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Sample records for neuromuscular coordination learning

  1. Learn About Neuromuscular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for MDA Blog Donate Search MDA.org Close Learn About Neuromuscular Disease Muscular dystrophy, ALS and related ... power of a multiple-disease approach, MDA leverages learnings from one disease to accelerate progress in others ...

  2. Improving Neuromuscular Monitoring and Reducing Residual Neuromuscular Blockade With E-Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Louis Demant; Mathiesen, Ole; Hägi-Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    . A neuromuscular monitoring e-learning module might support consistent use of neuromuscular monitoring devices. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study is to assess the effect of a neuromuscular monitoring e-learning module on anesthesia staff's use of objective neuromuscular monitoring and the incidence of residual...... as well as a multiple-choice test to assess knowledge. The e-learning module was developed based on a needs assessment process, including focus group interviews, surveys, and expert opinions. RESULTS: The e-learning module was implemented in 6 anesthesia departments on 21 November 2016. Currently, we...... are collecting postintervention data. The final dataset will include data from more than 10,000 anesthesia procedures. We expect to publish the results in late 2017 or early 2018. CONCLUSIONS: With a dataset consisting of thousands of general anesthesia procedures, the INVERT study will assess whether an e-learning...

  3. Gender-specific effects of CGP 55845, GABAB receptor antagonist, on neuromuscular coordination, learning and memory formation in albino mouse following neonatal hypoxia-ischemia insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillani, Quratul Ane; Akbar, Atif; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-06-01

    GABAB receptor antagonists are experimentally proved as spatial memory enhancers in mouse models but their role has not been described following hypoxic-ischemic insult. 10-day-old albino mice were subjected to Murine model of hypoxia and ischemia. Following brain damage, mice were fed on normal rodent diet till they were 13 weeks old. At this time point, mice were divided into two groups. Group 1 received saline and group 2 received intraperitoneally CGP 55845 (1 mg/ml solvent/Kg body weight) for 12 days. Behavioural observations were made during rota rod, open field and Morris water maze test along with brain infarct measurement in both CGP 55845 treated and untreated groups. It was observed that application of GABAB receptor antagonist improved the over all motor function in male and female albino mice but effects were more pronounced in males. In open field, CGP 55845-treated female mice showed poor performance. CGP 55845 had no significant effect on learning and memory formation during Morris water maze test and also on brain infract size in both genders following hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy. Effects of CGP 55845 can be further explored in a dose and duration dependent manner to improve the learning and memory in albino mice following neonatal brain damage.

  4. Neuromuscular stimulation therapy after incomplete spinal cord injury promotes recovery of interlimb coordination during locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, R.; Belanger, A.; Kanchiku, T.; Fairchild, M.; Abbas, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) induced repetitive limb movement therapy after incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) are unknown. This study establishes the capability of using therapeutic NMES in rodents with iSCI and evaluates its ability to promote recovery of interlimb control during locomotion. Ten adult female Long Evans rats received thoracic spinal contusion injuries (T9; 156 ± 9.52 Kdyne). 7 days post-recovery, 6/10 animals received NMES therapy for 15 min/day for 5 days, via electrodes implanted bilaterally into hip flexors and extensors. Six intact animals served as controls. Motor function was evaluated using the BBB locomotor scale for the first 6 days and on 14th day post-injury. 3D kinematic analysis of treadmill walking was performed on day 14 post-injury. Rodents receiving NMES therapy exhibited improved interlimb coordination in control of the hip joint, which was the specific NMES target. Symmetry indices improved significantly in the therapy group. Additionally, injured rodents receiving therapy more consistently displayed a high percentage of 1:1 coordinated steps, and more consistently achieved proper hindlimb touchdown timing. These results suggest that NMES techniques could provide an effective therapeutic tool for neuromotor treatment following iSCI.

  5. Coordinated movement, neuromuscular synaptogenesis and trans-synaptic signaling defects in Drosophila galactosemia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Parkinson, William M; Kopke, Danielle L; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-09-01

    The multiple galactosemia disease states manifest long-term neurological symptoms. Galactosemia I results from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which converts galactose-1-phosphate + UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate + UDP-galactose. Galactosemia II results from loss of galactokinase (GALK), phosphorylating galactose to galactose-1-phosphate. Galactosemia III results from the loss of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE), which interconverts UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose, as well as UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) alternatively makes UDP-galactose from uridine triphosphate and galactose-1-phosphate. All four UDP-sugars are essential donors for glycoprotein biosynthesis with critical roles at the developing neuromuscular synapse. Drosophila galactosemia I (dGALT) and II (dGALK) disease models genetically interact; manifesting deficits in coordinated movement, neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development, synaptic glycosylation, and Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. Similarly, dGALE and dUGP mutants display striking locomotor and NMJ formation defects, including expanded synaptic arbours, glycosylation losses, and differential changes in Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. In combination with dGALT loss, both dGALE and dUGP mutants compromise the synaptomatrix glycan environment that regulates Wnt trans-synaptic signalling that drives 1) presynaptic Futsch/MAP1b microtubule dynamics and 2) postsynaptic Frizzled nuclear import (FNI). Taken together, these findings indicate UDP-sugar balance is a key modifier of neurological outcomes in all three interacting galactosemia disease models, suggest that Futsch homolog MAP1B and the Wnt Frizzled receptor may be disease-relevant targets in epimerase and transferase galactosemias, and identify UGP as promising new potential therapeutic target for galactosemia neuropathology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  6. Improving Neuromuscular Monitoring and Reducing Residual Neuromuscular Blockade With E-Learning: Protocol for the Multicenter Interrupted Time Series INVERT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Jakob Louis Demant; Mathiesen, Ole; Hägi-Pedersen, Daniel; Skovgaard, Lene Theil; Østergaard, Doris; Engbaek, Jens; Gätke, Mona Ring

    2017-10-06

    Muscle relaxants facilitate endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia and improve surgical conditions. Residual neuromuscular blockade occurs when the patient is still partially paralyzed when awakened after surgery. The condition is associated with subjective discomfort and an increased risk of respiratory complications. Use of an objective neuromuscular monitoring device may prevent residual block. Despite this, many anesthetists refrain from using the device. Efforts to increase the use of objective monitoring are time consuming and require the presence of expert personnel. A neuromuscular monitoring e-learning module might support consistent use of neuromuscular monitoring devices. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of a neuromuscular monitoring e-learning module on anesthesia staff's use of objective neuromuscular monitoring and the incidence of residual neuromuscular blockade in surgical patients at 6 Danish teaching hospitals. In this interrupted time series study, we are collecting data repeatedly, in consecutive 3-week periods, before and after the intervention, and we will analyze the effect using segmented regression analysis. Anesthesia departments in the Zealand Region of Denmark are included, and data from all patients receiving a muscle relaxant are collected from the anesthesia information management system MetaVision. We will assess the effect of the module on all levels of potential effect: staff's knowledge and skills, patient care practice, and patient outcomes. The primary outcome is use of neuromuscular monitoring in patients according to the type of muscle relaxant received. Secondary outcomes include last recorded train-of-four value, administration of reversal agents, and time to discharge from the postanesthesia care unit as well as a multiple-choice test to assess knowledge. The e-learning module was developed based on a needs assessment process, including focus group interviews, surveys, and expert opinions. The e-learning

  7. Learning and coordinating in a multilayer network

    CERN Document Server

    Lugo, Haydee

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a two layer network model for social coordination incorporating two relevant ingredients: a) different networks of interaction to learn and to obtain a payoff , and b) decision making processes based both on social and strategic motivations. Two populations of agents are distributed in two layers with intralayer learning processes and playing interlayer a coordination game. We find that the skepticism about the wisdom of crowd and the local connectivity are the driving forces to accomplish full coordination of the two populations, while polarized coordinated layers are only possible for all-to-all interactions. Local interactions also allow for full coordination in the socially efficient Pareto-dominant strategy in spite of being the riskier one.

  8. Learning and coordinating in a multilayer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Haydée; Miguel, Maxi San

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a two layer network model for social coordination incorporating two relevant ingredients: a) different networks of interaction to learn and to obtain a pay-off, and b) decision making processes based both on social and strategic motivations. Two populations of agents are distributed in two layers with intralayer learning processes and playing interlayer a coordination game. We find that the skepticism about the wisdom of crowd and the local connectivity are the driving forces to accomplish full coordination of the two populations, while polarized coordinated layers are only possible for all-to-all interactions. Local interactions also allow for full coordination in the socially efficient Pareto-dominant strategy in spite of being the riskier one.

  9. Can we Rationally Learn to Coordinate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Goyal (Sanjeev); M.C.W. Janssen (Maarten)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we examine the issue whether individual rationality considerations are sufficient to guarantee that individuals will learn to coordinate. This question is central in any discussion of whether social phenomena (read: conventions) can be explained in terms of a purely

  10. A Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) and robot hybrid system for multi-joint coordinated upper limb rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Wei; Li, Waiming; Pang, Mankit; Hu, Junyan; Wei, Xijun; Yang, Bibo; Wai, Honwah; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Xiaoling

    2017-04-26

    It is a challenge to reduce the muscular discoordination in the paretic upper limb after stroke in the traditional rehabilitation programs. In this study, a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and robot hybrid system was developed for multi-joint coordinated upper limb physical training. The system could assist the elbow, wrist and fingers to conduct arm reaching out, hand opening/grasping and arm withdrawing by tracking an indicative moving cursor on the screen of a computer, with the support from the joint motors and electrical stimulations on target muscles, under the voluntary intention control by electromyography (EMG). Subjects with chronic stroke (n = 11) were recruited for the investigation on the assistive capability of the NMES-robot and the evaluation of the rehabilitation effectiveness through a 20-session device assisted upper limb training. In the evaluation, the movement accuracy measured by the root mean squared error (RMSE) during the tracking was significantly improved with the support from both the robot and NMES, in comparison with those without the assistance from the system (P robotic system could improve the muscular coordination at the elbow, wrist and fingers. ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT02117089 ; date of registration: April 10, 2014.

  11. Automated optimal coordination of multiple-DOF neuromuscular actions in feedforward neuroprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, J Luis; Crago, Patrick E

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for designing feedforward controllers for multiple-muscle, multiple-DOF, motor system neural prostheses. The design process is based on experimental measurement of the forward input/output properties of the neuromechanical system and numerical optimization of stimulation patterns to meet muscle coactivation criteria, thus resolving the muscle redundancy (i.e., overcontrol) and the coupled DOF problems inherent in neuromechanical systems. We designed feedforward controllers to control the isometric forces at the tip of the thumb in two directions during stimulation of three thumb muscles as a model system. We tested the method experimentally in ten able-bodied individuals and one patient with spinal cord injury. Good control of isometric force in both DOFs was observed, with rms errors less than 10% of the force range in seven experiments and statistically significant correlations between the actual and target forces in all ten experiments. Systematic bias and slope errors were observed in a few experiments, likely due to the neuromuscular fatigue. Overall, the tests demonstrated the ability of a general design approach to satisfy both control and coactivation criteria in multiple-muscle, multiple-axis neuromechanical systems, which is applicable to a wide range of neuromechanical systems and stimulation electrodes.

  12. Short-duration fatigue alters neuromuscular coordination of trunk musculature: implications for injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, M; Brown, J M M; Groeller, H

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of muscle fatigue, produced by two different fatigue protocols, on the coordination of trunk and thigh muscles during the performance of a manual-handling task (e.g. a weighted stoop lift). The two fatigue protocols were designed to produce either (a) a non-specific widespread fatigue of trunk and limb muscles (e.g. rowing fatigue protocol), or (b) a specific fatigue of the trunk extensor musculature (e.g. back extension fatigue protocol). Specifically, we wished to determine whether the coordination of trunk muscles during a stoop lift was compromised more, or less, by either of these two fatigue protocols. Ten male subjects (20-24 years) were tested utilising an electromyographic technique which collected electromyograms from trunk flexor and extensor muscles, as well as the Hamstring muscle group, during a pre- and a post-fatigue performance of a weighted stoop lift. The results showed that the back extension fatigue protocol, but not the rowing fatigue protocol, produced significant (pmuscle activation during a stoop lift. The longer periods of muscle activation seen only after the back extension fatigue protocol, suggested that fatigue of these muscles had required the CNS to alter their periods of activation to a pattern similar to that previously seen in elderly populations. The results also suggested that intense short-duration motor tasks, which may differentially target the back and its musculature, could leave the spine susceptible to increased risk of injury even though worker perceptions of general fatigue are low. Risk assessment guidelines for manual handling should consider not only the weight and frequency of the lift, but lift duration as well to maintain worker safety.

  13. Neuromuscular coordination deficit persists 12 months after ACL reconstruction but can be modulated by 6 weeks of kettlebell training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K.; Andersen, Christoffer H.; Bencke, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL i...

  14. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Christoffer H; Bencke, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL i...

  15. APP interacts with LRP4 and agrin to coordinate the development of the neuromuscular junction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hong Y; Liu, Yun; Tennert, Christian; Sugiura, Yoshie; Karakatsani, Andromachi; Kröger, Stephan; Johnson, Eric B; Hammer, Robert E; Lin, Weichun; Herz, Joachim

    2013-08-20

    ApoE, ApoE receptors and APP cooperate in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the ApoE receptor LRP4 and APP are also required for normal formation and function of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In this study, we show that APP interacts with LRP4, an obligate co-receptor for muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Agrin, a ligand for LRP4, also binds to APP and co-operatively enhances the interaction of APP with LRP4. In cultured myotubes, APP synergistically increases agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Deletion of the transmembrane domain of LRP4 (LRP4 ECD) results in growth retardation of the NMJ, and these defects are markedly enhanced in APP(-/-);LRP4(ECD/ECD) mice. Double mutant NMJs are significantly reduced in size and number, resulting in perinatal lethality. Our findings reveal novel roles for APP in regulating neuromuscular synapse formation through hetero-oligomeric interaction with LRP4 and agrin and thereby provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern NMJ formation and maintenance. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00220.001.

  16. Learning From Movie-Sets Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebjerg, Christin

    industries live with the reality of obstacles occurring on the ‘critical path’ and the process becoming not as fast as anticipated. So there is a need for a map of alternative ‘short cuts’ to get back on track. Usually this work is managed inside the head of a professional construction manager, but even...... the best person in the job can become tired from keeping a high level of overview, information and coordination of escalating problem chains. This paper describes the innovative experiment of designing and testing on construction professionals a proto-version of a similar digital tool and system...

  17. Augmented effects of EMG biofeedback interfaced with virtual reality on neuromuscular control and movement coordination during reaching in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Cha, Young Joo; You, Sung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare therapeutic effects of an electromyography (EMG) biofeedback augmented by virtual reality (VR) and EMG biofeedback alone on the triceps and biceps (T:B) muscle activity imbalance and elbow joint movement coordination during a reaching motor taskOBJECTIVE: To compare therapeutic effects of an electromyography (EMG) biofeedback augmented by virtual reality (VR) and EMG biofeedback alone on the triceps and biceps muscle activity imbalance and elbow joint movement coordination during a reaching motor task in normal children and children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). 18 children with spastic CP (2 females; mean±standard deviation = 9.5 ± 1.96 years) and 8 normal children (3 females; mean ± standard deviation = 9.75 ± 2.55 years) were recruited from a local community center. All children with CP first underwent one intensive session of EMG feedback (30 minutes), followed by one session of the EMG-VR feedback (30 minutes) after a 1-week washout period. Clinical tests included elbow extension range of motion (ROM), biceps muscle strength, and box and block test. EMG triceps and biceps (T:B) muscle activity imbalance and reaching movement acceleration coordination were concurrently determined by EMG and 3-axis accelerometer measurements respectively. Independent t-test and one-way repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) were performed at p EMG biofeedback when augmented by virtual reality exercise games in children with spastic CP. The augmented EMG and VR feedback produced better neuromuscular balance control in the elbow joint than the EMG biofeedback alone.

  18. Learning the optimal control of coordinated eye and head movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Saeb

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Various optimality principles have been proposed to explain the characteristics of coordinated eye and head movements during visual orienting behavior. At the same time, researchers have suggested several neural models to underly the generation of saccades, but these do not include online learning as a mechanism of optimization. Here, we suggest an open-loop neural controller with a local adaptation mechanism that minimizes a proposed cost function. Simulations show that the characteristics of coordinated eye and head movements generated by this model match the experimental data in many aspects, including the relationship between amplitude, duration and peak velocity in head-restrained and the relative contribution of eye and head to the total gaze shift in head-free conditions. Our model is a first step towards bringing together an optimality principle and an incremental local learning mechanism into a unified control scheme for coordinated eye and head movements.

  19. Motor Skill Learning in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Jin; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are characterized as having motor difficulties and learning impairment that may last well into adolescence and adulthood. Although behavioral deficits have been identified in many domains such as visuo-spatial processing, kinesthetic perception, and cross-modal sensory integration, recent…

  20. Achieving Quality in e-Learning through Relational Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalina, Vasilica Maria; De-Pablos-Heredero, Carmen; Montes-Botella, Jose Luis

    2017-01-01

    In this research, the relational coordination model has been applied to prove learners' and instructors' high levels of satisfaction in e-learning. According to the model, organizations can obtain better results in terms of satisfaction by providing shared knowledge, shared goals and mutual respect mechanisms, supported by a frequent, timely and…

  1. Hierarchical Participation Constraints for Adaptive Learning and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sangyoon; Stieglitz, Nils; Knudsen, Thorbjørn

    by formal aspects of organizations, the underlying mechanisms still need to be unpacked. As such an organizing principle, we suggest in this study that hierarchical participation constraints promote both adaptive learning at the individual level and dynamic coordination at the organization level....... Hierarchical participation constraints therefore provide for efficiency and adaptability in dealing with diverse problems from unpredictable environments....

  2. Effect of creatine monohydrate supplementation on learning, memory and neuromuscular coordination in female albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahyar, Razia; Akbar, Atif; Iqbal, Furhan

    2017-02-01

    Research findings made over the last few years have highlighted the important role of creatine (Cr) in health and disease. However, limited information is available regarding the effect of Cr supplementation on cognation. Present study was designed to determine the effect of variable doses of Cr (1% and 3%) on selected parameters of female albino mice behaviour. Following weaning, on 20th postnatal day, female albino mice were divided into three groups on the basis of dietary supplementation. Control group were was fed with normal rodent diet, whereas treated groups received diet supplemented with 1% and 3% Creatine monohydrate (Ssniff, Germany) for 10 weeks. Morris water maze (MWM), Rota rod and open field (OF) tests were carried out at the end of diet supplementation for neurofunctional assessment in all the groups. Data analysis showed that Cr supplementation did not affect the muscular activity and during rota rod test as well as locomotor and exploratory behaviour during OF test. Results of MWM probe trial indicated that mice supplemented with 3% Cr had significantly more entries in platform area than other two treatments (p=0.03) indicating improved spatial memory. Body weight remained unaffected (p>0.05) when compared between three experimental treatments. Female mice supplemented with 3% Cr showed improved spatial memory than mice fed on 1% Cr-supplemented diet and mice on normal rodent diet.

  3. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training: A Case Study in Women's Elite Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Christoffer H; Bencke, Jesper; Ørntoft, Christina; Linnebjerg, Connie; Hölmich, Per; Thorborg, Kristian; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL injury went through neuromuscular screening as measured by EMG preactivity of vastus lateralis and semitendinosus during a standardized sidecutting maneuver. Subsequently, the player experienced a noncontact ACL injury. The player was screened again following postreconstruction rehabilitation, then underwent 6-week kettlebell training, and was subsequently screened again at 6-week follow-up. Prior to and after postreconstruction rehabilitation the player demonstrated a neuromuscular profile during sidecutting known to increase the risk for noncontact ACL injury, that is, reduced EMG preactivity for semitendinosus and elevated EMG preactivity for vastus lateralis. Subsequently, the 6-week kettlebell training increased semitendinosus muscle preactivity during sidecutting by 38 percentage points to a level equivalent to a neuromuscular low-risk profile. An ACL rehabilitated female athlete with a high-risk neuromuscular profile changed to low-risk in response to 6 weeks of kettlebell training. Thus, short-term kettlebell exercise with documented high levels of medial hamstring activation was found to transfer into high medial hamstring preactivation during a sidecutting maneuver.

  4. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training: A Case Study in Women’s Elite Soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette K. Zebis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks’ kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years with no previous history of ACL injury went through neuromuscular screening as measured by EMG preactivity of vastus lateralis and semitendinosus during a standardized sidecutting maneuver. Subsequently, the player experienced a noncontact ACL injury. The player was screened again following postreconstruction rehabilitation, then underwent 6-week kettlebell training, and was subsequently screened again at 6-week follow-up. Prior to and after postreconstruction rehabilitation the player demonstrated a neuromuscular profile during sidecutting known to increase the risk for noncontact ACL injury, that is, reduced EMG preactivity for semitendinosus and elevated EMG preactivity for vastus lateralis. Subsequently, the 6-week kettlebell training increased semitendinosus muscle preactivity during sidecutting by 38 percentage points to a level equivalent to a neuromuscular low-risk profile. An ACL rehabilitated female athlete with a high-risk neuromuscular profile changed to low-risk in response to 6 weeks of kettlebell training. Thus, short-term kettlebell exercise with documented high levels of medial hamstring activation was found to transfer into high medial hamstring preactivation during a sidecutting maneuver.

  5. Neuromuscular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Umbertina C.

    2002-01-01

    Objetivo: apresentar os dados essenciais para o diagnóstico diferencial entre as principais doenças neuromusculares, denominação genérica sob a qual agrupam-se diferentes afecções, decorrentes do acometimento primário da unidade motora (motoneurônio medular, raiz nervosa, nervo periférico, junção mioneural e músculo). Fontes dos dados: os aspectos clínicos fundamentais para estabelecer o diagnóstico diferencial entre as diferentes doenças neuromusculares, bem como entre estas e as causas de h...

  6. Learning multisensory integration and coordinate transformation via density estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph G Makin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory processing in the brain includes three key operations: multisensory integration-the task of combining cues into a single estimate of a common underlying stimulus; coordinate transformations-the change of reference frame for a stimulus (e.g., retinotopic to body-centered effected through knowledge about an intervening variable (e.g., gaze position; and the incorporation of prior information. Statistically optimal sensory processing requires that each of these operations maintains the correct posterior distribution over the stimulus. Elements of this optimality have been demonstrated in many behavioral contexts in humans and other animals, suggesting that the neural computations are indeed optimal. That the relationships between sensory modalities are complex and plastic further suggests that these computations are learned-but how? We provide a principled answer, by treating the acquisition of these mappings as a case of density estimation, a well-studied problem in machine learning and statistics, in which the distribution of observed data is modeled in terms of a set of fixed parameters and a set of latent variables. In our case, the observed data are unisensory-population activities, the fixed parameters are synaptic connections, and the latent variables are multisensory-population activities. In particular, we train a restricted Boltzmann machine with the biologically plausible contrastive-divergence rule to learn a range of neural computations not previously demonstrated under a single approach: optimal integration; encoding of priors; hierarchical integration of cues; learning when not to integrate; and coordinate transformation. The model makes testable predictions about the nature of multisensory representations.

  7. Neuromuscular Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the optimal care of patients with spinal deformity Patients and Families Professionals About SRS Türkçe español ... unable to maintain appropriate balance / alignment of the spine and trunk. Neuromuscular curves are often associated with ...

  8. Motor learning as a criterion for evaluating coordination motor abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boraczynski Tomasz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of motor learning based on objective, metric criteria, in terms of pedagogical process aimed at improving the accuracy of hits a golf ball to the target. A group of 77 students of physical education participated in the study. Within 8 months there were performed 11 measurement sessions. In each session, subjects performed 10 hits a golf ball to the target from a distance of 9 m. Accuracy of hits was recorded. Effect of motor learning has been demonstrated in the progress of 10 consecutive hits a golf ball to the target in each session (operational control; in the dynamics of performance improvement between sessions (current control; as well as in the total result of eight-month experiment (stage control. There were developed norms for quantitative and qualitative assessment of accuracy of hits a golf ball to the target. Developed quantitative and qualitative criteria for assessing the speed of motor learning in various conditions of the educational process creates the possibility of organization the operational, current and stage control of the level of human coordination motor abilities, as required by leading process.

  9. E-Learning Quality Assurance: A Perspective of Business Teacher Educators and Distance Learning Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Betty F.; Henderson, Ronda G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Business teacher educators and distance learning coordinators have the responsibility to deliver quality online courses and programs. Therefore, they must make sure that quality assurance benchmarks are present in online business education courses and programs. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which…

  10. A Metadata Model for E-Learning Coordination through Semantic Web Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elci, Atilla

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a study aiming to develop a metadata model for e-learning coordination based on semantic web languages. A survey of e-learning modes are done initially in order to identify content such as phases, activities, data schema, rules and relations, etc. relevant for a coordination model. In this respect, the study looks into the…

  11. Motor learning of novel dynamics is not represented in a single global coordinate system: evaluation of mixed coordinate representations and local learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berniker, Max; Franklin, David W; Flanagan, J Randall; Wolpert, Daniel M; Kording, Konrad

    2014-03-01

    Successful motor performance requires the ability to adapt motor commands to task dynamics. A central question in movement neuroscience is how these dynamics are represented. Although it is widely assumed that dynamics (e.g., force fields) are represented in intrinsic, joint-based coordinates (Shadmehr R, Mussa-Ivaldi FA. J Neurosci 14: 3208-3224, 1994), recent evidence has questioned this proposal. Here we reexamine the representation of dynamics in two experiments. By testing generalization following changes in shoulder, elbow, or wrist configurations, the first experiment tested for extrinsic, intrinsic, or object-centered representations. No single coordinate frame accounted for the pattern of generalization. Rather, generalization patterns were better accounted for by a mixture of representations or by models that assumed local learning and graded, decaying generalization. A second experiment, in which we replicated the design of an influential study that had suggested encoding in intrinsic coordinates (Shadmehr and Mussa-Ivaldi 1994), yielded similar results. That is, we could not find evidence that dynamics are represented in a single coordinate system. Taken together, our experiments suggest that internal models do not employ a single coordinate system when generalizing and may well be represented as a mixture of coordinate systems, as a single system with local learning, or both.

  12. Leadership Styles and Management Skills of Learning Assistance/Developmental Education Program Directors/Coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Marie-Elaine Burns

    Leadership styles and management skills needed by directors and coordinators of learning assistance and developmental education were assessed. Based on a literature review, a questionnaire was constructed and then validated by a panel of experts in the field. The questionnaire was sent to 45 selected learning assistance/developmental education…

  13. Video Demo: Deep Reinforcement Learning for Coordination in Traffic Light Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, E.; Oliehoek, F.A.; Bosse, T.; Bredeweg, B.

    2016-01-01

    This video demonstration contrasts two approaches to coordination in traffic light control using reinforcement learning: earlier work, based on a deconstruction of the state space into a linear combination of vehicle states, and our own approach based on the Deep Q-learning algorithm.

  14. Learning in Global Teams: BIM Planning and Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Carrie Sturts Dossick; Hoda Homayouni; Ghang Lee

    2015-01-01

    Globally distributed student team projects allow for complex and multifaceted learning outcomes through experiential educational settings. While the students involved may be studying built environment disciplines such as architecture, engineering and construction, distributed teams are mediated by technology, separated by time zones, and differentiated by culture. In this paper, we explore such multifaceted learning in a globally distributed team project where students from seven universities...

  15. Theta coordinated error-driven learning in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Ketz

    Full Text Available The learning mechanism in the hippocampus has almost universally been assumed to be Hebbian in nature, where individual neurons in an engram join together with synaptic weight increases to support facilitated recall of memories later. However, it is also widely known that Hebbian learning mechanisms impose significant capacity constraints, and are generally less computationally powerful than learning mechanisms that take advantage of error signals. We show that the differential phase relationships of hippocampal subfields within the overall theta rhythm enable a powerful form of error-driven learning, which results in significantly greater capacity, as shown in computer simulations. In one phase of the theta cycle, the bidirectional connectivity between CA1 and entorhinal cortex can be trained in an error-driven fashion to learn to effectively encode the cortical inputs in a compact and sparse form over CA1. In a subsequent portion of the theta cycle, the system attempts to recall an existing memory, via the pathway from entorhinal cortex to CA3 and CA1. Finally the full theta cycle completes when a strong target encoding representation of the current input is imposed onto the CA1 via direct projections from entorhinal cortex. The difference between this target encoding and the attempted recall of the same representation on CA1 constitutes an error signal that can drive the learning of CA3 to CA1 synapses. This CA3 to CA1 pathway is critical for enabling full reinstatement of recalled hippocampal memories out in cortex. Taken together, these new learning dynamics enable a much more robust, high-capacity model of hippocampal learning than was available previously under the classical Hebbian model.

  16. Learning Based Frequency- and Time-Domain Inter-Cell Interference Coordination in HetNets

    OpenAIRE

    Simsek, Meryem; Bennis, Mehdi; Guvenc, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we focus on inter-cell interference coordination (ICIC) techniques in heterogeneous network (Het-Net) deployments, whereby macro- and picocells autonomously optimize their downlink transmissions, with loose coordination. We model this strategic coexistence as a multi-agent system, aiming at joint interference management and cell association. Using tools from Reinforcement Learning (RL), agents (i.e., macro- and picocells) sense their environment, and self-adapt based on local...

  17. Coordinated computer-supported collaborative learning: Awareness and awareness tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/242063667; Bodermer, D.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, research on awareness during online collaboration focused on topics such as the effects of spatial information about group members’ activities on the collaborative process. When the concept of awareness was introduced to computer-supported collaborative learning, this focus shifted to

  18. Coordinating Decentralized Learning and Conflict Resolution across Agent Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shanjun

    2012-01-01

    It is crucial for embedded systems to adapt to the dynamics of open environments. This adaptation process becomes especially challenging in the context of multiagent systems because of scalability, partial information accessibility and complex interaction of agents. It is a challenge for agents to learn good policies, when they need to plan and…

  19. The role of multisensor data fusion in neuromuscular control of a sagittal arm with a pair of muscles using actor-critic reinforcement learning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkhou, V; Parnianpour, M; Lucas, C

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we consider the role of multisensor data fusion in neuromuscular control using an actor-critic reinforcement learning method. The model we use is a single link system actuated by a pair of muscles that are excited with alpha and gamma signals. Various physiological sensor information such as proprioception, spindle sensors, and Golgi tendon organs have been integrated to achieve an oscillatory movement with variable amplitude and frequency, while achieving a stable movement with minimum metabolic cost and coactivation. The system is highly nonlinear in all its physical and physiological attributes. Transmission delays are included in the afferent and efferent neural paths to account for a more accurate representation of the reflex loops. This paper proposes a reinforcement learning method with an Actor-Critic architecture instead of middle and low level of central nervous system (CNS). The Actor in this structure is a two layer feedforward neural network and the Critic is a model of the cerebellum. The Critic is trained by the State-Action-Reward-State-Action (SARSA) method. The Critic will train the Actor by supervisory learning based on previous experiences. The reinforcement signal in SARSA is evaluated based on available alternatives concerning the concept of multisensor data fusion. The effectiveness and the biological plausibility of the present model are demonstrated by several simulations. The system showed excellent tracking capability when we integrated the available sensor information. Addition of a penalty for activation of muscles resulted in much lower muscle coactivation while keeping the movement stable.

  20. Temporally Coordinated Deep Brain Stimulation in the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum Synergistically Enhances Associative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katnani, Husam A; Patel, Shaun R; Kwon, Churl-Su; Abdel-Aziz, Samer; Gale, John T; Eskandar, Emad N

    2016-01-04

    The primate brain has the remarkable ability of mapping sensory stimuli into motor behaviors that can lead to positive outcomes. We have previously shown that during the reinforcement of visual-motor behavior, activity in the caudate nucleus is correlated with the rate of learning. Moreover, phasic microstimulation in the caudate during the reinforcement period was shown to enhance associative learning, demonstrating the importance of temporal specificity to manipulate learning related changes. Here we present evidence that extends upon our previous finding by demonstrating that temporally coordinated phasic deep brain stimulation across both the nucleus accumbens and caudate can further enhance associative learning. Monkeys performed a visual-motor associative learning task and received stimulation at time points critical to learning related changes. Resulting performance revealed an enhancement in the rate, ceiling, and reaction times of learning. Stimulation of each brain region alone or at different time points did not generate the same effect.

  1. Coordinated machine learning and decision support for situation awareness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draelos, Timothy John; Zhang, Peng-Chu.; Wunsch, Donald C. (University of Missouri, Rolla, MO); Seiffertt, John (University of Missouri, Rolla, MO); Conrad, Gregory N.; Brannon, Nathan Gregory

    2007-09-01

    For applications such as force protection, an effective decision maker needs to maintain an unambiguous grasp of the environment. Opportunities exist to leverage computational mechanisms for the adaptive fusion of diverse information sources. The current research employs neural networks and Markov chains to process information from sources including sensors, weather data, and law enforcement. Furthermore, the system operator's input is used as a point of reference for the machine learning algorithms. More detailed features of the approach are provided, along with an example force protection scenario.

  2. Lessons Learned From the Whole Child and Coordinated School Health Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Slade, Sean; Lohrmann, David K.; Valois, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The new Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model, designed to depict links between health and learning, is founded on concepts of coordinated school health (CSH) and a whole child approach to education. METHODS The existing literature, including scientific articles and key publications from national agencies and organizations, was reviewed and synthesized to describe (1) the historical context for CSH and a whole child approach, and (2) lessons learned from the imple...

  3. Short-term motor learning of dynamic balance control in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, Dorothee; Ferguson, Gilian D.; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C.M.; Geuze, Reint H.

    Purpose: To explore the differences in learning a dynamic balance task between children with and without probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (p-DCD) from different cultural backgrounds. Participants: Twenty-eight Dutch children with DCD (p-DCD-NL), a similar group of 17 South African

  4. Coordinated Implicitly? An Empirical Study on the Role of Social Media in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Chen, Hui; Ordóñez de Pablos, Patricia; Lytras, Miltiadis D.; Sun, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    As social media is widely adopted in collaborative learning, which places teams in a virtual environment, it is critical for teams to identify and leverage the knowledge of their members. Yet little is known about how social media influences teams to coordinate their knowledge and collaborate effectively. In this research, we explore the roles of…

  5. Working Memory and Learning in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder and Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloway, Tracy Packiam; Archibald, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The authors compared 6- to 11-year-olds with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and those with specific language impairment (SLI) on measures of memory (verbal and visuospatial short-term and working memory) and learning (reading and mathematics). Children with DCD with typical language skills were impaired in all four areas of memory…

  6. The Virtual Teacher (VT Paradigm: Learning New Patterns of Interpersonal Coordination Using the Human Dynamic Clamp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Kostrubiec

    Full Text Available The Virtual Teacher paradigm, a version of the Human Dynamic Clamp (HDC, is introduced into studies of learning patterns of inter-personal coordination. Combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we investigate how the HDC may be used as a Virtual Teacher (VT to help humans co-produce and internalize new inter-personal coordination pattern(s. Human learners produced rhythmic finger movements whilst observing a computer-driven avatar, animated by dynamic equations stemming from the well-established Haken-Kelso-Bunz (1985 and Schöner-Kelso (1988 models of coordination. We demonstrate that the VT is successful in shifting the pattern co-produced by the VT-human system toward any value (Experiment 1 and that the VT can help humans learn unstable relative phasing patterns (Experiment 2. Using transfer entropy, we find that information flow from one partner to the other increases when VT-human coordination loses stability. This suggests that variable joint performance may actually facilitate interaction, and in the long run learning. VT appears to be a promising tool for exploring basic learning processes involved in social interaction, unraveling the dynamics of information flow between interacting partners, and providing possible rehabilitation opportunities.

  7. The Virtual Teacher (VT) Paradigm: Learning New Patterns of Interpersonal Coordination Using the Human Dynamic Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Dumas, Guillaume; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Kelso, J A Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Teacher paradigm, a version of the Human Dynamic Clamp (HDC), is introduced into studies of learning patterns of inter-personal coordination. Combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we investigate how the HDC may be used as a Virtual Teacher (VT) to help humans co-produce and internalize new inter-personal coordination pattern(s). Human learners produced rhythmic finger movements whilst observing a computer-driven avatar, animated by dynamic equations stemming from the well-established Haken-Kelso-Bunz (1985) and Schöner-Kelso (1988) models of coordination. We demonstrate that the VT is successful in shifting the pattern co-produced by the VT-human system toward any value (Experiment 1) and that the VT can help humans learn unstable relative phasing patterns (Experiment 2). Using transfer entropy, we find that information flow from one partner to the other increases when VT-human coordination loses stability. This suggests that variable joint performance may actually facilitate interaction, and in the long run learning. VT appears to be a promising tool for exploring basic learning processes involved in social interaction, unraveling the dynamics of information flow between interacting partners, and providing possible rehabilitation opportunities.

  8. Iterative learning control for multi-agent systems coordination

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Shiping; Li, Xuefang; Shen, Dong

    2016-01-01

    A timely guide using iterative learning control (ILC) as a solution for multi-agent systems (MAS) challenges, this book showcases recent advances and industrially relevant applications. Readers are first given a comprehensive overview of the intersection between ILC and MAS, then introduced to a range of topics that include both basic and advanced theoretical discussions, rigorous mathematics, engineering practice, and both linear and nonlinear systems. Through systematic discussion of network theory and intelligent control, the authors explore future research possibilities, develop new tools, and provide numerous applications such as power grids, communication and sensor networks, intelligent transportation systems, and formation control. Readers will gain a roadmap of the latest advances in the fields and can use their newfound knowledge to design their own algorithms.

  9. Coordination of entorhinal-hippocampal ensemble activity during associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kei M; Lu, Li; Colgin, Laura L; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2014-06-05

    Accumulating evidence points to cortical oscillations as a mechanism for mediating interactions among functionally specialized neurons in distributed brain circuits. A brain function that may use such interactions is declarative memory--that is, memory that can be consciously recalled, such as episodes and facts. Declarative memory is enabled by circuits in the entorhinal cortex that interface the hippocampus with the neocortex. During encoding and retrieval of declarative memories, entorhinal and hippocampal circuits are thought to interact via theta and gamma oscillations, which in awake rodents predominate frequency spectra in both regions. In favour of this idea, theta-gamma coupling has been observed between entorhinal cortex and hippocampus under steady-state conditions in well-trained rats; however, the relationship between interregional coupling and memory formation remains poorly understood. Here we show, by multisite recording at successive stages of associative learning, that the coherence of firing patterns in directly connected entorhinal-hippocampus circuits evolves as rats learn to use an odour cue to guide navigational behaviour, and that such coherence is invariably linked to the development of ensemble representations for unique trial outcomes in each area. Entorhinal-hippocampal coupling was observed specifically in the 20-40-hertz frequency band and specifically between the distal part of hippocampal area CA1 and the lateral part of entorhinal cortex, the subfields that receive the predominant olfactory input to the hippocampal region. Collectively, the results identify 20-40-hertz oscillations as a mechanism for synchronizing evolving representations in dispersed neural circuits during encoding and retrieval of olfactory-spatial associative memory.

  10. The role of stability in the dynamics of learning, memorizing, and forgetting new coordination patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallet, Jessica; Kostrubiec, Viviane; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio

    2008-03-01

    According to a dynamic theory of learning, how a new memory is formed depends on the stability of the nearest preexisting memories. To predict retention after practice, the authors analyzed how 15 participants memorized 2 bimanual coordination patterns (45 degrees or 135 degrees relative phase). The authors assessed (a) how participants memorized the required patterns with learning and (b) how the associated memory layout evolved. Results showed that a practiced 45 degrees pattern near a very stable memory (0 degrees ) persisted, whereas a 135 degrees pattern near a less stable memory (180 degrees ) was forgotten. Those findings corroborate the proposition that retention of coordination patterns depends on the stability of the extant motor memories. The authors discuss that proposal in terms of the coevolution of accuracy and stability with learning to predict persistence of required or false memories.

  11. Neuromuscular adaptations to training, injury and passive interventions: implications for running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, Jason; Chapman, Andrew; Blanch, Peter; Vicenzino, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Performance in endurance sports such as running, cycling and triathlon has long been investigated from a physiological perspective. A strong relationship between running economy and distance running performance is well established in the literature. From this established base, improvements in running economy have traditionally been achieved through endurance training. More recently, research has demonstrated short-term resistance and plyometric training has resulted in enhanced running economy. This improvement in running economy has been hypothesized to be a result of enhanced neuromuscular characteristics such as improved muscle power development and more efficient use of stored elastic energy during running. Changes in indirect measures of neuromuscular control (i.e. stance phase contact times, maximal forward jumps) have been used to support this hypothesis. These results suggest that neuromuscular adaptations in response to training (i.e. neuromuscular learning effects) are an important contributor to enhancements in running economy. However, there is no direct evidence to suggest that these adaptations translate into more efficient muscle recruitment patterns during running. Optimization of training and run performance may be facilitated through direct investigation of muscle recruitment patterns before and after training interventions. There is emerging evidence that demonstrates neuromuscular adaptations during running and cycling vary with training status. Highly trained runners and cyclists display more refined patterns of muscle recruitment than their novice counterparts. In contrast, interference with motor learning and neuromuscular adaptation may occur as a result of ongoing multidiscipline training (e.g. triathlon). In the sport of triathlon, impairments in running economy are frequently observed after cycling. This impairment is related mainly to physiological stress, but an alteration in lower limb muscle coordination during running after cycling

  12. Neurotoxicity induced by alkyl nitrites: Impairment in learning/memory and motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hye Jin; Kim, Yun Ji; Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2016-04-21

    Although alkyl nitrites are used as recreational drugs, there is only little research data regarding their effects on the central nervous system including their neurotoxicity. This study investigated the neurotoxicity of three representative alkyl nitrites (isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite), and whether it affected learning/memory function and motor coordination in rodents. Morris water maze test was performed in mice after administrating the mice with varying doses of the substances in two different injection schedules of memory acquisition and memory retention. A rota-rod test was then performed in rats. All tested alkyl nitrites lowered the rodents' capacity for learning and memory, as assessed by both the acquisition and retention tests. The results of the rota-rod test showed that isobutyl nitrite in particular impaired motor coordination in chronically treated rats. The mice chronically injected with isoamyl nitrite also showed impaired function, while butyl nitrite had no significant effect. The results of the water maze test suggest that alkyl nitrites may impair learning and memory. Additionally, isoamyl nitrite affected the rodents' motor coordination ability. Collectively, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites may induce neurotoxicity, especially on the aspect of learning and memory function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Coordinated activity of ventral tegmental neurons adapts to appetitive and aversive learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbok Kim

    Full Text Available Our understanding of how value-related information is encoded in the ventral tegmental area (VTA is based mainly on the responses of individual putative dopamine neurons. In contrast to cortical areas, the nature of coordinated interactions between groups of VTA neurons during motivated behavior is largely unknown. These interactions can strongly affect information processing, highlighting the importance of investigating network level activity. We recorded the activity of multiple single units and local field potentials (LFP in the VTA during a task in which rats learned to associate novel stimuli with different outcomes. We found that coordinated activity of VTA units with either putative dopamine or GABA waveforms was influenced differently by rewarding versus aversive outcomes. Specifically, after learning, stimuli paired with a rewarding outcome increased the correlation in activity levels between unit pairs whereas stimuli paired with an aversive outcome decreased the correlation. Paired single unit responses also became more redundant after learning. These response patterns flexibly tracked the reversal of contingencies, suggesting that learning is associated with changing correlations and enhanced functional connectivity between VTA neurons. Analysis of LFP recorded simultaneously with unit activity showed an increase in the power of theta oscillations when stimuli predicted reward but not an aversive outcome. With learning, a higher proportion of putative GABA units were phase locked to the theta oscillations than putative dopamine units. These patterns also adapted when task contingencies were changed. Taken together, these data demonstrate that VTA neurons organize flexibly as functional networks to support appetitive and aversive learning.

  14. Modular organization of the brainstem noradrenaline system coordinates opposing learning states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Akira; Tan, Bao Zhen; Ycu, Edgar A; Cuevas, Jessica Sulkes; Koivumaa, Jenny; Junyent, Felix; Kremer, Eric J; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Johansen, Joshua P

    2017-11-01

    Noradrenaline modulates global brain states and diverse behaviors through what is traditionally believed to be a homogeneous cell population in the brainstem locus coeruleus (LC). However, it is unclear how LC coordinates disparate behavioral functions. We report a modular LC organization in rats, endowed with distinct neural projection patterns and coding properties for flexible specification of opposing behavioral learning states. LC projection mapping revealed functionally distinct cell modules with specific anatomical connectivity. An amygdala-projecting ensemble promoted aversive learning, while an independent medial prefrontal cortex-projecting ensemble extinguished aversive responses to enable flexible behavior. LC neurons displayed context-dependent inter-relationships, with moderate, discrete activation of distinct cell populations by fear or safety cues and robust, global recruitment of most cells by strong aversive stimuli. These results demonstrate a modular organization in LC in which combinatorial activation modes are coordinated with projection- and behavior-specific cell populations, enabling adaptive tuning of emotional responding and behavioral flexibility.

  15. Coordination learning in stag hunt games with application to emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Bond, Robert W

    2004-07-01

    Response teams for natural disaster emergencies require coordinated and self-organized efforts for rescue, medical services, damage containment, and evacuation. The unfolding of events depends on initial conditions of specific time, location, and preparedness of the response teams. This study considered a new range of emergency response situations where the perpetrator is a sentient attacker that learns with repeated exchanges. The strategy is conceptualized as a stag hunt coordination game on the part of the defense agents and a strictly competitive game with respect to the attacking adversary. Participants were 28 university students who played an iterative board game (The Creature that Ate Sheboygan) wherein a team of three Humans represented military and civil resources, against one Godzilla-type monster. The Monster gained points by destroying buildings and human combat power. The Humans gained points by wearing down the Monster's defenses and containing damage caused by the Monster. Experimental manipulations and empirical analysis showed the following: Communication outages among the Humans assisted the Monster, but the ability to communicate only equalized the Humans' chances rather than providing them with an advantage. Coordination among Humans was instant, but it fluctuated greatly as a result of the Monster's progress. Nonlinear analysis showed an asymptotic decline in coordination to a non-zero level in response to outcome uncertainty. Learning effects were noted for Humans and Monsters, but there were significant interactions with communication blackout conditions

  16. Procedural Learning in Children With Developmental Coordination, Reading, and Attention Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magallón, Sara; Crespo-Eguílaz, Nerea; Narbona, Juan

    2015-10-01

    The aim is to assess repetition-based learning of procedures in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), reading disorder (RD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants included 187 children, studied in 4 groups: (a) DCD comorbid with RD and ADHD (DCD+RD+ADHD) (n = 30); (b) RD comorbid with ADHD (RD+ADHD) (n = 48); (c) ADHD (n = 19); and typically developing children (control group) (n = 90). Two procedural learning tasks were used: Assembly learning and Mirror drawing. Children were tested on 4 occasions for each task: 3 trials were consecutive and the fourth trial was performed after an interference task. Task performance by DCD+RD+ADHD children improved with training (P learning abilities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Predictors of anxiety recurrence in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Jerome H.; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Bloch, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined anxiety recurrence after symptom remission in the primary care setting. We examined anxiety recurrence in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial. From 2006-2009, CALM randomized adults with anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder) in primary care clinics to usual care (UC) or a collaborative care (CC) intervention of pharmacotherapy and/or cognitive behavioral t...

  18. Task experience influences coordinative structures and performance variables in learning a slalom ski-simulator task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt-Mazumder, A; Newell, K M

    2018-01-29

    The experiment investigated the progressions of the qualitative and quantitative changes in the movement dynamics of learning the ski-simulator as a function of prior-related task experience. The focus was the differential timescales of change in the candidate collective variable, neuromuscular synergies, joint motions, and task outcome as a function of learning over 7 days of practice. Half of the novice participants revealed in day 1 a transition of in-phase to anti-phase coupling of center of mass (CoM)-platform motion whereas the remaining novices and experienced group all produced on the first trial an anti-phase CoM-platform coupling. The experienced group also had initially greater amplitude and velocity of platform motion-a performance advantage over the novice group that was reduced but not eliminated with 7 days of practice. The novice participants who had an in-phase CoM-platform coupling on the initial trials of day 1 also showed the most restricted platform motion in those trials. Prior-related practice experience differentially influenced the learning of the task as evidenced by both the qualitative organization and the quantitative motion properties of the individual degrees of freedom (dof) to meet the task demands. The findings provide further evidence to the proposition that CoM-platform coupling is a candidate collective variable in the ski-simulator task that provides organization and boundary conditions to the motions of the individual joint dof and their couplings. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Doenças neuromusculares Neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umbertina C. Reed

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: apresentar os dados essenciais para o diagnóstico diferencial entre as principais doenças neuromusculares, denominação genérica sob a qual agrupam-se diferentes afecções, decorrentes do acometimento primário da unidade motora (motoneurônio medular, raiz nervosa, nervo periférico, junção mioneural e músculo. Fontes dos dados: os aspectos clínicos fundamentais para estabelecer o diagnóstico diferencial entre as diferentes doenças neuromusculares, bem como entre estas e as causas de hipotonia muscular secundária ao comprometimento do sistema nervoso central ou a doenças sistêmicas não-neurológicas, são enfatizados, com base na experiência clínica vinda do atendimento a crianças com doenças neuromusculares durante os últimos 12 anos, no ambulatório de doenças neuromusculares do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina, da Universidade de São Paulo. A revisão bibliográfica foi efetuada através do Medline e do periódico Neuromuscular Disorders, publicação oficial da World Muscle Society. Síntese dos dados: nas crianças, a maior parte destas afecções é geneticamente determinada, sendo as mais comuns a distrofia muscular progressiva ligada ao sexo, de Duchenne, a amiotrofia espinal infantil, a distrofia muscular congênita, a distrofia miotônica de Steinert, e as miopatias congênitas, estruturais e não estruturais. Polineuropatias hereditárias, síndrome miastênica congênita e miopatias metabólicas são menos comuns, porém mostram correlação geno-fenotípica cada vez mais precisa. Conclusões: na década passada, inúmeros avanços da genética molecular facilitaram imensamente o diagnóstico e o aconselhamento genético das doenças neuromusculares mais comuns das crianças, inclusive possibilitando diagnóstico fetal e, adicionalmente, vieram permitir melhor caracterização fenotípica e classificação mais objetiva.Objective: to discuss the most important aspects for performing a

  20. Dictionary Learning Based on Nonnegative Matrix Factorization Using Parallel Coordinate Descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunyi Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sparse representation of signals via an overcomplete dictionary has recently received much attention as it has produced promising results in various applications. Since the nonnegativities of the signals and the dictionary are required in some applications, for example, multispectral data analysis, the conventional dictionary learning methods imposed simply with nonnegativity may become inapplicable. In this paper, we propose a novel method for learning a nonnegative, overcomplete dictionary for such a case. This is accomplished by posing the sparse representation of nonnegative signals as a problem of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF with a sparsity constraint. By employing the coordinate descent strategy for optimization and extending it to multivariable case for processing in parallel, we develop a so-called parallel coordinate descent dictionary learning (PCDDL algorithm, which is structured by iteratively solving the two optimal problems, the learning process of the dictionary and the estimating process of the coefficients for constructing the signals. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm performs better than the conventional nonnegative K-SVD (NN-KSVD algorithm and several other algorithms for comparison. What is more, its computational consumption is remarkably lower than that of the compared algorithms.

