WorldWideScience

Sample records for neuromodulation tools collectively

  1. Biogenic amines and collective organization in a superorganism: neuromodulation of social behavior in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, J Frances; Traniello, James F A

    2013-01-01

    The ecological dominance of ants has to a great extent been achieved through their collective action and complex social organization. Ants provide diverse model systems to examine the neural underpinnings of individual behavior and group action that contribute to their evolutionary success. Core elements of ant colony structure such as reproductive and ergonomic division of labor, task specialization, and social integration are beginning to be understood in terms of cellular neuroanatomy and neurochemistry. In this review we discuss the neuroethology of colony organization by focusing on the role of biogenic amines in the control of social behavior in ants. We examine the role of neuromodulation in significant sociobiological characteristics of ants, including reproductive hierarchies, colony foundation, social food flow, nestmate recognition, territoriality, and size- and age-related sensory perception and task performance as well as the involvement of monoamines in collective intelligence, the ultimate key to the global dominance of these remarkable superorganisms. We conclude by suggesting future directions for the analysis of the aminergic regulation of behavior and social complexity in ants. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Commercial saliva collections tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowey, Paul D

    2013-02-01

    Saliva has been used as a specimen for diagnostics purposes for many years, but it has only been in the last 10 years that a number of new tools have been developed that promise to greatly increase the use of oral specimens for broad-based diagnosis and potentially screening applications. This article focuses on tools that are commercially viable or can play a role in whole saliva collection and future testing for critical diseases.

  3. Ultrasonic neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Omer; Krupa, Steve; Shoham, Shy

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic waves can be non-invasively steered and focused into mm-scale regions across the human body and brain, and their application in generating controlled artificial modulation of neuronal activity could therefore potentially have profound implications for neural science and engineering. Ultrasonic neuro-modulation phenomena were experimentally observed and studied for nearly a century, with recent discoveries on direct neural excitation and suppression sparking a new wave of investigations in models ranging from rodents to humans. In this paper we review the physics, engineering and scientific aspects of ultrasonic fields, their control in both space and time, and their effect on neuronal activity, including a survey of both the field’s foundational history and of recent findings. We describe key constraints encountered in this field, as well as key engineering systems developed to surmount them. In closing, the state of the art is discussed, with an emphasis on emerging research and clinical directions.

  4. Commercial saliva collections tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Slowey, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Saliva has been used as a specimen for diagnostics purposes for many years, but it has only been in the last 10 years that a number of new tools have been developed that promise to greatly increase...

  5. Neuromodulation: present and emerging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song eLuan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulation has wide ranging potential applications in replacing impaired neural function (prosthetics, as a novel form of medical treatment (therapy, and as a tool for investigating neurons and neural function (research. Voltage and current controlled electrical neural stimulation (ENS are methods that have already been widely applied in both neuroscience and clinical practice for neuroprosthetics. However, there are numerous alternative methods of stimulating or inhibiting neurons. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in ENS as well as alternative neuromodulation techniques - presenting the operational concepts, technical implementation and limitations - in order to inform system design choices.

  6. Neuromodulation: present and emerging methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Song; Williams, Ian; Nikolic, Konstantin; Constandinou, Timothy G

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulation has wide ranging potential applications in replacing impaired neural function (prosthetics), as a novel form of medical treatment (therapy), and as a tool for investigating neurons and neural function (research). Voltage and current controlled electrical neural stimulation (ENS) are methods that have already been widely applied in both neuroscience and clinical practice for neuroprosthetics. However, there are numerous alternative methods of stimulating or inhibiting neurons. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in ENS as well as alternative neuromodulation techniques-presenting the operational concepts, technical implementation and limitations-in order to inform system design choices.

  7. Neuromodulation of chronic headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Jensen, Rigmor H; Antal, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    proper RCT-based evidence is limited. The European Headache Federation herewith provides a consensus statement on the clinical use of neuromodulation in headache, based on theoretical background, clinical data, and side effect of each method. This international consensus further gives recommendations...

  8. Neuromodulation of intestinal inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costes, L.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between the central nervous system and the immune system have been shown to exert a crucial role in the tight regulation of the immune response in the intestine. In particular, the vagus nerve was recently unraveled as an important player in this neuromodulation of intestinal

  9. Neuromodulation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Hesham; Hill, Eddie; Siddiqui, Junaid; Serra, Alessandro; Walter, Benjamin

    2017-11-01

    Neuromodulation, or the utilization of advanced technology for targeted electrical or chemical neuronal stimulation or inhibition, has been expanding in several neurological subspecialties. In the past decades, immune-modulating therapy has been the main focus of multiple sclerosis (MS) research with little attention to neuromodulation. However, with the recent advances in disease-modifying therapies, it is time to shift the focus of MS research to neuromodulation and restoration of function as with other neurological subspecialties. Preliminary research supports the value of intrathecal baclofen pump and functional electrical stimulation in improving spasticity and motor function in MS patients. Deep brain stimulation can improve MS-related tremor and trigeminal neuralgia. Spinal cord stimulation has been shown to be effective against MS-related pain and bladder dysfunction. Bladder overactivity also responds to sacral neuromodulation and posterior tibial nerve stimulation. Despite limited data in MS, transcranial magnetic stimulation and brain-computer interface are promising neuromodulatory techniques for symptom mitigation and neurorehabilitation of MS patients. In this review, we provide an overview of the available neuromodulatory techniques and the evidence for their use in MS.

  10. Neuromodulation, agency and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glannon, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulation consists in altering brain activity to restore mental and physical functions in individuals with neuropsychiatric disorders and brain and spinal cord injuries. This can be achieved by delivering electrical stimulation that excites or inhibits neural tissue, by using electrical signals in the brain to move computer cursors or robotic arms, or by displaying brain activity to subjects who regulate that activity by their own responses to it. As enabling prostheses, deep-brain stimulation and brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are forms of extended embodiment that become integrated into the individual's conception of himself as an autonomous agent. In BCIs and neurofeedback, the success or failure of the techniques depends on the interaction between the learner and the trainer. The restoration of agency and autonomy through neuromodulation thus involves neurophysiological, psychological and social factors.

  11. Penile Rehabilitation and Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Facio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED following treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer, particularly radical prostatectomy (RP, is a major quality of life issue that remains unsatisfactorily addressed. With the introduction and use of cavernous nerve–sparing procedures over the past 25 years, many men recover erections postoperatively that enable sexual intercourse unlike in the prior surgical era, when permanent ED postoperatively was certain. Despite this advance, 26–100% of these patients may never recover normal erectile function (EF. Recent advances in the understanding of ED after RP have stimulated great attention to develop penile rehabilitation programs and neuromodulation. The purpose of penile rehabilitation is to prevent adverse corpus cavernosal tissue structural alterations and thereby maximize the chances of recovering functional erections. Rehabilitation programs are common in clinical practice, but there is no definitive evidence to support their efficacy. Neuromodulation represents another strategy for promoting erection recovery postoperatively. This therapy involves the application of neuroprotective interventions, conceivably targeting biological elements involved in the erection response that are affected by neuropathic injury. Well-conducted, controlled trials with adequate follow-up are required in order to determine the erection preservative benefits of these therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this essay is to describe the mechanisms related to post-RP ED, assess the need for penile rehabilitation and neuromodulation following surgery, and analyze the basic science and clinical trial evidence associated with these applications for preserving EF following prostate cancer treatment.

  12. Army Ants as Research and Collection Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adrian A.; Haight, Kevin L.

    2008-01-01

    Ants that fall prey to the raids of army ants commonly respond by evacuating their nests. This documented behavior has been underexploited by researchers as an efficient research tool. This study focuses on the evacuation response of the southwestern desert ant Aphaenogaster cockerelli André (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) to the army ant Newamyrmex nigrescens Cresson. It is shown that army ants can be used to collect mature colonies of ants. The applicability of this tool to ecologically meaningfu...

  13. A translational platform for prototyping closed-loop neuromodulation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram eAfshar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While modulating neural activity through stimulation is an effective treatment for neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor, an opportunity for improving neuromodulation therapy remains in automatically adjusting therapy to continuously optimize patient outcomes. Practical issues associated with achieving this include the paucity of human data related to disease states, poorly validated estimators of patient state, and unknown dynamic mappings of optimal stimulation parameters based on estimated states. To overcome these challenges, we present an investigational platform including: an implanted sensing and stimulation device to collect data and run automated closed-loop algorithms; an external tool to prototype classifier and control-policy algorithms; and real-time telemetry to update the implanted device firmware and monitor its state. The prototyping system was demonstrated in a chronic large animal model studying hippocampal dynamics. We used the platform to find biomarkers of the observed states and transfer functions of different stimulation amplitudes. Data showed that moderate levels of stimulation suppress hippocampal beta activity, while high levels of stimulation produce seizure-like after-discharge activity. The biomarker and transfer function observations were mapped into classifier and control-policy algorithms, which were downloaded to the implanted device to continuously titrate stimulation amplitude for the desired network effect. The platform is designed to be a flexible prototyping tool and could be used to develop improved mechanistic models and automated closed-loop systems for a variety of neurological disorders.

  14. Neuromodulation for mood and memory: from the engineering bench to the patient bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; McClintock, Shawn M; Oey, Nicodemus E; Luber, Bruce; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2015-02-01

    Brain stimulation, in the form of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), has long been a gold standard treatment for depression, but today, the field of neuromodulation is rapidly changing with the advent of newer and more precise tools to alter neuroplasticity and to treat brain-based disorders. Now there are new means to induce focal seizures, as with magnetic seizure therapy (MST), or modifications to ECT. There are also surgical approaches to target brain circuits via implanted stimulators placed in the brain or on cranial nerves. Finally, there are noninvasive subconvulsive approaches for the transcranial application of either electric or magnetic fields. Collectively, these tools have transformed the face of neurotherapeutics and informed our understanding of the brain basis of complex neurobehavioral conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Noninvasive neuromodulation in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Láinez, Miguel J A; Jensen, Rigmor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neuromodulation is an alternative in the management of medically intractable cluster headache patients. Most of the techniques are invasive, but in the last 2 years, some studies using a noninvasive device have been presented. The objective of this article is to review the data...... using this approach. RECENT FINDINGS: Techniques as occipital nerve stimulation or sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation are recommended as first-line therapy in refractory cluster patients, but they are invasive and maybe associated with complications. Noninvasive vagal nerve stimulation with an external...... device has been tried in cluster patients. Results from clinical practice and a single randomized clinical trial have been presented showing a reduction of the number of cluster attacks/week in the patients treated with the device. The rate of adverse events was low and most of them were mild. SUMMARY...

  16. Sacral neuromodulation: No more skiing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, Jens; Pannek, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly suffer from neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) offers an alternative in the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with NLUTD. We report the cases of three patients with NLUTD due to SCI who received SNM. Due to treatment success, all patients could resume skiing. All suffered from skiing accidents, leading to a decreased effectiveness of SNM. Subsequent evaluation revealed a defect of the impulse generator (IPG) and/or dislocation of the electrodes. Reprogramming or replacement of the IPG or the electrodes resulted in restoration of SNM function. Trauma due to skiing is a potential risk factor for the integrity of SNM. Patients with SNM should be informed about the potential risk of SNM damage by falls and accidents.

  17. Collecting, Analyzing and Visualizing Tweets using Open Source Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Seungwon; Kavanaugh, Andrea L.

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial will teach participants how to collect, analyze and visualize results from twitter data. We will demonstrate several different free, open-source web-based tools that participants can use to collect twitter data (e.g., Archivist, 140kit.com, TwapperKeeper), and show them a few different methods, tools or programs they can use to analyze the data in a given collection. Finally, we will show participants visualization tools and programs they can use to present the analyses, such ...

  18. Comparison of Different toll collections system’s and RFID tool collection system

    OpenAIRE

    Omarhommadi; Hussain Asiri; Mamdoohalzahrani

    2017-01-01

    This research paper is based on comparison of manual toll collection verses automatic toll collection systems and proposes idea of tool collection using RFID. ATCSR is an Automated Toll Collection System using RFID used for collecting tax automatically. In this we do the identification with the help of radio frequency. A vehicle will hold an RFID tag. In accordance with this number we will store, all basic information as well as the amount he has paid in advance for the TOLL collection. Reade...

  19. Increased anatomical specificity of neuromodulation via modulated focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehić, Edin; Xu, Julia M; Caler, Connor J; Coulson, Nathaniel K; Moritz, Chet T; Mourad, Pierre D

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial ultrasound can alter brain function transiently and nondestructively, offering a new tool to study brain function now and inform future therapies. Previous research on neuromodulation implemented pulsed low-frequency (250-700 kHz) ultrasound with spatial peak temporal average intensities (ISPTA) of 0.1-10 W/cm(2). That work used transducers that either insonified relatively large volumes of mouse brain (several mL) with relatively low-frequency ultrasound and produced bilateral motor responses, or relatively small volumes of brain (on the order of 0.06 mL) with relatively high-frequency ultrasound that produced unilateral motor responses. This study seeks to increase anatomical specificity to neuromodulation with modulated focused ultrasound (mFU). Here, 'modulated' means modifying a focused 2-MHz carrier signal dynamically with a 500-kHz signal as in vibro-acoustography, thereby creating a low-frequency but small volume (approximately 0.015 mL) source of neuromodulation. Application of transcranial mFU to lightly anesthetized mice produced various motor movements with high spatial selectivity (on the order of 1 mm) that scaled with the temporal average ultrasound intensity. Alone, mFU and focused ultrasound (FUS) each induced motor activity, including unilateral motions, though anatomical location and type of motion varied. Future work should include larger animal models to determine the relative efficacy of mFU versus FUS. Other studies should determine the biophysical processes through which they act. Also of interest is exploration of the potential research and clinical applications for targeted, transcranial neuromodulation created by modulated focused ultrasound, especially mFU's ability to produce compact sources of ultrasound at the very low frequencies (10-100s of Hertz) that are commensurate with the natural frequencies of the brain.

  20. Tonic neuromodulation of the inspiratory rhythm generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando ePeña-Ortega

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neural network dynamics relies on the interactions between the intrinsic and synaptic properties of their neural components. Moreover, neuromodulators allow networks to change these properties and adjust their activity to specific challenges. Endogenous continuous (tonic neuromodulation can regulate and sometimes be indispensible for networks to produce basal activity. This seems to be the case for the inspiratory rhythm generator located in the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC. This neural network is necessary and sufficient for generating inspiratory rhythms. The preBötC produces normal respiratory activity (eupnea as well as sighs under normoxic conditions, and it generates gasping under hypoxic conditions after a reconfiguration process. The reconfiguration leading to gasping generation involves changes of synaptic and intrinsic properties that can be mediated by several neuromodulators. Over the past years, it has been shown that endogenous continuous neuromodulation of the preBötC may involve the continuous action of amines and peptides on extrasynaptic receptors. I will summarize the findings supporting the role of endogenous continuous neuromodulation in the generation and regulation of different inspiratory rhythms, exploring the possibility that these neuromodulatory actions involve extrasynaptic receptors along with evidence of glial modulation of preBötC activity.

  1. 78 FR 19572 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... employers in the food and beverage industry); and REG-107186-00 (TD 9114), Electronic Payee Statements...: 834. (4) Title: For Tip Rate Determination Agreement (for Use by Employers in the Food and Beverage... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools AGENCY...

  2. Collective screening tools for early identification of dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Olga V. C. A.; Andrade, Paulo E.; Capellini, Simone A.

    2015-01-01

    Current response to intervention models (RTIs) favor a three-tier system. In general, Tier 1 consists of evidence-based, effective reading instruction in the classroom and universal screening of all students at the beginning of the grade level to identify children for early intervention. Non-responders to Tier 1 receive small-group tutoring in Tier 2. Non-responders to Tier 2 are given still more intensive, individual intervention in Tier 3. Limited time, personnel and financial resources derail RTI’s implementation in Brazilian schools because this approach involves procedures that require extra time and extra personnel in all three tiers, including screening tools which normally consist of tasks administered individually. We explored the accuracy of collectively and easily administered screening tools for the early identification of second graders at risk for dyslexia in a two-stage screening model. A first-stage universal screening based on collectively administered curriculum-based measurements was used in 45 7 years old early Portuguese readers from 4 second-grade classrooms at the beginning of the school year and identified an at-risk group of 13 academic low-achievers. Collectively administered tasks based on phonological judgments by matching figures and figures to spoken words [alternative tools for educators (ATE)] and a comprehensive cognitive-linguistic battery of collective and individual assessments were both administered to all children and constituted the second-stage screening. Low-achievement on ATE tasks and on collectively administered writing tasks (scores at the 25th percentile) showed good sensitivity (true positives) and specificity (true negatives) to poor literacy status defined as scores ≤1 SD below the mean on literacy abilities at the end of fifth grade. These results provide implications for the use of a collectively administered screening tool for the early identification of children at risk for dyslexia in a classroom setting

  3. Collective screening tools for early identification of dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Valéria Campana Dos Anjos Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current response to intervention models (RTI favor a three-tier system. In general, Tier 1 consists of evidence-based, effective reading instruction in the classroom and universal screening of all students at the beginning of the grade level to identify children for early intervention. Nonresponders to Tier 1 receive small-group tutoring in Tier 2. Nonresponders to Tier 2 are given still more intensive, individual intervention in Tier 3. Limited time, personnel and financial resources derail RTI’s implementation in Brazilian schools because this approach involves procedures that require extra time and extra personnel in all three tiers, including screening tools which normally consist of tasks administered individually. We explored the accuracy of collectively and easily administered screening tools for the early identification of second graders at risk for dyslexia in a two-stage screening model. A first-stage universal screening based on collectively administered curriculum-based measurements was used in 45 seven years old early Portuguese readers from 4 second-grade classrooms at the beginning of the school year and identified an at-risk group of 13 academic low-achievers. Collectively administered tasks based on phonological judgments by matching figures and figures to spoken words (Alternative Tools for Educators-ATE and a comprehensive cognitive-linguistic battery of collective and individual assessments were both administered to all children and constituted the second-stage screening. Low-achievement on ATE tasks and on collectively administered writing tasks (scores at the 25th percentile showed good sensitivity (true positives and specificity (true negatives to poor literacy status defined as scores ≤ 1 SD below the mean on literacy abilities at the end of fifth grade. These results provide implications for the use of a collectively administered screening tool for the early identification of children at risk for dyslexia in a

  4. Collective screening tools for early identification of dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Olga V C A; Andrade, Paulo E; Capellini, Simone A

    2014-01-01

    Current response to intervention models (RTIs) favor a three-tier system. In general, Tier 1 consists of evidence-based, effective reading instruction in the classroom and universal screening of all students at the beginning of the grade level to identify children for early intervention. Non-responders to Tier 1 receive small-group tutoring in Tier 2. Non-responders to Tier 2 are given still more intensive, individual intervention in Tier 3. Limited time, personnel and financial resources derail RTI's implementation in Brazilian schools because this approach involves procedures that require extra time and extra personnel in all three tiers, including screening tools which normally consist of tasks administered individually. We explored the accuracy of collectively and easily administered screening tools for the early identification of second graders at risk for dyslexia in a two-stage screening model. A first-stage universal screening based on collectively administered curriculum-based measurements was used in 45 7 years old early Portuguese readers from 4 second-grade classrooms at the beginning of the school year and identified an at-risk group of 13 academic low-achievers. Collectively administered tasks based on phonological judgments by matching figures and figures to spoken words [alternative tools for educators (ATE)] and a comprehensive cognitive-linguistic battery of collective and individual assessments were both administered to all children and constituted the second-stage screening. Low-achievement on ATE tasks and on collectively administered writing tasks (scores at the 25th percentile) showed good sensitivity (true positives) and specificity (true negatives) to poor literacy status defined as scores ≤1 SD below the mean on literacy abilities at the end of fifth grade. These results provide implications for the use of a collectively administered screening tool for the early identification of children at risk for dyslexia in a classroom setting.

  5. Restoring Bladder Function by Spinal Cord Neuromodulation in SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    of functional neuroplasticity whereby neuromodulation (e.g. electromagnetic stimulation) activates spinal circuits associated with micturition. It...cord function is accomplished through a process of functional neuroplasticity whereby neuromodulation (e.g. electromagnetic stimulation) activates

  6. Towards closed-loop neuromodulation: a wireless miniaturized neural implant SoC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wentai; Wang, Po-Min; Lo, Yi-Kai

    2017-05-01

    This work reports a platform technology toward the development of closed-loop neuromodulation. A neural implant based on the SoC developed in our laboratory is used as an example to illustrate the necessary functionalities for the efficacious implantable system. We also present an example of using the system to investigate the epidural stimulation for partial motor function recovery after spinal cord injury in a rat model. This hardware-software co-design tool demonstrate its promising potential towards an effective closed-loop neuromodulation for various biomedical applications.

  7. Cyborg psychiatry to ensure agency and autonomy in mental disorders. A proposal for neuromodulation therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Arthur eMicoulaud Franchi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulation therapeutics—as repeated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS and neurofeedback—are valuable tools for psychiatry. Nevertheless, they currently face some limitations: rTMS has confounding effects on neural activation patterns, and neurofeedback fails to change neural dynamics in some cases. Here we propose how coupling rTMS and neurofeedback can tackle both issues by adapting neural activations during rTMS and actively guiding individuals during neurofeedback. An algorithmic challenge then consists in designing the proper recording, processing, feedback, and control of unwanted effects. But this new neuromodulation technique also poses an ethical challenge: ensuring treatment occurs within a biopsychosocial model of medicine, while considering both the interaction between the patients and the psychiatrist, and the maintenance of individuals’ autonomy. Our solution is the concept of Cyborg psychiatry, which embodies the technique and includes a self-engaged interaction between patients and the neuromodulation device.

  8. [The dental collection Hyacinthe Brabant: A pedagogic and scientific tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosenally, F; Vanmuylder, N; Louryan, S

    2016-03-01

    Among the numerous specimens preciously preserved in the Anatomical and Embryological Museum of ULB, there lies also a dental collection assembled by Professor Hyacinthe Brabant. This collection, previously unlabelled, shows several dental anomalies and pathologies as well as tumours. The objective of our study was to conduct an inventory of this collection and to set up an electronic iconographic tool through the Iconography website of ULB. A descriptive study was carried out and it was based on the analysis of 125 models and 90 extracted human teeth. The inspection of the models showed some non-odontological tumours as well as multiple dental anomalies. The extracted teeth showed generalised, coronal or radicular anomalies. The conducted inventory allowed us to classify and label the specimens and therefore to showcase this dental collection which is unique owing to its rich content and didactic display. Finally, the iconographic site will be a useful tool to raise awareness about several dental pathologies and anomalies among students and young practionners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Usability in Mobile Electronic Data Collection Tools: Form Developers' Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, Alice; Babic, Ankica; Wakholi, Peter; Nankabirwa, Victoria; Tylleskar, Thorkild

    2017-01-01

    Mobile Electronic Data Collection Tools (MEDCTs) are created by form developers to collect data. Usability being one of the top quality attributes is of great concern to developers of any interactive applications. However, little is known about the form developers' understanding of usability, how they measure usability and their limitations in designing for usability. We conducted an empirical study where we aimed at getting the developers' views on usability by interviewing 8 form developers. These are creators of forms used for data collection. We found that developers knew about usability, but it was not their main focus during form development. Challenges included constraining deadlines, software limitations and the insufficient communication with the field users to establish the usability needs. Furthermore, the methods used to evaluate the usability of created forms varied amongst developers and these included in-house evaluations and feedback from piloting sessions with end users.

  10. Mdmap: A Tool for Metadata Collection and Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Simke

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a front-end for the semi-automatic collection, matching, and generation of bibliographic metadata obtained from different sources for use within a digitization architecture. The Library of a Billion Words project is building an infrastructure for digitizing text that requires high-quality bibliographic metadata, but currently only sparse metadata from digitized editions is available. The project’s approach is to collect metadata for each digitized item from as many sources as possible. An expert user can then use an intuitive front-end tool to choose matching metadata. The collected metadata are centrally displayed in an interactive grid view. The user can choose which metadata they want to assign to a certain edition, and export these data as MARCXML. This paper presents a new approach to bibliographic work and metadata correction. We try to achieve a high quality of the metadata by generating a large amount of metadata to choose from, as well as by giving librarians an intuitive tool to manage their data.

  11. Collective curriculum design as a tool for rethinking scientific literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakitsi, Katerina

    2010-09-01

    This is a review essay from an educator's point of view, on the article written by Maria Inês Mafra Goulart and Wolff-Michael Roth Engaging young children in collective curriculum design. The article as well as the commentary essay contributes to the current agenda about the feasibility of social practices in (science) education even from the early childhood. A child centered collective curriculum design can be a tool for rethinking scientific literacy towards a multi-science perspective, participative thinking and dialectical teaching strategies that take account of structure or/and agency relationships. The review is structured on five levels: (a) scientific literacy, (b) multi-science perspective, (c) participative thinking—structure or∣and agency, (d) comments on methodology—the emergency of a new order, (e) conclusions.

  12. Email as a Data Collection Tool when Interviewing Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Brondani DDS, MSc, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores several aspects of electronic communication, specifically its advantages and disadvantages within the context of a brief experience using email to interview elders. Two older adults participated via email as the psychosocial impact of aging was collected using such venue. Our experiences are compared with published reports from others to analyze the benefits and limitations of email as a research tool. The email was spontaneous, comprehensive, interactive, efficient, confidential, and cost effective. The use of email within this exploratory study appeared to be an effective approach to collecting qualitative information about beliefs and behaviours from older adults who feel comfortable with this form of communication. The lack of similar studies limited the scope of discussion and comparison of findings; generalization is limited due to the small sample size. This investigation, however, suggested that the use of email as an interview tool may be considered in today's exploratory research arena as an alternative to conference calls or face-to-face interviews when time is a constraint.

  13. The Cornell Cooperative Extension Statewide Data Collection System: An Online Data Collection Tool for Parent Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopko, Kimberly; Dunifon, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    The Statewide Data Collection System for Parent Education Programs is an online tool for collecting statewide data on Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) parenting education programs. The process of the development and use of this data collection tool are provided as a guide to Extension systems. Results for data entered between March 2009 and…

  14. Successful peripheral neuromodulation for phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Philip; Wall, Cindy

    2015-04-01

    For decades, the heterogeneity of the amputee population and the complex interaction of biopsychosocial factors have confounded researchers' attempts to develop an effective treatment for phantom limb pain. Therefore, it remains difficult to treat, and affected patients often experience decreased quality of life, increased psychological distress, and poorer health outcomes. In the case study, we report a novel strategy for the peripheral placement of neuromodulation leads for the treatment of phantom limb pain in a patient who subsequently described complete and consistent pain relief independent of significant variations in psychosocial stress. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Advanced neuroimaging techniques for central neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Angela; Pouratian, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation an effective treatment of many neurologic conditions such as Parkinson disease, essential tremor, dystonia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Structural and functional neuroimaging studies provide the opportunity to visualize the dysfunctional nodes and networks underlying neurologic and psychiatric disease, and to thereby realize new targets for neuromodulation as well as personalize current therapy. This article reviews contemporary advances in neuroimaging in the basic sciences and how they can be applied to redirect and propel functional neurosurgery toward a goal of functional localization of targets with individualized maps and identification of novel targets for other neuropsychiatric diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Collaboratively Conceived, Designed and Implemented: Matching Visualization Tools with Geoscience Data Collections and Geoscience Data Collections with Visualization Tools via the ToolMatch Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebelheinrich, N. J.; Lynnes, C.; West, P.; Ferritto, M.

    2014-12-01

    Two problems common to many geoscience domains are the difficulties in finding tools to work with a given dataset collection, and conversely, the difficulties in finding data for a known tool. A collaborative team from the Earth Science Information Partnership (ESIP) has gotten together to design and create a web service, called ToolMatch, to address these problems. The team began their efforts by defining an initial, relatively simple conceptual model that addressed the two uses cases briefly described above. The conceptual model is expressed as an ontology using OWL (Web Ontology Language) and DCterms (Dublin Core Terms), and utilizing standard ontologies such as DOAP (Description of a Project), FOAF (Friend of a Friend), SKOS (Simple Knowledge Organization System) and DCAT (Data Catalog Vocabulary). The ToolMatch service will be taking advantage of various Semantic Web and Web standards, such as OpenSearch, RESTful web services, SWRL (Semantic Web Rule Language) and SPARQL (Simple Protocol and RDF Query Language). The first version of the ToolMatch service was deployed in early fall 2014. While more complete testing is required, a number of communities besides ESIP member organizations have expressed interest in collaborating to create, test and use the service and incorporate it into their own web pages, tools and / or services including the USGS Data Catalog service, DataONE, the Deep Carbon Observatory, Virtual Solar Terrestrial Observatory (VSTO), and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. In this session, presenters will discuss the inception and development of the ToolMatch service, the collaborative process used to design, refine, and test the service, and future plans for the service.

  17. Internal State Dependent Odor Processing and Perception—The Role of Neuromodulation in the Fly Olfactory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercan Sayin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Animals rely heavily on their sense of olfaction to perform various vital interactions with an ever-in-flux environment. The turbulent and combinatorial nature of air-borne odorant cues demands the employment of various coding strategies, which allow the animal to attune to its internal needs and past or present experiences. Furthermore, these internal needs can be dependent on internal states such as hunger, reproductive state and sickness. Neuromodulation is a key component providing flexibility under such conditions. Understanding the contributions of neuromodulation, such as sensory neuron sensitization and choice bias requires manipulation of neuronal activity on a local and global scale. With Drosophila's genetic toolset, these manipulations are feasible and even allow a detailed look on the functional role of classical neuromodulators such as dopamine, octopamine and neuropeptides. The past years unraveled various mechanisms adapting chemosensory processing and perception to internal states such as hunger and reproductive state. However, future research should also investigate the mechanisms underlying other internal states including the modulatory influence of endogenous microbiota on Drosophila behavior. Furthermore, sickness induced by pathogenic infection could lead to novel insights as to the neuromodulators of circuits that integrate such a negative postingestive signal within the circuits governing olfactory behavior and learning. The enriched emporium of tools Drosophila provides will help to build a concrete picture of the influence of neuromodulation on olfaction and metabolism, adaptive behavior and our overall understanding of how a brain works.

  18. A Cognitive Model Based on Neuromodulated Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Associative learning, including classical conditioning and operant conditioning, is regarded as the most fundamental type of learning for animals and human beings. Many models have been proposed surrounding classical conditioning or operant conditioning. However, a unified and integrated model to explain the two types of conditioning is much less studied. Here, a model based on neuromodulated synaptic plasticity is presented. The model is bioinspired including multistored memory module and simulated VTA dopaminergic neurons to produce reward signal. The synaptic weights are modified according to the reward signal, which simulates the change of associative strengths in associative learning. The experiment results in real robots prove the suitability and validity of the proposed model.

