevance of these mechanisms to human behavior and treatment of social deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Control of Neuropeptide Expression by Parallel Activity-dependent Pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo Romanos, Teresa; Petersen, Jakob Gramstrup; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of neuronal activity within circuits facilitates integrated responses and rapid changes in behavior. We have identified a system in Caenorhabditis elegans where neuropeptide expression is dependent on the ability of the BAG neurons to sense carbon dioxide. In C. elegans, CO2 sensing is predominantly coordinated by the BAG-expressed receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9. GCY-9 binding to CO2 causes accumulation of cyclic GMP and opening of the cGMP-gated TAX-2/TAX-4 cation channels; provoking an integrated downstream cascade that enables C. elegans to avoid high CO2. Here we show that cGMP regulation by GCY-9 and the PDE-1 phosphodiesterase controls BAG expression of a FMRFamide-related neuropeptide FLP-19 reporter (flp-19::GFP). This regulation is specific for CO2-sensing function of the BAG neurons, as loss of oxygen sensing function does not affect flp-19::GFP expression. We also found that expression of flp-19::GFP is controlled in parallel to GCY-9 by the activity-dependent transcription factor CREB (CRH-1) and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (KIN-2) signaling pathway. We therefore show that two parallel pathways regulate neuropeptide gene expression in the BAG sensory neurons: the ability to sense changes in carbon dioxide and CREB transcription factor. Such regulation may be required in particular environmental conditions to enable sophisticated behavioral decisions to be performed. PMID:28139692

  11. Mitogenic effects of vasoactive neuropeptides on cultured smooth muscle cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsuhashi, M.; Payan, D.G.

    1987-03-02

    In order to investigate the relationship between the biochemical pathways that characterize contraction and cell growth, the authors have studied both contraction, mitogenesis and protein synthesis induced by the vasoactive neuropeptides, substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on four different established vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle cell lines. Contraction in vitro was evaluated by light microscopy and recorded photographically. Mitogenesis and protein synthesis were evaluated by (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into cells and (/sup 3/H)-amino acid incorporation into trichloroacetic acid precipitated materials, respectively. SP stimulated mitogenesis of A7r5 cells (embryonic rat aorta), but failed to induce significant contraction of these cells, whereas, SP induced contraction of cultured adult rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), but failed to stimulate mitogenesis. CGRP and VIP stimulated mitogenesis and protein synthesis, respectively, of DDT/sub 1/MF-2 cells (hamster vas deferens), but neither induced contraction of this cell line. All three neuropeptides showed no effect on BC/sub 3/H1 (mouse smooth muscle-like) cells. These results suggest that neuropeptides with vasoactive properties modulate different stages of cellular mitogenic responses which may be regulated by the degree of maturation of smooth muscle cell. 22 references, 5 figures.

  12. Effects of acute heat stress on gene expression of brain-gut neuropeptides in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, L; Hepeng, L; Xianlei, L; Hongchao, J; Hai, L; Sheikhahmadi, A; Yufeng, W; Zhigang, S

    2013-11-01

    Heat stress-induced reduction in feed intake is an annoyance of the poultry industry. Feed intake is regulated by complex mechanisms in which brain-gut neuropeptides are involved, but the changes in such neuropeptides in broiler chickens during heat exposure remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute heat stress (35°C, 6 h, and 65% relative humidity) on the gene expression of appetite-regulating peptides in the hypothalamus and gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens at 42 d of age. The hypothalamic mRNA levels of neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, pro-opiomelanocortin, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, corticotropin-releasing hormone, melanocortin 4 receptor, melanin-concentrating hormone, prepro-orexin, cholecystokinin (CCK), and ghrelin did not significantly change (P>0.05) in the heat-exposed broiler chickens. However, the mRNA levels of ghrelin in the glandular stomach, duodenum, and jejunum significantly increased and the mRNA level of CCK in the duodenum significantly decreased. The results indicate that acute heat stress had no effect on the gene expression of central appetite-regulating peptides under current experimental conditions; however, some gastrointestinal tract peptides (e.g., ghrelin and CCK) might play a role in the regulation of appetite in acute heat-exposed broiler chickens. Furthermore, ghrelin in the glandular stomach, duodenum, and jejunum might be the main regulative target of acute heat stress induced anorexia.