  1. Short-term motor learning of dynamic balance control in children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsma, Dorothee; Ferguson, Gillian D; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Geuze, Reint H

    2015-03-01

    To explore the differences in learning a dynamic balance task between children with and without probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (p-DCD) from different cultural backgrounds. Twenty-eight Dutch children with DCD (p-DCD-NL), a similar group of 17 South African children (p-DCD-SA) and 21 Dutch typically developing children (TD-NL) participated in the study. All children performed the Wii Fit protocol. The slope of the learning curve was used to estimate motor learning for each group. The protocol was repeated after six weeks. Level of motor skill was assessed with the Movement ABC-2. No significant difference in motor learning rate was found between p-DCD-NL and p-DCD-SA, but the learning rate of children with p-DCD was slower than the learning rate of TD children. Speed-accuracy trade off, as a way to improve performance by slowing down in the beginning was only seen in the TD children, indicating that TD children and p-DCD children used different strategies. Retention of the level of learned control of the game after six weeks was found in all three groups after six weeks. The learning slope was associated with the level of balance skill for all children. This study provides evidence that children with p-DCD have limitations in motor learning on a complex balance task. In addition, the data do not support the contention that learning in DCD differs depending on cultural background. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Relationship of Neurogenesis and Growth of Brain Regions to Song Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirn, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Song learning, maintenance and production require coordinated activity across multiple auditory, sensory-motor, and neuromuscular structures. Telencephalic components of the sensory-motor circuitry are unique to avian species that engage in song learning. The song system shows protracted development that begins prior to hatching but continues well…

  3. Movement-related theta rhythm in humans: coordinating self-directed hippocampal learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Kaplan

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is crucial for episodic or declarative memory and the theta rhythm has been implicated in mnemonic processing, but the functional contribution of theta to memory remains the subject of intense speculation. Recent evidence suggests that the hippocampus might function as a network hub for volitional learning. In contrast to human experiments, electrophysiological recordings in the hippocampus of behaving rodents are dominated by theta oscillations reflecting volitional movement, which has been linked to spatial exploration and encoding. This literature makes the surprising cross-species prediction that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating exploratory movements in the service of self-directed learning. We examined the links between theta, spatial exploration, and memory encoding by designing an interactive human spatial navigation paradigm combined with multimodal neuroimaging. We used both non-invasive whole-head Magnetoencephalography (MEG to look at theta oscillations and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to look at brain regions associated with volitional movement and learning. We found that theta power increases during the self-initiation of virtual movement, additionally correlating with subsequent memory performance and environmental familiarity. Performance-related hippocampal theta increases were observed during a static pre-navigation retrieval phase, where planning for subsequent navigation occurred. Furthermore, periods of the task showing movement-related theta increases showed decreased fMRI activity in the parahippocampus and increased activity in the hippocampus and other brain regions that strikingly overlap with the previously observed volitional learning network (the reverse pattern was seen for stationary periods. These fMRI changes also correlated with participant's performance. Our findings suggest that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating

  4. Graphomotor skills in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD): Handwriting and learning a new letter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huau, Andréa; Velay, Jean-Luc; Jover, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze handwriting difficulties in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and investigate the hypothesis that a deficit in procedural learning could help to explain them. The experimental set-up was designed to compare the performances of children with DCD with those of a non-DCD group on tasks that rely on motor learning in different ways, namely handwriting and learning a new letter. Ten children with DCD and 10 non-DCD children, aged 8-10 years, were asked to perform handwriting tasks (letter/word/sentence; normal/fast), and a learning task (new letter) on a graphic tablet. The BHK concise assessment scale for children's handwriting was used to evaluate their handwriting quality. Results showed that both the handwriting and learning tasks differentiated between the groups. Furthermore, when speed or length constraints were added, handwriting was more impaired in children with DCD than in non-DCD children. Greater intra-individual variability was observed in the group of children with DCD, arguing in favor of a deficit in motor pattern stabilization. The results of this study could support both the hypothesis of a deficit in procedural learning and the hypothesis of neuromotor noise in DCD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lessons learned from the whole child and coordinated school health approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Slade, Sean; Lohrmann, David K; Valois, Robert F

    2015-11-01

    The new Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model, designed to depict links between health and learning, is founded on concepts of coordinated school health (CSH) and a whole child approach to education. The existing literature, including scientific articles and key publications from national agencies and organizations, was reviewed and synthesized to describe (1) the historical context for CSH and a whole child approach, and (2) lessons learned from the implementation and evaluation of these approaches. The literature revealed that interventions conducted in the context of CSH can improve health-related and academic outcomes, as well as policies, programs, or partnerships. Several structural elements and processes have proved useful for implementing CSH and a whole child approach in schools, including use of school health coordinators, school-level and district-level councils or teams; systematic assessment and planning; strong leadership and administrative support, particularly from school principals; integration of health-related goals into school improvement plans; and strong community collaborations. Lessons learned from years of experience with CSH and the whole child approaches have applicability for developing a better understanding of the WSCC model as well as maximizing and documenting its potential for impacting both health and education outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of School Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American School Health Association.

  6. How students learn to coordinate knowledge of physical and mathematical models in cellular physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew

    This dissertation explores the Knowledge in Pieces (KiP) theory to account for how students learn to coordinate knowledge of mathematical and physical models in biology education. The KiP approach characterizes student knowledge as a fragmented collection of knowledge elements as opposed to stable and theory-like knowledge. This dissertation sought to use this theoretical lens to account for how students understand and learn with mathematical models and representations, such as equations. Cellular physiology provides a quantified discipline that leverages concepts from mathematics, physics, and chemistry to understand cellular functioning. Therefore, this discipline provides an exemplary context for assessing how biology students think and learn with mathematical models. In particular, the resting membrane potential provides an exemplary concept well defined by models of dynamic equilibrium borrowed from physics and chemistry. In brief, membrane potentials, or voltages, "rest" when the electrical and chemical driving forces for permeable ionic species are equal in magnitude but opposite in direction. To assess students' understandings of this concept, this dissertation employed three studies: the first study employed the cognitive clinical interview to assess student thinking in the absence and presence of equations. The second study employed an intervention to assess student learning and the affordances of an innovative assessment. The third student employed a human-computer-interaction paradigm to assess how students learn with a novel multi-representational technology. Study 1 revealed that students saw only one influence--the chemical gradient--and that students coordinated knowledge of only this gradient with the related equations. Study 2 revealed that students benefited from learning with the multi-representational technology and that the assessment detected performance gains across both calculation and explanation tasks. Last, Study 3 revealed how students

  7. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  8. Motor Learning : An Analysis of 100 Trials of a Ski Slalom Game in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Jelsma, Lemke Dorothee; Ferguson, Gillian D; Geuze, Reint H

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is often characterized as a skill acquisition deficit disorder, few studies have addressed the process of motor learning. This study examined learning of a novel motor task; the Wii Fit ski slalom game. The main objectives were to

  9. The race to learn: spike timing and STDP can coordinate learning and recall in CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christopher R; Wyeth, Gordon; Milford, Michael; Wiles, Janet

    2011-06-01

    The CA3 region of the hippocampus has long been proposed as an autoassociative network performing pattern completion on known inputs. The dentate gyrus (DG) region is often proposed as a network performing the complementary function of pattern separation. Neural models of pattern completion and separation generally designate explicit learning phases to encode new information and assume an ideal fixed threshold at which to stop learning new patterns and begin recalling known patterns. Memory systems are significantly more complex in practice, with the degree of memory recall depending on context-specific goals. Here, we present our spike-timing separation and completion (STSC) model of the entorhinal cortex (EC), DG, and CA3 network, ascribing to each region a role similar to that in existing models but adding a temporal dimension by using a spiking neural network. Simulation results demonstrate that (a) spike-timing dependent plasticity in the EC-CA3 synapses provides a pattern completion ability without recurrent CA3 connections, (b) the race between activation of CA3 cells via EC-CA3 synapses and activation of the same cells via DG-CA3 synapses distinguishes novel from known inputs, and (c) modulation of the EC-CA3 synapses adjusts the learned versus test input similarity required to evoke a direct CA3 response prior to any DG activity, thereby adjusting the pattern completion threshold. These mechanisms suggest that spike timing can arbitrate between learning and recall based on the novelty of each individual input, ensuring control of the learn-recall decision resides in the same subsystem as the learned memories themselves. The proposed modulatory signal does not override this decision but biases the system toward either learning or recall. The model provides an explanation for empirical observations that a reduction in novelty produces a corresponding reduction in the latency of responses in CA3 and CA1. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Deficits in spatial learning and motor coordination in ADAM11-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamazaki Kazuto

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADAM11 is a member of the ADAM gene family and is mainly expressed in the nervous system. It is thought to be an adhesion molecule, since it has a disintegrin-like domain related to cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions. To elucidate the physiological functions of ADAM11, we generated ADAM11-deficient mice by means of gene targeting. Results ADAM11-deficient mice were apparently normal, and survived more than one year with no major histological abnormalities in the brain or spinal cord. Because ADAM11 is highly expressed in the hippocampus and cerebellum, we have examined ADAM11 mutant mice for learning using visual and hidden water maze tasks, and their motor coordination using a rotating rod task. Our results showed that their visual water maze task results are normal, but the hidden water maze and rotating rod task skills are impaired in ADAM11-deficient mice. Conclusion Our results indicate that ADAM11 mutation does not affect cell migration and differentiation during development, but affects learning and motor coordination. Thus, ADAM11 might play an important signalling or structural role as a cell adhesion molecule at the synapse, and may thus participate in synaptic regulation underlying behavioural changes.

  11. Procedural learning and automatization process in children with developmental coordination disorder and/or developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotteau, Maëlle; Chaix, Yves; Albaret, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that developmental dyslexia (DD) and developmental coordination disorder (DCD) actually form part of a broader disorder. Their frequent association could be justified by a deficit of the procedural memory system, that subtends many of the cognitive, motor and linguistic abilities that are impaired in both DD and DCD. However, studies of procedural learning in these two disorders have yielded divergent results, and in any case no studies have so far addressed the issue of automatization (dual-task paradigm). We administered a finger tapping task to participants aged 8-12 years (19 DCD, 18 DD, and 22 with both DD and DCD) to explore procedural learning and automatic movements in these three groups of children, comparing motor performances at the prelearning stage, after 2 weeks of training, and in a post-training dual-task condition. First, results indicated that all the children were able to learn a sequence of movements and even automatize their movements. Second, they revealed between-groups differences in procedural/automatization learning abilities, setting the DCD group apart from the other two. Third, contrary to our expectations concerning comorbidity, they suggested that the DD+DCD association does not have an additional impact on behavioral performances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Social coordination in toddler's word learning: interacting systems of perception and action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Alfredo; Smith, Linda; Yu, Chen

    2008-06-01

    We measured turn-taking in terms of hand and head movements and asked if the global rhythm of the participants' body activity relates to word learning. Six dyads composed of parents and toddlers (M=18 months) interacted in a tabletop task wearing motion-tracking sensors on their hands and head. Parents were instructed to teach the labels of 10 novel objects and the child was later tested on a name-comprehension task. Using dynamic time warping, we compared the motion data of all body-part pairs, within and between partners. For every dyad, we also computed an overall measure of the quality of the interaction, that takes into consideration the state of interaction when the parent uttered an object label and the overall smoothness of the turn-taking. The overall interaction quality measure was correlated with the total number of words learned. In particular, head movements were inversely related to other partner's hand movements, and the degree of bodily coupling of parent and toddler predicted the words that children learned during the interaction. The implications of joint body dynamics to understanding joint coordination of activity in a social interaction, its scaffolding effect on the child's learning and its use in the development of artificial systems are discussed.

  13. Activities of Daily Living in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder: Performance, Learning, and Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Linde, Berdien W; van Netten, Jaap J; Otten, Bert; Postema, Klaas; Geuze, Reint H; Schoemaker, Marina M

    2015-11-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) face evident motor difficulties in daily functioning. Little is known, however, about their difficulties in specific activities of daily living (ADL). The purposes of this study were: (1) to investigate differences between children with DCD and their peers with typical development for ADL performance, learning, and participation, and (2) to explore the predictive values of these aspects. This was a cross-sectional study. In both a clinical sample of children diagnosed with DCD (n=25 [21 male, 4 female], age range=5-8 years) and a group of peers with typical development (25 matched controls), the children's parents completed the DCDDaily-Q. Differences in scores between the groups were investigated using t tests for performance and participation and Pearson chi-square analysis for learning. Multiple regression analyses were performed to explore the predictive values of performance, learning, and participation. Compared with their peers, children with DCD showed poor performance of ADL and less frequent participation in some ADL. Children with DCD demonstrated heterogeneous patterns of performance (poor in 10%-80% of the items) and learning (delayed in 0%-100% of the items). In the DCD group, delays in learning of ADL were a predictor for poor performance of ADL, and poor performance of ADL was a predictor for less frequent participation in ADL compared with the control group. A limited number of children with DCD were addressed in this study. This study highlights the impact of DCD on children's daily lives and the need for tailored intervention. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  14. Coordinated Plasticity among Glutamatergic and GABAergic Neurons and Synapses in the Barrel Cortex Is Correlated to Learning Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Huang, Li; Guo, Rui; Liu, Yulong; Zhao, Shidi; Guan, Sudong; Ge, Rongjing; Cui, Shan; Wang, Shirlene; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Functional plasticity at cortical synapses and neurons is presumably associated with learning and memory. Additionally, coordinated refinement between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons occurs in associative memory. If these assumptions are present, neuronal plasticity strength and learning efficiency should be correlated. We have examined whether neuronal plasticity strength and learning efficiency are quantitatively correlated in a mouse model of associative learning. Paired whisker and odor stimulations in mice induce odorant-induced whisker motions. The fully establishment of this associative memory appears fast and slow, which are termed as high learning efficiency and low learning efficiency, respectively. In the study of cellular mechanisms underlying this differential learning efficiency, we have compared the strength of neuronal plasticity in the barrel cortices that store associative signals from the mice with high vs. low learning efficiencies. Our results indicate that the levels of learning efficiency are linearly correlated with the upregulated strengths of excitatory synaptic transmission on glutamatergic neurons and their excitability, as well as the downregulated strengths of GABAergic neurons' excitability, their excitatory synaptic inputs and inhibitory synaptic outputs in layers II~III of barrel cortices. The correlations between learning efficiency in associative memory formation and coordinated plasticity at cortical glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons support the notion that the plasticity of associative memory cells is a basis for memory strength. PMID:28798668

  15. [Characteristics of neuromuscular scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzier, M; Groß, C; Zahn, R K; Pumberger, M; Strube, P

    2016-06-01

    Usually, neuromuscular scolioses become clinically symptomatic relatively early and are rapidly progressive even after the end of growth. Without sufficient treatment they lead to a severe reduction of quality of life, to a loss of the ability of walking, standing or sitting as well as to an impairment of the cardiopulmonary system resulting in an increased mortality. Therefore, an intensive interdisciplinary treatment by physio- and ergotherapists, internists, pediatricians, orthotists, and orthopedists is indispensable. In contrast to idiopathic scoliosis the treatment of patients with neuromuscular scoliosis with orthosis is controversially discussed, whereas physiotherapy is established and essential to prevent contractures and to maintain the residual sensorimotor function.Frequently, the surgical treatment of the scoliosis is indicated. It should be noted that only long-segment posterior correction and fusion of the whole deformity leads to a significant improvement of the quality of life as well as to a prevention of a progression of the scoliosis and the development of junctional problems. The surgical intervention is usually performed before the end of growth. A prolonged delay of surgical intervention does not result in an increased height but only in a deformity progression and is therefore not justifiable. In early onset neuromuscular scolioses guided-growth implants are used to guarantee the adequat development. Because of the high complication rates, further optimization of these implant systems with regard to efficiency and safety have to be addressed in future research.

  16. The Effects of constructing domain-specific representations on coordination processes and learning in a CSCL-environment

    OpenAIRE

    Slof, Bert; Erkens, Gijsbert; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Slof, B., Erkens, G., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012). The effects of constructing domain-specific representations on coordination processes and learning in a CSCL-environment. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1478-1489. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2012.03.011

  17. Identifying Subtypes among Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder and Mathematical Learning Disabilities, Using Model-Based Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Stefanie; Roeyers, Herbert; Rosseel, Yves; Van Waelvelde, Hilde; Desoete, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    A relationship between motor and mathematical skills has been shown by previous research. However, the question of whether subtypes can be differentiated within developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and/or mathematical learning disability (MLD) remains unresolved. In a sample of children with and without DCD and/or MLD, a data-driven…

  18. Fine motor deficiencies in children with developmental coordination disorder and learning disabilities: an underlying open-loop control deficit.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Wilson, P.H.; Westenberg, Y.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-two children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and learning disabilities (LD) and their age-matched controls attending normal primary schools were investigated using kinematic movement analysis of fine-motor performance. Three hypotheses about the nature of the motor deficits

  19. Fine motor deficiencies in children with developmental coordination disorder and learning disabilities: An underlying open-loop control deficit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Wilson, P.H.; Westenberg, Y.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-two children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and learning disabilities (LD) and their age-matched controls attending normal primary schools were investigated using kinematic movement analysis of fine-motor performance. Three hypotheses about the nature of the motor deficits

  20. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoellinger, Thomas; Petieau, Mathieu; Duvinage, Matthieu; Castermans, Thierry; Seetharaman, Karthik; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Bengoetxea, Ana; Ivanenko, Yuri; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996) was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009) by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator (CPG) processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  1. Neuromuscular control of trunk stability: clinical implications for sports injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazulak, Bohdanna; Cholewicki, Jacek; Reeves, N Peter

    2008-09-01

    Recent prospective evidence supports the hypothesis that impaired trunk control is a contributing factor to sports injuries of the spine as well as to segments of the kinetic chain. The current concepts regarding neuromuscular control of trunk stability are best described from a systems engineering perspective. In the analysis of current neuromuscular training protocols for sports injury prevention, these principles are applied to identify components that optimize neuromuscular control of trunk stability. Current perspectives of neuromuscular learning can be applied clinically to aid in the formulation of injury prevention strategies.

  2. The Open Method of Co-ordination and the Analysis of Mutual Learning Processes of the European Employment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address two normative and interlinked methodological and theoretical questions concerning the Open Method of Coordination (OMC): First, what is the most appropriate approach to learning in the analyses of the processes of the European Employment Strategy (EES......)? Second, how should mutual learning processes be diffused among the Member States in order to be efficient? In answering these two questions the paper draws on a social constructivist approach to learning thereby contributing to the debate about learning in the political science literature. At the same...... time, based on the literature and participatory observations, it is concluded that the learning effects of the EES are probably somewhat larger than what is normally suggested, but that successful diffusion still depends on a variety of contextual factors. At the end of the paper a path for empirical...

  3. Prognostic subgroups for remission and response in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J MacLaren; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Bloch, Michael H

    2015-03-01

    Most patients with anxiety disorders receive treatment in primary care settings. Limited moderator data are available to inform clinicians of likely prognostic outcomes for individual patients. We identify baseline characteristics associated with outcome in adults seeking treatment for anxiety disorders. We conducted an exploratory moderator analysis from the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial. In the CALM trial, 1,004 adults who met DSM-IV criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomized to usual care (UC) or a collaborative care intervention (ITV) of cognitive-behavioral therapy and/or pharmacotherapy between June 2006 and April 2008. Logistic regression was used to examine baseline characteristics associated with remission and response overall and by treatment condition. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analyses identified subgroups associated with similar likelihood of response and remission of global anxiety symptoms. Remission was defined as score CALM in community treatment centers where patients typically are of low socioeconomic status and may particularly benefit from ITV. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00347269. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  4. Predictors of anxiety recurrence in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jerome H; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Bloch, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have examined anxiety recurrence after symptom remission in the primary care setting. We examined anxiety recurrence in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial. From 2006 to 2009, CALM randomized adults with anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder) in primary care clinics to usual care (UC) or a collaborative care (CC) intervention of pharmacotherapy and/or cognitive behavioral therapy. We examined 274 patients who met criteria for anxiety remission (Brief Symptom Inventory for anxiety and somatization (BSI-12) anxiety recurrence (BSI-12 ≥ 6 and 50% increase from 6-month ratings) during the year following remission. Recurrence was lower in CC (29%) compared to UC (41%) (p = 0.04). Patients with comorbid depression or lower self-perceived socioeconomic status particularly benefited (in terms of reduced recurrence) if assigned to CC instead of UC. In the multivariable logistic regression model, smoking, being single, Anxiety Sensitivity Index score, functional impairment at month 6 due to residual anxiety (measured with the Sheehan Disability Scale), and treatment with benzodiazepines were associated with subsequent anxiety recurrence. ROC identified prognostic subgroups based on the risk of recurrence. Our study was exploratory, and our findings require replication. Future studies should also examine the effectiveness of relapse prevention programs in patients at highest risk for recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. More feedback is better than less: Learning a novel upper limb joint coordination pattern with augmented auditory feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya eFujii

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Motor learning is a process whereby the acquisition of new skills occurs with practice, and can be influenced by the provision of feedback. An important question is what frequency of feedback facilitates motor learning. The guidance hypothesis assumes that the provision of less augmented feedback is better than more because a learner can use his/her own inherent feedback. However, it is unclear whether this hypothesis holds true for all types of augmented feedback, including for example sonified information about performance. Thus, we aimed to test what frequency of augmented sonified feedback facilitates the motor learning of a novel joint coordination pattern. Twenty healthy volunteers first reached to a target with their arm (baseline phase. We manipulated this baseline kinematic data for each individual to create a novel target joint coordination pattern. Participants then practiced to learn the novel target joint coordination pattern, receiving either feedback on every trial i.e. 100% feedback (n = 10, or every other trial, i.e. 50% feedback (n = 10 (acquisition phase. We created a sonification system to provide the feedback. This feedback was a pure tone that varied in intensity in proportion to the error of the performed joint coordination relative to the target pattern. Thus, the auditory feedback contained information about performance in real-time (i.e. concurrent, knowledge of performance feedback. Participants performed the novel joint coordination pattern with no-feedback immediately after the acquisition phase (immediate retention phase, and on the next day (delayed retention phase. The root-mean squared error (RMSE and variable error (VE of joint coordination were significantly reduced during the acquisition phase in both 100% and 50% feedback groups. There was no significant difference in VE between the groups at immediate and delayed retention phases. However, at both these retention phases, the 100% feedback group showed

  6. Incremental benefits and cost of coordinated anxiety learning and management for anxiety treatment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joesch, J M; Sherbourne, C D; Sullivan, G; Stein, M B; Craske, M G; Roy-Byrne, P

    2012-09-01

    Improving the quality of mental health care requires integrating successful research interventions into 'real-world' practice settings. Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) is a treatment-delivery model for anxiety disorders encountered in primary care. CALM offers cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication, or both; non-expert care managers assisting primary care clinicians with adherence promotion and medication optimization; computer-assisted CBT delivery; and outcome monitoring. This study describes incremental benefits, costs and net benefits of CALM versus usual care (UC). The CALM randomized, controlled effectiveness trial was conducted in 17 primary care clinics in four US cities from 2006 to 2009. Of 1062 eligible patients, 1004 English- or Spanish-speaking patients aged 18-75 years with panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with or without major depression were randomized. Anxiety-free days (AFDs), quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and expenditures for out-patient visits, emergency room (ER) visits, in-patient stays and psychiatric medications were estimated based on blinded telephone assessments at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Over 18 months, CALM participants, on average, experienced 57.1 more AFDs [95% confidence interval (CI) 31-83] and $245 additional medical expenses (95% CI $-733 to $1223). The mean incremental net benefit (INB) of CALM versus UC was positive when an AFD was valued ≥$4. For QALYs based on the Short-Form Health Survey-12 (SF-12) and the EuroQol EQ-5D, the mean INB was positive at ≥$5000. Compared with UC, CALM provides significant benefits with modest increases in health-care expenditures.

  7. Autoantibodies in neuromuscular transmission disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vincent, Angela

    2008-01-01

    .... The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the site of a number of different autoimmune and genetic disorders, and it is also the target of many neurotoxins from venomous snakes, spiders, scorpions and other species...

  8. The punctum fixum-punctum mobile model: a neuromuscular principle for efficient movement generation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph von Laßberg

    Full Text Available According to the "punctum fixum-punctum mobile model" that was introduced in prior studies, for generation of the most effective intentional acceleration of a body part the intersegmental neuromuscular onset succession has to spread successively from the rotation axis (punctum fixum toward the body part that shall be accelerated (punctum mobile. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this principle is, indeed, fundamental for any kind of efficient rotational accelerations in general, independent of the kind of movements, type of rotational axis, the current body position, or movement direction. Neuromuscular onset succession was captured by surface electromyography of relevant muscles of the anterior and posterior muscle chain in 16 high-level gymnasts during intentional accelerating movement phases while performing 18 different gymnastics elements (in various body positions to forward and backward, performed on high bar, parallel bars, rings and trampoline, as well as during non-sport specific pivot movements around the longitudinal axis. The succession patterns to generate the acceleration phases during these movements were described and statistically evaluated based on the onset time difference between the muscles of the corresponding muscle chain. In all the analyzed movement phases, the results clearly support the hypothesized succession pattern from punctum fixum to punctum mobile. This principle was further underlined by the finding that the succession patterns do change their direction running through the body when the rotational axis (punctum fixum has been changed (e.g., high bar or rings [hands] vs. floor or trampoline [feet]. The findings improve our understanding of intersegmental neuromuscular coordination patterns to generate intentional movements most efficiently. This could help to develop more specific methods to facilitate such patterns in particular contexts, thus allowing for shorter motor learning

  9. Effect of internal versus external focus of attention on implicit motor learning in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarus, Tal; Ghanouni, Parisa; Abel, Rachel L; Fomenoff, Shelby L; Lundberg, Jocelyn; Davidson, Stephanie; Caswell, Sarah; Bickerton, Laura; Zwicker, Jill G

    2015-02-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) struggle to learn new motor skills. It is unknown whether children with DCD learn motor skills more effectively with an external focus of attention (focusing on impact of movement on the environment) or an internal focus of attention (focusing on one's body movements) during implicit (unconscious) and explicit (conscious) motor learning. This paper aims to determine the trends of implicit motor learning in children with DCD, and how focus of attention influences motor learning in children with DCD in comparison with typically developing children. 25 children, aged 8-12, with (n=12) and without (n=13) DCD were randomly assigned to receive instructions that focused attention externally or internally while completing a computer tracking task during acquisition, retention, and transfer phases. The motor task involved tracking both repeated and random patterns, with the repeated pattern indicative of implicit learning. Children with DCD scored lower on the motor task in all three phases of the study, demonstrating poorer implicit learning. Furthermore, graphical data showed that for the children with DCD, there was no apparent difference between internal and external focus of attention during retention and transfer, while there was an advantage to the external focus of attention group for typically developing children. Children with DCD demonstrate less accuracy than typically developing children in learning a motor task. Also, the effect of focus of attention on motor performance is different in children with DCD versus their typically developing counterparts during the three phases of motor learning. Results may inform clinicians how to facilitate motor learning in children with DCD by incorporating explicit learning with either internal or external focus of attention within interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neural changes associated to procedural learning and automatization process in Developmental Coordination Disorder and/or Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotteau, Maëlle; Péran, Patrice; Vayssière, Nathalie; Tallet, Jessica; Albaret, Jean-Michel; Chaix, Yves

    2017-03-01

    Recent theories hypothesize that procedural learning may support the frequent overlap between neurodevelopmental disorders. The neural circuitry supporting procedural learning includes, among others, cortico-cerebellar and cortico-striatal loops. Alteration of these loops may account for the frequent comorbidity between Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and Developmental Dyslexia (DD). The aim of our study was to investigate cerebral changes due to the learning and automatization of a sequence learning task in children with DD, or DCD, or both disorders. fMRI on 48 children (aged 8-12) with DD, DCD or DD + DCD was used to explore their brain activity during procedural tasks, performed either after two weeks of training or in the early stage of learning. Firstly, our results indicate that all children were able to perform the task with the same level of automaticity, but recruit different brain processes to achieve the same performance. Secondly, our fMRI results do not appear to confirm Nicolson and Fawcett's model. The neural correlates recruited for procedural learning by the DD and the comorbid groups are very close, while the DCD group presents distinct characteristics. This provide a promising direction on the neural mechanisms associated with procedural learning in neurodevelopmental disorders and for understanding comorbidity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Motor Learning: An Analysis of 100 Trials of a Ski Slalom Game in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Jelsma, Lemke Dorothee; Ferguson, Gillian D; Geuze, Reint H

    2015-01-01

    Although Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is often characterized as a skill acquisition deficit disorder, few studies have addressed the process of motor learning. This study examined learning of a novel motor task; the Wii Fit ski slalom game. The main objectives were to determine: 1) whether learning occurs over 100 trial runs of the game, 2) if the learning curve is different between children with and without DCD, 3) if learning is different in an easier or harder version of the task, 4) if learning transfers to other balance tasks. 17 children with DCD (6-10 years) and a matched control group of 17 typically developing (TD) children engaged in 20 minutes of gaming, twice a week for five weeks. Each training session comprised of alternating trial runs, with five runs at an easy level and five runs at a difficult level. Wii scores, which combine speed and accuracy per run, were recorded. Standardized balance tasks were used to measure transfer. Significant differences in initial performance were found between groups on the Wii score and balance tasks. Both groups improved their Wii score over the five weeks. Improvement in the easy and in the hard task did not differ between groups. Retention in the time between training sessions was not different between TD and DCD groups either. The DCD group improved significantly on all balance tasks. The findings in this study give a fairly coherent picture of the learning process over a medium time scale (5 weeks) in children novice to active computer games; they learn, retain and there is evidence of transfer to other balance tasks. The rate of motor learning is similar for those with and without DCD. Our results raise a number of questions about motor learning that need to be addressed in future research.

  12. Motor Learning: An Analysis of 100 Trials of a Ski Slalom Game in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwien C M Smits-Engelsman

    Full Text Available Although Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD is often characterized as a skill acquisition deficit disorder, few studies have addressed the process of motor learning. This study examined learning of a novel motor task; the Wii Fit ski slalom game. The main objectives were to determine: 1 whether learning occurs over 100 trial runs of the game, 2 if the learning curve is different between children with and without DCD, 3 if learning is different in an easier or harder version of the task, 4 if learning transfers to other balance tasks.17 children with DCD (6-10 years and a matched control group of 17 typically developing (TD children engaged in 20 minutes of gaming, twice a week for five weeks. Each training session comprised of alternating trial runs, with five runs at an easy level and five runs at a difficult level. Wii scores, which combine speed and accuracy per run, were recorded. Standardized balance tasks were used to measure transfer.Significant differences in initial performance were found between groups on the Wii score and balance tasks. Both groups improved their Wii score over the five weeks. Improvement in the easy and in the hard task did not differ between groups. Retention in the time between training sessions was not different between TD and DCD groups either. The DCD group improved significantly on all balance tasks.The findings in this study give a fairly coherent picture of the learning process over a medium time scale (5 weeks in children novice to active computer games; they learn, retain and there is evidence of transfer to other balance tasks. The rate of motor learning is similar for those with and without DCD. Our results raise a number of questions about motor learning that need to be addressed in future research.

  13. From Metalloproteins to Coordination Chemistry: A Learning Exercise to Teach Transition Metal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglinski, John; Graham, Duncan; Kennedy, Alan R.; Gibson, Lorraine T.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise is organized to reinforce the fundamental rules of coordination chemistry through a biological study of metalloproteins. The work, which is divided into four well-defined activities, involves a major application of computer databases to address chemical problems.

  14. Unemployment protection reform in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, and the UK: policy learning through open coordination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gerven, M.; Beckers, M.; Heidenreich, M.; Zeitlin, J.

    2009-01-01

    This book examines how and to what extent the European Employment Strategy and the Open Method of Coordination (OMC) on Social Protection and Social Inclusion have influenced national labour market and social welfare policies.

  15. Neuromuscular disease classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M.; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns.

  16. Bidirectional coupling between astrocytes and neurons mediates learning and dynamic coordination in the brain: a multiple modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Wade

    Full Text Available In recent years research suggests that astrocyte networks, in addition to nutrient and waste processing functions, regulate both structural and synaptic plasticity. To understand the biological mechanisms that underpin such plasticity requires the development of cell level models that capture the mutual interaction between astrocytes and neurons. This paper presents a detailed model of bidirectional signaling between astrocytes and neurons (the astrocyte-neuron model or AN model which yields new insights into the computational role of astrocyte-neuronal coupling. From a set of modeling studies we demonstrate two significant findings. Firstly, that spatial signaling via astrocytes can relay a "learning signal" to remote synaptic sites. Results show that slow inward currents cause synchronized postsynaptic activity in remote neurons and subsequently allow Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity based learning to occur at the associated synapses. Secondly, that bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes underpins dynamic coordination between neuron clusters. Although our composite AN model is presently applied to simplified neural structures and limited to coordination between localized neurons, the principle (which embodies structural, functional and dynamic complexity, and the modeling strategy may be extended to coordination among remote neuron clusters.

  17. A Software Control Framework for Learning Coordinated, Multi-Robot Strategies in Open Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grupen, Roderic

    2003-01-01

    .... The UMass effort marries high-level process descriptions, discrete event analysis and model checking, learning and stochastic exploration, and a control theoretic substrate to accomplish these goals...

  18. How Students Learn from Multiple Contexts and Definitions: Proper Time as a Coordination Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Olivia; diSessa, Andrea A.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an empirical analysis of a single classroom episode in which students reveal difficulties with the concept of proper time in special relativity but slowly make progress in improving their understanding. The theoretical framework used is "coordination class theory," which is an evolving model of concepts and conceptual change.…

  19. Emergent Coordination Underlying Learning to Reach-to-Grasp with a Brain-Machine Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Mukta; Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan; Southerland, Joshua; Badreldin, Islam; Eleryan, Ahmed; Shattuck, Kelsey; Gururangan, Suchin; Slutzky, Marc W; Osborne, Leslie C; Fagg, Andrew H; Oweiss, Karim G; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G

    2017-12-13

    The development of coordinated reach to grasp has been well-studied in infants and children (Kuhtz-Buschbeck, Stolze, Jöhnk, Boczek-Funcke, & Illert, 1998; von Hofsten, 1984a). However, the role of motor cortex during this development is unclear because it is difficult to study in humans. We took the approach using a brain-machine interface (BMI) paradigm in rhesus macaques with prior therapeutic amputations to examine the emergence of novel, coordinated reach-to-grasp. Previous research has shown that after amputation, the cortical area previously involved in the control of the lost limb undergoes reorganization (Qi, Stepniewska, & Kaas, 2000; Schieber & Deuel, 1997; Wu & Kaas, 1999), but prior BMI work has largely relied on finding neurons that already encode specific movement-related information. Here, we taught macaques to cortically control a robotic arm and hand through operant conditioning using neurons that were not explicitly reach- or grasp-related. Over the course of training, stereotypical patterns emerged and stabilized in the cross-covariance between the reaching and grasping velocity profiles, between pairs of neurons involved in controlling reach and grasp, and to a comparable, but lesser, extent between other stable neurons in the network. In fact, we found evidence of this structured coordination between pairs composed of all combinations of neurons decoding reach or grasp, and other stable neurons in the network. The degree of and participation in coordination was highly correlated across all pair-types. Our approach provides a unique model for studying the development of novel, coordinated reach-to-grasp at the behavioral and cortical levels.

  20. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  1. Doenças neuromusculares

    OpenAIRE

    Reed,Umbertina C.

    2002-01-01

    Objetivo: apresentar os dados essenciais para o diagnóstico diferencial entre as principais doenças neuromusculares, denominação genérica sob a qual agrupam-se diferentes afecções, decorrentes do acometimento primário da unidade motora (motoneurônio medular, raiz nervosa, nervo periférico, junção mioneural e músculo). Fontes dos dados: os aspectos clínicos fundamentais para estabelecer o diagnóstico diferencial entre as diferentes doenças neuromusculares, bem como entre estas e as causas de h...

  2. REHABILITATION PROGRAMS FOR PEOPLE WITH NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Zupan

    2004-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases are inherited, chronic, degenerative and progressive. The main characteristics of neuromuscular diseases are: muscular weakness, contractures, scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, cardiac affection, nutrition disturbances, dependence on the help of others, possible social isolation and physiological problems. Appropriate rehabilitation programs should influence all mentioned characteristics. A special unit for rehabilitation of patients with neuromuscular diseases with...

  3. Using visualizations to support collaboration and coordination during computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses the topic of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL in short). In a CSCL-environment, students work in small groups on complex and challenging tasks. Although the teacher guides this process at a distance, students have to regulate and monitor their own learning

  4. Children Can't Be Ready to Learn without Coordinated Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Nick

    1992-01-01

    According to William Raspberry, U.S. schools are already doing a good job of teaching children who come to school ready for learning. The problem with America 2000 is that the $700-800 million price tag is too small; billions are needed for establishing child service centers and other support services to ensure optimal learning. (MLH)

  5. Procedural learning, consolidation, and transfer of a new skill in Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Caroline; Wansard, Murielle; Geurten, Marie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the differences in procedural learning abilities between children with DCD and typically developing children by investigating the steps that lead to skill automatization (i.e., the stages of fast learning, consolidation, and slow learning). Transfer of the skill to a new situation was also assessed. We tested 34 children aged 6-12 years with and without DCD on a perceptuomotor adaptation task, a form of procedural learning that is thought to involve the cerebellum and the basal ganglia (regions whose impairment has been associated with DCD) but also other brain areas including frontal regions. The results showed similar rates of learning, consolidation, and transfer in DCD and control children. However, the DCD children's performance remained slower than that of controls throughout the procedural task and they reached a lower asymptotic performance level; the difficulties observed at the outset did not diminish with practice.

  6. Conservative nature of oestradiol signalling pathways in the brain lobes of octopus vulgaris involved in reproduction, learning and motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisa, E; Paolucci, M; Di Cosmo, A

    2012-02-01

    Oestradiol plays crucial roles in the mammalian brain by modulating reproductive behaviour, neural plasticity and pain perception. The cephalopod Octopus vulgaris is considered, along with its relatives, to be the most behaviourally advanced invertebrate, although the neurophysiological basis of its behaviours, including pain perception, remain largely unknown. In the present study, using a combination of molecular and imaging techniques, we found that oestradiol up-regulated O. vulgaris gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (Oct-GnRH) and O. vulgaris oestrogen receptor (Oct-ER) mRNA levels in the olfactory lobes; in turn, Oct-ER mRNA was regulated by NMDA in lobes involved in learning and motor coordination. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis revealed that oestradiol binds Oct-ER causing conformational modifications and nuclear translocation consistent with the classical genomic mechanism of the oestrogen receptor. Moreover, oestradiol triggered a calcium influx and cyclic AMP response element binding protein phosphorylation via membrane receptors, providing evidence for a rapid nongenomic action of oestradiol in O. vulgaris. In the present study, we demonstrate, for the first time, the physiological role of oestradiol in the brain lobes of O. vulgaris involved in reproduction, learning and motor coordination. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Exposing Piaget's scheme: Empirical evidence for the ontogenesis of coordination in learning a mathematical concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahamson, Dor; Shayan, Shakila; Bakker, Arthur; Van Der Schaaf, Marieke F.

    2016-01-01

    The combination of two methodological resources-natural-user interfaces (NUI) and multimodal learning analytics (MMLA)-is creating opportunities for educational researchers to empirically evaluate seminal models for the hypothetical emergence of concepts from situated sensorimotor activity. 76

  8. Muscle ultrasound in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Arts, I.M.P.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders, as these disorders result in muscle atrophy and intramuscular fibrosis and fatty infiltration, which can be visualized with ultrasound. Several prospective studies have reported high sensitivities and specificities in

  9. Palliative care in neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Marianne; Oliver, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness. Neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) are characterized by progressive muscle weakness, leading to pronounced and incapacitating

  10. Vocational perspectives and neuromuscular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andries, F.; Wevers, C. W.; Wintzen, A. R.; Busch, H. F.; Höweler, C. J.; de Jager, A. E.; Padberg, G. W.; de Visser, M.; Wokke, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    The present study analyses the actual occupational situation, vocational handicaps and past labour career of a group of about 1000 Dutch patients suffering from a neuromuscular disorder (NMD). On the basis of the likelihood of a substantial employment history and sufficient numbers of patients, four

  11. Muscle recruitment and coordination with an ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Katherine M; Jackson, Rachel W; Shuman, Benjamin R; Collins, Steven H

    2017-07-05

    Exoskeletons have the potential to assist and augment human performance. Understanding how users adapt their movement and neuromuscular control in response to external assistance is important to inform the design of these devices. The aim of this research was to evaluate changes in muscle recruitment and coordination for ten unimpaired individuals walking with an ankle exoskeleton. We evaluated changes in the activity of individual muscles, cocontraction levels, and synergistic patterns of muscle coordination with increasing exoskeleton work and torque. Participants were able to selectively reduce activity of the ankle plantarflexors with increasing exoskeleton assistance. Increasing exoskeleton net work resulted in greater reductions in muscle activity than increasing exoskeleton torque. Patterns of muscle coordination were not restricted or constrained to synergistic patterns observed during unassisted walking. While three synergies could describe nearly 95% of the variance in electromyography data during unassisted walking, these same synergies could describe only 85-90% of the variance in muscle activity while walking with the exoskeleton. Synergies calculated with the exoskeleton demonstrated greater changes in synergy weights with increasing exoskeleton work versus greater changes in synergy activations with increasing exoskeleton torque. These results support the theory that unimpaired individuals do not exclusively use central pattern generators or other low-level building blocks to coordinate muscle activity, especially when learning a new task or adapting to external assistance, and demonstrate the potential for using exoskeletons to modulate muscle recruitment and coordination patterns for rehabilitation or performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coordinated Implementation and Evaluation of Flipped Classes and Peer-Led Team Learning in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Jenay; Lewis, Scott E.; Oueini, Razanne; Mapugay, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The research-based pedagogical strategy of flipped classes has been shown to be effective for increasing student achievement and retention in postsecondary chemistry classes. The purpose of flipped classes is to move content delivery (e.g., lecture) outside of the classroom, freeing more face-to-face time for active learning strategies. The…

  13. Sensorimotor coordination in a "baby" robot: learning about objects through grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Lorenzo; Orabona, Francesco; Metta, Giorgio; Sandini, Giulio

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a developmental approach to the design of a humanoid robot. The robot, equipped with initial perceptual and motor competencies, explores the "shape" of its own body before devoting its attention to the external environment. The initial form of sensorimotor coordination consists of a set of explorative motor behaviors coupled to visual routines providing a bottom-up sensory-driven attention system. Subsequently, development leads the robot from the construction of a "body schema" to the exploration of the world of objects. The "body schema" allows controlling the arm and hand to reach and touch objects within the robot's workspace. Eventually, the interaction between the environment and the robot's body is exploited to acquire a visual model of the objects the robot encounters which can then be used to guide a top-down attention system.

  14. The Open Method of Co-ordination and the Analysis of Mutual Learning Processes of the European Employment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    The purpose of this paper is solely to address two interlinked methodological and theoretical questions concerning the Open Method of Coordination (OMC), using the European Employment Strategy as a case: First, what is the most appropriate approach to learning in the analyses of the processes...... of the European Employment Strategy (EES)? Second, how is mutual learning processes diffused among the Member States? In answering these two questions the paper draws on a social constructivist approach to learning thereby contributing to the debate about learning in the political science literature. At the same...

  15. [Respiratory treatments in neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Cols Roig, M; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sardon Prado, O; Asensio de la Cruz, O; Torrent Vernetta, A

    2014-10-01

    In a previous article, a review was presented of the respiratory pathophysiology of the patient with neuromuscular disease, as well as their clinical evaluation and the major complications causing pulmonary deterioration. This article presents the respiratory treatments required to preserve lung function in neuromuscular disease as long as possible, as well as in special situations (respiratory infections, spinal curvature surgery, etc.). Special emphasis is made on the use of non-invasive ventilation, which is changing the natural history of many of these diseases. The increase in survival and life expectancy of these children means that they can continue their clinical care in adult units. The transition from pediatric care must be an active, timely and progressive process. It may be slightly stressful for the patient before the adaptation to this new environment, with multidisciplinary care always being maintained. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuromuscular fatigue in racquet sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2008-02-01

    This article describes the physiologic and neural mechanisms that cause neuromuscular fatigue in racquet sports: table tennis, tennis, squash, and badminton. In these intermittent and dual activities, performance may be limited as a match progresses because of a reduced central activation, linked to changes in neurotransmitter concentration or in response to afferent sensory feedback. Alternatively, modulation of spinal loop properties may occur because of changes in metabolic or mechanical properties within the muscle. Finally, increased fatigue manifested by mistimed strokes, lower speed, and altered on-court movements may be caused by ionic disturbances and impairments in excitation-contraction coupling properties. These alterations in neuromuscular function contribute to decrease in racquet sports performance observed under fatigue.

  17. Procedural learning in Parkinson's disease, specific language impairment, dyslexia, schizophrenia, developmental coordination disorder, and autism spectrum disorders: A second-order meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gillian M; Lum, Jarrad A G

    2017-10-01

    The serial reaction time task (SRTT) has been used to study procedural learning in clinical populations. In this report, second-order meta-analysis was used to investigate whether disorder type moderates performance on the SRTT. Using this approach to quantitatively summarise past research, it was tested whether autism spectrum disorder, developmental coordination disorder, dyslexia, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and specific language impairment differentially affect procedural learning on the SRTT. The main analysis revealed disorder type moderated SRTT performance (p=0.010). This report demonstrates comparable levels of procedural learning impairment in developmental coordination disorder, dyslexia, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and specific language impairment. However, in autism, procedural learning is spared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Myths and facts in neuromuscular pharmacology - New developments in reversing neuromuscular blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, H.; Hollmann, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacologic reversal of neuromuscular blockade is a topic nor very well acknowledged and controversially discussed. Reasons for this are numerous and include missing perception of the potential complications of residual neuromuscular paralysis including an increased morbidity and mortality, as

  19. The undesirable effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Garvey, L H; Viby-Mogensen, J

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking drugs are designed to bind to the nicotinic receptor at the neuromuscular junction. However, they also interact with other acetylcholine receptors in the body. Binding to these receptors causes adverse effects that vary with the specificity for the cholinergic receptor...... in question. Moreover, all neuromuscular blocking drugs may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Often the symptoms are mild and self-limiting but massive histamine release can cause systematic reactions with circulatory and respiratory symptoms and signs. At the end of anaesthesia, no residual effect...... of a neuromuscular blocking drug should be present. However, the huge variability in response to neuromuscular blocking drugs makes it impossible to predict which patient will suffer postoperative residual curarization. This article discusses the undesirable effects of the currently available neuromuscular blocking...

  20. Landscaping: teamwork and integration into inter-individual coordination as a learning situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayen, Patrick; Olry, Paul

    2012-01-01

    One of the dimensions of work that is not well known in training is teamwork and the work of the team leader. The team leader is the personne who provides local supervision. Teachers and trainers, as well as business employers aknowledge the place and importance of teamwork and the role of the team leader. However, most consider themselves, insufficiently prepared to offer training in line with these elements. This paper thus aims to present the results of an analysis of group work in the field of landscaping conducted from the perspective of team work and team leader learning and training.

  1. Serotonin Coordinates Responses to Social Stress—What We Can Learn from Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Backström

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Social interaction is stressful and subordinate individuals are often subjected to chronic stress, which greatly affects both their behavior and physiology. In teleost fish the social position of an individual may have long-term effects, such as effects on migration, age of sexual maturation or even sex. The brain serotonergic system plays a key role in coordinating autonomic, behavioral and neuroendocrine stress responses. Social subordination results in a chronic activation of the brain serotonergic system an effect, which seems to be central in the subordinate phenotype. However, behavioral effects of short-term acute activation of the serotonergic system are less obvious. As in other vertebrates, divergent stress coping styles, often referred to as proactive and reactive, has been described in teleosts. As demonstrated by selective breeding, stress coping styles appear to be partly heritable. However, teleost fish are characterized by plasticity, stress coping style being affected by social experience. Again, the brain serotonergic system appears to play an important role. Studies comparing brain gene expression of fish of different social rank and/or displaying divergent stress coping styles have identified several novel factors that seem important for controlling aggressive behavior and stress coping, e.g., histamine and hypocretin/orexin. These may also interact with brain monoaminergic systems, including serotonin.

  2. Embedding an institution-wide capacity building opportunity around transition pedagogy: First Year Teaching and Learning Network Coordinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Clark

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A First Year Teaching and Learning Network was established in a regional university with a strong focus on distance education for a very diverse student cohort.  The purpose of the Network, which consisted of a Coordinator in each of nine schools, was to support staff teaching students transitioning into tertiary education. The paper explores the theoretical bases of the structure, its current method of operation, its impact so far, and future plans. The development of the Network illustrates how a university can consciously embed opportunities for staff to take ownership of transition pedagogy and thus encourage widespread capacity building amongst their peers. The experiences of the Network in its first two years provide a case study of how institutional support for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, in particular scholarship around capacity building, can be used as a mechanism to promote both staff and student engagement with transition pedagogy resulting in a shift from a second generation approach towards a third generation approach to transition.

  3. Strategic and Organisational Considerations in Planning Content and Language Integrated Learning: A Study on the Coordination between Content and Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón Vázquez, Víctor; Ávila López, Javier; Gallego Segador, Arturo; Espejo Mohedano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) is generally recognised as a fruitful example of bilingual education. However, success in CLIL may not be straightforward and may require the establishment of coordination between content and language teachers. The aim of this study is to investigate if content and language teachers are able to plan…

  4. Neuromuscular interactions around the knee in children, adults and elderly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Mademli, Lida; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Although injury and neuromuscular activation patterns may be common for all individuals, there are certain factors which differentiate neuromuscular activity responses between children, adults and elderly...

  5. Kinship and interaction in neuromuscular pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiere, Sjouke

    2006-01-01

    The background of this thesis is presented in the introductory chapters and stafts with a brief history of neuromuscular relaxants. It is followed by a short description of the neuromuscular physiology and pharmacology in chapters 2 and 3, respectively. In chapter 4 the aim of the thesis is

  6. Sugammadex Improves Neuromuscular Function in Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... with a modified gamma-cyclodextrin structure offers a viable alternative to the traditional decurarization by cholinesterase inhibitors in the context of the use of steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents. Sugammadex shows its effects through encapsulation of the steroidal neuromuscular blockers, its effects ...

  7. The Coordination Dynamics of Observational Learning: Relative Motion Direction and Relative Phase as Informational Content Linking Action-Perception to Action-Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, John J

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of this chapter is to merge together the visual perception perspective of observational learning and the coordination dynamics theory of pattern formation in perception and action. Emphasis is placed on identifying movement features that constrain and inform action-perception and action-production processes. Two sources of visual information are examined, relative motion direction and relative phase. The visual perception perspective states that the topological features of relative motion between limbs and joints remains invariant across an actor's motion and therefore are available for pickup by an observer. Relative phase has been put forth as an informational variable that links perception to action within the coordination dynamics theory. A primary assumption of the coordination dynamics approach is that environmental information is meaningful only in terms of the behavior it modifies. Across a series of single limb tasks and bimanual tasks it is shown that the relative motion and relative phase between limbs and joints is picked up through visual processes and supports observational learning of motor skills. Moreover, internal estimations of motor skill proficiency and competency are linked to the informational content found in relative motion and relative phase. Thus, the chapter links action to perception and vice versa and also links cognitive evaluations to the coordination dynamics that support action-perception and action-production processes.

  8. Autoantibodies in neuromuscular transmission disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Angela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a great pleasure to be asked to honour the memory of Dr. Baldev Singh by reviewing the field of autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis and other neurotransmission disorders. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ is the site of a number of different autoimmune and genetic disorders, and it is also the target of many neurotoxins from venomous snakes, spiders, scorpions and other species. The molecular organization of the NMJ is graphically represented in [Figure 1A], where different ion channels, receptors and other proteins are shown. Four of the ion channels or receptors are directly involved in autoimmune diseases. This brief review will not only concentrate on these conditions but also illustrate how their study is helping us to understand the etiology of rare but treatable neurological syndromes of the central nervous system.

  9. FUNCTIONS OF A NEUROMUSCULAR CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Zidar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Main functions of a neuromuscular (NM centre are making diagnosis, treatment and counselling. Some other functions, e. g. forming a register and epidemiological endeavours, could be added. All these activities are expected to be achieved by multidisciplinary approach with the idea that members use the same guidelines and share the same knowledge.NM diseases affect lower levels of the nervous system that is motor units (motor cells in the brainstem and spinal cord, nerve roots, cranial and peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. There are many such diseases; a few are more common others are rare.Rational approach in making a diagnosis can be divided into several steps. The process begins with a person with clinical symptoms and signs which raise the suspicion of NM disease. The first step is the description of the predominant pattern of muscular wasting and weakness (e. g. limb-girdle, distal, ocular, facio-scapulo-humeral. Each of these syndromes require a differential diagnosis within the motor unit territory what is achieved by means of EMG and muscle biopsy. The latter is even more important to define the nature of the abnormality. Disease nature can also be determined biochemically and, as NM disorders are commonly genetically determined, at the molecular genetic level. Treatment modalities include drugs (causative and symptomatic and other measures such as promoting and maintaining good general health, preventing skeletal deformities, physiotherapy, orthoses, surgery, and prevention of respiratory and cardiac functions. Counselling is mainly by social workers that focus on the practical aspects of coping with illness and disability and by genetic counsellors who gave advise on family planning.

  10. REHABILITATION PROGRAMS FOR PEOPLE WITH NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Zupan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular diseases are inherited, chronic, degenerative and progressive. The main characteristics of neuromuscular diseases are: muscular weakness, contractures, scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, cardiac affection, nutrition disturbances, dependence on the help of others, possible social isolation and physiological problems. Appropriate rehabilitation programs should influence all mentioned characteristics. A special unit for rehabilitation of patients with neuromuscular diseases within the Institute for rehabilitation of the Republic of Slovenia was established in 1993 at the initiative of the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Slovenia. The main aim of this establishment was to try to guide the patient and his family through the course of the disease. The article describes the work of the mentioned unit. Different clinical rehabilitation programs for people with neuromuscular diseases are presented and some research results of the unit are mentioned.

  11. Vibration or balance training on neuromuscular performance in osteopenic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, N; Belavý, D L; Rawer, R; Felsenberg, D

    2013-11-01

    Maintaining neuromuscular function in older age is an important topic for aging societies, especially for older women with low bone density who may be at risk of falls and bone fracture. This randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of resistive exercise with either whole-body vibration training (VIB) or coordination/balance training (BAL) on neuromuscular function (countermovement jump, multiple 1-leg hopping, sit-to-stand test). 68 postmenopausal women with osteopenia or osteoporosis were recruited for the study. 57 subjects completed the 9-month, twice weekly, intervention period. All subjects conducted 30 min of resistance exercise each training day. The VIB-group performed additional training on the Galileo vibration exercise device. The BAL-group performed balance training. An "intent-to-treat" analysis showed greater improvement in the VIB-group for peak countermovement power (p=0.004). The mean [95% confidence interval] effect size for this parameter was a  + 0.9[0.3 to 1.5] W/kg greater change in VIB than BAL after 9 months. In multiple 1-leg hopping, a significantly better performance in the VIB-group after the intervention period was seen on a "per-protocol" analysis only. Both groups improved in the sit-to-stand test. The current study provides evidence that short-duration whole-body vibration exercise can have a greater impact on some aspects of neuromuscular function in post-menopausal women with low bone density than proprioceptive training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Eccentric Exercise to Enhance Neuromuscular Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Lindsey K; Lepley, Adam S; Onate, James A; Grooms, Dustin R

    Neuromuscular alterations are a major causal factor of primary and secondary injuries. Though injury prevention programs have experienced some success, rates of injuries have not declined, and after injury, individuals often return to activity with functionality below clinical recommendations. Considering alternative therapies to the conventional concentric exercise approach, such as one that can target neuromuscular injury risk and postinjury alterations, may provide for more effective injury prevention and rehabilitation protocols. Peer-reviewed sources available on the Web of Science and MEDLINE databases from 2000 through 2016 were gathered using searches associated with the keywords eccentric exercise, injury prevention, and neuromuscular control. Eccentric exercise will reduce injury risk by targeting specific neural and morphologic alterations that precipitate neuromuscular dysfunction. Clinical review. Level 4. Neuromuscular control is influenced by alterations in muscle morphology and neural activity. Eccentric exercise beneficially modifies several underlying factors of muscle morphology (fiber typing, cross-sectional area, working range, and pennation angle), and emerging evidence indicates that eccentric exercise is also beneficial to peripheral and central neural activity (alpha motorneuron recruitment/firing, sarcolemma activity, corticospinal excitability, and brain activation). There is mounting evidence that eccentric exercise is not only a therapeutic intervention influencing muscle morphology but also targets unique alterations in neuromuscular control, influencing injury risk.