  19. Neuromodulation therapies and treatment-resistant depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Harbi KS

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Khalid Saad Al-Harbi,1 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi21National Guard Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2General Administration for Research and Studies and Mental Health and Social Services, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: Patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD who showed partial response to pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions need a trial of neuromodulation therapies (NTs.Objective: This paper aims to review evidence-based data on the use of NTs in TRD.Method: Using keywords and combined-word strategy, multiple computer searches of PubMed, Google Scholar, Quertle(R, and Medline were conducted for retrieving relevant articles published in English-language peer-reviewed journals (2000–2012. Those papers that addressed NTs in TRD were retained for extensive review.Results: Despite methodological challenges, a range of 30%–93% of TRD patients showed substantial improvement to one of the NTs. One hundred–percent improvement was reported in two single-case studies on deep brain stimulation. Some studies reported no benefits from transcranial direct current stimulation. NTs were reported to have good clinical efficacy, better safety margin, and benign side-effect profile. Data are limited regarding randomized clinical trials, long-term efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of these approaches. Both modified electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy were associated with reversible but disturbing neurocognitive adverse effects. Besides clinical utility, NTs including approaches on the horizon may unlock the biological basis underlying mood disorders including TRD.Conclusion: NTs are promising in patients with TRD, as the majority of them show good clinical response measured by standardized depression scales. NTs need further technological refinements and optimization together with continuing well-designed studies that recruit larger numbers of participants with TRD.Keywords: treatment

  20. An integrated modelling framework for neural circuits with multiple neuromodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Alok; Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Vemana, Vinith; McGinnity, T M; Prasad, Girijesh; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2017-01-01

    Neuromodulators are endogenous neurochemicals that regulate biophysical and biochemical processes, which control brain function and behaviour, and are often the targets of neuropharmacological drugs. Neuromodulator effects are generally complex partly owing to the involvement of broad innervation, co-release of neuromodulators, complex intra- and extrasynaptic mechanism, existence of multiple receptor subtypes and high interconnectivity within the brain. In this work, we propose an efficient yet sufficiently realistic computational neural modelling framework to study some of these complex behaviours. Specifically, we propose a novel dynamical neural circuit model that integrates the effective neuromodulator-induced currents based on various experimental data (e.g. electrophysiology, neuropharmacology and voltammetry). The model can incorporate multiple interacting brain regions, including neuromodulator sources, simulate efficiently and easily extendable to large-scale brain models, e.g. for neuroimaging purposes. As an example, we model a network of mutually interacting neural populations in the lateral hypothalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus, which are major sources of neuromodulator orexin/hypocretin, serotonin and norepinephrine/noradrenaline, respectively, and which play significant roles in regulating many physiological functions. We demonstrate that such a model can provide predictions of systemic drug effects of the popular antidepressants (e.g. reuptake inhibitors), neuromodulator antagonists or their combinations. Finally, we developed user-friendly graphical user interface software for model simulation and visualization for both fundamental sciences and pharmacological studies. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Securing a future for responsible neuromodulation in children: The importance of maintaining a broad clinical gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John

    2017-01-01

    This perspective paper provides an overview of several key tensions and challenges within the social context of neuromodulation, and it suggests a means of securing the future of paediatric neuromodulation in light of these. Tensions and challenges relate to: the considerable clinical and economic need for new therapies to manage neurological diseases; significant commercial involvement in the field; funding pressures; public perceptions (particularly unrealistic expectations); and the emerging Responsible Research and Innovation initiative. This paper argues that managing these challenges and tensions requires that clinicians working within the field adopt what could be called a broad clinical gaze. This paper will define the broad clinical gaze, and it will propose several ways in which a broad clinical gaze can be - and indeed is being - operationalised in recent advances in neuromodulation in children. These include the use of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary clinical team structures, the adoption of clinical assessment tools that capture day-to-day functionality, and the use of patient registries. By adopting a broad clinical gaze, clinicians and investigators can ensure that the field as a whole can responsibly and ethically deliver on its significant clinical potential. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuromodulation Treatments for Geriatric Mood and Cognitive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, William M

    2016-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of neuromodulation in the treatment of resistant mood disorders and emerging data supporting the use of neuromodulation in cognitive disorders. A significant minority of depressed elders do not respond to pharmacotherapy and/or psychotherapy. This has led clinicians to recommend the increasing use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the treatment of medication-resistant or life-threatening geriatric depression. Multiple studies have supported the safety and efficacy of ECT in the elderly, yet ECT is associated with side effects including cardiovascular and cognitive side effects. Neuromodulation therapies have the potential for providing effective treatment for treatment-resistant older adults with reduced side effects and this review will outline the risks and benefits of neuromodulation treatment in geriatric psychiatry. There is also emerging evidence of the efficacy of neuromodulation devices in the treatment of cognitive disorders. Pharmacotherapy has been largely ineffective in changing the course of neurodegenerative diseases causing dementia and other treatments are clearly needed. This review will outline the available evidence for neuromodulation in the treatment of mood and cognitive disorders in the elderly. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Joining the Dots: Piloting the Work Diary as a Data Collection Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the pilot of one data collection tool, the work diary, for an educational research project. Before inclusion in the wider research project, the researcher developed, piloted and qualitatively assessed the feasibility of the data collection tool. As the wider research project will be conducted in and investigate…

  4. 32 CFR 903.10 - Information collections, records, and forms or information management tools (IMTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information collections, records, and forms or information management tools (IMTS). 903.10 Section 903.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... Information collections, records, and forms or information management tools (IMTS). (a) Information...

  5. Neuromodulation of group prejudice and religious belief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Colin; Izuma, Keise; Deblieck, Choi; Fessler, Daniel M T; Iacoboni, Marco

    2016-03-01

    People cleave to ideological convictions with greater intensity in the aftermath of threat. The posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) plays a key role in both detecting discrepancies between desired and current conditions and adjusting subsequent behavior to resolve such conflicts. Building on prior literature examining the role of the pMFC in shifts in relatively low-level decision processes, we demonstrate that the pMFC mediates adjustments in adherence to political and religious ideologies. We presented participants with a reminder of death and a critique of their in-group ostensibly written by a member of an out-group, then experimentally decreased both avowed belief in God and out-group derogation by downregulating pMFC activity via transcranial magnetic stimulation. The results provide the first evidence that group prejudice and religious belief are susceptible to targeted neuromodulation, and point to a shared cognitive mechanism underlying concrete and abstract decision processes. We discuss the implications of these findings for further research characterizing the cognitive and affective mechanisms at play. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Models of neuromodulation for computational psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Sandra; Tomiello, Sara; Schneebeli, Maya; Stephan, Klaas E

    2017-05-01

    Psychiatry faces fundamental challenges: based on a syndrome-based nosology, it presently lacks clinical tests to infer on disease processes that cause symptoms of individual patients and must resort to trial-and-error treatment strategies. These challenges have fueled the recent emergence of a novel field-computational psychiatry-that strives for mathematical models of disease processes at physiological and computational (information processing) levels. This review is motivated by one particular goal of computational psychiatry: the development of 'computational assays' that can be applied to behavioral or neuroimaging data from individual patients and support differential diagnosis and guiding patient-specific treatment. Because the majority of available pharmacotherapeutic approaches in psychiatry target neuromodulatory transmitters, models that infer (patho)physiological and (patho)computational actions of different neuromodulatory transmitters are of central interest for computational psychiatry. This article reviews the (many) outstanding questions on the computational roles of neuromodulators (dopamine, acetylcholine, serotonin, and noradrenaline), outlines available evidence, and discusses promises and pitfalls in translating these findings to clinical applications. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1420. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1420 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 32 CFR 806b.54 - Information collections, records, and forms or information management tools (IMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... information management tools (IMT). 806b.54 Section 806b.54 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued..., records, and forms or information management tools (IMT). (a) Information Collections. No information.../pubfiles/af/37/afman37-139/afman37-139.pdf. (c) Forms or Information Management Tools (Adopted and...

  8. Development of a Visual Inspection Data Collection Tool for Evaluation of Fielded PV Module Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packard, C. E.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-08-01

    A visual inspection data collection tool for the evaluation of fielded photovoltaic (PV) modules has been developed to facilitate describing the condition of PV modules with regard to field performance. The proposed data collection tool consists of 14 sections, each documenting the appearance or properties of a part of the module. This report instructs on how to use the collection tool and defines each attribute to ensure reliable and valid data collection. This tool has been evaluated through the inspection of over 60 PV modules produced by more than 20 manufacturers and fielded at two different sites for varying periods of time. Aggregated data from such a single data collection tool has the potential to enable longitudinal studies of module condition over time, technology evolution, and field location for the enhancement of module reliability models.

  9. A tool for collections-specific searches in genetic databases

    OpenAIRE

    Trizna, Michael

    2017-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for museums and other scientific collections to quantify the amount of genetic resources being derived from their holdings. Genetic database records, such as GenBank and Barcode of Life (BOLD), have an optional field for indicating the specimen that it derived from, and, on the other side, specimen databases, such as GBIF (gbif.org) and iDigBio (idigbio.org), have an optional field for indicating sequence records that were derived from it. Making connecti...

  10. Neuromodulation: advances in the next decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Russell J

    2010-06-01

    Many nervous system disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, mood disorders) involve neurotransmitters as well as electrical activity. Pharmacologic treatment does not target the precise location(s) where neurotransmitter imbalances occur. Additionally, non-neuronal cells in the brain--notably astrocytes--influence neuronal activity through both electrical and neurochemical modulation of nearby neurons. Precise monitoring/recording and modulating/stimulating (both electrical and neurochemical) can optimize therapy in specific disorders and specific patients. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (5 microm diameter) in freely moving rodents have shown that dopamine release is heterogeneous within various regions in the nucleus accumbens, a region involved in many mood disorders. Because neurons are only several microns in diameter (axons, dendrites, and synaptic clefts smaller still), ultramicroelectrodes will be essential to selectively monitor/modulate the cell body, the axon, or at the intracellular level. Nanoelectrode arrays can monitor both electrical activity and dopamine in real time with submicron resolution, and stimulate neurons with equal precision. Computational models indicate that precise monitoring/modulating (electrically and neurochemically) at the subnucleus or neuron level will be necessary to restore normal firing patterns and neurotransmitter levels in many brain disorders. Endovascular techniques can introduce ultramicroelectrodes (0.5 micron or smaller) into the brain via capillaries; such electrodes can stimulate/record neuronal tissue with a response virtually identical to extra-vascular microelectrodes. Within the next decade, hundreds if not thousands of submicron-sized monitoring/modulating electrodes can be placed wherever needed to restore brain function to normal. The term "neuromodulation" will likely replace deep brain stimulation (DBS) as both neurochemistry and electrical activity are included in the therapeutic modalities.

  11. 78 FR 43003 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request on Information Collection Tools Relating to the Offshore...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... information unless the collection of information displays a valid OMB control number. Books or records... for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall...

  12. MoDOT pavement preservation research program volume IV, pavement evaluation tools-data collection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The overarching goal of the MoDOT Pavement Preservation Research Program, Task 3: Pavement Evaluation Tools Data : Collection Methods was to identify and evaluate methods to rapidly obtain network-level and project-level information relevant to :...

  13. Neuromodulation for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction – An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Hussain

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide an update on the use of neuromodulation using sacral nerve stimulation for the treatment of disorders of the lower urinary tract. Neuromodulation using the InterStim® system (Medtronic Inc. is now accepted as an established therapeutic option for patients with detrusor overactivity, and for women with retention or severe voiding difficulties. However, the use of nerve stimulation in modulating lower urinary tract function has to be regarded as a technique that is in its infancy. Much has yet to be learned about the mechanism by which neuromodulation exerts its effects and there is a need to better define the clinical indications for the treatment. There is also work to be done in terms of optimising stimulation delivery, both in anatomical and electronic terms.

  14. Disparities in the Use of Sacral Neuromodulation among Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudano, Melissa A; Seklehner, Stephan; Sandhu, Jaspreet; Reynolds, W Stuart; Garrett, Kelly A; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Te, Alexis E; Kaplan, Steven A; Chughtai, Bilal; Lee, Richard K

    2015-08-01

    Sacral neuromodulation with the InterStim® has been done to treat urinary and bowel control. There are limited data in the literature on use trends of sacral neuromodulation. We explored disparities in use among Medicare beneficiaries. We queried a 5% national random sample of Medicare claims for 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2010. All patients with an ICD-9 diagnosis code representing a potential urological indication for sacral neuromodulation were included. Patients who underwent device implantation were identified using CPT-4 codes. Statistical analysis was done with the chi-square and Fisher tests, and multivariate logistic regression using software. A total of 2,322,060 patients were identified with a diagnosis that could potentially be treated with sacral neuromodulation. During the 10-year study period the percent of these patients who ultimately underwent implantation increased from 0.03% to 0.91% (p <0.0001) for a total of 13,360 (0.58%). On logistic regression analysis women (OR 3.85, p <0.0001) and patients younger than 65 years (OR 1.00 vs 0.29 to 0.39, p <0.0001) were more likely to be treated. Minority patients (OR 0.38, p <0.0001) and those living in the western United States (OR 0.52, p <0.0001) were less likely to receive treatment. Sacral neuromodulation use significantly increased among Medicare beneficiaries in a 10-year period. Patients were more likely to be treated with sacral neuromodulation if they were female, white, younger (younger than 65 years) and living outside the western United States. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Using iPads as a Data Collection Tool in Extension Programming Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowntree, J. E.; Witman, R. R.; Lindquist, G. L.; Raven, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Program evaluation is an important part of Extension, especially with the increased emphasis on metrics and accountability. Agents are often the point persons for evaluation data collection, and Web-based surveys are a commonly used tool. The iPad tablet with Internet access has the potential to be an effective survey tool. iPads were field tested…

  16. A Danish survey of spinal cord stimulation baseline data: First results from a national neuromodulation database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare; Scherer, Christian; Rosenlund, Christina

    A Danish survey of spinal cord stimulation baseline data: First results from a national neuromodulation database......A Danish survey of spinal cord stimulation baseline data: First results from a national neuromodulation database...

  17. 78 FR 19580 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... for use in U.S. possessions. The Form W-3 series is used to transmit W-2 series forms to the Social... of a currently approved collection. Affected Public: Business or other for-profit organizations and..., and Schedule PH. Abstract: Form 1120 is used by corporations to compute their taxable income and tax...

  18. Focus: Design and Evaluation of a Software Tool for Collecting Reader Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Menno; Lentz, Leo

    2001-01-01

    Describes "Focus," a software tool for collecting reader comments more efficiently. Discusses the design and rationale of the software. Notes that results obtained using Focus were compared to the reader feedback collected under the plus-minus method. Concludes that Focus participants appeared to comment more from a reviewer's and less…

  19. Collecting Poetry for the Academic Library: An Evaluation of Poetry Prizes as Selection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Liorah

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of poetry book prizes as a selection tool by evaluating their fairness, meaningfulness, and reliability as an indication of quality. The results of two surveys, one collecting data on poetry book prizes and the other asking librarians about their collecting practices, suggest that selecting on the basis of prizes…

  20. Muscle fibrillation as a sign of electrode damage in sacral neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Hinkel, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Sacral root neuromodulation is recognized as an effective therapy for chronic voiding dysfunction. However, knowledge about the neuromodulator in the general medical community is scarce. We report a case of muscle fibrillation caused by current leaking from a neuromodulator lead which had been damaged during disc prolapse surgery.

  1. Methodological tools for the collection and analysis of participant observation data using grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Heleena; Kaunonen, Marja; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2014-11-01

    To give clarity to the analysis of participant observation in nursing when implementing the grounded theory method. Participant observation (PO) is a method of collecting data that reveals the reality of daily life in a specific context. In grounded theory, interviews are the primary method of collecting data but PO gives a distinctive insight, revealing what people are really doing, instead of what they say they are doing. However, more focus is needed on the analysis of PO. An observational study carried out to gain awareness of nursing care and its electronic documentation in four acute care wards in hospitals in Finland. Discussion of using the grounded theory method and PO as a data collection tool. The following methodological tools are discussed: an observational protocol, jotting of notes, microanalysis, the use of questioning, constant comparison, and writing and illustrating. Each tool has specific significance in collecting and analysing data, working in constant interaction. Grounded theory and participant observation supplied rich data and revealed the complexity of the daily reality of acute care. In this study, the methodological tools provided a base for the study at the research sites and outside. The process as a whole was challenging. It was time-consuming and it required rigorous and simultaneous data collection and analysis, including reflective writing. Using these methodological tools helped the researcher stay focused from data collection and analysis to building theory. Using PO as a data collection method in qualitative nursing research provides insights. It is not commonly discussed in nursing research and therefore this study can provide insight, which cannot be seen or revealed by using other data collection methods. Therefore, this paper can produce a useful tool for those who intend to use PO and grounded theory in their nursing research.

  2. Neuromodulation of Behavioral and Cognitive Development across the Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Among other mechanisms, behavioral and cognitive development entail, on the one hand, contextual scaffolding and, on the other hand, neuromodulation of adaptive neurocognitive representations across the life span. Key brain networks underlying cognition, emotion, and motivation are innervated by major transmitter systems (e.g., the catecholamines…

  3. Rethinking the Fashion Collection as a Strategic Tool in a Circular Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ræbild, Ulla; Bang, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    a crucial role in the development of the collection. To some degree this differ from developing a linear fashion collection. The paper concludes by suggesting a framework for using the collection as a design strategic tool designing garments for a product-service-system adopting a circular economy thinking....... design. The study builds on a case study of a company offering a subscription service of baby clothing. We explore in details if and how they use the collection as a strategic design tool. In the analysis and discussion, it is clarified that the feedback from users, manufacturers and the garments play......The fashion industry currently undergoes radical change showing signs of an overall sustainable paradigm shift. This paper investigates how the fashion collection, as a particular design framework, might be reconfigured as a strategic driver for garment longevity furthering sustainable fashion...

  4. Rethinking the Fashion Collection as a Design Strategic Tool in a Circular Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ræbild, Ulla; Bang, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    in the development of the collection. To some degree this differs from the development of a linear fashion collection. The paper concludes by suggesting a framework for using the collection as a strategic design tool designing garments for a product service system while adopting a circular economy thinking........ The study builds on a case study of a company offering a subscription service for baby clothing, exploring in detail whether and how the collection is used as a strategic design tool. In the analysis and discussion, feedback from users, manufacturers and the garments themselves plays a crucial role......The fashion industry is currently undergoing a radical change towards an overall sustainable paradigm shift. This paper investigates how the fashion collection, as a particular design framework, might be reconfigured as a strategic driver for garment longevity furthering sustainable fashion design...

  5. Neuroimaging and neuromodulation approaches to study eating behavior and prevent and treat eating disorders and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val-Laillet, D; Aarts, E; Weber, B; Ferrari, M; Quaresima, V; Stoeckel, L E; Alonso-Alonso, M; Audette, M; Malbert, C H; Stice, E

    2015-01-01

    Functional, molecular and genetic neuroimaging has highlighted the existence of brain anomalies and neural vulnerability factors related to obesity and eating disorders such as binge eating or anorexia nervosa. In particular, decreased basal metabolism in the prefrontal cortex and striatum as well as dopaminergic alterations have been described in obese subjects, in parallel with increased activation of reward brain areas in response to palatable food cues. Elevated reward region responsivity may trigger food craving and predict future weight gain. This opens the way to prevention studies using functional and molecular neuroimaging to perform early diagnostics and to phenotype subjects at risk by exploring different neurobehavioral dimensions of the food choices and motivation processes. In the first part of this review, advantages and limitations of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), pharmacogenetic fMRI and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) will be discussed in the context of recent work dealing with eating behavior, with a particular focus on obesity. In the second part of the review, non-invasive strategies to modulate food-related brain processes and functions will be presented. At the leading edge of non-invasive brain-based technologies is real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback, which is a powerful tool to better understand the complexity of human brain-behavior relationships. rtfMRI, alone or when combined with other techniques and tools such as EEG and cognitive therapy, could be used to alter neural plasticity and learned behavior to optimize and/or restore healthy cognition and eating behavior. Other promising non-invasive neuromodulation approaches being explored are repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS). Converging evidence points at the value of

  6. Neuroimaging and neuromodulation approaches to study eating behavior and prevent and treat eating disorders and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val-Laillet, D.; Aarts, E.; Weber, B.; Ferrari, M.; Quaresima, V.; Stoeckel, L.E.; Alonso-Alonso, M.; Audette, M.; Malbert, C.H.; Stice, E.

    2015-01-01

    Functional, molecular and genetic neuroimaging has highlighted the existence of brain anomalies and neural vulnerability factors related to obesity and eating disorders such as binge eating or anorexia nervosa. In particular, decreased basal metabolism in the prefrontal cortex and striatum as well as dopaminergic alterations have been described in obese subjects, in parallel with increased activation of reward brain areas in response to palatable food cues. Elevated reward region responsivity may trigger food craving and predict future weight gain. This opens the way to prevention studies using functional and molecular neuroimaging to perform early diagnostics and to phenotype subjects at risk by exploring different neurobehavioral dimensions of the food choices and motivation processes. In the first part of this review, advantages and limitations of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), pharmacogenetic fMRI and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) will be discussed in the context of recent work dealing with eating behavior, with a particular focus on obesity. In the second part of the review, non-invasive strategies to modulate food-related brain processes and functions will be presented. At the leading edge of non-invasive brain-based technologies is real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback, which is a powerful tool to better understand the complexity of human brain–behavior relationships. rtfMRI, alone or when combined with other techniques and tools such as EEG and cognitive therapy, could be used to alter neural plasticity and learned behavior to optimize and/or restore healthy cognition and eating behavior. Other promising non-invasive neuromodulation approaches being explored are repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS). Converging evidence points at the value of

  7. Neuroimaging and neuromodulation approaches to study eating behavior and prevent and treat eating disorders and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Val-Laillet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional, molecular and genetic neuroimaging has highlighted the existence of brain anomalies and neural vulnerability factors related to obesity and eating disorders such as binge eating or anorexia nervosa. In particular, decreased basal metabolism in the prefrontal cortex and striatum as well as dopaminergic alterations have been described in obese subjects, in parallel with increased activation of reward brain areas in response to palatable food cues. Elevated reward region responsivity may trigger food craving and predict future weight gain. This opens the way to prevention studies using functional and molecular neuroimaging to perform early diagnostics and to phenotype subjects at risk by exploring different neurobehavioral dimensions of the food choices and motivation processes. In the first part of this review, advantages and limitations of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, pharmacogenetic fMRI and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS will be discussed in the context of recent work dealing with eating behavior, with a particular focus on obesity. In the second part of the review, non-invasive strategies to modulate food-related brain processes and functions will be presented. At the leading edge of non-invasive brain-based technologies is real-time fMRI (rtfMRI neurofeedback, which is a powerful tool to better understand the complexity of human brain–behavior relationships. rtfMRI, alone or when combined with other techniques and tools such as EEG and cognitive therapy, could be used to alter neural plasticity and learned behavior to optimize and/or restore healthy cognition and eating behavior. Other promising non-invasive neuromodulation approaches being explored are repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS. Converging evidence points at

  8. Using an Ecomap as a Tool for Qualitative Data Collection in Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jo; Grant, Natalie S.

    2016-01-01

    An ecomap is a social work data collection tool that is used to gather data about a participant's environment. Derived from Bronfenbrenner's ecological system theory, the ecomap can be used in adult education and human resource development to record information of in-and-out-of-work and learning experiences and show how these interactions support…

  9. Building Collective Leadership Capacity Using Collaborative Twenty-First Century Digital Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Freddy; Figaro-Henry, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The current research explores how using collaborative twenty-first century digital tools developed the collective leadership capacity among participants in an educational leadership course. A qualitative interpretive approach was used. The data show how learning within the digital collaborative spaces was multidirectional and enhanced the…

  10. Neuromodulation of neuropathic pain syndrome induced by elapidae (cobra) envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretanski, Michael F

    2009-01-01

    Objectives.  This study aims to demonstrate the utility of spinal cord stimulation in a neuropathic pain syndrome and overall decline in health and functional independence following elapid envenomation in a morbidly obese, insulin-dependent diabetic. Materials and Methods.  A two-lead, 16-electrode constant-current, independently controlled system is placed in the mid-cervical spine. Results.  Noted were a improvement in overall health status with better glycemic control and return to work status in response to adequate pain control. Conclusions.  The case serves as a model for other orphan pain cases with a seemingly esoteric etiology and adds to the existing body of literature that spinal cord stimulation and neuromodulation, in general, has a wide-ranging applicability peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes. © 2009 International Neuromodulation Society.

  11. The Aging Face: Global Approach With Fillers and Neuromodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solish, Nowell

    2016-06-01

    The goal of treating the aging face is to restore facial balance and modify shadows. A facial evaluation should focus on areas of volume loss and opportunities to use neuromodulators (eg, botulinum toxin A) and the use of fillers. A thorough understanding of facial anatomy, including muscles, nerves, bone, and fat pads, is essential for effective and safe treatment. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S120-S121. 2016 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  12. The Development of a Novel High Throughput Computational Tool for Studying Individual and Collective Cellular Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapnick, Douglas A.; Jacobsen, Jeremy; Liu, Xuedong

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how cells migrate individually and collectively during development and cancer metastasis can be significantly aided by a computation tool to accurately measure not only cellular migration speed, but also migration direction and changes in migration direction in a temporal and spatial manner. We have developed such a tool for cell migration researchers, named Pathfinder, which is capable of simultaneously measuring the migration speed, migration direction, and changes in migration directions of thousands of cells both instantaneously and over long periods of time from fluorescence microscopy data. Additionally, we demonstrate how the Pathfinder software can be used to quantify collective cell migration. The novel capability of the Pathfinder software to measure the changes in migration direction of large populations of cells in a spatiotemporal manner will aid cellular migration research by providing a robust method for determining the mechanisms of cellular guidance during individual and collective cell migration. PMID:24386097

  13. [Design and Implementation of the Data Collection Tools for National Mental Health Survey of Colombia, 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Viviana; Moreno, Socorro; Camacho, Jhon; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; de Santacruz, Cecilia; Rodriguez, Maria Nelcy; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    Population surveys on mental health are performed as part of the inputs required for the creation, implementation and evaluation of policies related to mental health, worldwide, and as an initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO). was held The fourth National Survey of Mental Health (ENSM 2015) was carried out during the first half of 2015 on a representative sample of 2,727 children between 7 and 11 years of age, 1,754 adolescents, and 10, 870 adults who were selected throughout the country. To describe the selection and definition of the tools used to measure mental health (including social cognition and violence), problems, mental disorders, and the evaluation of health states, as well as to describe the process used to develop the data collection tools finally used. The measurement of mental disorders in children was performed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC), and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used for adolescents and adults. For the remaining components evaluated in the survey, a search was conducted on the tools used at a national and international level. The selection of the toos used for the evaluation was based on the questions made by each tool, as well as the scientific validity that could be obtained from the results. In some cases the complete tool (as published) was used, in other cases the tools were constructed unifying parts of different ones, or questions were written based on the concepts or characteristics to be measured. Subsequently, a validation of content, concept and semantic of every tool was carried out, including the CIDI and DISC. The resulting tools were used on a group of people with different characteristics. It was noted that further clarification was necessary for some people to fully understand what was being asked. Because the collection of all the information in the survey would be computer assisted, a stream format was generated to guide the implementation in

  14. Introducing LIR (Lithotheque Ireland, a reference collection of flaked stone tool raw materials from Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killian Driscoll

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The LIR (Lithotheque Ireland reference collection of flaked stone tool raw materials from Ireland began in 2013, and is based on the geological prospection from two projects. The first (2013-2015 focused attention primarily on Carboniferous cherts from the northwest of Ireland, collecting 405 samples. The second (2015-2017 is currently collecting samples of the Cretaceous flint primarily from in situ contexts in the northeast of Ireland, but also includes beach surveys of Cretaceous flint from around the island; the first phase of geological prospection in Autumn 2015 collected 239 samples, with the geological prospection continuing in 2016. Therefore, to date the collection contains over 600 hand samples of chert and flint, along with a small number of other materials (siliceous limestone, tuff, mudstone. The physical reference collection is housed at the UCD School of Archaeology, University College Dublin and contains the geological hand samples along with the various thin sections of the samples that are used for petrographic analysis. The physical collection is complemented by an online database that is to be used alongside the physical collection, or can be used as a stand-alone resource. This paper provides an overview of the database’s metadata and the processes of data entry and editing, to serve as a reference point for the database and the fieldwork undertaken to date, and to serve as a template for other researchers undertaking similar work on lithic reference collections.

  15. Smartphone tool to collect repeated 24 h dietary recall data in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Fry, Helen; Beard, B James; Harrisson, Tom; Paudel, Puskar; Shrestha, Niva; Jha, Sonali; Shrestha, Bhim P; Manandhar, Dharma S; Costello, Anthony; Saville, Naomi M

    2018-02-01

    To outline the development of a smartphone-based tool to collect thrice-repeated 24 h dietary recall data in rural Nepal, and to describe energy intakes, common errors and researchers' experiences using the tool. We designed a novel tool to collect multi-pass 24 h dietary recalls in rural Nepal by combining the use of a CommCare questionnaire on smartphones, a paper form, a QR (quick response)-coded list of foods and a photographic atlas of portion sizes. Twenty interviewers collected dietary data on three non-consecutive days per respondent, with three respondents per household. Intakes were converted into nutrients using databases on nutritional composition of foods, recipes and portion sizes. Dhanusha and Mahottari districts, Nepal. Pregnant women, their mothers-in-law and male household heads. Energy intakes assessed in 150 households; data corrections and our experiences reported from 805 households and 6765 individual recalls. Dietary intake estimates gave plausible values, with male household heads appearing to have higher energy intakes (median (25th-75th centile): 12 079 (9293-14 108) kJ/d) than female members (8979 (7234-11 042) kJ/d for pregnant women). Manual editing of data was required when interviewers mistook portions for food codes and for coding items not on the food list. Smartphones enabled quick monitoring of data and interviewer performance, but we initially faced technical challenges with CommCare forms crashing. With sufficient time dedicated to development and pre-testing, this novel smartphone-based tool provides a useful method to collect data. Future work is needed to further validate this tool and adapt it for other contexts.

  16. Put it Simply: Tools and Tips for Communicating Library Collections Data

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    In communicating library collections data to our stakeholders and administrators, our main goals are to be impactful, to make our points clearly and concisely, and to provide data that can move decisions forward. Accomplishing these goals requires time and creativity to experiment and refine—assets that can be hard to come by for busy librarians. This presentation will provide an introduction to a few easy-to-use data visualization tools and how they can be applied for communicating data abou...

  17. Modulation of Perception or Emotion? A Scoping Review of Tinnitus Neuromodulation Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Giriraj Singh; Stinear, Cathy M; Searchfield, Grant D

    2015-10-01

    Tinnitus is the phantom perception of sound and can have negative effect on the quality of life. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive neuromodulation technique, which can increase or decrease the cortical excitability in the brain region to which it is applied. tDCS has been used for tinnitus research since 2006. To investigate whether tDCS affects tinnitus perception, related emotion, or both, and the potential implications for tinnitus management. A scoping review was undertaken using the methods proposed by Arksey and O'Malley. After initial consideration of title relevance and reading abstracts, 15 studies were included in this review. The data from these studies were charted to investigate the impact of tDCS on tinnitus perception and emotions. tDCS results in transient suppression of tinnitus loudness and annoyance; however, it does not lead to long-term impact on tinnitus related emotion. Local stimulation of different sites of stimulation (left temporoparietal area, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and auditory cortex) might modulate tinnitus perception (loudness) and emotions differently; however, further research is needed to explore this hypothesis. This review has identified aspects of methodologies that require attention in upcoming tinnitus and tDCS trials to offer better insights. tDCS is an effective research tool for transient tinnitus neuromodulation. However, efforts should be invested in designing clinical trials using local and multiple sites of stimulation, optimized parameters, and objective outcome measures before it can be translated in to a clinical tool for tinnitus management. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Documenting the Intangible and the Use of "collective Memory" as a Tool for Risk Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekim, Z.; Güney, E. E.; Vatan, M.