  13. Neuropeptide W: a key player in the homeostatic regulation of feeding and energy metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenoya, Fumiko; Kageyama, Haruaki; Shiba, Kanako; Date, Yukari; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Shioda, Seiji

    2010-07-01

    Neuropeptide W (NPW), recently isolated from porcine hypothalamus, has been identified as the endogenous ligand for both NPBWR1 (GPR7) and NPBWR2 (GPR8), which belong to the orphan G protein-coupled receptor family. NPW is thought to play an important role in the regulation of feeding and drinking behavior, and to be related to the stress response. NPW-containing neurons are localized in several regions of the brain, including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, limbic system, midbrain, and brain stem. Accumulated evidence suggests that hypothalamic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy homeostasis via neuronal circuits in the hypothalamus. NPW also forms part of the feeding-regulating neuronal circuitry in conjunction with other feeding-regulating peptide-containing neurons within the hypothalamus. We summarize our current understanding of the distribution of NPW and of the neuronal interactions between NPW and the different feeding-regulating peptide-containing neurons. This review also discusses evidence for the dichotomous actions of NPW on energy balance and the potential mechanisms involved.

  14. Investigations into mild electric foot shock stress-induced cognitive enhancement: possible role of angiotensin neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2013-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of angiotensin neuropeptides in mild electric foot shock stress-induced cognitive enhancement in mice. Mild stress was induced by applying mild electric foot shocks of 0.15 mA intensity for 0.5 s. The stress-induced alteration in cognition was assessed using a Morris water maze test. The animals were subjected to mild electric foot shocks 5 min before we recorded escape latency time (ELT), an index of learning, during the first 4 days of a 5-day trial in the Morris water maze. The time spent in target quadrant (TSTQ), an index of retrieval, was noted on the fifth day without prior administration of electric foot shock. The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg), and telmisartan (1, 2 and 5 mg/kg), an angiotensin II receptor blocker, were employed to assess the role of angiotensin neuropeptides. The application of mild electric shocks significantly decreased ELT and increased TSTQ, indicating enhancement in stress-induced learning and memory. However, administration of lisinopril and telmisartan significantly attenuated the stress-induced decrease in ELT and increase in TSTQ. It may be concluded that mild electric foot shock-induced stress triggers the release of angiotensin neuropeptides that may be responsible for memory enhancement.

  15. Central Modulation of Neuroinflammation by Neuropeptides and Energy-Sensing Hormones during Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Maldonado-Ruiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS senses energy homeostasis by integrating both peripheral and autonomic signals and responding to them by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides release. Although it is previously considered an immunologically privileged organ, we now know that this is not so. Cells belonging to the immune system, such as B and T lymphocytes, can be recruited into the CNS to face damage or infection, in addition to possessing resident immunological cells, called microglia. In this way, positive energy balance during obesity promotes an inflammatory state in the CNS. Saturated fatty acids from the diet have been pointed out as powerful candidates to trigger immune response in peripheral system and in the CNS. However, how central immunity communicates to peripheral immune response remains to be clarified. Recently there has been a great interest in the neuropeptides, POMC derived peptides, ghrelin, and leptin, due to their capacity to suppress or induce inflammatory responses in the brain, respectively. These may be potential candidates to treat different pathologies associated with autoimmunity and inflammation. In this review, we will discuss the role of lipotoxicity associated with positive energy balance during obesity in proinflammatory response in microglia, B and T lymphocytes, and its modulation by neuropeptides.

  16. 中华蟾蜍中脑视叶白介素1α、干扰素γ和肿瘤坏死因子α阳性细胞的分布%Distribution of IL-1α-, IFN-γ-and TNF-α-like immunoreactive cells in the optic lobe of Bufo gargariizans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨乐乐; 刘再群

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the distribution of IL-lα-, IFN-y- and TNF-α-like immunoreactive cells in the optic lobe of Bufo gargariizans, and get much more knowledge of cytokines expressed in the brain in amphibians to aim at providing basic information of the study on cytokines acting on the central nervous system. Methods: The immunohistochemical SABC method and Nissl staining were used to observe the distribution of cells in the optic lobe under a light microscope, and statistic analysis was also used. Results: There were many IL-lcr and IFN-y- like immunoreactive cells in the whole optic lobe. They were large, middle or small sized cells, but most of them were middle and small