  13. Innervation and neuromuscular control in ageing skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepple, Russell T; Rice, Charles L

    2016-04-15

    Changes in the neuromuscular system affecting the ageing motor unit manifest structurally as a reduction in motor unit number secondary to motor neuron loss; fibre type grouping due to repeating cycles of denervation-reinnervation; and instability of the neuromuscular junction that may be due to either or both of a gradual perturbation in postsynaptic signalling mechanisms necessary for maintenance of the endplate acetylcholine receptor clusters or a sudden process involving motor neuron death or traumatic injury to the muscle fibre. Functionally, these changes manifest as a reduction in strength and coordination that precedes a loss in muscle mass and contributes to impairments in fatigue. Regular muscle activation in postural muscles or through habitual physical activity can attenuate some of these structural and functional changes up to a point along the ageing continuum. On the other hand, regular muscle activation in advanced age (>75 years) loses its efficacy, and at least in rodents may exacerbate age-related motor neuron death. Transgenic mouse studies aimed at identifying potential mechanisms of motor unit disruptions in ageing muscle are not conclusive due to many different mechanisms converging on similar motor unit alterations, many of which phenocopy ageing muscle. Longitudinal studies of ageing models and humans will help clarify the cause and effect relationships and thus, identify relevant therapeutic targets to better preserve muscle function across the lifespan. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  14. Neuromuscular blocking properties of dioxonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammisto, T; Salmenperä, M

    1980-12-01

    The characteristics of the myoneural block caused by a new neuromuscular blocking agent, dioxonium (Dx), were evaluated in surgical patients. The force and the corresponding electromyogram (EMG) of the thumb adduction evoked by various modes of ulnar nerve stimuli were measured. Onset, maintenance and disappearance of blockade after sequential administration of Dx were compared with results obtained with d-tubocurarine (dTc) or suxamethonium (Sx). Initially the Dx block was shown to be depolarizing with a negligible fade in the 2 Hz train of four stimuli with a single twitch suppression of 90%. On a weight basis, Dx was found to be about 15 times as potent as dTc in suppressing twitch to the 90% level. During maintenance, the block gained nondepolarizing characteristics with profound fades in the 2 and 50 Hz trains. The transition was associated with tachyphylaxis and with a more pronounced suppression of EMG amplitude than that measured in the twitch force. After a total dose of about 100 microgram/kg of Dx, the sensitivity to Dx again increased and the discrepancy between twitch tension and EMG disappeared. This pattern of changes was also seen with Sx. Spontaneous recovery occurred slightly faster than after dTc blocks of corresponding duration. With neostigmine, reversal was hastened and a full recovery with restitution of prerelaxant twitch and disappearance of fades was reached in about 20 min. Some discrepancy in EMG amplitude and twitch force persisted, however.

  15. Neuromuscular function in healthy occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, S E; Allen, S J; Presswood, R G; Toy, A C; Pain, M T G

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to measure neuromuscular function for the masticatory muscles under a range of occlusal conditions in healthy, dentate adults. Forty-one subjects conducted maximum voluntary clenches under nine different occlusal loading conditions encompassing bilateral posterior teeth contacts with the mandible in different positions, anterior teeth contacts and unilateral posterior teeth contacts. Surface electromyography was recorded bilaterally from the anterior temporalis, superficial masseter, sternocleidomastoid, anterior digastric and trapezius muscles. Clench condition had a significant effect on muscle function (P = 0.0000) with the maximum function obtained for occlusions with bilateral posterior contacts and the mandible in a stable centric position. The remaining contact points and moving the mandible to a protruded position, whilst keeping posterior contacts, resulted in significantly lower muscle activities. Clench condition also had a significant effect on the per cent overlap, anterior-posterior and torque coefficients (P = 0.0000-0.0024), which describe the degree of symmetry in these muscle activities. Bilateral posterior contact conditions had significantly greater symmetry in muscle activities than anterior contact conditions. Activity in the sternocleidomastoid, anterior digastric and trapezius was consistently low for all clench conditions, i.e. centric position, whilst with anterior teeth contacts, both the muscle activity and the degree of symmetry in muscle activity are significantly reduced.

  16. Agrin to YAP in Cancer and Neuromuscular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2017-04-01

    Agrin is utilized by motor neurons to stimulate the LRP4-MuSK receptor in muscles for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation. Recent studies of cancer have identified novel functions of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4-muscle-specific kinase (LRP4-MuSK) pathway. Agrin may act as a mechanotransduction signal in the extracellular matrix (ECM) to coordinate the cross-talk between the LRP4-MuSK pathway and integrin-focal adhesion pathway. Ensuing Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation promotes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we discuss the implications of the converged pathways in NMJ formation and liver cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Employment profiles in neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, W M; Abresch, R T; Koch, T R; Brewer, M L; Bowden, R K; Wanlass, R L

    1997-01-01

    Consumer and rehabilitation provider factors that might limit employment opportunities for 154 individuals with six slowly progressive neuromuscular diseases (NMD) were investigated. The NMDs were spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), hereditary motor sensory neuropathy (HMSN), Becker's muscular dystrophy (BMD), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD), and limb-girdle syndrome (LGS). Forty percent were employed in the competitive labor market at the time of the study, 50% had been employed in the past, and 10% had never been employed. The major consumer barrier to employment was education. Other important factors were type of occupation, intellectual capacity, psychosocial adjustment, and the belief by most individuals that their physical disability was the only or major barrier to obtaining a job. Psychological characteristics were associated with level of unemployment. However, physical impairment and disability were not associated with level of unemployment. There also were differences among the types of NMDs. Compared with the SMA, HMSN, BMD, and FSHD groups, the MMD and LGS groups had significantly higher levels of unemployment, lower educational levels, and fewer employed professional, management, and technical workers. Nonphysical impairment factors such as a low percentage of college graduates, impaired intellectual function in some individuals, and poor psychological adjustment were correlated with higher unemployment levels in the MMD group. Unemployment in the LGS group was correlated with a failure to complete high school. Major provider barriers to employment were the low level of referrals to Department of Rehabilitation by physicians and the low percentage of acceptance into the State Department of Rehabilitation. The low rate of acceptance was primarily attributable to the low number of referrals compounded by a lack of counselor experience with individuals with NMD. Both consumer and provider barriers may

  18. Protein defects in neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vainzof M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined progressive disorders of the muscle with a primary or predominant involvement of the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from severe congenital forms with rapid progression to milder forms with later onset and a slower course. In recent years, several proteins from the sarcolemmal muscle membrane (dystrophin, sarcoglycans, dysferlin, caveolin-3, from the extracellular matrix (alpha2-laminin, collagen VI, from the sarcomere (telethonin, myotilin, titin, nebulin, from the muscle cytosol (calpain 3, TRIM32, from the nucleus (emerin, lamin A/C, survival motor neuron protein, and from the glycosylation pathway (fukutin, fukutin-related protein have been identified. Mutations in their respective genes are responsible for different forms of neuromuscular diseases. Protein analysis using Western blotting or immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies is of the utmost importance for the differential diagnosis and elucidation of the physiopathology of each genetic disorder involved. Recent molecular studies have shown clinical inter- and intra-familial variability in several genetic disorders highlighting the importance of other factors in determining phenotypic expression and the role of possible modifying genes and protein interactions. Developmental studies can help elucidate the mechanism of normal muscle formation and thus muscle regeneration. In the last fifteen years, our research has focused on muscle protein expression, localization and possible interactions in patients affected by different forms of muscular dystrophies. The main objective of this review is to summarize the most recent findings in the field and our own contribution.

  19. Effects of Aldrin-transdiol on neuromuscular facilitation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, L.M.A.; Bercken, J. van den; Zalm, J.M. van der

    The effects of aldrin-transdiol, one of the active metabolites of the insecticide dieldrin, on evoked transmitter release, neuromuscular facilitation and neuromuscular depression have been studied in frog sartorius nerve-muscle preparations. Conventional techniques of intracellular recordings were

  20. Quantitative skeletal muscle ultrasonography in children with suspected neuromuscular disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Scholten, R.R.; Zwarts, M.J.; Verrips, A.

    2003-01-01

    We determined prospectively the diagnostic value of quantitative ultrasonography in detecting neuromuscular disorders in children. Ultrasonographic scans of four muscles were made in 36 children with symptoms or signs suggestive of neuromuscular disease, such as muscle weakness and hypotonia. The

  1. Neuromuscular Junction Dismantling in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cappello

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular junction assembly and plasticity during embryonic, postnatal, and adult life are tightly regulated by the continuous cross-talk among motor nerve endings, muscle fibers, and glial cells. Altered communications among these components is thought to be responsible for the physiological age-related changes at this synapse and possibly for its destruction in pathological states. Neuromuscular junction dismantling plays a crucial role in the onset of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS. ALS is characterized by the degeneration and death of motor neurons leading to skeletal muscle denervation, atrophy and, most often, death of the patient within five years from diagnosis. ALS is a non-cell autonomous disease as, besides motor neuron degeneration, glial cells, and possibly muscle fibers, play a role in its onset and progression. Here, we will review the recent literature regarding the mechanisms leading to neuromuscular junction disassembly and muscle denervation focusing on the role of the three players of this peripheral tripartite synapse.

  2. Multicategory classification of 11 neuromuscular diseases based on microarray data using support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Beom; Park, Jee Soo; Chung, Jai Won; Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Deok Won

    2014-01-01

    We applied multicategory machine learning methods to classify 11 neuromuscular disease groups and one control group based on microarray data. To develop multicategory classification models with optimal parameters and features, we performed a systematic evaluation of three machine learning algorithms and four feature selection methods using three-fold cross validation and a grid search. This study included 114 subjects of 11 neuromuscular diseases and 31 subjects of a control group using microarray data with 22,283 probe sets from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). We obtained an accuracy of 100%, relative classifier information (RCI) of 1.0, and a kappa index of 1.0 by applying the models of support vector machines one-versus-one (SVM-OVO), SVM one-versus-rest (OVR), and directed acyclic graph SVM (DAGSVM), using the ratio of genes between categories to within-category sums of squares (BW) feature selection method. Each of these three models selected only four features to categorize the 12 groups, resulting in a time-saving and cost-effective strategy for diagnosing neuromuscular diseases. In addition, a gene symbol, SPP1 was selected as the top-ranked gene by the BW method. We confirmed relationships between the gene (SPP1) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) from a previous study. With our models as clinically helpful tools, neuromuscular diseases could be classified quickly using a computer, thereby giving a time-saving, cost-effective, and accurate diagnosis.

  3. [Electrodiagnosis in disorders of neuromuscular transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumillas, M J; Cortés, V

    Electrophysiological studies are of recognized use in the confirmation of alterations of neuromuscular transmission in further determining their physiopathological characteristics, helping to differentiate them from other conditions with secondary effects on their function. In our study we review the physiopathology of these disorders which compromise the safety factor of the neuromuscular junction, by presynaptic or postsynaptic alterations, and forms the basis of the results of electrophysiological studies. We describe the techniques currently most used: repetitive stimulation and single fibre electromyography complemented by conventional electromyography. Their application and findings in the commonest syndromes are discussed. Finally, their sensitivity, specificity and difficulties are considered.

  4. Research highlights of partial neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the latest progression on neuromuscular disorders for clinicians, this review screened and systemized the papers on neuromuscular disorders which were collected by PubMed from January 2013 to February 2014. This review also introduced the clinical diagnosis and treatment hightlights on glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ (GSD Ⅱ, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. The important references will be useful for clinicians. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.004

  5. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. 882.5860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5860 Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted neuromuscular stimulator is a device that provides...

  6. The Structure of Human Neuromuscular Junctions: Some Unanswered Molecular Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke R. Slater

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The commands that control animal movement are transmitted from motor neurons to their target muscle cells at the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs. The NMJs contain many protein species whose role in transmission depends not only on their inherent properties, but also on how they are distributed within the complex structure of the motor nerve terminal and the postsynaptic muscle membrane. These molecules mediate evoked chemical transmitter release from the nerve and the action of that transmitter on the muscle. Human NMJs are among the smallest known and release the smallest number of transmitter “quanta”. By contrast, they have the most deeply infolded postsynaptic membranes, which help to amplify transmitter action. The same structural features that distinguish human NMJs make them particularly susceptible to pathological processes. While much has been learned about the molecules which mediate transmitter release and action, little is known about the molecular processes that control the growth of the cellular and subcellular components of the NMJ so as to give rise to its mature form. A major challenge for molecular biologists is to understand the molecular basis for the development and maintenance of functionally important aspects of NMJ structure, and thereby to point to new directions for treatment of diseases in which neuromuscular transmission is impaired.

  7. Adaptation mechanism of interlimb coordination in human split-belt treadmill walking through learning of foot contact timing: a robotics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Soichiro; Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro; Tomita, Nozomi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2015-09-06

    Human walking behaviour adaptation strategies have previously been examined using split-belt treadmills, which have two parallel independently controlled belts. In such human split-belt treadmill walking, two types of adaptations have been identified: early and late. Early-type adaptations appear as rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination activities when the belt speeds of the treadmill change between tied (same speed for both belts) and split-belt (different speeds for each belt) configurations. By contrast, late-type adaptations occur after the early-type adaptations as a gradual change and only involve interlimb coordination. Furthermore, interlimb coordination shows after-effects that are related to these adaptations. It has been suggested that these adaptations are governed primarily by the spinal cord and cerebellum, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Because various physiological findings suggest that foot contact timing is crucial to adaptive locomotion, this paper reports on the development of a two-layered control model for walking composed of spinal and cerebellar models, and on its use as the focus of our control model. The spinal model generates rhythmic motor commands using an oscillator network based on a central pattern generator and modulates the commands formulated in immediate response to foot contact, while the cerebellar model modifies motor commands through learning based on error information related to differences between the predicted and actual foot contact timings of each leg. We investigated adaptive behaviour and its mechanism by split-belt treadmill walking experiments using both computer simulations and an experimental bipedal robot. Our results showed that the robot exhibited rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination that were similar to the early-type adaptations observed in humans. In addition, despite the lack of direct interlimb coordination control, gradual changes and after-effects in the

  8. Coordinating Supplemental Reading Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeney, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Although supplemental reading services are meant to improve reading achievement of struggling readers and students with reading disabilities, without concerted effort to ensure communication and coordination with in-school instruction, they may fall short of their desired mark. To promote learning, it is critical that any services provided outside…

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF LEARNING APPROACH AND EYE-HAND COORDINATION AGAINST THE RESULTS OF A FREE THROW IN BASKETBALL GAMES "PENGARUH PENDEKATAN PEMBELAJARAN DAN KOORDINASI MATA-TANGAN TERHADAP HASIL FREE THROW PADA PERMAINAN BOLA BASKET"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramoda Wardana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this recearch were to examine the influence of direct and indirect learning approaches on free throw result in basketball, the difference of free throw result played by students with good and poor hand-eye coordinations, and the interaction influence of learning approach and hand-eye coordination on the result. This research applied experimental method with 2x2 factorial design. The population within this study was male students in 5th semester of the major program. Purposive Random Sampling was used as the sampling technique. 40 students were taken as the samples, in which students with good and poor hand-eye coordinations were equal. The analytical technique of this study belonged to ANOVA to use SPSS 22 and 5% significancy. Study result showed the difference of significant influence between direct and indirect learning approaches on free throw result, for p-value = 0,045, smaller than 0,05; the difference of increase in the result from students with good and poor hand-eye coordinations, for p-value = 0,035, smaller than 0,05; and the interaction of learning approach and hand-eye coordination on the result, for p-value = 0, 012, smaller than 0,05.It is concluded that there were differences of the significant influence between the learning approaches on free throw result, the free throw result from students with good and poor hand-eye coordinations, and there was an interaction influence of learning approaches and hand-eye coordination on the free throw result.

  10. Neuromuscular Exercise Post Partial Medial Meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V

    2015-01-01

    : In patients 3-12 months following a medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, a neuromuscular exercise program did not alter the peak knee adduction moment, a key predictor of osteoarthritis structural disease progression. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (#ACTRN12612000542897)....

  11. Experienced and physiological fatigue in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillings, M.L.; Kalkman, J.S.; Janssen, H.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Bleijenberg, G.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fatigue has been described as a typical symptom of neurological diseases. It might be caused both by changes at the peripheral and at the central level. This study measured the level of experienced fatigue and physiological correlates of fatigue in three genetically defined neuromuscular

  12. Postoperative neuromuscular function following non-depolarising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... speaking, difficulty swallowing, unsteady gait and sensations of fatigue and muscle weakness.8,10,24–26 These newer studies have resulted in a recovery to a TOF of 0.9 or greater prior to extubation becoming widely adopted as a standard of anaesthetic practice following non-depolarising neuromuscular ...

  13. Neuromuscular dysfunction associated with delayed weaning from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yehia Khalil

    2012-03-21

    Mar 21, 2012 ... Neuromuscular dysfunction associated with delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation in patients with respiratory failure. Yehia Khalil a. , Emad El Din Mustafa a. , Ahmed Youssef a. ,. Mohamed Hassan Imam b,. *, Amni Fathy El Behiry a a Department of Chest, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, ...

  14. O uso de bloqueadores neuromusculares no Brasil El uso de bloqueadores neuromusculares en Brasil Neuromuscular blockers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Simões de Almeida

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Dados estatísticos referentes ao uso de bloqueadores neuromusculares no Brasil são desconhecidos. Este trabalho se propõe a análise estatística desse tópico. MÉTODO: Foram compiladas 831 respostas de um questionário preenchido em parte por anestesiologistas presentes ao 48º Congresso Brasileiro de Anestesiologia em Recife, 2001 e em parte via Internet, por anestesiologistas cujos endereços eletrônicos constam na página da Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia (www.sba.com.br. Foram analisados os seguintes dados: tempo de contato com a especialidade, região onde atuam os anestesiologistas, uso de bloqueadores neuromusculares (BNM em ordem de preferência, indicações do uso de succinilcolina, uso do monitor da transmissão neuromuscular, critérios para se considerar o paciente descurarizado, uso de neostigmina, forma de administração dos BNM e descrição de complicações observadas. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos anestesiologistas em questão exerce a profissão há mais de 11 anos e o maior número de respostas foi proveniente da região sudeste do Brasil. O BNM mais empregado é o atracúrio, seguido de pancurônio e succinilcolina. A succinilcolina é mais empregada na indução rápida e em crianças (80% e 25% respectivamente. Monitores da transmissão neuromuscular, 53% dos anestesiologistas nunca usam, e como critério de recuperação, 92% consideram o paciente descurarizado mediante sinais clínicos. Em 45% das vezes os profissionais empregam a neostigmina de forma rotineira, e 94% administra os BNM sob forma de bolus. Cerca de 30% registra ter havido complicação decorrente do uso de BNM. As complicações mais apontadas foram o bloqueio prolongado, o broncoespasmo grave e a curarização residual. CONCLUSÕES: O atracúrio é o bloqueador neuromuscular mais empregado no Brasil, há percentual alto de uso da succinilcolina em situações não emergenciais, o uso de monitores da transmiss

  15. Information in learning to co-ordinate and control movements: Is there a need for specificity of practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, Geert J.P.; Van Der Kamp, John

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to defend the thesis that information and movement are tightly coupled and as a result specificity of training is required in order to get meaningful learning effects. This thesis will be illustrated by elaborating upon the role of informational constraints in the control

  16. Neuromuscular blockade in children Bloqueadores neuromusculares em crianças

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fernando Lourenço de Almeida

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs have been widely used to control patients who need to be immobilized for some kind of medical intervention, such as an invasive procedure or synchronism with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this monograph is to review the pharmacology of the NMBAs, to compare the main differences between the neuromuscular junction in neonates, infants, toddlers and adults, and moreover to discuss their indications in critically ill pediatric patients. Continuous improvement of knowledge about NMBAs pharmacology, adverse effects, and the many other remaining unanswered questions about neuromuscular junction and neuromuscular blockade in children is essential for the correct use of these drugs. Therefore, the indication of these agents in pediatrics is determined with extreme judiciousness. Computorized (Medline 1990-2000 and active search of articles were the mechanisms used in this review.Os bloqueadores neuromusculares têm sido amplamente utilizados para controlar pacientes que necessitem imobilidade para algum tipo de intervenção médica, desde a realização de procedimentos invasivos até a obtenção de sincronismo com a ventilação mecânica. O objetivo básico desta monografia é revisar a farmacologia dos principais bloqueadores neuromusculares, analisar as diferenças existentes na junção neuromuscular de neonatos, lactentes, pré-escolares e adultos, além de discutir suas indicações em pacientes criticamente enfermos internados em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica. Revisão computadorizada da literatura (Medline 1990-2000 associado a busca ativa de artigos compuseram o mecanismo de busca dos dados desta revisão.

  17. Improvement in Offaxis Neuromuscular Control Under Slippery Conditions Following Six-Week Pivoting Leg Neuromuscular Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Joo; Ren, Yupeng; Press, Joel M; Lee, Jungwha; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2017-11-01

    Knee injuries are usually associated with offaxis loadings in the transverse and frontal planes. Thus, improvement of lower limb offaxis neuromuscular control is important in knee injury prevention and post-injury rehabilitation. The goal of this paper was to investigate the effects of six-week pivoting offaxis intensity adjustable neuromuscular control training (POINT) using a custom-made offaxis elliptical trainer on lower limb offaxis neuromuscular control performance in trained and untrained functional tasks under slippery conditions. Twenty-six subjects participated in 18 sessions of POINT (three sessions per week for six weeks) and 25 subjects served as controls who did a regular workout. Offaxis neuromuscular control performance measures in terms of pivoting instability, sliding instability, and time-to-peak offaxis EMG entropy were evaluated on both groups under slippery conditions including a trained free pivoting task and untrained free sliding task and free pivoting and sliding task. Compared with the control group, the training group significantly decreased pivoting instability and the time-to-peak offaxis EMG entropy in lower limb muscles, indicating improvement in offaxis neuromuscular control performance. Furthermore, the training group showed reduced pivoting instability and sliding instability during the untrained free pivoting and sliding task. This paper may help us develop more focused and effective offaxis training programs to reduce knee injuries associated with offaxis loadings.

  18. Neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic ventral herniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Roar; Madsen, Matias V; Asadzadeh, Sami

    2015-01-01

    's rating of surgical conditions during suturing, duration of surgery and duration of the suturing of the hernia. CONCLUSION: This randomised cross-over study investigated a potential effect on the surgical workspace in laparoscopic ventral herniotomy using deep NMB compared with no NMB. The study may......INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic herniotomy is the preferred technique for some ventral hernias. Several factors may influence the surgical conditions, one being the depth of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) applied. We hypothesised that deep neuromuscular blockade defined as a post-tetanic count below eight...... would provide a better surgical workspace. METHODS: This was an investigator-initiated, assessor- and patient-blinded randomised cross-over study. A total of 34 patients with planned laparoscopic umbilical, incisional and linea alba herniotomy were studied. Patients would be randomised to receive deep...

  19. Neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic ventral herniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Roar; Madsen, Matias V; Asadzadeh, Sami

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic herniotomy is the preferred technique for some ventral hernias. Several factors may influence the surgical conditions, one being the depth of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) applied. We hypothesised that deep neuromuscular blockade defined as a post-tetanic count below eight......'s rating of surgical conditions during suturing, duration of surgery and duration of the suturing of the hernia. CONCLUSION: This randomised cross-over study investigated a potential effect on the surgical workspace in laparoscopic ventral herniotomy using deep NMB compared with no NMB. The study may...... provide knowledge relevant to other laparoscopic techniques. FUNDING: The study is funded by a research grant from the Investigator Initiated Studies Program of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02247466....

  20. Progressive inhibition of neuromuscular structures (PINS) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, D J

    2000-05-01

    Progressive inhibition of neuromuscular structures (PINS) is a technique that can be included in the osteopathic manipulative treatment repertoire. It relies on knowledge of anatomy and neuromuscular physiologic features as well as on standard forms of osteopathic palpatory diagnosis and treatment. It is a variant of the inhibition technique that has been taught as an osteopathic manipulative technique for many years, and it bears some resemblance to other manual medicine techniques. The emphasis of the approach is the determination of the alteration of the tissues due to dysfunction, delivering treatment based on palpatory evaluation and patient feedback. Two related points are initially chosen, followed by a progression from one to the other. Relationships to similar techniques are also discussed. Theoretical as well as selected practical applications are presented.

  1. Options for mechanical ventilation in neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterborn, J N; Hill, N S

    1994-12-01

    A variety of mechanical devices may be used to provide assistance when ventilation and cough are severely impaired by progressive respiratory weakness caused by neuromuscular disease. Traditionally, positive pressure ventilation via a tracheostomy has been used, but if upper airway function is adequate, a variety of noninvasive devices also may be considered. Although positive pressure ventilation is the preferred noninvasive mode for assisting ventilation, other modes may be selected depending on patient needs, preferences, and physical characteristics.

  2. Oral supplementation of Ocimum basilicum has the potential to improves the locomotory, exploratory, anxiolytic behavior and learning in adult male albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, K; Khan, M A; Iqbal, F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this project was to determine the effect of 100 mg/ml solvent/kg body weight of Ocimum basilicum leaf extract on neuromuscular co-ordination, exploratory, locomotory and short-term memory formation in male albino mice. Five weeks old, male albino mice were used as the experimental animals in order to demonstrate the effect of O. basilicum's extract on learning and memory. Each male albino mouse was weighted and orally treated either with 100 mg/ml solvent/kg body weight of O. basilicum leaf extract or with commercially available saline solution (Otsuka, Pakistan) for 7 days. Behavioral observations were made by applying a series of neurological tests (Elevated plus maze, Light and dark box, Open field and Rota rod). Dose supplementation continued during neurological testing. It was observed that 100 mg/ml solvent/kg body weight of leaf extract improves neuromuscular co-ordination and male albino mouse performance in open field, light dark box and during novel object test when compared with control group. We concluded that 100 mg/ml solvent/kg body weight of leaf extract has the potential to improve neuromuscular co-ordination, exploratory behavior, object recognition ability and transfer latency in male albino mice and can be safely administrated orally.

  3. Neuromuscular adaptation to actual and simulated weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The chronic "unloading" of the neuromuscular system during spaceflight has detrimental functional and morphological effects. Changes in the metabolic and mechanical properties of the musculature can be attributed largely to the loss of muscle protein and the alteration in the relative proportion of the proteins in skeletal muscle, particularly in the muscles that have an antigravity function under normal loading conditions. These adaptations could result in decrements in the performance of routine or specialized motor tasks, both of which may be critical for survival in an altered gravitational field, i.e., during spaceflight and during return to 1 G. For example, the loss in extensor muscle mass requires a higher percentage of recruitment of the motor pools for any specific motor task. Thus, a faster rate of fatigue will occur in the activated muscles. These consequences emphasize the importance of developing techniques for minimizing muscle loss during spaceflight, at least in preparation for the return to 1 G after spaceflight. New insights into the complexity and the interactive elements that contribute to the neuromuscular adaptations to space have been gained from studies of the role of exercise and/or growth factors as countermeasures of atrophy. The present chapter illustrates the inevitable interactive effects of neural and muscular systems in adapting to space. It also describes the considerable progress that has been made toward the goal of minimizing the functional impact of the stimuli that induce the neuromuscular adaptations to space.

  4. Neuromuscular interactions around the knee in children, adults and elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Mademli, Lida; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Although injury and neuromuscular activation patterns may be common for all individuals, there are certain factors which differentiate neuromuscular activity responses between children, adults and elderly. The purpose of this study is to review recent evidence on age differences in neural activation and muscle balances around the knee when performing single joint movements. Particularly, current evidence indicates that there are some interesting similarities in the neuromuscular mechanisms by...

  5. The influence of gender on neuromuscular pre-activity during side-cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencke, Jesper; Zebis, Mette K

    2011-04-01

    It is well established that female athletes are at increased risk for sustaining ACL injuries in sports, where sudden changes of direction are a frequent movement pattern. The underlying neuromuscular mechanisms related to the elevated ACL injury rate in female athletes has yet to be fully investigated. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine gender differences in neuromuscular pre-activity during a maneuver that mimics a movement associated with the incidence of ACL injuries. Twenty-four team handball players (12 male and 12 female) with no history of ACL injury were tested for EMG pre-activity of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris during a side-cutting maneuver. Mean EMG amplitude 50ms prior to toe down was normalized to maximal EMG obtained during maximal isometric contraction. The results showed that females had significantly lower hamstring EMG pre-activity 50ms prior to toe-down than males (P<0.01). No gender difference was present in quadriceps EMG pre-activity during side-cutting. Lower hamstring activation prior to toe-down may result in lower hamstring contraction force during the initial part of the ground contact, and thus lesser knee joint stability compared to males. Specific training should be employed to alter the neuromuscular coordination towards a more stabilizing motor pattern. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Urgencias en patología neuromuscular Emergencies in neuromuscular pathology

    OpenAIRE

    T. Ayuso; I. Jericó

    2008-01-01

    La debilidad muscular aguda (DMA) es el síntoma predominante de las urgencias neuromusculares, especialmente si afecta a la musculatura respiratoria u orofaríngea. La DMA es un síndrome plurietiológico y con distintos niveles lesionales en la unidad motora. Dentro del amplio grupo de enfermedades neuromusculares, las que con mayor frecuencia provocan DMA e insuficiencia respiratoria son el síndrome de Guillain-Barré (SGB) y la miastenia gravis (MG). El SGB constituye la causa más frecuente de...

  7. Lola regulates glutamate receptor expression at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Fukui

    2012-02-01

    Communication between pre- and post-synaptic cells is a key process in the development and modulation of synapses. Reciprocal induction between pre- and postsynaptic cells involves regulation of gene transcription, yet the underlying genetic program remains largely unknown. To investigate how innervation-dependent gene expression in postsynaptic cells supports synaptic differentiation, we performed comparative microarray analysis of Drosophila muscles before and after innervation, and of prospero mutants, which show a delay in motor axon outgrowth. We identified 84 candidate genes that are potentially up- or downregulated in response to innervation. By systematic functional analysis, we found that one of the downregulated genes, longitudinals lacking (lola, which encodes a BTB-Zn-finger transcription factor, is required for proper expression of glutamate receptors. When the function of lola was knocked down in muscles by RNAi, the abundance of glutamate receptors (GluRs, GluRIIA, GluRIIB and GluRIII, as well as that of p-21 activated kinase (PAK, was greatly reduced at the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs. Recordings of the synaptic response revealed a decrease in postsynaptic quantal size, consistent with the reduction in GluR levels. Lola appears to regulate the expression of GluRs and PAK at the level of transcription, because the amount of mRNAs encoding these molecules was also reduced in the mutants. The transcriptional level of lola, in turn, is downregulated by increased neural activity. We propose that Lola coordinates expression of multiple postsynaptic components by transcriptional regulation.

  8. Neuromuscular Manifestations of West Nile Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arturo eLeis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common neuromuscular manifestation of West Nile virus (WNV infection is a poliomyelitis syndrome with asymmetric paralysis variably involving one (monoparesis to four limbs (quadriparesis, with or without brainstem involvement and respiratory failure. This syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis may occur without overt fever or meningoencephalitis. Although involvement of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor neurons in the brainstem are the major sites of pathology responsible for neuromuscular signs, inflammation also may involve skeletal or cardiac muscle (myositis, myocarditis, motor axons (polyradiculitis, peripheral nerve (Guillain-Barré syndrome, brachial plexopathy. In addition, involvement of spinal sympathetic neurons and ganglia provides a plausible explanation for autonomic instability seen in some patients. Many patients also experience prolonged subjective generalized weakness and disabling fatigue. Despite recent evidence that WNV may persist long term in the central nervous system or periphery in animals, the evidence in humans is controversial. WNV persistence would be of great concern in immunosuppressed patients or in those with prolonged or recurrent symptoms. Support for the contention that WNV can lead to autoimmune disease arises from reports of patients presenting with various neuromuscular diseases that presumably involve autoimmune mechanisms (GBS, other demyelinating neu¬ropathies, myasthenia gravis, brachial plexopathies, stiff-person syndrome, and delayed or recurrent symptoms. Although there is no specific treatment or vaccine currently approved in humans, and the standard remains supportive care, drugs that can alter the cascade of immunobiochemical events leading to neuronal death may be potentially useful (high-dose corticosteroids, interferon preparations, and intravenous immune globulin containing WNV-specific antibodies. Human experience with these agents seems promising based on anecdotal

  9. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  10. A coordination theory for intelligent machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei-Yue; Saridis, George N.

    1990-01-01

    A formal model for the coordination level of intelligent machines is established. The framework of the coordination level investigated consists of one dispatcher and a number of coordinators. The model called coordination structure has been used to describe analytically the information structure and information flow for the coordination activities in the coordination level. Specifically, the coordination structure offers a formalism to (1) describe the task translation of the dispatcher and coordinators; (2) represent the individual process within the dispatcher and coordinators; (3) specify the cooperation and connection among the dispatcher and coordinators; (4) perform the process analysis and evaluation; and (5) provide a control and communication mechanism for the real-time monitor or simulation of the coordination process. A simple procedure for the task scheduling in the coordination structure is presented. The task translation is achieved by a stochastic learning algorithm. The learning process is measured with entropy and its convergence is guaranteed. Finally, a case study of the coordination structure with three coordinators and one dispatcher for a simple intelligent manipulator system illustrates the proposed model and the simulation of the task processes performed on the model verifies the soundness of the theory.

  11. Medical back belt with integrated neuromuscular electrical stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottenberg, E. (Eliza); Brinks, G.J. (Ger); Hesse, J. (Jenny)

    2014-01-01

    The medical back belt with integrated neuromuscular electrical stimulation is anorthopedic device, which has two main functions. The first function is to stimulate the backmuscles by using a neuromuscular electrical stimulation device that releases regular,electrical impulses. The second function of

  12. Motoneuron and sensory neuron plasticity to varying neuromuscular activity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Roy, Roland R.; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2002-01-01

    The size and phenotypic properties of the neural and muscular elements of the neuromuscular unit are matched under normal conditions. When subjected to chronic decreases or increases in neuromuscular activity, however, the adaptations in these properties are much more limited in the neural compared with the muscular elements.

  13. ATRACURIUM-INDUCED NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCK IN THE ISOLATED ARM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ERIKSSON, LI; VANDENBROM, RHG; LENNMARKEN, C; AGOSTON, S

    1992-01-01

    A modification of the isolated arm technique was applied in 10 females under opioid-based i.v. anaesthesia for comparison of the offset of an atracurium-induced neuromuscular block in an isolated arm to an arm with maintained circulation. The neuromuscular blocking effect of a bolus dose of

  14. Electrophysiological study in neuromuscular junction disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Cherian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is on ultrastructure and subcellular physiology at normal and abnormal neuromuscular junctions. The clinical and electrophysiological findings in myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS, congenital myasthenic syndromes, and botulinum intoxication are discussed. Single fiber electromyography (SFEMG helps to explain the basis of testing neuromuscular junction function by repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS. SFEMG requires skill and patience and its availability is limited to a few centers. For RNS supramaximal stimulation is essential and so is display of the whole waveform of each muscle response at maximum amplitude. The amplitudes of the negative phase of the first and fourth responses are measured from baseline to negative peak, and the percent change of the fourth response compared with the first represents the decrement or increment. A decrement greater than 10% is accepted as abnormal and smooth progression of response amplitude train and reproducibility form the crux. In suspected LEMS the effect of fast rates of stimulation should be determined after RNS response to slow rates of stimulation. Caution is required to avoid misinterpretation of potentiation and pseudofacilitation.

  15. Cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular responses to motocross riding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konttinen, Tomi; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine physiological and neuromuscular responses during motocross riding at individual maximal speed together with the riding-induced changes in maximal isometric force production. Seven A-level (group A) and 5 hobby-class (group H) motocross-riders performed a 30-minute riding test on a motocross track and maximal muscle strength and oxygen uptake (VO2max) tests in a laboratory. During the riding the mean (+/-SD) VO2 reduced in group A from 86 +/- 10% to 69 +/- 6% of the maximum (P physical stress and demands on both skill and physical capacity of the rider. Physical stress occurs as the result of handling of the bike when receiving continuous impacts in the situation requiring both aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. Our data suggest that both maximal capacity and strain during the ride should be measured to analyze the true physiological and neuromuscular demands of motocross ride. For the practice, this study strongly suggests to train not only aerobic and anaerobic capacity but also to use strength and power training for successful motocross riding.

  16. Neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattjes, Mike P. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, De Boelelaan 1117, HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kley, Rudolf A. [Klinken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University, Department of Neurology, Neuromuscular Centre Ruhrgebiet, Bochum (Germany); Fischer, Dirk [University Hospital of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); University Children' s Hospital Basel, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Driven by increasing numbers of newly identified genetic defects and new insights into the field of inherited muscle diseases, neuromuscular imaging in general and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular are increasingly being used to characterise the severity and pattern of muscle involvement. Although muscle biopsy is still the gold standard for the establishment of the definitive diagnosis, muscular imaging is an important diagnostic tool for the detection and quantification of dystrophic changes during the clinical workup of patients with hereditary muscle diseases. MRI is frequently used to describe muscle involvement patterns, which aids in narrowing of the differential diagnosis and distinguishing between dystrophic and non-dystrophic diseases. Recent work has demonstrated the usefulness of muscle imaging for the detection of specific congenital myopathies, mainly for the identification of the underlying genetic defect in core and centronuclear myopathies. Muscle imaging demonstrates characteristic patterns, which can be helpful for the differentiation of individual limb girdle muscular dystrophies. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of current methods and applications as well as future perspectives in the field of neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases. We also provide diagnostic algorithms that might guide us through the differential diagnosis in hereditary myopathies. (orig.)

  17. Neuromuscular dressing effects: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calero PA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The kinesio taping is a technique that was created in 1979 by Doctor Kenzo Kase I’m looking through it that could generate a new therapeutic option to control pain, improve athletic performance and reduce the impact of musculoskeletal disorders. From the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, this technique as a therapeutic alternative PTO and is composed of health professionals in the field of sport and physical rehabilitation.Objetive: This article aims to identify theoretical approaches on the bandage neuromuscular. Material and methods: held today, for which conducted a literature search of databases such as como Proquest, Ovid, Cochraine, PEDro, Journal of Orthopedic and Sports Physical, Sciencedirect, Pubmed y Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (Lilacs.The paper proposes a scheme of contextualization of the current landscape of the use and effects of kinesio taping in the management of different pathologies of the musculo-skeletal system in sports. Conclusion: it is concluded that currently many health professionals, and take the neuromuscular bandage a good therapeutic option in the management of diseases affecting the human body is investigated and every day more about the subject, which makes these new therapeutic methods to acquire a scientific value and transcends knowledge.

  18. Prevalence of complications in neuromuscular scoliosis surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Shallu; Wu, Chunsen; Andersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our objectives were primarily to review the published literature on complications in neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS) surgery and secondarily, by means of a meta-analysis, to determine the overall pooled rates (PR) of various complications associated with NMS surgery. METHODS: PubMed and Em......PURPOSE: Our objectives were primarily to review the published literature on complications in neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS) surgery and secondarily, by means of a meta-analysis, to determine the overall pooled rates (PR) of various complications associated with NMS surgery. METHODS: Pub......Med and Embase databases were searched for studies reporting the outcomes and complications of NMS surgery, published from 1997 to May 2011. We focused on NMS as defined by the Scoliosis Research Society's classification. We measured the pooled estimate of the overall complication rates (PR) using a random....... In regard to surgical complications affiliated with various surgical techniques in NMS, the level of evidence of published literature ranges between 2+ to 2-; the subsequent recommendations are level C. CONCLUSION: NMS patients have diverse and high complication rates after scoliosis surgery. High PRs...

  19. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  20. Neuromuscular blockade in cardiac surgery: An update for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmerling Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been great advancements in cardiac surgery over the last two decades; the widespread use of off-pump aortocoronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and robotic surgery have also changed the face of cardiac anaesthesia. The concept of "Fast-track anaesthesia" demands the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs with short duration of action, combining the ability to provide (if necessary sufficiently profound neuromuscular blockade during surgery and immediate re-establishment of normal neuromuscular transmission at the end of surgery. Postoperative residual muscle paralysis is one of the major hurdles for immediate or early extubation after cardiac surgery. Nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs for cardiac surgery should therefore be easy to titrate, of rapid onset and short duration of action with a pathway of elimination independent from hepatic or renal dysfunction, and should equally not affect haemodynamic stability. The difference between repetitive bolus application and continuous infusion is outlined in this review, with the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics of vecuronium, pancuronium, rocuronium, and cisatracurium. Kinemyography and acceleromyography are the most important currently used neuromuscular monitoring methods. Whereas monitoring at the adductor pollicis muscle is appropriate at the end of surgery, monitoring of the corrugator supercilii muscle better reflects neuromuscular blockade at more central, profound muscles, such as the diaphragm, larynx, or thoraco-abdominal muscles. In conclusion, cisatracurium or rocuronium is recommended for neuromuscular blockade in modern cardiac surgery.

  1. Discussion on the concepts of "coordination" and "agility" in terms of physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zaporozhanov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the scientific and methodological literature and practice of physical education concepts of "coordination" and "agility" are often used synonymously. And discussion about the appropriateness distinguish these concepts is mainly analytical character. Purpose : to evaluate the nature of the relationship metrically between indicators kinesthesia (which characterize the internal processes of interaction in the neuro-muscular system - coordination and the efficient delivery of a complex exercise (in cooperation man in the external environment of physical education - agility. Material : 77 students surveyed. Students performed on 100 strikes the ball into the goal in terms of golf (10 control measurements. The experiment was conducted for 8 months. 7700 measurement precision of centimeters processed statistically. Calculated reliability of measurements: 100 comparability repetitive beats, accuracy hitting the ball into the goal and the pace of learning in terms of the impact of blows. Results : the total volume measurements was characterized by high variability (V% = 53,5, indicating that the low status of kinesthesia surveyed. This reduces the reliability of the correlation coefficients according to 30 and then 10 of the best students in the general rank in terms of reliability of measurements. Significant correlation occurred only in terms of performance beats the purpose of learning the technique and pace (0,417; n = 30, p <0,05; and 0,677; n = 10, p <0,05. Conclusions : Overall, the results of our study showed that the concept of "coordination" and "agility" should still be distinguished. In some cases, students with a good level of kinesthesia occurred and high mobility in complex locomotion. If we recognize it expedient to continue this discussion, then we must rely on objective, metric information. This information should be obtained in studies with a broad contingent surveyed, consistently show good concentration and high reliability

  2. Deep Neuromuscular Blockade Improves Laparoscopic Surgical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Herring, W Joseph; Blobner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Hg; 'standard') insufflation pressure in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Primary endpoint was surgeon's overall satisfaction with surgical conditions, rated at end of surgery using an 11-point numerical scale. Post-operative pain scores were also evaluated. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance. RESULTS......INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic......: Of 127 randomized patients, 120 had evaluable data for the primary endpoint. Surgeon's score of overall satisfaction with surgical conditions was significantly higher with deep versus moderate NMB indicated by a least-square mean difference of 1.1 points (95% confidence interval 0.1-2.0; P = 0...

  3. Deep Neuromuscular Blockade Improves Laparoscopic Surgical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Herring, W Joseph; Blobner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic......Hg; 'standard') insufflation pressure in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Primary endpoint was surgeon's overall satisfaction with surgical conditions, rated at end of surgery using an 11-point numerical scale. Post-operative pain scores were also evaluated. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance. RESULTS......: Of 127 randomized patients, 120 had evaluable data for the primary endpoint. Surgeon's score of overall satisfaction with surgical conditions was significantly higher with deep versus moderate NMB indicated by a least-square mean difference of 1.1 points (95% confidence interval 0.1-2.0; P = 0...

  4. Monitoring strength training: neuromuscular and hormonal profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, C; Colli, R; Bonomi, R; von Duvillard, S P; Viru, A

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated changes induced by a single heavy resistance training session on neuromuscular and endocrine systems in trained athletes, using the same exercises for training and testing. Five different groups volunteered: track and field male sprinters (MS, N = 6), track and field female sprinters (FS, N = 6), body builders (BB, N = 6), and weight lifters performing low-repetition exercise (WLL, N = 4) and high-repetition exercise (WLH, N = 4). In training, the work performed during half and full squat exercise was monitored for mechanical power output as well as EMG analysis on leg extensor muscles of the subjects belonging to the MS, FS, and BB groups. Just before and immediately after the training session, venous blood samples were obtained for RIA determination of testosterone (T), cortisol (C), lutropin (LH), human prolactin (PRL), and follitropin (FSH) in FS and MS. In the other three groups (BB, WLH, and WLL), the hormonal profile was limited to T and human growth hormone (hGH) only. After training the power developed in full squat demonstrated a statistically significant decrease (P training session. Consequently, the EMG/Power ratio increased in both MS and FS, although only in MS a statistical significance was noted (P < 0.05). In MS immediately after the session the levels of C, T, and LH were significantly lower (P < 0.05). No changes were found in FS. In both groups and in BB significant negative correlation was found between changes in T level and EMG/Power ratio in half squat performance. It is likely that adequate T level may compensate the effect of fatigue in FT fibers by ensuring a better neuromuscular efficiency.

  5. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  6. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  7. Seeking a better landscape for therapy development in neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkindale, Jane; Porter, John D

    2018-01-01

    Although the neuromuscular field has seen accelerated approval of a drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and full approval of one for spinal muscular atrophy, these experiences have shown that objective data and an adequate level of effect are essential for drug approval and reimbursement. The appropriateness and validity of biomarkers and clinically meaningful endpoints and an understanding of disease progression rates all played essential roles in the levels of evidence for these drugs. Such tools are best developed through integration of clinical data. The siloing of clinical data for rare neuromuscular diseases represents a considerable barrier to achieving better care and novel therapies for patients living with neuromuscular diseases. We discuss a data-sharing model implemented for DMD and urge cultural changes in the ways natural history and clinical trial data are collected and shared across all neuromuscular diseases in order to benefit the primary stakeholder, the patient. Muscle Nerve 57: 16-19, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The role of proprioception and neuromuscular stability in carpal instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, E; Lluch, A; Rein, S

    2016-01-01

    Carpal stability has traditionally been defined as dependent on the articular congruity of joint surfaces, the static stability maintained by intact ligaments, and the dynamic stability caused by muscle contractions resulting in a compression of joint surfaces. In the past decade, a fourth factor in carpal stability has been proposed, involving the neuromuscular and proprioceptive control of joints. The proprioception of the wrist originates from afferent signals elicited by sensory end organs (mechanoreceptors) in ligaments and joint capsules that elicit spinal reflexes for immediate joint stability, as well as higher order neuromuscular influx to the cerebellum and sensorimotor cortices for planning and executing joint control. The aim of this review is to provide an understanding of the role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in carpal instabilities by delineating the sensory innervation and the neuromuscular control of the carpus, as well as descriptions of clinical applications of proprioception in carpal instabilities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Neuromuscular training for sports injury prevention: a systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hübscher, Markus; Zech, Astrid; Pfeifer, Klaus; Hänsel, Frank; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of proprioceptive/neuromuscular training in preventing sports injuries by using the best available evidence from methodologically well...

  10. Quantitative skeletal muscle ultrasound: diagnostic value in childhood neuromuscular disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Verrips, A.; Alfen, N. van; Arts, I.M.P.; Sie, L.T.L.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study we investigated the diagnostic value of quantitative skeletal muscle ultrasonography in 150 consecutively referred children with symptoms suspect for a neuromuscular disorder. Muscle thickness and quantitatively determined echo intensity of four muscles and the distribution of these

  11. Effects of napping on neuromuscular fatigue in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassardjian, Charles D; Murray, Brian J; Kokokyi, Seint; Jewell, Dana; Barnett, Carolina; Bril, Vera; Katzberg, Hans D

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between sleep and neuromuscular fatigue is understood poorly. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of napping on quantitative measures of neuromuscular fatigue in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Eight patients with mild to moderate MG were recruited. Patients underwent maintenance of wakefulness tests (MWT) and multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). The Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score (QMGS) was measured before nap and after each nap to examine the effects of napping and sleep on neuromuscular weakness. Results showed that QMGS improves only after naps where patients slept more than 5 min but not where patients did not sleep or slept less than 5 min. Daytime napping mitigates neuromuscular fatigue in patients with MG, especially if patients slept for more than 5 min. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Genetics of Pediatric-Onset Motor Neuron and Neuromuscular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy; Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease; Muscular Dystrophy; Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Respiratory Distress 1; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Motor Neuron Disease; Neuromuscular Disease; Peroneal Muscular Atrophy; Fragile X Syndrome

  13. [Neuromuscular relaxation and CCMDP. The Zilgrei and Feldenkrais methods 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, F; Maiorana, C; Faccin, C

    1989-10-31

    The Authors show two neuromuscular release methods employed in the treatment of cranio-cervico-mandibular syndrome; these methods work at the place of origin of the pathology resolving the symptoms in different districts of the body.

  14. Exploring employment in consultation reports of patients with neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minis, M.A.H; Cup, E.H.C.; Heerkens, Y.H.; Engels, J.A.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2012-01-01

    Minis MA, Cup EH, Heerkens YF, Engels JA, van Engelen BG, Oostendorp RA. Exploring employment in consultation reports of patients with neuromuscular diseases. OBJECTIVES: To explore consultation reports for patient and employment characteristics and recommendations on employment regarding patients

  15. Influence of intense neuromuscular blockade on surgical conditions during laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Donatsky, Anders Meller; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2015-01-01

    endotracheally intubated, mechanically ventilated, anesthetized with propofol and fentanyl, and randomized into two groups in a cross-over assessor-blinded design. Neuromuscular block was established with rocuronium. Artificial laparotomy for ileus was performed. We investigated the influence of intense......PURPOSE: Intense neuromuscular block may improve surgical conditions in ileus laparotomies; however, it is difficult to evaluate. The aim of this study was to investigate if neuromuscular block improved surgical conditions in pigs with artificial ileus laparotomy. METHODS: Six pigs were...... neuromuscular block on surgical conditions with a subjective rating scale, force needed to close the fascia, incidences of abdominal contractions while suctioning the lungs, width of the wound diastase and operating time as outcome parameters. RESULTS: In all six pigs no abdominal contractions occurred while...

  16. EFFECT OF NEUROMUSCULAR TRAINING ON BALANCE AMONG UNIVERSITY ATHLETES

    OpenAIRE

    Mohansundar Sankaravel; Jeffrey Low Fook Lee; Ong Kuan Boon; Sanmuganathan Jeganathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proprioceptive deficiency followed by lateral ankle sprain leads to poor balance is not uncommon. It has been linked with increased injury risk among young athletes. Introducing neuromuscular training programs for this have been believed as one of the means of injury prevention. Hence, this study was aimed to determine the effects of six weeks progressive neuromuscular training (PNM Training) on static balance gains among the young athletes with a previous history of ankle sprains...