    2017-08-01

    Increasing immigration activities due to globalized economies, political conflicts, wars and disasters of the recent years not only had a serious impact on the tangible heritage fabric, but also on the intangible values of heritage sites. With the challenges of managing drastic changes the field of heritage is faced with in mind, this paper proposes a documentation strategy that utilizes "collective memory" as a tool for risk mitigation of culturally diverse sites. Intangible and tangible values of two cases studies, from Turkey and Canada, are studied in a comparative way to create a methodology for the use of collected data on "collective memory and identity" in risk mitigation and managing change as a living value of the site.

  19. Evaluation in medical education: A topical review of target parameters, data collection tools and confounding factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiekirka, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Evaluation is an integral part of education in German medical schools. According to the quality standards set by the German Society for Evaluation, evaluation tools must provide an accurate and fair appraisal of teaching quality. Thus, data collection tools must be highly reliable and valid. This review summarises the current literature on evaluation of medical education with regard to the possible dimensions of teaching quality, the psychometric properties of survey instruments and potential confounding factors.Methods: We searched Pubmed, PsycINFO and PSYNDEX for literature on evaluation in medical education and included studies published up until June 30, 2011 as well as articles identified in the “grey literature”. Results are presented as a narrative review.Results: We identified four dimensions of teaching quality: structure, process, teacher characteristics, and outcome. Student ratings are predominantly used to address the first three dimensions, and a number of reliable tools are available for this purpose. However, potential confounders of student ratings pose a threat to the validity of these instruments. Outcome is usually operationalised in terms of student performance on examinations, but methodological problems may limit the usability of these data for evaluation purposes. In addition, not all examinations at German medical schools meet current quality standards.Conclusion: The choice of tools for evaluating medical education should be guided by the dimension that is targeted by the evaluation. Likewise, evaluation results can only be interpreted within the context of the construct addressed by the data collection tool that was used as well as its specific confounding factors.

  20. A simple web-based tool to compare freshwater fish data collected using AFS standard methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Rahr, Matt; Torrey, Yuta T.; Cate, Averill

    2016-01-01

    The American Fisheries Society (AFS) recently published Standard Methods for Sampling North American Freshwater Fishes. Enlisting the expertise of 284 scientists from 107 organizations throughout Canada, Mexico, and the United States, this text was developed to facilitate comparisons of fish data across regions or time. Here we describe a user-friendly web tool that automates among-sample comparisons in individual fish condition, population length-frequency distributions, and catch per unit effort (CPUE) data collected using AFS standard methods. Currently, the web tool (1) provides instantaneous summaries of almost 4,000 data sets of condition, length frequency, and CPUE of common freshwater fishes collected using standard gears in 43 states and provinces; (2) is easily appended with new standardized field data to update subsequent queries and summaries; (3) compares fish data from a particular water body with continent, ecoregion, and state data summaries; and (4) provides additional information about AFS standard fish sampling including benefits, ongoing validation studies, and opportunities to comment on specific methods. The web tool—programmed in a PHP-based Drupal framework—was supported by several AFS Sections, agencies, and universities and is freely available from the AFS website and fisheriesstandardsampling.org. With widespread use, the online tool could become an important resource for fisheries biologists.

  1. Playbook Data Analysis Tool: Collecting Interaction Data from Extremely Remote Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanefsky, Bob; Zheng, Jimin; Deliz, Ivonne; Marquez, Jessica J.; Hillenius, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Typically, user tests for software tools are conducted in person. At NASA, the users may be located at the bottom of the ocean in a pressurized habitat, above the atmosphere in the International Space Station, or in an isolated capsule on a simulated asteroid mission. The Playbook Data Analysis Tool (P-DAT) is a human-computer interaction (HCI) evaluation tool that the NASA Ames HCI Group has developed to record user interactions with Playbook, the group's existing planning-and-execution software application. Once the remotely collected user interaction data makes its way back to Earth, researchers can use P-DAT for in-depth analysis. Since a critical component of the Playbook project is to understand how to develop more intuitive software tools for astronauts to plan in space, P-DAT helps guide us in the development of additional easy-to-use features for Playbook, informing the design of future crew autonomy tools.P-DAT has demonstrated the capability of discreetly capturing usability data in amanner that is transparent to Playbook’s end-users. In our experience, P-DAT data hasalready shown its utility, revealing potential usability patterns, helping diagnose softwarebugs, and identifying metrics and events that are pertinent to Playbook usage aswell as spaceflight operations. As we continue to develop this analysis tool, P-DATmay yet provide a method for long-duration, unobtrusive human performance collectionand evaluation for mission controllers back on Earth and researchers investigatingthe effects and mitigations related to future human spaceflight performance.

  2. And Then There Was Light: Perspectives of Optogenetics for Deep Brain Stimulation and Neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbeke, Jean; Hoffman, Luis; Mols, Katrien; Braeken, Dries; Prodanov, Dimiter

    2017-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has evolved into a well-accepted add-on treatment for patients with severe Parkinsons disease as well as for other chronic neurological conditions. The focal action of electrical stimulation can yield better responses and it exposes the patient to fewer side effects compared to pharmaceuticals distributed throughout the body toward the brain. On the other hand, the current practice of DBS is hampered by the relatively coarse level of neuromodulation achieved. Optogenetics, in contrast, offers the perspective of much more selective actions on the various physiological structures, provided that the stimulated cells are rendered sensitive to the action of light. Optogenetics has experienced tremendous progress since its first in vivo applications about 10 years ago. Recent advancements of viral vector technology for gene transfer substantially reduce vector-associated cytotoxicity and immune responses. This brings about the possibility to transfer this technology into the clinic as a possible alternative to DBS and neuromodulation. New paths could be opened toward a rich panel of clinical applications. Some technical issues still limit the long term use in humans but realistic perspectives quickly emerge. Despite a rapid accumulation of observations about patho-physiological mechanisms, it is still mostly serendipity and empiric adjustments that dictate clinical practice while more efficient logically designed interventions remain rather exceptional. Interestingly, it is also very much the neuro technology developed around optogenetics that offers the most promising tools to fill in the existing knowledge gaps about brain function in health and disease. The present review examines Parkinson's disease and refractory epilepsy as use cases for possible optogenetic stimulation therapies.

  3. And Then There Was Light: Perspectives of Optogenetics for Deep Brain Stimulation and Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Delbeke

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS has evolved into a well-accepted add-on treatment for patients with severe Parkinsons disease as well as for other chronic neurological conditions. The focal action of electrical stimulation can yield better responses and it exposes the patient to fewer side effects compared to pharmaceuticals distributed throughout the body toward the brain. On the other hand, the current practice of DBS is hampered by the relatively coarse level of neuromodulation achieved. Optogenetics, in contrast, offers the perspective of much more selective actions on the various physiological structures, provided that the stimulated cells are rendered sensitive to the action of light. Optogenetics has experienced tremendous progress since its first in vivo applications about 10 years ago. Recent advancements of viral vector technology for gene transfer substantially reduce vector-associated cytotoxicity and immune responses. This brings about the possibility to transfer this technology into the clinic as a possible alternative to DBS and neuromodulation. New paths could be opened toward a rich panel of clinical applications. Some technical issues still limit the long term use in humans but realistic perspectives quickly emerge. Despite a rapid accumulation of observations about patho-physiological mechanisms, it is still mostly serendipity and empiric adjustments that dictate clinical practice while more efficient logically designed interventions remain rather exceptional. Interestingly, it is also very much the neuro technology developed around optogenetics that offers the most promising tools to fill in the existing knowledge gaps about brain function in health and disease. The present review examines Parkinson's disease and refractory epilepsy as use cases for possible optogenetic stimulation therapies.

  4. Cholinergic neuromodulation controls directed temporal communication in neocortex in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita K Roopun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the primary neuromodulator involved in cortical arousal in mammals. Cholinergic modulation is involved in conscious awareness, memory formation and attention – processes that involve intercommunication between different cortical regions. Such communication is achieved in part through temporal structuring of neuronal activity by population rhythms, particularly in the beta and gamma frequency ranges (12 – 80 Hz. Here we demonstrate, using in vitro and in silico models, that spectrally identical patterns of beta2 and gamma rhythms are generated in primary sensory areas and polymodal association areas by fundamentally different local circuit mechanisms: Glutamatergic excitation induced beta2 frequency population rhythms only in layer 5 association cortex whereas cholinergic neuromodulation induced this rhythm only in layer 5 primary sensory cortex. This region-specific sensitivity of local circuits to cholinergic modulation allowed for control of the extent of cortical temporal interactions. Furthermore, the contrasting mechanisms underlying these beta2 rhythms produced a high degree of directionality, favouring an influence of association cortex over primary auditory cortex.

  5. Neuromodulated Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity, and Theory of Three-Factor Learning Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémaux, Nicolas; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hebbian learning puts the emphasis on joint pre- and postsynaptic activity, but neglects the potential role of neuromodulators. Since neuromodulators convey information about novelty or reward, the influence of neuromodulators on synaptic plasticity is useful not just for action learning in classical conditioning, but also to decide “when” to create new memories in response to a flow of sensory stimuli. In this review, we focus on timing requirements for pre- and postsynaptic activity in conjunction with one or several phasic neuromodulatory signals. While the emphasis of the text is on conceptual models and mathematical theories, we also discuss some experimental evidence for neuromodulation of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity. We highlight the importance of synaptic mechanisms in bridging the temporal gap between sensory stimulation and neuromodulatory signals, and develop a framework for a class of neo-Hebbian three-factor learning rules that depend on presynaptic activity, postsynaptic variables as well as the influence of neuromodulators. PMID:26834568

  6. A systematic review of the effects of neuromodulation on eating and body weight: evidence from human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Jessica; Bozhilova, Natali; Campbell, Iain; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2013-11-01

    Eating disorders (ED) are chronic and sometimes deadly illnesses. Existing treatments have limited proven efficacy, especially in the case of adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). Emerging neural models of ED provide a rationale for more targeted, brain-directed interventions. This systematic review has examined the effects of neuromodulation techniques on eating behaviours and body weight and assessed their potential for therapeutic use in ED. All articles in PubMed, PsychInfo and Web of Knowledge were considered and screened against a priori inclusion/exclusion criteria. The effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), transcranial direct current stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS) were examined across studies in ED samples, other psychiatric and neurological disorders, and animal models. Sixty studies were identified. There is evidence for ED symptom reduction following rTMS and DBS in both AN and bulimia nervosa. Findings from studies of other psychiatric and neurological disorders and from animal studies demonstrate that increases in food intake and body weight can be achieved following DBS and that VNS has potential value as a means of controlling eating and inducing weight loss. Neuromodulation tools have potential for reducing ED symptomatology and related behaviours, and for altering food intake and body weight. In response to such findings, and emerging neural models of ED, treatment approaches are highly unlikely to remain 'brainless'. More research is required to evaluate the potential of neuromodulation procedures for improving long-term outcomes in ED. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  7. Genome profiling (GP) as an effective tool for monitoring culture collections: a case study with Trichosporon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Keiichi; Ueno-Tsuji, Sachika; Tanaka, Reiko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nishimura, Kazuko; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    Species identification and classification of a large number of microbes are essential and heavy workloads in culture collections and relevant laboratories. The identification of species usually requires different methods depending on species. Therefore, the development of a method which is simple and applicable to any organisms will lessen the burdens, increase the reliability of databases and thus enhance the science on microbes. The genome profiling (GP) method, developed previously, was found effective in monitoring authenticities of all strains/species tested in culture collections and expectedly various species, which was shown by applying the GP and the conventional sequencing methods to identifying and classifying species/strains belonging to the genus Trichosporon (38 strains; 16 species). Small differences between strains (11 strains of Trichosporon asahii and 4 strains of Trichosporon coremiiforme) can be reliably discriminated by GP, which was unsuccessful in the conventional sequencing approach. Importantly, seven possible false-assignments contained in the database were all pointed out by the GP method with near-perfect correctness, showing the power of the GP method.GP was shown to be a potent tool for rapidly and correctly monitoring species and strains of fungi in culture collections owing to its simple and informative natures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuromodulation of central pattern generators in invertebrates and vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Patsy S

    2006-12-01

    Central pattern generators are subject to extensive modulation that generates flexibility in the rhythmic outputs of these neural networks. The effects of neuromodulators interact with one another, and modulatory neurons are themselves often subject to modulation, enabling both higher order control and indirect interactions among central pattern generators. In addition, modulators often directly mediate the interactions between functionally related central pattern generators. In systems such as the vertebrate respiratory central pattern generator, multiple pacemaker types interact to produce rhythmic output. Modulators can then alter the relative contributions of the different pacemakers, leading to substantial changes in motor output and hence to different behaviors. Surprisingly, substantial changes in some aspects of the circuitry of a central pattern generator, such as a several-fold increase in synaptic strength, can sometimes have little effect on the output of the CPG, whereas other changes have profound effects.

  9. Effects of Sacral Neuromodulation on Urinary and Fecal Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ada; Taragano, Lee; Condrea, Alexander; Sidi, Ami; Ron, Yshai; Ginath, Shimon

    2015-06-01

    Fecal incontinence is defined as involuntary passage of stool through the anus. It may vary from soiling to complete evacuation. This involuntary loss of feces, flatus or urge incontinence adversely affects quality of life. Urinary urge incontinence is characterized by symptoms of frequency, urgency and urge incontinence (either alone or in combination). Urgency frequency syndrome is defined as symptoms of frequency and urgency without incontinence episodes. To evaluate the efficacy of sacral neuromodulation on these pathologies. Following a detailed investigation, 51 patients with either urinary or fecal incontinence, or both, who did not respond to medical and behavioral treatment were offered the temporary implant. Of the 51 patients 40 showed improvement and advanced for a permanent device. After a mean follow-up of 5 years (range 1-8), there was a significant reduction in the number of incontinence episodes (P pads used also declined significantly (P incontinence and can dramatically improve patients' quality of life.

  10. Textbook of neuromodulation principles, methods and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Knotkova, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, it was thought that the adult brain is modifiable only during early stages of ontogenesis. However, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies now indicate that the mature human brain is, under certain conditions, capable of substantial neuroplastic changes. Neuroplasticity reflects the ability of the human brain to alter the pattern of neural activation in response to previous experience, and recent findings indicate that the effects of experience can lead to both structural as well as functional reorganization. It has been shown that pathological neuroplastic changes can be reverted/normalized and that the modulation of the neuroplastic changes can be paralleled by improvement of the patient's status. However, there is a gap between the potential of neuromodulation, technical progress and actual preparedness of medical personnel to provide this type of treatment. A prevalent opinion among medical professionals indicates that training programs and educational materials in neuromodulatory ...

  11. Animal-to-Animal Variability in Neuromodulation and Circuit Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamood, Albert W; Marder, Eve

    2014-01-01

    Each animal alive in the world is different from all other individuals, while sharing most attributes of form and function with others of the same species. Still other attributes are shared within a phylum, and still others are common to most eukaryotic organisms. All animals have mechanisms that modulate the strength of their synapses or alter the intrinsic excitability of component neurons. What animal-to-animal variability in behavior arises from differences in neuronal structure, ion channel expression, or connectivity, and what variability arises from neuromodulation of brain states? Conversely, can robust behavior be maintained despite variability in circuit components by the action of neuromodulatory inputs? These are fundamental issues relevant to all nervous systems that have been illuminated by many years of study of the small, rhythmic motor circuits found in the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  12. Structural dichotomy of the mind; the role of sexual neuromodulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion G. Motofei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The mind (mental function and sexuality represent two distinct environmental functions, but which are supported within the brain by a common (somatic-autonomic neurobiological substrate. As a consequence, mental function takes on autonomic characteristics from the sexual-autonomic system (like autonomy, duality, while sexual function takes on features from mental functioning (such as lateralization. In this paper we discuss the lateralized action of two classes of sexual neuromodulators: hormones and pheromones. This process of lateralization is assimilated with the structural dichotomy of the mind. A relatively similar process but related to informational dichotomy of the mind will be presented in a forthcoming paper. Structural and informational dichotomies of the mind represent essential aspects that need clarification in order to continue the solving of the mind-body process, a work in progress articulated through a succession of papers.

  13. Neuromodulation of the neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Parag N; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Taccola, Giuliano; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2016-11-01

    The inability to control timely bladder emptying is one of the most serious challenges among the many functional deficits that occur after a spinal cord injury. We previously demonstrated that electrodes placed epidurally on the dorsum of the spinal cord can be used in animals and humans to recover postural and locomotor function after complete paralysis and can be used to enable voiding in spinal rats. In the present study, we examined the neuromodulation of lower urinary tract function associated with acute epidural spinal cord stimulation, locomotion, and peripheral nerve stimulation in adult rats. Herein we demonstrate that electrically evoked potentials in the hindlimb muscles and external urethral sphincter are modulated uniquely when the rat is stepping bipedally and not voiding, immediately pre-voiding, or when voiding. We also show that spinal cord stimulation can effectively neuromodulate the lower urinary tract via frequency-dependent stimulation patterns and that neural peripheral nerve stimulation can activate the external urethral sphincter both directly and via relays in the spinal cord. The data demonstrate that the sensorimotor networks controlling bladder and locomotion are highly integrated neurophysiologically and behaviorally and demonstrate how these two functions are modulated by sensory input from the tibial and pudental nerves. A more detailed understanding of the high level of interaction between these networks could lead to the integration of multiple neurophysiological strategies to improve bladder function. These data suggest that the development of strategies to improve bladder function should simultaneously engage these highly integrated networks in an activity-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Taurine as an Essential Neuromodulator during Perinatal Cortical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Kilb

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A variety of experimental studies demonstrated that neurotransmitters are an important factor for the development of the central nervous system, affecting neurodevelopmental events like neurogenesis, neuronal migration, programmed cell death, and differentiation. While the role of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA on neuronal development is well established, the aminosulfonic acid taurine has also been considered as possible neuromodulator during early neuronal development. The purpose of the present review article is to summarize the properties of taurine as neuromodulator in detail, focusing on the direct involvement of taurine on various neurodevelopmental events and the regulation of neuronal activity during early developmental epochs. The current knowledge is that taurine lacks a synaptic release mechanism but is released by volume-sensitive organic anion channels and/or a reversal of the taurine transporter. Extracellular taurine affects neurons and neuronal progenitor cells mainly via glycine, GABA(A, and GABA(B receptors with considerable receptor and subtype-specific affinities. Taurine has been shown to directly influence neurogenesis in vitro as well as neuronal migration in vitro and in vivo. It provides a depolarizing signal for a variety of neuronal population in the immature central nervous system, thereby directly influencing neuronal activity. While in the neocortex, taurine probably enhance neuronal activity, in the immature hippocampus, a tonic taurinergic tone might be necessary to attenuate activity. In summary, taurine must be considered as an essential modulator of neurodevelopmental events, and possible adverse consequences on fetal and/or early postnatal development should be evaluated for pharmacological therapies affecting taurinergic functions.

  15. Collecting urban health indicators from routinely available sources: development and piloting of a tool for the collection of existing data for EURO-URHIS 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgerson, James; Pope, Dan; Birt, Christopher A; van Ameijden, Erik; Verma, Arpana

    2017-05-01

    EURO-URHIS 2 aimed to collect comparable health indicators across a large number of urban areas (UAs) across Europe and Vietnam using four data collection tools. This paper outlines the process for the selection of indicators to be collected from routinely available sources, and the piloting of the data collection tool. A long-list of indicators potentially collectable from routinely available sources was generated by the EURO-URHIS 2 consortium. Key contacts from each UA completed an e-mail survey reporting for each indicator whether it could be collected using the given definition, an alternative definition or not at all. Additionally participants listed the 20 leading causes of death for their UAs from the Eurostat 65. Results were compiled to inform indicator selection for the main data collection phase. Responses were received for 25 of 28 eligible UAs. Of the 29 proposed indicators, 55.1% ( n = 16) were accepted without change, 24.1% ( n = 7) were re-allocated to other data collection tools and 17.2% ( n = 5) were accepted after a modification of the EURO-URHIS 2 definition. This scoping exercise and piloting phase for the 'existing data tool' for the project was useful and informative. It provided detailed information on what could be collected, and an opportunity to modify indicator definitions to maximize response rates. These results are only applicable to those UAs returning results and cannot be generalized. Detailed interrogation of definitions is essential to this sort of data collection, and the process described was designed with cross-national comparability in mind.

  16. Assessing the Validity of Automated Webcrawlers as Data Collection Tools to Investigate Online Child Sexual Exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, Bryce; Bouchard, Martin; Frank, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The distribution of child sexual exploitation (CE) material has been aided by the growth of the Internet. The graphic nature and prevalence of the material has made researching and combating difficult. Although used to study online CE distribution, automated data collection tools (e.g., webcrawlers) have yet to be shown effective at targeting only relevant data. Using CE-related image and keyword criteria, we compare networks starting from CE websites to those from similar non-CE sexuality websites and dissimilar sports websites. Our results provide evidence that (a) webcrawlers have the potential to provide valid CE data, if the appropriate criterion is selected; (b) CE distribution is still heavily image-based suggesting images as an effective criterion; (c) CE-seeded networks are more hub-based and differ from non-CE-seeded networks on several website characteristics. Recommendations for improvements to reliable criteria selection are discussed.

  17. Development of a data collection tool to profile osteopathic practice: use of a nominal group technique to enhance clinician involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawkes, C A; Leach, C M J; Mathias, S; Moore, A P

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the profile of osteopathic care in the United Kingdom (UK). To address this, a standardised data collection (SDC) tool was developed to record patient-based data within private practice. The development of the SDC tool took place within a national network of research groups (hubs) created by the National Council for Osteopathic Research (NCOR); nominal groups were created from the hub network. A Nominal Group Technique (NGT) was used to promote maximum involvement by clinicians and increase ownership of the process: this approach encouraged generation of ideas around specific topics. Following several rounds of iteration, a draft tool was created, followed by a three stage testing process to identify omissions, unnecessary jargon, ambiguities, and any regional differences. The tool developed for a national use by UK osteopaths consisted of 65 items. These were divided into specific sections for patient or clinician completion. The section for patient completion collected data concerning demographic and symptom data. Clinicians provided data concerning treatment provided, advice to promote self-management and avoidance of symptom recurrence, outcome information, service data concerned with waiting times, the number of treatments delivered, and the necessity for referral. The tool development process produced a data collection tool aimed to collect snapshot data across the osteopathic profession. The national pilot of the tool will identify changes required, and any barriers to its use by busy professionals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evidence of heterosynaptic LTD in the human nociceptive system: superficial skin neuromodulation using a matrix electrode reduces deep pain sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mücke

    Full Text Available Long term depression (LTD is a neuronal learning mechanism after low frequency stimulation (LFS. This study compares two types of electrodes (concentric vs. matrix and stimulation frequencies (4 and 30 Hz to examine homo- and heterosynaptic effects indirectly depicted from the somatosensory profile of healthy subjects. Both electrodes were compared in a prospective, randomized, controlled cross-over study using 4 Hz as the conditioning LFS compared to 30 Hz (intended sham condition. Quantitative sensory testing (QST was used to examine 13 thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds. Sixteen healthy volunteers (10 women, age 31.0 ± 12.7 years were examined. Depending on the electrodes and frequencies used a divergent pattern of sensory minus signs occurred. Using LFS the concentric electrode increased thermal thresholds, while the matrix electrode rather increased mechanical including deep pain thresholds. Findings after cutaneous neuromodulation using LFS and a matrix electrode are consistent with the concept of heterosynaptic LTD in the human nociceptive system, where deep pain sensitivity was reduced after superficial stimulation of intraepidermal nerve fibres. Cutaneous neuromodulation using LFS and a matrix electrode may be a useful tool to influence deep pain sensitivity in a variety of chronic pain syndromes.

  19. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation as neuromodulative treatment of chronic pelvic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balken, M.R. van; Vandoninck, V.; Messelink, B.J.; Vergunst, H.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Debruyne, F.M.J.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Neuromodulative therapies have been used with moderate success in patients with chronic pelvic pain. Intermittent Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation (PTNS) is a new, minimally invasive treatment option, which has shown to significantly decrease accompanying pain complaints in patients

  20. Visualizing Neuromodulation In Vivo: TANGO-Mapping of Dopamine Signaling Reveals Appeptite Control of Sugar Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Hidehiko K.; de-Leon, Shlomo Ben-Tabou; Wong, Allan M.; Jagadish, Smitha; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Barnea, Gilad; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Axel, Richard; Anderson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Behavior cannot be predicted from a “connectome,” because the brain contains a chemical “map” of neuromodulation superimposed upon its synaptic connectivity map. Neuromodulation changes how neural circuits process information in different states, such as hunger or arousal. Here we describe a novel, genetically based method to map, in an unbiased and brain-wide manner, sites of neuromodulation under different conditions in the Drosophila brain. This method, and genetic perturbations, reveal that the well-known effect of hunger to enhance behavioral sensitivity to sugar is mediated, at least in part, by the release of dopamine onto primary gustatory sensory neurons, which enhances sugar-evoked calcium influx. These data reinforce the concept that sensory neurons constitute an important locus for state-dependent gain-control of behavior, and introduce a new methodology that can be extended to other neuromodulators and model organisms. PMID:22304923

  1. Deep brain stimulation and neuromodulation for torsion dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing WANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the curative effect and safety of deep brain stimulation (DBS and neuromodulation in the treatment of patients with torsion dystonia. Methods Ten patients with torsion dystonia underwent subthalamic nucleus DBS (STN-DBS and 3 patients with torsion dystonia underwent globus pallidus internus DBS (GPi-DBS. Regulate the stimulus parameters, evaluate the improvement of torsion dystonia by using Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS and record related adverse events. Results Among the 13 patients, 6 patients were improved by over 60% in 1-3 d and 3 patients one week after stimulation, and the improvement rate was > 75% in 6 months and > 85% in one year. Two patients showed improvement 2 months after stimulation, and the improvement rate was > 60% in 6 months and > 80% in one year. One patient showed slight improvement immediately after operation, and the improvement rate increased to 45% in 6 months and 75% in one year. One patient removed the stimulator. No adverse event related to the operation was found in all 13 patients. The stimulus parameters for STN-DBS were voltage 1.50-2.00 V, frequency 130-145 Hz, pulse width 60-90 μs at 6 months postoperatively, and were voltage 2.00-2.50 V, frequency 130-150 Hz, pulse width 60-90 μs at one year postoperatively. The stimulus parameters for GPi-DBS were voltage 2.50-2.80 V, frequency 130-160 Hz, pulse width 60-90 μs at 6 months postoperatively, and were voltage 2.50-4.00 V, frequency 145-170 Hz, pulse width 60-90 μs at one year postoperatively. Conclusions Both STN-DBS and GPi-DBS have good curative effect and safety in the treatment for torsion dystonia. Besides, patients should be treated with individual neuromodulation. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.007

  2. Point-of-Care Programming for Neuromodulation: A Feasibility Study Using Remote Presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Ivar; Song, Michael; Chiasson, Paula; Bustamante, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of neuromodulation and its indications has resulted in hundreds of thousands of patients with implanted devices worldwide. Because all patients require programming, this growth has created a heavy burden on neuromodulation centers and patients. Remote point-of-care programming may provide patients with real-time access to neuromodulation expertise in their communities. To test the feasibility of remotely programming a neuromodulation device using a remote-presence robot and to determine the ability of an expert programmer to telementor a nonexpert in programming the device. A remote-presence robot (RP-7) was used for remote programming. Twenty patients were randomly assigned to either conventional programming or a robotic session. The expert remotely mentored 10 nurses with no previous experience to program the devices of patients assigned to the remote-presence sessions. Accuracy of programming, adverse events, and satisfaction scores for all participants were assessed. There was no difference in the accuracy or clinical outcomes of programming between the standard and remote-presence sessions. No adverse events occurred in any session. The patients, nurses, and the expert programmer expressed high satisfaction scores with the remote-presence sessions. This study establishes the proof-of-principle that remote programming of neuromodulation devices using telepresence and expert telementoring of an individual with no previous experience to accurately program a device is feasible. We envision a time in the future when patients with implanted devices will have real-time access to neuromodulation expertise from the comfort of their own home.

  3. Lunar Samples: Apollo Collection Tools, Curation Handling, Surveyor III and Soviet Luna Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    The 6 Apollo missions that landed on the lunar surface returned 2196 samples comprised of 382 kg. The 58 samples weighing 21.5 kg collected on Apollo 11 expanded to 741 samples weighing 110.5 kg by the time of Apollo 17. The main goal on Apollo 11 was to obtain some material and return it safely to Earth. As we gained experience, the sampling tools and a more specific sampling strategy evolved. A summary of the sample types returned is shown in Table 1. By year 1989, some statistics on allocation by sample type were compiled [2]. The "scientific interest index" is based on the assumption that the more allocations per gram of sample, the higher the scientific interest. It is basically a reflection of the amount of diversity within a given sample type. Samples were also set aside for biohazard testing. The samples set aside and used for biohazard testing were represen-tative, as opposed to diverse. They tended to be larger and be comprised of less scientifically valuable mate-rial, such as dust and debris in the bottom of sample containers.

  4. An intelligent data collection tool for chemical safety/risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, Frederik A M; Van Sprang, Patrick A; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2008-02-01

    REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) is the new European chemical legislation which aims to assess risk or safety of tens of thousands of chemicals to improve the protection of human health and the environment. The chemical safety assessment process is of an iterative nature. First, an initial, worst-case assessment is conducted after which refinements are made until no risk has been estimated or the risk is adequately controlled. Wasting time and resources on additional testing and implementing risk management measures with low effect on risk conclusions should be avoided as much as possible. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of an intelligent data collection strategy based on a sensitivity (and uncertainty) analysis on the risk assessment model EUSES to identify and order the most important "within-EU-TGD-reducible" input parameters influencing the local and regional risk characterisation ratios. The ordering can be adjusted for the costs involved in additional testing (e.g. ecotoxicity, physico-chemical properties, emission estimates, etc.). The risk refinement tool therefore reduces the resources needed to obtain a realistic risk estimate (both less conservative and less uncertain) as efficient as possible.

  5. IL-17 is a neuromodulator of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changchun; Itakura, Eisuke; Nelson, Geoffrey M; Sheng, Ming; Laurent, Patrick; Fenk, Lorenz A; Butcher, Rebecca A; Hegde, Ramanujan S; de Bono, Mario

    2017-02-02

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine: it mediates responses to pathogens or tissue damage, and drives autoimmune diseases. Little is known about its role in the nervous system. Here we show that IL-17 has neuromodulator-like properties in Caenorhabditis elegans. IL-17 can act directly on neurons to alter their response properties and contribution to behaviour. Using unbiased genetic screens, we delineate an IL-17 signalling pathway and show that it acts in the RMG hub interneurons. Disrupting IL-17 signalling reduces RMG responsiveness to input from oxygen sensors, and renders sustained escape from 21% oxygen transient and contingent on additional stimuli. Over-activating IL-17 receptors abnormally heightens responses to 21% oxygen in RMG neurons and whole animals. IL-17 deficiency can be bypassed by optogenetic stimulation of RMG. Inducing IL-17 expression in adults can rescue mutant defects within 6 h. These findings reveal a non-immunological role of IL-17 modulating circuit function and behaviour.

  6. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeng Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC/norepinephrine (NE system is regarded as a critical part of the central “stress circuitry,” whose major function is to induce “fight or flight” behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty. The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear, but also for fight (anger. Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. “Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush” and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders.