  17. Effects of Pivoting Neuromuscular Training on Pivoting Control and Proprioception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Joo; Ren, Yupeng; Chang, Alison H.; Geiger, François; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pivoting neuromuscular control and proprioceptive acuity may play an important role in ACL injuries. The goal of this study was to investigate whether pivoting neuromuscular training on an offaxis elliptical trainer (POINT) could improve pivoting neuromuscular control, proprioceptive acuity, and functional performance. Methods Among 41 subjects, 21 subjects participated in 18 sessions of POINT (3 sessions/week for 6 weeks), and 20 subjects served as controls who did their regular workout. Both groups received pre-, mid-, and post-intervention evaluations. Propensity score analysis with multivariable regression adjustment was used to investigate the effect of training on pivoting neuromuscular control (pivoting instability, leg pivoting stiffness, maximum internal and external pivoting angles), proprioceptive acuity, and functional performance in both groups. Results Compared to the control group, the training group significantly improved pivoting neuromuscular control as reduced pivoting instability, reduced maximum internal and external pivoting angles, increased leg pivoting stiffness, and decreased entropy of time to peak EMG in the gluteus maximus and lateral gastrocnemius under pivoting perturbations. Furthermore, the training group enhanced weight-bearing proprioceptive acuity and improved the single leg hop distance. Conclusion Improvement of pivoting neuromuscular control in functional weight-bearing activities and task performances following POINT may help develop lower limb injury prevention and rehabilitation methods to reduce ACL and other musculoskeletal injuries associated with pivoting sports. PMID:24389517

  18. Effects of pivoting neuromuscular training on pivoting control and proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Joo; Ren, Yupeng; Chang, Alison H; Geiger, François; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-07-01

    Pivoting neuromuscular control and proprioceptive acuity may play an important role in anterior cruciate ligament injuries. The goal of this study was to investigate whether pivoting off-axis intensity adjustable neuromuscular control training (POINT) could improve pivoting neuromuscular control, proprioceptive acuity, and functional performance. Among 41 subjects, 21 subjects participated in 18 sessions of POINT (three sessions per week for 6 wk), and 20 subjects served as controls who did their regular workout. Both groups received pre-, mid-, and postintervention evaluations. Propensity score analysis with multivariable regression adjustment was used to investigate the effect of training on pivoting neuromuscular control (pivoting instability, leg pivoting stiffness, maximum internal, and external pivoting angles), proprioceptive acuity, and functional performance in both groups. Compared with the control group, the training group significantly improved pivoting neuromuscular control as reduced pivoting instability, reduced maximum internal and external pivoting angles, increased leg pivoting stiffness, and decreased entropy of time to peak EMG in the gluteus maximus and lateral gastrocnemius under pivoting perturbations. Furthermore, the training group enhanced weight-bearing proprioceptive acuity and improved the single leg hop distance. Improvement of pivoting neuromuscular control in functional weight-bearing activities and task performances after POINT may help develop lower limb injury prevention and rehabilitation methods to reduce anterior cruciate ligament and other musculoskeletal injuries associated with pivoting sports.

  19. Coordinating Units at the Candy Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven; Hatch, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In general, units coordination refers to the relationships that students can maintain between various units when working within a numerical situation. It is critical that middle school students learn to coordinate three levels of units not only because of their importance in understanding fractions but also because of their implications for…

  20. Sleep polygraphic parameters in neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Pradella

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available In a polysomnography study of 32 neuromuscular patients - 22 with a form of muscular dystrophy, 3 with a form of congenital myopathy, 4 with a form of spinal muscular atrophy, 1 with a recurrent form of polymyositis and 1 with osteogenesis imperfecta syndrome - of which 21 were nonambulatory, we observed sleep related respiratory disturbances represented by: drops in oxygen saturation (SaO2, cardiac arrythmia, sleep disruption, apneas, tachypnea, tachycardia and snoring. Nine out of the cohort of 32 patients presented with significant desaturations periods. These patients presented with an associated restrictive syndrome and thoracic deformities, some with tachypnea and/or SaO2 below 90% during wakefulness. In this group, snoring was observed in those patients with a form of muscular dystrophy while tachypnea was observed in patients who presented the highest desaturations levels. Sleep quantification revealed an increase of stage 1 sleep coupled with a decrease or even total absence of REM sleep. This is, we believe, a likely consequence of episodic desaturations that may accompany sleep hypoventilation which is potentialised during REM sleep stage.

  1. Neuromuscular disorders in chronic alcohol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Emelyanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the present-day Russian and foreign literature on neuromuscular disorders in chronic alcohol intoxication. The most common manifestations of alcohol disease include alcoholic polyneuropathy (PNP and alcohol-induced skeletal muscle injury. The clinical polymorphism of alcoholic PNP is discussed. The paper considers a chronic sensory automatic form due to the direct toxic effects of ethanol and its metabolites during long-term alcohol intoxication, as well as acute/subacute sensorimotor neuropathy, the basis for the pathogenesis of which is B group vitamins, predominantly thiamine, deficiency that develops in the presence of drinking bouts concurrent with malnutrition and/or alcohol-related gastrointestinal tract diseases. In addition to nonuse of alcohol and a properly balanced diet, antioxidant therapy with alphalipoic acid and neurotropic B group vitamins is considered to be pathogenetic therapy for neuropathy. The most common and least studied clinicalform of alcohol-induced musculoskeletal injury is chronic alcoholic myopathy (AM, the diagnostic standard for which is morphometricand immunohistochemical examination of a muscle biopsy specimen. The morphological base for this form of myopathy is predominantly type 2 muscle fiber atrophy caused by impaired protein synthesis and a decreased regenerative potential of muscle fiber. The efficacy of antioxidants and leucine-containing amino acid mixtures in the treatment of chronic AM is discussed.

  2. Neuromuscular Fatigue During 200 M Breaststroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Conceição

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were: i to analyze activation patterns of four upper limb muscles (duration of the active and non-active phase in each lap of 200m breaststroke, ii quantify neuromuscular fatigue, with kinematics and physiologic assessment. Surface electromyogram was collected for the biceps brachii, deltoid anterior, pectoralis major and triceps brachii of nine male swimmers performing a maximal 200m breaststroke trial. Swimming speed, SL, SR, SI decreased from the 1st to the 3rd lap. SR increased on the 4th lap (35.91 ± 2.99 stroke·min-1. Peak blood lactate was 13.02 ± 1.72 mmol·l-1 three minutes after the maximal trial. The EMG average rectified value (ARV increased at the end of the race for all selected muscles, but the deltoid anterior and pectoralis major in the 1st lap and for biceps brachii, deltoid anterior and triceps brachii in the 4th lap. The mean frequency of the power spectral density (MNF decreased at the 4th lap for all muscles. These findings suggest the occurrence of fatigue at the beginning of the 2nd lap in the 200m breaststroke trial, characterized by changes in kinematic parameters and selective changes in upper limb muscle action. There was a trend towards a non-linear fatigue state.

  3. Brain-controlled neuromuscular stimulation to drive neural plasticity and functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C; Gallego, J A; Miller, L E

    2015-08-01

    There is mounting evidence that appropriately timed neuromuscular stimulation can induce neural plasticity and generate functional recovery from motor disorders. This review addresses the idea that coordinating stimulation with a patient's voluntary effort might further enhance neurorehabilitation. Studies in cell cultures and behaving animals have delineated the rules underlying neural plasticity when single neurons are used as triggers. However, the rules governing more complex stimuli and larger networks are less well understood. We argue that functional recovery might be optimized if stimulation were modulated by a brain machine interface, to match the details of the patient's voluntary intent. The potential of this novel approach highlights the need for a better understanding of the complex rules underlying this form of plasticity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Learning to Live with Neuromuscular Disease: A Message for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... licensed psychologist, holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology. We’re also grateful to Scott Bennett for ... about your spouse and children and affect your behavior toward them. Although wholly without justification, such beliefs ...

  5. Effect of patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation on vertical jump in collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Dawn T; Castel, John C; Palermo, Francis X; Draper, David O

    2011-03-01

    Patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation (PENS) uses the electrical stimulation of sensory and motor nerves to achieve a skeletal muscle contraction using an electromyogram-derived functional pattern. PENS is used extensively for neuromuscular reeducation and treatment of muscle disuse atrophy. To explore the effectiveness of PENS as applied to the quadriceps muscles on the vertical jump of an athletic population. Experimental with control and repeated measures over time. Healthy college athletes (54 women, 75 men) were divided into 3 groups (control, n = 30; jump, n = 33; and jump with PENS, n = 63). There was no difference among groups' height and weight. Athletes performed a baseline standing vertical jump using a vertical jump system. The control group continued its normal daily activities with no jumping tasks included. The jump groups performed 3 sets of 12 repetitions with a 2-minute rest between sets at a frequency of 3 times per week. The PENS group did the jumping with the coordination of an electrical stimulation system. Vertical jump was retested after 6 weeks of intervention and 2 weeks after cessation. A 3-way repeated measures analysis of variance for time (control, jump alone, jump with PENS) revealed a significant difference (P jump group from posttest to follow-up jump. There was no significant difference between groups for the baseline vertical jump. This study demonstrated that 6 weeks of vertical jump training coordinated with PENS resulted in a greater increase than jumping only or control. This pattern of stimulation with PENS in combination with jump training may positively affect jumping.

  6. Genome Editing of Monogenic Neuromuscular Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Chengzu; Amoasii, Leonela; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-11-01

    Muscle weakness, the most common symptom of neuromuscular disease, may result from muscle dysfunction or may be caused indirectly by neuronal and neuromuscular junction abnormalities. To date, more than 780 monogenic neuromuscular diseases, linked to 417 different genes, have been identified in humans. Genome-editing methods, especially the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system, hold clinical potential for curing many monogenic disorders, including neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and myotonic dystrophy type 1. To provide an overview of genome-editing approaches; to summarize published reports on the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of current genome-editing methods as they relate to the potential correction of monogenic neuromuscular diseases; and to highlight scientific and clinical opportunities and obstacles toward permanent correction of disease-causing mutations responsible for monogenic neuromuscular diseases by genome editing. PubMed and Google Scholar were searched for articles published from June 30, 1989, through June 9, 2016, using the following keywords: genome editing, CRISPR-Cas9, neuromuscular disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and myotonic dystrophy type 1. The following sources were reviewed: 341 articles describing different approaches to edit mammalian genomes; 330 articles describing CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing in cell culture lines (in vitro) and animal models (in vivo); 16 websites used to generate single-guide RNA; 4 websites for off-target effects; and 382 articles describing viral and nonviral delivery systems. Articles describing neuromuscular diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and myotonic dystrophy type 1, were also reviewed. Multiple proof

  7. Glial Processes at the Drosophila Larval Neuromuscular Junction Match Synaptic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Deidre L.; Gilbert, Mary; Xie, Xiaojun; Petley-Ragan, Lindsay; Auld, Vanessa J.

    2012-01-01

    Glia are integral participants in synaptic physiology, remodeling and maturation from blowflies to humans, yet how glial structure is coordinated with synaptic growth is unknown. To investigate the dynamics of glial development at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we developed a live imaging system to establish the relationship between glia, neuronal boutons, and the muscle subsynaptic reticulum. Using this system we observed processes from two classes of peripheral glia present at the NMJ. Processes from the subperineurial glia formed a blood-nerve barrier around the axon proximal to the first bouton. Processes from the perineurial glial extended beyond the end of the blood-nerve barrier into the NMJ where they contacted synapses and extended across non-synaptic muscle. Growth of the glial processes was coordinated with NMJ growth and synaptic activity. Increasing synaptic size through elevated temperature or the highwire mutation increased the extent of glial processes at the NMJ and conversely blocking synaptic activity and size decreased the presence and size of glial processes. We found that elevated temperature was required during embryogenesis in order to increase glial expansion at the nmj. Therefore, in our live imaging system, glial processes at the NMJ are likely indirectly regulated by synaptic changes to ensure the coordinated growth of all components of the tripartite larval NMJ. PMID:22666403

  8. Glial processes at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction match synaptic growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deidre L Brink

    Full Text Available Glia are integral participants in synaptic physiology, remodeling and maturation from blowflies to humans, yet how glial structure is coordinated with synaptic growth is unknown. To investigate the dynamics of glial development at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ, we developed a live imaging system to establish the relationship between glia, neuronal boutons, and the muscle subsynaptic reticulum. Using this system we observed processes from two classes of peripheral glia present at the NMJ. Processes from the subperineurial glia formed a blood-nerve barrier around the axon proximal to the first bouton. Processes from the perineurial glial extended beyond the end of the blood-nerve barrier into the NMJ where they contacted synapses and extended across non-synaptic muscle. Growth of the glial processes was coordinated with NMJ growth and synaptic activity. Increasing synaptic size through elevated temperature or the highwire mutation increased the extent of glial processes at the NMJ and conversely blocking synaptic activity and size decreased the presence and size of glial processes. We found that elevated temperature was required during embryogenesis in order to increase glial expansion at the nmj. Therefore, in our live imaging system, glial processes at the NMJ are likely indirectly regulated by synaptic changes to ensure the coordinated growth of all components of the tripartite larval NMJ.

  9. Neuromuscular Fatigue during Prolonged Exercise in Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeau, Marc; Rupp, Thomas; Temesi, John; Perrey, Stéphane; Wuyam, Bernard; Millet, Guillaume Y; Verges, Samuel

    2017-03-01

    Prolonged cycling exercise performance in normoxia is limited because of both peripheral and central neuromuscular impairments. It has been reported that cerebral perturbations are greater during short-duration exercise in hypoxia compared with normoxia. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that central deficits are accentuated in hypoxia compared with normoxia during prolonged (three bouts of 80 min separated by 25 min) whole-body exercise at the same relative intensity. Ten subjects performed two sessions consisting of three 80-min cycling bouts at 45% of their relative maximal aerobic power in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2 = 0.12). Before exercise and after each bout, maximal voluntary force, voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation, corticospinal excitability (motor evoked potential), intracortical inhibition (cortical silent period), and electrical (M-wave) and contractile (twitch and doublet peak forces) properties of the knee extensors were measured. Prefrontal and motor cortical oxygenation was also recorded during each cycling bout in both conditions. A significant but similar force reduction (≈-22%) was observed at the end of exercise in normoxia and hypoxia. The modifications of voluntary activation assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation and nerve stimulation, motor evoked potential, cortical silent period, and M-wave were also similar in both conditions. However, cerebral oxygenation was reduced in hypoxia compared with normoxia. These findings show that when performed at the same relative low intensity, prolonged exercise does not induce greater supraspinal fatigue in hypoxia compared with normoxia. Despite lower absolute exercise intensities in hypoxia, reduced brain O2 availability might contribute to similar amounts of central fatigue compared with normoxia.

  10. Implementing the awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring/management, and early exercise/mobility bundle into everyday care: opportunities, challenges, and lessons learned for implementing the ICU Pain, Agitation, and Delirium Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Michele C; Burke, William J; Gannon, David; Cohen, Marlene Z; Colburn, Lois; Bevil, Catherine; Franz, Doug; Olsen, Keith M; Ely, E Wesley; Vasilevskis, Eduard E

    2013-09-01

    other ICU team members. In this study of the implementation of the awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring/management, and early exercise/mobility bundle in a tertiary care setting, clear factors were identified that both advanced and impeded adoption of this complex intervention that requires interprofessional education, coordination, and cooperation. Focusing on these factors preemptively should enable a more effective and lasting implementation of the bundle and better care for critically ill patients. Lessons learned from this study will also help healthcare providers optimize implementation of the recent ICU pain, agitation, and delirium guidelines, which has many similarities but also some important differences as compared with the awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring/management, and early exercise/mobility bundle.

  11. 'It's a hard conversation to have'. Healthcare professionals' views concerning advance care discussions with young people affected by life-limiting neuromuscular diseases: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Andy; Barclay, Stephen

    2017-06-19

    Life-limiting neuromuscular disease, such as some of the muscular dystrophies, are often diagnosed in early childhood: when death comes, commonly in the second or third decade of life, patients rarely have advance care plans in place or documented end-of-life care preferences. There is very limited literature concerning the discussions about end-of-life plans healthcare professionals have with young people affected by life-limiting neuromuscular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the views and experiences of healthcare professionals concerning having discussions about advance care plans and end-of-life care with teenagers and young adult patients affected by life-limiting neuromuscular diseases. Semistructured interviews with a maximum variety sample of nine professionals involved in the care of young people with life-limiting neuromuscular diseases in one region of the UK. While recognising the inevitable progression of the conditions, there was no consensus among interviewees concerning best approaches to discuss end-of-life care plans. Several environmental and personal barriers were identified that lead to avoidance of the emotionally challenging and difficult conversations. Community-based professionals with well-established relationships with patients and families may be best placed to take the lead and coordinate discussions, but individual case-by-case preferences need to be carefully considered. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Influence of proprioceptive training in the improvement of neuromuscular performance after ACL reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubljanin-Raspopović Emilija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available ACL injury leads to a decrease in proprioceptive abilities, which can be improved with ACL surgery and postoperative rehabilitation. The goal of our study was to investigate whether the impact of coordinative training can be differentiated from the influence of surgery on proprioceptive improvement, and whether there is a correlation between improvement in coordinative abilities and other objective parameters of functional recovery. This follow-up study included 45 patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction and who were randomized into a conservative (TH-C and an intensive (TH-I rehabilitation group. In the TH-I group, coordinative training began earlier due to unrestricted weight-bearing. The groups were first compared preoperatively, then postoperatively, after 6 weeks, 4,6,9, and 12 months via the single leg stance test, the one leg hop test, the Lysholm knee score, and the Tegner score. A faster recovery of coordinative skills was registered in the TH-I group. Already after 6 weeks, highly statistically significant progress in one leg stance abilities was noticed, while in the TH-C group the same was not noticed until 4 months after surgery (p<0.01. Such a result speaks for the distinct influence of proprioceptive training on coordinative abilities. Also, a highly statistically significant correlation was noticed between the single leg stance, one leg hop, Lysholm, and Tegner tests (p<0.01, which points out the importance of a good rehabilitation programme, since neuromuscular performance cannot be separated from other parameters of functional recovery.

  13. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents: Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viby-Mogensen, J.; Østergaard, D.; Donati, F.

    2000-01-01

    Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design......Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design...

  14. Vertebral column resection in children with neuromuscular spine deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Paul D; Jain, Amit; Lenke, Lawrence G; Shah, Suken A; Sucato, Daniel J; Emans, John B; Newton, Peter O

    2012-05-15

    Retrospective analysis. To determine, in pediatric patients with neuromuscular deformity undergoing vertebral column resection (VCR), the (1) characteristics of the surgery performed; (2) amount of pelvic obliquity restoration, and coronal and sagittal correction achieved; (3) associated blood loss and complications; and (4) extent to which curve type and VCR approach influenced correction, blood loss, and complications. VCR allows for correction of severe, rigid spinal deformity. This technique has not been previously reported in children with neuromuscular disorders. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 23 children with neuromuscular disorders (mean age, 15 years) and spinal deformities (severe scoliosis, 9; global kyphosis or angular kyphosis, 4; kyphoscoliosis, 10) who underwent VCR. The Student t test was used to compare correction differences (statistical significance, P deformity. However, this challenging procedure involves the potential for major complications.

  15. Effects of sugammadex on incidence of postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brueckmann, B; Sasaki, N; Grobara, P

    2015-01-01

    by randomized allocation to sugammadex (2 or 4 mg kg(-1)) or usual care (neostigmine/glycopyrrolate, dosing per usual care practice) for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Timing of reversal agent administration was based on the providers' clinical judgement. Primary endpoint was the presence of residual...... measured at PACU entry. Zero out of 74 sugammadex patients and 33 out of 76 (43.4%) usual care patients had TOF-Watch® SX-assessed residual neuromuscular blockade at PACU admission (odds ratio 0.0, 95% CI [0-0.06], Pcare patients, 2 also had clinical evidence of partial...... paralysis. Time between reversal agent administration and operating room discharge-readiness was shorter for sugammadex vs usual care (14.7 vs 18.6 min respectively; P=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: After abdominal surgery, sugammadex reversal eliminated residual neuromuscular blockade in the PACU, and shortened...

  16. Effect of GABAB Receptor Antagonist (CGP35348 on Learning and Memory in Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quratulane Gillani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to demonstrate the potential effect of CGP 35348 (GABAB receptor antagonist on the learning, memory formation, and neuromuscular coordination in albino mouse. Mice were intrapertoneally injected with 1 mg CGP 35348/mL of distilled water/Kg body weight, while the control animals were injected with equal volume of saline solution. A battery of neurological tests was applied following the intrapertoneal injections. Results of rota rod indicated that CGP 35348 had no effect on neuromuscular coordination in both male (P=0.528 and female (P=0.125 albino mice. CGP 35348 treated females demonstrated poor exploratory behavior during open filed for several parameters (time mobile (P=0.04, time immobile (P=0.04, rotations (P=0.04, and anticlockwise rotations (P=0.038. The results for Morris water maze (MWM retention phase indicated that CGP 35348 treated male mice took shorter latency to reach the hidden platform (P=0.04 than control indicating improved memory. This observation was complemented by the swim strategies used by mice during training days in MWM as CGP 35348 treated males used more direct and focal approach to reach the platform as the training proceeded.

  17. Effect of coordination movement using the PNF pattern underwater on the balance and gait of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Jung, Sang-In

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of coordination movement using the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation pattern underwater on the balance and gait of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group that performed coordination movement using the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation pattern underwater and a control group (n =10 each). Both the groups underwent neurodevelopmental treatment, and the experimental group performed coordination movement using the Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation pattern underwater. Balance was measured using the Berg Balance Scale and Functional Reach Test, and gait was measured using the 10-Meter Walk Test and Timed Up and Go Test. To compare in-group data before and after the intervention, paired t-test was used. Independent t-test was used to compare differences in the results of the Berg Balance Scale, Functional Reach Test, 10-Meter Walk Test, and Timed Up and Go Test before and after the intervention between the groups. [Results] Comparison within the groups showed significant differences in the results of the Berg Balance Scale, Functional Reach Test, 10-Meter Walk Test, and Timed Up and Go Test before and after the experimental intervention. On comparison between the groups, there were greater improvements in the scores of the Berg Balance Scale, Functional Reach Test, 10-Meter Walk Test, and Timed Up and Go Test in the experimental group. [Conclusion] The findings demonstrate that coordination movement using the Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation pattern under water has a significant effect on the balance and gait of stroke patients.

  18. A neuromuscular test battery for osteoporotic women: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschan-Schindl, K; Uher, E; Grampp, S; Kaider, A; Ghanem, A H; Fialka-Moser, V; Preisinger, E

    2001-05-01

    To examine the efficacy of a short neuromuscular test battery in elderly women suffering from osteoporosis in accordance with the World Health Organization criteria, with and without a history of fractures. Reduced bone mass and a high likelihood of falling increase the risk of osteoporotic fractures. There is a need for neuromuscular tests to identify individuals at risk for falls and fractures. The women were assessed twice. Forty-two women, with a mean age of 70.0 +/- 5.1 (SD) yr, completed the first assessment. The number of postmenopausal fractures and the women's history with regard to agility and falls were assessed. The women performed neuromuscular tests (one-leg stance, tandem walk, and body sway); bone mineral density of the spine and femoral neck were measured. For the follow-up assessment, 13.2 +/- 1.3 mo later, 39 women were studied. The same outcome measurements were obtained at both evaluations. During the observation period, five women fell once and one woman fell twice; there were only two vertebral fractures and no nonvertebral fracture. Neuromuscular performance did not change during this observation period. The median changes in bone mineral density between the two assessments were clinically not relevant. A comparison between patients suffering from established osteoporosis and osteoporotic patients without a history of postmenopausal fractures showed that both groups of patients did not differ with respect to age, neuromuscular performance, bone mineral density, and fear of falling. This neuromuscular test battery is a feasible and practical tool because it is brief and economical to perform. However, its efficacy as a predictor of fractures must be tested in additional studies with a long-term follow-up and a larger group of subjects.

  19. American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... self-study course available anytime, anywhere via your iPad. Learn more New Membership Benefit The new AANEM ... Committees AANEM Staff Annual Report History Contact Us Education All Education Products Self-Assessment Examinations Education for ...

  20. Efectos del vendaje neuromuscular sobre la flexibilidad del raquis lumbar

    OpenAIRE

    A.M. Labrador-Cerrato; P. Ortega Sánchez-Diezma; G. Lanzas Melendo; C. Gutiérrez-Ortega

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: El vendaje neuromuscular es una técnica que produce una estimulación muy selectiva sobre la piel a través de la aplicación de unas vendas elásticas especiales con el fin de lograr cambios propioceptivos, aumento o inhibición del tono muscular y mitigación de algias, entre otros. Objetivos: Comprobar si la aplicación del vendaje neuromuscular permite aumentar la flexión del raquis lumbar comparándola con otras técnicas de vendaje placebo (esparadrapo rígido convencional; Omniplas...

  1. Miller Fisher syndrome with presynaptic neuromuscular transmission disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehler, Edvard; Latta, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome is defined by a triad of symptoms, namely areflexia, ataxia, and ophthalmoparesis. The ophthalmoparesis is mostly severe, undulating weakness of eye movements with ptosis and increased fatigability resembling a neuromuscular transmission disorder. We present a 52-year-old man with severe Miller Fisher syndrome with a high level of anti-GQ1b antibodies and a presynaptic type of neuromuscular transmission disorder. The diagnosis was confirmed by stimulated single-fiber electromyography with the use of a concentric needle electrode and various stimulation rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise Therapy in Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Other Neuromuscular Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia Rebecka; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    There is no curative treatment for most neuromuscular disorders. Exercise, as a treatment for these diseases, has therefore received growing attention. When executed properly, exercise can maintain and improve health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. In persons...... in patients with neuromuscular diseases associated with weakness and wasting. We review studies that have investigated different types of exercise in both myopathies and motor neuron diseases, with particular emphasis on training of persons affected by spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Finally, we provide...

  3. Neuromuscular Activity and Knee Kinematics in Adolescents with Patellofemoral Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Samani, Afshin; Olesen, Jens L

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS).......This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)....

  4. Pivoting neuromuscular control and proprioception in females and males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Joo; Ren, Yupeng; Kang, Sang Hoon; Geiger, François; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2015-04-01

    Noncontact ACL injuries occur most commonly in pivoting sports and are much more frequent in females than in males. However, information on sex differences in proprioceptive acuity under weight-bearing and leg neuromuscular control in pivoting is scarce. The objective of this study was to investigate sex differences in pivoting neuromuscular control during strenuous stepping tasks and proprioceptive acuity under weight-bearing. 21 male and 22 female subjects were recruited to evaluate pivoting proprioceptive acuity under weight-bearing, and pivoting neuromuscular control (in terms of leg pivoting instability, stiffness, maximum internal and external pivoting angles, and entropy of time-to-peak EMG in lower limb muscles) during strenuous stepping tasks performed on a novel offaxis elliptical trainer. Compared to males, females had significantly lower proprioceptive acuity under weight-bearing in both internal and external pivoting directions, higher pivoting instability, larger maximum internal pivoting angle, lower leg pivoting stiffness, and higher entropy of time-to-peak EMG in the gastrocnemius muscles during strenuous stepping tasks with internal and external pivoting perturbations. Results of this study may help us better understand factors contributing to ACL injuries in females and males, develop training strategies to improve pivoting neuromuscular control and proprioceptive acuity, and potentially reduce ACL and lower-limb musculoskeletal injuries.

  5. Roles of neuro-exocytotic proteins at the neuromuscular junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sons-Michel, Michèle S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in the thesis was to elucidate the roles of several neuro-exocytotic proteins at the motor nerve terminal in neuromuscular synaptic transmission, making use of genetic knockout (KO) mice, each missing one (or more) neuro-exocytotic proteins. In addition, it was

  6. [Neuro-muscular apparatus state in lumbosacral radiculopathy in miners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battakova, Sh B; Amanbekov, U A; Otarbaeva, M B; Fazylova, M D; Sraĭmanov, K S; Miianova, G A; Kozhakhmetova, K M

    2008-01-01

    Based on clinical and electrophysiologic studies, the authors analysed neuro-muscular apparatus of "spinal center--periphery" axis for miners with radicular pain caused by occupational lumbosacral radiculopathy. Findings are that constantly irritated receptors in lumbar motor segment during occupational activities alter habitual motor stereotype and cause specific compensatory muscular reactions, rearrangement of motor activity in segmental apparatus.

  7. Imaging of respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, L; Ciet, P; van der Ploeg, A T; Brusse, E; van der Beek, N A M E; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruijne, M; Tiddens, H A W M; van Doorn, P A

    2017-11-24

    Respiratory muscle weakness frequently occurs in patients with neuromuscular disease. Measuring respiratory function with standard pulmonary function tests provides information about the contribution of all respiratory muscles, the lungs and airways. Imaging potentially enables the study of different respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm, separately. In this review, we provide an overview of imaging techniques used to study respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease. We identified 26 studies which included a total of 573 patients with neuromuscular disease. Imaging of respiratory muscles was divided into static and dynamic techniques. Static techniques comprise chest radiography, B-mode (brightness mode) ultrasound, CT and MRI, and are used to assess the position and thickness of the diaphragm and the other respiratory muscles. Dynamic techniques include fluoroscopy, M-mode (motion mode) ultrasound and MRI, used to assess diaphragm motion in one or more directions. We discuss how these imaging techniques relate with spirometric values and whether these can be used to study the contribution of the different respiratory muscles in patients with neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Neuromuscular stimulation after stroke: from technology to clinical deployment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Geurts, Alexander C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, electrical or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been used to support the rehabilitation of stroke patients. One of the earliest applications of NMES included the use of external muscle stimulation to correct drop-foot after stroke. During the last few decades

  9. Neuromuscular stimulation after stroke: from technology to clinical deployment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, M.J.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, electrical or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been used to support the rehabilitation of stroke patients. One of the earliest applications of NMES included the use of external muscle stimulation to correct drop-foot after stroke. During the last few decades

  10. Assessment of Neuromuscular Function Using Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozand, Vianney; Grosprêtre, Sidney; Stapley, Paul J; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-09-13

    Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a non-invasive method commonly used to evaluate neuromuscular function from brain to muscle (supra-spinal, spinal and peripheral levels). The present protocol describes how this method can be used to stimulate the posterior tibial nerve that activates plantar flexor muscles. Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation consists of inducing an electrical stimulus to a motor nerve to evoke a muscular response. Direct (M-wave) and/or indirect (H-reflex) electrophysiological responses can be recorded at rest using surface electromyography. Mechanical (twitch torque) responses can be quantified with a force/torque ergometer. M-wave and twitch torque reflect neuromuscular transmission and excitation-contraction coupling, whereas H-reflex provides an index of spinal excitability. EMG activity and mechanical (superimposed twitch) responses can also be recorded during maximal voluntary contractions to evaluate voluntary activation level. Percutaneous nerve stimulation provides an assessment of neuromuscular function in humans, and is highly beneficial especially for studies evaluating neuromuscular plasticity following acute (fatigue) or chronic (training/detraining) exercise.

  11. [New surgical treatment of late-stage neuromuscular ureteral dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Zhitnikova, L H; Berestennikov, K A

    1999-01-01

    A surgical treatment of neuromuscular ureteral, dysplasia (NUD) is proposed which provides development of restenosis in vesicoureteral anastomosis and vesicoureteral reflux in maintenance of normal urodynamics of the upper urinary tracts. This organ-saving method can be applied at late disease. Multichannel impedance ureterography proved useful in definition of the operation's scope.

  12. Radiation fibrosis syndrome: neuromuscular and musculoskeletal complications in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    Radiation-induced toxicity is a major cause of long-term disability after cancer treatment. Radiation fibrosis describes the insidious pathologic fibrotic tissue sclerosis that can occur in response to radiation exposure. Radiation fibrosis syndrome describes the myriad clinical manifestations of progressive fibrotic tissue sclerosis resulting from radiation treatment. Radiation-induced damage can include "myelo-radiculo-plexo-neuro-myopathy," causing muscle weakness and dysfunction and contributing to neuromuscular injury. Similarly, radiation damage to neuromuscular structures contributes to radiation-induced trismus and cervical dystonia in head and neck cancer survivors. This narrative review discusses the pathophysiology, anatomy, evaluation, and treatment of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and functional disorders that can result as late effects of radiation treatment. Rehabilitation medicine physicians with extensive training in neuromuscular and musculoskeletal medicine as well as in the principles of functional restoration are uniquely positioned to help lead efforts to improve the quality of life for cancer survivors with radiation fibrosis syndrome. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intraorbital neuromuscular choristoma adjacent to the optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Perry, M.D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular choristoma is a rare tumor that incorporates mature skeletal muscle within fascicles of peripheral nerve. The etiology is poorly understood, yet most present in large nerves of children, with a tight link to post-operative fibromatosis recently appreciated. Herein, we report an exceptional intra-orbital example in a 53-year-old man with optic nerve compression.

  14. Comparison of the Effect of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often demonstrate poor hand function due to spasticity. Thus spasticity in the wrist and finger flexors poses a great deal of functional limitations. This study was therefore designed to compare the effectiveness of Cryotherapy and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) on spasticity ...

  15. Neuromuscular and mitochondrial disorders: what is relevant to the anaesthesiologist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review provides an up-to-date information to the anaesthesiologist about the more frequent and important neuromuscular disorders for which new basic insights or clinical implications have been reported. RECENT FINDINGS: The findings include the mechanisms of the hyperkalemia

  16. Is deep neuromuscular blockade beneficial in laparoscopic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. V.; Staehr-Rye, A K; Claudius, C

    2016-01-01

    this in narrative form. We have shared our analysis and text with the authors of the 'Con-' side of these paired position papers during the preparation of the manuscripts. RESULTS: There are a few low risk of bias studies indicating that use of deep neuromuscular blockade improve surgical conditions and improve...

  17. Neuromuscular function during stair descent in meniscectomized patients and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Roos, Ewa M; Aagaard, Per

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differences in knee range of motion (ROM), movement speed, ground reaction forces (GRF) profile, neuromuscular activity, and muscle coactivation during the transition between stair descent and level walking in meniscectomized patients at high risk of knee...

  18. Neuromuscular Activity of Micrurus laticollaris (Squamata: Elapidae Venom in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Carbajal-Saucedo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have examined the neuromuscular activity of Micrurus laticollaris (Mexican coral snake venom (MLV in vertebrate isolated nerve-muscle preparations. In chick biventer cervicis preparations, the MLV induced an irreversible concentration- and time-dependent (1–30 µg/mL neuromuscular blockade, with 50% blockade occurring between 8 and 30 min. Muscle contractures evoked by exogenous acetylcholine were completely abolished by MLV, whereas those of KCl were also significantly altered (86% ± 11%, 53% ± 11%, 89% ± 5% and 89% ± 7% for one, three, 10 and 30 µg of venom/mL, respectively; n = 4; p < 0.05. In mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations, MLV (1–10 µg/mL promoted a slight increase in the amplitude of twitch-tension (3 µg/mL, followed by neuromuscular blockade (n = 4; the highest concentration caused complete inhibition of the twitches (time for 50% blockade = 26 ± 3 min, without exhibiting a previous neuromuscular facilitation. The venom (3 µg/mL induced a biphasic modulation in the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs/min, causing a significant increase after 15 min, followed by a decrease after 60 min (from 17 ± 1.4 (basal to 28 ± 2.5 (t15 and 12 ± 2 (t60. The membrane resting potential of mouse diaphragm preparations pre-exposed or not to d-tubocurarine (5 µg/mL was also significantly less negative with MLV (10 µg/mL. Together, these results indicate that M. laticollaris venom induces neuromuscular blockade by a combination of pre- and post-synaptic activities.

  19. Endomicroscopy and electromyography of neuromuscular junctions in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rosalind; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Skehel, Paul A; Ribchester, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electromyography (EMG) is used routinely to diagnose neuromuscular dysfunction in a wide range of peripheral neuropathies, myopathies, and neuromuscular degenerative diseases including motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Definitive neurological diagnosis may also be indicated by the analysis of pathological neuromuscular innervation in motor-point biopsies. Our objective in this study was to preempt motor-point biopsy by combining live imaging with electrophysiological analysis of slow degeneration of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in vivo. Methods We combined conventional needle electromyography with fiber-optic confocal endomicroscopy (CEM), using an integrated hand-held, 1.5-mm-diameter probe. We utilized as a test bed, various axotomized muscles in the hind limbs of anaesthetized, double-homozygous thy1.2YFP16: WldS mice, which coexpress the Wallerian-degeneration Slow (WldS) protein and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in motor neurons. We also tested exogenous vital stains, including Alexa488-α-bungarotoxin; the styryl pyridinium dye 4-Di-2-Asp; and a GFP conjugate of botulinum toxin Type A heavy chain (GFP-HcBoNT/A). Results We show that an integrated EMG/CEM probe is effective in longitudinal evaluation of functional and morphological changes that take place over a 7-day period during axotomy-induced, slow neuromuscular synaptic degeneration. EMG amplitude declined in parallel with overt degeneration of motor nerve terminals. EMG/CEM was safe and effective when nerve terminals and motor endplates were selectively stained with vital dyes. Interpretation Our findings constitute proof-of-concept, based on live imaging in an animal model, that combining EMG/CEM may be useful as a minimally invasive precursor or alternative to motor-point biopsy in neurological diagnosis and for monitoring local administration of potential therapeutics. PMID:25540801

  20. Stunted PFC activity during neuromuscular control under stress with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ranjana K

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for impaired cognition, which is primarily regulated by the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, very little is known about the neural pathways that underlie obesity-related declines in neuromuscular control, particularly under stress. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the PFC on neuromuscular control during handgrip exertions under stress with obesity. Twenty non-obese and obese young adults performed submaximal handgrip exertions in the absence and presence of a concurrent stressful task. Primary dependent measures included oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2: a measure of PFC activity) and force fluctuations (an indicator of neuromuscular control). Higher HbO2 levels in the PFC were observed in the non-obese compared to the obese group (P = 0.009). In addition, higher HbO2 levels were observed in the stress compared to the control condition in the non-obese group; however, this trend was reversed in the obese group (P = 0.043). In general, force fluctuations increased by 26% in the stress when compared to the control condition (P = 0.001) and obesity was associated with 39% greater force fluctuation (P = 0.024). Finally, while not significant, obesity-related decrements in force fluctuations were magnified under stress (P = 0.063). The current study provides the first evidence that neuromuscular decrements with obesity were associated with impaired PFC activity and this relationship was augmented in stress conditions. These findings are important because they provide new information on obesity-specific changes in brain function associated with neuromuscular control since the knowledge previously focused largely on obesity-specific changes in peripheral muscle capacity.

  1. Neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue responses to consecutive tag football matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Luke W; Burkett, Brendan J; McKean, Mark R

    2015-07-01

    To examine the neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue responses to consecutive tag football matches played on the same day and determine the relationship between fatigue and match running performance. Neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue responses of 15 national tag football players were assessed before and during the 2014 State of Origin tournament. Global positioning systems (GPS) provided data on players' match running performance, and a vertical-jump test and subjective questionnaire were used to assess players' neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue, respectively. There were small to moderate reductions in the majority of match-running-performance variables over consecutive matches, including distance (ES=-0.81), high-speed-running (HSR) distance (ES=-0.51), HSR efforts (ES=-0.64), and maximal accelerations (ES=-0.76). Prematch vertical jump was initially below baseline values before the first match (ES=0.68-0.88). There were no substantial reductions in vertical-jump performance from baseline values over consecutive matches, although there was a small decline from after match 2 to after match 3 (3.3%; ES=-0.45±0.62). There were progressive reductions in perceived well-being scores after matches 1 (ES=-0.38), 2 (ES=-0.70), and 3 (ES=-1.14). There were small to moderate associations between changes in fatigue measures and match running performance. Perceptual fatigue accumulates over consecutive tag football matches, although there were only marginal increases in neuromuscular fatigue. However, both neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue measures were found to contribute to reduced match running performance in the final match.

  2. Quantifying linguistic coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    task (Bahrami et al 2010, Fusaroli et al. 2012) we extend to linguistic coordination dynamical measures of recurrence employed in the analysis of sensorimotor coordination (such as heart-rate (Konvalinka et al 2011), postural sway (Shockley 2005) and eye-movements (Dale, Richardson and Kirkham 2012...... of linguistic coordination and their effects at a fine-degree....

  3. Histochemical and immunohistological approach to comparative neuromuscular diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Papparella

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The broad category of neuromuscular diseases covers conditions that involve the weakness or wasting of the body muscles. These problems may occur in the spinal cord, the peripheral nerves or the muscle fibers. Some may be hereditary, while others are acquired. Commonly recognized conditions fall into the categories of myopathies, which are diseases of the muscle like muscular dystrophy, disorders of the junction where the nerve impulses are transmitted to the muscle like myasthenia gravis, and neuropathies, which are diseases of the peripheral nervous system. The diagnosis of most neuromuscular diseases rest on careful clinical evaluation of the patient, electromyography, the muscle biopsy, and in some instances, molecular genetic studies. Muscle biopsy, associated to histochemical and immunohistological techniques, plays a key role in diagnosis of many neuromuscular disorders. A number of morphological abnormalities of muscle can be recognized on histological stains such as haematoxylin and eosin and Engel trichrome. Histochemical techniques are essential for the study of muscle biopsies for four main reasons. First, they demonstrate the non-uniform nature of the muscle highlighting the different biochemical properties of specific fibre type and their selective involvement in certain disease processes. Second, they may show an absences of a particular enzyme. Third, an excess of a particular substrate can be demonstrated. Fourth, they may show structural changes in the muscle which would not be apparent with routine histological stains, such as the enzyme-deficient cores in central core disease "mouth-eaten" fibers, and abnormalities in the distribution of mitochondria. In some neuromuscular disorders there could be only non-specific myopathological features. However, a number of proteins, including sarcolemmal, sarcomeric, and nuclear proteins as well as enzymes with defects responsible for neuromuscular disorders, have been identified during

  4. Movement coordination during conversation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Latif

    Full Text Available Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers' perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers.

  5. DOSE-RESPONSE RELATION, NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING ACTION, INTUBATION CONDITIONS, AND CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS OF ORG-9273, A NEW NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING-AGENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBROEK, L; LAMBALK, LM; RICHARDSON, FJ; WIERDA, JMKH

    The ED50 and the ED90, the time-course of the neuromuscular block, the intubation conditions, and the cardiovascular effects of Org 9273, a new steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent, have been evaluated in 41 anesthetized patients. From cumulative dose-response curves the ED50 and

  6. No Neuromuscular Side-Effects of Scopolamine in Sensorimotor Control and Force-Generating Capacity Among Parabolic Fliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Freyler, Kathrin; Krause, Anne; Gollhofer, Albert

    2016-10-01

    Scopolamine is used to counteract motion sickness in parabolic flight (PF) experiments. Although the drug's anticholinergic properties effectively impede vomiting, recent studies document other sensory side-effects in the central nervous system that may considerably influence sensorimotor performance. This study aimed to quantify such effects in order to determine if they are of methodological and operational significance for sensorimotor control. Ten subjects of a PF campaign received a weight-sex-based dose of a subcutaneous scopolamine injection. Sensorimotor performance was recorded before medication, 20min, 2h and 4h after injection in four space-relevant paradigms: balance control in one-leg stance with eyes open (protocol 1) and closed as well as force-generating capacity in countermovement jumps and hops (protocol 2). Postural sway, forces and joint angles were recorded. Neuromuscular control was assessed by electromyography and peripheral nerve stimulation; H-reflexes and M-waves were used to monitor spinal excitability of the Ia afferent reflex circuitry and maximal motor output. (1) H-reflex amplitudes, latencies and functional reflexes remained unchanged after scopolamine injection. (2) M-waves, neuromuscular activation intensities and antagonistic muscle coordination did not change with scopolamine administration. (3) Balance performance and force-generating capacity were not impeded by scopolamine. We found no evidence for changes in sensorimotor control in response to scopolamine injection. Sensory processing of daily relevant reflexes, spinal excitability, maximal motor output and performance parameters were not sensitive to the medication. We conclude that scopolamine administration can be used to counteract motion sickness in PF without methodological and operational concerns or interference regarding sensorimotor skills associated with neuromuscular control.

  7. Motor-coordination-dependent learning, more than others, is impaired in transgenic mice expressing pseudorabies virus immediate-early protein IE180.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C López-Ramos

    Full Text Available The cerebellum in transgenic mice expressing pseudorabies virus immediate-early protein IE180 (TgIE96 was substantially diminished in size, and its histoarchitecture was severely disorganized, resulting in severe ataxia. TgIE96 mice can therefore be used as an experimental model to study the involvement of cerebellar circuits in different learning tasks. The performance of three-month-old TgIE96 mice was studied in various behavioral tests, including associative learning (classical eyeblink conditioning, object recognition, spatial orientation (water maze, startle response and prepulse inhibition, and passive avoidance, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Wild-type and TgIE96 mice presented similar reflexively evoked eyeblinks, and acquired classical conditioned eyelid responses with similar learning curves for both trace and delay conditioning paradigms. The two groups of mice also had similar performances during the object recognition test. However, they showed significant differences for the other three tests included in this study. Although both groups of animals were capable of swimming, TgIE96 mice failed to learn the water maze task during the allowed time. The startle response to a severe tone was similar in both control and TgIE96 mice, but the latter were unable to produce a significant prepulse inhibition. TgIE96 mice also presented evident deficits for the proper accomplishment of a passive avoidance test. These results suggest that the cerebellum is not indispensable for the performance of classical eyeblink conditioning and for object recognition tasks, but seems to be necessary for the proper performance of water maze, prepulse inhibition, and passive avoidance tests.

  8. Anormalidades neuromuscular no desuso, senilidade e caquexia Neuromuscular abnormalities in disuse, cachexia and ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Aris Kouyoumdjian

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available É feita revisão de literatura sobre as principais alterações do sistema neuromuscular no desuso, senilidade e caquexia no ser humano e em modelos animais. A diminuição do diâmetro das fibras musculares após período de inatividade/imobilidade (desuso deve-se à perda de miofibrilas periféricas não ocorrendo formação de core-targetóides ou diminuição da atividade da miofosforilase, próprias da desnervação; mantêm-se a liberação espontânea de acetilcolina e fatores tróficos na junção mio-neural; em geral são afetadas preferencialmente fibras II, que podem assumir forma angular. Existe um processo contínuo intrínseco de envelhecimento de nervos e músculos, com desnervação e reinervação lenta e progressiva; o número de unidades motoras se reduz após 60 anos, sem ocorrência de atividade elétrica desnervatória; a quantidade de acetilcolina liberada nos neurônios terminais e a capacidade máxima de utilização de oxigênio estão diminuídas; a redução da capacidade oxidativa mitocondrial pode explicar o aumento de fibras I, mantendo-se o equilíbrio energético. Após poucas semanas de caquexia as fibras musculares podem ter o diâmetro reduzido em 30%, essa redução ocorre em ordem decrescente nos músculos dos membros inferiores, superiores e tronco; existe atrofia II preferencial com fibras angulares ocasionais, redução de RNA/síntese proteica, mantendo-se DNA normal.Cachexia, ageing and disuse and their effects on the human and animals neuromuscular system are reviewed. Disuse induces reduction of muscle fibers (mainly II diameter with peripheral myofibrils lost; there is no core-targetoid or even reduction on myophosphorilase activity, both typical of denervation; the acetylcholine spontaneous release and trophic factors on myoneural junction are maintained; muscle fibers could change to angular shape. Ageing affects nerve and muscle by a continuous and progressive process of denervation and reinner

  9. [Electromyography (EMG) and neurography in patients with severe neuromuscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løseth, Sissel; Torbergsen, Torberg

    2013-01-22

    Many neuromuscular diseases are potentially severe, and EMG and neurography are methods used in the assessment of these conditions. The article is based on the authors' knowledge and experience, with special emphasis on the use of these methods in the assessment of severe diseases affecting striated muscle and peripheral nerves. A PubMed search was performed with the cut-off fifteen years back in time, and in addition a discretionary selection was made of articles known to the authors. EMG is the most valuable method for assessing myopathy, and neurography provides most information about neuropathy, but the methods are complementary. These examinations are the most sensitive for diagnosing some conditions (for example myasthaenia) A high level of expertise is necessary for diagnosing these conditions. EMG and neurography are important and often necessary means of assessing patients with severe neuromuscular disease.

  10. Effect of electrostimulation training-detraining on neuromuscular fatigue mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeau, Marc; Zory, Raphaël; Gondin, Julien; Martin, Alain; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2007-08-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) training and subsequent detraining on neuromuscular fatigue mechanisms. Ten young healthy men completed one NMES fatigue protocol before and after a NMES training program of 4 weeks and again after 4 weeks of detraining. Muscle fatigue (maximal voluntary torque loss), central fatigue (activation failure), and peripheral fatigue (transmission failure and contractile failure) of the plantar flexor muscles were assessed by using a series of electrically evoked and voluntary contractions with concomitant electromyographic and torque recordings. At baseline, maximal voluntary torque decreased significantly with fatigue (Pmuscle activation after training and detraining was significantly lower compared to baseline values (Ptraining-detraining of the plantar flexor muscles significantly reduced the muscle fatigue associated to one single NMES exercise session. This was mainly attributable to a reduction in activation failure, i.e., lower central fatigue, probably as a result of subject's accommodation to pain and discomfort during NMES.

  11. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Early appearance and possible roles of non-neuromuscular cholinesterases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eFalugi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The biological function of the cholinesterase (ChE enzymes is well known and has been studied since the beginning of the XXth century; in particular, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, E.C. 3.1.1.7 is an enzyme playing a key role in the modulation of neuromuscular impulse transmission. However, in the past decades, there has been increasing interest concerning its role in regulating non-neuromuscular cell-to-cell interactions mediated by intracellular ion concentration changes, like the ones occurring during gamete interaction and embryonic development. An understanding of the mechanisms of the cholinergic regulation of these events can help us foresee the possible impact on environmental and human health, including gamete efficiency and possible teratogenic effects on different models, and help elucidate the extent to which exposure to ChE inhibitors may affect human health.

  13. One clinic's experience with carbon fiber orthoses in neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnatsakanian, Ani; Kissel, John T; Terry, Philip; King, Wendy M

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize our experience with off-the-shelf anterior shell carbon fiber ankle-foot orthoses (CFAFOs) prescribed to adult neuromuscular patients in an outpatient clinic. We studied ambulatory patients who were seen in Muscular Dystrophy Association or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis clinics between 2011 and 2014 and prescribed anterior shell CFAFOs. Charts were reviewed with attention to diagnosis, satisfaction with use, and reasons for acceptance or rejection. We included individuals who were currently using AFOs and those being prescribed AFOs for the first time. We were especially interested in reasons for acceptance or rejection of the orthosis. Two hundred eighty-three charts were reviewed. Of these, 109 of 123 (89%) patients were satisfied or extremely satisfied with the anterior shell CFAFOs, including 38 who had previously used other styles. Anterior shell CFAFOs should be considered for most neuromuscular patients with distal leg weakness. Muscle Nerve 55: 202-205, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Neuromuscular paralysis for newborn infants receiving mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, F; Offringa, M

    2005-04-18

    Ventilated newborn infants breathing in asynchrony with the ventilator are at risk for complications during mechanical ventilation, such as pneumothorax or intraventricular hemorrhage, and are exposed to more severe barotrauma, which consequently could impair their clinical outcome. Neuromuscular paralysis, which eliminates spontaneous breathing efforts of the infant, has potential advantages in this respect. However, a number of complications have been reported with muscle relaxation in infants, so that concerns exist regarding the safety of prolonged neuromuscular paralysis in newborn infants. To determine whether routine neuromuscular paralysis of newborn infants receiving mechanical ventilation compared with no routine paralysis results in clinically important benefits or harms. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2004), MEDLINE (from 1966 to April 2004) and EMBASE (from 1988 to April 2004) were searched. References of review articles were hand searched. Language restriction was not imposed. All trials using random or quasi-random patient allocation, in which the routine use of neuromuscular blocking agents during mechanical ventilation was compared to no paralysis or selective paralysis in newborn infants. Methodological quality was assessed blindly and independently by the two authors. Data were abstracted using standard methods of the Cochrane Collaboration and its Neonatal Review Group, with independent evaluation of trial quality, and abstraction and synthesis of data by both authors. Treatment effect was analysed using relative risk, risk difference and weighted mean difference. Ten possibly eligible trials were identified, of which six were included in the review. All the included trials studied preterm infants ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome, and used pancuronium as the neuromuscular blocking agent. In the analysis of the results of all trials, no significant difference was found in

  15. Monitoring of intense neuromuscular blockade in a pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias V; Donatsky, Anders M; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2014-01-01

    Intense neuromuscular blockade (NMB) measured by post tetanic count (PTC) was monitored, reversed and verified in this pig model. In a cross-over assessor blinded design six pigs were randomized to either no NMB followed by intense NMB, or intense NMB followed by no NMB. Neuromuscular measurements...... were performed with acceleromyography [train-of-four (TOF) Watch SX]. In all pigs, the response to TOF nerve stimulation was stable and intense NMB (PTC 0-1) was established with rocuronium 3 mg/kg. For reversal, the pigs received sugammadex 20-35 mg/kg and returned to TOF-ratio above 0.90 within 2.......15 min after injection. We established a pig model for monitoring intense NMB with surface stimulation electrodes and acceleromyography. We verified total relaxation of the diaphragm and the abdominal muscles at the PTC 0-1 by suction test and with surface electromyography. This pig model is suitable...

  16. Neuromuscular fatigue induced by whole-body vibration exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Saugy, Jonas; Cardinale, Marco; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Place, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and the origin of neuromuscular fatigue induced by half-squat static whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise, and to compare it to a non-WBV condition. Nine healthy volunteers completed two fatiguing protocols (WBV and non-WBV, randomly presented) consisting of five 1-min bouts of static half-squat exercise with a load corresponding to 50 % of their individual body mass. Neuromuscular fatigue of knee and ankle muscles was investigated before and immediately after each fatiguing protocol. The main outcomes were maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, voluntary activation, and doublet peak torque. Knee extensor MVC torque decreased significantly (P fatiguing protocols. Doublet peak torque decreased significantly and to a similar extent following WBV and non-WBV exercise, for both knee extensors (-25 %; P fatigue and did not change its causative factors compared to non-WBV half-squat resistive exercise in recreationally active subjects.

  17. [From joint to neuromuscular, from mechanics to electronics: the concept of neuromuscular compatibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubol, J P; Duret, F

    1989-06-01

    The development of devices to record the functional mandibular kinetics, has permitted the physiological analysis of the masticatory cycles. Therefore, it is possible to consider a functional integration of the corrections, by addition or subtraction to the occlusal surfaces of the teeth. For this purpose, we have established the conditions of a physiological concept of occlusion taking into account the efficiency of the masticatory apparatus through a velocity analysis. This is the N.M.C. concept or concept of Neuro-Muscular Compatibility. This concept has led us to define the ISCA (Intra-Cuspid Spatial Angle), represented by the angle defined in the three spatial planes, by the trajectory of the occlusal contact point of a cusp liding over its opposite, in any excursive opportunity. We have shortly reported the studies by Levin on the SIROGNATOGRAPH and the prospects resulting from these studies. Then, we have studied in greater details the Saphon VISI TRAINER III developed by HOBO and described the various potentials of its use in the GBM Laboratory in Vienna (France), with François DURET. We have also analyzed the specific points which seem to represent the weaknesses of this device and have outlined some solutions to this problem. This approach, within a clinical context, may at term give rise to a complex analyser-expert-system intends to facilitate the establishment of a reliable diagnosis and to control the physiological integration of our procedures. The establishment, at term, of parameters and constants of this function, will guide this progression towards success.

  18. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Motor Restoration in Hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Jayme S; Fu, Michael J; Sheffler, Lynne R; Chae, John

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the most common therapeutic and neuroprosthetic applications of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for upper and lower extremity stroke rehabilitation. Fundamental NMES principles and purposes in stroke rehabilitation are explained. NMES modalities used for upper and lower limb rehabilitation are described, and efficacy studies are summarized. The evidence for peripheral and central mechanisms of action is also summarized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal, circulatory, and neuromuscular responses to whole-body cryotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Westerlund, T. (Tarja)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine thermal (body temperature, thermal sensation and comfort ratings), circulatory (blood pressure, heart rate variability) and neuromuscular performance responses to whole-body cryotherapy (WBC, -110 °C). Altogether 66 healthy subjects were exposed to WBC for two minutes. The acute and long-term changes were examined, when the subjects were exposed to WBC three times a week during three months. Skin temperatures decreased very rapidl...

  20. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, You-jou

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. Howeve...

  1. Effect of newly proposed CK reference limits on neuromuscular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardin, Rachel A; Zarrin, Amy R; Horowitz, Gary L; Tarulli, Andrew W

    2009-04-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of a proposed increase in the upper reference limits of serum creatine kinase (CK) on neuromuscular disease diagnosis. This was a retrospective study of 94 Caucasian subjects (49 women and 45 men) in whom a neuromuscular physician ordered a CK as part of their evaluation. The patients were divided into two groups: those with diagnoses that either should or could elevate serum CK, and those with diagnoses that should not elevate serum CK. Sensitivities and specificities of the manufacturer's and the newly proposed upper reference limits were determined. For women, raising the upper reference limit of CK from 140 IU/L to 201 IU/L reduced the sensitivity of the test from 50% to 29%, while increasing the specificity from 67% to 80%. For men, raising the upper reference limit of CK from 174 IU/L to 322 IU/L reduced the sensitivity from 80% to 60%, while increasing the specificity from 63% to 80%. The newly proposed upper reference limits resulted in a false-negative CK of clinical significance in 7 of 94 subjects. Increasing the upper reference limit for CK reduced the sensitivity and increased the specificity of serum CK for neuromuscular disease diagnosis. Such a change will reduce unnecessary referrals and invasive diagnostic testing in patients with asymptomatic CK elevations. The clinical impact of the loss in sensitivity is small. If these new upper reference limits are adopted, neuromuscular physicians should be aware that a normal CK level does not exclude a diagnosis of myopathy.

  2. Ultrastructural muscle and neuro-muscular junction alterations in polymyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Babakova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural analysis of 7 biopsies from m.palmaris longus and m.deltoideus in patients with confirmed polymyositis revealed alterationand degeneration of muscle fibers and anomalies of neuro-muscular junction (NMJ. The NMJ abnormalities and following denervation ofmuscle fibers in polymyositis start with subsynaptic damages. The occurance of regeneration features in muscle fibers at any stage is characteristic for PM.

  3. Computed tomography of skeletal muscles in neuromuscular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Kuether, G.

    1985-06-01

    CT-documentation of skeletal muscular lesions caused by neuromuscular diseases implies an essential contribution to conventional techniques in the macroscopic field. Size, distribution and degree of lesions as well as compensatory mechanisms are proved thereby. We report about the different effects on muscle appearance referring to 106 patients of our own experience in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, polyradiculitis, polyneuropathy as well as peripheral traumatic nerve lesions.

  4. Adiposity, physical activity and neuromuscular performance in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Eero A; Väistö, Juuso; Lintu, Niina; Tompuri, Tuomo; Brage, Soren; Westgate, Kate; Ekelund, Ulf; Lampinen, Eeva-Kaarina; Sääkslahti, Arja; Lindi, Virpi; Lakka, Timo A

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the associations of body fat percentage (BF%), objectively assessed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and different types of physical activity assessed by a questionnaire with neuromuscular performance. The participants were 404 children aged 6-8 years. BF% was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and physical activity by combined heart rate and movement sensing and a questionnaire. The results of 50-m shuttle run, 15-m sprint run, hand grip strength, standing long jump, sit-up, modified flamingo balance, box-and-block and sit-and-reach tests were used as measures of neuromuscular performance. Children who had a combination of higher BF% and lower levels of physical activity had the poorest performance in 50-m shuttle run, 15-m sprint run and standing long jump tests. Higher BF% was associated with slower 50-m shuttle run and 15-m sprint times, shorter distance jumped in standing long jump test, fewer sit-ups, more errors in balance test and less cubes moved in box-and-block test. Higher levels of physical activity and particularly MVPA assessed objectively by combined accelerometer and heart rate monitor were related to shorter 50-m shuttle run and 15-m sprint times. In conclusion, higher BF% and lower levels of physical activity and particularly the combination of these two factors were associated with worse neuromuscular performance.

  5. Neuromuscular dose-response studies: determining sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, A F; Lien, C A; Naguib, M

    2011-02-01

    Investigators planning dose-response studies of neuromuscular blockers have rarely used a priori power analysis to determine the minimal sample size their protocols require. Institutional Review Boards and peer-reviewed journals now generally ask for this information. This study outlines a proposed method for meeting these requirements. The slopes of the dose-response relationships of eight neuromuscular blocking agents were determined using regression analysis. These values were substituted for γ in the Hill equation. When this is done, the coefficient of variation (COV) around the mean value of the ED₅₀ for each drug is easily calculated. Using these values, we performed an a priori one-sample two-tailed t-test of the means to determine the required sample size when the allowable error in the ED₅₀ was varied from ±10-20%. The COV averaged 22% (range 15-27%). We used a COV value of 25% in determining the sample size. If the allowable error in finding the mean ED₅₀ is ±15%, a sample size of 24 is needed to achieve a power of 80%. Increasing 'accuracy' beyond this point requires increasing greater sample sizes (e.g. an 'n' of 37 for a ±12% error). On the basis of the results of this retrospective analysis, a total sample size of not less than 24 subjects should be adequate for determining a neuromuscular blocking drug's clinical potency with a reasonable degree of assurance.

  6. Neuromuscular interactions around the knee in children, adults and elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Mademli, Lida; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2014-09-18

    Although injury and neuromuscular activation patterns may be common for all individuals, there are certain factors which differentiate neuromuscular activity responses between children, adults and elderly. The purpose of this study is to review recent evidence on age differences in neural activation and muscle balances around the knee when performing single joint movements. Particularly, current evidence indicates that there are some interesting similarities in the neuromuscular mechanisms by which children or the elderly differ compared with adults. Both children and elderly display a lower absolute muscle strength capacity than adults which cannot fully be explained by differences in muscle mass. Quadriceps activation failure is a common symptom of all knee injuries, irrespective of age but it is likely that its effect is more evident in children or adults. While one might expect that antagonist co-activation would differ between age categories, it appears that this is not the case. Although hamstring: quadriceps ratio levels are altered after knee injury, it is not clear whether this is an age specific response. Finally, evidence suggests that both children and the elderly display less stiffness of the quadriceps muscle-tendon unit than adults which affects their knee joint function.

  7. Fatty replacement of lower paraspinal muscles: normal and neuromuscular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hader, H.; Gadoth, N.; Heifetz, H.

    1983-11-01

    The physiologic replacement of the lower paraspinal muscles by fat was evaluated in 157 patients undergoing computed tomography for reasons unrelated to abnormalities of the locomotor system. Five patients with neuromuscular disorders were similarly evaluated. The changes were graded according to severity at three spinal levels: lower thoracic-upper lumbar, midlumbar, and lumbosacral. The results were analyzed in relation to age and gender. It was found that fatty replacement of paraspinal muscles is a normal age-progressive phenomenon most prominent in females. It progresses down the spine, being most advanced in the lumbosacral region. The severest changes in the five patients with neuromuscular disorders (three with poliomyelitis and two with progressive muscular dystrophy) consisted of complete muscle group replacement by fat. In postpoliomyelitis atrophy, the distribution was typically asymmetric and sometimes lacked clinical correlation. In muscular dystrophy, fatty replacement was symmetric, showing relative sparing of the psoas and multifidus muscles. In patients with neuromuscular diseases, computed tomography of muscles may be helpful in planning a better rehabilitation regimen.

  8. Altered neuromuscular control mechanisms of the trapezius muscle in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Stefan J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background fibromyalgia is a relatively common condition with widespread pain and pressure allodynia, but unknown aetiology. For decades, the association between motor control strategies and chronic pain has been a topic for debate. One long held functional neuromuscular control mechanism is differential activation between regions within a single muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in neuromuscular control, i.e. differential activation, between myalgic trapezius in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls. Methods 27 fibromyalgia patients and 30 healthy controls performed 3 minutes bilateral shoulder elevations with different loads (0-4 Kg with a high-density surface electromyographical (EMG grid placed above the upper trapezius. Differential activation was quantified by the power spectral median frequency of the difference in EMG amplitude between the cranial and caudal parts of the upper trapezius. The average duration of the differential activation was described by the inverse of the median frequency of the differential activations. Results the median frequency of the differential activations was significantly lower, and the average duration of the differential activations significantly longer in fibromyalgia compared with controls at the two lowest load levels (0-1 Kg (p Conclusion these findings illustrate a different neuromuscular control between fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls during a low load functional task, either sustaining or resulting from the chronic painful condition. The findings may have clinical relevance for rehabilitation strategies for fibromyalgia.

  9. Can muscle coordination be precisely studied by surface electromyography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, François

    2011-02-01

    Despite the many reviews and research papers on the limitations of surface electromyography (EMG), there are relatively few that address this issue by considering dynamic contractions and specifically from the point of view of muscle coordination. Nevertheless, whether muscle coordination can be precisely studied using surface EMG signals is still a matter of discussion in the scientific community. In other words, it is uncertain whether neural control strategies of movement can be inferred from EMG. This review article discusses the appropriateness of using EMG recordings for studying muscle coordination. First, the main uses of surface EMG for studying muscle coordination are depicted. Then, the main intrinsic drawbacks of the EMG technique (i.e., amplitude cancellation, crosstalk and spatial variability of muscle activity) and of EMG processing (i.e., smoothing of the linear envelope, normalization of the time scale and the amplitude and timing of muscle activation) are described and discussed. Finally, three other factors (i.e., variability, electromechanical delay and neuromuscular fatigue), which can affect the interpretation of EMG and have received little attention in the literature, are presented and discussed. All of this information is crucial to the proper interpretation of muscle coordination from EMG signals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-invasive neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions: an educational review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schuhfried, Othmar; Crevenna, Richard; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    ...) functional electrical stimulation. Therapeutic electrical stimulation improves neuromuscular functional condition by strengthening muscles, increasing motor control, reducing spasticity, decreasing pain and increasing range of motion...

  11. Coordinate measuring machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This document is used in connection with three exercises of 2 hours duration as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The exercises concern three aspects of coordinate measuring: 1) Measuring and verification of tolerances on coordinate measuring machines, 2) Traceabilit...

  12. Coordination failure caused by sunspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beugnot, Julie; Gürgüç, Zeynep; Øvlisen, Frederik Roose

    2012-01-01

    In a coordination game with Pareto-ranked equilibria, we study whether a sunspot can lead to either coordination on an inferior equilibrium (mis-coordination) or to out-of equilibrium behavior (dis-coordination). While much of the literature searches for mechanisms to attain coordination on the e......In a coordination game with Pareto-ranked equilibria, we study whether a sunspot can lead to either coordination on an inferior equilibrium (mis-coordination) or to out-of equilibrium behavior (dis-coordination). While much of the literature searches for mechanisms to attain coordination...

  13. Prepubescent males are less susceptible to neuromuscular fatigue following resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Justin R; Button, Duane C; Chaouachi, Anis; Behm, David G

    2014-04-01

    To determine if prepubescent and adult males have similar fatigue profiles following high and lower intensity knee extensions. Ten male children and ten adults completed two sessions of three sets of high repetition (17 typical muscle endurance training) high repetition (High RM) or low repetition (seven typical strength training) maximum (Low RM) dynamic knee extensions. Voluntary and evoked contractile properties, heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed before and after each knee extension RM. Knee extension RM measures revealed that boys performed more (children set 2, 6.7 ± 0.5; set 3, 5.7 ± 0.5 vs. adult set 2, 5.2 ± 0.4; set 3, 3.5 ± 0.5; P muscle coordination changes as a primary mechanism for MVC force decrements. The lower RPE and similar agonist EMG activity may also indicate an inability of boys to perceive or produce a maximal effort. Independent of High or Low RM knee extensions, boys had greater neuromuscular fatigue resistance and recovered faster than adults.

  14. Laminins promote postsynaptic maturation by an autocrine mechanism at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimune, Hiroshi; Valdez, Gregorio; Jarad, George; Moulson, Casey L; Müller, Ulrich; Miner, Jeffrey H; Sanes, Joshua R

    2008-09-22

    A prominent feature of synaptic maturation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the topological transformation of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-rich postsynaptic membrane from an ovoid plaque into a complex array of branches. We show here that laminins play an autocrine role in promoting this transformation. Laminins containing the alpha4, alpha5, and beta2 subunits are synthesized by muscle fibers and concentrated in the small portion of the basal lamina that passes through the synaptic cleft at the NMJ. Topological maturation of AChR clusters was delayed in targeted mutant mice lacking laminin alpha5 and arrested in mutants lacking both alpha4 and alpha5. Analysis of chimeric laminins in vivo and of mutant myotubes cultured aneurally demonstrated that the laminins act directly on muscle cells to promote postsynaptic maturation. Immunohistochemical studies in vivo and in vitro along with analysis of targeted mutants provide evidence that laminin-dependent aggregation of dystroglycan in the postsynaptic membrane is a key step in synaptic maturation. Another synaptically concentrated laminin receptor, Bcam, is dispensable. Together with previous studies implicating laminins as organizers of presynaptic differentiation, these results show that laminins coordinate post- with presynaptic maturation.

  15. Wrist Rehabilitation Assisted by an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Robot After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Ling; Tong, Raymond Kai-yu; Ho, Newmen S K; Xue, Jing-jing; Rong, Wei; Li, Leonard S W

    2015-09-01

    Augmented physical training with assistance from robot and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may introduce intensive motor improvement in chronic stroke. To compare the rehabilitation effectiveness achieved by NMES robot-assisted wrist training and that by robot-assisted training. This study was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up. Twenty-six hemiplegic subjects with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to receive 20-session wrist training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven NMES robot (NMES robot group, n = 11) and with an EMG-driven robot (robot group, n = 15), completed within 7 consecutive weeks. Clinical scores, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Modified Ashworth Score (MAS), and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were used to evaluate the training effects before and after the training, as well as 3 months later. An EMG parameter, muscle co-contraction index, was also applied to investigate the session-by-session variation in muscular coordination patterns during the training. The improvement in FMA (shoulder/elbow, wrist/hand) obtained in the NMES robot group was more significant than the robot group (P robot group (P robot group. NMES robot-assisted training showed better performance in releasing muscle co-contraction than the robot-assisted across the training sessions (P robot-assisted wrist training was more effective than the pure robot. The additional NMES application in the treatment could bring more improvements in the distal motor functions and faster rehabilitation progress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Rapid synthesis of acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, D A; Drachman, D B; Pestronk, A

    1988-10-11

    The rate of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) degradation in mature, innervated mammalian neuromuscular junctions has recently been shown to be biphasic; up to 20% are rapidly turned over (RTOs; half life less than 1 day) whereas the remainder are lost more slowly ('stable' AChRs; half life 10-12 days). In order to maintain normal junctional receptor density, synthesis and insertion of AChRs should presumably be sufficiently rapid to replace both the RTOs and the stable receptors. We have tested this prediction by blocking pre-existing AChRs in the mouse sternomastoid muscle with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BuTx), and monitoring the subsequent appearance of 'new' junctional AChRs at intervals of 3 h to 20 days by labeling them with 125I-alpha-BuTx. The results show that new receptors were initially inserted rapidly (16% at 24 h and 28% at 48 h). The rate of increase of 'new' 125I-alpha-BuTx binding sites gradually slowed down during the remainder of the time period studied. Control observations excluded possible artifacts of the experimental procedure including incomplete blockade of AChRs, dissociation of toxin-receptor complexes, or experimentally induced alteration of receptor synthesis. The present demonstration of rapid synthesis and incorporation of AChRs at innervated neuromuscular junctions provides support for the concept of a subpopulation of rapidly turned over AChRs. The RTOs may serve as precursors for the larger population of stable receptors and have an important role in the metabolism of the neuromuscular synapse.

  17. Temperature dependent modulation of lobster neuromuscular properties by serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jonna L; Edwards, Claire R; Holt, Stephen R; Worden, Mary Kate

    2007-03-01

    In cold-blooded species the efficacy of neuromuscular function depends both on the thermal environmental of the animal's habitat and on the concentrations of modulatory hormones circulating within the animal's body. The goal of this study is to examine how temperature variation within an ecologically relevant range affects neuromuscular function and its modulation by the neurohormone serotonin (5-HT) in Homarus americanus, a lobster species that inhabits a broad thermal range in the wild. The synaptic strength of the excitatory and inhibitory motoneurons innervating the lobster dactyl opener muscle depends on temperature, with the strongest neurally evoked muscle movements being elicited at cold (temperatures. However, whereas neurally evoked contractions can be elicited over the entire temperature range from 2 to >20 degrees C, neurally evoked relaxations of resting muscle tension are effective only at colder temperatures at which the inhibitory junction potentials are hyperpolarizing in polarity. 5-HT has two effects on inhibitory synaptic signals: it potentiates their amplitude and also shifts the temperature at which they reverse polarity by approximately +7 degrees C. Thus 5-HT both potentiates neurally evoked relaxations of the muscle and increases the temperature range over which neurally evoked muscle relaxations can be elicited. Neurally evoked contractions are maximally potentiated by 5-HT at warm (18 degrees C) temperatures; however, 5-HT enhances excitatory junction potentials in a temperature-independent manner. Finally, 5-HT strongly increases resting muscle tension at the coldest extent of the temperature range tested (2 degrees C) but is ineffective at 22 degrees C. These data demonstrate that 5-HT elicits several temperature-dependent physiological changes in the passive and active responses of muscle to neural input. The overall effect of 5-HT is to increase the temperature range over which neurally evoked motor movements can be elicited in this

  18. Neuromuscular Responses to Simulated Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Fights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa da Silva Bruno Victor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the neuromuscular performance responses following successive Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ fights. Twenty-three BJJ athletes (age: 26.3 ± 6.3 years; body mass: 79.4 ± 9.7 kg; body height: 1.80 ± 0.1 m undertook 3 simulated BJJ fights (10 min duration each separated by 15 min of rest. Neuromuscular performance was measured by the bench press throw (BPT and vertical counter movement jump (VCMJ tests, assessed before the 1st fight (Pre and after the last one (Post. Blood lactate (LA was measured at Pre, 1 min Post, and 15 min Post fights. Paired t-tests were employed in order to compare the BPT and VCMJ results. One-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc tests were utilized to compare LA responses. The results revealed a significant (p < 0.05 increase in VCMJ performance (40.8 ± 5.5 cm Pre vs. 42.0 ± 5.8 cm Post, but no significant changes in the BPT (814 ± 167 W Pre vs. 835 ± 213 W Post were observed. LA concentration increased significantly (p < 0.05 at Post, both in the 1st min and the 15th min of recovery. We concluded that successive simulated BJJ fights demanded considerable anaerobic contribution of ATP supply, reinforcing the high-intensity intermittent nature of the sport. Nevertheless, no negative impact on acute neuromuscular performance (power was observed.

  19. Quality of life after surgery for neuromuscular scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Obid

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Surgery in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis is associated with a higher rate of complications. It is still controversially discussed whether the patients truly benefit from deformity correction. The purpose of this study is to investigate if the quality of life has been improved and if the patients and their caregivers are satisfied with the results of surgery. This is a retrospective clinical outcome study of 46 patients with neuromuscular scoliosis which were treated with primary stable posterior pedicle screw instrumentation and correction. To achieve fusion only autologous bone was used. Follow up was minimum 2 years and maximum 5 years with an average of 36 months. The patients and/or their caregivers received a questionnaire based on the PEDI (pediatric disability inventory and the GMFS (gross motor function score. The patients (and their caregivers were also asked if the quality of life has improved after surgery. Only 32 of 46 patients answered the questionnaire. The answers showed a high approval-rate regarding the patients satisfaction with the surgery and the improvement of quality of life. The questionnaire could be answered from 1 (I do not agree to 4 (I completely agree. The average agreement to the following statements was: i the quality of life has improved: 3.35; ii I am satisfied with surgery: 3.95; iii the operation has fulfilled my expectations: 3.76. The average age at surgery was 12.7 years. The mean pre-operative cobb-angle of the main curve was 83.1° with a correction post-operatively to a mean of 36.9° and 42.6° at final follow-up. That is an average correction of 56.9%. Although spinal fusion in neuromuscular scoliosis is associated with a higher rate of complications our results show that the patients and their caregivers are satisfied with the operation and the quality of life has improved after surgery.

  20. [The silent yet successful revolution of mechanical ventilation in patients with neuromuscular disorders, in particular Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2007-01-01

    While developments in molecular biology have been giving rise to breakthroughs in diagnosis, management and promising treatment approaches for neuromuscular disorders, there has been a silent revolution in ventilatory support of patients with a range of neuromuscular disorders with respiratory

  1. Preventing Ischial Pressure Ulcers: I. Review of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton M. Kaplan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure ulcers (PUs are common and debilitating wounds that arise when immobilized patients cannot shift their weight. Treatment is expensive and recurrence rates are high. Pathophysiological mechanisms include reduced bulk and perfusion of chronically atrophic muscles as well as prolonged occlusion of blood flow to soft tissues from lack of voluntary postural shifting of body weight. This has suggested that PUs might be prevented by reanimating the paralyzed muscles using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES. A review of the published literature over the past 2 decades is detailed.

  2. El vendaje neuromuscular en podología

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Amela, F. Xavier (Francesc Xavier); Verdaguer Sanmartí, Josefina; Lluch Fruns, Joan; Genís Barniol, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Desde hace unos cinco años la introducción en España de los vendajes neuromusculares ha ido cobrando mayor relevancia, llegando el momento más álgido las imágenes de las olimpiadas de Beijing, donde se pudo observar el uso de este tipo de vendajes en muchas de las disciplinas deportivas. En este artículo pretendemos hacer una introducción general a este tipo de vendajes y la aplicación en patologías podales de gran incidencia en nuestras consultas.

  3. Segmental spinal instrumentation in the management of neuromuscular spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddonio, R F

    1982-01-01

    Seventeen patients with progressive neuromuscular spinal deformity were critically analyzed. All patients were surgically managed by employing segmental spinal instrumentation with Luque rods accompanied by posterior spinal fusion to sacrum. Satisfactory correction of scoliosis, kyphosis, and lordosis was achieved. Furthermore, maintainence and production of physiologic postural curves was possible with this method of instrumentation. Head and trunk decompensation and pelvic obliquity were not well controlled in this series. Respiratory complications in this high-risk group were minimal. Partial postoperative immobilization with bivalved thoraco-lumbosacral orthoses (TLSO) was employed in the majority of patients. Segmental spinal instrumentation provides significant benefits to justify its continued use and development.

  4. MRI in neuromuscular disorders; MRT bei neuromuskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischmann, Arne [Klinik St. Anna, Luzern (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Fischer, Dirk [Kantonsspital Bruderholz (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Neuromuscular disorders are caused by damage of the skeletal muscles or supplying nerves, in many cases due to a genetic defect, resulting in progressive disability, loss of ambulation and often a reduced life expectancy. Previously only supportive care and steroids were available as treatments, but several novel therapies are under development or in clinical trial phase. Muscle imaging can detect specific patterns of involvement and facilitate diagnosis and guide genetic testing. Quantitative MRT can be used to monitor disease progression either to monitor treatment or as a surrogate parameter for clinical trails. Novel imaging sequences can provide insights into disease pathology and muscle metabolism. (orig.)

  5. Resúmenes de los trabajos sobre las Enfermedades Neuromusculares

    OpenAIRE

    Congreso Nacional de Neurología

    2010-01-01

    Las enfermedades neuromusculares constituyen un conjunto de afectaciones que afectan las neuronas motoras periférica, las vías motoras eferentes o los efectores (músculos esqueléticos). Sus manifestaciones clínicas son muy variadas y dependen de la causa y de los niveles de afectación. En este acápite se pueden encontrar los resúmenes de trabajos relacionados con el síndrome de Guillain Barre, polineuropatía diabética, Atrofia Muscular Espinal, Distrofia miotónica y otros todos presentados en...

  6. 20 CFR 628.315 - Education coordination and grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... lifelong learning opportunities and services of demonstrated effectiveness, including basic education and... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Education coordination and grants. 628.315... UNDER TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT State Programs § 628.315 Education coordination and...

  7. The Dutch neuromuscular database CRAMP (Computer Registry of All Myopathies and Polyneuropathies) : Development and preliminary data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engelen, B. G. M.; van Veenendaal, H.; van Doorn, P. A.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Janssen, N. G.; Notermans, N. C.; van Schaik, I. N.; Visser, L. H.; Verschuuren, J. J. G. M.

    Each of the various neuromuscular diseases is rare. Consequently, solid epidemiological data are not available and it is often difficult to find sufficient patients for studies. For this reason, the Dutch neuromuscular database, CRAMP (Computer Registry of All Myopathies and Polyneuropathies), was

  8. Lumbar hyperlordosis of neuromuscular origin: pathophysiology and surgical strategy for correction

    OpenAIRE

    Vialle, Raphaël; Khouri, Nejib; Glorion, Christophe; Lechevallier, Joël; Morin, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar hyperlordosis of neuromuscular origin is rare and requires surgical treatment in order to preserve a good sitting posture. We report twenty-seven cases of a preponderantly sagittal hyperlordosis deformity of the lumbar spine in patients with neuromuscular disorders and identify the indications and results of treatment.

  9. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents : Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viby-Mogensen, J; Ostergaard, D; Donati, F; Fisher, D; Hunter, J; Kampmann, JP; Kopman, A; Proost, JH; Rasmussen, SN; Skovgaard, LT; Varin, F; Wright, PMC

    2000-01-01

    In September 1997, an international consensus conference on standardization of studies of neuromuscular blocking agents was held in Copenhagen, Denmark. Based on the conference, a set of guidelines fur good clinical research practice (GCRT) in pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents

  10. Neuromuscular blockade for optimising surgical conditions during abdominal and gynaecological surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M V; Staehr-Rye, A K; Gätke, M R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) that provides optimal surgical conditions during abdominal surgery has not been well established. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate current evidence on the use of neuromuscular blocking agents in order to optimise surgical...

  11. A new approach to anesthesia management in myasthenia gravis: reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de; Egmond, J. van; Driessen, J.J.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2010-01-01

    A neuromuscular blocking drug (NMBD) induced neuromuscular blockade (NMB) in patients with myasthenia gravis usually dissipates either spontaneously or by administration of neostigmine. We administered sugammadex to a patient with myasthenia gravis to reverse a rocuronium-induced profound NMB. NMBDs

  12. Plantar flexor neuromuscular adjustments following match-play football in hot and cool conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girard, O; Nybo, Lars; Mohr, Magni

    2015-01-01

    We assessed neuromuscular fatigue and recovery of the plantar flexors after playing football with or without severe heat stress. Neuromuscular characteristics of the plantar flexors were assessed in 17 male players at baseline and ∼30 min, 24, and 48 h after two 90-min football matches in temperate...

  13. CLINICAL-PHARMACOLOGY OF ORG-7617, A SHORT-ACTING NONDEPOLARIZING NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING-AGENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBROEK, L; WIERDA, JMKH; PROOST, JH; HOMMES, FDM; AGOSTON, S

    The dose-response relationship and the time course of action of Org 7617, a short acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent, were evaluated during thiopentone, fentanyl, halothane and N2O anaesthesia. Neuromuscular transmission was monitored mechanomyographically. The ED(50) and ED(90)

  14. The curvature coordinate system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a concept for a curvature coordinate system on regular curved surfaces from which faceted surfaces with plane quadrangular facets can be designed. The lines of curvature are used as parametric lines for the curvature coordinate system on the surface. A new conjugate set of lines......, called middle curvature lines, is introduced. These lines define the curvature coordinate system. Using the curvature coordinate system, the surface can be conformally mapped on the plane. In this mapping, elliptic sections are mapped as circles, and hyperbolic sections are mapped as equilateral...... hyperbolas. This means that when a plane orthogonal system of curves for which the vertices in a mesh always lie on a circle is mapped on a surface with positive Gaussian curvature using inverse mapping, and the mapped vertices are connected by straight lines, this network will form a faceted surface...

  15. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An order to establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance

  16. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  17. Effects of a short proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching bout on quadriceps neuromuscular function, flexibility, and vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Blum, Yannick; Armand, Stéphane; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Behm, David G

    2013-02-01

    The inclusion of relatively long bouts of stretching (repeated static stretches of ∼30 seconds) in the warm-up is usually associated with a drop in muscle performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a novel self-administered proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) paradigm with short periods of stretching and contraction on quadriceps neuromuscular function, vertical jump performance, and articular range of motion (ROM). Twelve healthy men (age: 27.7 ± 7.3 years, height: 178.4 ± 10.4 cm, weight: 73.8 ± 16.9 kg) volunteered to participate in a PNF session and a control session separated by 2-7 days. The PNF stretching lasted 2 minutes and consisted of 4 sets of 5-second isometric hamstring contraction immediately followed by 5 seconds of passive static stretch of the quadriceps immediately followed by 5 seconds isometric quadriceps contraction for each leg. For the control session, the participants were asked to walk at a comfortable speed for 2 minutes. Active ROM of knee flexion, vertical jump performance, and quadriceps neuromuscular function were tested before, immediately after, and 15 minutes after the intervention. The PNF stretching procedure did not affect ROM, squat jump, and countermovement jump performances. Accordingly, we did not observe any change in maximal voluntary contraction force, voluntary activation level, M-wave and twitch contractile properties that could be attributed to PNF stretching. The present self-administered PNF stretching of the quadriceps with short (5-second) stretches is not recommended before sports where flexibility is mandatory for performance.

  18. Metric Coordinate Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Calcaterra, Craig; Boldt, Axel; Green, Michael; Bleecker, David

    2002-01-01

    Coordinate systems are defined on general metric spaces with the purpose of generalizing vector fields on a manifold. Conversion formulae are available between metric and Cartesian coordinates on a Hilbert space. Nagumo's Invariance Theorem is invoked to prove the analogue of the classical Cauchy-Lipschitz Theorem for vector fields on a locally compact coordinatized space. A metric space version of Nagumo's Theorem is one consequence. Examples are given throughout.

  19. Magnetic Coordinate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundal, K. M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    Geospace phenomena such as the aurora, plasma motion, ionospheric currents and associated magnetic field disturbances are highly organized by Earth's main magnetic field. This is due to the fact that the charged particles that comprise space plasma can move almost freely along magnetic field lines, but not across them. For this reason it is sensible to present such phenomena relative to Earth's magnetic field. A large variety of magnetic coordinate systems exist, designed for different purposes and regions, ranging from the magnetopause to the ionosphere. In this paper we review the most common magnetic coordinate systems and describe how they are defined, where they are used, and how to convert between them. The definitions are presented based on the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and, in some of the coordinate systems, the position of the Sun which we show how to calculate from the time and date. The most detailed coordinate systems take the full IGRF into account and define magnetic latitude and longitude such that they are constant along field lines. These coordinate systems, which are useful at ionospheric altitudes, are non-orthogonal. We show how to handle vectors and vector calculus in such coordinates, and discuss how systematic errors may appear if this is not done correctly.

  20. [Coordination and donation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, J; Lorente, M

    2006-01-01

    The progressive incorporation of organ transplants as a therapeutic resource resulted in organisational adaptation and overall transplant management, leading to the emergence of the figure of the transplant coordinator in the mid-1980s. In Spain, the National Organisation of Transplants (Organización Nacional de Transplantes - ONT) was created, establishing a system - called the "Spanish model" - based on a network of coordinators at three levels: national, the autonomous community and the hospital. This organisational structure is a point of reference at the world level. The prevalence of the Intensive Medicine specialisation amongst hospital transplant coordinators is remarkable. The majority of organs proceed from brain-dead patients with beating hearts and this requires the infrastructure offered by intensive care units. The functions of the coordinator can be summarised in guaranteeing a synchrony of all the elements and teams that come together in an organisational chain that has come to be called the "process of donation". Schematically, the crucial points that the hospital coordinator develops are the following: - Detection of the potential donor. - Maintenance of the donor. - Diagnosis of brain death. - Family consent. - Preparation of the hospital logistics. - Helping the relatives. - Direct involvement in the Program of Guarantee of Quality. - Person of reference in any activity related to the transplant. It would be desirable to achieve the creation of transplant coordination teams, with univocal messages, professionalism and a permanent input of the so-called "human factor", which is so necessary and also so close to the transplant world.

  1. Neuromuscular rate of force development deficit in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Kelley G; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S; Schilling, Brian K

    2017-06-01

    Bradykinesia and reduced neuromuscular force exist in Parkinson disease. The interpolated twitch technique has been used to evaluate central versus peripheral manifestations of neuromuscular strength in healthy, aging, and athletic populations, as well as moderate to advanced Parkinson disease, but this method has not been used in mild Parkinson disease. This study aimed to evaluate quadriceps femoris rate of force development and quantify potential central and peripheral activation deficits in individuals with Parkinson disease. Nine persons with mild Parkinson Disease (Hoehn & Yahr≤2, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total score=mean 19.1 (SD 5.0)) and eight age-matched controls were recruited in a cross-sectional investigation. Quadriceps femoris voluntary and stimulated maximal force and rate of force development were evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique. Thirteen participants satisfactorily completed the protocol. Individuals with early Parkinson disease (n=7) had significantly slower voluntary rate of force development (p=0.008; d=1.97) and rate of force development ratio (p=0.004; d=2.18) than controls (n=6). No significant differences were found between groups for all other variables. Persons with mild-to-moderate Parkinson disease display disparities in rate of force development, even without deficits in maximal force. The inability to produce force at a rate comparable to controls is likely a downstream effect of central dysfunction of the motor pathway in Parkinson disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. [Basic principles of non-respiratory physiotherapy for neuromuscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzek, I; Winterholler, M

    2008-03-01

    Loss of function, muscle pain and secondary muscoloskeletal complaints are common symptoms of patients with neuromuscular disease. Many patients develop a progressive handicap. Physiotherapeutic treatment is often used in the management of neuromuscular diseases. Different therapeutic strategies are useful depending on the stage and pathophysiology of the disease and with regard to the extent of the patient's handicap. The aims of the physiotherapy and realistic targets should be discussed critically with the patient at the beginning of the treatment. We propose different physiotherapeutic strategies depending on the stage of the underlying disease: 1) Patient is able to walk--active phase: education in self-training with regard to the risks of exhaustion. Manual and physical treatment of mycofascial complaints. 2) Progressive functional loss--assistive phase: support of compensation and daily functioning. 3) Patient in wheelchair or bedbound, loss of most voluntary functions--passive phase. The knowledge of the pathopysiology of the underlying disease is essential for the development of therapeutic strategies. Loss of upper neurons leads to the development of spasticity and muscle hypertonia whereas muscular atrophy and weakness is a prominent feature of lower motor neuron loss. Overtreatment and exhaustive training may lead to secondary muscle damage in primary myopathies. Training in short sessions with intervals between may have protective effects.

  3. A neuromuscular monitoring system based on a personal computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D A; Hull, M

    1992-07-01

    We have developed a computerized neuromuscular monitoring system (NMMS) using commercially available subsystems, i.e., computer equipment, clinical nerve stimulator, force transducer, and strip-chart recorder. This NMMS was developed for acquisition and analysis of data for research and teaching purposes. Computer analysis of the muscle response to stimulation allows graphic and numeric presentation of the twitch response and calculated ratios. Since the system can store and recall data, research data can be accessed for analysis and graphic presentation. An IBM PC/AT computer is used as the central controller and data processor. The computer controls timing of the nerve stimulator output, initiates data acquisition, and adjusts the paper speed of the strip chart recorder. The data processing functions include establishing control response values (when no neuromuscular blockade is present), displaying force versus time and calculated data graphically and numerically, and storing these data for further analysis. The general purpose nature of the computer and strip chart recording equipment allow modification of the system primarily by changes in software. For example, new patterns of nerve stimulation, such as the posttetanic count, can be programmed into the computer system along with appropriate data display and analysis routines. The NMMS has functioned well in the operating room environment. We have had no episodes of electrocautery interference with the computer functions. The automated features have enhanced the utility of the NMMS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Motor unit recruitment during neuromuscular electrical stimulation: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, C Scott; Gregory, Chris M; Dean, Jesse C

    2011-10-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in clinical settings to activate skeletal muscle in an effort to mimic voluntary contractions and enhance the rehabilitation of human skeletal muscles. It is also used as a tool in research to assess muscle performance and/or neuromuscular activation levels. However, there are fundamental differences between voluntary- and artificial-activation of motor units that need to be appreciated before NMES protocol design can be most effective. The unique effects of NMES have been attributed to several mechanisms, most notably, a reversal of the voluntary recruitment pattern that is known to occur during voluntary muscle contractions. This review outlines the assertion that electrical stimulation recruits motor units in a nonselective, spatially fixed, and temporally synchronous pattern. Additionally, it synthesizes the evidence that supports the contention that this recruitment pattern contributes to increased muscle fatigue when compared with voluntary actions and provides some commentary on the parameters of electrical stimulation as well as emerging technologies being developed to facilitate NMES implementation. A greater understanding of how electrical stimulation recruits motor units, as well as the benefits and limitations of its use, is highly relevant when using this tool for testing and training in rehabilitation, exercise, and/or research.

  5. Synaptic Homeostasis and Its Immunological Disturbance in Neuromuscular Junction Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Takamori

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the neuromuscular junction, postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR clustering, trans-synaptic communication and synaptic stabilization are modulated by the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. The synaptic functions are based presynaptically on the active zone architecture, synaptic vesicle proteins, Ca2+ channels and synaptic vesicle recycling. Postsynaptically, they are based on rapsyn-anchored nAChR clusters, localized sensitivity to ACh, and synaptic stabilization via linkage to the extracellular matrix so as to be precisely opposed to the nerve terminal. Focusing on neural agrin, Wnts, muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (a mediator of agrin and Wnts signalings and regulator of trans-synaptic communication, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (the receptor of agrin and Wnts and participant in retrograde signaling, laminin-network (including muscle-derived agrin, extracellular matrix proteins (participating in the synaptic stabilization and presynaptic receptors (including muscarinic and adenosine receptors, we review the functional structures of the synapse by making reference to immunological pathogenecities in postsynaptic disease, myasthenia gravis. The synapse-related proteins including cortactin, coronin-6, caveolin-3, doublecortin, R-spondin 2, amyloid precursor family proteins, glia cell-derived neurotrophic factor and neurexins are also discussed in terms of their possible contribution to efficient synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction.

  6. Fundamental Molecules and Mechanisms for Forming and Maintaining Neuromuscular Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Burden

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The neuromuscular synapse is a relatively large synapse with hundreds of active zones in presynaptic motor nerve terminals and more than ten million acetylcholine receptors (AChRs in the postsynaptic membrane. The enrichment of proteins in presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes ensures a rapid, robust, and reliable synaptic transmission. Over fifty years ago, classic studies of the neuromuscular synapse led to a comprehensive understanding of how a synapse looks and works, but these landmark studies did not reveal the molecular mechanisms responsible for building and maintaining a synapse. During the past two-dozen years, the critical molecular players, responsible for assembling the specialized postsynaptic membrane and regulating nerve terminal differentiation, have begun to be identified and their mechanism of action better understood. Here, we describe and discuss five of these key molecular players, paying heed to their discovery as well as describing their currently understood mechanisms of action. In addition, we discuss the important gaps that remain to better understand how these proteins act to control synaptic differentiation and maintenance.

  7. Neuromuscular compensation mechanisms in vocal fold paralysis and paresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Karuna; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew; Soofer, Donna; Chhetri, Dinesh K

    2017-07-01

    Vocal fold paresis and paralysis are common conditions. Treatment options include augmentation laryngoplasty and voice therapy. The optimal management for this condition is unclear. The objective of this study was to assess possible neuromuscular compensation mechanisms that could potentially be used in the treatment of vocal fold paresis and paralysis. In vivo canine model. In an in vivo canine model, we examined three conditions: 1) unilateral right recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) paresis and paralysis, 2) unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) paralysis, and 3) unilateral vagal nerve paresis and paralysis. Phonatory acoustics and aerodynamics were measured in each of these conditions. Effective compensation was defined as improved acoustic and aerodynamic profile. The most effective compensation for all conditions was increasing RLN activation and decreasing glottal gap. Increasing RLN activation increased the percentage of possible phonatory conditions that achieved phonation onset. SLN activation generally led to decreased number of total phonation onset conditions within each category. Differential effects of SLN (cricothyroid [CT] muscle) activation were seen. Ipsilateral SLN activation could compensate for RLN paralysis; normal CT compensated well in unilateral SLN paralysis; and in vagal paresis/paralysis, contralateral SLN and RLN displayed antagonistic relationships. Methods to improve glottal closure should be the primary treatment for large glottal gaps. Neuromuscular compensation is possible for paresis. This study provides insights into possible compensatory mechanisms in vocal fold paresis and paralysis. NA Laryngoscope, 127:1633-1638, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Sarcocystis fayeri in skeletal muscle of horses with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Monica; Shapiro, Karen; Sisó, Silvia; Williams, Diane C; Rejmanek, Daniel; Aguilar, Beatriz; Conrad, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of Sarcocystis fayeri-induced toxicity in people consuming horse meat warrant investigation on the prevalence and molecular characterization of Sarcocystis spp. infection in horses. Sarcocysts in skeletal muscle of horses have been commonly regarded as an incidental finding. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of sarcocysts in skeletal muscle of horses with neuromuscular disease. Our findings indicated that S. fayeri infection was common in young mature horses with neuromuscular disease and could be associated with myopathic and neurogenic processes. The number of infected muscles and number of sarcocysts per muscle were significantly higher in diseased than in control horses. S. fayeri was predominantly found in low oxidative highly glycolytic myofibers. This pathogen had a high glycolytic metabolism. Common clinical signs of disease included muscle atrophy, weakness with or without apparent muscle pain, gait deficits, and dysphagia in horses with involvement of the tongue and esophagus. Horses with myositis were lethargic, apparently painful, stiff, and reluctant to move. Similar to humans, sarcocystosis and cardiomyopathy can occur in horses. This study did not establish causality but supported a possible association (8.9% of cases) with disease. The assumption of Sarcocysts spp. being an incidental finding in every case might be inaccurate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Six-minute walk test in children with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Anleu, Israel Didier; Baños-Mejía, Benjamín Omar; Galicia-Amor, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: neuromuscular diseases affect the motor unit. When they evolve, respiratory complications are common; the six-minute walk test plays an important role in the assessment of functional capacity. Methods: prospective, transversal, descriptive and observational study. We studied seven children with a variety of neuromuscular diseases and spontaneous ambulation. We tested their lung function, and administered a six-minute walk test and a test of respiratory muscle strength to these children. Results: the age was 9.8 ± 2.4 years. All patients were males. Forced vital capacity decreased in three patients (42.8 %), forced expiratory volume during the first second (2.04 ± 1.4 L) and peak expiratory flow (4.33 ± 3.3 L/s) were normal. The maximum strength of respiratory muscles was less than 60 % of predicted values. The distance covered in the six-minute walk test was lower when compared with healthy controls (29.9 %). Conclusions: the six-minute walk test can be a useful tool in early stages of this disease, since it is easy to perform and well tolerated by the patients.

  10. Antisense Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for Neuromuscular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Sardone

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular disorders such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Spinal Muscular Atrophy are neurodegenerative genetic diseases characterized primarily by muscle weakness and wasting. Until recently there were no effective therapies for these conditions, but antisense oligonucleotides, a new class of synthetic single stranded molecules of nucleic acids, have demonstrated promising experimental results and are at different stages of regulatory approval. The antisense oligonucleotides can modulate the protein expression via targeting hnRNAs or mRNAs and inducing interference with splicing, mRNA degradation, or arrest of translation, finally, resulting in rescue or reduction of the target protein expression. Different classes of antisense oligonucleotides are being tested in several clinical trials, and limitations of their clinical efficacy and toxicity have been reported for some of these compounds, while more encouraging results have supported the development of others. New generation antisense oligonucleotides are also being tested in preclinical models together with specific delivery systems that could allow some of the limitations of current antisense oligonucleotides to be overcome, to improve the cell penetration, to achieve more robust target engagement, and hopefully also be associated with acceptable toxicity. This review article describes the chemical properties and molecular mechanisms of action of the antisense oligonucleotides and the therapeutic implications these compounds have in neuromuscular diseases. Current strategies and carrier systems available for the oligonucleotides delivery will be also described to provide an overview on the past, present and future of these appealing molecules.

  11. Acute and chronic neuromuscular adaptations to local vibration training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souron, Robin; Besson, Thibault; Millet, Guillaume Y; Lapole, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Vibratory stimuli are thought to have the potential to promote neural and/or muscular (re)conditioning. This has been well described for whole-body vibration (WBV), which is commonly used as a training method to improve strength and/or functional abilities. Yet, this technique may present some limitations, especially in clinical settings where patients are unable to maintain an active position during the vibration exposure. Thus, a local vibration (LV) technique, which consists of applying portable vibrators directly over the tendon or muscle belly without active contribution from the participant, may present an alternative to WBV. The purpose of this narrative review is (1) to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature related to the acute and chronic neuromuscular changes associated with LV, and (2) to show that LV training may be an innovative and efficient alternative method to the 'classic' training programs, including in the context of muscle deconditioning prevention or rehabilitation. An acute LV application (one bout of 20-60 min) may be considered as a significant neuromuscular workload, as demonstrated by an impairment of force generating capacity and LV-induced neural changes. Accordingly, it has been reported that a training period of LV is efficient in improving muscular performance over a wide range of training (duration, number of session) and vibration (frequency, amplitude, site of application) parameters. The functional improvements are principally triggered by adaptations within the central nervous system. A model illustrating the current research on LV-induced adaptations is provided.

  12. Modulation of ankle EMG in spinally contused rats through application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation timed to robotic treadmill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Sina; Kamgar, Parisa; Chao, TeKang; Diaz, Eric; de Leon, Ray D; Won, Deborah S

    2012-01-01

    While neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has enabled patients of neuromotor dysfunction to effectively regain some functions, analysis of neuromuscular changes underlying these functional improvements is lacking. We have developed an NMES system for a rodent model of SCI with the long term goal of creating a therapy which restores control over stepping back to the spinal circuitry. NMES was applied to the tibialis anterior (TA) and timed to the afferent feedback generated during robotic treadmill training (RTT). The effect of NMES+RTT on modifications in EMG was compared with that of RTT alone. A longitudinal study with a crossover design was conducted in which group 1 (n=7) received 2 weeks of RTT only followed by 2 weeks of NMES+RTT; group 2 (n=7) received 2 weeks of NMES+RTT followed by RTT only. On average, both types of training helped to modulate TA EMG activity over a gait cycle, resulting in EMG profiles across steps with peaks occurring just before or at the beginning of the swing phase, when ankle flexion is most needed. However, NMES+RTT resulted in concentration of EMG activation during the initial swing phase more than RTT only. In conjunction with these improvements in EMG activation presented here, a more complete analyses comparing changes after NMES+RTT vs. RTT is expected to further support the notion that NMES timed appropriately to hindlimb stepping could help to reinforce the motor learning that is induced by afferent activity generated by treadmill training.

  13. Coordination of multiple mobile robots via communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huosheng; Kelly, Ian; Keating, David A.; Vinagre, David

    1999-01-01

    Research on the coordination of multiple mobile robots has to address three main problems: (i) how to appropriately divide the functionality of the system into multiple roots, (ii) how to manage the dynamic configuration of the system, and (iii) how to realize cooperation behavior. This paper will concentrate on the third aspect. More specifically, the aim of our research is to develop a team of coordinating mobile robots via effective communication for real work applications. We will describe the methodology to achieve cooperative behavior, the experimental mobile robots developed, and potential application areas. The developed system is demonstrated by two examples such as flocking and shared experience learning.

  14. Coordinating Interactions: The Event Coordination Notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    The purpose of a domain model is to concisely capture the concepts of an application’s domain, and their relation among each other. Even though the main purpose of domain models is not on implementing the application, major parts of an application can be generated from the application’s domain...... on a much more technical level. The Event Coordination Notation (ECNO) allows modelling the behaviour of an application on a high level of abstraction that is closer to the application’s domain than to the software realizing it. Still, these models contain all necessary details for actually executing...... models fully automatically with today’s technologies. The focus of today’s code generation technologies, however, is mostly on the structural aspects of the domain; the domain’s behaviour is often not modelled at all, or implemented manually based on some informal models, or the behaviour is modelled...

  15. The Preparation Period in Basketball: Training Load and Neuromuscular Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferioli, Davide; Bosio, Andrea; Bilsborough, Johann C; Torre, Antonio La; Tornaghi, Michele; Rampinini, Ermanno

    2018-01-18

    To investigate the 1) effect of the preparation period on the neuromuscular characteristics of 12 professional (PRO) and 16 semi-professional (SEMI-PRO) basketball players; 2) relationships between training load indices and changes in neuromuscular physical performance. Prior to and following the preparation period, players underwent a counter-movement jump (CMJ) test, followed by a repeated change of direction (COD) test consisting of 4 levels with increasing intensities. The peripheral neuromuscular functions of the knee extensors (peak torque, PT) were measured using electrical stimulations after each level (PT1, PT2, PT3 and PT4). Furthermore, PT Max (the highest value of PT) and PT Dec (PT decrement from PT Max to PT4) were calculated. Trivial-to-small (effect size, ES: -0.17 to 0.46) improvements were found in CMJ variables, regardless of the competitive levels. After the preparation period, peripheral fatigue induced by a COD test was similarly reduced in both PRO (PT Dec: from 27.8±21.3% to 11.4±13.7%, ES±90%CI= -0.71±0.30) and SEMI-PRO (PT Dec: from 26.1±21.9% to 10.2±8.2%, ES±90%CI= -0.69±0.32). Moderate-to-large relationships were found between session rating of perceived exertion training load and changes in PPO measured during the CMJs (r s ±90%CI: PPOabs, -0.46±0.26; PPOrel, -0.53±0.23) and in some PTs measured during the COD test (PT1, -0.45±0.26; PT2, -0.44±0.26; PT3, -0.40±0.27 and PT Max, -0.38±0.28). Preparation period induced minimal changes in the CMJ, while the ability to sustain repeated COD efforts was improved. Reaching high session rating of perceived exertion training loads might partially and negatively affect the ability to produce strength and power.

  16. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first......This PhD dissertation is a product of my PhD project carried out in collaboration between DTU Management Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark, Research Unit for General Practice at University of Southern Denmark, and Research Unit for General Practice at University of Copenhagen...

  17. Facilitators and Barriers to Care Coordination in Patient-centered Medical Homes (PCMHs) from Coordinators' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Asia; Howard, Jenna; Shaw, Eric K; Cohen, Deborah J; Shahidi, Laleh; Ferrante, Jeanne M

    2016-01-01

    Care coordinators are increasingly featured in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) projects, yet little research examines how coordinators themselves define and experience their role. This is the first study describing experiences of care coordinators across the US from their own perspectives. This qualitative study used a 5-month private, online discussion forum to gather data from 25 care coordinators from PCMH practices representing diversity in practice size, setting, and type. Participants answered questions and interacted with one another, creating an online social learning collaborative while allowing for data collection for research. Coordinators identified barriers and facilitators in their work at the organization/system level, the interpersonal level, and the individual level. Some factors emerged as both barriers and facilitators, including the functionality of clinical information technology; the availability of community resources; interactions with clinicians and other health care facilities; interactions with patients; and self-care practices for mental health and wellness. Colocation and full integration into practices were other key facilitators, whereas excessive case loads and data management responsibilities were felt to be important barriers. While all the barriers and facilitators were important to performing coordinators' roles, relationship building materialized as key to effective care coordination, whether with clinicians, patients, or outside organizations. We discuss implications for practice and provide suggestions for further research. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  18. Introduction to Coordination Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrance, Geoffrey Alan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction to Coordination Chemistry examines and explains how metals and molecules that bind as ligands interact, and the consequences of this assembly process. This book describes the chemical and physical properties and behavior of the complex assemblies that form, and applications that may arise as a result of these properties. Coordination complexes are an important but often hidden part of our world?even part of us?and what they do is probed in this book. This book distills the essence of this topic for undergraduate students and for research scientists.