  7. [Neuromodulation using matrix stimulation : A treatment for acute pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, M; Schulze, H; Radbruch, L; Marinova, M; Cuhls, H; Kravchenko, D; Conrad, R; Rolke, R

    2017-07-03

    There is currently a lack of studies that evaluate the effects of matrix electrode neuromodulation on acute pain. In this prospective and randomized cross-over study, we investigated the efficacy of 4 Hz-matrix stimulation on venipuncture-induced pain in 30 healthy subjects. We compared two conditions of neurostimulation: in EC1 (experimental condition 1), we performed venipuncture during stimulation, with 2.5 min of prestimulation with 600 stimuli; in EC2 (experimental condition 2), the length of stimulation was 5 min, at 1200 stimuli, with subsequent venipuncture. A group with no stimulation was used as control condition. The EC2 group did not only show a 77% reduction in puncture pain when compared to the control group (p time that pre-emptive matrix stimulation could be an effective way to reduce acute pain. The duration of stimulation seems to play a key role in the effectiveness of the neurophysiological mechanism of action. Matrix stimulation is a therapeutic intervention with very few side effects, which could, in the future, expand our pain-management options for the treatment of acute pain.

  8. Machine Assistance in Collection Building: New Tools, Research, Issues, and Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Mitchell

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital tool making offers many challenges, involving much trial and error. Developing machine learning and assistance in automated and semi-automated Internet resource discovery, metadata generation, and rich-text identification provides opportunities for great discovery, innovation, and the potential for transformation of the library community. The areas of computer science involved, as applied to the library applications addressed, are among that discipline’s leading edges. Making applied research practical and applicable, through placement within library/collection-management systems and services, involves equal parts computer scientist, research librarian, and legacy-systems archaeologist. Still, the early harvest is there for us now, with a large harvest pending. Data Fountains and iVia, the projects discussed, demonstrate this. Clearly, then, the present would be a good time for the library community to more proactively and significantly engage with this technology and research, to better plan for its impacts, to more proactively take up the challenges involved in its exploration, and to better and more comprehensively guide effort in this new territory. The alternative to doing this is that others will develop this territory for us, do it not as well, and sell it back to us at a premium. Awareness of this technology and its current capabilities, promises, limitations, and probable major impacts needs to be generalized throughout the library management, metadata, and systems communities. This article charts recent work, promising avenues for new research and development, and issues the library community needs to understand.

  9. Neuromodulation Therapies for Alcohol Addiction: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Celeste A; Mammis, Antonios

    2018-02-01

    associated with oral baclofen. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  10. Basal Ganglia Circuits as Targets for Neuromodulation in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Mahlon R; Wichmann, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The revival of stereotactic surgery for Parkinson disease (PD) in the 1990s, with pallidotomy and then with high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS), has led to a renaissance in functional surgery for movement and other neuropsychiatric disorders. To examine the scientific foundations and rationale for the use of ablation and DBS for treatment of neurologic and psychiatric diseases, using PD as the primary example. A summary of the large body of relevant literature is presented on anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and functional surgery for PD and other basal ganglia disorders. The signs and symptoms of movement disorders appear to result largely from signature abnormalities in one of several parallel and largely segregated basal ganglia thalamocortical circuits (ie, the motor circuit). The available evidence suggests that the varied movement disorders resulting from dysfunction of this circuit result from propagated disruption of downstream network activity in the thalamus, cortex, and brainstem. Ablation and DBS act to free downstream networks to function more normally. The basal ganglia thalamocortical circuit may play a key role in the expression of disordered movement, and the basal ganglia-brainstem projections may play roles in akinesia and disturbances of gait. Efforts are under way to target circuit dysfunction in brain areas outside of the traditionally implicated basal ganglia thalamocortical system, in particular, the pedunculopontine nucleus, to address gait disorders that respond poorly to levodopa and conventional DBS targets. Deep brain stimulation is now the treatment of choice for many patients with advanced PD and other movement disorders. The success of DBS and other forms of neuromodulation for neuropsychiatric disorders is the result of the ability to modulate circuit activity in discrete functional domains within the basal ganglia circuitry with highly focused interventions, which spare uninvolved areas that are often disrupted with

  11. Sacral neuromodulation in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, J; Krebs, J; Pannek, J

    2016-02-01

    This is a retrospective chart analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). This study was conducted in a spinal cord injury rehabilitation center in Switzerland. The charts of all patients who underwent SNM (testing and/or permanent implantation) because of NLUTD at our institution between 2007 and 2013 were evaluated. Treatment outcomes and complications were recorded. A total of 50 patients, 30 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 46 (±14) years, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The most frequent cause for SNM was spinal cord injury in 35 patients (70%). Median duration of the underlying disease was 9.5 (±9.3) years. In all, 35 patients (70%) received a permanent implant. The complication rate was 16% (8/50). At the last follow-up, SNM was in use in 32 patients. In 26 patients with SNM because of detrusor overactivity, voiding frequency per 24 h was significantly reduced from 9 to 6, and daily pad use rate was significantly improved (2.6 versus 0.6 pads per 24h). On comparing urodynamic assessment of detrusor function before and under SNM, no significant suppression of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was detected. In nine patients with chronic neurogenic urinary retention, median postvoid residual urine was significantly reduced from 370 to 59 ml. In all, 94% of the patients were either very satisfied or satisfied with SNM. SNM might be an additional therapy option in carefully selected patients with NLUTD. On the basis of our results, urodynamic evaluation before SNM is mandatory, as the procedure does not seem to be suited to significantly alleviate NDO.

  12. Brain plasticity effects of neuromodulation against multiple sclerosis fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca eTecchio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RationaleWe recently reported on the efficacy of a personalized transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS treatment in reducing MS fatigue. That result supports the notion that interventions targeted at modifying unbalanced interactions within the sensorimotor network could represent valid non-pharmacological treatments. ObjectiveThe present work aimed at assessing whether the mentioned intervention also induces changes in the excitability of cortical areas. MethodTwo separate groups of fatigued MS patients were given a 5-day tDCS treatments targeting respectively the whole body somatosensory areas (S1wb and the hand sensorimotor areas (SM1hand. The study had a double blind, sham-controlled, randomized, cross-over (Real vs. Sham design. Before and after each treatment, we measured fatigue levels (by the modified Fatigue Impact Scale, mFIS, motor evoked potentials (MEPs in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP in response to median nerve stimulation. We took MEPs and SEPs as measures of the excitability of the primary motor area (M1 and the primary somatosensory area (S1 respectively.ResultsThe Real S1wb treatment produced a 27% reduction of the mFIS baseline level, while the SM1hand treatment showed no difference between Real and Sham stimulations. M1 excitability increased on average 6 % of the baseline in the S1wb group and 40% in the SM1hand group. Observed SEP changes were not significant and we found no association between M1 excitability changes and mFIS decrease.ConclusionsThe tDCS treatment was more effective against MS fatigue when the electrode was focused on the bilateral whole body somatosensory area. Changes in S1 and M1 excitability did not correlate with symptoms amelioration.SignificanceThe neuromodulation treatment that proved effective against MS fatigue induced only minor variations of the motor cortex excitability, not enough to explain the beneficial effects of

  13. Citizen Science as a Tool for Augmenting Museum Collection Data from Urban Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Dakota M. Spear; Gregory B. Pauly; Gregory B. Pauly; Kristine Kaiser; Kristine Kaiser; Kristine Kaiser

    2017-01-01

    Museum collections are critical to contemporary biological research, but museum acquisitions have declined in recent decades, hampering researchers' ability to use collections to assess species responses to habitat modification, urbanization, and global climate change. Citizen science may be a key method to bolster museum collections data, particularly from urban regions, where ongoing data collection is critical to our understanding of ecosystem dynamics in a highly modified and variable lan...

  14. Acoustic Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation in a Real Life Patient Population with Chronic Tonal Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Christian; Ströbel, Armin; Williams, Mark; Patel, Nitesh; Wurzer, Hannes; von Stackelberg, Tatjana; Brinkmann, Uwe; Langguth, Berthold; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Primary tinnitus has a severe negative influence on the quality of life of a significant portion of the general population. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation is designed to induce a long-lasting reduction of tinnitus symptoms. To test acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation as a treatment for chronic, tonal tinnitus under real life conditions, an outpatient study “RESET Real Life” was commissioned by ANM GmbH. Herein we present the results of this study. Methods. In a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized, noncontrolled multicenter clinical study with 200 chronic tinnitus patients, tinnitus questionnaire TBF-12 and Global Clinical Improvement-Impression Scale (CGI-I7) are used to study the safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation. 189 patients completed the last 12-month visit, 11 patients dropped out (8 because of nontreatment related reasons; 2 because tinnitus did not change; and 1 because tinnitus got louder). Results. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation caused a statistically and clinically significant decrease in TBF-12 scores as well as in CGI-I7 after 12 months of therapy under real life conditions. There were no persistent adverse events reported that were related to the therapy. Conclusion. The field study “RESET Real Life” provides evidence for safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation in a prospective, open-label, real life setting. PMID:26568958

  15. Acoustic Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation in a Real Life Patient Population with Chronic Tonal Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hauptmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Primary tinnitus has a severe negative influence on the quality of life of a significant portion of the general population. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation is designed to induce a long-lasting reduction of tinnitus symptoms. To test acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation as a treatment for chronic, tonal tinnitus under real life conditions, an outpatient study “RESET Real Life” was commissioned by ANM GmbH. Herein we present the results of this study. Methods. In a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized, noncontrolled multicenter clinical study with 200 chronic tinnitus patients, tinnitus questionnaire TBF-12 and Global Clinical Improvement-Impression Scale (CGI-I7 are used to study the safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation. 189 patients completed the last 12-month visit, 11 patients dropped out (8 because of nontreatment related reasons; 2 because tinnitus did not change; and 1 because tinnitus got louder. Results. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation caused a statistically and clinically significant decrease in TBF-12 scores as well as in CGI-I7 after 12 months of therapy under real life conditions. There were no persistent adverse events reported that were related to the therapy. Conclusion. The field study “RESET Real Life” provides evidence for safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation in a prospective, open-label, real life setting.

  16. Citizen Science as a Tool for Augmenting Museum Collection Data from Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakota M. Spear

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Museum collections are critical to contemporary biological research, but museum acquisitions have declined in recent decades, hampering researchers' ability to use collections to assess species responses to habitat modification, urbanization, and global climate change. Citizen science may be a key method to bolster museum collections data, particularly from urban regions, where ongoing data collection is critical to our understanding of ecosystem dynamics in a highly modified and variable landscape. In this study, we compare data collected as part of the citizen-science project Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California (RASCals, hosted on the platform iNaturalist (www.inaturalist.org, to data in the VertNet database (www.vertnet.org, which houses millions of museum collection records from over 250 natural-history collections, for four focal species, including a native lizard of conservation concern that has declined with urbanization, a native lizard that is widespread in urban areas, and two invasive aquatic species. We compared numbers of VertNet records over time to modern RASCals records, and the number of records collected from urban, suburban, and protected areas from both databases. For all species, citizen-science records were generated much more rapidly than museum records. For three of our four focal species, RASCals participants over 27 months documented from 70 to 750% more records than were added to the VertNet database after 1990. For the urban-tolerant southern alligator lizard, RASCals participants collected nearly 45 times more modern urban records than are contained in the VertNet database. For all other species, the majority of RASCals records were collected within suburban or other highly modified landscapes, demonstrating the value of citizen science for collecting data within urban and suburban ecosystems. As new museum acquisitions decline, citizen-science projects like RASCals may become critical to the maintenance

  17. Tools for practice and theory: how to monitor collective learning in schools.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Jos Castelijns; dr. Jeannette Geldens; dr Bob Koster; dr.ir. Quinta Kools

    2010-01-01

    Primary schools are challenged to continuously improve their teachers' teaching and their students' learning. Through an iterative process, we have developed a method to stimulate teachers to collectively collect and analyze data, derive consequences from their analyses, take actions and evaluate

  18. A Novel Tool Improves Existing Estimates of Recent Tuberculosis Transmission in Settings of Sparse Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaie, Parastu; Mathema, Barun; Kelton, W David; Azman, Andrew S; Pennington, Jeff; Dowdy, David W

    2015-01-01

    In any setting, a proportion of incident active tuberculosis (TB) reflects recent transmission ("recent transmission proportion"), whereas the remainder represents reactivation. Appropriately estimating the recent transmission proportion has important implications for local TB control, but existing approaches have known biases, especially where data are incomplete. We constructed a stochastic individual-based model of a TB epidemic and designed a set of simulations (derivation set) to develop two regression-based tools for estimating the recent transmission proportion from five inputs: underlying TB incidence, sampling coverage, study duration, clustered proportion of observed cases, and proportion of observed clusters in the sample. We tested these tools on a set of unrelated simulations (validation set), and compared their performance against that of the traditional 'n-1' approach. In the validation set, the regression tools reduced the absolute estimation bias (difference between estimated and true recent transmission proportion) in the 'n-1' technique by a median [interquartile range] of 60% [9%, 82%] and 69% [30%, 87%]. The bias in the 'n-1' model was highly sensitive to underlying levels of study coverage and duration, and substantially underestimated the recent transmission proportion in settings of incomplete data coverage. By contrast, the regression models' performance was more consistent across different epidemiological settings and study characteristics. We provide one of these regression models as a user-friendly, web-based tool. Novel tools can improve our ability to estimate the recent TB transmission proportion from data that are observable (or estimable) by public health practitioners with limited available molecular data.

  19. Enabling functional neural circuit simulations with distributed computing of neuromodulated plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke ePotjans

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A major puzzle in the field of computational neuroscience is how to relate system-level learning in higher organisms to synaptic plasticity. Recently, plasticity rules depending not only on pre- and post-synaptic activity but also on a third, non-local neuromodulatory signal have emerged as key candidates to bridge the gap between the macroscopic and the microscopic level of learning. Crucial insights into this topic are expected to be gained from simulations of neural systems, as these allow the simultaneous study of the multiple spatial and temporal scales that are involved in the problem. In particular, synaptic plasticity can be studied during the whole learning process, i.e. on a time scale of minutes to hours and across multiple brain areas. Implementing neuromodulated plasticity in large-scale network simulations where the neuromodulatory signal is dynamically generated by the network itself is challenging, because the network structure is commonly defined purely by the connectivity graph without explicit reference to the embedding of the nodes in physical space. Furthermore, the simulation of networks with realistic connectivity entails the use of distributed computing. A neuromodulated synapse must therefore be informed in an efficient way about the neuromodulatory signal, which is typically generated by a population of neurons located on different machines than either the pre- or post-synaptic neuron. Here, we develop a general framework to solve the problem of implementing neuromodulated plasticity in a time-driven distributed simulation, without reference to a particular implementation language, neuromodulator or neuromodulated plasticity mechanism. We implement our framework in the simulator NEST and demonstrate excellent scaling up to 1024 processors for simulations of a recurrent network incorporating neuromodulated spike-timing dependent plasticity.

  20. [Lumbar post-laminectomy syndrome: II. Pain management using neuro-modulation techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaina Padrón, F J

    2008-02-01

    The application of neuro-modulation techniques in general is currently gaining acceptance in various aspects of medicine. Neuro-modulation is defined as: "Therapeutical interventions using implantable devices to modify the functioning of central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems". Following lumbar disc surgery, or lumbar spine surgery in general, several chronic pain syndromes can result, either in the lumbar region and/or in the lower limbs. The current status is for the application of surgery to the degenerative spine (degenerative disc disease and lumbar stenosis) for the relief of chronic pain. A review of the methodology of evidence based medicine, show that the instrumented and fusion techniques are not the answered despite 20 years of the use of these techniques following failure of surgery for the relief of back pain syndrome. Neuro-modulation techniques represent a step in the right direction for the management of these chronic pain syndromes. Frequently they enable the resolution of chronic pain following spine surgery without having to resort to repeat surgery. We describe here the different neuro-modulation techniques (spinal cord stimulation, spinal drug infusions) which can be used in the case of back surgery failure, and we describe technical aspects and "tricks of the trade" for the correct implantation of the devices used in techniques. Neuro-modulation techniques are applied to the management of chronic pain following disc surgery and represent a valid alternative to repeat surgery and/or arthrodesis (instrumented or not). Neurosurgeons are again called to play active roles in the field of neuro-modulation for the treatment.

  1. PySCeSToolbox: a collection of metabolic pathway analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Carl D; Hofmeyr, Jan-Hendrik S; Rohwer, Johann M

    2018-01-01

    PySCeSToolbox is an extension to the Python Simulator for Cellular Systems (PySCeS) that includes tools for performing generalized supply-demand analysis, symbolic metabolic control analysis, and a framework for investigating the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Each tool addresses a different aspect of metabolic behaviour, control, and regulation; the tools complement each other and can be used in conjunction to better understand higher level system behaviour. PySCeSToolbox is available on Linux, Mac OS X and Windows. It is licensed under the BSD 3-clause licence. Code, setup instructions and a link to documentation can be found at https://github.com/PySCeS/PyscesToolbox. jr@sun.ac.za. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Understanding How to Prevent and Treat Adverse Events of Fillers and Neuromodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablon, Glynis

    2016-12-01

    Experience teaches cosmetic surgeons to become good, but avoiding and treating adverse events make them great. In no area is this more true than in cosmetic procedures involving fillers and neuromodulators. By utilizing knowledge of materials and anatomy involved, specialists seek to avoid complications. A well-trained physician is able to reduce the sequelae from an adverse event by acting promptly using algorithms and a methodical approach to treatments. In this article I discuss the difference between perceived and true complications from fillers and neuromodulators, how to avoid, what to look for and how to treat to provide patients with the best possible outcomes, and make the physicians life less stressful.

  3. The Appropriate Use of Neurostimulation of the Spinal Cord and Peripheral Nervous System for the Treatment of Chronic Pain and Ischemic Diseases : The Neuromodulation Appropriateness Consensus Committee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deer, Timothy R.; Mekhail, Nagy; Provenzano, David; Pope, Jason; Krames, Elliot; Leong, Michael; Levy, Robert M.; Abejon, David; Buchser, Eric; Burton, Allen; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Candido, Kenneth; Caraway, David; Cousins, Michael; de Jongste, Micheal; Diwan, Sudhir; Eldabe, Sam; Gatzinsky, Kliment; Foreman, Robert D.; Hayek, Salim; Kim, Philip; Kinfe, Thomas; Kloth, David; Kumar, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed; Lad, Shivanand P.; Liem, Liong; Linderoth, Bengt; Mackey, Sean; McDowell, Gladstone; McRoberts, Porter; Poree, Lawrence; Prager, Joshua; Raso, Lou; Rauck, Richard; Russo, Marc; Simpson, Brian; Slavin, Konstantin; Staats, Peter; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Verrills, Paul; Wellington, Joshua; Williams, Kayode; North, Richard

    Introduction: The Neuromodulation Appropriateness Consensus Committee (NACC) of the International Neuromodulation Society (INS) evaluated evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of neurostimulation to treat chronic pain, chronic critical limb ischemia, and refractory angina and recommended

  4. Developing a Web Tool for Searching and Viewing Collections of High-Quality Cultural Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarinis, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Searching for information and viewing visual representations of products in e-organisations is a common activity of the e-visitors to these organisations. For example, in e-museums, users are shown images or other visual information of the existing objects. The aim of this paper is to present a tool which supports the effective searching…

  5. A smartphone-based ASR data collection tool for under-resourced languages

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic data collection for automatic speech recognition (ASR) purposes is a particularly challenging task when working with under resourced languages, many of which are found in the developing world. We provide a brief overview of related data...

  6. Mating system and pollen dispersal in Eugenia dysenterica (Myrtaceae) germplasm collection: tools for conservation and domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Eduardo B; Collevatti, Rosane G; Chaves, Lázaro J; Moreira, Lucas R; Telles, Mariana P C

    2016-04-01

    Eugenia dysenterica DC. (Myrtaceae) is a perennial tree producing edible fruits and ornamental flowers of potential value widely distributed in Brazilian "Cerrados" (savannas), but available genetic resources and potential for future breeding programs must be evaluated. Here we evaluated the reproductive system and pollen-mediated gene flow in one generation of Eugenia dysenterica germplasm collection of Agronomy School, Federal University of Goiás (in Goiânia city, Central Brazil). We collected leaves from all adults from the germplasm collection (682 plants) and seeds (542) from 23 mother-trees. Genotypes were obtained for seven microsatellite loci. Genetic diversity was high and did not significantly differ between adults (H e = 0.777) and progeny arrays (H e = 0.617). Our results showed that E. dysenterica has an allogamous mating system in the germplasm collection (t m = 0.957), but with high and significant biparental inbreeding (t m - t s = 0.109). Because sibs are very close to each other, mating between closely related individuals is likely. Paternity correlation was also relatively high, indicating a 11.9 % probability that a randomly chosen pair of outcrossed progeny from the same array are full sibs. The maximum pollen dispersal distance (224 m), estimated using assignment test, corresponded to the boundaries of the orchard. We were able to assign the paternity to only 64 % of the 349 seeds analyzed, indicating potential pollen immigration to the germplasm collection. The variance effective population size estimated for one maternal family in the germplasm collection (N ev = 3.42) is very close to the theoretical maximum value for half-sibs (Nev = 4.0). Because E. dysenterica has a long life cycle and generation time, the maintenance of an effective population size of at least 100 in the germplasm collection is suggested, which can be achieved by maintaining a seed-trees number around 30 individuals.

  7. Benefits of a clinical data warehouse with data mining tools to collect data for a radiotherapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Erik; Persoon, Lucas; Nijsten, Sebastiaan; Wiessler, Wolfgang; Dekker, André; Lambin, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    Collecting trial data in a medical environment is at present mostly performed manually and therefore time-consuming, prone to errors and often incomplete with the complex data considered. Faster and more accurate methods are needed to improve the data quality and to shorten data collection times where information is often scattered over multiple data sources. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible benefit of modern data warehouse technology in the radiation oncology field. In this study, a Computer Aided Theragnostics (CAT) data warehouse combined with automated tools for feature extraction was benchmarked against the regular manual data-collection processes. Two sets of clinical parameters were compiled for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and rectal cancer, using 27 patients per disease. Data collection times and inconsistencies were compared between the manual and the automated extraction method. The average time per case to collect the NSCLC data manually was 10.4 ± 2.1 min and 4.3 ± 1.1 min when using the automated method (pdata collected for NSCLC and 5.3% for rectal cancer, there was a discrepancy between the manual and automated method. Aggregating multiple data sources in a data warehouse combined with tools for extraction of relevant parameters is beneficial for data collection times and offers the ability to improve data quality. The initial investments in digitizing the data are expected to be compensated due to the flexibility of the data analysis. Furthermore, successive investigations can easily select trial candidates and extract new parameters from the existing databases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cost-effectiveness evaluations of spinal neuromodulation with ziconotide continuous infusion in cancer pain in a real clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orietta Zaniolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: ziconotide is the first-in-class drug of selective N-type voltage-sensitive calcium-channel blockers used to control severe chronic pain. The present study is developed in order to analyze clinical and economical outcomes of spinal neuromodulation with ziconotide continuous infusion in cancer pain in a real clinical practice.Methods: costs and effects of ziconotide are compared with those of traditional neuromodulation with morphine and adjuvant drugs, administered by intrathecal infusion.Effectiveness and resources consumption data were retrospectively collected in 22 patients with severe complex cancer pain followed by one Italian centre from the day of port implantation to drop-out , due to death or consent withdrawal. 11 patients received morphine regimens and the other 11 were treated with ziconotide. The evaluation of the number of days with controlled pain (i.e., with an at least 30% reduction on the Numeric Rating Scale-Pain Intensity, NRSPI is the primary outcome of the analysis. The evaluated consumed health resources include drugs, visits, port maintenance, and pump recharge and amortization. Current Italian prices, real practice acquisition and remuneration costs borne by the third payer are applied.Results: patients receiving ziconotide lived significantly more days with controlled pain (78% vs 40%; p < 0.05. Average weekly cost is about 232 € for ziconotide and 120 € for morphine; the main driver being the pharmaceutical cost (respectively 81% and 65% of the total. Higher ziconotide acquisition costs are partially offset by minor expenses for adjuvant therapies, as ziconotide-treated patients on average receive a lower number of drugs than those receiving a traditional regimen. The incremental cost for one further day with controlled pain resulted of 42,30 €.Conclusions: ziconotide permits effective treatment of extremely difficult-to-manage pain, with a mild increment of cost, as compared to

  9. Domain-Specific Thesaurus as a Tool for Information Retrieval and Collection of Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Boikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports basic approaches to constructive creation of an open resource named ”Domain-specified thesaurus of poetics”, which is one of the levels of an information-analytical system of the Russian poetry (IAS RP. The poetics is a group of disciplines focused on a comprehensive theoretical and historical study of poetry. IAS RP will be used as a tool for a wide range of studies allowing to determine the characteristic features of the analyzed works of poetry. Consequently, the thesaurus is the knowledge base from which one can borrow input data for training the system. The aim of our research requires a specific approach to formating the knowledge base. Thesaurus is a web-based resource which includes a domain-specific directory, information retrieval tools and tools for further analyzes. The study of glossary consisting of three thousand terms and a set of semantic fields is reviewed in this paper. Rdf-graph of the domain-specified thesaurus of poetics is presented, containing 9 types of objects and different kinds of relationships among them. Wiki-tecnologies are used for implementing a resource which allows to store data in Semantic Web formats.

  10. 76 FR 49398 - Non-Discrimination in Compensation; Compensation Data Collection Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ...'' difference may understate the true effect of discrimination. In addition to the gender pay gap, scholars have... of Federal Contract Compliance Programs 41 CFR Parts 60-1 RIN 1250-AA03 Non-Discrimination in... collected data include generating insight into potential problems of compensation discrimination at the...

  11. Embedding E-mail in primary schools: developing a tool for collective reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, B.; van der Meij, Hans; Boersma, Kerst Th.; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2005-01-01

    Reflection is an important aspect of learning in groups. In collective moments of reflection, learners can share and compare their ideas with others, and by doing so can reach an articulated and personal understanding of a learning task and domain. In the research presented here, e-mail is examined

  12. New Tools for Preservation: Assessing Long-Term Environmental Effects on Library and Archives Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, James M.; And Others

    A new method was developed by the Image Permanence Institute for monitoring the effects of dynamic environmental conditions on organic materials in order to make it easier to manage the preservation of library and archives collections. This new approach to preservation management applies to the many types of scholarly resources for which research…

  13. Using GIS-Based Tools for the Optimization of Solid Waste Collection and Transport: Case Study of Sfax City, Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Kallel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expenditure for waste collection and transport in Tunisia constitutes 75–100% of the total solid waste management budget. In this study, optimized scenarios were developed using ArcGIS Network Analyst tool in order to improve the efficiency of waste collection and transportation in the district Cité El Habib of Sfax city, Tunisia. Geographic Information System (GIS was created based on data collection and GPS tracking (collection route/bins position. The actual state (Scenario S0 was evaluated, and by modifying its particular parameters, other scenarios were generated and analyzed to identify optimal routes: S1, route optimized with the same working resources (change of stops sequencing only; S2, route optimized with change of vehicles; and S3, route optimized with change of collection method (vehicles and reallocation of bins. The results showed that the three scenarios guarantee savings compared to S0 in terms of collection time (14%, 57%, and 57% for S1, S2, and S3, resp. and distance (13.5%, 13.5%, and 40.5% for S1, S2, and S3, resp.. Thus, a direct impact on fuel consumption can be expected with savings of 16%, 20%, and 48% for S1, S2, and S3, respectively, without mentioning the additional benefits related to CO2 emissions, hours of work, vehicles wear/maintenance, and so forth.

  14. Minimally invasive sacral neuromodulation implant technique: modifications to the conventional procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratto, Carlo; Morelli, Umberto; Paparo, Stefania; Parello, Angelo; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista

    2003-03-01

    Sacral neuromodulation is a novel treatment for selected urinary and bowel dysfunctions. A new method is described for electrode implantation, the "minimally invasive sacral neuromodulation implant technique." After the percutaneous nerve evaluation test, a small longitudinal incision (3 cm) is made, and a catheter cannula segment is inserted through the sacral foramen beside an insulated needle. The electrode is introduced into the catheter cannula, which is then removed and fixed to the sacrum by means of small anchors. The proximal part of the lead is tunneled into the subcutaneous tissue, reaching the pocket made to accommodate the neurostimulator. This procedure was performed in ten patients (5 male; mean age, 50.4 years). In four patients a single electrode was implanted, and in six patients two electrodes were implanted. The minimally invasive technique was significantly faster, saving a mean time of 20 minutes for each electrode. The incision made directly on the sacral foramen was significantly reduced (3 vs. 12 cm), avoiding the wide, blunt dissection of subcutaneous fat tissue. Application of the catheter cannula allowed the electrode to be introduced easily and correctly. The electrode anchors never failed: no cases of lead displacement or suboptimal position of the electrode occurred. A unilateral, sterile subcutaneous seroma occurred in one of the ten patients. The minimally invasive sacral neuromodulation implant technique seems to be a safe procedure-making sacral neuromodulation implant easier, faster, and safer, in as much as complications could be potentially reduced.

  15. Is on-demand sacral neuromodulation in patients with OAB syndrome a feasible therapy regime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerlemans, Dennis J A J; van Voskuilen, Anco C; Marcelissen, Tom; Weil, Ernest H J; de Bie, Rob A; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip E V

    2011-11-01

    Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) of the lower urinary tract has proven to be safe and effective in patients with complaints of OAB syndrome who are not responding to conservative therapy. After 5 years of treatment the implanted system is still effective in 56-71% of patients. The loss of effect could be caused by adaptation of the nerve system to prolonged stimulation of the sacral nerves. We set up a pilot intervention study. After a run-in period of 2 weeks patients were randomized into two groups: one group with on-demand neuromodulation (intervention group) and one group with continuous neuromodulation (control group). Patients in the intervention group were instructed to switch their INS off by default and to switch it on again when they felt recurrent symptoms, patients in the control group were asked to use their system as normally. After 2 weeks 10 out of 16 subjects reported a comparable symptom score during on-demand use of their neuromodulation system. Patients appreciated the comfort of being self-determent in the need for therapy. Possible benefits for patients could be: more autonomy, longer battery life of the implanted INS, decreasing the chance of adaptation by the nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Non-Traditional Management of the Neurogenic Bladder: Tissue Engineering and Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with spina bifida and a neurogenic bladder have traditionally been managed with clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy in order to treat abnormal bladder wall dynamics, protect the upper urinary tract from damage, and achieve urinary continence. However, some patients will fail this therapy and require surgical reconstruction in the form of bladder augmentation surgery using reconfigured intestine or stomach to increase the bladder capacity while reducing the internal storage pressure. Despite functional success of bladder augmentation in achieving a low pressure reservoir, there are several associated complications of this operation and patients do not have the ability to volitionally void. For these reasons, alternative treatments have been sought. Two exciting alternative approaches that are currently being investigated are tissue engineering and neuromodulation. Tissue engineering aims to create new bladder tissue for replacement purposes with both “seeded” and “unseeded” technology. Advances in the fields of nanotechnology and stem cell biology have further enhanced these tissue engineering technologies. Neuromodulation therapies directly address the root of the problem in patients with spina bifida and a neurogenic bladder, namely the abnormal relationship between the nerves and the bladder wall. These therapies include transurethral bladder electrostimulation, sacral neuromodulation, and neurosurgical techniques such as selective sacral rhizotomy and artificial somatic-autonomic reflex pathway construction. This review will discuss both tissue engineering techniques and neuromodulation therapies in more detail including rationale, experimental data, current status of clinical application, and future direction.