  19. Gait and neuromuscular adaptations after using a feedback-based gait monitoring knee brace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Jody L

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gait and neuromuscular effects of a feedback-based gait monitoring knee brace. The aim of this paper was to explore how training with this knee brace affected the gait pattern utilized, rate of loading (ROL), and proprioceptive acuity. Fifteen healthy women wore this knee brace that provided audible feedback on gait kinematics for a 30-min training period. We performed pre- and post-gait analyses and proprioceptive acuity assessments to determine gait learning and adaptation with this training. Post-training significant changes were seen in the knee angle prior to and at initial contact and peak knee extensor, flexor, and adductor moments, which ultimately led to a reduced ROL experienced. Subjects also had improved proprioceptive acuity post-training. Our results indicate that using a feedback-based gait monitoring knee brace can change the gait pattern by increasing the knee flexion angle during the swing to stance transition. Though there was an approximate 25% decrease in the ROL experienced, there was also an increase in the knee adductor moment. Future long-term studies are needed to further explore the positive and negative effects of feedback-based gait monitoring knee brace on individuals with a compromised knee joint, such as those post-anterior cruciate ligament injury. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Alterations in neuromuscular function in girls with generalized joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Melcher, Jesper Sandfeld; Melcher, Pia Grethe Sandfeld

    2016-01-01

    (90°) at 20 % Maximum Voluntary Contraction, and explosive isometric knee flexions while sitting. EMG was recorded from knee flexor and extensor muscles. RESULTS: Early rate of torque development was 53 % faster for GJH. Reduced hamstring muscle activation in girls with GJH was found while knee......BACKGROUND: Generalized Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is associated with increased risk of musculoskeletal joint pain. We investigated neuromuscular performance and muscle activation strategy. METHODS: Girls with GJH and non-GJH (NGJH) performed isometric knee flexions (90°,110°,130°), and extensions...... extensor and calf muscle activation did not differ between groups. Flexion-extension and medial-lateral co-activation ratio during flexions were higher for girls with GJH than NGJH girls. CONCLUSIONS: Girls with GJH had higher capacity to rapidly generate force than NGJH girls which may reflect motor...

  1. A novel neuromuscular syndrome associated with clenbuterol-tainted heroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manini, Alex; Labinson, Robert M; Kirrane, Barbara; Hoffman, Robert S; Rao, Rama; Stajic, Marina; Nelson, Lewis S

    2008-12-01

    Clenbuterol is a potent, long-acting beta-adrenergic agonist that has been reported as an adulterant of heroin. We describe an atypical syndrome in five users of clenbuterol-tainted heroin. All cases were referred to a regional Poison Control Center. Urine and blood were analyzed using gas and liquid chromatography as well as mass spectrometry. Five heroin users presented with a syndrome characterized by muscular spasm, tremor, hyperreflexia, and elevated serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations. All patients lacked findings of acute clenbuterol toxicity but tested positive for clenbuterol and negative for strychnine and a battery of common potential adulterants. We report five cases of a novel neuromuscular syndrome in users of clenbuterol-adulterated heroin. It is unclear whether these reactions represent an atypical response to clenbuterol or another unidentified contaminant.

  2. Correlation between specific histological and electromyographic findings in neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to find a correlation between specific electromyography (EMG abnormalities with histological findings in muscle biopsies (MB in 100 patients with neuromuscular disorders. Quantified EMG and MB with histochemistry was made in the same muscle, but on the opposite side, within a period of 3 weeks. The isolated findings of EMG and MB were analysed with a computer through a chi-square test. A statistical relation (p<0.01 was found between the isolated findings of MB and EMG in only 6.99% (39 in 558 attempts of the abnormalities expected to occur in myopathy and denervation. Also was found 2.51% (14 in 558 attempts of inconsistences with the current literature.

  3. [Anaphylaxis during anesthesia--especially from neuromuscular blocking agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Kyoko; Hayakawa, Yuka; Nakajima, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Among all drugs used for general anesthesia, neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) seem to play a predominant role in the incidence of severe adverse reactions. The overall incidence of perioperative anaphylaxis is estimated at 1 in 10,000-20,000 anesthetic procedures, whereas it is estimated at 1 in 6,500 administrations of NMBAs. After anaphylaxis, allergologic assessment is essential to identify the offending agent and to prevent recurrences. The estimated sensitivity of skin tests for muscle relaxants is approximately 94% to 97%. Prick testing is advised for the diagnosis of the NMBAs responsible for an anaphylactic reaction, and intradermal testing is preferred when investing cross-reaction. The choice of the safest possible anesthetic agents should be based on the result of a rigorously performed allergologic assessment.

  4. Isozyme patterns and protein profiles in neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Y H; Tipler, T D; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Neerunjun, J S; Hopkinson, D A

    1982-06-01

    The isozyme patterns of six different enzymes and the polypeptide profiles of soluble proteins have been examined in muscle biopsy specimens from 74 patients with a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. About half of the samples showed unusual features in at least one, and often several, of the enzymes and proteins tested. The extent of the biochemical abnormalities was roughly proportional to the severity of the disorders. In all cases the unusual isozymes and polypeptide profiles seemed to reflect a reversion to the fetal pattern of gene expression. However, this change appeared to occur in extant muscle and was not dependent on the appearance of new muscle fibres. Among the enzymes, phosphoglycerate mutase followed by creatine kinase appeared to be the most sensitive index of muscle disorder. The extent of the change in the muscle creatine kinase isozyme pattern was not correlated with the levels of serum creatine kinase activity.

  5. Cellular and Molecular Anatomy of the Human Neuromuscular Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A. Jones

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The neuromuscular junction (NMJ plays a fundamental role in transferring information from lower motor neuron to skeletal muscle to generate movement. It is also an experimentally accessible model synapse routinely studied in animal models to explore fundamental aspects of synaptic form and function. Here, we combined morphological techniques, super-resolution imaging, and proteomic profiling to reveal the detailed cellular and molecular architecture of the human NMJ. Human NMJs were significantly smaller, less complex, and more fragmented than mouse NMJs. In contrast to mice, human NMJs were also remarkably stable across the entire adult lifespan, showing no signs of age-related degeneration or remodeling. Super-resolution imaging and proteomic profiling revealed distinctive distribution of active zone proteins and differential expression of core synaptic proteins and molecular pathways at the human NMJ. Taken together, these findings reveal human-specific cellular and molecular features of the NMJ that distinguish them from comparable synapses in other mammalian species.

  6. Deep neuromuscular blockade and low insufflation pressure during laparoscopic hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Istre, Olav; Springborg, Henrik Halvor

    2017-01-01

    . The gynaecologists registered increasing abdominal tensions in no versus eight procedures (p = 0.006) in the deep and standard NMB group, respectively. CONCLUSION: Deep NMB in combination with 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum prevented sudden abdominal contractions during laparoscopic hysterectomy. FUNDING: This work......INTRODUCTION: Establishment of sufficient muscle relaxation is essential in laparoscopic surgery. During laparoscopy, surgeons can experience abdominal contractions in their patients. Deep neuromuscular block (NMB) has the potential to prevent such episodes. In this study, we explored if deep NMB...... reduces the incidence of sudden abdominal contractions as compared with standard NMB. METHODS: This was a pre-planned secondary analysis of a randomized, controlled study. A total of 110 patients scheduled for laparoscopic hysterectomy were randomized to either deep NMB and 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (deep...

  7. Neuromuscular blockade for improvement of surgical conditions during laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Scheppan, Susanne; Kissmeyer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    scale every 30 min. Primary outcome is the average score for a patient's surgical condition. Secondary outcomes are, among others, surgical rating score during fascial closure, wound dehiscence, wound infection requiring surgical drainage and incisional hernia at the six-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS......INTRODUCTION: During laparotomy, surgeons frequently experience difficult surgical conditions if the patient's abdominal wall or diaphragm is tense. This issue is particularly pertinent while closing the fascia and placing the intestines into the abdominal cavity. Establishment of a deep...... neuromuscular blockade (NMB), defined as a post-tetanic-count (PTC) of 0-1, paralyses the abdominal wall muscles and the diaphragm. We hypothesised that deep NMB (PTC 0-1) would improve surgical conditions during upper laparotomy as compared to standard NMB with bolus administration. METHODS...

  8. Supervised neuromuscular exercise prior to hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Linda; Roos, Ewa M; Overgaard, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are indications of beneficial short-term effect of pre-operative exercise in reducing pain and improving activity of daily living after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. Though, information from studies conducting longer follow-ups and economic...... for standard THR or TKR at a hospital located in a rural area of Denmark. The patients were randomised to replacement surgery with or without an 8-week preoperative supervised neuromuscular exercise program (Clinical Trials registration no.: NCT01003756). Clinical effect was measured with Hip disability...... and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Quality adjusted life years (QALYs) were based on EQ-5D-3L and Danish preference weights. Resource use was extracted from national registries and valued using standard tariffs (2012-EUR). Incremental net benefit...

  9. Memory traces of long-range coordinated oscillations in the sleeping human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piantoni, G.; Werf, Y.D. van der; Jensen, O.; Someren, E.J.W. Van

    2015-01-01

    Cognition involves coordinated activity across distributed neuronal networks. Neuronal activity during learning triggers cortical plasticity that allows for reorganization of the neuronal network and integration of new information. Animal studies have shown post-learning reactivation of

  10. Memory Traces of Long-Range Coordinated Oscillations in the Sleeping Human Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piantoni, G.; van der Werf, Y.D.; Jensen, O.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Cognition involves coordinated activity across distributed neuronal networks. Neuronal activity during learning triggers cortical plasticity that allows for reorganization of the neuronal network and integration of new information. Animal studies have shown post-learning reactivation of

  11. Mathematical Abstraction: Constructing Concept of Parallel Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhasanah, F.; Kusumah, Y. S.; Sabandar, J.; Suryadi, D.

    2017-09-01

    Mathematical abstraction is an important process in teaching and learning mathematics so pre-service mathematics teachers need to understand and experience this process. One of the theoretical-methodological frameworks for studying this process is Abstraction in Context (AiC). Based on this framework, abstraction process comprises of observable epistemic actions, Recognition, Building-With, Construction, and Consolidation called as RBC + C model. This study investigates and analyzes how pre-service mathematics teachers constructed and consolidated concept of Parallel Coordinates in a group discussion. It uses AiC framework for analyzing mathematical abstraction of a group of pre-service teachers consisted of four students in learning Parallel Coordinates concepts. The data were collected through video recording, students’ worksheet, test, and field notes. The result shows that the students’ prior knowledge related to concept of the Cartesian coordinate has significant role in the process of constructing Parallel Coordinates concept as a new knowledge. The consolidation process is influenced by the social interaction between group members. The abstraction process taken place in this group were dominated by empirical abstraction that emphasizes on the aspect of identifying characteristic of manipulated or imagined object during the process of recognizing and building-with.

  12. Sensory Motor Coordination in Robonaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Richard Alan, II

    2003-01-01

    As a participant of the year 2000 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, I worked with the engineers of the Dexterous Robotics Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center on the Robonaut project. The Robonaut is an articulated torso with two dexterous arms, left and right five-fingered hands, and a head with cameras mounted on an articulated neck. This advanced space robot, now driven only teleoperatively using VR gloves, sensors and helmets, is to be upgraded to a thinking system that can find, interact with and assist humans autonomously, allowing the Crew to work with Robonaut as a (junior) member of their team. Thus, the work performed this summer was toward the goal of enabling Robonaut to operate autonomously as an intelligent assistant to astronauts. Our underlying hypothesis is that a robot can develop intelligence if it learns a set of basic behaviors (i.e., reflexes - actions tightly coupled to sensing) and through experience learns how to sequence these to solve problems or to accomplish higher-level tasks. We describe our approach to the automatic acquisition of basic behaviors as learning sensory-motor coordination (SMC). Although research in the ontogenesis of animals development from the time of conception) supports the approach of learning SMC as the foundation for intelligent, autonomous behavior, we do not know whether it will prove viable for the development of autonomy in robots. The first step in testing the hypothesis is to determine if SMC can be learned by the robot. To do this, we have taken advantage of Robonaut's teleoperated control system. When a person teleoperates Robonaut, the person's own SMC causes the robot to act purposefully. If the sensory signals that the robot detects during teleoperation are recorded over several repetitions of the same task, it should be possible through signal analysis to identify the sensory-motor couplings that accompany purposeful motion. In this report, reasons for suspecting SMC as the basis for

  13. Neuromuscular medicine competency in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents: a method of development and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei; Cuccurullo, Sara J; Innerfield, Caitlin E; Strax, Thomas E; Petagna, Anne

    2013-03-01

    This project endeavored to create an educational module including methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation residents in the evaluation and appropriate treatment of patients with neuromuscular disorders. It further sought to verify acquired competencies in neuromuscular rehabilitation through objective evaluation methodology. An American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine board-certified physician with 10 yrs of clinical experience in neuromuscular and general rehabilitation trained 19 residents using a standardized competency-based module. The residents were trained through clinical training, lectures, and review of self-assessment examination concepts from the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation syllabus provided in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. After delivery of the educational module, knowledge acquisition and skill proficiency were measured in (1) completion of neuromuscular history and physical examination satisfactorily, (2) diagnosis and ability to design a patient care management plan via chart stimulated recall examinations, (3) physician-patient interaction via patient surveys, (4) physician-staff interaction via 360-degree global ratings, and (5) ability to write a comprehensive patient care report and to document a patient care management plan in accordance with Medicare guidelines via written patient reports. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. To test the success of the standardized educational module, data were collected on an ongoing basis. The objective measures compared resident self-assessment examination scores in neuromuscular rehabilitation before and after the institution of the comprehensive neuromuscular competency module in the residency program. Nineteen (100%) of 19 residents successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the

  14. Neuromuscular training for sports injury prevention: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübscher, Markus; Zech, Astrid; Pfeifer, Klaus; Hänsel, Frank; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of proprioceptive/neuromuscular training in preventing sports injuries by using the best available evidence from methodologically well-conducted randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical trials without randomization. Two independent researchers performed a literature search in various electronic databases and reference lists. The reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion criteria and methodological quality and extracted the data. Focusing on studies of high methodological quality, relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate treatment effects. From a total of 32 relevant studies, 7 methodologically well-conducted studies were considered for this review. Pooled analysis revealed that multi-intervention training was effective in reducing the risk of lower limb injuries (RR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.49-0.77, P injuries (RR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.28-0.76, P injuries (RR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.31-0.79, P training alone resulted in a significant risk reduction of ankle sprain injuries (RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.46-0.9, P injuries overall (RR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.13-1.8, P = 0.28). Exercise interventions were more effective in athletes with a history of sports injury than in those without. On the basis of the results of seven high-quality studies, this review showed evidence for the effectiveness of proprioceptive/neuromuscular training in reducing the incidence of certain types of sports injuries among adolescent and young adult athletes during pivoting sports. Future research should focus on the conduct of comparative trials to identify the most appropriate and effective training components for preventing injuries in specific sports and populations.

  15. [Genetic defects and disorders at the neuromuscular junction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kinji

    2011-07-01

    Genetic defects in molecules expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) cause congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), which are characterized by muscle weakness, abnormal fatigability, amyotrophy, and minor facial anomalies. Muscle weakness mostly develops under 2 years but is also sometimes seen in adults. Mutations identified to date include (i) muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits, (ii) rapsyn that anchors and clusters AChRs at the neuromuscular junction, (iii) agrin that is released from the nerve terminal and induces AChR clustering by stimulating the downstream LRP4/MuSK/Dok-7/rapsyn/AChR pathway, (iv) muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) that transmits the AChR-clustering signal from agrin/LRP4 to rapsyn/AChR, (v) Dok-7 that transmits the AChR-clustering signal from agrin/LRP4/MuSK to rapsyn/AChR, (vi) skeletal muscle sodium channel type 1.4 (Nav1.4) that spreads the depolarization potential from the endplate throughout muscle fibers, (vii) collagen Q that anchors acetylcholinesterase to the synaptic basal lamina, and (viii) choline acetyltransferase that resynthesizes acetylcholine from recycled choline at the nerve terminal. In addition, mutations in the heparin sulfate proteoglycan perlecan, which binds to many molecules including collagen Q and dystroglycan, causes Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Interestingly, mutations in LRP4 cause Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome but not CMS. AChR, MuSK, and LRP4 are also targets of auto-antibodies in myasthenia gravis. In addition, molecules at the NMJ are targets of many other disease states AChRs are blocked by the snake toxin alpha-bungarotoxin and the plant poison curare. The presynaptic SNARE complex is attacked by botulinum toxin. Acetylcholinesterase is inhibited by the nerve gas sarin and by organophosphate pesticides. This review focuses on the molecular bases underlying defects of AChR, rapsyn, Nav1.4, collagen Q, and choline acetyltransferase.

  16. LRP4 is critical for neuromuscular junction maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Bowman, Andrew; Shen, Chengyong; Li, Lei; Xiong, Wen-cheng; Mei, Lin

    2014-10-15

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibers, and is critical for control of muscle contraction. Its formation requires neuronal agrin that acts by binding to LRP4 to stimulate MuSK. Mutations have been identified in agrin, MuSK, and LRP4 in patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome, and patients with myasthenia gravis develop antibodies against agrin, LRP4, and MuSK. However, it remains unclear whether the agrin signaling pathway is critical for NMJ maintenance because null mutation of any of the three genes is perinatal lethal. In this study, we generated imKO mice, a mutant strain whose LRP4 gene can be deleted in muscles by doxycycline (Dox) treatment. Ablation of the LRP4 gene in adult muscle enabled studies of its role in NMJ maintenance. We demonstrate that Dox treatment of P30 mice reduced muscle strength and compound muscle action potentials. AChR clusters became fragmented with diminished junctional folds and synaptic vesicles. The amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials were reduced, indicating impaired neuromuscular transmission and providing cellular mechanisms of adult LRP4 deficiency. We showed that LRP4 ablation led to the loss of synaptic agrin and the 90 kDa fragments, which occurred ahead of other prejunctional and postjunctional components, suggesting that LRP4 may regulate the stability of synaptic agrin. These observations demonstrate that LRP4 is essential for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the NMJ and that loss of muscle LRP4 in adulthood alone is sufficient to cause myasthenic symptoms. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413892-14$15.00/0.

  17. Neuromuscular Fatigue After Repeated Jumping With Concomitant Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyroud, Daria; Samararatne, Jimmy; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas

    2017-12-18

    To evaluate the etiology and extent of neuromuscular fatigue induced by 50 squat jumps performed with and without neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the knee extensors. Nine healthy, recreationally active men (24 ± 2 y) took part in 2 experiments. These consisted of 50 squat jumps performed with stimulation (NMES) or without (CON). Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, maximal voluntary activation level (VAL), and forces evoked by single and double (10 and 100 Hz) stimulations were recorded before and after the 50 jumps. NMES was delivered at the maximal tolerated intensity. Despite average jump height being ∼16% lower in the NMES than in the CON session, a reduction over time in jump height was only found in the NMES condition (-6%). After the 50 jumps, MVC force was reduced to a greater extent in NMES than in CON (-25% ± 11% vs -11% ± 12%). Similarly, forces evoked by single stimulations, as well as by 10-Hz and 100-Hz paired stimulations, were reduced to a greater extent in NMES (-33% ± 12%, -42% ± 15%, and -25% ± 13%) than in CON (-21% ± 6%, -30% ± 9%, and -14% ± 11%). VAL was not significantly altered by either condition. Performing repeated squat jumps with concomitant NMES induced a greater fatigue than squat jumps performed alone and might potentially represent a stronger training stimulus.

  18. EFFECT OF NEUROMUSCULAR TRAINING ON BALANCE AMONG UNIVERSITY ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohansundar Sankaravel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proprioceptive deficiency followed by lateral ankle sprain leads to poor balance is not uncommon. It has been linked with increased injury risk among young athletes. Introducing neuromuscular training programs for this have been believed as one of the means of injury prevention. Hence, this study was aimed to determine the effects of six weeks progressive neuromuscular training (PNM Training on static balance gains among the young athletes with a previous history of ankle sprains. Methods: This study was an experimental study design, with pre and post test method to determine the effects of PNM Training on static balance gains. All data were collected at university’s sports rehabilitation lab before and after six weeks of intervention period. There were 20 male and female volunteer young athletes (20.9 ± 0.85 years of age with a previous history of ankle sprain involving various sports were recruited from the University community. All the subjects were participated in a six week PNM Training that included stability, strength and power training. Outcome measures were collected by calculating the errors on balance error scoring system made by the athletes on static balance before and after the six weeks of intervention period. Static balance was tested in firm and foam surfaces and recorded accordingly. Results: The researchers found a significant decrease (2.40 ± 0.82 in total errors among the samples at the post test compared with their pre test (P >0.05. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that a PNM Training can improve the static balance on both the firm and foam surfaces among the young athletes with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  19. Correcting Neuromuscular Deficits With Gene Therapy in Pompe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Adrian G.; McElroy, Jessica A.; Grange, Robert W.; Fuller, David D.; Walter, Glenn A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Falk, Darin J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have recently reported on the pathology of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in Pompe disease, reflecting disruption of neuronal and muscle homeostasis as a result of glycogen accumulation. The aim of this study was to examine how the alteration of NMJ physiology contributes to Pompe disease pathology; we performed molecular, physiological, and histochemical analyses of NMJ-related measures of the tibialis anterior muscles of young-, mid-, and late-stage alpha-glucosidase (GAA)-deficient mice. Methods We performed intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 vector expressing GAA (AAV9-hGAA) into the tibialis anterior muscle of Gaa–/– mice at early, mid, and severe pathological time points. We analyzed expression of NMJ-related genes, in situ muscle force production, and clearance of glycogen in conjunction with histological assessment of the NMJ. Results Our data demonstrate that AAV9-hGAA is able to replace GAA to the affected tissue and modify AChR mRNA expression, muscle force production, motor endplate area, and innervation status. Importantly, the degree of restoration for these outcomes is limited by severity of disease. Early restoration of GAA activity was most effective, whereas late correction of GAA expression was not effective in modifying parameters reflecting NMJ structure and function nor in force restoration despite resolution of glycogen storage in muscle. Interpretation Our data provide new mechanistic insight into the pathology of Pompe disease and suggest that early systemic correction to both neural and muscle tissues may be essential for successful correction of neuromuscular function in Pompe disease. PMID:25925726

  20. An Infant Development-inspired Approach to Robot Hand-eye Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel developmental learning approach for hand-eye coordination in an autonomous robotic system. Robotic hand-eye coordination plays an important role in dealing with real-time environments. Under the approach, infant developmental patterns are introduced to build our robot's learning system. The method works by first constructing a brain-like computational structure to control the robot, and then by using infant behavioural patterns to build a hand-eye coordination learning algorithm. This work is supported by an experimental evaluation, which shows that the control system is implemented simply, and that the learning approach provides fast and incremental learning of behavioural competence.

  1. Polymeric coordination compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Metal coordination polymers with one- and two-dimensional structures are of current interest due to their possible relevance to material science 1. In continuation of our previous studies 2,3, several new polymeric compounds are reported here. Among the complexes of silver with aminomethyl pyridine (amp) ...

  2. Coordination Games on Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Apt (Krzysztof); M.M. Rahn (Mona); G. Schäfer (Guido); S.E. Simon (Sunil)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractWe introduce natural strategic games on graphs, which capture the idea of coordination in a local setting.We show that these games have an exact potential and have strong equilibria when the graph is a pseudoforest. We also exhibit some other classes of games for which a strong

  3. Dimensions of Organizational Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Schmidt; Aldewereld, Huib; Dignum, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    be supported to include organizational objectives and constraints into their reasoning processes by considering two alternatives: agent reasoning and middleware regulation. We show how agents can use an organizational specification to achieve organizational objectives by delegating and coordinating...... their activities with other agents in the society, using the GOAL agent programming language and the OperA organizational model....

  4. Coordination Compounds in Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 6. Coordination Compounds in Biology - The Chemistry of Vitamin B12 and Model Compounds. K Hussian Reddy. General Article Volume 4 Issue 6 June 1999 pp 67-77 ...

  5. Recursive Advice for Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terepeta, Michal Tomasz; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Aspect-oriented programming is a programming paradigm that is often praised for the ability to create modular software and separate cross-cutting concerns. Recently aspects have been also considered in the context of coordination languages, offering similar advantages. However, introducing aspects...

  6. Coordination Games on Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apt, K.R.; Rahn, M.; Schäfer, G.; Simon, S.; Liu, T.-Y.; Qi, Q.; Ye, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce natural strategic games on graphs, which capture the idea of coordination in a local setting. We show that these games have an exact potential and have strong equilibria when the graph is a pseudoforest. We also exhibit some other classes of graphs for which a strong equilibrium exists.

  7. What is Coordinated in Bimanual Coordination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechsner, Franz; Prinz, Wolfgang

    In periodic bimanual movements there is a characteristic spontaneous tendency towards mirror-symmetry. This phenomenon has widely been interpreted as a tendency towards co-activation of homologous muscles, possibly originating in motoric neuronal structures. The experiments reported here provide evidence contrary to this common claim. The symmetry tendency in bimanual abductive/adductive finger oscillation as well as in bimanual multi-finger tapping is actually towards spatial, perceptual symmetry, without regard to the muscles and thus to the motor commands involved. It is hypothesized that, as a rule, spontaneous coordination phenomena of this kind are purely perceptual-cognitive in nature. Moreover, in the case of a bimanual circling paradigm, the reported findings reveal that highly complex, even 'impossible' movements can easily be performed if, rather than the bodily movements themselves, simple sensory consequences are controlled. It is suggested that voluntary movements are organized by representing and controlling their perceptual goals or anticipated effects, whereas the corresponding motor activity of sometimes high formal complexity is rather spontaneously and flexibly tuned in service of these effects.

  8. Transcriptional response of the neuromuscular system to exercise training and potential implications for ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraiuolo, Laura; De Bono, Joseph P; Heath, Paul R; Holden, Hazel; Kasher, Paul; Channon, Keith M; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J

    2009-06-01

    The transcriptional adaptive response of motoneurons and muscles to voluntary exercise has been investigated by using laser capture microdissection and microarray analysis. Our results show that motoneurons respond to physical activity by activating a complex transcriptional plan, with changes involved in neurotrophic factor signalling, electrophysiological changes and synaptic reorganization. Gastrocnemius muscle shows increases in transcripts responsible for neovascularization and new myogenesis. Both tissues show transcriptional changes involved in the growth and reinforcement of the neuromuscular junction. This study indicates that the neuromuscular system undergoes significant structural and functional alterations, aiming to optimize the transmission of both chemical and electrical stimuli, thus prompting axonal outgrowth and mechanisms similar to long-term potentiation in hippocampal neurons. Understanding the response of these cells during exercise has potentially important implications for human neuromuscular disease, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by highlighting candidate genes pivotal for the balance between the physiology and the pathology of the neuromuscular system in terms of the stress response to physical exercise.

  9. Incidence and risk factors of prolonged mechanical ventilation in neuromuscular scoliosis surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udink Ten Cate, F.E.A.; van Royen, B.J.; van Heerde, M.; Roerdink, D.; Plotz, F.B.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS) are frequently considered at high risk for postoperative complications based on their underlying disease and comorbidities. Postoperative complications include prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV), defined longer than 72h, at the paediatric intensive care

  10. DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms in differential diagnosis of genetic disease: application in neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defesche, J. C.; de Vissar, M.; Bakker, E.; Bouwsma, G.; de Vijlder, J. J.; Bolhuis, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Three families, in which several male individuals suffer from a hereditary neuromuscular disease, were examined by analysis of naturally occurring restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and by screening for deletions. Originally, differential diagnosis included spinal muscular atrophy

  11. Exercise therapy and other types of physical therapy for patients with neuromuscular diseases: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cup, E.H.C.; Pieterse, A.J.; Broek-Pastoor, J.M. Ten; Munneke, M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Hendricks, H.T.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and critically appraise the available evidence on exercise therapy and other types of physical therapies for patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, CINAHL,

  12. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for preventing skeletal-muscle weakness and wasting in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Roig, Marc; Karatzanos, Eleftherios

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy may be useful in early musculoskeletal rehabilitation during acute critical illness. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of NMES for preventing skeletal-muscle weakness and wasting in critically...

  13. Rate of complications due to neuromuscular scoliosis spine surgery in a 30-years consecutive series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turturro, Francesco; Montanaro, Antonello; Calderaro, Cosma; Labianca, Luca; Di Sanzo, Vincenzo; Ferretti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    ... procedure, or corrupting the final result of the treatment.Of the 358 patients affected by neuromuscular scoliosis treated from January 1985 to December 2010, 185 that met the inclusion criteria were included in the study...

  14. Noninvasive measurement of the tension-time index in children with neuromuscular disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laura T. Mulreany; Daniel J. Weiner; Joseph M. McDonough; Howard B. Panitch; Julian L. Allen

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory muscle weakness is common in children with neuromuscular disease (NMD). We hypothesized that weakness puts them at risk for respiratory muscle fatigue, a harbinger of chronic respiratory failure...

  15. A Dutch guideline for the treatment of scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullender, M. G.; Blom, N. A.; de Kleuver, M.; Fock, J. M.; Hitters, W. M. G. C.; Horemans, A. M. C.; Kalkman, C. J.; Pruijs, J. E. H.; Timmer, R. R.; Titarsolej, P. J.; van Haasteren, N. C.; van Tol-de Jager, M. J.; van Vught, A. J.; van Royen, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Children with neuromuscular disorders with a progressive muscle weakness such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Spinal Muscular Atrophy frequently develop a progressive scoliosis. A severe scoliosis compromises respiratory function and makes sitting more difficult. Spinal

  16. Intelligent multiagent coordination based on reinforcement hierarchical neuro-fuzzy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Leonardo Forero; Vellasco, Marley; Figueiredo, Karla

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the research and development of two hybrid neuro-fuzzy models for the hierarchical coordination of multiple intelligent agents. The main objective of the models is to have multiple agents interact intelligently with each other in complex systems. We developed two new models of coordination for intelligent multiagent systems, which integrates the Reinforcement Learning Hierarchical Neuro-Fuzzy model with two proposed coordination mechanisms: the MultiAgent Reinforcement Learning Hierarchical Neuro-Fuzzy with a market-driven coordination mechanism (MA-RL-HNFP-MD) and the MultiAgent Reinforcement Learning Hierarchical Neuro-Fuzzy with graph coordination (MA-RL-HNFP-CG). In order to evaluate the proposed models and verify the contribution of the proposed coordination mechanisms, two multiagent benchmark applications were developed: the pursuit game and the robot soccer simulation. The results obtained demonstrated that the proposed coordination mechanisms greatly improve the performance of the multiagent system when compared with other strategies.

  17. Reading as functional coordination: not recycling but a novel synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Thomas; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2014-01-01

    The Functional Coordination approach describes the processes involved in learning to read as a form of procedural learning in which pre-existing skills, mainly from the visual, and auditory domain, are (1) recruited, (2) modified, and (3) coordinated to create the procedures for reading text, which form the basis of subsequent (4) automatization. In this context, we discuss evidence relating to the emerging prevalence of analytic processing in letter perception. We argue that the process of learning to read does not have to lead to a loss of perceptual skill as consequence of a "cultural recycling"; learning to read just leads to a novel synthesis of functions, which are coordinated for reading and then automatized as a package over several years. Developmental dyslexia is explained within this framework as a Functional Coordination Deficit (Lachmann, 2002), since the coordination level is assumed to be most liable to manifest deficiencies. This is because, at this level, the greatest degree of fine tuning of complex functions is required. Thus, developmental dyslexia is not seen as a consequence of a deficient automatization per se, but of automatization of abnormally developed functional coordination.

  18. The emergence of leadership in coordination-intensive groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Bond, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    Although group coordination was introduced to psychology in the early 1990s, it was not until the advent of nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) that it was possible to gain an understanding of how the process of implicit learning and self-organization take place in conditions where no hierarchical (management) influences are involved. This experimental study examined how leaders might emerge from coordination-intensive task groups where verbal interaction is not possible. NDS and game-theoretical research indicate that the presence of leaders is not required to produce coordination. Thus the question remains as to whether leaders would emerge from coordination-intensive task groups in the similar manner to how they emerge from other types of groups. In the experiment, 13 4-person groups were allowed to discuss the coordination (card game) task while performing it; 13 other groups worked nonverbally. Split-plot ANOVA showed that verbalizing groups performed better than nonverbalizing groups overall and showed more acute coordination learning curves. Nonlinear regression for temporal dynamics within verbalizing and nonverbalizing groups showed asymptotic stability for initial coordination learning and transfer to a coordination rule of equal difficulty, but a chaotic function was observed when the teams switched to a more difficult coordination rule. A questionnaire measured leadership emergence at the end of the game along with other social contributions to the groups' efforts. The average level of leadership emergence for individuals did not differ between verbal and nonverbal conditions, although differences in other social contributions were observed. This experiment illustrates, furthermore, how the nonlinear science paradigm produces new hypotheses concerning verbalization that would not have been formulated otherwise. New avenues of study concerning coordination, leadership, and hierarchies are also discussed.

  19. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used t...

  20. Relationship between neuromuscular and perceived fatigue and locomotor performance in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameau, Sophie; Zory, Raphael; Latrille, Christophe; Roche, Nicolas; Bensmail, Djamel

    2017-12-01

    Fatigue is a common problem in patients with multiple sclerosis; however, the impact of neuromuscular and perceived fatigue on locomotor performance is currently unknown in these patients. The aim of this study was: 1) to determine the relationship between perceived and neuromuscular fatigue and locomotor performance in patients with multiple sclerosis; 2) to determine if neuromuscular and perceived fatigue depend on the severity of the pathology defined by the Expanded disability status scale score (EDSS). Observational study. Outpatients from a hospital rehabilitation department. Thirty patients with multiple sclerosis underwent clinical (spasticity, strength, perceived fatigue and locomotor performance) and isokinetic evaluations (peak torque of knee flexor and extensor muscles and neuromuscular fatigue of knee extensor muscles). The main outcome measures were perceived and neuromuscular fatigue and locomotor performance. Secondary outcomes were strength of the weakest limb and peak isometric torque of knee flexor and extensor muscles, spasticity, EDSS. There were no significant correlations between perceived or neuromuscular fatigue and locomotor performance. Locomotor performance was correlated with EDSS, spasticity, strength of the weakest limb and peak isometric torque of knee flexor and extensor muscles. Eighty‑three percent of the variance of the 6MWT could be explained by EDSS score, strength of the weakest limb (MRCsum), torque produced during the last five contractions of the fatigue protocol and peak isometric torque of knee flexor muscles. Patients with moderate disability (EDSS Score 4-6) had greater levels of neuromuscular fatigue than patients with mild disability (<4). Although fatigue is a disabling symptom of multiple sclerosis, and neuromuscular fatigue was found to be higher in more disabled patients, locomotor performance was correlated with strength and spasticity but not with fatigue. Nevertheless, fatigue was related to 6MWT performance

  1. Physical complications in anorexia nervosa. Haematological and neuromuscular changes in 12 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloway, R; Shur, E; Obrecht, R; Russell, G F

    1988-07-01

    Of twelve patients consecutively admitted to the Maudsley Hospital Eating Disorders Unit, four had neuromuscular abnormality, eight haematological abnormality, and four no abnormality. All those having neuromuscular signs had concomitant haematological dysfunction. Vomiting, and food restriction with vegetarianism, appeared more likely to lead to complications than either food restriction alone or laxative abuse. The physical status of severely underweight patients admitted for refeeding needs to be carefully monitored.

  2. Update on the approach of respiratory therapy in patients with neuromuscular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Priscilla Barreto Paula; Laura Maria de Lima Belizário Facury Lasmar; Maria Teresa Mohallem Fonseca; Marina Belisário Carvalhais; Maria da Glória Rodrigues Machado

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of physiotherapy in approaching neuromuscular disease (NMD), with emphasis on preventive and therapeutic aspects of respiratory therapy. Methods: A nonsystematic literature review covering the past twenty years, using the databases MEDLINE and LILACS through the following descriptors: neuromuscular diseases, physical therapy, vital capacity and respiratory failure. Results: The studies reviewed show the need to establish a routine periodic evaluation of respirato...

  3. Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Laabidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays learning technologies transformed educational systems with impressive progress of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. Furthermore, when these technologies are available, affordable and accessible, they represent more than a transformation for people with disabilities. They represent real opportunities with access to an inclusive education and help to overcome the obstacles they met in classical educational systems. In this paper, we will cover basic concepts of e-accessibility, universal design and assistive technologies, with a special focus on accessible e-learning systems. Then, we will present recent research works conducted in our research Laboratory LaTICE toward the development of an accessible online learning environment for persons with disabilities from the design and specification step to the implementation. We will present, in particular, the accessible version “MoodleAcc+” of the well known e-learning platform Moodle as well as new elaborated generic models and a range of tools for authoring and evaluating accessible educational content.

  4. Coordinating Work with Groupware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Jens Kaaber; Simonsen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    One important goal of employing groupware is to make possible complex collaboration between geographically distributed groups. This requires a dual transformation of both technology and work practice. The challenge is to re­duce the complexity of the coordination work by successfully inte......­grating the protocol stipulating the collaboration and the ar­te­fact, in form of the groupware application, mediating the col­laboration. This paper analyses a generic groupware application that was deployed in a large financial organisation in order to support working groups distributed throughout four countries....... Using the CSCW frame­work of coordination mechanisms, we have elicited six general factors influencing the integration of the groupware application in two situations....

  5. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Liang; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable ef...

  6. Coordinating Shared Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  7. Global coordination: weighted voting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Erik Lane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to halt the depletion of global ecological capital, a number of different kinds of meetings between Governments of countries in the world has been scheduled. The need for global coordination of environmental policies has become ever more obvious, supported by more and more evidence of the running down of ecological capital. But there are no formal or binding arrangements in sight, as global environmental coordination suffers from high transaction costs (qualitative voting. The CO2 equivalent emissions, resulting in global warming, are driven by the unstoppable economic expansion in the global market economy, employing mainly fossil fuel generated energy, although at the same time lifting sharply the GDP per capita of several emerging countries. Only global environmental coordination on the successful model of the World Band and the IMF (quantitative voting can stem the rising emissions numbers and stop further environmental degradation. However, the system of weighted voting in the WB and the IMF must be reformed by reducing the excessive voting power disparities, for instance by reducing all member country votes by the cube root expression.

  8. Vertical jump coordination: fatigue effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodacki, André Luiz Felix; Fowler, Neil E; Bennett, Simon J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the segmental coordination of vertical jumps under fatigue of the knee extensor and flexor muscles. Eleven healthy and active subjects performed maximal vertical jumps with and without fatigue, which was imposed by requesting the subjects to extend/flex their knees continuously in a weight machine, until they could not lift a load corresponding to approximately 50% of their body weight. Knee extensor and flexor isokinetic peak torques were also measured before and after fatigue. Video, ground reaction forces, and electromyographic data were collected simultaneously and used to provide several variables of the jumps. Fatiguing the knee flexor muscles did not reduce the height of the jumps or induce changes in the kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic profiles. Knee extensor fatigue caused the subjects to adjust several variables of the movement, in which the peak joint angular velocity, peak joint net moment, and power around the knee were reduced and occurred earlier in comparison with the nonfatigued jumps. The electromyographic data analyses indicated that the countermovement jumps were performed similarly, i.e., a single strategy was used, irrespective of which muscle group (extensor or flexors) or the changes imposed on the muscle force-generating characteristics (fatigue or nonfatigue). The subjects executed the movements as if they scaled a robust template motor program, which guided the movement execution in all jump conditions. It was speculated that training programs designed to improve jump height performance should avoid severe fatigue levels, which may cause the subjects to learn and adopt a nonoptimal and nonspecific coordination solution. It was suggested that the neural input used in the fatigued condition did not constitute an optimal solution and may have played a role in decreasing maximal jump height achievement.

  9. Evaluation of neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea using chin surface electromyography of polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guo-ping; Ye, Jing-ying; Han, De-min; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhang, Yu-huan; Li, Yan-ru

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that defects in upper airway neuromuscular control play a role in sleep apnea pathogenesis. Currently, there is no simple and non-invasive method for evaluating neuromuscular activity for the purpose of screening in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. This study was designed to assess the validity of chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography in evaluating the neuromuscular activity of obstructive sleep apnea subjects and probe the neuromuscular contribution in the pathogenesis of the condition. The chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography during normal breathing and obstructive apnea were quantified in 36 male patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The change of chin surface electromyography from normal breathing to obstructive apnea was expressed as the percent compensated electromyography value, where the percent compensated electromyography value = (normal breath surface electromyography - apnea surface electromyography)/normal breath surface electromyography, and the percent compensated electromyography values among subjects were compared. The relationship between sleep apnea related parameters and the percent compensated electromyography value was examined. The percent compensated electromyography value of the subjects varied from 1% to 90% and had a significant positive correlation with apnea hypopnea index (R(2) = 0.382, P electromyography by routine polysomnography is a valid way of screening the neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The neuromuscular contribution is different among subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

  10. Sleep monitoring in children during neuromuscular blockade in the pediatric intensive care unit: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carno, Margaret-Ann; Hoffman, Leslie A; Henker, Richard; Carcillo, Joseph; Sanders, Mark H

    2004-05-01

    Sleep is an important physiologic process that is known to be disrupted in the intensive care unit. Nevertheless, there is little information on how intensive care unit admission affects sleep in children. Because laryngotracheoplasty is elective but entails 5-7 days of neuromuscular blockade following surgery, children undergoing this procedure present a unique opportunity to analyze sleep during neuromuscular blockade apart from confounding variables resulting from critical illness. To determine the feasibility of using polysomnography to assess sleep patterns in children during neuromuscular blockade. Polysomnography recordings were obtained continuously for 4 days (96 hrs) in two children following laryngotracheoplasty. Medication administration (neuromuscular blockades, sedatives) and time of suctioning were also recorded. Both subjects had documented sleep. However, the proportion of time in each stage was markedly different from developmental norms, and a greater proportion of sleep occurred during the day. Furthermore, there was substantial day-night and day-to-day variability. Some rebound of consolidated sleep appeared by day 4. Sedative use varied considerably. However, neither bolus sedation administration nor endotracheal suctioning appeared to affect sleep. Few monitoring difficulties were encountered. Sleep can be monitored with minimal difficulty in children undergoing neuromuscular blockade in the pediatric intensive care unit. Sleep occurred throughout the day, and there was considerable fragmentation. To fully assess sleep in the intensive care unit, monitoring needs to be continuous over several days, rather than only at night or for < or =24 hrs. Further research is needed in the area to determine typical sleep patterns in children undergoing neuromuscular blockade.

  11. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF): Its Mechanisms and Effects on Range of Motion and Muscular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Kayla B; Whitcomb, Tyler J; Briggs, Wyatt O; Hong, Junggi

    2012-03-01

    Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is common practice for increasing range of motion, though little research has been done to evaluate theories behind it. The purpose of this study was to review possible mechanisms, proposed theories, and physiological changes that occur due to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques. Four theoretical mechanisms were identified: autogenic inhibition, reciprocal inhibition, stress relaxation, and the gate control theory. The studies suggest that a combination of these four mechanisms enhance range of motion. When completed prior to exercise, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation decreases performance in maximal effort exercises. When this stretching technique is performed consistently and post exercise, it increases athletic performance, along with range of motion. Little investigation has been done regarding the theoretical mechanisms of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, though four mechanisms were identified from the literature. As stated, the main goal of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation is to increase range of motion and performance. Studies found both of these to be true when completed under the correct conditions. These mechanisms were found to be plausible; however, further investigation needs to be conducted. All four mechanisms behind the stretching technique explain the reasoning behind the increase in range of motion, as well as in strength and athletic performance. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation shows potential benefits if performed correctly and consistently.

  12. Rehabilitation interventions for foot drop in neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackley, Catherine; Disler, Peter B; Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Wade, Derick T; Brittle, Nicola; Hoppitt, Thomas

    2009-07-08

    "Foot drop" or "Floppy foot drop" is the term commonly used to describe weakness or contracture of the muscles around the ankle joint. It may arise from many neuromuscular diseases. To conduct a systematic review of randomised trials for the treatment of foot drop resulting from neuromuscular disease. In this update, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register (April 2009), MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 24 2009), EMBASE January 1980 to April 24 2009), CINAHL (January 1982 to May 6 2009), AMED (January 1985 to April 24 2009), the British Nursing Index (January 1985 to January 2008) and Royal College of Nursing Journal of Databases (January 1985 to January 2008). Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of physical, orthotic and surgical treatments for foot drop resulting from lower motor neuron or muscle disease and related contractures were included. People with primary joint disease were excluded. Interventions included a 'wait and see' approach, physiotherapy, orthoses, surgery and pharmacological therapy. The primary outcome measure was quantified ability to walk whilst secondary outcome measures included range of movement, dorsiflexor torque and strength, measures of activity and participation, quality of life and adverse effects. Methodological quality was evaluated by two authors using the van Tulder criteria. Four studies with a total of n = 152 participants were included in the update to the original review. Heterogeneity of the studies precluded pooling the data. Early surgery did not significantly affect walking speed in a trial including 20 children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Both groups deteriorated during the 12 months follow-up. After one year, the mean difference (MD) of the 28 feet walking time was 0.00 seconds (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.83 to 0.83) and the MD of the 150 feet walking time was -2.88 seconds, favouring the control group (95% CI -8.18 to 2.42). Night splinting of the ankle did not significantly

  13. Acute and Chronic Effects of N-acetylcysteine on Pentylenetetrazole-induced Seizure and Neuromuscular Coordination in Mice

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    Sasan Zaeri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: N-acetylcysteine (NAC has been indicated against experimental seizures, but with relatively inconclusive results. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether NAC exerts a dose-dependent anticonvulsant effect and to determine NAC safe therapeutic dose range and its muscle-relaxant activity in both acute and chronic uses. Methods: Following intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of N-acetylcysteine acutely (50-300 mg/kg or chronically for 8 days (25-300 mg/kg, mice were injected with PTZ (90 mg/kg, i.p. and latency times to the onset of myoclonic and clonic seizures and protection against death were recorded. Changes in body weight and mortality rate were considered as parameters for drug safety. The muscle-relaxant activity of NAC was assessed by rotarod test. Results: Acute and chronic treatment with NAC delayed latency times to myoclonic and clonic seizures in a dose-dependent manner, but with no significant prevention against PTZ-induced death. Chronic administration of 300 mg/kg NAC was fully lethal while lower doses (100 and 150 mg/kg resulted in a significant weight loss and decreased stay time on rotarod. Acute treatment with NAC had no significant effect on stay time on rotarod at all studied doses. Conclusion: NAC exerts a dose-dependent anticonvulsant effect in acute and chronic uses, with no muscle relaxant activity. NAC has higher efficacy in preventing seizure in chronic than acute treatment, but its chronic use at higher doses of 75 mg/kg may be associated with side effects and/or toxicity. These findings suggest that low doses of NAC may have a potential use as a prophylactic treatment for absence seizure in human.

  14. Lumbopelvic neuromuscular training and injury rehabilitation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Matthew S; Givens, Deborah L; Best, Thomas M; Chaudhari, Ajit M

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the evidence for lumbopelvic neuromuscular training (LNMT) in individuals after musculoskeletal (MSK) injury. A literature search of PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed for English studies from January 1990 to March 2012. Search terms including and related to trunk, core, stability, injury, and LNMT were used. All studies directly involving LNMT for MSK injuries were reviewed by 2 authors. These articles were assessed based on the inclusion criteria and if appropriate selected for further analysis. Expert opinion, review articles, and articles involving non-MSK injuries were excluded. Four authors then scored the selected articles for methodological quality. A total of 2312 articles were initially identified. Twenty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria for review and were divided into categories of lower extremity (LE), lumbar, and upper extremity (UE). No trials involving the UE met the inclusion criteria. Data including subject demographics (age, height, weight, gender, etc), injury type, intervention type, and outcome measurements were extracted from the relevant articles. A variety of baseline and follow-up scores were extracted including pain levels, patient satisfaction, disability questionnaires, and other functional outcomes. Two out of 3 LE randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 9/26 lumbar RCTs were rated with high methodological quality based on the scoring system described by van Tulder et al. The average quality score for the LE RCTs was 6.3 (range = 4-9) and for the lumbar RCTs was 5.1 (range = 2-9). The evidence for the effectiveness of the 3 LE studies was rated as conflicting, whereas 24 lumbar studies demonstrated moderate-to-strong evidence. Unfortunately, heterogeneity of populations, interventions, and outcomes precluded a quantitative meta-analysis and specific clinical recommendations. High-quality evidence is lacking to make specific clinical recommendations for or against the use of

  15. Symmetric two-coordinate photodiode

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    Dobrovolskiy Yu. G.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The two-coordinate photodiode is developed and explored on the longitudinal photoeffect, which allows to get the coordinate descriptions symmetric on the steepness and longitudinal resistance great exactness. It was shown, that the best type of the coordinate description is observed in the case of scanning by the optical probe on the central part of the photosensitive element. The ways of improvement of steepness and linear of its coordinate description were analyzed.

  16. Develop a Professional Learning Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Staff Development, 2013

    2013-01-01

    A professional learning plan establishes short-and long-term plans for professional learning and implementation of the learning. Such plans guide individuals, schools, districts, and states in coordinating learning experiences designed to achieve outcomes for educators and students. Professional learning plans focus on the program of educator…

  17. Understanding Leadership A Coordination Theory

    OpenAIRE

    J. Foss, Nicolai

    1999-01-01

    Important aspects of leadership behavior can be rendered intelligible through a focus on coordination games. The concept of common knowledge is shown to be particularly important to understanding leadership. Thus, leaders may establish common knowledge conditions and assist the coordination of strategies in this way, or make decisions in situations where coordination problems persist in spite of common knowledge.

  18. [The coordination of community care for patients with chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savigneau, Gaëlle; Soyeux, Esther

    2017-05-01

    Patients with chronic pain require global and multi-disciplinary care. The network "Lutter contre la douleur" offers coordinated support for health professionals and a multidimensional assessment of the patients. Its therapeutic education programme favours learning of bodymind techniques. In this context, the nurse coordinator can play a key role in ensuring the efficiency of the patient management and health care pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Directional Coordination of Thumb and Finger Forces during Precision Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Nataraj, Raviraj; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The human opposable thumb enables the hand to perform dexterous manipulation of objects, which requires well-coordinated digit force vectors. This study investigated the directional coordination of force vectors generated by the thumb and index finger during precision pinch. Fourteen right-handed, healthy subjects were instructed to exert pinch force on an externally stabilized apparatus with the pulps of the thumb and index finger. Subjects applied forces to follow a force-ramp profile that linearly increased from 0 to 12 N and then decreased to 0 N, at a rate of ±3 N/s. Directional relationships between the thumb and index finger force vectors were quantified using the coordination angle (CA) between the force vectors. Individual force vectors were further analyzed according to their projection angles (PAs) with respect to the pinch surface planes and the shear angles (SAs) within those planes. Results demonstrated that fingertip force directions were dependent on pinch force magnitude, especially at forces below 2 N. Hysteresis was observed in the force-CA relationship for increasing and decreasing forces and fitted with exponential models. The fitted asymptotic values were 156.0±6.6° and 150.8±9.3° for increasing and decreasing force ramps, respectively. The PA of the thumb force vector deviated further from the direction perpendicular to the pinching surface planes than that of the index finger. The SA showed that the index finger force vector deviated in the ulnar-proximal direction, whereas the thumb switched its force between the ulnar-proximal and radial-proximal directions. The findings shed light on the effects of anatomical composition, biomechanical function, and neuromuscular control in coordinating digit forces during precision pinch, and provided insight into the magnitude-dependent force directional control which potentially affects a range of dexterous manipulations. PMID:24236128

  20. Neuromuscular strategies contributing to faster multidirectional agility performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Tania; Newton, Robert U; Nimphius, Sophia

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to first determine differences in neuromuscular strategy between a faster and slower agility performance, and second compare differences in muscle activation strategy employed when performing two closely executed agility movements. Participants recruited from an elite female basketball team completed an ultrasound to determine quadriceps muscle-cross sectional area; reactive isometric mid-thigh pull to determine the rate of muscle activation, rate of force development, pre-motor time and motor time; and multidirectional agility tests completing two directional changes in response to a visual stimulus. Peak and average relative muscle activation of the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus and gastrocnemius were measured 100ms prior to heel strike (pre-heel strike) and across stance phase for both directional changes. Faster agility performance was characterized by greater pre-heel strike muscle activity and greater anterior muscle activation during stance phase resulting in greater hip and knee extension increasing propulsive impulse. Differences between directional changes appear to result from processing speed, where a greater delay in refractory times during the second directional change resulted in greater anterior muscle activation, decelerating the body while movement direction was determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lower Limb Neuromuscular Asymmetry in Volleyball and Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe, Azahara; Gual, Gabriel; Romero-Rodriguez, Daniel; Unnitha, Viswanath

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the agreement between the dominant leg (DL) (determined subjectively) and the stronger leg (SL) (determined via a functional test) in a group of basketball and volleyball players. The secondary objective was to calculate lower limb neuromuscular asymmetry when comparing the DL vs the non-dominant leg (NDL) and the SL vs the weaker (WL) leg in the whole group and when differentiating by sex. Seventy-nine male and female volleyball and basketball players (age: 23.7 ± 4.5 years) performed three single-leg vertical countermovement jumps (SLVCJ) on a contact mat. Vertical jump height and an inter-limb asymmetry index (ASI) were determined. Only 32 (40%) of the subjects had a concordance between the perception of their dominant leg and the limb reaching the highest jump height. Using the DL as the discriminating variable, significant (pplayers. When comparing between sexes, significant differences (pjump performance. Vertical jump asymmetry of 10-15% exists and this can be considered as a reference value for male and female basketball and volleyball players.

  2. Homeostatic synaptic plasticity at the neuromuscular junction in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyong; Rich, Mark M

    2018-01-01

    A number of studies in the past 20 years have shown that perturbation of activity of the nervous system leads to compensatory changes in synaptic strength that serve to return network activity to its original level. This response has been termed homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Despite the intense interest in homeostatic synaptic plasticity, little attention has been paid to its role in the prototypic synaptic disease, myasthenia gravis. In this review, we discuss mechanisms that have been shown to mediate homeostatic synaptic plasticity at the mammalian neuromuscular junction. A subset of these mechanisms have been shown to occur in myasthenia gravis. The homeostatic changes occurring in myasthenia gravis appear to involve the presynaptic nerve terminal and may even involve changes in the excitability of motor neurons within the spinal cord. The finding of presynaptic homeostatic synaptic plasticity in myasthenia gravis leads us to propose that changes in the motor unit in myasthenia gravis may be more widespread than previously appreciated. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. The mode of neuromuscular blocking action of chlorpromazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C.; Lee, C. Y.

    1960-01-01

    The inhibitory action of chlorpromazine on skeletal muscle has been studied with isolated preparations. In the nerve-muscle preparations of the frog sartorius and the rat diaphragm, the twitch responses to indirect stimulation are much more strongly depressed by chlorpromazine than those to direct stimulation. The conductivity of the nerve trunk is unaffected. The contractures of the frog rectus abdominis muscle caused by acetylcholine are depressed by chlorpromazine,but the contractures due to KCl are not influenced. Larger doses of chlorpromazine cause contracture by themselves, and this cannot be prevented by tubocurarine. In the sartorius muscle of the toad, the depolarization due to acetylcholine is reduced by chlorpromazine. The paralysing action of chlorpromazine adds to that of tubocurarine, and is antagonized to some extent by eserine or neostigmine. Muscles treated with chlorpromazine do not completely recover on washing. High concentrations of chlorpromazine depress the release of acetylcholine by motor-nerve stimulation, although they do not affect the enzymic synthesis of acetylcholine by acetone-dried powder of guinea-pig brain. The differences between the neuromuscular block produced by chlorpromazine and that by tubocurarine are discussed. PMID:13835490

  4. Neuromuscular quadriceps dysfunction prior to osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Roland; Berth, Alexander; Nehring, Markus; Awiszus, Friedemann

    2004-07-01

    Decreased maximal quadriceps strength and voluntary activation has been observed in patients with osteoarthritis in previous studies, but those results do not allow any conclusions to be drawn as to whether quadriceps dysfunction precedes or follows osteoarthritis. Thirty-two patients (group a) who underwent partial meniscectomy 48+/-9 month prior to the study were matched according to their weight and body mass index with a control group (group b). The twitch interpolation technique was used to determine maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and voluntary activation (VA) of the quadriceps muscle of both legs. Subjective assessment of the knee was performed using the Lysholm-Score. AP and lateral X-rays of the operated knee were obtained. None of the participants showed any evidence of characteristic radiological or clinical signs for osteoarthritis. A significantly lower MVC was noticed in both the affected and the contralateral knee of group a in comparison to group b (p weakness as already described in patients with manifest osteoarthritis. The authors hypothesise that muscle dysfunction may be an etiologic factor underlying the pathologic changes of osteoarthritis. Whether muscle dysfunction occurs also at other sites, e.g. in the upper extremity, remains unclear but would be of interest in order to detect a generalized neuromuscular dysfunction.

  5. Extracardiac medical and neuromuscular implications in restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2007-08-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP) is characterized by restrictive filling and reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles with normal or near-normal systolic function and wall thickness. It may occur idiopathically or as a cardiac manifestation of systemic diseases such as scleroderma, amyloidosis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, cystinosis, sarcoidosis, lymphoma, Gaucher's disease, hemochromatosis, Fabry's disease, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hypereosinophilic syndrome, carcinoid, Noonan's syndrome, reactive arthritis, or Werner's syndrome and various neuromuscular disorders. Whereas in idiopathic RCMP the therapeutic options are only treatment of cardiac congestion, in cases with an underlying disorder, a causal therapy may be available. Patients with RCMP should be investigated as soon as the cardiac diagnosis is established for extracardiac diseases to detect a possibly treatable cause of RCMP before the disease becomes intractable. These investigations include a diligent clinical history and examination, blood tests, and ophthalmologic, otologic, dermatologic, gastroenterologic, nephrologic, hematologic, and neurologic examinations. If extracardiac examinations do not reveal a plausible cause for RCMP, endomyocardial biopsy is indicated. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. HEMODYNAMIC AND LACTIC ACID RESPONSES TO PROPRIOCEPTIVE NEUROMUSCULAR FACILITATION EXERCISE

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    Zuhal Gültekin

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic and metabolic responses to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF exercise were examined in 32 male university students (aged 19-28 years. Ten repetitions of PNF exercises were applied to the subjects' dominant upper extremities in the following order: as an agonist pattern flexion, adduction and external rotation; and as an antagonist pattern extension, abduction and internal rotation. Heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, double product (DP, and blood lactate concentration (La were determined before, immediately after, and at 1st, 3rd, and 5th minutes after PNF exercise. A one-way ANOVA with repeated measures indicated significant differences in HR, SBP, DBP, DP and La immediately after PNF exercise. HR increased from 81 (±10 to 108 (±15 b·min-1 (p < 0.01, SBP increased from 117 (±10 to 125 (±11 mmHg (p < 0.01, DBP increased from 71 (±10 to 75 (±8 mmHg (p < 0.01, DP increased from 96 (±16 to 135 (±24 (p < 0.01, and La increased from 0.69 (±0.31 to 3.99 (±14.63 mmol·L-1 (p < 0.01. Thus PNF exercise resulted in increased hemodynamic responses and blood lactate concentration that indicate a high strain on the cardiovascular system and anaerobic metabolism in healthy subjects

  7. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayana Zatz

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuromuscular disorders (NMD are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country.

  8. Development of neuromuscular organization in the ctenophore Pleurobrachia bachei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norekian, Tigran P; Moroz, Leonid L

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the phylum Ctenophora and the nature of ctenphore nervous systems are highly debated topics in modern evolutionary biology. However, very little is known about the organization of ctenophore neural and muscular systems, and virtually nothing has been reported about their embryogenesis. Here we have characterized the neural and muscular development of the sea gooseberry, Pleurobrachia bachei, starting from the cleavage stages to posthatching larvae. Scanning electron microscopy and immunochemistry were used to describe the formation of the embryonic mouth, tentacles, combs, aboral organ, and putative sensory cells. The muscles started their specification at the end of the first day of Pleurobrachia development. In contrast, neurons appeared 2 days after myogenesis, just before the hatching of fully formed cydippid larvae. The first tubulin-immunoreactive neurons, a small group of four to six cells with neuronal processes, was initially recognized at the aboral pole during the third day of development. Surprisingly, this observed neurogenesis occurred after the emergence of distinct behavioral patterns in the embryos. Thus, the embryonic behavior associated with comb cilia beatings and initial muscle organization does not require morphologically defined neurons and their elongated neurites. This study provides the first description of neuromuscular development in the enigmatic ctenophores and establishes the foundation for future research using emerging genomic tools and resources. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Neuromuscular transmission and muscle fatigue changes by nanostructured oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivannikov, Maxim V; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen (O 2 ) nanobubbles offer a new method for tissue oxygenation. The effects of O 2 nanobubbles on transmission at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and muscle function were explored in murine diaphragm. Electrophysiological parameters, NMJ ultrastructure, muscle force, and muscle fatigue were studied during superfusion with solutions with different oxygen levels or oxygen nanobubbles. High frequency nerve stimulation of muscles superfused with O 2 nanobubble solution slowed neurotransmission decline over those with either control or hyperoxic solution. O 2 nanobubble solution increased the amplitude of evoked end plate potentials and quantal content but did not affect spontaneous activity. Electron microscopy of stimulated O 2 nanobubble treated NMJs showed accumulation of large synaptic vesicles and endosome-like structures. O 2 nanobubble solution had no effects on isometric muscle force, but it significantly decreased fatigability and maximum force recovery time in nerve stimulated muscles. O 2 nanobubbles increase neurotransmission and reduce the probability of neurotransmission failure in muscle fatigue. Muscle Nerve 55: 555-563, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Neuromuscular adjustments of the quadriceps muscle after repeated cycling sprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Girard

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigated the supraspinal processes of fatigue of the quadriceps muscle in response to repeated cycling sprints. METHODS: Twelve active individuals performed 10 × 6-s "all-out" sprints on a cycle ergometer (recovery = 30 s, followed 6 min later by 5 × 6-s sprints (recovery = 30 s. Transcranial magnetic and electrical femoral nerve stimulations during brief (5-s and sustained (30-s isometric contractions of the knee extensors were performed before and 3 min post-exercise. RESULTS: Maximal strength of the knee extensors decreased during brief and sustained contractions (~11% and 9%, respectively; P0.05. While cortical voluntary activation declined (P 40% reduced (P<0.001 following exercise. CONCLUSION: The capacity of the motor cortex to optimally drive the knee extensors following a repeated-sprint test was shown in sustained, but not brief, maximal isometric contractions. Additionally, peripheral factors were largely involved in the exercise-induced impairment in neuromuscular function, while corticospinal excitability was well-preserved.

  11. Applications of Shape Memory Alloys for Neurology and Neuromuscular Rehabilitation

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    Simone Pittaccio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are a very promising class of metallic materials that display interesting nonlinear properties, such as pseudoelasticity (PE, shape memory effect (SME and damping capacity, due to high mechanical hysteresis and internal friction. Our group has applied SMA in the field of neuromuscular rehabilitation, designing some new devices based on the mentioned SMA properties: in particular, a new type of orthosis for spastic limb repositioning, which allows residual voluntary movement of the impaired limb and has no predetermined final target position, but follows and supports muscular elongation in a dynamic and compliant way. Considering patients in the sub-acute phase after a neurological lesion, and possibly bedridden, the paper presents a mobiliser for the ankle joint, which is designed exploiting the SME to provide passive exercise to the paretic lower limb. Two different SMA-based applications in the field of neuroscience are then presented, a guide and a limb mobiliser specially designed to be compatible with diagnostic instrumentations that impose rigid constraints in terms of electromagnetic compatibility and noise distortion. Finally, the paper discusses possible uses of these materials in the treatment of movement disorders, such as dystonia or hyperkinesia, where their dynamic characteristics can be advantageous.

  12. Neuromuscular factors related to success in Olympic wrestling

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    Alfonso Martínez-Moreno

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study was undertaken to determine the relationship between maximum dynamic and isometric strength and success in male and female Olympic wrestling. Thirty-five female and thirty-seven male wrestlers were assigned into 4 groups according to their gender and competitive level: men elite (♂ ET, n = 18 and amateur (AT ♂, n = 19 and female elite (♀ ET n = 13 and amateur (AT ♀, n = 22. All subjects underwent assessments of body composition, countermovement jump, maximum dynamic strength test in full squat and bench press exercises and maximum isometric strength test of grip and hip extension. All the neuromuscular markers studied showed significantly higher values in the two elite groups compared to their respective amateur groups results, except the jump height between ♀ET y ♀AT, where no significant differences were detected. The present results suggest that the higher maximum isometric and dynamic strength values, explained in part by the differences in lean mass, will give elite wrestlers a clear advantage during the most frequently used techniques in Olympic wrestling. Key  Words: bench press; squat; maximum dynamic strength; maximum isometric strength; combat.

  13. Neuromuscular factors related to success in Olympic wrestling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Martínez-Moreno

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was undertaken to determine the relationship between maximum dynamic and isometric strength and success in male and female Olympic wrestling. Thirty-five female and thirty-seven male wrestlers were assigned into 4 groups according to their gender and competitive level: men elite (♂ ET, n = 18 and amateur (AT ♂, n = 19 and female elite (♀ ET n = 13 and amateur (AT ♀, n = 22. All subjects underwent assessments of body composition, countermovement jump, maximum dynamic strength test in full squat and bench press exercises and maximum isometric strength test of grip and hip extension. All the neuromuscular markers studied showed significantly higher values in the two elite groups compared to their respective amateur groups results, except the jump height between ♀ET y ♀AT, where no significant differences were detected. The present results suggest that the higher maximum isometric and dynamic strength values, explained in part by the differences in lean mass, will give elite wrestlers a clear advantage during the most frequently used techniques in Olympic wrestling.  Key  Words: bench press; squat; maximum dynamic strength; maximum isometric strength; combat.

  14. Oxidative stress induces overgrowth of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Valerie J; Jarrett, Helen E; Gowers, Kate; Chalak, Salma; Briggs, Laura; Robinson, Iain M; Sweeney, Sean T

    2011-10-18

    Synaptic terminals are known to expand and contract throughout an animal's life. The physiological constraints and demands that regulate appropriate synaptic growth and connectivity are currently poorly understood. In previous work, we identified a Drosophila model of lysosomal storage disease (LSD), spinster (spin), with larval neuromuscular synapse overgrowth. Here we identify a reactive oxygen species (ROS) burden in spin that may be attributable to previously identified lipofuscin deposition and lysosomal dysfunction, a cellular hallmark of LSD. Reducing ROS in spin mutants rescues synaptic overgrowth and electrophysiological deficits. Synapse overgrowth was also observed in mutants defective for protection from ROS and animals subjected to excessive ROS. ROS are known to stimulate JNK and fos signaling. Furthermore, JNK and fos in turn are known potent activators of synapse growth and function. Inhibiting JNK and fos activity in spin rescues synapse overgrowth and electrophysiological deficits. Similarly, inhibiting JNK, fos, and jun activity in animals with excessive oxidative stress rescues the overgrowth phenotype. These data suggest that ROS, via activation of the JNK signaling pathway, are a major regulator of synapse overgrowth. In LSD, increased autophagy contributes to lysosomal storage and, presumably, elevated levels of oxidative stress. In support of this suggestion, we report here that impaired autophagy function reverses synaptic overgrowth in spin. Our data describe a previously unexplored link between oxidative stress and synapse overgrowth via the JNK signaling pathway.

  15. An Innovative Ergometer to Measure Neuromuscular Fatigue Immediately after Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Baker, Douglas; Temesi, John; Medysky, Mary E; Holash, Robert J; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2018-02-01

    When assessing neuromuscular fatigue (NMF) from dynamic exercise using large muscle mass (e.g., cycling), most studies have delayed measurement for 1 to 3 min after task failure. This study aimed to determine the reliability of an innovative cycling ergometer permitting the start of fatigue measurement within 1 s after cycling. Twelve subjects participated in two experimental sessions. Knee-extensor NMF was assessed by electrical nerve and transcranial magnetic stimulation with both a traditional chair setup (PRE- and POST-Chair, 2 min postexercise) and the new cycling ergometer (PRE, every 3 min during incremental exercise and POST-Bike, at task failure). The reduction in maximal voluntary contraction force POST-Bike (63% ± 12% PRE; P cycling protocol (P > 0.05). Vastus lateralis and rectus femoris M-wave and motor-evoked potential areas showed fair to excellent reliability (ICC, 0.45-0.88). The reduction in maximal voluntary contraction and Db100 was greater on the cycling ergometer than the isometric chair. The innovative cycling ergometer is a reliable tool to assess NMF during and immediately postexercise. This will allow fatigue etiology during dynamic exercise with large muscle mass to be revisited in various populations and environmental conditions.

  16. Peripheral nerve and neuromuscular junction pathology in Pompe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Darin J.; Todd, Adrian Gary; Lee, Sooyeon; Soustek, Meghan S.; ElMallah, Mai K.; Fuller, David D.; Notterpek, Lucia; Byrne, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease is a systemic metabolic disorder characterized by lack of acid-alpha glucosidase (GAA) resulting in ubiquitous lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Respiratory and ambulatory dysfunction are prominent features in patients with Pompe yet the mechanism defining the development of muscle weakness is currently unclear. Transgenic animal models of Pompe disease mirroring the patient phenotype have been invaluable in mechanistic and therapeutic study. Here, we demonstrate significant pathological alterations at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of the diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscle as prominent features of disease pathology in Gaa knockout mice. Postsynaptic defects including increased motor endplate area and fragmentation were readily observed in Gaa−/− but not wild-type mice. Presynaptic neuropathic changes were also evident, as demonstrated by significant reduction in the levels of neurofilament proteins, and alterations in axonal fiber diameter and myelin thickness within the sciatic and phrenic nerves. Our data suggest the loss of NMJ integrity is a primary contributor to the decline in respiratory and ambulatory function in Pompe and arises from both pre- and postsynaptic pathology. These observations highlight the importance of systemic phenotype correction, specifically restoration of GAA to skeletal muscle and the nervous system for treatment of Pompe disease. PMID:25217571

  17. Work Coordination Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendejas, Silvino; Bui, Tung; Bui, Bach; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie; Kim, Rachel; Allen, Christopher; Luong, Ivy; Chang, George; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    The Work Coordination Engine (WCE) is a Java application integrated into the Service Management Database (SMDB), which coordinates the dispatching and monitoring of a work order system. WCE de-queues work orders from SMDB and orchestrates the dispatching of work to a registered set of software worker applications distributed over a set of local, or remote, heterogeneous computing systems. WCE monitors the execution of work orders once dispatched, and accepts the results of the work order by storing to the SMDB persistent store. The software leverages the use of a relational database, Java Messaging System (JMS), and Web Services using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) technologies to implement an efficient work-order dispatching mechanism capable of coordinating the work of multiple computer servers on various platforms working concurrently on different, or similar, types of data or algorithmic processing. Existing (legacy) applications can be wrapped with a proxy object so that no changes to the application are needed to make them available for integration into the work order system as "workers." WCE automatically reschedules work orders that fail to be executed by one server to a different server if available. From initiation to completion, the system manages the execution state of work orders and workers via a well-defined set of events, states, and actions. It allows for configurable work-order execution timeouts by work-order type. This innovation eliminates a current processing bottleneck by providing a highly scalable, distributed work-order system used to quickly generate products needed by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to support space flight operations. WCE is driven by asynchronous messages delivered via JMS indicating the availability of new work or workers. It runs completely unattended in support of the lights-out operations concept in the DSN.

  18. Markov stochasticity coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-01-01

    Markov dynamics constitute one of the most fundamental models of random motion between the states of a system of interest. Markov dynamics have diverse applications in many fields of science and engineering, and are particularly applicable in the context of random motion in networks. In this paper we present a two-dimensional gauging method of the randomness of Markov dynamics. The method-termed Markov Stochasticity Coordinates-is established, discussed, and exemplified. Also, the method is tweaked to quantify the stochasticity of the first-passage-times of Markov dynamics, and the socioeconomic equality and mobility in human societies.

  19. Acute effect of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and classic exercises in adhesive capsulitis: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Yuruk, Zeliha Ozlem; Zeybek, Aslican; Gulsen, Mustafa; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of our study was to compare the initial effects of scapular proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and classic exercise interventions with physiotherapy modalities on pain...

  20. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    ...) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop...

  1. Open Method of Co-Ordination for Demoi-Cracy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Radaelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Under which conditions does the open method of co-ordination match the standards for demoi-cracy? To answer this question, we need some explicit standards about demoi-cracy. In fact, open co-ordination serves three different but interrelated purposes in European Union policy: to facilitate...... convergence; to support learning processes; and to encourage exploration of policy innovation. By intersecting standards and purposes, we find open co-ordination is neither inherently ‘good’ nor ‘bad’ for demoi-cracy, as it depends on how it has been put into practice. Therefore, we qualify the answer...

  2. Influence of local anesthetics on the neuromuscular blockade produced by rocuronium: effects of lidocaine and 50% enantiomeric excess bupivacaine on the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Angélica de Fátima de Assunção; Carvalho, Vanessa Henriques; Braga, Franklin Sarmento da Silva; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; Loyola, Yolanda Christina S; Potério, Glória Braga

    2009-01-01

    The effects of local anesthetics (LA) on neuromuscular transmission and their influence on the neuromuscular blockade produced by competitive neuromuscular blockers have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the effects of lidocaine and 50% enantiomeric excess bupivacaine (S75-R25) on the neuromuscular blockade produced by rocuronium. The rats were divided in five groups (n = 5) according to the drug used: isolated lidocaine, bupivacaine (S75-R25), or rocuronium (groups I, II, and II); and rocuronium in preparations previously exposed to LAs (groups IV and V). The concentrations used were as follows: 20 microg x mL(-1), 5 microg x mL(-1), and 4 microg x mL(-1) of lidocaine, bupivacaine (S75-R25), and rocuronium, respectively. The following parameters were evaluated: 1) the strength of muscular contraction of the diaphragm to indirect electrical stimulations, before and 60 minutes after the isolated addition of the LAs and rocuronium, and the association AL-rocuronium; and 2) the effects of LAs on membrane potential (MP) and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPP). The effect of LAs on muscle contraction in response to acetylcholine was evaluated in chick biventer cervicis preparations. Isolated lidocaine and bupivacaine (S75-R25) did not change the muscular response and the levels of MPs. In preparations exposed to LAs, rocuroniuminduced blockade was significantly greater than that produced by rocuronium alone. In chick biventer cervicis preparations, lidocaine and bupivacaine (S75R25) decreased contraction in response to acetylcholine. Lidocaine increased the frequency of MEPPs, which was followed by the blockade; bupivacaine (S75R25) caused a reduction in MEPPs followed by blockade. Local anesthetics caused a potentiation of the neuromuscular blockade produced by rocuronium. The results showed pre- and post-synaptic effects.

  3. Coordinate green growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, F.; Hekkert, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Green economic growth needs a shared sense of direction if it is to lead to a more sustainable future under climate change. Studies on green innovation and societal transformation show that uncoordinated initiatives are unlikely to be an effective way “to get the ball rolling and to ‘learn

  4. Development of a serial order in speech constrained by articulatory coordination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Oohashi

    Full Text Available Universal linguistic constraints seem to govern the organization of sound sequences in words. However, our understanding of the origin and development of these constraints is incomplete. One possibility is that the development of neuromuscular control of articulators acts as a constraint for the emergence of sequences in words. Repetitions of the same consonant observed in early infancy and an increase in variation of consonantal sequences over months of age have been interpreted as a consequence of the development of neuromuscular control. Yet, it is not clear how sequential coordination of articulators such as lips, tongue apex and tongue dorsum constrains sequences of labial, coronal and dorsal consonants in words over the course of development. We examined longitudinal development of consonant-vowel-consonant(-vowel sequences produced by Japanese children between 7 and 60 months of age. The sequences were classified according to places of articulation for corresponding consonants. The analyses of individual and group data show that infants prefer repetitive and fronting articulations, as shown in previous studies. Furthermore, we reveal that serial order of different places of articulations within the same organ appears earlier and then gradually develops, whereas serial order of different articulatory organs appears later and then rapidly develops. In the same way, we also analyzed the sequences produced by English children and obtained similar developmental trends. These results suggest that the development of intra- and inter-articulator coordination constrains the acquisition of serial orders in speech with the complexity that characterizes adult language.

  5. Development of a serial order in speech constrained by articulatory coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohashi, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hama; Taga, Gentaro

    2013-01-01

    Universal linguistic constraints seem to govern the organization of sound sequences in words. However, our understanding of the origin and development of these constraints is incomplete. One possibility is that the development of neuromuscular control of articulators acts as a constraint for the emergence of sequences in words. Repetitions of the same consonant observed in early infancy and an increase in variation of consonantal sequences over months of age have been interpreted as a consequence of the development of neuromuscular control. Yet, it is not clear how sequential coordination of articulators such as lips, tongue apex and tongue dorsum constrains sequences of labial, coronal and dorsal consonants in words over the course of development. We examined longitudinal development of consonant-vowel-consonant(-vowel) sequences produced by Japanese children between 7 and 60 months of age. The sequences were classified according to places of articulation for corresponding consonants. The analyses of individual and group data show that infants prefer repetitive and fronting articulations, as shown in previous studies. Furthermore, we reveal that serial order of different places of articulations within the same organ appears earlier and then gradually develops, whereas serial order of different articulatory organs appears later and then rapidly develops. In the same way, we also analyzed the sequences produced by English children and obtained similar developmental trends. These results suggest that the development of intra- and inter-articulator coordination constrains the acquisition of serial orders in speech with the complexity that characterizes adult language.

  6. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation for people with neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Brenda; Zampoli, Marco; van Aswegen, Helena; Argent, Andrew

    2013-12-30

    People with neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) may have weak respiratory (breathing) muscles which makes it difficult for them to effectively cough and clear mucus from the lungs. This places them at risk of recurrent chest infections and chronic lung disease. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MI-E) is one of a number of techniques available to improve cough efficacy and mucus clearance. To determine the efficacy and safety of MI-E in people with NMDs. On 7 October 2013, we searched the following databases from inception: the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, and EMBASE. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. We conducted handsearches of reference lists and conference proceedings. We considered randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials, and randomised cross-over trials of MI-E used to assist airway clearance in people with a NMD and respiratory insufficiency. We considered comparisons of MI-E with no treatment, or alternative cough augmentation techniques. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias in included studies according to standard Cochrane methodology. The primary outcome was mortality throughout follow-up or at six months follow-up. Five studies with a total of 105 participants were found to be eligible for inclusion in this review. All included trials were short-term studies (two days or less), measuring immediate effects of the interventions. There was insufficient detail in the reports to assess methods of randomisation and allocation concealment. All five studies were at a high risk of bias from lack of blinding. The studies did not report on mortality, morbidity, quality of life, serious adverse events or any of the other prespecified outcomes. One study was a randomised cross-over trial conducted over two days, in which investigators applied two

  7. Effects of involuntary eccentric contraction training by neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the enhancement of muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jongsang; Lee, Dongyeop; Kim, Youngho

    2014-08-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation is well-known as a modality to improve the performance of neuromuscular system, but its clinical value on muscle strengthening remains equivocal. In this study, we designed a system for an involuntary eccentric contraction of biceps brachii muscles using continuous passive movement and commercial neuromuscular electrical stimulation devices. To investigate the effects of involuntary eccentric contraction training by neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the enhancement of muscle strength, seven healthy men between the ages of 24 and 29 years participated in this study. Participants were trained two times per week for 12 weeks. Each exercise session was performed for 30 min with no rest intervals. Isometric elbow flexion torque and biceps brachii muscle thickness were chosen as evaluation indices, and were measured at pre-/post-training. After the 12-week training, the isometric elbow flexion torque of the trained side significantly increased by approximately 23% compared to the initial performance (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the torque of the untrained side showed no significant change (P=0.862). During the 12-week training period, the biceps brachii muscle thickness of the trained side significantly increased by around 8% at rest and 16% at maximum voluntary contraction (P<0.01). The developed system and the technique show promising results, suggesting that it has the potential to be used to increase the muscle strength in patients with neuromuscular disease and to be implemented in design rehabilitative protocols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Deep versus moderate neuromuscular block during one-lung ventilation in lung resection surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Javier; Piñeiro, Patricia; De La Gala, Francisco; Olmedilla, Luis; Cruz, Patricia; Duque, Patricia; Garutti, Ignacio

    Neuromuscular relaxants are essential during general anesthesia for several procedures. Classical anesthesiology literature indicates that the use of neuromuscular blockade in thoracic surgery may be deleterious in patients in lateral decubitus position in one-lung ventilation. The primary objective of our study was to compare respiratory function according to the degree of patient neuromuscular relaxation. Secondary, we wanted to check that neuromuscular blockade during one-lung ventilation is not deleterious. A prospective, longitudinal observational study was made in which each patient served as both treated subject and control. 76 consecutive patients programmed for lung resection surgery in Gregorio Marañon Hospital along the year of 2013 who required one-lung ventilation in lateral decubitus were included. Ventilator data, hemodynamic parameters were registered in different moments according to train-of-four response (intense, deep and moderate blockade) during one-lung ventilation. Peak, plateau and mean pressures were significantly lower during the intense and deep blockade. Besides, compliance and peripheral oxygen saturation were significantly higher in those moments. Heart rate was significantly higher during deep blockade. No mechanical ventilation parameters were modified during measurements. Deep neuromuscular blockade attenuates the poor lung mechanics observed during one-lung ventilation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Time course and dimensions of postural control changes following neuromuscular training in youth field hockey athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Astrid; Klahn, Philipp; Hoeft, Jon; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Steib, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Injury prevention effects of neuromuscular training have been partly attributed to postural control adaptations. Uncertainty exists regarding the magnitude of these adaptations and on how they can be adequately monitored. The objective was to determine the time course of neuromuscular training effects on functional, dynamic and static balance measures. Thirty youth (14.9 ± 3 years) field hockey athletes were randomised to an intervention or control group. The intervention included a 20-min neuromuscular warm-up program performed twice weekly for 10 weeks. Balance assessments were performed at baseline, week three, week six and post-intervention. They included the star excursion balance test (SEBT), balance error scoring system (BESS), jump-landing time to stabilization (TTS) and center of pressure (COP) sway velocity during single-leg standing. No baseline differences were found between groups in demographic data and balance measures. Adherence was at 86%. All balance measures except the medial-lateral TTS improved significantly over time (p controls (31.8 ± 22.1%). There were no significant group by time interactions in the SEBT, TTS and COP sway velocity. Neuromuscular training was effective in improving postural control in youth team athletes. However, this effect was not reflected in all balance measures suggesting that the neuromuscular training did not influence all dimensions of postural control. Further studies are needed to confirm the potential of specific warm-up programs to improve postural control.

  10. Regulation and restoration of motoneuronal synaptic transmission during neuromuscular regeneration in the pulmonate snail Helisoma trivolvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M B; Szabo-Maas, T M; Poyer, J C; Zoran, M J

    2011-08-01

    Regeneration of motor systems involves reestablishment of central control networks, reinnervation of muscle targets by motoneurons, and reconnection of neuromodulatory circuits. Still, how these processes are integrated as motor function is restored during regeneration remains ill defined. Here, we examined the mechanisms underlying motoneuronal regeneration of neuromuscular synapses related to feeding movements in the pulmonate snail Helisoma trivolvis. Neurons B19 and B110, although activated during different phases of the feeding pattern, innervate similar sets of muscles. However, the percentage of muscle fibers innervated, the efficacy of excitatory junction potentials, and the strength of muscle contractions were different for each cell's specific connections. After peripheral nerve crush, a sequence of transient electrical and chemical connections formed centrally within the buccal ganglia. Neuromuscular synapse regeneration involved a three-phase process: the emergence of spontaneous synaptic transmission (P1), the acquisition of evoked potentials of weak efficacy (P2), and the establishment of functional reinnervation (P3). Differential synaptic efficacy at muscle contacts was recapitulated in cell culture. Differences in motoneuronal presynaptic properties (i.e., quantal content) were the basis of disparate neuromuscular synapse function, suggesting a role for retrograde target influences. We propose a homeostatic model of molluscan motor system regeneration. This model has three restoration events: (1) transient central synaptogenesis during axonal outgrowth, (2) intermotoneuronal inhibitory synaptogenesis during initial neuromuscular synapse formation, and (3) target-dependent regulation of neuromuscular junction formation.

  11. A Dutch guideline for the treatment of scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titarsolej PJ

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with neuromuscular disorders with a progressive muscle weakness such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Spinal Muscular Atrophy frequently develop a progressive scoliosis. A severe scoliosis compromises respiratory function and makes sitting more difficult. Spinal surgery is considered the primary treatment option for correcting severe scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders. Surgery in this population requires a multidisciplinary approach, careful planning, dedicated surgical procedures, and specialized after care. Methods The guideline is based on scientific evidence and expert opinions. A multidisciplinary working group representing experts from all relevant specialties performed the research. A literature search was conducted to collect scientific evidence in answer to specific questions posed by the working group. Literature was classified according to the level of evidence. Results For most aspects of the treatment scientific evidence is scarce and only low level cohort studies were found. Nevertheless, a high degree of consensus was reached about the management of patients with scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders. This was translated into a set of recommendations, which are now officially accepted as a general guideline in the Netherlands. Conclusion In order to optimize the treatment for scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders a Dutch guideline has been composed. This evidence-based, multidisciplinary guideline addresses conservative treatment, the preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative care of scoliosis in neuromuscular disorders.

  12. Neuromuscular fatigue following isometric contractions with similar torque time integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozand, V; Cattagni, T; Theurel, J; Martin, A; Lepers, R

    2015-01-01

    Torque time integral (TTI) is the combination of intensity and duration of a contraction. The aim of this study was to compare neuromuscular alterations following different isometric sub-maximal contractions of the knee extensor muscles but with similar TTI. Sixteen participants performed 3 sustained contractions at different intensities (25%, 50%, and 75% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC) torque) with different durations (68.5±33.4 s, 35.1±16.8 s and 24.8±12.9 s, respectively) but similar TTI value. MVC torque, maximal voluntary activation level (VAL), M-wave characteristics and potentiated doublet amplitude were assessed before and immediately after the sustained contractions. EMG activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) and -rectus femoris (RF) muscles was recorded during the sustained contractions. MVC torque reduction was similar in the 3 conditions after the exercise (-23.4±2.7%). VAL decreased significantly in a similar extent (-3.1±1.3%) after the 3 sustained contractions. Potentiated doublet amplitude was similarly reduced in the 3 conditions (-19.7±1.5%), but VL and RF M-wave amplitudes remained unchanged. EMG activity of VL and RF muscles increased in the same extent during the 3 contractions (VL: 54.5±40.4%; RF: 53.1±48.7%). These results suggest that central and peripheral alterations accounting for muscle fatigue are similar following isometric contractions with similar TTI. TTI should be considered in the exploration of muscle fatigue during sustained isometric contractions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Neuromuscular fatigue after maximal exercise in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, J M; Gruet, M; Mely, L; Pensini, M; Brisswalter, J

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), despite their ventilatory limitation, would develop neuromuscular fatigue of quadriceps muscles following a maximal cycling exercise. Eleven adults with CF (age=26.8±6.9years; forced expiratory volume in 1s=54.1±12.8% predicted) and 11 age-matched healthy subjects performed a maximal incremental cycle test with respiratory gas exchange measurements. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus medialis muscle were recorded before and after exercise. Neural and contractile properties of the quadriceps were also investigated using femoral nerve electrical stimulation. Patients had lower exercise capacity, peak oxygen uptake and MVC than controls. MVC fell significantly postexercise in both groups (CF: -20±10%, controls: -19±6%; pdevelopment (-50.3±13.8%) and relaxation (-35.2±19.5%) were all reduced after exercise in CF patients. The control group followed the same pattern (-38.4±14.4%, -42.1±14.7% and -15±20.4%) but the statistical significance was not reached for the maximal rate of twitch torque relaxation. In conclusion, CF patients demonstrated lower limb fatigue following symptom-limited cycle exercise, which was comparable to that exhibited by healthy controls. This fatigue may be due to contractile impairments and not to transmission failure. Further studies should be conducted in a larger sample to confirm these preliminary results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recovery of central and peripheral neuromuscular fatigue after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, T J; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2017-05-01

    Sustained physical exercise leads to a reduced capacity to produce voluntary force that typically outlasts the exercise bout. This "fatigue" can be due both to impaired muscle function, termed "peripheral fatigue," and a reduction in the capacity of the central nervous system to activate muscles, termed "central fatigue." In this review we consider the factors that determine the recovery of voluntary force generating capacity after various types of exercise. After brief, high-intensity exercise there is typically a rapid restitution of force that is due to recovery of central fatigue (typically within 2 min) and aspects of peripheral fatigue associated with excitation-contraction coupling and reperfusion of muscles (typically within 3-5 min). Complete recovery of muscle function may be incomplete for some hours, however, due to prolonged impairment in intracellular Ca(2+) release or sensitivity. After low-intensity exercise of long duration, voluntary force typically shows rapid, partial, recovery within the first few minutes, due largely to recovery of the central, neural component. However, the ability to voluntarily activate muscles may not recover completely within 30 min after exercise. Recovery of peripheral fatigue contributes comparatively little to the fast initial force restitution and is typically incomplete for at least 20-30 min. Work remains to identify what factors underlie the prolonged central fatigue that usually accompanies long-duration single joint and locomotor exercise and to document how the time course of neuromuscular recovery is affected by exercise intensity and duration in locomotor exercise. Such information could be useful to enhance rehabilitation and sports performance. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Lower Limb Neuromuscular Asymmetry in Volleyball and Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fort-Vanmeerhaeghe Azahara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the agreement between the dominant leg (DL (determined subjectively and the stronger leg (SL (determined via a functional test in a group of basketball and volleyball players. The secondary objective was to calculate lower limb neuromuscular asymmetry when comparing the DL vs the non-dominant leg (NDL and the SL vs the weaker (WL leg in the whole group and when differentiating by sex. Seventy-nine male and female volleyball and basketball players (age: 23.7 ± 4.5 years performed three single-leg vertical countermovement jumps (SLVCJ on a contact mat. Vertical jump height and an inter-limb asymmetry index (ASI were determined. Only 32 (40% of the subjects had a concordance between the perception of their dominant leg and the limb reaching the highest jump height. Using the DL as the discriminating variable, significant (p<0.05 inter-limb differences were found in the total group of players. When comparing between sexes, significant differences (p<0.05 arose in the female group only. With regard to the WL vs. the SL, significant (p<0.05 differences were noted in the whole group and when stratified into males and females. The mean ASI ranged from 9.31% (males to 12.84% (females and from 10.49% (males to 14.26% (females, when comparing the DL vs. the NDL and the SL vs. the WL, respectively. Subjective expression of leg dominance cannot be used as a predictor of limb jump performance. Vertical jump asymmetry of 10-15% exists and this can be considered as a reference value for male and female basketball and volleyball players.

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junction: GABA receptors and ivermectin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermina Hernando

    Full Text Available The prevalence of human and animal helminth infections remains staggeringly high, thus urging the need for concerted efforts towards this area of research. GABA receptors, encoded by the unc-49 gene, mediate body muscle inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes and are targets of anthelmintic drugs. Thus, the characterization of nematode GABA receptors provides a foundation for rational anti-parasitic drug design. We therefore explored UNC-49 channels from C. elegans muscle cultured cells of the first larval stage at the electrophysiological and behavioral levels. Whole-cell recordings reveal that GABA, muscimol and the anthelmintic piperazine elicit macroscopic currents from UNC-49 receptors that decay in their sustained presence, indicating full desensitization. Single-channel recordings show that all drugs elicit openings of ∼2.5 pA (+100 mV, which appear either as brief isolated events or in short bursts. The comparison of the lowest concentration required for detectable channel opening, the frequency of openings and the amplitude of macroscopic currents suggest that piperazine is the least efficacious of the three drugs. Macroscopic and single-channel GABA-activated currents are profoundly and apparently irreversibly inhibited by ivermectin. To gain further insight into ivermectin action at C. elegans muscle, we analyzed its effect on single-channel activity of the levamisol-sensitive nicotinic receptor (L-AChR, the excitatory receptor involved in neuromuscular transmission. Ivermectin produces a profound inhibition of the frequency of channel opening without significant changes in channel properties. By revealing that ivermectin inhibits C. elegans muscle GABA and L-AChR receptors, our study adds two receptors to the already known ivermectin targets, thus contributing to the elucidation of its pleiotropic effects. Behavioral assays in worms show that ivermectin potentiates piperazine-induced paralysis, thus suggesting

  17. Deep neuromuscular blockade and low insufflation pressure during laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Istre, Olav; Springborg, Henrik Halvor; Staehr-Rye, Anne Kathrine; Rosenberg, Jacob; Lund, Jørgen; Gätke, Mona Ring

    2017-05-01

    Establishment of sufficient muscle relaxation is essential in laparoscopic surgery. During laparoscopy, surgeons can experience abdominal contractions in their patients. Deep neuromuscular block (NMB) has the potential to prevent such episodes. In this study, we explored if deep NMB reduces the incidence of sudden abdominal contractions as compared with standard NMB. This was a pre-planned secondary analysis of a randomized, controlled study. A total of 110 patients scheduled for laparoscopic hysterectomy were randomized to either deep NMB and 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (deep NMB group) or single-bolus NMB and 12 mmHg pneumoperitoneum (standard NMB group). NMB was established with rocuronium and reversed with sugammadex. Two gynaecologists registered episodes of sudden abdominal contractions, alarms from the insufflator due to increased intraabdominal pressure and incidences with tightness of the abdominal wall. No sudden abdominal contractions were detected in the deep NMB group as compared with 12 episodes in the standard NMB group (p deep and standard NMB group, respectively. The gynaecologists registered increasing abdominal tensions in no versus eight procedures (p = 0.006) in the deep and standard NMB group, respectively. Deep NMB in combination with 8 mmHg pneumoperitoneum prevented sudden abdominal contractions during laparoscopic hysterectomy. This work was funded in part by a research grant from the Investigator Initiated Studies Program of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp, USA. The opinions expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. The study was assigned with EudraCT number 2012-003787-51 and registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722097). Articles published in the DMJ are “open access”. This means that the articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits any non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any

  18. Effects of hindlimb unloading on neuromuscular development of neonatal rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckstorf, B. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Bain, J. L.; Reiser, P. M.; Sedlak, F. R.; Wong-Riley, M. T.; Riley, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that hindlimb suspension unloading of 8-day-old neonatal rats would disrupt the normal development of muscle fiber types and the motor innervation of the antigravity (weightbearing) soleus muscles but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Five rats were suspended 4.5 h and returned 1.5 h to the dam for nursing on a 24 h cycle for 9 days. To control for isolation from the dam, the remaining five littermates were removed on the same schedule but not suspended. Another litter of 10 rats housed in the same room provided a vivarium control. Fibers were typed by myofibrillar ATPase histochemistry and immunostaining for embryonic, slow, fast IIA and fast IIB isomyosins. The percentage of multiple innervation and the complexity of singly-innervated motor terminal endings were assessed in silver/cholinesterase stained sections. Unique to the soleus, unloading accelerated production of fast IIA myosin, delayed expression of slow myosin and retarded increases in standardized muscle weight and fiber size. Loss of multiple innervation was not delayed. However, fewer than normal motor nerve endings achieved complexity. Suspended rats continued unloaded hindlimb movements. These findings suggest that motor neurons resolve multiple innervation through nerve impulse activity, whereas the postsynaptic element (muscle fiber) controls endplate size, which regulates motor terminal arborization. Unexpectedly, in the EDL of unloaded rats, transition from embryonic to fast myosin expression was retarded. Suspension-related foot drop, which stretches and chronically loads EDL, may have prevented fast fiber differentiation. These results demonstrate that neuromuscular development of both weightbearing and non-weightbearing muscles in rats is dependent upon and modulated by hindlimb loading.

  19. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching : mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Melanie J; Cresswell, Andrew G; Riek, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching techniques are commonly used in the athletic and clinical environments to enhance both active and passive range of motion (ROM) with a view to optimising motor performance and rehabilitation. PNF stretching is positioned in the literature as the most effective stretching technique when the aim is to increase ROM, particularly in respect to short-term changes in ROM. With due consideration of the heterogeneity across the applied PNF stretching research, a summary of the findings suggests that an 'active' PNF stretching technique achieves the greatest gains in ROM, e.g. utilising a shortening contraction of the opposing muscle to place the target muscle on stretch, followed by a static contraction of the target muscle. The inclusion of a shortening contraction of the opposing muscle appears to have the greatest impact on enhancing ROM. When including a static contraction of the target muscle, this needs to be held for approximately 3 seconds at no more than 20% of a maximum voluntary contraction. The greatest changes in ROM generally occur after the first repetition and in order to achieve more lasting changes in ROM, PNF stretching needs to be performed once or twice per week. The superior changes in ROM that PNF stretching often produces compared with other stretching techniques has traditionally been attributed to autogenic and/or reciprocal inhibition, although the literature does not support this hypothesis. Instead, and in the absence of a biomechanical explanation, the contemporary view proposes that PNF stretching influences the point at which stretch is perceived or tolerated. The mechanism(s) underpinning the change in stretch perception or tolerance are not known, although pain modulation has been suggested.

  20. Neuromuscular consequences of an extreme mountain ultra-marathon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Y Millet

    Full Text Available We investigated the physiological consequences of one of the most extreme exercises realized by humans in race conditions: a 166-km mountain ultra-marathon (MUM with 9500 m of positive and negative elevation change. For this purpose, (i the fatigue induced by the MUM and (ii the recovery processes over two weeks were assessed. Evaluation of neuromuscular function (NMF and blood markers of muscle damage and inflammation were performed before and immediately following (n = 22, and 2, 5, 9 and 16 days after the MUM (n = 11 in experienced ultra-marathon runners. Large maximal voluntary contraction decreases occurred after MUM (-35% [95% CI: -28 to -42%] and -39% [95% CI: -32 to -46%] for KE and PF, respectively, with alteration of maximal voluntary activation, mainly for KE (-19% [95% CI: -7 to -32%]. Significant modifications in markers of muscle damage and inflammation were observed after the MUM as suggested by the large changes in creatine kinase (from 144 ± 94 to 13,633 ± 12,626 UI L(-1, myoglobin (from 32 ± 22 to 1,432 ± 1,209 µg L(-1, and C-Reactive Protein (from <2.0 to 37.7 ± 26.5 mg L(-1. Moderate to large reductions in maximal compound muscle action potential amplitude, high-frequency doublet force, and low frequency fatigue (index of excitation-contraction coupling alteration were also observed for both muscle groups. Sixteen days after MUM, NMF had returned to initial values, with most of the recovery process occurring within 9 days of the race. These findings suggest that the large alterations in NMF after an ultra-marathon race are multi-factorial, including failure of excitation-contraction coupling, which has never been described after prolonged running. It is also concluded that as early as two weeks after such an extreme running exercise, maximal force capacities have returned to baseline.

  1. Electromyographic and neuromuscular fatigue thresholds as concepts of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäestu, Jarek; Cicchella, Antonio; Purge, Priit; Ruosi, Sergio; Jürimäe, Jaak; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the concepts of electromyographic (EMG) threshold (EMGT) by integrated EMG (iEMG) signals and neuromuscular fatigue threshold (NMFT) concepts in trained male athletes. Nine competitive national-level male rowers (21.8 +/- 4.4 years; 186.2 +/- 4.6 cm; 79.6 +/- 8.4 kg) took part in this investigation. Subjects were asked to participate in the graded exercise test to volitional exhaustion and 500-, 1,000-, and 2,000-m all-out rowing ergometer tests on a rowing ergometer. During all tests, oxygen consumption parameters, average power, and iEMG of the musculus vastus lateralis were recorded. The second ventilatory threshold (248.9 +/- 26.67 W) and EMGT (258.89 +/- 27.13 W) were not significantly different but were significantly lower than the NMFT (302.25 +/- 45.10 W). During 1,000- and 2,000-m all-out distances, VO(2) increased during the first minute and then leveled on a plateau with a slight decrease at the end of the exercise. Vastus lateralis activity showed a slight increase during all distances that was accompanied by a remarkable increase towards the end of the distance. All measured threshold values were significantly correlated (r > 0.70; p < 0.05) to the rowing ergometer performance characteristics. It was concluded that EMGT is closely related to the aerobic-anaerobic transition phase, because NMFT represents the local fatigue accumulation in the muscle. NMFT indicates the performance capacity of the muscles; therefore, it helps coaches to better predict top athletes' performance.

  2. Coordinating Group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup.

  3. Speak, Move, Play and Learn with Children on the Autism Spectrum: Activities to Boost Communication Skills, Sensory Integration and Coordination Using Simple Ideas from Speech and Language Pathology and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Lois Jean; Gonzalez, America X.; Zawadzki, Maciej; Presley, Corinda

    2012-01-01

    This practical resource is brimming with ideas and guidance for using simple ideas from speech and language pathology and occupational therapy to boost communication, sensory integration, and coordination skills in children on the autism spectrum. Suitable for use in the classroom, at home, and in community settings, it is packed with…

  4. Effect of exercise therapy on neuromuscular activity and knee strength in female adolescents with patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S.; Samani, Afshin; Olesen, Jens L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female adolescents with patellofemoral pain are characterized by altered neuromuscular knee control and reduced maximal quadriceps torque. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether exercise therapy and patient education are associated with larger improvements in neuromuscular...... knee control and maximal quadriceps torque compared with patient education alone. METHODS: This is an ancillary analysis of a cluster randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of patient education and exercise therapy on self-reported recovery in 121 adolescents with patellofemoral pain...... flexion/extension kinematics and maximal quadriceps torque. FINDINGS: There was an 8-15% greater decrease in the complexity of surface electromyography suggesting an improvement in neuromuscular knee control among those randomized to exercise therapy (0.08

  5. Update on the approach of respiratory therapy in patients with neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Barreto Paula

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the role of physiotherapy in approaching neuromuscular disease (NMD, with emphasis on preventive and therapeutic aspects of respiratory therapy. Methods: A nonsystematic literature review covering the past twenty years, using the databases MEDLINE and LILACS through the following descriptors: neuromuscular diseases, physical therapy, vital capacity and respiratory failure. Results: The studies reviewed show the need to establish a routine periodic evaluation of respiratory function in order to introduce physical therapy measures relevant to each stage of the disease. The monitoring should include pulmonary function tests and specific techniques of chest physiotherapy, in order to avoid complications such as respiratory failure. Conclusion: The introduction of regular monitoring and preventive physiotherapy measures have helped to increase survival and improve quality of life of patients with neuromuscular diseases.

  6. Congenital myopathies with secondary neuromuscular transmission defects; a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M; Sewry, Caroline; Beeson, David; Jayawant, Sandeep; Squier, Waney; McWilliam, Robert; Palace, Jacqueline

    2014-12-01

    Congenital myopathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by early onset hypotonia, weakness and characteristic, but not pathognomonic, structural abnormalities in muscle fibres. The clinical features overlap with muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, neurogenic conditions and congenital myasthenic syndromes. We describe a case of cap myopathy with myasthenic features due to a mutation in the TPM2 gene that responded to anticholinesterase therapy. We also review other published cases of congenital myopathies with neuromuscular transmission abnormalities. This report expands the spectrum of congenital myopathies with secondary neuromuscular transmission defects. The recognition of these cases is important since these conditions can benefit from treatment with drugs enhancing neuromuscular transmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of in-flight foot pressure as a countermeasure to neuromuscular degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, C. S.; Mulavara, A. P.; Pruett, C. J.; McDonald, P. V.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether applying foot pressure to unrestrained subjects during space flight could enhance the neuromuscular activation associated with rapid arm movements. Four men performed unilateral arm raises while wearing —or not wearing—specially designed boots during a 81- or 115-day space flight. Arm acceleration and surface EMG were obtained from selected lower limb and trunk muscles. Pearson r coefficients were used to evaluate similarity in phasic patterns between the two in-flight conditions. In-flight data also were magnitude normalized to the mean voltage value of the muscle activation waveforms obtained during the no-foot-pressure condition to facilitate comparison of activation amplitude between the two in-flight conditions. Foot pressure enhanced neuromuscular activation and somewhat modified the phasic features of the neuromuscular activation during the arm raises.

  8. Acceleromyography and mechanomyography for establishing potency of neuromuscular blocking agents: a randomized-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Viby-Mogensen, J; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acceleromyography (AMG) is increasingly being used in neuromuscular research, including in studies establishing the potency of neuromuscular blocking and reversal agents. However, AMG is insufficiently validated for use interchangeably with the gold standard, mechanomyography (MMG......) for this purpose. The aim of this study was to compare AMG and MMG for establishing dose-response relationship and potency, using rocuronium as an example. METHODS: We included 40 adult patients in this randomized-controlled single-dose response study. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol...... difference between AMG and MMG is so small that it justifies AMG to be used for establishing the potency of neuromuscular blocking agents. However, the wide CIs show that we cannot rule out a 13% higher ED(50) and a 26% higher ED(95) for AMG....

  9. Reliability of the 2- and 6-minute walk tests in neuromuscular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knak, Kirsten Lykke; Andersen, Linda Kahr; Witting, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 2- and 6-minute walk tests are used to evaluate walking capacity, but reliability has been sparsely investigated in patients with neuromuscular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative and absolute reliability of the 2- and 6-minute walk tests in patients...... with neuromuscular diseases. DESIGN: Each patient performed a 2- and a 6-minute walk test on 2 test days separated by 1-2 weeks. SUBJECTS: A total of 93 adult patients (mean age 53 years, age range 22-83 years) with 12 different neuromuscular diseases were included. RESULTS: The mean walking distance increased by 4.......3 and 11.2 m (p walk tests, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficient in the 2- and 6-minute walk tests was 0.99 (p walk test and 14.0 m in the 6-minute walk test. Minimal detectable difference...