  17. The role of multiple neuromodulators in reinforcement learning that is based on competition between eligibility traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Huertas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to maximize reward and avoid punishment is essential for animal survival. Reinforcement learning (RL refers to the algorithms used by biological or artificial systems to learn how to maximize reward or avoid negative outcomes based on past experiences. While RL is also important in machine learning, the types of mechanistic constraints encountered by biological machinery might be different than those for artificial systems. Two major problems encountered by RL are how to relate a stimulus with a reinforcing signal that is delayed in time (temporal credit assignment, and how to stop learning once the target behaviors are attained (stopping rule. To address the first problem, synaptic eligibility traces were introduced, bridging the temporal gap between a stimulus and its reward. Although these were mere theoretical constructs, recent experiements have provided evidence of their existence. These experiments also reveal that the presence of specific neuromodulators converts the traces into changes in synaptic efficacy. A mechanistic implementation of the stopping rule usually assumes the inhibition of the reward nucleus; however, recent experimental results have shown that learning terminates at the appropriate network state even in setups where the reward cannot be inhibited. In an effort to describe a learning rule that solves the temporal credit assignment problem and implements a biologically plausible stopping rule, we proposed a model based on two separate synaptic eligibility traces, one for long-term potentiation (LTP and one for long-term depression (LTD, each obeying different dynamics and having different effective magnitudes. The model has been shown to successfully generate stable learning in recurrent networks. Although the model assumes the presence of a single neuromodulator, evidence indicates that there are different neuromodulators for expressing the different traces. What could be the role of different

  18. Assessing the role of learning devices and geovisualisation tools for collective action in natural resource management: Experiences from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castella, Jean-Christophe

    2009-02-01

    In northern Vietnam uplands the successive policy reforms that accompanied agricultural decollectivisation triggered very rapid changes in land use in the 1990s. From a centralized system of natural resource management, a multitude of individual strategies emerged which contributed to new production interactions among farming households, changes in landscape structures, and conflicting strategies among local stakeholders. Within this context of agrarian transition, learning devices can help local communities to collectively design their own course of action towards sustainable natural resource management. This paper presents a collaborative approach combining a number of participatory methods and geovisualisation tools (e.g., spatially explicit multi-agent models and role-playing games) with the shared goal to analyse and represent the interactions between: (i) decision-making processes by individual farmers based on the resource profiles of their farms; (ii) the institutions which regulate resource access and usage; and (iii) the biophysical and socioeconomic environment. This methodological pathway is illustrated by a case study in Bac Kan Province where it successfully led to a communication platform on natural resource management. In a context of rapid socioeconomic changes, learning devices and geovisualisation tools helped embed the participatory approach within a process of community development. The combination of different tools, each with its own advantages and constraints, proved highly relevant for supporting collective natural resource management.

  19. Development of a Web-based tool to collect and display water system customer service areas for public health action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michelle; Wolff, Craig; Collins, Natalie; Guo, Liang; Meltzer, Dan; English, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Significant illness is associated with biological contaminants in drinking water, but little is known about health effects from low levels of chemical contamination in drinking water. To examine these effects in epidemiological studies, the sources of drinking water of study populations need to be known. The California Environmental Health Tracking Program developed an online application that would collect data on the geographic location of public water system (PWS) customer service areas in California, which then could be linked to demographic and drinking water quality data. We deployed the Water Boundary Tool (WBT), a Web-based geospatial crowdsourcing application that can manage customer service boundary data for each PWS in California and can track changes over time. We also conducted a needs assessment for expansion to other states. The WBT was designed for water system operators, local and state regulatory agencies, and government entities. Since its public launch in 2012, the WBT has collected service area boundaries for about 2300 individual PWS, serving more than 90% of the California population. Results of the needs assessment suggest interest and utility for deploying such a tool among states lacking statewide PWS service area boundary data. Although the WBT data set is incomplete, it has already been used for a variety of applications, including fulfilling legislatively mandated reporting requirements and linking customer service areas to drinking water quality data to better understand local water quality issues. Development of this tool holds promise to assist with outbreak investigations and prevention, environmental health monitoring, and emergency preparedness and response.

  20. An Analysis of Physician Assistant LibGuides: A Tool for Collection Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine V; Johnson, Scott Y

    2017-01-01

    The Physician Assistant (PA) specialty encompasses many subject areas and requires many types of library resources. An analysis of PA LibGuides was performed to determine most frequently recommended resources. A sample of LibGuides from U.S. institutions accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) was included in this study. Resources presented on guides were tabulated and organized by resource type. Databases and point-of-care tools were the types of resources listed by the most LibGuides. There were over 1,000 books listed on the 45 guides, including over 600 unique books listed. There were fewer journals listed, only 163. Overall, while the 45 LibGuides evaluated list many unique resources in each category, a librarian can create an accepted list of the most frequently listed resources from the data gathered.

  1. Young people and drug consumption: workshops to provide tools for workers in social institutions, from a collective health perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Baldini Soares

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was, through workshops, to provide tools for workers in social institutions who work with young people, so that they could understand present-day drug consumption. It started from the presupposition that approaching this topic from a collective health perspective, i.e. from understanding the structure of the production, distribution and consumption of drugs today, the work of these institutions might be improved. The aim was to investigate the effectiveness of workshops as tools in the educational process. The methodology consisted of systematically conducting workshops within a theoretical-methodological framework of historical-critical theory. The workers' participation evolved qualitatively, thereby showing that the knowledge identified, along with the common sense initially brought in, evolved into comprehension of the roots of harmful drug consumption and into surmounting reiterative practices that fed back into myths, prejudice and stereotypes regarding users, as well as gaining respect for the power and effects of drugs.

  2. Applying Multiple Data Collection Tools to Quantify Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Communication on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip M; Leader, Amy; Yom-Tov, Elad; Budenz, Alexandra; Fisher, Kara; Klassen, Ann C

    2016-12-05

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. There are several vaccines that protect against strains of HPV most associated with cervical and other cancers. Thus, HPV vaccination has become an important component of adolescent preventive health care. As media evolves, more information about HPV vaccination is shifting to social media platforms such as Twitter. Health information consumed on social media may be especially influential for segments of society such as younger populations, as well as ethnic and racial minorities. The objectives of our study were to quantify HPV vaccine communication on Twitter, and to develop a novel methodology to improve the collection and analysis of Twitter data. We collected Twitter data using 10 keywords related to HPV vaccination from August 1, 2014 to July 31, 2015. Prospective data collection used the Twitter Search API and retrospective data collection used Twitter Firehose. Using a codebook to characterize tweet sentiment and content, we coded a subsample of tweets by hand to develop classification models to code the entire sample using machine learning procedures. We also documented the words in the 140-character tweet text most associated with each keyword. We used chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and nonparametric equality of medians to test for significant differences in tweet characteristic by sentiment. A total of 193,379 English-language tweets were collected, classified, and analyzed. Associated words varied with each keyword, with more positive and preventive words associated with "HPV vaccine" and more negative words associated with name-brand vaccines. Positive sentiment was the largest type of sentiment in the sample, with 75,393 positive tweets (38.99% of the sample), followed by negative sentiment with 48,940 tweets (25.31% of the sample). Positive and neutral tweets constituted the largest percentage of tweets mentioning prevention or protection (20

  3. Using Twitter for Demographic and Social Science Research: Tools for Data Collection and Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Tyler H; Lee, Hedwig; Cesare, Nina; Shojaie, Ali; Spiro, Emma S

    2017-08-01

    Despite recent and growing interest in using Twitter to examine human behavior and attitudes, there is still significant room for growth regarding the ability to leverage Twitter data for social science research. In particular, gleaning demographic information about Twitter users-a key component of much social science research-remains a challenge. This article develops an accurate and reliable data processing approach for social science researchers interested in using Twitter data to examine behaviors and attitudes, as well as the demographic characteristics of the populations expressing or engaging in them. Using information gathered from Twitter users who state an intention to not vote in the 2012 presidential election, we describe and evaluate a method for processing data to retrieve demographic information reported by users that is not encoded as text (e.g., details of images) and evaluate the reliability of these techniques. We end by assessing the challenges of this data collection strategy and discussing how large-scale social media data may benefit demographic researchers.

  4. [Antipyretics indication by pediatricians. Internet as a tool in data collections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamud, Ariel; Suwezda, Alejandro; Matamoros, Rodrigo; Ringuelet, Lucio

    2008-10-01

    Fever is one of the most common complaints in Pediatrics. We performed this study to know how pediatricians use antipyretics to manage fever in children, and Internet was used to collect data. On line survey with a questionnaire regarding general and specific issues about fever. 1600 pediatricians participated. 62% were female, 35% had less than 10 years of practice, 28% between 10 and 20 years of practice, and 33% over 20 years of practice. 67% had training in Pediatrics. 93% use the arm-pit to measure fever and 37% consider over 38 degrees C as being fever. The mostly used antithermic in older than 6 month was Ibuprofeno and in younger than 6 months, Paracetamol. 59% of the pediatricians alternate 2 antipyretics (63.7% with less than 20 year of experience versus 49.3% with > 20 years of experience in their profession); 29% define their actions based on the Argentine Society of Pediatrics guidelines and 26% on their personal experience. Pediatricians prescribe antipyretics regularly alternating them in spite of the lack of evidence supporting that behavior. The less experienced the pediatrician, the more frecuent the practice of alternating antipyretics.

  5. A Tool for the Automated Collection of Space Utilization Data: Three Dimensional Space Utilization Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Gordon A.; Fink, Patrick; Ngo, Phong H.; Morency, Richard; Simon, Cory; Williams, Robert E.; Perez, Lance C.

    2017-01-01

    Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element within the Human Research Program (HRP) and the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Element are conducting research regarding Net Habitable Volume (NHV), the internal volume within a spacecraft or habitat that is available to crew for required activities, as well as layout and accommodations within the volume. NASA needs methods to unobtrusively collect NHV data without impacting crew time. Data required includes metrics such as location and orientation of crew, volume used to complete tasks, internal translation paths, flow of work, and task completion times. In less constrained environments methods exist yet many are obtrusive and require significant post-processing. ?Examplesused in terrestrial settings include infrared (IR) retro-reflective marker based motion capture, GPS sensor tracking, inertial tracking, and multi-camera methods ?Due to constraints of space operations many such methods are infeasible. Inertial tracking systems typically rely upon a gravity vector to normalize sensor readings,and traditional IR systems are large and require extensive calibration. ?However, multiple technologies have not been applied to space operations for these purposes. Two of these include: 3D Radio Frequency Identification Real-Time Localization Systems (3D RFID-RTLS) ?Depth imaging systems which allow for 3D motion capture and volumetric scanning (such as those using IR-depth cameras like the Microsoft Kinect or Light Detection and Ranging / Light-Radar systems, referred to as LIDAR)

  6. Virtual Interpretation of Earth Web-Interface Tool (VIEW-IT for Collecting Land-Use/Land-Cover Reference Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Clark

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Web-based applications that integrate geospatial information, or the geoweb, offer exciting opportunities for remote sensing science. One such application is a Web‑based system for automating the collection of reference data for producing and verifying the accuracy of land-use/land-cover (LULC maps derived from satellite imagery. Here we describe the capabilities and technical components of the Virtual Interpretation of Earth Web-Interface Tool (VIEW-IT, a collaborative browser-based tool for “crowdsourcing” interpretation of reference data from high resolution imagery. The principal component of VIEW-IT is the Google Earth plug-in, which allows users to visually estimate percent cover of seven basic LULC classes within a sample grid. The current system provides a 250 m square sample to match the resolution of MODIS satellite data, although other scales could be easily accommodated. Using VIEW-IT, a team of 23 student and 7 expert interpreters collected over 46,000 reference samples across Latin America and the Caribbean. Samples covered all biomes, avoided spatial autocorrelation, and spanned years 2000 to 2010. By embedding Google Earth within a Web-based application with an intuitive user interface, basic interpretation criteria, distributed Internet access, server-side storage, and automated error-checking, VIEW-IT provides a time and cost efficient means of collecting a large dataset of samples across space and time. When matched with predictor variables from satellite imagery, these data can provide robust mapping algorithm calibration and accuracy assessment. This development is particularly important for regional to global scale LULC mapping efforts, which have traditionally relied on sparse sampling of medium resolution imagery and products for reference data. Our ultimate goal is to make VIEW-IT available to all users to promote rigorous, global land-change monitoring.

  7. Applications of neuromodulation of the lower urinary tract in female urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouz Daneshgari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulation is becoming part of clinical armamentarium for treatment of a variety of lower urinary tract conditions in female urology. Its increased usage stems from need of patients who have exhausted all other therapeutic options for their complex and poorly understood lower urinary tract disorders. Currently neuromodulation may consist of the use of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS and injectable therapies. Herein, we will discuss the background and development of SNS, its current indications, methods of patient selection and will review the results of the recent published literature on SNS. In addition, we will discuss some of the newer developments in SNS such as Bion device and the future direction in integration of SNS in female urology.

  8. Spatiotemporal neuromodulation therapies engaging muscle synergies improve motor control after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jerome; Musienko, Pavel; Capogrosso, Marco; Baud, Laetitia; Le Goff, Camille G.; Barraud, Quentin; Pavlova, Natalia; Dominici, Nadia; Minev, Ivan R.; Asboth, Leonie; Hirsch, Arthur; Duis, Simone; Kreider, Julie; Mortera, Andrea; Haverbeck, Oliver; Kraus, Silvio; Schmitz, Felix; DiGiovanna, Jack; van den Brand, Rubia; Bloch, Jocelyne; Detemple, Peter; Lacour, Stéphanie P.; Bézard, Erwan; Micera, Silvestro; Courtine, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Electrical neuromodulation of lumbar segments improves motor control after spinal cord injury in animal models and humans. However, the physiological principles underlying the effect of this intervention remain poorly understood, which has limited this therapeutic approach to continuous stimulation applied to restricted spinal cord locations. Here, we developed novel stimulation protocols that reproduce the natural dynamics of motoneuron activation during locomotion. For this, we computed the spatiotemporal activation pattern of muscle synergies during locomotion in healthy rats. Computer simulations identified optimal electrode locations to target each synergy through the recruitment of proprioceptive feedback circuits. This framework steered the design of spatially selective spinal implants and real–time control software that modulate extensor versus flexor synergies with precise temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal neuromodulation therapies improved gait quality, weight–bearing capacities, endurance and skilled locomotion in multiple rodent models of spinal cord injury. These new concepts are directly translatable to strategies to improve motor control in humans. PMID:26779815

  9. Cost-effectiveness evaluations of spinal neuromodulation with ziconotide continuous infusion in cancer pain in a real clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Orietta Zaniolo; Sergio Iannazzo; Gian Piero Patrucco; Roberto Bellini

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and objective: ziconotide is the first-in-class drug of selective N-type voltage-sensitive calcium-channel blockers used to control severe chronic pain. The present study is developed in order to analyze clinical and economical outcomes of spinal neuromodulation with ziconotide continuous infusion in cancer pain in a real clinical practice.Methods: costs and effects of ziconotide are compared with those of traditional neuromodulation with morphine and adjuvant drugs, administered...

  10. Prevalence and Cost Analysis of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS): A Role for Neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Yang, Siyun; Sergesketter, Amanda R; Ashraf, Bilal; Charalambous, Lefko; Kemeny, Hanna; Ejikeme, Tiffany; Ren, Xinru; Pagadala, Promila; Parente, Beth; Xie, Jichun; Lad, Shivanand P

    2017-09-29

    The diagnosis and treatment of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is challenging and there is a paucity of data describing its overall cost burden and quantifying its impact on the US healthcare system. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and healthcare utilization costs associated with CRPS. A retrospective longitudinal study was performed using the Truven MarketScan® database to identify patients with a new indexed diagnosis of CRPS (Type I, II, or both) from 2001 to 2012. We collected total, outpatient, and pain prescription costs three years prior to CRPS diagnosis (baseline), at year of CRPS diagnosis, and eight-year post-CRPS diagnosis. A longitudinal multivariate analysis was used to model the estimated total and pain prescription cost ratios comparing patients diagnosed before and after CRPS. We included 35,316 patients with a newly indexed diagnosis of CRPS (Type I: n = 18,703, Type II: n = 14,599, Unspecified: n = 2014). Baseline characteristics were similar between the CRPS cohorts. Compared to two- and three-year baseline costs, one-year prior to diagnosis for all CRPS patients yielded the highest interquartile median [IQR] costs: total costs $7904[$3469, $16,084]; outpatient costs $6706[$3119, $12,715]; and pain prescription costs $1862[$147, $7649]. At the year of CRPS diagnosis, the median [IQR] costs were significantly higher than baseline costs: total costs $8508[$3943, $16,666]; outpatient costs $7251[$3527, $13,568]; and pain prescription costs $2077[$140, $8856]. Over the eight-year period after CRPS diagnosis, costs between all the years were similar, ranging from the highest (one-year) to lowest (seven-years), $4845 to $3888. The median total cumulative cost 8-years after CRPS diagnosis was $43,026 and $12,037 for pain prescription costs. [Correction added on 06 November 2017 after first online publication: the preceding sentence has been updated to demonstrate the median cumulative cost in replacement of the

  11. Male/female differences in neuroprotection and neuromodulation of brain dopamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Mélanie eBourque; Dluzen, Dean E.; Thérèse eDi Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The existence of a sex difference in Parkinson’s disease is observed in several variables, including susceptibility of the disease, age at onset and symptoms. These differences between men and women represent a significant characteristic of Parkinson’s disease which suggests that estrogens may exert beneficial effects against the development and the progression of the disease. This paper reviews the neuroprotective and neuromodulator effect of 17β-estradiol and progesterone as compared to and...

  12. An introduction to operative neuromodulation and functional neuroprosthetics, the new frontiers of clinical neuroscience and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakas, D E; Panourias, I G; Simpson, B A; Krames, E S

    2007-01-01

    Operative neuromodulation is the field of altering electrically or chemically the signal transmission in the nervous system by implanted devices in order to excite, inhibit or tune the activities of neurons or neural networks and produce therapeutic effects. It is a rapidly evolving biomedical and high-technology field on the cutting-edge of developments across a wide range of scientific disciplines. The authors review relevant literature on the neuromodulation procedures that are performed in the spinal cord or peripheral nerves in order to treat a considerable number of conditions such as (a) chronic pain (craniofacial, somatic, pelvic, limb, or due to failed back surgery), (b) spasticity (due to spinal trauma, multiple sclerosis, upper motor neuron disease, dystonia, cerebral palsy, cerebrovascular disease or head trauma), (c) respiratory disorders, (d) cardiovascular ischemia, (e) neuropathic bladder, and (f) bowel dysfunction of neural cause. Functional neuroprosthetics, a field of operative neuromodulation, encompasses the design, construction and implantation of artificial devices capable of generating electrical stimuli, thereby, replacing the function of damaged parts of the nervous system. The present article also reviews important literature on functional neuroprostheses, functional electrical stimulation (FES), and various emerging applications based on microsystems devices, neural engineering, neuroaugmentation, neurostimulation, and assistive technologies. The authors highlight promising lines of research such as endoneural prostheses for peripheral nerve stimulation, closed-loop systems for responsive neurostimulation or implanted microwires for microstimulation of the spinal cord to enable movements of paralyzed limbs. The above growing scientific fields, in combination with biological regenerative methods, are certainly going to enhance the practice of neuromodulation. The range of neuromodulatory procedures in the spine and peripheral nerves and

  13. Mating regulates neuromodulator ensembles at nerve termini innervating the Drosophila reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heifetz, Yael; Lindner, Moshe; Garini, Yuval; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2014-03-31

    Upon mating, regions of the female reproductive tract mature and alter their function [1-3], for example to facilitate storage of sperm or control the release of eggs [4-6]. The female's nervous system and neuromodulators play important roles in her responses to mating [7-13]. However, it is difficult to reconcile the reproductive tract's many changing but coordinated events with the small set of neuromodulators present [14-18]. We hypothesized that each part of the reproductive tract contains a characteristic combination of neuromodulators that confer unique identities on each region and that postmating changes in these combinations coordinate subsequent actions. We examined the presence, locations, and levels of neuromodulators and related molecules ("signaling molecules") in the reproductive tract of Drosophila melanogaster females before and after mating: the biogenic amine octopamine, which regulates ovulation rate in Drosophila and locusts [7, 14-20]; serotonin, which regulates muscle contraction in locust oviducts [21]; and the FMRF amide dromyosuppressin, which regulates contraction of Drosophila heart muscle [22] and may regulate muscle contractions in the reproductive tract, if it is expressed there. We find that separate aspects of mating (sperm, seminal proteins, and physical effects) independently modulate the release of signaling molecules. Each reproductive tract subregion displays a characteristic combination of signaling molecule release, resulting in a unique functional identity. These patterns, and thus functions, change reproducibly after mating. Thus, one event (mating) promotes new combinations of signaling molecules that endow different parts of the reproductive tract with unique temporal and spatial identities that facilitate many aspects of fertilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Some Non-FDA Approved Uses for Neuromodulation in Treating Autonomic Nervous System Disorders: A Discussion of the Preliminary Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samuel; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa

    2016-12-01

    Neuromodulation, including cavernous nerve stimulation, gastric electrical stimulation, deep brain stimulation, and vagus nerve stimulation, has been used with success in treating several functional disease conditions. The FDA has approved the use of neuromodulation for a few indications. We discuss in our review article the evidence of using neuromodulation for treating some important disorders involving the autonomic nervous system that are not currently FDA approved. This was a review article that included a systematic online web search for human clinical studies testing the efficacy of neuromodulation in treating erectile dysfunction, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity, asthma, and heart failure. Our review includes all feasibility studies, nonrandomized clinical trials, and randomized controlled trials. Our systematic literature search found 3, 4, 5, 4, 1, and 4 clinical studies relating to erectile dysfunction, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity, asthma, and heart failure, respectively. This review article shows preliminary support based on clinical studies that neuromodulation can be of benefit for patients with important autonomic nervous system disease conditions that are not currently approved by the FDA. All of these investigational uses are encouraging; further studies are necessary and warranted for all indications discussed in this review before achieving FDA approval. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Neuromodulation of reward-based learning and decision making in human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Ben; Hämmerer, Dorothea; Li, Shu-Chen

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we review the current literature to highlight relations between age-associated declines in dopaminergic and serotonergic neuromodulation and adult age differences in adaptive goal-directed behavior. Specifically, we focus on evidence suggesting that deficits in neuromodulation contribute to older adults' behavioral disadvantages in learning and decision making. These deficits are particularly pronounced when reward information is uncertain or the task context requires flexible adaptations to changing stimulus-reward contingencies. Moreover, emerging evidence points to age-related differences in the sensitivity to rewarding and aversive outcomes during learning and decision making if the acquisition of behavior critically depends on outcome processing. These age-related asymmetries in outcome valuation may be explained by age differences in the interplay of dopaminergic and serotonergic neuromodulation. This hypothesis is based on recent neurocomputational and psychopharmacological approaches, which suggest that dopamine and serotonin serve opponent roles in regulating the balance between approach behavior and inhibitory control. Studying adaptive regulation of behavior across the adult life span may shed new light on how the aging brain changes functionally in response to its diminishing resources. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Permanente sakrale Neuromodulation mittels InterStim®: Ergebnisse einer Anwendungsbefragung zu aktuellen technischen Entwicklungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sievert KD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In den vergangenen über 20 Jahren wurde die sakrale Neuromodulation als klinische Therapie etabliert. Die anfängliche Indikation wurde ständig erweitert und umfaßt heute verschiedene Formen der Blasen- und Stuhlentleerungsstörung sowie eingeschränkt die Schmerztherapie im kleinen Becken. Fortwährend wurde die Technik der Implantation verbessert und die zur Verfügung stehende Hardware verkleinert. Als Resultat der konsequenten Weiterentwicklung wurde im letzten Jahr der miniaturisierte InterStim® II vorgestellt und dessen klinischer Einsatz durch versierte Operateure der unterschiedlichsten Disziplinen mittels einer internetbasierten Befragung beurteilt. Durch die Verwendung des InterStim® II werden im Vergleich zum InterStim® die operative Invasivität mit der Operationszeit und daraus resultierend der postoperative Schmerz gesenkt. Die neue Fernbedienung läßt einen weiteren Anstieg der Akzeptanz erwarten, da durch das Display der Fernbedienung der Patient die Einstellungen kontrollieren kann. Die weitere Miniaturisierung mit gleichzeitig erweiterter Programmierbarkeit des Implantates, der direkten Verbindung von Elektrode und Impulsgeber mit einer einzelnen Schraube verbessert die Option der Neuromodulation weiter. Die Entwicklungen unterstützen den minimal-invasiven Aspekt der InterStim®-Therapie, wodurch die Möglichkeit der ambulanten Therapieoption gegeben sein könnte. Es bleibt abzuwarten, ob die Therapie der Neuromodulation durch die erweiterten Programmiermöglichkeiten für den einzelnen Patienten in Zukunft noch individueller im chronischen Einsatz optimiert werden kann.

  17. Indigenous Australian household structure: a simple data collection tool and implications for close contact transmission of communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiripura Vino

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Households are an important location for the transmission of communicable diseases. Social contact between household members is typically more frequent, of greater intensity, and is more likely to involve people of different age groups than contact occurring in the general community. Understanding household structure in different populations is therefore fundamental to explaining patterns of disease transmission in these populations. Indigenous populations in Australia tend to live in larger households than non-Indigenous populations, but limited data are available on the structure of these households, and how they differ between remote and urban communities. We have developed a novel approach to the collection of household structure data, suitable for use in a variety of contexts, which provides a detailed view of age, gender, and room occupancy patterns in remote and urban Australian Indigenous households. Here we report analysis of data collected using this tool, which quantifies the extent of crowding in Indigenous households, particularly in remote areas. We use these data to generate matrices of age-specific contact rates, as used by mathematical models of infectious disease transmission. To demonstrate the impact of household structure, we use a mathematical model to simulate an influenza-like illness in different populations. Our simulations suggest that outbreaks in remote populations are likely to spread more rapidly and to a greater extent than outbreaks in non-Indigenous populations.

  18. THE METHOD OF APPLICATION OF A COLLECTIVE SEARCH ACTIVITY AS A TOOL DEVELOPING METHODOLOGICAL THINKING OF A TEACHER

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    Луиза Вахаевна Ибрагимова

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To realize any pedagogical theory into practice it is necessary to transform the theoretical concepts in teaching methods. The development of all abilities, including thinking, occurs only in the activity, which is specially organized by creating the required pedagogical conditions, in this case – it is a the application of enhanced mental activity in teachers training course and vocational training b establishment of a "virtual university" for teachers in an institute of professional training c the organization of interdisciplinary interaction of teachers, based on conditions of the nonlinear didactics (training teachers of different subjects. The presented method is implemented for two years and consists of three phases: the motivational and educational, intellectual and developmental, innovative and reflective. At the motivational and educational stage, possibilities of collective search activity actualize during the course of training, group goals are set and chosen methods of their achieving by using the first pedagogical conditions. At intellectual and developmental stage, the development of skills to the collective search for effective teaching decisions during intercourse training with the first-and second-pedagogical conditions is carried out. The innovative step is the promotion of teachers to self-determination of techniques and tools that improve the quality of the educational process, providing assistance to each other in the development of teaching manuals, which is achieved with the help of all three pedagogical conditions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-17

  19. THE METHOD OF APPLICATION OF A COLLECTIVE SEARCH ACTIVITY AS A TOOL DEVELOPING METHODOLOGICAL THINKING OF A TEACHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibragimova Luiza Vahaevna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To realize any pedagogical theory into practice it is necessary to transform the theoretical concepts in teaching methods. The development of all abilities, including thinking, occurs only in the activity, which is specially organized by creating the required pedagogical conditions, in this case – it is a the application of enhanced mental activity in teachers training course and vocational training b establishment of a "virtual university" for teachers in an institute of professional training c the organization of interdisciplinary interaction of teachers, based on conditions of the nonlinear didactics (training teachers of different subjects. The presented method is implemented for two years and consists of three phases: the motivational and educational, intellectual and developmental, innovative and reflective. At the motivational and educational stage, possibilities of collective search activity actualize during the course of training, group goals are set and chosen methods of their achieving by using the first pedagogical conditions. At intellectual and developmental stage, the development of skills to the collective search for effective teaching decisions during intercourse training with the first-and second-pedagogical conditions is carried out. The innovative step is the promotion of teachers to self-determination of techniques and tools that improve the quality of the educational process, providing assistance to each other in the development of teaching manuals, which is achieved with the help of all three pedagogical conditions.

  20. Indigenous Australian household structure: a simple data collection tool and implications for close contact transmission of communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vino, Thiripura; Singh, Gurmeet R; Davison, Belinda; Campbell, Patricia T; Lydeamore, Michael J; Robinson, Andrew; McVernon, Jodie; Tong, Steven Y C; Geard, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Households are an important location for the transmission of communicable diseases. Social contact between household members is typically more frequent, of greater intensity, and is more likely to involve people of different age groups than contact occurring in the general community. Understanding household structure in different populations is therefore fundamental to explaining patterns of disease transmission in these populations. Indigenous populations in Australia tend to live in larger households than non-Indigenous populations, but limited data are available on the structure of these households, and how they differ between remote and urban communities. We have developed a novel approach to the collection of household structure data, suitable for use in a variety of contexts, which provides a detailed view of age, gender, and room occupancy patterns in remote and urban Australian Indigenous households. Here we report analysis of data collected using this tool, which quantifies the extent of crowding in Indigenous households, particularly in remote areas. We use these data to generate matrices of age-specific contact rates, as used by mathematical models of infectious disease transmission. To demonstrate the impact of household structure, we use a mathematical model to simulate an influenza-like illness in different populations. Our simulations suggest that outbreaks in remote populations are likely to spread more rapidly and to a greater extent than outbreaks in non-Indigenous populations.

  1. Neuromodulation of Nestmate Recognition Decisions by Pavement Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubak, Andrew N; Yaeger, Jazmine D W; Renner, Kenneth J; Swallow, John G; Greene, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Ant colonies are distributed systems that are regulated in a non-hierarchical manner. Without a central authority, individuals inform their decisions by comparing information in local cues to a set of inherent behavioral rules. Individual behavioral decisions collectively change colony behavior and lead to self-organization capable of solving complex problems such as the decision to engage in aggressive societal conflicts with neighbors. Despite the relevance to colony fitness, the mechanisms that drive individual decisions leading to cooperative behavior are not well understood. Here we show how sensory information, both tactile and chemical, and social context-isolation, nestmate interaction, or fighting non-nestmates-affects brain monoamine levels in pavement ants (Tetramorium caespitum). Our results provide evidence that changes in octopamine and serotonin in the brains of individuals are sufficient to alter the decision by pavement ants to be aggressive towards non-nestmate ants whereas increased brain levels of dopamine correlate to physical fighting. We propose a model in which the changes in brain states of many workers collectively lead to the self-organization of societal aggression between neighboring colonies of pavement ants.

  2. Neuromodulation of Nestmate Recognition Decisions by Pavement Ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N Bubak

    Full Text Available Ant colonies are distributed systems that are regulated in a non-hierarchical manner. Without a central authority, individuals inform their decisions by comparing information in local cues to a set of inherent behavioral rules. Individual behavioral decisions collectively change colony behavior and lead to self-organization capable of solving complex problems such as the decision to engage in aggressive societal conflicts with neighbors. Despite the relevance to colony fitness, the mechanisms that drive individual decisions leading to cooperative behavior are not well understood. Here we show how sensory information, both tactile and chemical, and social context-isolation, nestmate interaction, or fighting non-nestmates-affects brain monoamine levels in pavement ants (Tetramorium caespitum. Our results provide evidence that changes in octopamine and serotonin in the brains of individuals are sufficient to alter the decision by pavement ants to be aggressive towards non-nestmate ants whereas increased brain levels of dopamine correlate to physical fighting. We propose a model in which the changes in brain states of many workers collectively lead to the self-organization of societal aggression between neighboring colonies of pavement ants.

  3. Patient Perceived Benefit in Facial Aesthetic Procedures: FACE-Q as a Tool to Study Botulinum Toxin Injection Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Brian L; Wilson, Anthony J; Taglienti, Anthony J; Chang, Catherine S; Folsom, Nancy; Percec, Ivona

    2016-07-01

    There are numerous methods of assessing patient satisfaction with botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation of the glabellar rhytids. As the use of aesthetic neuromodulation increases both in breadth and number of procedures, there is a need for more comprehensive tools to evaluate patient-reported outcomes. The FACE-Q is a recently validated patient-reported outcome instrument that can be used to measure patient perceptions of botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation. This study used the FACE-Q to assess patient satisfaction following botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation of the glabellar rhytids. 57 female patients completed the FACE-Q, a survey that evaluates patients' satisfaction with their facial appearance. After this baseline survey, the patients received injections of one of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Dublin, Ireland), abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport, Galderma, Lausanne, Switzerland), or incobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin, Merz Pharmaceuticals, Frankfurt am Main, Germany) in the glabella. Two weeks post-injection, the patients completed the FACE-Q again. The percentage changes in patient responses were tabulated to determine how neuromodulation affects patient satisfaction with their facial appearance. The percentage changes for each of the neurotoxin groups were compared to determine if patient satisfaction with neuromodulation varies with the type of neurotoxin. Patient satisfaction with their overall facial appearance increased by 28% following neuromodulation. Patients stated that they believe they look an average of 5.6 years younger post-neuromodulation. There were no significant differences among the treatment groups. The FACE-Q demonstrates that patients are more satisfied by their overall facial appearance and age appearance following neuromodulation of their glabellar rhytids. Patients are equally satisfied with the improvement of their facial appearance regardless of which neurotoxin they received. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 2: Therapeutic. © 2016 The

  4. Online survey software as a data collection tool for medical education: A case study on lesson plan assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimiafar, Khalil; Sarbaz, Masoumeh; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are no general strategies or tools to evaluate daily lesson plans; however, assessments conducted using traditional methods usually include course plans. This study aimed to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of online survey software in collecting data on education in medical fields and the application of such softwares to evaluate students' views and modification of lesson plans. Methods: After investigating the available online survey software, esurveypro was selected for assessing daily lesson plans. After using the software for one semester, a questionnaire was prepared to assess the advantages and disadvantages of this method and students’ views in a cross-sectional study. Results: The majority of the students (51.7%) rated the evaluation of classes per session (lesson plans) using the online survey as useful or very useful. About 51% (n=36) of the students considered this method effective in improving the management of each session, 67.1% (n=47) considered it effective in improving the management of sessions for the next semester, and 51.4% (n=36) said it had a high impact on improving the educational content of subsequent sessions. Finally, 61.4% (n=43) students expressed high and very high levels of satisfaction with using an online survey at each session. Conclusion: The use of online surveys may be appropriate to improve lesson plans and educational planning at different levels. This method can be used for other evaluations and for assessing people’s opinions at different levels of an educational system. PMID:28491839

  5. Pacemaker neuron and network oscillations depend on a neuromodulator-regulated linear current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunbing Zhao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Linear leak currents have been implicated in the regulation of neuronal excitability, generation of neuronal and network oscillations, and network state transitions. Yet, few studies have directly tested the dependence of network oscillations on leak currents or explored the role of leak currents on network activity. In the oscillatory pyloric network of decapod crustaceans neuromodulatory inputs are necessary for pacemaker activity. A large subset of neuromodulators is known to activate a single voltage-gated inward current IMI, which has been shown to regulate the rhythmic activity of the network and its pacemaker neurons. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we show that the crucial component of IMI for the generation of oscillatory activity is only a close-to-linear portion of the current-voltage relationship. The nature of this conductance is such that the presence or the absence of neuromodulators effectively regulates the amount of leak current and the input resistance in the pacemaker neurons. When deprived of neuromodulatory inputs, pyloric oscillations are disrupted; yet, a linear reduction of the total conductance in a single neuron within the pacemaker group recovers not only the pacemaker activity in that neuron, but also leads to a recovery of oscillations in the entire pyloric network. The recovered activity produces proper frequency and phasing that is similar to that induced by neuromodulators. These results show that the passive properties of pacemaker neurons can significantly affect their capacity to generate and regulate the oscillatory activity of an entire network, and that this feature is exploited by neuromodulatory inputs.

  6. The dorsal root ganglion in chronic pain and as a target for neuromodulation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krames, Elliot S

    2015-01-01

    In the not-too-distant past, the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was portrayed as a passive neural structure without involvement in the development or maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain (NP). The DRG was thought of as a structure that merely "supported" physiologic communication between the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and the central nervous system (CNS). Newer scientific information regarding the anatomic and physiologic changes that occur within the DRG as a result of environmental pressures has dispelled this concept and suggests that the DRG is an active participant in the development of NP. This new information, along with new clinical data showing that stimulation of the DRG reduces intensity of pain, suggests that the DRG can be a robust target for neuromodulation therapies. A review of the anatomical and physiological literature regarding the role of the DRG in the development of NP was performed utilizing SciBase, PubMed, and Google Scholar. The information gathered was used to lay an anatomic and physiologic foundation for establishing the DRG as a relevant target for neuromodulation therapies and to formulate a hypothesis as to how electrical stimulation of the DRG might reverse the process and perception of NP. The DRG is an active participant in the development of NP. DRG stimulation has multiple effects on the abnormal changes that occur within the DRG as a result of peripheral afferent fiber injury. The sum total of these stimulation effects is to stabilize and decrease hyperexcitability of DRG neurons and thereby decrease NP. © 2014 International Neuromodulation Society.

  7. Neuromodulation impact on nonlinear firing behavior of a reduced model motoneuron with the active dendrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojeong; Heckman, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulatory inputs from brainstem systems modulate the normal function of spinal motoneurons by altering the activation properties of persistent inward currents (PICs) in their dendrites. However, the effect of the PIC on firing outputs also depends on its location in the dendritic tree. To investigate the interaction between PIC neuromodulation and PIC location dependence, we used a two-compartment model that was biologically realistic in that it retains directional and frequency-dependent electrical coupling between the soma and the dendrites, as seen in multi-compartment models based on full anatomical reconstructions of motoneurons. Our two-compartment approach allowed us to systematically vary the coupling parameters between the soma and the dendrite to accurately reproduce the effect of location of the dendritic PIC on the generation of nonlinear (hysteretic) motoneuron firing patterns. Our results show that as a single parameter value for PIC activation was either increased or decreased by 20% from its default value, the solution space of the coupling parameter values for nonlinear firing outputs was drastically reduced by approximately 80%. As a result, the model tended to fire only in a linear mode at the majority of dendritic PIC sites. The same results were obtained when all parameters for the PIC activation simultaneously changed only by approximately ±10%. Our results suggest the democratization effect of neuromodulation: the neuromodulation by the brainstem systems may play a role in switching the motoneurons with PICs at different dendritic locations to a similar mode of firing by reducing the effect of the dendritic location of PICs on the firing behavior. PMID:25309410

  8. A New Tool for Automated Data Collection and Complete On-site Flux Data Processing for Eddy Covariance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begashaw, I. G.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Li, J.; Beaty, K.; Ediger, K.; Forgione, A.; Fratini, G.; Johnson, D.; Velgersdyk, M.; Hupp, J. R.; Xu, L.; Burba, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The eddy covariance method is widely used for direct measurements of turbulent exchange of gases and energy between the surface and atmosphere. In the past, raw data were collected first in the field and then processed back in the laboratory to achieve fully corrected publication-ready flux results. This post-processing consumed significant amount of time and resources, and precluded researchers from accessing near real-time final flux results. A new automated measurement system with novel hardware and software designs was developed, tested, and deployed starting late 2013. The major advancements with this automated flux system include: 1) Enabling logging high-frequency, three-dimensional wind speeds and multiple gas densities (CO2, H2O and CH4), low-frequency meteorological data, and site metadata simultaneously through a specially designed file format 2) Conducting fully corrected, real-time on-site flux computations using conventional as well as user-specified methods, by implementing EddyPro Software on a small low-power microprocessor 3) Providing precision clock control and coordinate information for data synchronization and inter-site data comparison by incorporating a GPS and Precision Time Protocol. Along with these innovations, a data management server application was also developed to chart fully corrected real-time fluxes to assist remote system monitoring, to send e-mail alerts, and to automate data QA/QC, transfer and archiving at individual stations or on a network level. Combination of all of these functions was designed to help save substantial amount of time and costs associated with managing a research site by eliminating the post-field data processing, reducing user errors and facilitating real-time access to fully corrected flux results. The design, functionality, and test results from this new eddy covariance measurement tool will be presented.

  9. Sacral Neuromodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzel, Klaus E; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Knowles, Charles H

    2017-01-01

    multidisciplinary working party of ten individuals highly experienced in performing SNM convened two meetings (including live operating) to standardize the implant procedure. This report addresses the main steps to optimal electrode lead placement in temporal sequence. RESULTS: Key elements of the electrode...... describes quadripolar electrode placement and then either insertion of a connecting percutaneous extension lead or permanent implantation of the programmable device. CONCLUSION: Standardization of electrode placement may ensure close electrode proximity to the target nerve providing a higher likelihood...

  10. New approach to neurorehabilitation: cranial nerve noninvasive neuromodulation (CN-NINM) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Yuri P.; Tyler, Mitchel E.; Kaczmarek, Kurt A.; Skinner, Kimberley L.

    2014-06-01

    Cranial Nerve NonInvasive NeuroModulation (CN-NINM) is a primary and complementary multi-targeted rehabilitation therapy that appears to initiate the recovery of multiple damaged or suppressed brain functions affected by neurological disorders. It is deployable as a simple, home-based device (portable neuromodulation stimulator, or PoNSTM) and training regimen following initial patient training in an outpatient clinic. It may be easily combined with many existing rehabilitation therapies, and may reduce or eliminate the need for more aggressive invasive procedures or possibly decrease total medication intake. CN-NINM uses sequenced patterns of electrical stimulation on the tongue. Our hypothesis is that CN-NINM induces neuroplasticity by noninvasive stimulation of two major cranial nerves: trigeminal (CN-V), and facial (CN-VII). This stimulation excites a natural flow of neural impulses to the brainstem (pons varolli and medulla), and cerebellum, to effect changes in the function of these targeted brain structures, extending to corresponding nuclei of the brainstem. CN-NINM represents a synthesis of a new noninvasive brain stimulation technique with applications in physical medicine, cognitive, and affective neurosciences. Our new stimulation method appears promising for treatment of a full spectrum of movement disorders, and for both attention and memory dysfunction associated with traumatic brain injury.

  11. Migraine generator network and spreading depression dynamics as neuromodulation targets in episodic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Markus A.

    2013-12-01

    Migraine is a common disabling headache disorder characterized by recurrent episodes sometimes preceded or accompanied by focal neurological symptoms called aura. The relation between two subtypes, migraine without aura (MWoA) and migraine with aura (MWA), is explored with the aim to identify targets for neuromodulation techniques. To this end, a dynamically regulated control system is schematically reduced to a network of the trigeminal nerve, which innervates the cranial circulation, an associated descending modulatory network of brainstem nuclei, and parasympathetic vasomotor efferents. This extends the idea of a migraine generator region in the brainstem to a larger network and is still simple and explicit enough to open up possibilities for mathematical modeling in the future. In this study, it is suggested that the migraine generator network (MGN) is driven and may therefore respond differently to different spatio-temporal noxious input in the migraine subtypes MWA and MWoA. The noxious input is caused by a cortical perturbation of homeostasis, known as spreading depression (SD). The MGN might even trigger SD in the first place by a failure in vasomotor control. As a consequence, migraine is considered as an inherently dynamical disease to which a linear course from upstream to downstream events would not do justice. Minimally invasive and noninvasive neuromodulation techniques are briefly reviewed and their rational is discussed in the context of the proposed mechanism.

  12. Neuromodulation interventions for addictive disorders: challenges, promise, and roadmap for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Primavera A; Goldman, David

    2017-05-01

    Addictive disorders are a major public health concern, associated with high relapse rates, significant disability and substantial mortality. Unfortunately, current interventions are only modestly effective. Preclinical studies as well as human neuroimaging studies have provided strong evidence that the observable behaviours that characterize the addiction phenotype, such as compulsive drug consumption, impaired self-control, and behavioural inflexibility, reflect underlying dysregulation and malfunction in specific neural circuits. These developments have been accompanied by advances in neuromodulation interventions, both invasive as deep brain stimulation, and non-invasive such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. These interventions appear particularly promising as they may not only allow us to probe affected brain circuits in addictive disorders, but also seem to have unique therapeutic applications to directly target and remodel impaired circuits. However, the available literature is still relatively small and sparse, and the long-term safety and efficacy of these interventions need to be confirmed. Here we review the literature on the use of neuromodulation in addictive disorders to highlight progress limitations with the aim to suggest future directions for this field. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  13. Neuromodulation of chronic headaches: position statement from the European Headache Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The medical treatment of patients with chronic primary headache syndromes (chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, chronic cluster headache, hemicrania continua) is challenging as serious side effects frequently complicate the course of medical treatment and some patients may be even medically intractable. When a definitive lack of responsiveness to conservative treatments is ascertained and medication overuse headache is excluded, neuromodulation options can be considered in selected cases. Here, the various invasive and non-invasive approaches, such as hypothalamic deep brain stimulation, occipital nerve stimulation, stimulation of sphenopalatine ganglion, cervical spinal cord stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are extensively published although proper RCT-based evidence is limited. The European Headache Federation herewith provides a consensus statement on the clinical use of neuromodulation in headache, based on theoretical background, clinical data, and side effect of each method. This international consensus further gives recommendations for future studies on these new approaches. In spite of a growing field of stimulation devices in headaches treatment, further controlled studies to validate, strengthen and disseminate the use of neurostimulation are clearly warranted. Consequently, until these data are available any neurostimulation device should only be used in patients with medically intractable syndromes from tertiary headache centers either as part of a valid study or have shown to be effective in such controlled studies with an acceptable side effect profile. PMID:24144382

  14. Linking Neuromodulated Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity with the Free-Energy Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Takuya; Sakai, Koji; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    The free-energy principle is a candidate unified theory for learning and memory in the brain that predicts that neurons, synapses, and neuromodulators work in a manner that minimizes free energy. However, electrophysiological data elucidating the neural and synaptic bases for this theory are lacking. Here, we propose a novel theory bridging the information-theoretical principle with the biological phenomenon of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) regulated by neuromodulators, which we term mSTDP. We propose that by integrating an mSTDP equation, we can obtain a form of Friston's free energy (an information-theoretical function). Then we analytically and numerically show that dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) influence the accuracy of a principal component analysis (PCA) performed using the mSTDP algorithm. From the perspective of free-energy minimization, these neuromodulatory changes alter the relative weighting or precision of accuracy and prior terms, which induces a switch from pattern completion to separation. These results are consistent with electrophysiological findings and validate the free-energy principle and mSTDP. Moreover, our scheme can potentially be applied in computational psychiatry to build models of the faulty neural networks that underlie the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, which involve abnormal DA levels, as well as models of the NA contribution to memory triage and posttraumatic stress disorder.

  15. Acute effects and after-effects of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation in patients with chronic subjective tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Adamchic

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic CR neuromodulation caused the longest significant reduction of delta and gamma and increase of alpha power in the auditory cortex region. Noisy CR-like stimulation had weaker and LFR stimulation hardly any electrophysiological after-effects. This qualitative difference further supports the assertion that long-term effects of acoustic CR neuromodulation on tinnitus are mediated by a specific disruption of synchronous neural activity. Furthermore, our results indicate that acute electrophysiological after-effects might serve as a marker to further improve desynchronizing sound stimulation.

  16. PanMetaDocs - A tool for collecting and managing the long tail of "small science data"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, J.; Ulbricht, D.

    2011-12-01

    REST interface to create version controlled items with metadata records in XML format. PanMetaDocs utilizes the eSciDoc items model to add multiple metadata records that describe uploaded files in different metadata schemata. While datasets are collected and described, shared to collaborate with other scientists and finally published, data objects are transferred from a shared data curation domain into a persistent data curation domain. Through an RSS interface for recent datasets PanMetaWorks allows project members to be informed about data uploaded by other project members. The implementation of the OAI-PMH interface can be used to syndicate data catalogs to research data portals, such as the panFMP data portal framework. Once data objects are uploaded to the eSciDoc infrastructure it is possible to drop the software instance that was used for collecting the data, while the compiled data and metadata are accessible for other authorized applications through the institution's eSciDoc middleware. This approach of "expendable data curation tools" allows for a significant reduction in costs for software maintenance as expensive data capture applications do not need to be maintained indefinitely to ensure long term access to the stored data.

  17. Hospital-Based Nurses’ Perceptions of the Adoption of Web 2.0 Tools for Knowledge Sharing, Learning, Social Interaction and the Production of Collective Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Web 2.0 provides a platform or a set of tools such as blogs, wikis, really simple syndication (RSS), podcasts, tags, social bookmarks, and social networking software for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in a virtual environment. Web 2.0 is also becoming increasingly popular in e-learning and e-social communities. Objectives The objectives were to investigate how Web 2.0 tools can be applied for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in the nursing domain and to investigate what behavioral perceptions are involved in the adoption of Web 2.0 tools by nurses. Methods The decomposed technology acceptance model was applied to construct the research model on which the hypotheses were based. A questionnaire was developed based on the model and data from nurses (n = 388) were collected from late January 2009 until April 30, 2009. Pearson’s correlation analysis and t tests were used for data analysis. Results Intention toward using Web 2.0 tools was positively correlated with usage behavior (r = .60, P collective intelligence. PMID:22079851

  18. Hospital-based nurses' perceptions of the adoption of Web 2.0 tools for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction and the production of collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Adela S M

    2011-11-11

    Web 2.0 provides a platform or a set of tools such as blogs, wikis, really simple syndication (RSS), podcasts, tags, social bookmarks, and social networking software for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in a virtual environment. Web 2.0 is also becoming increasingly popular in e-learning and e-social communities. The objectives were to investigate how Web 2.0 tools can be applied for knowledge sharing, learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence in the nursing domain and to investigate what behavioral perceptions are involved in the adoption of Web 2.0 tools by nurses. The decomposed technology acceptance model was applied to construct the research model on which the hypotheses were based. A questionnaire was developed based on the model and data from nurses (n = 388) were collected from late January 2009 until April 30, 2009. Pearson's correlation analysis and t tests were used for data analysis. Intention toward using Web 2.0 tools was positively correlated with usage behavior (r = .60, P r = .72, P r = .58, P r = .45, P r = .7, P r = .64, P r = .60,P r = .004, P r = .47, P r = .24,P r = .45, P r = .41,P r = .69,P learning, social interaction, and the production of collective intelligence.

  19. Astrocytic calcium signals induced by neuromodulators via functional metabotropic receptors in the ventral respiratory group of neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtel, Kai; Schnell, Christian; Hülsmann, Swen

    2009-06-01

    A controlled, periodic exchange of air between lungs and atmosphere requires a neuronal rhythm generated by a network of neurons in the ventral respiratory group (VRG) of the brainstem. Glial cells, e.g. astrocytes, have been shown to be supportive in stabilizing this neuronal activity in the central nervous system during development. In addition, a variety of neuromodulators including serotonin (5-HT), Substance P (SP), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulate respiratory neurons directly. If astrocytes in the VRG, like their neuronal neighbors, are also directly stimulated by neuromodulators, they might indirectly affect the respiratory neurons and consequently the respiratory rhythm. In the present study, we provide support for this concept by demonstrating expression of NK1-R, TRH-R, and 5-HT(2)-R in astrocytes of the VRG with immunohistochemistry. Additionally, we showed that the external application of the neuromodulators 5-HT, SP, and TRH activate calcium transients in VRG astrocytes. Consequently, we postulate that in the VRG of the neonatal mouse, neuromodulation by SP, TRH, and serotonin also involves astrocytic calcium signaling. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Brain stimulation: Neuromodulation as a potential treatment for motor recovery following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, E; Kinley-Cooper, S K; Weber, R A; Adkins, D L

    2016-06-01

    There is growing evidence that electrical and magnetic brain stimulation can improve motor function and motor learning following brain damage. Rodent and primate studies have strongly demonstrated that combining cortical stimulation (CS) with skilled motor rehabilitative training enhances functional motor recovery following stroke. Brain stimulation following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is less well studied, but early pre-clinical and human pilot studies suggest that it is a promising treatment for TBI-induced motor impairments as well. This review will first discuss the evidence supporting brain stimulation efficacy derived from the stroke research field as proof of principle and then will review the few studies exploring neuromodulation in experimental TBI studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Requirements of decision support tools based on total cost of ownership for collective self-organised housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkmans, T.J.A.; Klerks, S.A.W.

    2013-01-01

    Collective self-organised (CSO) housing refers to the process of a collective of individuals that organize, finance, plan and commission their own housing projects. CSO housing can refer both to new construction, and retrofitting /refurbishment processes. The unique feature of CSO housing is the

  2. Health Heritage© a web-based tool for the collection and assessment of family health history: initial user experience and analytic validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, W F; Ropka, M E; Pelletier, S L; Barrett, J R; Kinzie, M B; Harrison, M B; Liu, Z; Miesfeldt, S; Tucker, A L; Worrall, B B; Gibson, J; Mullins, I M; Elward, K S; Franko, J; Guterbock, T M; Knaus, W A

    2010-01-01

    A detailed family health history is currently the most potentially useful tool for diagnosis and risk assessment in clinical genetics. We developed and evaluated the usability and analytic validity of a patient-driven web-based family health history collection and analysis tool. Health Heritage(©) guides users through the collection of their family health history by relative, generates a pedigree, completes risk assessment, stratification, and recommendations for 89 conditions. We compared the performance of Health Heritage to that of Usual Care using a nonrandomized cohort trial of 109 volunteers. We contrasted the completeness and sensitivity of family health history collection and risk assessments derived from Health Heritage and Usual Care to those obtained by genetic counselors and genetic assessment teams. Nearly half (42%) of the Health Heritage participants reported discovery of health risks; 63% found the information easy to understand and 56% indicated it would change their health behavior. Health Heritage consistently outperformed Usual Care in the completeness and accuracy of family health history collection, identifying 60% of the elevated risk conditions specified by the genetic team versus 24% identified by Usual Care. Health Heritage also had greater sensitivity than Usual Care when comparing the identification of risks. These results suggest a strong role for automated family health history collection and risk assessment and underscore the potential of these data to serve as the foundation for comprehensive, cost-effective personalized genomic medicine. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Everything in its place. Social bookmarking and reference manager tools to collect, manage and cite information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglia, E

    2010-06-01

    Aim of this contribution was to present some free reference manager software and social bookmarking tools. They help scholars and authors in recording, managing and re-using Web pages, scientific articles and bibliographic citations. Most of them support integration within the commonly used browsers or word processors, in order to easily create or import a full bibliography or a single reference.

  4. Occupational self-coding and automatic recording (OSCAR): a novel web-based tool to collect and code lifetime job histories in large population-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteis, Sara; Jarvis, Deborah; Young, Heather; Young, Alan; Allen, Naomi; Potts, James; Darnton, Andrew; Rushton, Lesley; Cullinan, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Objectives The standard approach to the assessment of occupational exposures is through the manual collection and coding of job histories. This method is time-consuming and costly and makes it potentially unfeasible to perform high quality analyses on occupational exposures in large population-based studies. Our aim was to develop a novel, efficient web-based tool to collect and code lifetime job histories in the UK Biobank, a population-based cohort of over 500 000 participants. Methods We developed OSCAR (occupations self-coding automatic recording) based on the hierarchical structure of the UK Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) 2000, which allows individuals to collect and automatically code their lifetime job histories via a simple decision-tree model. Participants were asked to find each of their jobs by selecting appropriate job categories until they identified their job title, which was linked to a hidden 4-digit SOC code. For each occupation a job title in free text was also collected to estimate Cohen's kappa (κ) inter-rater agreement between SOC codes assigned by OSCAR and an expert manual coder. Results OSCAR was administered to 324 653 UK Biobank participants with an existing email address between June and September 2015. Complete 4-digit SOC-coded lifetime job histories were collected for 108 784 participants (response rate: 34%). Agreement between the 4-digit SOC codes assigned by OSCAR and the manual coder for a random sample of 400 job titles was moderately good [κ=0.45, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.42-0.49], and improved when broader job categories were considered (κ=0.64, 95% CI 0.61-0.69 at a 1-digit SOC-code level). Conclusions OSCAR is a novel, efficient, and reasonably reliable web-based tool for collecting and automatically coding lifetime job histories in large population-based studies. Further application in other research projects for external validation purposes is warranted.

  5. Interleukin-6-type cytokines in neuroprotection and neuromodulation: Oncostatin M, but not leukemia inhibitory factor, requires neuronal Adenosine A1 receptor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moidunny, S.; Dias, R.; Van Calker, D.; Boddeke, H.; Sebastiao, A.; Biber, K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Adenosine is a neuromodulator in the central nervous system exhibiting anticonvulsive, neuroprotective and sedating/sleep regulating properties. A pathophysiological importance of adenosine in various neuropsychiatric diseases (e.g. epilepsy, neurodegenerative disorders, apoplexia and

  6. Epi InfoTM a mHealth tool for primary field data collection in subsample population of Uttarakhand- A cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Aggarwal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A deficient data is among the biggest obstacle facing planners and policy makers. Health data collection in the developing world is often hampered by the high costs and inefficiencies of traditional large-scale paper-based surveys. mHealth using Epi-Info is most appropriate tool to create, share, deploy health surveys and for strengthening of health systems. The program runs on free and open software, is easy to use, and can be downloaded to handheld devices to be used by workers in the field. Objectives: To find out the usefulness and limitations of data collection for mHealth by use of Epi InfoTM software. Methods: The devices used Epi Info 7.1.5 (Android version, which has been modeled as a database with variables of the traditional form. A cross sectional survey among adolescents regarding their health needs was carried out in a sample of 200 adolescents (purposive sampling of rural hilly (Jaunpur block of Tehri Garhwal district and plain (Doiwala block of Dehradun district areas of Uttarakhand by the use of Android tablets with Epi InfoTM. Results: It was found that adolescent questionnaire tool developed in Epi InfoTM android tablet application is a powerful tool for data collection having numerable practical advantages like: Interview Time Tracking (ITT that gives the reality check in field studies along with cases Geographical presentation by GIS mapping. In addition to this complete filling of data in field so no left over or guessing for data entry operator, paperless, bio-friendly. Despite of Tablet cost, it is cost effective as tablet can be repeatedly used for other surveys. Conclusions: Epi InfoTM is a developing open access software for primary data collection and analyzing data from the field, with advantageous benefits of epidemiological surveys.

  7. The CUSUM chart method as a tool for continuous monitoring of clinical outcomes using routinely collected data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibanda Nokuthaba

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of robust systems for monitoring quality in healthcare has been highlighted. Statistical process control (SPC methods, utilizing the increasingly available routinely collected electronic patient records, could be used in creating surveillance systems that could lead to rapid detection of periods of deteriorating standards. We aimed to develop and test a CUmulative SUM (CUSUM based surveillance system that could be used in continuous monitoring of clinical outcomes, using routinely collected data. The low Apgar score (5 minute Apgar score Method A surveillance system based on the Observed minus Expected (O-E as well as the 2-sided Log-Likelihood CUSUM charts was developed. The Log-Likelihood chart was designed to detect a 50% rise (deterioration and halving (improvement in the odds of low Apgar scores. Baseline rates were calculated from data for 2001 to 2004, and were used to monitor deliveries for 2005. Deliveries for nulliparous and multiparous women were monitored separately. All analyses were retrospective. Results The CUSUM system detected periods of increased rates of low Apgar scores for each of the nulliparous and multiparous cohorts. The overall rate for 2005 was eventually found to be 0.67%, which was higher than the baseline reference rate of 0.44% from 2001 to 2004. Conclusion CUSUM methods can be used in continuous monitoring of clinical outcomes using routinely collected data. Used prospectively, they could lead to the prompt detection of periods of suboptimal standards.

  8. Applying the ICF linking rules to compare population-based data from different sources: an exemplary analysis of tools used to collect information on disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Lenildo; Dos Santos, Wederson Rufino; Castro, Shamyr Sulyvan de; Ito, Elizabeth; da Luz E Silva, Danilo Campos; Yokota, Renata Tiene de Carvalho; Abaakouk, Zohra; Corrêa Filho, Heleno Rodrigues; Gomes Pérez, Marco Antonio; Fellinghauer, Carolina Saskia; Sabariego, Carla

    2017-10-17

    Data on disability are regularly collected by different institutions or ministries using specific tools for different purposes, for instance to estimate the prevalence of disability or eligibility of specific populations for social benefits. The interoperability of disability data collected in countries is essential for policy making and to monitor the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The first objective of this paper is to map and compare tools that collect data on disability for different purposes, more specifically the Brazilian National Health Survey and the Brazilian Functioning Index to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Bank Model Disability Survey (MDS), currently recommended as a standard tool for disability measurement. The second objective is to demonstrate the usefulness and value of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Linking Rules to map and compare population-based surveys and other content-related tools collecting data on disability, even when these have already been developed based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Disability information collected with the three different tools was mapped and compared using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Linking Rules. Although the disability module in the Brazilian National Health Survey is fundamentally different from the MDS, the mapping disclosed that several modules of the Brazilian National Health Survey already cover many aspects necessary to estimate prevalence and understand disability as currently recommended by the WHO and the World Bank. The Brazilian Functioning Index and the MDS are both based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and are very similar in the approach and content of their questions on functioning. Specific information on environmental factors is essential to identify needs and

  9. Acoustic CR neuromodulation therapy for subjective tonal tinnitus: a review of clinical outcomes in an independent audiology practice setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eWilliams

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the quantitative treatment outcomes of patients undergoing acoustic coordinated reset (CR neuromodulation at a single independent audiology practice over a 22 – 26 week period as part of an open label, non-randomized, non-controlled observational study.Methods: Sixty six patients with subjective tonal tinnitus were treated with acoustic CR Neuromodulation with a retrospective review of patient records being performed in order to identify changes of visual analogue scale (VAS, n=66 and in the score of the Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire (THQ, n =51. Patients had their tinnitus severity recorded prior to the initiation of therapy using the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI in order to categorize patients into slight up to catastrophic impact categories. THQ and VAS for tinnitus loudness / annoyance were obtained at the patient’s initial visit, at 10-14 weeks and 22-26 weeks. RESULTS: VAS scores were significantly improved, demonstrating a 25.8% mean reduction in tinnitus loudness and a 32% mean reduction in tinnitus annoyance with a clinically significant reduction in percept loudness and annoyance being recorded in 59.1% and 72.7% of the patient group. THQ scores were significantly improved by 19.4% after 22-26 weeks of therapy compared to baseline. CONCLUSION: Acoustic CR neuromodulation therapy appears to be a practical and promising treatment for subjective tonal tinnitus. However, due to the lack of a control group it is difficult to reach an absolute conclusion regarding to what extent the observed effects are related directly to the acoustic CR neuromodulation therapy. Also as the observed patient group was made up of paying clients it is unknown as to whether this could have caused any additional placebo like effects to influence the final results.