  10. Assessment of bone density in patients with scoliosis neuromuscular secondary to cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbel Jacob Júnior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate bone mineral density in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. METHODS: A prospective descriptive study in which, in addition to bone densitometry, the anthropometric data of the patients were assessed. As inclusion criterion we adopted patients with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, wheelchair users, aged between 10 and 20 years and with neuromuscular scoliosis. RESULTS: We evaluated 31 patients, 20 female, whose average age was 14.2 years. The mean bone density was -3.2 standard deviation (Z-score, with mean biceps circumference of 19.4 cm, calf circumference 18.6 cm and BMI of 13.6 kg/m². CONCLUSION: There is a high incidence of osteoporosis in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

  11. Enterprise Coordination on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Petrie

    2011-01-01

    Enterprises are now connected internally and externally to other Enterprises via the Internet in ways that are increasingly difficult to manage, especially as these interconnections become more dynamic. Current methods of coordinating the effects of change as they propagate through these networks of connections are not likely to scale. What is needed is a new paradigm for how the Internet supports such coordination. Indeed, the Internet should and could provide fundamental coordination functi...

  12. Toroidal equilibria in spherical coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, K. H.

    2009-01-01

    The standard Grad-Shafranov equation for axisymmetric toroidal plasma equilibrium is customary expressed in cylindrical coordinates with toroidal contours, and through which benchmark equilibria are solved. An alternative approach to cast the Grad-Shafranov equation in spherical coordinates is presented. This equation, in spherical coordinates, is examined for toroidal solutions to describe low $\\beta$ Solovev and high $\\beta$ plasma equilibria in terms of elementary functions.

  13. The effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint motor control during sidecutting in female elite soccer and handball players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    and knee, and ground reaction forces were recorded during a sidecutting maneuver. Neuromuscular activity in the prelanding phase was obtained 10 and 50 ms before foot strike on a force plate and at 10 and 50 ms after foot strike on a force plate. RESULTS: Neuromuscular training markedly increased before...

  14. Comparison of the effects of hamstring stretching using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation with prior application of cryotherapy or ultrasound therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Magalh?es, Francisco Elezier Xavier; Junior, Arlindo Rodrigues de Mesquita; Meneses, Harnold?s Tyson de Sousa; Moreira dos Santos, Rayele Pricila; Rodrigues, Ezaine Costa; Gouveia, Samara Sousa Vasconcelos; Gouveia, Guilherme Pertinni de Morais; Orsini, Marco; Bastos, Victor Hugo do Vale; Machado, Dionis de Castro Dutra

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Stretching using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation involve physiological reflex mechanisms through submaximal contraction of agonists which activate Golgi organ, promoting the relaxation reflex. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation alone and with prior application of cryotherapy and thermotherapy on hamstring stretching. [Subjects and Methods] The sample comprised of 32 young subjects with hamstring retraction of the ...

  15. The effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint motor control during sidecutting in female elite soccer and handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebis, Mette K; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars L; Døssing, Simon; Alkjaer, Tine; Magnusson, S Peter; Kjaer, Michael; Aagaard, Per

    2008-07-01

    The project aimed to implement neuromuscular training during a full soccer and handball league season and to experimentally analyze the neuromuscular adaptation mechanisms elicited by this training during a standardized sidecutting maneuver known to be associated with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The players were tested before and after 1 season without implementation of the prophylactic training and subsequently before and after a full season with the implementation of prophylactic training. A total of 12 female elite soccer players and 8 female elite team handball players aged 26 +/- 3 years at the start of the study. The subjects participated in a specific neuromuscular training program previously shown to reduce non-contact ACL injury. Neuromuscular activity at the knee joint, joint angles at the hip and knee, and ground reaction forces were recorded during a sidecutting maneuver. Neuromuscular activity in the prelanding phase was obtained 10 and 50 ms before foot strike on a force plate and at 10 and 50 ms after foot strike on a force plate. Neuromuscular training markedly increased before activity and landing activity electromyography (EMG) of the semitendinosus (P < 0.05), while quadriceps EMG activity remained unchanged. Neuromuscular training increased EMG activity for the medial hamstring muscles, thereby decreasing the risk of dynamic valgus. This observed neuromuscular adaptation during sidecutting could potentially reduce the risk for non-contact ACL injury.

  16. Consideration in GIS insulation coordination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargigia, A.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of electrical system failures reveals that many are caused by insulation breakdowns due to overvoltages. The problem of insulation co-ordination is then one of the most important aspects in the design of an electrical system. Insulation co-ordination of gas-insulated sub-stations (GIS) has recently received much attention especially due to a large diffusion of this insulation technique. In this review of GIS insulation co-ordination, attention is given to the impact on the insulation co-ordination strategy of the metal-clad disconnector performance during capacity current switching operations.

  17. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Driscoll Jeremiah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  18. The role of neuromuscular changes in aging and knee osteoarthritis on dynamic postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Carpenter, Mark G; Garland, S Jayne; Hunt, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint condition, with 30% of those over the age of 75 exhibiting severe radiographic disease. Nearly 50% of those with knee OA have experienced a fall in the past year. Falls are a considerable public health concern, with a high risk of serious injury and a significant socioeconomic impact. The ability to defend against a fall relies on adequate dynamic postural control, and alterations in dynamic postural control are seen with normal aging. Neuromuscular changes associated with aging may be responsible for some of these alterations in dynamic postural control. Even greater neuromuscular deficits, which may impact dynamic postural control and the ability to defend against a fall, are seen in people with knee OA. There is little evidence to date on how knee OA affects the ability to respond to and defend against falls and the neuromuscular changes that contribute to balance deficits. As a result, this review will: summarize the key characteristics of postural responses to an external perturbation, highlight the changes in dynamic postural control seen with normal aging, review the neuromuscular changes associated with aging that have known and possible effects on dynamic postural control, and summarize the neuromuscular changes and balance problems in knee OA. Future research to better understand the role of neuromuscular changes in knee OA and their effect on dynamic postural control will be suggested. Such an understanding is critical to the successful creation and implementation of fall prevention and treatment programs, in order to reduce the excessive risk of falling in knee OA.

  19. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Driscoll, Jeremiah

    2011-06-09

    Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed\\/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  20. Octanuclear cubic coordination cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidmarsh, Ian S; Faust, Thomas B; Adams, Harry; Harding, Lindsay P; Russo, Luca; Clegg, William; Ward, Michael D

    2008-11-12

    Two new bis-bidentate bridging ligands have been prepared, L (naph) and L (anth), which contain two chelating pyrazolyl-pyridine units connected to an aromatic spacer (naphthalene-1,5-diyl and anthracene-9,10-diyl respectively) via methylene connectors. Each of these reacts with transition metal dications having a preference for octahedral coordination geometry to afford {M 8L 12} (16+) cages (for L (anth), M = Cu, Zn; for L (naph), M = Co, Ni, Cd) which have an approximately cubic arrangement of metal ions with a bridging ligand spanning each of the twelve edges, and a large central cavity containing a mixture of anions and/or solvent molecules. The cages based on L (anth) have two cyclic helical {M 4L 4} faces, of opposite chirality, connected by four additional L (anth) ligands as "pillars"; all metal centers have a meridional tris-chelate configuration. In contrast the cages based on L (naph) have (noncrystallographic) S 6 symmetry, with a diagonally opposite pair of corners having a facial tris-chelate configuration with the other six being meridional. An additional significant difference between the two types of structure is that the cubes containing L (anth) do not show significant interligand aromatic stacking interactions. However, in the cages based on L (naph), there are six five-membered stacks of aromatic ligand fragments around the periphery, each based on an alternating array of electron-rich (naphthyl) and electron-deficient (pyrazolyl-pyridine, coordinated to M (2+)) aromatic units. A consequence of this is that the cages {M 8(L (naph)) 12} (16+) retain their structural integrity in polar solvents, in contrast to the cages {M 8(L (anth)) 12} (16+) which dissociate in polar solvents. Consequently, the cages {M 8(L (naph)) 12} (16+) give NMR spectra in agreement with the symmetry observed in the solid state, and their fluorescence spectra (for M = Cd) display (in addition to the normal naphthalene-based pi-pi* fluorescence) a lower-energy exciplex

  1. coordination polymer with a coordinated nitro group of 2-nitrobenzoate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    For correspondence. A one-dimensional barium(II) coordination polymer with a coordinated nitro group of 2-nitrobenzoate*. BIKSHANDARKOIL R SRINIVASAN. 1,#. , SANTOSH Y SHETGAONKAR. 1 and. PALLEPOGU RAGHAVAIAH. 1,2. 1. Department of Chemistry, Goa University, Goa 403 206. 2. School of Chemistry ...

  2. Propiocepción y control neuromuscular en el fútblo infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Zarza, Cristían

    2014-01-01

    En el fútbol profesional la escasa utilización de la pierna no hábil hace que muchas situaciones de juego no se resuelvan eficazmente, además de predisponer a la aparición de lesiones. El presente estudio se concentró en determinar la influencia del entrenamiento propioceptivo y del control neuromuscular en las cualidades físicas y técnicas del miembro no hábil. Objetivo: Indagar el nivel propioceptivo y de control neuromuscular del miembro inferior no hábil en chicos que re...

  3. Efectividad del vendaje neuromuscular en pacientes con retropié pronado

    OpenAIRE

    Bersano, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Por medio de una evaluación funcional del retropié, recolectaremos datos sobre su estado desde el punto de vista de la semiología clínica, de la osteocinemática, la artrocinemática y la miocinematica. A partir de aquí se procederá a realizar la aplicación de un Vendaje Neuromuscular para analizar el beneficio de la técnica de corrección articular. Objetivos: Determinar los efectos de la aplicación del vendaje neuromuscular en pacientes con retropié pronado. Sujetos de estudio: Pacientes...

  4. Valoració i entrenament del control neuromuscular per a la millora del rendiment esportiu

    OpenAIRE

    Fort Vanmeerhaeghe, Azahara

    2010-01-01

    El control neuromuscular ha estat descrit com un important factor per a l'èxit en el rendiment esportiu. De la mateixa manera, també s'ha identificat com a clau en la prevenció i readaptació de les lesions esportives. El principal objectiu d'aquesta tesi doctoral és avaluar l'eficàcia de diferents tipus d'entrenament neuromuscular en esportistes.S'ha utilitzat una mostra de 81 esportistes sans entre els diferents estudis que s'hi presenten. Les diferents avaluacions realitzades han registrat ...

  5. EFEITO AGUDO DO VOLUME DE ALONGAMENTO ESTÁTICO NO DESEMPENHO NEUROMUSCULAR DE JOVENS E IDOSAS

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Laísla da Silva Paixão; Dias, Matheus da Silva; Costa, Sebastião da Silva; Oliveira, Sandra Leite de; Victor, Narcélio Pinheiro; Gurjão, André Luiz Demantova

    2017-01-01

    RESUMO Introdução: Os exercícios prévios de alongamento estático (AE) podem promover decréscimo transitório da força muscular. Características dos protocolos de AE e da amostra estudada podem interferir no desempenho neuromuscular subsequente às rotinas de alongamento. Objetivo: Investigar o efeito agudo de dois diferentes volumes de AE sobre o sistema neuromuscular de mulheres jovens e idosas durante a execução do leg press horizontal. Métodos: Vinte e quatro mulheres (12 jovens e 12 i...

  6. The influence of gender on neuromuscular pre-activity during side-cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bencke, Jesper; Zebis, Mette K

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that female athletes are at increased risk for sustaining ACL injuries in sports, where sudden changes of direction are a frequent movement pattern. The underlying neuromuscular mechanisms related to the elevated ACL injury rate in female athletes has yet to be fully...... investigated. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine gender differences in neuromuscular pre-activity during a maneuver that mimics a movement associated with the incidence of ACL injuries. Twenty-four team handball players (12 male and 12 female) with no history of ACL injury were tested for EMG pre...

  7. [Ionic calcium and magnesium from pharmaceutical product BEROCCA effects on neuromuscular excitability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratone, Ana; Stratone, Carmen; Chiruţă, Roxana; Zaharia, D; Căruntu, Lidia; Diaconu, Mariana; Stefancu, Oana; Topoliceanu, Fl

    2005-01-01

    The important physiological role of calcium and magnesium ions is all over recognised, about a lot of enzymatic reactions. Magnesium deficit produce neuromuscular hyper-reactivity, psychic reactions, functional hypoparathyroidism, increase of K+ channels membranes permeability, while hypermagnesemia decrease Ach release from neuromuscular synapsis, with post-synaptic excitability decreasing. Using BEROCCA (Hoffman la Roche) 1 cp/day, 30 days at the teenagers with behaviour troubles and at a goup of pregnant women (trimester I-III) with paresthesia, irritability, sleeplessness, we observed an improve of clinical signs, increasing plasma Ca2+ and Mg2+. EEG and EMG prove the beneficial effects of pharmaceutical product BEROCCA.

  8. On Coordinating Collaborative Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessamad Imine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A collaborative object represents a data type (such as a text document designed to be shared by a group of dispersed users. The Operational Transformation (OT is a coordination approach used for supporting optimistic replication for these objects. It allows the users to concurrently update the shared data and exchange their updates in any order since the convergence of all replicas, i.e. the fact that all users view the same data, is ensured in all cases. However, designing algorithms for achieving convergence with the OT approach is a critical and challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a formal compositional method for specifying complex collaborative objects. The most important feature of our method is that designing an OT algorithm for the composed collaborative object can be done by reusing the OT algorithms of component collaborative objects. By using our method, we can start from correct small collaborative objects which are relatively easy to handle and incrementally combine them to build more complex collaborative objects.

  9. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Mayr

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within "MOBIL" we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in “compliance data storage” as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period

  10. Neuromuscular abnormality and autonomic dysfunction in patients with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chi-Ren

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX is a rare lipid-storage disease. Neuromuscular abnormality and autonomic system (ANS dysfuction in CTX are rarely examined in large-scale studies in the literature. We studied the peripheral nervous system, myopathology, and autonomic system of four CTX patients and performed a literature review of the reported CTX patients with peripheral neuropathy. Methods Four biochemically and genetically confirmed CTX patients, belonging to two families, were included for study and all received nerve conduction study (NCS, muscle biopsy for histopathologic and ultrastructural study, skin biopsy for intraepidermal nerve fiber (INEF density measurement, autonomic testings including sympathetic skin response, R-R interval variation and head-up tilt test using an automated tilt table to record the changes of blood pressure and heart rate in different postures. The Q-Sweat test was also applied for the detection of sweat amount and onset time of response. The clinical characteristics, study methods and results of 13 studies of peripheral neuropathy in CTX patients in the literature were also recorded for analysis. Results The results of NCS study showed axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy in three CTX cases and mixed axonal and demyelinating sensor-motor polyneuropathy in one. The myopathological and histopathologic studies revealed mild denervation characteristics, but the ultrastructural study revealed changes of mitochondria and the membranous system, and increased amounts of glycogen, lipofuscin and lipid deposition. The ANS study revealed different degrees of abnormalities in the applied tests and the INEF density measurement showed small fiber neuropathy in three of the four CTX patients. The literature review of peripheral neuropathy in CTX revealed different types of peripheral neuropathy, of which axonal peripheral neuropathy was the most common. Conclusions Peripheral neuropathy, especially the

  11. Distributed sensor coordination for advanced energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumer, Kagan [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

    2015-03-12

    coordination, and sensor network control in advanced power systems. Each application has specific needs, but they all share the one crucial underlying problem: how to ensure that the interactions of a large number of heterogenous agents lead to coordinated system behavior. This proposal describes a new paradigm that addresses that very issue in a systematic way. Key Results and Findings: All milestones have been completed. Our results demonstrate that by properly shaping agent objective functions, we can develop large (up to 10,000 devices) heterogeneous sensor networks with key desirable properties. The first milestone shows that properly choosing agent-specific objective functions increases system performance by up to 99.9% compared to global evaluations. The second milestone shows evolutionary algorithms learn excellent sensor network coordination policies prior to network deployment, and these policies can be refined online once the network is deployed. The third milestone shows the resulting sensor networks networks are extremely robust to sensor noise, where networks with up to 25% sensor noise are capable of providing measurements with errors on the order of 10⁻³. The fourth milestone shows the resulting sensor networks are extremely robust to sensor failure, with 25% of the sensors in the system failing resulting in no significant performance losses after system reconfiguration.

  12. Critical components of neuromuscular training to reduce ACL injury risk in female athletes: meta-regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D; Barber Foss, Kim D; Pepin, Michael J; Micheli, Lyle J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine key components in neuromuscular training that optimise ACL injury reduction in female athletes using meta-regression analyses. Design Systematic review and meta-regression. Data sources The literature search was performed in PubMed and EBSCO. Eligibility criteria Inclusion criteria for the current analysis were: (1) documented the number of ACL injuries, (2) employed a neuromuscular training intervention that aimed to reduce ACL injuries, (3) had a comparison group, (4) used a prospective control study design and (5) recruited female athletes as participants. Two independent reviewers extracted studies which met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of included study and strength of recommendation were evaluated. Number of ACL injuries and participants in control and intervention groups, age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and status of verbal feedback were extracted. Results The meta-regression analyses identified age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and utilisation of verbal feedback as significant predictors of ACL injury reduction (p=0.01 in fixed-effects model, p=0.03 in random-effects model). Inclusion of 1 of the 4 components in neuromuscular training could reduce ACL injury risk by 17.2–17.7% in female athletes. No significant heterogeneity and publication bias effects were detected. Strength of recommendation was rated as A (recommendation based on consistent and good-quality patient-oriented study evidence). Conclusions Age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and utilisation of verbal feedback are predictors that influence the optimisation of prophylactic effects of neuromuscular training and the resultant ACL injury reduction in female athletes. PMID:27251898

  13. Impairment of diaphragm muscle force and neuromuscular transmission after normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass: effect of low-dose inhaled CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Leonid G.; Pulido, Juan N.; Atchison, Fawn W.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Ereth, Mark H.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is associated with significant postoperative morbidity, but its effects on the neuromuscular system are unclear. Recent studies indicate that even relatively short periods of mechanical ventilation result in significant neuromuscular effects. Carbon monoxide (CO) has gained recent attention as therapy to reduce the deleterious effects of CPB. We hypothesized that 1) CPB results in impaired neuromuscular transmission and reduced diaphragm force generation; and 2) CO treatment during CPB will mitigate these effects. In adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, diaphragm muscle-specific force and neuromuscular transmission properties were measured 90 min after weaning from normothermic CPB (1 h). During CPB, either low-dose inhaled CO (250 ppm) or air was administered. The short period of mechanical ventilation used in the present study (∼3 h) did not adversely affect diaphragm muscle contractile properties or neuromuscular transmission. CPB elicited a significant decrease in isometric diaphragm muscle-specific force compared with time-matched, mechanically ventilated rats (∼25% decline in both twitch and tetanic force). Diaphragm muscle fatigability to 40-Hz repetitive stimulation did not change significantly. Neuromuscular transmission failure during repetitive activation was 60 ± 2% in CPB animals compared with 76 ± 4% in mechanically ventilated rats (P < 0.05). CO treatment during CPB abrogated the neuromuscular effects of CPB, such that diaphragm isometric twitch force and neuromuscular transmission were no longer significantly different from mechanically ventilated rats. Thus, CPB has important detrimental effects on diaphragm muscle contractility and neuromuscular transmission that are largely mitigated by CO treatment. Further studies are needed to ascertain the underlying mechanisms of CPB-induced neuromuscular dysfunction and to establish the potential role of CO therapy. PMID:20089713

  14. Critical components of neuromuscular training to reduce ACL injury risk in female athletes: meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D; Barber Foss, Kim D; Pepin, Michael J; Micheli, Lyle J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine key components in neuromuscular training that optimise ACL injury reduction in female athletes using meta-regression analyses. Systematic review and meta-regression. The literature search was performed in PubMed and EBSCO. Inclusion criteria for the current analysis were: (1) documented the number of ACL injuries, (2) employed a neuromuscular training intervention that aimed to reduce ACL injuries, (3) had a comparison group, (4) used a prospective control study design and (5) recruited female athletes as participants. Two independent reviewers extracted studies which met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of included study and strength of recommendation were evaluated. Number of ACL injuries and participants in control and intervention groups, age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and status of verbal feedback were extracted. The meta-regression analyses identified age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and utilisation of verbal feedback as significant predictors of ACL injury reduction (p=0.01 in fixed-effects model, p=0.03 in random-effects model). Inclusion of 1 of the 4 components in neuromuscular training could reduce ACL injury risk by 17.2-17.7% in female athletes. No significant heterogeneity and publication bias effects were detected. Strength of recommendation was rated as A (recommendation based on consistent and good-quality patient-oriented study evidence). Age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and utilisation of verbal feedback are predictors that influence the optimisation of prophylactic effects of neuromuscular training and the resultant ACL injury reduction in female athletes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  15. Ação neuro-muscular do veneno crotálico: dados preliminares Neuromuscular action of crotalid venom: preliminar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dorvalina Silva

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Estudamos 6 pacientes, 2 cães e um coelho com intoxicação crotálica. Avaliamos a condução nervosa periférica sensitiva e motora, a transmissão neuromuscular e eletromiografias. As biópsias de músculo foram processadas por histoquímica. Os 6 pacientes apresentaram mononeuropatia sensitiva no nervo periférico adjacente ao local da inoculação do veneno e encontramos evidências histoquímicas de miopatia mitocondrial. Os defeitos da transmissão neuromuscular foram mínimos. A maioria dos autores admite que veneno crotálico determina síndrome miastênica. Nossos achados indicam que ptose palpebral, facies miastênico e fraqueza muscular observados após acidente crotálico, correspondem provavelmente a miopatia mitocondrial, muitas vezes transitória e reversível.We studied 6 patients and 2 dogs that have been bitten by South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus and one rabbit inoculated with crotalid venom. We analized sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction, repetitive stimulation for studying neuromuscular transmission and electromyographies. Muscle biopsies were processed by histochemistry. All patients had peripheral mononeuropathy of the closest sensitive nerve to the area of snakebite. The neuromuscular transmission alterations were minimal. Muscle histochemistry of 4 patients, 2 dogs and 1 rabbit showed findings of mitochondrial myopathy. The majority of authors admit that crotalid venom causes myastenic syndrome. Our findings suggest that palpebral ptosis, myastenic facies and muscular weakness observed after crotalid poisoning are, probably, due to transient and reversible mitochondrial myopathy. As far as we know, this is the first report on the ability of the venom of this rattlesnake to cause local sensitive mononeuropathy and the first muscle histochemistry showing mitochondrial myopathy in humans poisoned by crotalid venom.

  16. The ecology of entrainment: Foundations of coordinated rhythmic movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Aktipis, C Athena; Bryant, Gregory A

    2010-09-01

    Entrainment has been studied in a variety of contexts including music perception, dance, verbal communication and motor coordination more generally. Here we seek to provide a unifying framework that incorporates the key aspects of entrainment as it has been studied in these varying domains. We propose that there are a number of types of entrainment that build upon pre-existing adaptations that allow organisms to perceive stimuli as rhythmic, to produce periodic stimuli, and to integrate the two using sensory feedback. We suggest that social entrainment is a special case of spatiotemporal coordination where the rhythmic signal originates from another individual. We use this framework to understand the function and evolutionary basis for coordinated rhythmic movement and to explore questions about the nature of entrainment in music and dance. The framework of entrainment presented here has a number of implications for the vocal learning hypothesis and other proposals for the evolution of coordinated rhythmic behavior across an array of species.

  17. Coordination of Conditional Poisson Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grafström Anton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sample coordination seeks to maximize or to minimize the overlap of two or more samples. The former is known as positive coordination, and the latter as negative coordination. Positive coordination is mainly used for estimation purposes and to reduce data collection costs. Negative coordination is mainly performed to diminish the response burden of the sampled units. Poisson sampling design with permanent random numbers provides an optimum coordination degree of two or more samples. The size of a Poisson sample is, however, random. Conditional Poisson (CP sampling is a modification of the classical Poisson sampling that produces a fixed-size πps sample. We introduce two methods to coordinate Conditional Poisson samples over time or simultaneously. The first one uses permanent random numbers and the list-sequential implementation of CP sampling. The second method uses a CP sample in the first selection and provides an approximate one in the second selection because the prescribed inclusion probabilities are not respected exactly. The methods are evaluated using the size of the expected sample overlap, and are compared with their competitors using Monte Carlo simulation. The new methods provide a good coordination degree of two samples, close to the performance of Poisson sampling with permanent random numbers.

  18. 75 FR 55947 - Coordinated Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... for Final Rules on General Public Political Communications Coordinated with Candidates and Party... Coalition, the Commission defined a new term, ``coordinated general public political communication'' (``GPPC... communications directed or made by persons who previously served as an employee of a candidate or a political...

  19. Introduction to coordinated linear systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempker, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter serves as an introduction to the concepts of coordinated linear systems, in formal as well as intuitive terms. The concept of a coordinated linear system is introduced and formulated, and some basic properties are derived, providing both a motivaton and a formal basis for the following

  20. Bimanual coordination in dyslexic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, L H; Brown, W S; Markee, T E; Theberge, D C; Zvi, J C

    1995-06-01

    Various types of dyslexia have been associated with tactile-motor coordination deficits and inefficient transfer of information between the two cerebral hemispheres. Twenty-one dyslexic adults were compared to 21 controls on the Bimanual Coordination Task, a test of tactile-motor coordination and interhemispheric collaboration. When compared to control subjects, dyslexics showed a consistent pattern of deficits in bimanual motor coordination, both with and without visual feedback. In particular, dyslexics had greater difficulty relative to normals when the left hand had to move faster than the right, and when the hands had to make opposite (mirror-image) movements, suggesting problems with interhemispheric modulation of visuomotor control. In addition, accuracy on this bimanual coordination task was significantly correlated with the Block Design subtest of the WAIS--R, but not with a rhyme fluency task, suggesting some contribution of right hemisphere controlled visuospatial skill to performance.

  1. Characterizing EMG data using machine-learning tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Jamileh; Hamilton-Wright, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Effective electromyographic (EMG) signal characterization is critical in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders. Machine-learning based pattern classification algorithms are commonly used to produce such characterizations. Several classifiers have been investigated to develop accurate and computationally efficient strategies for EMG signal characterization. This paper provides a critical review of some of the classification methodologies used in EMG characterization, and presents the state-of-the-art accomplishments in this field, emphasizing neuromuscular pathology. The techniques studied are grouped by their methodology, and a summary of the salient findings associated with each method is presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The extremity function index (EFI), a disability severity measure for neuromuscular diseases : psychometric evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Isaac; Wynia, Klaske; Drost, Gea; Almansa, Josué; Kuks, Joannes

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To adapt and to combine the self-report Upper Extremity Functional Index and Lower Extremity Function Scale, for the assessment of disability severity in patients with a neuromuscular disease and to examine its psychometric properties in order to make it suitable for indicating disease

  3. Efficacy of brain-computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation for chronic paresis after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaino, Masahiko; Ono, Takashi; Shindo, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Ota, Tetsuo; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2014-04-01

    Brain computer interface technology is of great interest to researchers as a potential therapeutic measure for people with severe neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of brain computer interface, by comparing conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and brain computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation, using an A-B-A-B withdrawal single-subject design. A 38-year-old male with severe hemiplegia due to a putaminal haemorrhage participated in this study. The design involved 2 epochs. In epoch A, the patient attempted to open his fingers during the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, irrespective of his actual brain activity. In epoch B, neuromuscular electrical stimulation was applied only when a significant motor-related cortical potential was observed in the electroencephalogram. The subject initially showed diffuse functional magnetic resonance imaging activation and small electro-encephalogram responses while attempting finger movement. Epoch A was associated with few neurological or clinical signs of improvement. Epoch B, with a brain computer interface, was associated with marked lateralization of electroencephalogram (EEG) and blood oxygenation level dependent responses. Voluntary electromyogram (EMG) activity, with significant EEG-EMG coherence, was also prompted. Clinical improvement in upper-extremity function and muscle tone was observed. These results indicate that self-directed training with a brain computer interface may induce activity- dependent cortical plasticity and promote functional recovery. This preliminary clinical investigation encourages further research using a controlled design.

  4. Man-machine interface system for neuromuscular training and evaluation based on EMG and MMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Ramon; Alonso, Alonso; Carrera, Albano; Durán, Ramon; Fernández, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System), a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES) and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS). In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals.

  5. Man-Machine Interface System for Neuromuscular Training and Evaluation Based on EMG and MMG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fernández

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the UVa-NTS (University of Valladolid Neuromuscular Training System, a multifunction and portable Neuromuscular Training System. The UVa-NTS is designed to analyze the voluntary control of severe neuromotor handicapped patients, their interactive response, and their adaptation to neuromuscular interface systems, such as neural prostheses or domotic applications. Thus, it is an excellent tool to evaluate the residual muscle capabilities in the handicapped. The UVa-NTS is composed of a custom signal conditioning front-end and a computer. The front-end electronics is described thoroughly as well as the overall features of the custom software implementation. The software system is composed of a set of graphical training tools and a processing core. The UVa-NTS works with two classes of neuromuscular signals: the classic myoelectric signals (MES and, as a novelty, the myomechanic signals (MMS. In order to evaluate the performance of the processing core, a complete analysis has been done to classify its efficiency and to check that it fulfils with the real-time constraints. Tests were performed both with healthy and selected impaired subjects. The adaptation was achieved rapidly, applying a predefined protocol for the UVa-NTS set of training tools. Fine voluntary control was demonstrated to be reached with the myoelectric signals. And the UVa-NTS demonstrated to provide a satisfactory voluntary control when applying the myomechanic signals.

  6. The epidemiology of neuromuscular disorders: Age at onset and gender in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, J.C.; Doorn, P.A. van; Faber, C.G.; Kooi, A.J. van der; Kuks, J.B.M.; Notermans, N.C.; Visser, L.H.; Horlings, C.G.; Verschuuren, J.J.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Based on approximately eight years of data collection with the nationwide Computer Registry of All Myopathies and Polyneuropathies (CRAMP) in the Netherlands, recent epidemiologic information for thirty neuromuscular disorders is presented. This overview includes age and gender data for a number of

  7. The epidemiology of neuromuscular disorders : Age at onset and gender in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, Johanna C. W.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Faber, Catharina G.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Notermans, Nicolette C.; Visser, Leo H.; Horlings, Corinne G. C.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; Verbeek, Andre L. M.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.

    Based on approximately eight years of data collection with the nationwide Computer Registry of All Myopathies and Polyneuropathies (CRAMP) in the Netherlands, recent epidemiologic information for thirty neuromuscular disorders is presented. This overview includes age and gender data for a number of

  8. Effect of preoperative neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) on functional outcome after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Erika O; Roos, Ewa M.; Meichtry, André

    2015-01-01

    baseline to 3 months after Total Knee Replacement (TKR) following a neuromuscular exercise programme (NEMEX-TJR) plus a knee school educational package (KS) or KS alone. METHODS: 45 patients (55-83 years, 53% male, waiting for TKR) were randomized to receive a minimum of 8 sessions of NEMEXTJR plus 3...

  9. Stability and relative validity of the Neuromuscular Disease Impact Profile (NMDIP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Isaac; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Almansa, Josue; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Wynia, Klaske

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the stability and relative validity (RV) of the Neuromuscular Disease Impact Profile (NMDIP) using criterion-related groups. In a previous study the NMDIP-scales showed good internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity. Known-groups

  10. Lowland copperhead (Austrelaps superbus) envenomation causing severe neuromuscular paralysis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, L V; Indrawirawan, Y H

    2017-06-01

    A case of lowland copperhead snake (Austrelaps superbus) envenomation in a dog is described. The dog developed severe and prolonged neuromuscular paralysis, including ventilatory failure. The dog was treated successfully with antivenom, intravenous fluids and mechanical ventilation. The toxic components of lowland copperhead snake venom are reviewed. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  11. Exploratory study of electromyographic behavior of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis at neuromuscular fatigue onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Rocha da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine and analyze the neuromuscular fatigue onset by median frequency (MDF and the root mean square (RMS behavior of an electromyographic signal (EMG. Eighteen healthy men with no prior knee problems initially performed three maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC. After two days of MVIC test, participants performed a fatiguing protocol in which they performed submaximal knee-extension contractions at 20% and 70% MVIC held to exhaustion. The MDF and RMS values from the EMG signals were recorded from the vastus medialis (VM and the vastus lateralis (VL. Analysis of the MDF and RMS behavior enabled identification of neuromuscular fatigue onset for VM and VL muscles in 20% and 70% loads. Alterations between the VM and VL in the neuromuscular fatigue onset, at 20% and 70% MVIC, were not significant. These findings suggest that the methodology proposal was capable of indicating minute differences sensible to alterations in the EMG signals, allowing identification of the moment when the MDF and the RMS showed significant changes in behavior. The methodology used was also a viable one for describing and identifying the neuromuscular fatigue onset by means of the analysis of EMG signals.

  12. Performance and neuromuscular adaptations following differing ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Thomas W.; Howatson, Glyn; Russell, Mark; French, Duncan N.

    2013-01-01

    The interference effect attenuates strength and hypertrophic responses when strength and endurance training are conducted concurrently; however, the influence of training frequency on these responses remain unclear when varying ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training are performed. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine the strength, limb girth, and neuromuscular adaptations to varying ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training. Tw...

  13. Neuromuscular correlates of subthalamic stimulation and upper limb freezing in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, M.; Klotz, R.; Plewnia, C.; Wachter, T.; Mielke, K.P.; Bloem, B.R.; Braun, C.; Ziemann, U.; Govindan, R.B.; Gharabaghi, A.; Kruger, R.; Weiss, D.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathophysiology of deep brain stimulation mechanisms and resistant freezing phenomena in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD) remains incompletely understood. Further studies on the neuromuscular substrates are needed. METHODS: We analyzed 16 patients with advanced iPD and bilateral

  14. Optimized surgical space during low-pressure laparoscopy with deep neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr-Rye, Anne K; Rasmussen, Lars S; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) can be performed using low intra-abdominal pressure (space conditions using either deep, continuous muscle relaxation or moderate blockade during low-pressure (8 mm......Hg) LC. We hypothesized that a deep neuromuscular block would be associated with a higher proportion of optimal surgical space conditions....

  15. Optimized surgical space during low-pressure laparoscopy with deep neuromuscular blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehr-Rye, Anne K; Rasmussen, Lars S; Rosenberg, Jacob; Juul, Poul; Gätke, Mona R

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) can be performed using low intra-abdominal pressure (space conditions using either deep, continuous muscle relaxation or moderate blockade during low-pressure (8 mmHg) LC. We hypothesized that a deep neuromuscular block would be associated with a higher proportion of optimal surgical space conditions. This was an investigator-initiated, patient- and assessor-blinded study. Up to 72 patients scheduled for elective LC were randomised to either deep neuromuscular blockade (post-tetanic count 0-1) or moderate neuromuscular blockade, where at least one response to train-of-four nerve stimulation was present. The primary outcome was surgical space conditions at the time during surgery when conditions were worst. The secondary outcomes included the proportion of procedures completed at pneumoperitoneum 8 mmHg, post-operative pain, and incidence of nausea and vomiting. This study was the first randomised study to assess the association between depth of neuromuscular blockade and surgical space conditions during low-pressure LC. The study findings may be applicable to a general surgical population undergoing LC. The University of Copenhagen, Denmark and Sophus Johansens Foundation of 1981, Denmark funded this study, which was also financed by a research grant from the Investigator Initiated Studies Program of Merck Sharp and Dohme Corp. NCT 01523886.

  16. Modified step aerobics training and neuromuscular function in osteoporotic patients: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Martin; Müller, Karoline; Kilb, Jill-Isabel; Schleese, Lennart; Herlyn, Philipp K E; Bruhn, Sven; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Schober, Hans-Christof; Fischer, Dagmar-C

    2017-02-01

    Training programs directed to improve neuromuscular and musculoskeletal function of the legs are scarce with respect to older osteoporotic patients. We hypothesized that a modified step aerobics training program might be suitable for this purpose and performed a randomized controlled pilot study to assess the feasibility of conducting a large study. Here we report on the training-related effects on neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors. Twenty-seven patients with an age of at least 65 years were enrolled and randomized into control and intervention group. The latter received supervised modified step aerobics training (twice weekly, 1 h per session) over a period of 6 months. At baseline, and after 3 and 6 months neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors, i.e., isometric maximum voluntary torque, rate of torque development and twitch torque parameters were determined in detail in all patients of both groups. Twenty-seven patients (median age 75 years; range 66-84 years) were randomized (control group n = 14; intervention group n = 13). After 3 and 6 months of training, maximum voluntary contraction strength in the intervention group was significantly higher by 7.7 Nm (9.1%; 95% CI 3.3-12.2 Nm, P training program in a large randomized trial. However, a detailed neuromuscular assessment appears feasible only in a subset of participants.

  17. Ultrasound of oral and masticatory muscles: Why every neuromuscular swallow team should have an ultrasound machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Lagarde, M.L.J.; Alfen, N. van

    2017-01-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disorders often present with swallowing difficulties due to oral phase problems and pharyngeal residue after swallow. It is important to assess the underlying pathology and cause of the swallowing disturbance in this patient group, such as dystrophic changes in oral and

  18. Adaptation of neuromuscular activation patterns during treadmill walking after long-duration space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, C. S.; Lange, G. W.; Pruett, C. J.; McDonald, P. V.; Merkle, L. A.; Mulavara, A. P.; Smith, S. L.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    The precise neuromuscular control needed for optimal locomotion, particularly around heel strike and toe off, is known to be compromised after short duration (8- to 15-day) space flight. We hypothesized here that longer exposure to weightlessness would result in maladaptive neuromuscular activation during postflight treadmill walking. We also hypothesized that space flight would affect the ability of the sensory-motor control system to generate adaptive neuromuscular activation patterns in response to changes in visual target distance during postflight treadmill walking. Seven crewmembers, who completed 3- to 6-month missions, walked on a motorized treadmill while visually fixating on a target placed 30 cm (NEAR) or 2 m (FAR) from the subject's eyes. Electronic foot switch data and surface electromyography were collected from selected muscles of the right lower limb. Results indicate that the phasic features of neuromuscular activation were moderately affected and the relative amplitude of activity in the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris around toe off changed after space flight. Changes also were evident after space flight in how these muscles adapted to the shift in visual target distance.

  19. Chronic ventilation and social participation: experiences of men with neuromuscular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. A.L. van Staa; MSc S.S. van Huijzen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate how mechanical ventilation-dependent adults with neuromuscular disorders experience their occupational and social participation. Methods: Data were collected through two successive focusgroup discussions with six men (aged 23–40 years) living

  20. PRE- AND POSTSYNAPTIC NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION ABNORMALITIES IN MuSK MYASTHENIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niks, Erik H.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Veldman, Henk; Bakker, Egbert; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; Plomp, Jaap J.

    Autoantibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) can cause myasthenia gravis (MG). The pathophysiological mechanism remains unknown. We report in vitro electrophysiological and histological studies of the neuromuscular junction in a MuSK MG patient. Low levels of presynaptic acetylcholine release and

  1. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  2. Genome engineering: a new approach to gene therapy for neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher E; Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N; Gersbach, Charles A

    2017-11-01

    For many neuromuscular disorders, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy and myotonic dystrophy, the genetic causes are well known. Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of these monogenic neuromuscular diseases, and many such therapies have made substantial strides toward clinical translation. Recently, genome engineering tools, including targeted gene editing and gene regulation, have become available to correct the underlying genetic mutations that cause these diseases. In particular, meganucleases, zinc finger nucleases, TALENs, and the CRISPR-Cas9 system have been harnessed to make targeted and specific modifications to the genome. However, for most gene therapy applications, including genome engineering, gene delivery remains the primary hurdle to clinical translation. In preclinical models, genome engineering tools have been delivered via gene-modified cells or by non-viral or viral vectors to correct a diverse array of genetic diseases. In light of the positive results of these studies, genome engineering therapies are being enthusiastically explored for several genetic neuromuscular disorders. This Review summarizes the genome engineering strategies that are currently under preclinical evaluation for the treatment of degenerative neuromuscular disorders, with a focus on the molecular tools that show the greatest potential for clinical translation of these therapies.

  3. Deep neuromuscular blockade leads to a larger intraabdominal volume during laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekaer, Astrid Listov; Halvor Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2013-01-01

    for measuring the intra-abdominal space available to the surgeon during laproscopy, in order to examine whether the relaxation produced by deep neuromuscular blockade can increase the working surgical space sufficiently to permit a reduction in the CO2 insufflation pressure. Using the laproscopic grasper...

  4. A service to promote autonomy of person affected by neuromuscular disorders from ASEM Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Pousada García

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pousada García, T. et al. (2013: “Un servicio para la promoción de la autonomía de las personas con enfermedades neuromusculares en la Federación ASEM”, Revista Española de Discapacidad, 1 (1: 215-223.

  5. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  6. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, Simone; Kalf, Johanna G.; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Drost, Gea; Hendricks, Henk T.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  7. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, S.; Kalf, J.G.; Swart, B.J. de; Drost, G.; Hendricks, H.T.; Geurts, A.C.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  8. Optimized surgical space during low-pressure laparoscopy with deep neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr-Rye, Anne K; Rasmussen, Lars S; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) can be performed using low intra-abdominal pressure (surgical conditions may not be optimal. The present study aimed at comparing surgical space conditions using either deep, continuous muscle relaxation or moderate blockade during low-pressure (8 mm......Hg) LC. We hypothesized that a deep neuromuscular block would be associated with a higher proportion of optimal surgical space conditions....

  9. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  10. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Eccentric Strength Training in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Siobhan; Hamer, Peter; Alderson, Jacqueline; Lloyd, David

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To determine the neuromuscular outcomes of an eccentric strength-training programme for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: In this randomised, parallel-group trial with waiting control, 14 participants with CP (six males, eight females; mean age 11y, SD 2y range 9-15y), diagnosed with upper-limb spasticity were…

  11. Non-invasive neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions: an educational review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhfried, Othmar; Crevenna, Richard; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this educational review is to provide an overview of the clinical application of transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the extremities in patients with upper motor neurone lesions. In general two methods of electrical stimulation can be distinguished: (i) therapeutic electrical stimulation, and (ii) functional electrical stimulation. Therapeutic electrical stimulation improves neuromuscular functional condition by strengthening muscles, increasing motor control, reducing spasticity, decreasing pain and increasing range of motion. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation may be used for neuromuscular electrical stimulation inducing repetitive muscle contraction, electromyography-triggered neuromuscular electrical stimulation, position-triggered electrical stimulation and subsensory or sensory transcutaneous electric stimulation. Functional electrical stimulation provokes muscle contraction and thereby produces a functionally useful movement during stimulation. In patients with spinal cord injuries or stroke, electrical upper limb neuroprostheses are applied to enhance upper limb and hand function, and electrical lower limb neuroprostheses are applied for restoration of standing and walking. For example, a dropped foot stimulator is used to trigger ankle dorsiflexion to restore gait function. A review of the literature and clinical experience of the use of therapeutic electrical stimulation as well as of functional electrical stimulation in combination with botulinum toxin, exercise therapy and/or splinting are presented. Although the evidence is limited we conclude that neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with central nervous system lesions can be an effective modality to improve function, and that combination with other treatments has an additive therapeutic effect.

  12. Keep Meaning in Conversational Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Clare Cuffari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coordination is a widely employed term across recent quantitative and qualitative approaches to intersubjectivity, particularly approaches that give embodiment and enaction central explanatory roles. With a focus on linguistic and bodily coordination in conversational contexts, I review the operational meaning of coordination in recent empirical research and related theorizing of embodied intersubjectivity. This discussion articulates what must be involved in treating linguistic meaning as dynamic processes of coordination. The coordination approach presents languaging as a set of dynamic self-organizing processes and actions on multiple timescales and across multiple modalities that come about and work in certain domains (those jointly constructed in social, interactive, high-order sense-making. These processes go beyond meaning at the level that is available to first-person experience. I take one crucial consequence of this to be the ubiquitously moral nature of languaging with others. Languaging coordinates experience, among other levels of behavior and event. Ethical effort is called for by the automatic autonomy-influencing forces of languaging as coordination.

  13. Keep meaning in conversational coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffari, Elena C

    2014-01-01

    Coordination is a widely employed term across recent quantitative and qualitative approaches to intersubjectivity, particularly approaches that give embodiment and enaction central explanatory roles. With a focus on linguistic and bodily coordination in conversational contexts, I review the operational meaning of coordination in recent empirical research and related theorizing of embodied intersubjectivity. This discussion articulates what must be involved in treating linguistic meaning as dynamic processes of coordination. The coordination approach presents languaging as a set of dynamic self-organizing processes and actions on multiple timescales and across multiple modalities that come about and work in certain domains (those jointly constructed in social, interactive, high-order sense-making). These processes go beyond meaning at the level that is available to first-person experience. I take one crucial consequence of this to be the ubiquitously moral nature of languaging with others. Languaging coordinates experience, among other levels of behavior and event. Ethical effort is called for by the automatic autonomy-influencing forces of languaging as coordination.

  14. The Influence of Robotic Assistance on Reducing Neuromuscular Effort and Fatigue during Extravehicular Activity Glove Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Kaci E.; Deshpande, Ashish D.; Peters, Benjamin J.; Rogers, Jonathan M.; Laske, Evan A.; McBryan, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    The three-layered, pressurized space suit glove worn by Extravehicular Activity (EVA) crew members during missions commonly causes hand and forearm fatigue. The Spacesuit RoboGlove (SSRG), a Phase VI EVA space suit glove modified with robotic grasp-assist capabilities, has been developed to augment grip strength in order to improve endurance and reduce the risk of injury in astronauts. The overall goals of this study were to i) quantify the neuromuscular modulations that occur in response to wearing a conventional Phase VI space suit glove (SSG) during a fatiguing task, and ii) determine the efficacy of Spacesuit RoboGlove (SSRG) in reversing the adverse neuromuscular modulations and restoring altered muscular activity to barehanded levels. Six subjects performed a fatigue sequence consisting of repetitive dynamic-gripping interspersed with isometric grip-holds under three conditions: barehanded, wearing pressurized SSG, and wearing pressurized SSRG. Surface electromyography (sEMG) from six forearm muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), extensor digitorum (ED), extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU)) and subjective fatigue ratings were collected during each condition. Trends in amplitude and spectral distributions of the sEMG signals were used to derive metrics quantifying neuromuscular effort and fatigue that were compared across the glove conditions. Results showed that by augmenting finger flexion, the SSRG successfully reduced the neuromuscular effort needed to close the fingers of the space suit glove in more than half of subjects during two types of tasks. However, the SSRG required more neuromuscular effort to extend the fingers compared to a conventional SSG in many subjects. Psychologically, the SSRG aided subjects in feeling less fatigued during short periods of intense work compared to the SSG. The results of this study reveal the promise of the SSRG as a

  15. Reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex in laparoscopic bariatric surgery: In support of dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaoui, Rachid; Cabaret, Aurélie; Alami, Youssef; Zogheib, Elie; Popov, Ivan; Lorne, Emmanuel; Dupont, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    Sugammadex is the first molecule able to antagonize steroidal muscle relaxants with few adverse effects. Doses are adjusted to body weight and the level of neuromuscular blockade. Sleeve gastrectomy is becoming a very popular form of bariatric surgery. It requires deep muscle relaxation followed by complete and rapid reversal to decrease postoperative and especially post-anaesthetic morbidity. Sugammadex is therefore particularly indicated in this setting. The objective of this study was to evaluate the deep neuromuscular blockade reversal time after administration of various doses of sugammadex (based on real weight or at lower doses). Secondary endpoints were the interval between the sugammadex injection and extubation and transfer from the operating room to the recovery room. We then investigated any complications observed in the recovery room. This pilot, prospective, observational, clinical practice evaluation study was conducted in the Amiens University Hospital. Neuromuscular blockade was induced by rocuronium. At the end of the operation, deep neuromuscular blockade was reversed by sugammadex at the dose of 4mg/kg. Sixty-four patients were included: 31 patients received sugammadex at a dosage based on their real weight (RW) and 33 patients received a lower dose (based on ideal weight [IW]). For identical rocuronium doses calculated based on IBW, sugammadex doses were significantly lower in the IW group: 349 (± 65) mg versus 508 (± 75) mg (P<0.0001). Despite this dose reduction, neuromuscular blockade reversal took 115 (± 69) s in the IW group versus 87 (± 40) s in the RW group, but with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.08). The intervals between injection of sugammadex and extubation (P=0.07) and transfer from the operating room to the recovery room (P=0.68) were also non-significantly longer in the IW group. The mean dose of sugammadex used by anaesthetists in the IW group was 4mg/kg of ideal weight increased by 35% to 50% (n

  16. Acute Effects of Static and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Muscle Strength and Power Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Sarah M; Cramer, Joel T; Fincher, A Louise; Massey, Laurie L; Dangelmaier, Suzanne M; Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fitz, Kristi A; Culbertson, Julie Y

    2005-06-01

    Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the clinical setting. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help clinicians make decisions for rehabilitation progression and return to play.Objective: To examine the short-term effects of static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on peak torque (PT), mean power output (MP), active range of motion (AROM), passive range of motion (PROM), electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles during voluntary maximal concentric isokinetic leg extensions at 60 and 300 degrees .s.Design: A randomized, counterbalanced, cross-sectional, repeated-measures design.Setting: A university human research laboratory.Patients or Other Participants: Ten female (age, 23 +/- 3 years) and 9 male (age, 21 +/- 3 years) apparently healthy and recreationally active volunteers.Intervention(s): Four static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching exercises to stretch the leg extensor muscles of the dominant limb during 2 separate, randomly ordered laboratory visits.Main Outcome Measure(s): The PT and MP were measured at 60 and 300 degrees .s, EMG and MMG signals were recorded, and AROM and PROM were measured at the knee joint before and after the stretching exercises.Results: Static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching reduced PT (P = .051), MP (P = .041), and EMG amplitude (P = .013) from prestretching to poststretching at 60 and 300 degrees .s (P static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching. The MMG amplitude increased in the rectus femoris muscle in response to the static stretching at 60 degrees .s (P = .031), but no other changes in MMG amplitude were observed (P > .05).Conclusions: Both static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching caused similar deficits in strength, power output, and muscle

  17. Coordinating distributed work : Exploring situated coordination with gaming-simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laere, J.

    2003-01-01

    Organizational work has become more and more distributed nowadays. Information and communication technologies (ICT) provide opportunities to improve coordination of distributed work, but in practice many organizations struggle with integrating new organizational structures, new work practices and

  18. Attitudes and expectations of patients with neuromuscular diseases about their participation in a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, M; Herson, A; Michon, C C; Hogrel, J Y; Doppler, V; Laloui, K; Herson, S; Payan, C; Eymard, B; Laforêt, P

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to gain a better understanding of the psychological impact of participating in a clinical trial for patients with Pompe disease (Acid Maltase Deficiency). Attitudes and expectations of adult patients with neuromuscular diseases regarding medical trials are as yet unreported. In order to learn about the psychological consequences of participating in a clinical trial, we conducted a prospective assessment of patients with late-onset Pompe Disease, a rare genetic condition, for which no treatment had been available before. This psychological study was carried out as an ancillary study to the randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial described elsewhere (van der Ploeg et al., 2010). We assessed patients (n=8) at inclusion, and at 12 and 18 months for six psychological dimensions: depression (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI), hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale, BHS), anxiety (STAI A-B), quality of life (Whoqol-26), social adjustment (S.A.S-self-report) and locus of control (IPC Levenson). We produced a self-administered questionnaire in order to assess the attitudes, motivations and expectations of patients during the trial. At 12 months, mean social adjustment (SAS-SR, P=0.02) had improved, and at 18 months mean depression score had improved as well (BDI, P=0.03). The quality of life of patients (Whoqol-26) remained unchanged. Throughout the study, patients were more likely to have an internal locus of control than an external one (IPC Levenson). The self-administered questionnaire showed that patients' expectations were disproportionate compared to the medical information they had received starting the trial. For all patients, the first motivation for being enrolled in a clinical trial was "to help research", for half of them the motivation was to "improve their health". Whether patients believed to be part of one group or another (placebo or treatment) depended on their subjective perception of improvement during the trial. Given the small

  19. Evolution of intelligent transportation systems for mobility management and coordination serving California's rural frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the evolution, development, and lessons learned while attempting to identify, modify, and deploy Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) and advanced technology tools to facilitate coordination of public transit and social (huma...

  20. Fatiguing exercise intensity influences the relationship between parameters reflecting neuromuscular function and postural control variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Boyas

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of fatiguing exercise intensity on the nature and extent of fatigue-induced changes in neuromuscular function and postural stability in quiet standing. We also explored the contribution of selected neuromuscular mechanisms involved in force production to postural stability impairment observed following fatigue using an approach based on multivariate regressions. Eighteen young subjects performed 30-s postural trials on one leg with their eyes closed. Postural trials were performed before and after fatiguing exercises of different intensities: 25, 50 and 75% of maximal isometric plantarflexor torque. Fatiguing exercises consisted of sustaining a plantarflexor isometric contraction at the target intensity until task failure. Maximal isometric plantarflexor torque, electromyographic activity of plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles, activation level (twitch interpolation technique and twitch contractile properties of plantarflexors were used to characterize neuromuscular function. The 25% exercise was associated with greater central fatigue whereas the 50 and 75% exercises involved mostly peripheral fatigue. However, all fatiguing exercises induced similar alterations in postural stability, which was unexpected considering previous literature. Stepwise multiple regression analyses showed that fatigue-related changes in selected parameters related to neuromuscular function could explain more than half (0.51≤R(2≤0.82 of the changes in postural variables for the 25% exercise. On the other hand, regression models were less predictive (0.17≤R(2≤0.73 for the 50 and 75% exercises. This study suggests that fatiguing exercise intensity does not influence the extent of postural stability impairment, but does influence the type of fatigue induced and the neuromuscular function predictors explaining changes in postural variables.