  10. The AmeriFlux data activity and data system: an evolving collection of data management techniques, tools, products and services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Boden

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, USA has provided scientific data management support for the US Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Among the many data archived and available from CDIAC are collections from long-term measurement projects. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. To successfully manage AmeriFlux data and support climate change research, CDIAC has designed flexible data systems using proven technologies and standards blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. The AmeriFlux data system, comprised primarily of a relational database, a PHP-based data interface and a FTP server, offers a broad suite of AmeriFlux data. The data interface allows users to query the AmeriFlux collection in a variety of ways and then subset, visualize and download the data. From the perspective of data stewardship, on the other hand, this system is designed for CDIAC to easily control database content, automate data movement, track data provenance, manage metadata content, and handle frequent additions and corrections. CDIAC and researchers in the flux community developed data submission guidelines to enhance the AmeriFlux data collection, enable automated data processing, and promote standardization across regional networks. Both continuous flux and meteorological data and irregular biological data collected at AmeriFlux sites are carefully scrutinized by CDIAC using established quality-control algorithms before the data are ingested into the AmeriFlux data system. Other tasks at CDIAC include reformatting and standardizing the diverse and heterogeneous datasets received from individual sites into a uniform and consistent

  11. Sacral neuromodulation in children and adolescents with chronic constipation refractory to conservative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wilt, Aart A; van Wunnik, Bart P W; Sturkenboom, Rosel; Han-Geurts, Ingrid J; Melenhorst, Jarno; Benninga, Marc A; Baeten, Cor G M I; Breukink, Stephanie O

    2016-08-01

    Functional constipation in children and adolescents is a common and invalidating condition. In a minority of patients, symptoms persist despite optimal conservative therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the short-term effects of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) in children and adolescents with constipation are sustained over prolonged period of time. Patients aged 10-20 years, with refractory constipation, fulfilling the Rome III criteria, were included in our study. If SNM test treatment showed >50 % improvement in defecation frequency, a permanent stimulator was implanted. Primary outcome measure was defecation frequency during 3 weeks. Secondary endpoints were abdominal pain and Wexner score. To assess sustainability of treatment effect, a survival analysis was performed. Cross-sectional quality of life was assessed using the EQ-5D VAS score. Thirty girls, mean age 16 (range 10-20), were included. The mean defecation frequency increased from 5.9 (SD 6.5) in 21 days at baseline to 17.4 (SD 11.6) after 3 weeks of test treatment (p children with chronic constipation not responding to intensive oral and/or laxative therapy, providing benefits that appear to be sustained over prolonged period of time.

  12. Male/female differences in neuroprotection and neuromodulation of brain dopamine.

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    Mélanie eBourque

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a sex difference in Parkinson’s disease is observed in several variables, including susceptibility of the disease, age at onset and symptoms. These differences between men and women represent a significant characteristic of Parkinson’s disease which suggests that estrogens may exert beneficial effects against the development and the progression of the disease. This paper reviews the neuroprotective and neuromodulator effect of 17β-estradiol and progesterone as compared to androgens in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of both female and male rodents. The 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mice model of Parkinson’s disease and methamphetamine toxicity faithfully reproduce the sex differences of Parkinson’s disease in that endogenous estrogen levels appear to influence the vulnerability to toxins targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. Exogenous 17β-estradiol and/or progesterone treatments show neuroprotective properties against nigrostriatal dopaminergic toxins while androgens fail to induce beneficial effect. Sex steroids treatments show males and females difference in their neuroprotective action against methamphetamine toxicity. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic structure and function, as well as the distribution of estrogen receptors, show sex difference and may influence the susceptibility to the toxins and the response to sex steroids. Genomic and non-genomic actions of 17β-estradiol converge to promote survival factors and the presence of both estrogen receptors α and β are critical to 17β-estradiol neuroprotective action against MPTP toxicity.

  13. The Neuromodulator of Exploration: A Unifying Theory of the Role of Dopamine in Personality

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    Colin G DeYoung

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The neuromodulator dopamine is centrally involved in reward, approach behavior, exploration, and various aspects of cognition. Variations in dopaminergic function are assumed to be associated with variations in personality, but exactly which traits are influenced by dopamine remains an open question. This paper proposes a theory of the role of dopamine in personality that organizes and explains the diversity of findings, utilizing the division of the dopaminergic system into value coding and salience coding neurons (Bromberg-Martin, Matsumoto, and Hikosaka, 2010. The value coding system is proposed to be related primarily to Extraversion and the salience coding system to Openness/Intellect. Global levels of dopamine influence the higher order personality factor, Plasticity, which comprises the shared variance of Extraversion and Openness/Intellect. All other traits related to dopamine are linked to Plasticity or its subtraits. The general function of dopamine is to promote exploration, by facilitating engagement with cues of specific reward (value and cues of the reward value of information (salience. This theory constitutes an extension of the entropy model of uncertainty (EMU; Hirsh, Mar, & Peterson, 2012, enabling EMU to account for the fact that uncertainty is an innate incentive reward as well as an innate threat. The theory accounts for the association of dopamine with traits ranging from sensation and novelty seeking, to impulsivity and aggression, to achievement striving, creativity, and cognitive abilities, to the overinclusive thinking characteristic of schizotypy.

  14. An Elongin-Cullin-SOCS Box Complex Regulates Stress-Induced Serotonergic Neuromodulation

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    Xicotencatl Gracida

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulatory cells transduce environmental information into long-lasting behavioral responses. However, the mechanisms governing how neuronal cells influence behavioral plasticity are difficult to characterize. Here, we adapted the translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP approach in C. elegans to profile ribosome-associated mRNAs from three major tissues and the neuromodulatory dopaminergic and serotonergic cells. We identified elc-2, an Elongin C ortholog, specifically expressed in stress-sensing amphid neuron dual ciliated sensory ending (ADF serotonergic sensory neurons, and we found that it plays a role in mediating a long-lasting change in serotonin-dependent feeding behavior induced by heat stress. We demonstrate that ELC-2 and the von Hippel-Lindau protein VHL-1, components of an Elongin-Cullin-SOCS box (ECS E3 ubiquitin ligase, modulate this behavior after experiencing stress. Also, heat stress induces a transient redistribution of ELC-2, becoming more nuclearly enriched. Together, our results demonstrate dynamic regulation of an E3 ligase and a role for an ECS complex in neuromodulation and control of lasting behavioral states.

  15. The neuromodulator of exploration: A unifying theory of the role of dopamine in personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Colin G.

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulator dopamine is centrally involved in reward, approach behavior, exploration, and various aspects of cognition. Variations in dopaminergic function appear to be associated with variations in personality, but exactly which traits are influenced by dopamine remains an open question. This paper proposes a theory of the role of dopamine in personality that organizes and explains the diversity of findings, utilizing the division of the dopaminergic system into value coding and salience coding neurons (Bromberg-Martin et al., 2010). The value coding system is proposed to be related primarily to Extraversion and the salience coding system to Openness/Intellect. Global levels of dopamine influence the higher order personality factor, Plasticity, which comprises the shared variance of Extraversion and Openness/Intellect. All other traits related to dopamine are linked to Plasticity or its subtraits. The general function of dopamine is to promote exploration, by facilitating engagement with cues of specific reward (value) and cues of the reward value of information (salience). This theory constitutes an extension of the entropy model of uncertainty (EMU; Hirsh et al., 2012), enabling EMU to account for the fact that uncertainty is an innate incentive reward as well as an innate threat. The theory accounts for the association of dopamine with traits ranging from sensation and novelty seeking, to impulsivity and aggression, to achievement striving, creativity, and cognitive abilities, to the overinclusive thinking characteristic of schizotypy. PMID:24294198

  16. Sacral neuromodulation for combined faecal and urinary incontinence following obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydningen, M; Riise, Stine; Wilsgaard, T; Lindsetmo, R O; Norderval, S

    2017-07-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) in the treatment of faecal incontinence and concomitant urinary incontinence in women with a history of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS). In this prospective study, consecutive women with faecal incontinence following OASIS accepted for SNM were screened for concomitant urinary incontinence. The primary outcome was the change in urinary incontinence score (ICIQ-UI-SF) between baseline and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included the change in St Mark's score, sexual function and quality of life, change in grade of urinary incontinence and disappearance of urgency. From March 2012 to September 2014, 39 women with combined faecal incontinence and urinary incontinence received SNM. Thirty-seven women were available for analysis after 12 months. The mean reduction in the ICIQ-UI-SF score between the baseline and 12 months was 5.8 (95% CI 3.7-8.0, p incontinence resolved in 13/37 (35%, 95% CI 20-50%) patients, and urgency disappeared in 14/33 (42%, 95% CI 26-59%). The mean reduction in the St Mark's score was 10.6 (95% CI 8.6-12.7, pincontinence following OASIS reported a successful outcome with reduction in ICIQ-UI-SF at 12 months after SNM. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynorphin acts as a neuromodulator to inhibit itch in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord.

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    Kardon, Adam P; Polgár, Erika; Hachisuka, Junichi; Snyder, Lindsey M; Cameron, Darren; Savage, Sinead; Cai, Xiaoyun; Karnup, Sergei; Fan, Christopher R; Hemenway, Gregory M; Bernard, Carcha S; Schwartz, Erica S; Nagase, Hiroshi; Schwarzer, Christoph; Watanabe, Masahiko; Furuta, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takeshi; Koerber, H Richard; Todd, Andrew J; Ross, Sarah E

    2014-05-07

    Menthol and other counterstimuli relieve itch, resulting in an antipruritic state that persists for minutes to hours. However, the neural basis for this effect is unclear, and the underlying neuromodulatory mechanisms are unknown. Previous studies revealed that Bhlhb5(-/-) mice, which lack a specific population of spinal inhibitory interneurons (B5-I neurons), develop pathological itch. Here we characterize B5-I neurons and show that they belong to a neurochemically distinct subset. We provide cause-and-effect evidence that B5-I neurons inhibit itch and show that dynorphin, which is released from B5-I neurons, is a key neuromodulator of pruritus. Finally, we show that B5-I neurons are innervated by menthol-, capsaicin-, and mustard oil-responsive sensory neurons and are required for the inhibition of itch by menthol. These findings provide a cellular basis for the inhibition of itch by chemical counterstimuli and suggest that kappa opioids may be a broadly effective therapy for pathological itch. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does the use of an automated tool for self-reporting mood by patients with bipolar disorder bias the collected data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Rasgon, Natalie; Grof, Paul; Gyulai, Laszlo; Glenn, Tasha; Whybrow, Peter C

    2005-08-25

    Automating data collection from patients can improve data quality, enhance compliance, and decrease costs in longitudinal studies. About half of all households in industrialized countries now have a home computer. While we previously validated the ChronoRecord software for self-reporting mood on a home computer with patients who have bipolar disorder, this study further investigates whether this technology created a bias in the collected data. During the validation study, 80 of 96 (83%) patients returned 8662 days of data (mean, 114.7 +/- 32.3 SD days). The patients' demographics were compared with those of similar longitudinal studies in which patients used paper-based data collection tools. In addition, because demographic characteristics may influence attitudes toward technology, observer-rated scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale were used to group patients by severity of illness, and the self-reported mood ratings were analyzed for evidence of bias from the patients' gender, ethnicity, diagnosis, age, disability status, or years of education. Analysis was performed using the 2-way analysis of variance and general linear model. The patients' demographic characteristics were very similar to those of patients with bipolar disorder who participated in comparable longitudinal studies using paper-based tools. After grouping the patients by severity of illness, none of the demographic variables had a significant effect on the patients' self-reported mood using the automated tool. The use of a computer does not seem to bias sample data. As with studies using paper-based self-reporting, results from studies of patients using ChronoRecord software on a home computer to report mood can be generalized.

  19. Citation Analysis Shows Promise as an Effective Tool for Monograph Collection Citation Analysis Shows Promise as an Effective Tool for Monograph Collection Development. A Review of: Enger, K. B. (2009. Using citation analysis to develop core book collections in academic libraries. Library & Information Science Research, 31(2, 107‐112.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Marsalis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To test whether acquiring books written by authors of highly cited journal articles is an effective method for building a collection in the social sciences.Design – Comparison Study.Setting – Academic library at a public university in the US.Subjects – A total of 1,359 book titles, selected by traditional means (n=1,267 or based on citation analysis (n=92.Methods – The researchers identified highly‐ranked authors, defined as the most frequently cited authors publishing in journals with an impact factor greater than one, with no more than six journals in any category, using 1999 ISI data. They included authors in the categories Business, Anthropology, Criminology & Penology, Education & Education Research, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology/Anthropology, and General Social Sciences. The Books in Print bibliographic tool was searched to identify monographs published by these authors, and any titles not already owned were purchased. All books in the study were available to patrons by Fall 2005. The researchers collected circulation data in Spring 2007, and used it to compare titles acquired by this method with titles selected by traditional means.Main Results – Overall, books selected by traditional methods circulated more than those selected by citation analysis, with differences significant at the .001 level. However, at the subject category level, there was no significant difference at the .05 level. Most books selected by the test method circulated one to two times.Conclusion – Citation analysis can be an effective method for building a relevant book collection, and may be especially effective for identifying works relevant to a discipline beyond local context.

  20. Neuromodulators for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (Disorders of Gut-Brain Interaction): A Rome Foundation Working Team Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossman, Douglas A; Tack, Jan; Ford, Alexander C; Szigethy, Eva; Törnblom, Hans; Van Oudenhove, Lukas

    2017-12-22

    Central neuromodulators (antidepressants, antipsychotics, and other central nervous system-targeted medications) are increasingly used for treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), now recognized as disorders of gut-brain interaction. However, the available evidence and guidance for the use of central neuromodulators in these conditions is scanty and incomplete. In this Rome Foundation Working Team report, a multidisciplinary team summarized available research evidence and clinical experience to provide guidance and treatment recommendations. The working team summarized the literature on the pharmacology of central neuromodulators and their effects on gastrointestinal sensorimotor function and conducted an evidence-based review on their use for treating FGID syndromes. Because of the paucity of data for FGIDs, we included data for non-gastrointestinal painful disorders and specific symptoms of pain, nausea, and vomiting. This information was combined into a final document comprising a synthesis of available evidence and recommendations for clinical use guided by the research and clinical experience of the experts on the committee. The evidence-based review on neuromodulators in FGID, restricted by the limited available controlled trials, was integrated with open-label studies and case series, along with the experience of experts to create recommendations using a consensus (Delphi) approach. Due to the diversity of conditions and complexity of treatment options, specific recommendations were generated for different FGIDs. However, some general recommendations include: (1) low to modest dosages of tricyclic antidepressants provide the most convincing evidence of benefit for treating chronic gastrointestinal pain and painful FGIDs and serotonin noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors can also be recommended, though further studies are needed; (2) augmentation, that is, adding a second treatment (adding quetiapine, aripiprazole, buspirone α2δ ligand

  1. The collective capabilities as a methodological tool for assessing human welfare in indigenous territories of the Colombian Amazon

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    Luis Eduardo Acosta Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an integrating approach of conceptual issues to evaluate the wellbeing in indigenous communities. The approach recognizes the consensual absence of a “wellbeing” definition. Therefore, understanding the local concepts of wellbeing could help develop planning tools for decision-makers in indigenous societies contexts. The approach is based on the concept of capacities developed by A. Sen in which a group of human wellbeing indicators are constructed and where cultural issues might be included without affecting the power of the indicator. A study with Uitoto (múrui-muina-mɨnɨka and the called People of the Center indigenous groups of the Northern Amazonia has been done to discuss their particular idea of what wellbeing is. It is a concept the People of the Center summarizes in the word monifue (abundance. This concept is the result of the analysis of their symbolic and ritual contexts. The concept has been actualized through the time and today integrate issues of their contemporary life style. The paper describes some elements derived of this concept, and contributes to the conceptualization of issues that might be used in a valid model to describe the life style of these indigenous societies. The discussion of the paper is not based on technical issues of the model yet. The discussion define some limits where the variables to measure and relate should be placed. This is an important result about the understanding of the concept wellbeing of these indigenous societies and the elements that require to be transformed in concrete indicators.

  2. Geoscience data: Defining policies and workflow tools for long-term storage of continuously and temporarily collected data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, P.; Kirchner, I.; Peters-Kottig, W.; Klump, J.; Bertelmann, R.; Rusch, B.; Ulbricht, D.; Wattenbach, M.

    2012-04-01

    The intention of the project EWIG (Developing workflow components for long-term archiving of research data in geosciences) is to support geoscientists in transferring their data in a standardized way for storage in digital long-term archives. In the pilot phase test data are provided by two participating research institutions, both producing large amounts of data. One of them - Institut für Meteorologie, Freie Universität Berlin - provides continuously meteorological data, these data are measured every minute at several stations throughout Berlin. The other - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam - conducts geophysical field experiments and thus produces data temporarily. The digital long-term archive test system is provided by an infrastructure facility - Konrad-Zuse-Zentrum für Informationstechnik Berlin. Both use cases require definite ways for the digital preservation workflows. Policies for the workflow independent from the working area will be defined. At the beginning of the project the actual state of the art in science data preservation policies has to be identified, gaps should be detected and analyzed, so that missing workflow components can be designed. Contact to other institutions, having already policies for their data lifecycle, is necessary to get an overview of existing operating procedures and data management software tools. Assuring the usability of the archived data is necessary during all stages of the project. All information essential for interpreting the data has to be available in a simple way. Usability tests of the archive will be performed together with domain scientists as well as students (bachelor, master, graduate). Questions about the quality of data access, documentation, metadata, etc. should be answered. User feedback and the knowledge of the consortium will be used to compose a university lecture or seminar series on digital data curation, so that future generations of scientists become familiar with the handling of their

  3. Zinc as a Neuromodulator in the Central Nervous System with a Focus on the Olfactory Bulb

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    Blakemore, Laura J.; Trombley, Paul Q.

    2017-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is central to the sense of smell, as it is the site of the first synaptic relay involved in the processing of odor information. Odor sensations are first transduced by olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) before being transmitted, by way of the OB, to higher olfactory centers that mediate olfactory discrimination and perception. Zinc is a common trace element, and it is highly concentrated in the synaptic vesicles of subsets of glutamatergic neurons in some brain regions including the hippocampus and OB. In addition, zinc is contained in the synaptic vesicles of some glycinergic and GABAergic neurons. Thus, zinc released from synaptic vesicles is available to modulate synaptic transmission mediated by excitatory (e.g., N-methyl-D aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)) and inhibitory (e.g., gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine) amino acid receptors. Furthermore, extracellular zinc can alter the excitability of neurons through effects on a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. Consistent with the notion that zinc acts as a regulator of neuronal activity, we and others have shown zinc modulation (inhibition and/or potentiation) of amino acid receptors and voltage-gated ion channels expressed by OB neurons. This review summarizes the locations and release of vesicular zinc in the central nervous system (CNS), including in the OB. It also summarizes the effects of zinc on various amino acid receptors and ion channels involved in regulating synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability, with a special emphasis on the actions of zinc as a neuromodulator in the OB. An understanding of how neuroactive substances such as zinc modulate receptors and ion channels expressed by OB neurons will increase our understanding of the roles that synaptic circuits in the OB play in odor information processing and transmission. PMID:29033788

  4. Reconsidering the role of neuronal intrinsic properties and neuromodulation in vestibular homeostasis

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    Mathieu eBeraneck

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The sensorimotor transformations performed by central vestibular neurons (2°VN constantly adapt as the animal faces conflicting sensory information or sustains injuries. In order to ensure the homeostasis of vestibular-related functions, neural changes could in part rely on the regulation of 2°VN intrinsic properties. Here, we review evidence which demonstrates modulation and plasticity of 2°VN intrinsic properties. We first present partition of rodents 2°VN into distinct subtypes, namely type A and type B. Then, we focus on the respective properties of each type and their putative roles in vestibular functions. The intrinsic properties of 2°VN can be swiftly modulated by a wealth of neuromodulators, to adapt rapidly, for example, to temporary changes of the ecophysiological surroundings. To illustrate how intrinsic excitability can rapidly be modified in physiological conditions and therefore be targeted in the clinic, we present the modulation of vestibular reflexes in relation to the neuromodulatory fluctuation of the sleep/wake cycle. On the other hand, intrinsic properties can also be slowly yet deeply modified in response to major perturbations as is the case following a unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL. We revisit the experimental evidence which demonstrate that drastic alterations of the 2°VN intrinsic properties occur following UL, however with a slow dynamic, more on par with the compensation of dynamic deficits than static ones. Data are interpreted in the framework of a distributed process which progress from the global, large scale coping mechanisms (e.g. changes in behavioural strategies to the local, small scale ones (e.g. changes in intrinsic properties. Within this framework, the compensation of dynamic deficits improves with time as deeper modifications are engraved within the finer parts of the vestibular-related networks. Finally, we propose perspectives and working hypotheses to pave the way for future research aiming at

  5. Detecting a cortical fingerprint of Parkinson’s disease for closed-loop neuromodulation

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    Kevin eKern

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN in Parkinson’s disease (PD mediates its clinical effects by modulating cortical oscillatory activity, presumably via a direct cortico-subthalamic connection. This observation might pave the way for novel closed-loop approaches comprising a cortical sensor. Enhanced beta oscillations (13-35 Hz have been linked to the pathophysiology of PD and may serve as such a candidate marker to localize a cortical area reliably modulated by DBS. However, beta-oscillations are widely distributed over the cortical surface, necessitating an additional signal source for spotting the cortical area linked to the pathologically synchronized cortico-subcortical motor network.In this context, both cortico-subthalamic coherence and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC have been studied in PD patients. Whereas the former requires invasive recordings, the latter allows for non-invasive detection, but displays a rather distributed cortical synchronization pattern in motor tasks. This distributed cortical representation may conflict with the goal of detecting a cortical localization with robust biomarker properties which is detectable on a single subject basis. We propose that this limitation could be overcome when recording CMC at rest. We hypothesized that – unlike healthy subjects – PD would show CMC at rest owing to the enhanced beta oscillations observed in PD. By performing source space analysis of beta CMC recorded during resting-state magnetoencephalography, we provide preliminary evidence in one patient for a cortical hot spot that is modulated most strongly by subthalamic DBS. Such a spot would provide a prominent target region either for direct neuromodulation or for placing a potential sensor in closed-loop DBS approaches, a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of PD patients.

  6. Detecting a Cortical Fingerprint of Parkinson's Disease for Closed-Loop Neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Kevin; Naros, Georgios; Braun, Christoph; Weiss, Daniel; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD) mediates its clinical effects by modulating cortical oscillatory activity, presumably via a direct cortico-subthalamic connection. This observation might pave the way for novel closed-loop approaches comprising a cortical sensor. Enhanced beta oscillations (13-35 Hz) have been linked to the pathophysiology of PD and may serve as such a candidate marker to localize a cortical area reliably modulated by DBS. However, beta-oscillations are widely distributed over the cortical surface, necessitating an additional signal source for spotting the cortical area linked to the pathologically synchronized cortico-subcortical motor network. In this context, both cortico-subthalamic coherence and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) have been studied in PD patients. Whereas, the former requires invasive recordings, the latter allows for non-invasive detection, but displays a rather distributed cortical synchronization pattern in motor tasks. This distributed cortical representation may conflict with the goal of detecting a cortical localization with robust biomarker properties which is detectable on a single subject basis. We propose that this limitation could be overcome when recording CMC at rest. We hypothesized that—unlike healthy subjects—PD would show CMC at rest owing to the enhanced beta oscillations observed in PD. By performing source space analysis of beta CMC recorded during resting-state magnetoencephalography, we provide preliminary evidence in one patient for a cortical hot spot that is modulated most strongly by subthalamic DBS. Such a spot would provide a prominent target region either for direct neuromodulation or for placing a potential sensor in closed-loop DBS approaches, a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of PD patients. PMID:27065781

  7. Toward an International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health clinical data collection tool: the Italian experience of developing simple, intuitive descriptions of the Rehabilitation Set categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selb, Melissa; Gimigliano, Francesca; Prodinger, Birgit; Stucki, Gerold; Pestelli, Germano; Iocco, Maurizio; Boldrini, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    As part of international efforts to develop and implement national models including the specification of ICF-based clinical data collection tools, the Italian rehabilitation community initiated a project to develop simple, intuitive descriptions of the ICF Rehabilitation Set, highlighting the core concept of each category in user-friendly language. This paper outlines the Italian experience in developing simple, intuitive descriptions of the ICF Rehabilitation Set as an ICF-based clinical data collection tool for Italy. Consensus process. Expert conference. Multidisciplinary group of rehabilitation professionals. The first of a two-stage consensus process involved developing an initial proposal for simple, intuitive descriptions of each ICF Rehabilitation Set category based on descriptions generated in a similar process in China. Stage two involved a consensus conference. Divided into three working groups, participants discussed and voted (vote A) whether the initially proposed descriptions of each ICF Rehabilitation Set category was simple and intuitive enough for use in daily practice. Afterwards the categories with descriptions considered ambiguous i.e. not simple and intuitive enough, were divided among the working groups, who were asked to propose a new description for the allocated categories. These proposals were then voted (vote B) on in a plenary session. The last step of the consensus conference required each working group to develop a new proposal for each and the same categories with descriptions still considered ambiguous. Participants then voted (final vote) for which of the three proposed descriptions they preferred. Nineteen clinicians from diverse rehabilitation disciplines from various regions of Italy participated in the consensus process. Three ICF categories already achieved consensus in vote A, while 20 ICF categories were accepted in vote B. The remaining 7 categories were decided in the final vote. The findings were discussed in light of

  8. Quantifying patient improvement following sacral neuromodulation: is it time for a new scoring system for fecal incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Ian M; Abodeely, Adam; Johnson, Bobby L; Rafferty, Janice F

    2014-10-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Florida Fecal Incontinence score is widely used to assess the severity of fecal incontinence. We hypothesized that the Cleveland Clinic Fecal Florida Incontinence score is useful at establishing baseline disease severity, but it may underestimate the response to treatment following sacral neuromodulation because of the large number of patients who still wear a pad despite improved continence, as well as the inability to track improvements in urgency. Data were obtained from prospectively maintained database of patients treated with sacral neuromodulation for fecal incontinence at 2 institutions beginning in 2011. A retrospective review of the individual components of Cleveland Clinic Fecal Florida Incontinence scores in response to treatment with sacral neuromodulation was performed. The study was conducted at 1 academic medical center and 1 community medical center. One hundred twenty-one consecutive patients were treated with sacral neuromodulation for fecal incontinence. No interventions occurred. Individual components of posttreatment Cleveland Clinic Florida Fecal Incontinence scores and subjective improvement in fecal urgency were the primary outcomes measured. The median preoperative Cleveland Clinic Fecal Florida Incontinence score of 14 decreased to 3 (interquartile range, 2-4) at 12 months. Of the patients, 66.1% reported still wearing a pad after the procedure. The reason for wearing a pad was residual fecal incontinence (41%), habit despite normal continence (35.3%), and urinary incontinence with complete fecal continence (23.5%). Of patients who report wearing a pad, 59% have falsely elevated Cleveland Clinic Fecal Florida Incontinence scores owing to wearing a pad despite complete fecal continence. Additionally, 96.3% of patients reported improvement in fecal urgency. This retrospective study did not include a comparison with an alternative scoring system. Although the Cleveland Clinic Fecal Florida Incontinence score is a

  9. Vagus nerve stimulation: state of the art of stimulation and recording strategies to address autonomic function neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Bonnet, Stéphane; Carrault, Guy; Couderc, Pascal; Hagège, Albert; Henry, Christine; Hernandez, Alfredo; Karam, Nicole; Le Rolle, Virginie; Mabo, Philippe; Maciejasz, Paweł; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Marijon, Eloi; Maubert, Sandrine; Picq, Chloé; Rossel, Olivier; Bonnet, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Neural signals along the vagus nerve (VN) drive many somatic and autonomic functions. The clinical interest of VN stimulation (VNS) is thus potentially huge and has already been demonstrated in epilepsy. However, side effects are often elicited, in addition to the targeted neuromodulation. Approach. This review examines the state of the art of VNS applied to two emerging modulations of autonomic function: heart failure and obesity, especially morbid obesity. Main results. We report that VNS may benefit from improved stimulation delivery using very advanced technologies. However, most of the results from fundamental animal studies still need to be demonstrated in humans.

  10. SedCT: MATLAB™ tools for standardized and quantitative processing of sediment core computed tomography (CT) data collected using a medical CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, B. T.; Stoner, J. S.; Wiest, J.

    2017-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of sediment cores allows for high-resolution images, three-dimensional volumes, and down core profiles. These quantitative data are generated through the attenuation of X-rays, which are sensitive to sediment density and atomic number, and are stored in pixels as relative gray scale values or Hounsfield units (HU). We present a suite of MATLAB™ tools specifically designed for routine sediment core analysis as a means to standardize and better quantify the products of CT data collected on medical CT scanners. SedCT uses a graphical interface to process Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) files, stitch overlapping scanned intervals, and create down core HU profiles in a manner robust to normal coring imperfections. Utilizing a random sampling technique, SedCT reduces data size and allows for quick processing on typical laptop computers. SedCTimage uses a graphical interface to create quality tiff files of CT slices that are scaled to a user-defined HU range, preserving the quantitative nature of CT images and easily allowing for comparison between sediment cores with different HU means and variance. These tools are presented along with examples from lacustrine and marine sediment cores to highlight the robustness and quantitative nature of this method.

  11. Loss of catecholaminergic neuromodulation of persistent forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity with increasing age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Twarkowski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulation by means of the catecholaminergic system is a key component of motivation-driven learning and behaviorally modulated hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In particular, dopamine acting on D1/D5 receptors and noradrenaline acting on beta-adrenergic receptors exert a very potent regulation of forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity that last for very long-periods of time (>24h, and occur in conjunction with novel spatial learning. Antagonism of these receptors not only prevents long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD, but prevents the memory of the spatial event that, under normal circumstances, leads to the perpetuation of these plasticity forms. Spatial learning behavior that normally comes easily to rats, such as object-place learning and spatial reference learning, becomes increasingly impaired with aging. Middle-aged animals display aging-related deficits of specific, but not all, components of spatial learning, and one possibility is that this initial manifestation of decrements in learning ability that become manifest in middle-age relate to changes in motivation, attention and/or the regulation by neuromodulatory systems of these behavioral states.Here, we compared the regulation by dopaminergic D1/D5 and beta-adrenergic receptors of persistent LTP in young (2-4 month old and middle-aged (8-14 month old rats. We observed in young rats, that weak potentiation that typically lasts for ca. 2h could be strengthened into persistent (>24h LTP by pharmacological activation of either D1/D5 or beta-adrenergic receptors. By contrast, no such facilitation occurred in middle-aged rats. This difference was not related to an ostensible learning deficit: a facilitation of weak potentiation into LTP by spatial learning was possible both in young and middle-aged rats. It was also not directly linked to deficits in LTP: strong afferent stimulation resulted in equivalent LTP in both age groups. We postulate that this change in

  12. Impact of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation on effective connectivity in a neural network of phantom sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silchenko, Alexander N; Adamchic, Ilya; Hauptmann, Christian; Tass, Peter A

    2013-08-15

    Chronic subjective tinnitus is an auditory phantom phenomenon characterized by abnormal neuronal synchrony in the central auditory system. As recently shown in a proof of concept clinical trial, acoustic coordinated reset (CR) neuromodulation causes a significant relief of tinnitus symptoms combined with a significant decrease of pathological oscillatory activity in a network comprising auditory and non-auditory brain areas. The objective of the present study was to analyze whether CR therapy caused an alteration of the effective connectivity in a tinnitus related network of localized EEG brain sources. To determine which connections matter, in a first step, we considered a larger network of brain sources previously associated with tinnitus. To that network we applied a data-driven approach, combining empirical mode decomposition and partial directed coherence analysis, in patients with bilateral tinnitus before and after 12 weeks of CR therapy as well as in healthy controls. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio, we focused on the good responders, classified by a reliable-change-index (RCI). Prior to CR therapy and compared to the healthy controls, the good responders showed a significantly increased connectivity between the left primary cortex auditory cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex in the gamma and delta bands together with a significantly decreased effective connectivity between the right primary auditory cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in the alpha band. Intriguingly, after 12 weeks of CR therapy most of the pathological interactions were gone, so that the connectivity patterns of good responders and healthy controls became statistically indistinguishable. In addition, we used dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to examine the types of interactions which were altered by CR therapy. Our DCM results show that CR therapy specifically counteracted the imbalance of excitation and inhibition. CR significantly weakened the excitatory connection

  13. Tell Us™: A Web-Based Tool for Improving Communication Among Patients, Families, and Providers in Hospice and Palliative Care Through Systematic Data Specification, Collection, and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Sydney M.; Roy, Jayashree; Ott, Geoffrey E.; McHale, Michael; Kennedy, Christine; Kutner, Jean S.; Tien, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Context Routine electronic patient-reported outcome collection in patients with advanced disease could improve communication among patients, caregivers and providers and improve the timeliness of identifying problems and effectiveness of follow-up. Objective To develop a web-based tool to collect symptoms and need data and provide feedback to hospice and palliative care patients, caregivers and providers. Methods We developed Tell Us™ based on an existing pure web technology platform, the Medical Decision Logic, Inc. (“mdlogix”) Health Science Process Framework (HSPF™). The software development process included eliciting information on systems and needs and mapping care processes with three diverse hospices, and soliciting ideas for the software from clinicians and researchers. We developed a prototype software product, incorporated the hospices’ processes, assessment questions, and educational materials, and refined the product with feedback from other hospice and palliative care professionals. Results Tell Us includes modules for authoring and deploying clinical queries and completion schedules; for enrolling clinical sites and patients for patients and/or families to complete assigned assessments on a scheduled basis; and for providers to view patient-reported data. Tell Us provides customizable automated provider e-mail alerts based on patient responses (such as uncontrolled symptoms or need for medication refills) and provides educational materials targeted to patient needs. Conclusions This web-based toolset may be useful for improving communication between hospice and palliative care patients, caregivers, and providers and proactive patient management. Future research will involve integrating the software into care and evaluating its feasibility and use for data collection, patient education, and improving outcomes. PMID:21458214

  14. Developing a Deep Brain Stimulation Neuromodulation Network for Parkinson Disease, Essential Tremor, and Dystonia: Report of a Quality Improvement Project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B Dewey

    Full Text Available To develop a process to improve patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery for Parkinson disease (PD, essential tremor (ET, and dystonia.We employed standard quality improvement methodology using the Plan-Do-Study-Act process to improve patient selection, surgical DBS lead implantation, postoperative programming, and ongoing assessment of patient outcomes.The result of this quality improvement process was the development of a neuromodulation network. The key aspect of this program is rigorous patient assessment of both motor and non-motor outcomes tracked longitudinally using a REDCap database. We describe how this information is used to identify problems and to initiate Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles to address them. Preliminary outcomes data is presented for the cohort of PD and ET patients who have received surgery since the creation of the neuromodulation network.Careful outcomes tracking is essential to ensure quality in a complex therapeutic endeavor like DBS surgery for movement disorders. The REDCap database system is well suited to store outcomes data for the purpose of ongoing quality assurance monitoring.

  15. Evolving Applications, Technological Challenges and Future Opportunities in Neuromodulation: Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS Think Tank provides a focal opportunity for a multidisciplinary ensemble of experts in the field of neuromodulation to discuss advancements and forthcoming opportunities and challenges in the field. The proceedings of the fifth Think Tank summarize progress in neuromodulation neurotechnology and techniques for the treatment of a range of neuropsychiatric conditions including Parkinson's disease, dystonia, essential tremor, Tourette syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, epilepsy and cognitive, and motor disorders. Each section of this overview of the meeting provides insight to the critical elements of discussion, current challenges, and identified future directions of scientific and technological development and application. The report addresses key issues in developing, and emphasizes major innovations that have occurred during the past year. Specifically, this year's meeting focused on technical developments in DBS, design considerations for DBS electrodes, improved sensors, neuronal signal processing, advancements in development and uses of responsive DBS (closed-loop systems, updates on National Institutes of Health and DARPA DBS programs of the BRAIN initiative, and neuroethical and policy issues arising in and from DBS research and applications in practice.

  16. Short neuropeptide F acts as a functional neuromodulator for olfactory memory in Kenyon cells of Drosophila mushroom bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapek, Stephan; Kahsai, Lily; Winther, Asa M E; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Nässel, Dick R

    2013-03-20

    In insects, many complex behaviors, including olfactory memory, are controlled by a paired brain structure, the so-called mushroom bodies (MB). In Drosophila, the development, neuroanatomy, and function of intrinsic neurons of the MB, the Kenyon cells, have been well characterized. Until now, several potential neurotransmitters or neuromodulators of Kenyon cells have been anatomically identified. However, whether these neuroactive substances of the Kenyon cells are functional has not been clarified yet. Here we show that a neuropeptide precursor gene encoding four types of short neuropeptide F (sNPF) is required in the Kenyon cells for appetitive olfactory memory. We found that activation of Kenyon cells by expressing a thermosensitive cation channel (dTrpA1) leads to a decrease in sNPF immunoreactivity in the MB lobes. Targeted expression of RNA interference against the sNPF precursor in Kenyon cells results in a highly significant knockdown of sNPF levels. This knockdown of sNPF in the Kenyon cells impairs sugar-rewarded olfactory memory. This impairment is not due to a defect in the reflexive sugar preference or odor response. Consistently, knockdown of sNPF receptors outside the MB causes deficits in appetitive memory. Altogether, these results suggest that sNPF is a functional neuromodulator released by Kenyon cells.

  17. Data collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callaert, J.; Epping, Elisabeth; Federkeil, G.; Jongbloed, Benjamin W.A.; Kaiser, Franciscus; Tijssen, R.; van Vught, F.A.; Ziegele, F.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the data collection instruments used in the development of U-Multirank. The first section is an overview of existing databases – mainly on bibliometrics and patents. The second describes the questionnaires and survey tools used for collecting data from the institutions – at

  18. Canis mtDNA HV1 database: a web-based tool for collecting and surveying Canis mtDNA HV1 haplotype in public database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Quan Ke; Chung, Dung Anh; Tran, Hoang-Dung

    2017-06-26

    Canine and wolf mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, which can be used for forensic or phylogenetic analyses, have been defined in various schemes depending on the region analyzed. In recent studies, the 582 bp fragment of the HV1 region is most commonly used. 317 different canine HV1 haplotypes have been reported in the rapidly growing public database GenBank. These reported haplotypes contain several inconsistencies in their haplotype information. To overcome this issue, we have developed a Canis mtDNA HV1 database. This database collects data on the HV1 582 bp region in dog mitochondrial DNA from the GenBank to screen and correct the inconsistencies. It also supports users in detection of new novel mutation profiles and assignment of new haplotypes. The Canis mtDNA HV1 database (CHD) contains 5567 nucleotide entries originating from 15 subspecies in the species Canis lupus. Of these entries, 3646 were haplotypes and grouped into 804 distinct sequences. 319 sequences were recognized as previously assigned haplotypes, while the remaining 485 sequences had new mutation profiles and were marked as new haplotype candidates awaiting further analysis for haplotype assignment. Of the 3646 nucleotide entries, only 414 were annotated with correct haplotype information, while 3232 had insufficient or lacked haplotype information and were corrected or modified before storing in the CHD. The CHD can be accessed at http://chd.vnbiology.com . It provides sequences, haplotype information, and a web-based tool for mtDNA HV1 haplotyping. The CHD is updated monthly and supplies all data for download. The Canis mtDNA HV1 database contains information about canine mitochondrial DNA HV1 sequences with reconciled annotation. It serves as a tool for detection of inconsistencies in GenBank and helps identifying new HV1 haplotypes. Thus, it supports the scientific community in naming new HV1 haplotypes and to reconcile existing annotation of HV1 582 bp sequences.

  19. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR as diagnostic tools for detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in ticks collected from humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briciu, Violeta T; Sebah, Daniela; Coroiu, Georgiana; Lupşe, Mihaela; Cârstina, Dumitru; Ţăţulescu, Doina F; Mihalca, Andrei D; Gherman, Călin M; Leucuţa, Daniel; Meyer, Fabian; Hizo-Teufel, Cecilia; Fingerle, Volker; Huber, Ingrid

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate different methods used for detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) in ticks: immunohistochemistry followed by focus floating microscopy (FFM) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) targeting the ospA and hbb genes. Additionally, an optimized ospA real-time PCR assay was developed with an integrated internal amplification control (IAC) for the detection of inhibition in the PCR assay and was validated as an improved screening tool for B. burgdorferi. One hundred and thirty-six ticks collected from humans in a hospital from Cluj-Napoca, Romania, were investigated regarding genus, stage of development and sex, and then tested by all three assays. A poor quality of agreement was found between FFM and each of the two real-time PCR assays, as assessed by concordance analysis (Cohen's kappa), whereas the agreement between the two real-time PCR assays was moderate. The present study argues for a low sensitivity of FFM and underlines that discordant results of different assays used for detection of B. burgdorferi in ticks are frequent.

  20. Classification of H2O2 as a Neuromodulator that Regulates Striatal Dopamine Release on a Subsecond Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Here we review evidence that the reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), meets the criteria for classification as a neuromodulator through its effects on striatal dopamine (DA) release. This evidence was obtained using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to detect evoked DA release in striatal slices, along with whole-cell and fluorescence imaging to monitor cellular activity and H2O2 generation in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). The data show that (1) exogenous H2O2 suppresses DA release in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens shell and the same effect is seen with elevation of endogenous H2O2 levels; (2) H2O2 is generated downstream from glutamatergic AMPA receptor activation in MSNs, but not DA axons; (3) generation of modulatory H2O2 is activity dependent; (4) H2O2 generated in MSNs diffuses to DA axons to cause transient DA release suppression by activating ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels on DA axons; and (5) the amplitude of H2O2-dependent inhibition of DA release is attenuated by enzymatic degradation of H2O2, but the subsecond time course is determined by H2O2 diffusion rate and/or KATP-channel kinetics. In the dorsal striatum, neuromodulatory H2O2 is an intermediate in the regulation of DA release by the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as other neuromodulators, including cannabinoids. However, modulatory actions of H2O2 occur in other regions and cell types, as well, consistent with the widespread expression of KATP and other H2O2-sensitive channels throughout the CNS. PMID:23259034

  1. Participatory data collection and monitoring of agricultural pest dynamics for climate-resilient coffee production using Tiko'n, a generic tool to develop agroecological food web models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, M.; Malard, J. J.; Adamowski, J. F.; Tuy, H.

    2016-12-01

    Climate variability impacts agricultural processes through many mechanisms. For example, the proliferation of pests and diseases increases with warmer climate and alternated wind patterns, as longer growing seasons allow pest species to complete more reproductive cycles and changes in the weather patterns alter the stages and rates of development of pests and pathogens. Several studies suggest that enhancing plant diversity and complexity in farming systems, such as in agroforestry systems, reduces the vulnerability of farms to extreme climatic events. On the other hand, other authors have argued that vegetation diversity does not necessarily reduce the incidence of pests and diseases, highlighting the importance of understanding how, where and when it is recommendable to diversify vegetation to improve pest and disease control, and emphasising the need for tools to develop, monitor and evaluate agroecosystems. In order to understand how biodiversity can enhance ecosystem services provided by the agroecosystem in the context of climatic variability, it is important to develop comprehensive models that include the role of trophic chains in the regulation of pests, which can be achieved by integrating crop models with pest-predator models, also known as agroecosystem network (AEN) models. Here we present a methodology for the participatory data collection and monitoring necessary for running Tiko'n, an AEN model that can also be coupled to a crop model such as DSSAT. This methodology aims to combine the local and practical knowledge of farmers with the scientific knowledge of entomologists and agronomists, allowing for the simplification of complex ecological networks of plant and insect interactions. This also increases the acceptability, credibility, and comprehension of the model by farmers, allowing them to understand their relationship with the local agroecosystem and their potential to use key agroecosystem principles such as functional diversity to mitigate

  2. Volatile Compound Profiling by HS-SPME/GC-MS-FID of a Core Olive Cultivar Collection as a Tool for Aroma Improvement of Virgin Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes García-Vico

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Virgin olive oil (VOO is the only food product requiring official sensory analysis to be classified in commercial categories, in which the evaluation of the aroma plays a very important role. The selection of parents, with the aim of obtaining new cultivars with improved oil aroma, is of paramount importance in olive breeding programs. We have assessed the volatile fraction by headspace-solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-flame ionization detection (HS-SPME/GC-MS-FID and the deduced aroma properties of VOO from a core set of olive cultivars (Core-36 which possesses most of the genetic diversity found in the World Olive Germplasm Collection (IFAPA Alameda del Obispo located in Cordoba, Spain. The VOO volatile fractions of Core-36 cultivars display a high level of variability. It is mostly made of compounds produced from polyunsaturated fatty acids through the lipoxygenase pathway, which confirms to be a general characteristic of the olive species (Olea europaea L.. The main group of volatile compounds in the oils was six straight-chain carbon compounds derived from linolenic acid, some of them being the main contributors to the aroma of the olive oils according to their odor activity values (OAV. The high level of variability found for the volatile fraction of the oils from Core-36 and, therefore, for the aroma odor notes, suggest that this core set may be a very useful tool for the choice of optimal parents in olive breeding programs in order to raise new cultivars with improved VOO aroma.

  3. Volatile Compound Profiling by HS-SPME/GC-MS-FID of a Core Olive Cultivar Collection as a Tool for Aroma Improvement of Virgin Olive Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vico, Lourdes; Belaj, Angjelina; Sánchez-Ortiz, Araceli; Martínez-Rivas, José M; Pérez, Ana G; Sanz, Carlos

    2017-01-14

    Virgin olive oil (VOO) is the only food product requiring official sensory analysis to be classified in commercial categories, in which the evaluation of the aroma plays a very important role. The selection of parents, with the aim of obtaining new cultivars with improved oil aroma, is of paramount importance in olive breeding programs. We have assessed the volatile fraction by headspace-solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-flame ionization detection (HS-SPME/GC-MS-FID) and the deduced aroma properties of VOO from a core set of olive cultivars (Core-36) which possesses most of the genetic diversity found in the World Olive Germplasm Collection (IFAPA Alameda del Obispo) located in Cordoba, Spain. The VOO volatile fractions of Core-36 cultivars display a high level of variability. It is mostly made of compounds produced from polyunsaturated fatty acids through the lipoxygenase pathway, which confirms to be a general characteristic of the olive species (Olea europaea L.). The main group of volatile compounds in the oils was six straight-chain carbon compounds derived from linolenic acid, some of them being the main contributors to the aroma of the olive oils according to their odor activity values (OAV). The high level of variability found for the volatile fraction of the oils from Core-36 and, therefore, for the aroma odor notes, suggest that this core set may be a very useful tool for the choice of optimal parents in olive breeding programs in order to raise new cultivars with improved VOO aroma.

  4. A new internet-based tool for reporting and analysing patient-reported outcomes and the feasibility of repeated data collection from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochmann, Nana; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Kjerholt, Mette

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: An Internet-based tool for reporting and analysing patient-reported outcomes (PROs) has been developed. The tool enables merging PROs with blood test results and allows for computation of treatment responses. Data may be visualized by graphical analysis and may be exported for downstream...

  5. Sacral-neuromodulation CT-guided; Nuova tecnica di centraggio TC-assistista nella neuromodulazione sacrale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, Lamberto; Ricci, Stefano [INRCA, Ancona (Italy). Dipartimento di radiologia e medicina nucleare; Pelliccioni, Giuseppe; Scarpino, Osvaldo [INRCA, Ancona (Italy). Unita' operativa di radiologia; Ghiselli, Roberto; Saba, Vittorio [INRCA, Ancona (Italy). Dipartimento di chirurgia

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Sacral neuromodulation is a new treatment for refractory voiding disorders such as urge incontinence, urinary retention, frequency-urgency syndromes and faecal incontinence. The current approach to sacral nerve stimulation consists of a two-stage procedure. The first is a PNE test (Percutaneous Nerve Evaluation) by a provisional electrically stimulated spinal needle, placed percutaneously in the S3 foramina for four of ten days. If successful, the second stage, permanent implantation, is carried out. The PNE test is performed under fluoroscopic control using the palpable bony sacral foramina as referral points. This technique can show some limitations, such as operator Rx exposure, poor visualization of sacral foramina because of bowel gas artefacts or sacral malformation. In order to reduce these inconveniences and to improve efficiency of the test we tried an alternative technique. The purpose of our study was to test the use of CT as an alternative technique in order to evaluate its advantages and possible routine use. Materials and methods: We tested 30 patients with the PNE test under CT guidance (16 males and 14 females) suffering from serious pelvic disorders and not responding to the normal therapeutic regime. Twenty-seven patient showed relative anatomical integrity of the pelvis and the sacrum, the remaining 3 patients presented morphological anormalities of the sacral foramina. With the patient in the prone position the sacral foramina were identified with CT volumetric scanning using a spiral CT scanner equipped with a second console for the three-dimensional reconstructions. Having identified the location of the S3 foramina, a sterile field was prepared and the spiral needle introduced checking correct positioning with a CT control scan. An electrode was inserted after having checked correct muscular contractile response and the precise position with a further CT scan. Results: Thirty patients were subjected to PNE under CT guidance for a

  6. Coupling Flux Towers and Networks with Proximal and Remote Sensing Data: New Tools to Collect and Share Time-Synchronized Hourly Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, George; Avenson, Tom; Burkart, Andreas; Gamon, John; Guan, Kaiyu; Julitta, Tommaso; Pastorello, Gilberto; Sakowska, Karolina

    2017-04-01

    Multiple hundreds of flux towers are presently operational as standalone projects and as parts of larger networks. However, the vast majority of these towers do not allow straight-forward coupling with satellite data, and even fewer have optical sensors for validation of satellite products and upscaling from field to regional levels. In 2016, new tools to collect, process, and share time-synchronized flux data from multiple towers were developed and deployed globally. Originally designed to automate site and data management, these new tools can also be effective in coupling tower data with satellite data due to the following present capabilities: Fully automated FluxSuite system combines hardware, software and web-services, and does not require an expert to run it It can be incorporated into a new flux station or added to a present station, using weatherized remotely-accessible microcomputer, SmartFlux2 It utilizes EddyPro software to calculate fully-processed fluxes and footprints in near-realtime, alongside radiation, optical, weather and soil data All site data are merged into a single quality-controlled file timed using PTP time protocol Data from optical sensors can be integrated into this complete dataset via compatible dataloggers Multiple stations can be linked into time-synchronized network with automated reports and email alerts visible to PIs in real-time Remote sensing researchers without stations can form "virtual networks" of stations by collaborating with tower PIs from different physical networks The present system can then be utilized to couple ground data with satellite data via the following proposed concept: GPS-driven PTP protocol will synchronize instrumentation within the station, different stations with each other, and all of these to satellite data to precisely align optical and flux data in time Footprint size and coordinates computed and stored with flux data will help correctly align footprints and satellite motion to precisely align

  7. Citation Analysis Shows Promise as an Effective Tool for Monograph Collection Citation Analysis Shows Promise as an Effective Tool for Monograph Collection Development. A Review of: Enger, K. B. (2009). Using citation analysis to develop core book collections in academic libraries. Library & Information Science Research, 31(2), 107‐112.

    OpenAIRE

    Scott Marsalis

    2010-01-01

    Objective – To test whether acquiring books written by authors of highly cited journal articles is an effective method for building a collection in the social sciences.Design – Comparison Study.Setting – Academic library at a public university in the US.Subjects – A total of 1,359 book titles, selected by traditional means (n=1,267) or based on citation analysis (n=92).Methods – The researchers identified highly‐ranked authors, defined as the most frequently cited authors publishing in journa...

  8. Determining the Feasibility of Spinal Cord Neuromodulation for the Treatment of Chronic Systolic Heart Failure: The DEFEAT-HF Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipes, Douglas P; Neuzil, Petr; Theres, Heinz; Caraway, David; Mann, Douglas L; Mannheimer, Clas; Van Buren, Peter; Linde, Cecilia; Linderoth, Bengt; Kueffer, Fred; Sarazin, Scott A; DeJongste, Michael J L

    2016-02-01

    The primary objective of the study was a change in left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVi) from baseline to 6 months of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy in the treatment arm compared to the control arm as measured by echocardiography. Secondary objectives were changes in peak oxygen uptake and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) between the treatment arm and control arm from baseline through 6 months. Abnormal neurohormonal activation is often responsible for progression of heart failure (HF). Treatment has often included drug therapy to modulate the neurohormonal axis. The purpose of the DEFEAT-HF (Determining the Feasibility of Spinal Cord Neuromodulation for the Treatment of Chronic Heart Failure) clinical study was to evaluate whether direct modulation of the nervous system through SCS improved HF metrics, including heart size, biomarkers, functional capacity, and symptoms. The DEFEAT-HF study was a prospective, multicenter randomized (3:2), parallel, single-blind, controlled study to investigate whether SCS was a feasible therapy for the treatment of systolic HF for patients with New York Heart Association functional class III HF, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35%, QRS duration HF study was to evaluate the reduction in LVESVi after 6 months of SCS therapy in the treatment arm compared to the control arm. In total, 81 patients were enrolled, with 66 successfully randomized and implanted with the SCS device system. Seventy-six percent (50 of 66) had an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator at the baseline visit. Among randomized patients, the mean age was 61 years, 79% were male, mean LVEF was 27%, and mean QRS duration was 105 ms. The change in LVESVi over 6 months was not significantly different between randomization arms (SCS OFF: -2.2 [95% confidence interval: -9.1 to 4.6] vs. 2.1 [95% confidence interval: -2.7 to 6.9]; p = 0.30). Analyses of secondary endpoints for the study were also not significantly

  9. Behavioral Senescence and Aging-Related Changes in Motor Neurons and Brain Neuromodulator Levels Are Ameliorated by Lifespan-Extending Reproductive Dormancy in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick R. Nässel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The lifespan of Drosophilamelanogaster can be extended substantially by inducing reproductive dormancy (also known as diapause by lowered temperature and short days. This increase of longevity is accompanied by lowered metabolism and increased stress tolerance. We ask here whether behavioral senescence is ameliorated during adult dormancy. To study this we kept flies for seven or more weeks in normal rearing conditions or in diapause conditions and compared to 1-week-old flies in different behavioral assays of sleep, negative geotaxis and exploratory walking. We found that the senescence of geotaxis and locomotor behavior seen under normal rearing conditions was negligible in flies kept in dormancy. The normal senescence of rhythmic activity and sleep patterns during the daytime was also reduced by adult dormancy. Investigating the morphology of specific neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, we found that changes normally seen with aging do not take place in dormant flies. To monitor age-associated changes in neuronal circuits regulating activity rhythms, sleep and walking behavior we applied antisera to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, serotonin and several neuropeptides to examine changes in expression levels and neuron morphology. In most neuron types the levels of stored neuromodulators decreased during normal aging, but not in diapause treated flies. No signs of neurodegeneration were seen in either condition. Our data suggest that age-related changes in motor neurons could be the cause of part of the behavioral senescence and that this is ameliorated by reproductive diapause. Earlier studies established a link between age-associated decreases in neuromodulator levels and behavioral decline that could be rescued by overexpression of neuromodulator. Thus, it is likely that the retained levels of neuromodulators in dormant flies alleviate behavioral senescence.

  10. Neuromodulation and Neurorehabilitation for Treatment of Functional Deficits after mTBI plus PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...14. ABSTRACT This study is a double blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial using repeated measures. The objective is to improve...recovery of functional skills for persons living in states of seriously impaired consciousness 3 to 12 months after severe TBI. This will be achieved by

  11. Caudal Neuromodulation with the Transforaminal Sacral Electrode (InterStim®): Experience in a Pain Center Regarding 12 Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Guardo, Laura; Cano Gala, Carlos; Sánchez Poveda, David; Rueda Juan, Pablo; Sánchez Montero, Francisco José; Garzón Sánchez, José Carlos; Santos Lamas, Juan Ignacio; Sánchez Hernández, Miguel Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation is a therapeutic option with demonstrated efficacy for conditions presenting with perineal pain caused by different etiologies. We aimed to assess whether a sacral electrode (InterStim®, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) inserted through the caudal pathway is able to offer an acceptable level of sacral stimulation and rate of catheter migration. We present 12 patients with pelvic pain who received sacral neuromodulation via the sacral hiatus with the InterStim electrode. We evaluated patient satisfaction as well as migration and removal of the electrode, if necessary. Our experience included 12 patients, 10 women and two men, with a mean age of 60 years. In eight of the 12 patients, the initial therapy was effective, and the final system implantation was performed. During subsequent follow-up, patient satisfaction was good. To date, there have been no cases of electrode displacement or migration. The caudal insertion of the InterStim electrode, with its own fixation system, and initially designed for transsacral insertion, appears in our experience to be a satisfactory option which can minimize electrode displacements, achieving similar results in therapeutic efficacy and causing no difficulties in removal.

  12. Historical development of epistemology and the study of pain: Place of neuromodulation of electroacupuncture in the experimental pain research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara B. Garrido-Suárez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the diffusion of acupuncture and its related techniques in Cuba and the World, its mechanism of action is still controversial, being considered by the most sceptics as placebo or some kind oriental myth, and it only should by related to this subjects as a matter of cultural-historical elements and not to science. The purpose of this revision is to characterize the pain sensation, after a critical analysis of the different philosophical streams related to the human knowledge and its expression in the historical evolution of the algology. On the other hand, to emphasize the importance of electroacupuncture-induced neuro-modulation in the field of experimental pain researches. In this content will be analyzed the concept of Khun paradigm and his ideas about the structure of scientific revolution in the theory of gates control and the explosion of pain researches in the last decades. It will related the introduction to acupuncture and its techniques in pain clinics, with scientific context of the historical moment. In addition, a space will be dedicated to the topic of complementary and alternative medicine on the century of evidence based medicine, given its scientific needs of validation in ours times.

  13. Weight Bearing Over-ground Stepping in an Exoskeleton with Non-invasive Spinal Cord Neuromodulation after Motor Complete Paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Parag; Gerasimenko, Yury; Zdunowski, Sharon; Turner, Amanda; Sayenko, Dimitry; Lu, Daniel C; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2017-01-01

    We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 year) and completely absent of vision (>15 year) using two novel strategies-transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spine as well as pharmacological neuromodulation by buspirone. We also asked whether these neuromodulatory strategies could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics, CA) that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation and drug enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton along with changes in autonomic functions including cardiovascular and thermoregulation. Based on these data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the over-ground step training in an exoskeleton, combined with transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation either without or with pharmacological modulation.

  14. Weight Bearing Over-ground Stepping in an Exoskeleton with Non-invasive Spinal Cord Neuromodulation after Motor Complete Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Gad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We asked whether coordinated voluntary movement of the lower limbs could be regained in an individual having been completely paralyzed (>4 year and completely absent of vision (>15 year using two novel strategies—transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation at selected sites over the spine as well as pharmacological neuromodulation by buspirone. We also asked whether these neuromodulatory strategies could facilitate stepping assisted by an exoskeleton (EKSO, EKSO Bionics, CA that is designed so that the subject can voluntarily complement the work being performed by the exoskeleton. We found that spinal cord stimulation and drug enhanced the level of effort that the subject could generate while stepping in the exoskeleton. In addition, stimulation improved the coordination patterns of the lower limb muscles resulting in a more continuous, smooth stepping motion in the exoskeleton along with changes in autonomic functions including cardiovascular and thermoregulation. Based on these data from this case study it appears that there is considerable potential for positive synergistic effects after complete paralysis by combining the over-ground step training in an exoskeleton, combined with transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation either without or with pharmacological modulation.

  15. Nonsurgical Facial Rejuvenation: Outcomes and Safety of Neuromodulator and Soft-Tissue Filler Procedures Performed in a Resident Cosmetic Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ali A; Parikh, Rajiv P; Sharma, Ketan; Myckatyn, Terence M; Tenenbaum, Marissa M

    2017-10-01

    The ability to perform nonsurgical facial rejuvenation procedures is a core competency requirement for plastic surgery residents. However, limited data exist on training models to achieve competency in nonsurgical facial rejuvenation and on outcomes of these procedures performed by residents. The purpose here is to evaluate patient-reported outcomes and safety of nonsurgical facial rejuvenation procedures performed by plastic surgery residents. We prospectively enrolled 50 patients undergoing neuromodulator and/or soft-tissue filler injections in a resident cosmetic clinic between April and August 2016. Patients completed FACE-Q modules pre-procedure, and at 1 week and 1 month post-procedure. Paired t-tests were used to calculate statistical significance of changes between pre- and post-procedure scores. Effect sizes were calculated to assess clinical improvement from pre- to post-procedure. The magnitude of change was interpreted using Cohen's arbitrary criteria (small 0.20, moderate 0.50, large 0.80). Forty-five patients completed the study. Patients experienced significant improvements (p Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266 .

  16. Does Epileptiform Activity Represent a Failure of Neuromodulation to Control Central Pattern Generator-Like Neocortical Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D. Traub

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic motor patterns in invertebrates are often driven by specialized “central pattern generators” (CPGs, containing small numbers of neurons, which are likely to be “identifiable” in one individual compared with another. The dynamics of any particular CPG lies under the control of modulatory substances, amines, or peptides, entering the CPG from outside it, or released by internal constituent neurons; consequently, a particular CPG can generate a given rhythm at different frequencies and amplitudes, and perhaps even generate a repertoire of distinctive patterns. The mechanisms exploited by neuromodulators in this respect are manifold: Intrinsic conductances (e.g., calcium, potassium channels, conductance state of postsynaptic receptors, degree of plasticity, and magnitude and kinetics of transmitter release can all be affected. The CPG concept has been generalized to vertebrate motor pattern generating circuits (e.g., for locomotion, which may contain large numbers of neurons – a construct that is sensible, if there is enough redundancy: that is, the large number of neurons consists of only a small number of classes, and the cells within any one class act stereotypically. Here we suggest that CPG and modulator ideas may also help to understand cortical oscillations, normal ones, and particularly transition to epileptiform pathology. Furthermore, in the case illustrated, the mechanism of the transition appears to be an exaggerated form of a normal modulatory action used to influence sensory processing.

  17. "Cardio-Neuromodulation" With a Multielectrode Irrigated Catheter: A Potential New Approach for Patients With Cardio-Inhibitory Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Syncope is frequently neurally mediated and can seriously affect quality of life. Different ablation strategies have been successfully performed. These approaches have not gained wide acceptance and are quite extensive and complex, exposing patients to significant risks. This article reports the case of a 16-year-old girl who was severely affected by frequent and prolonged episodes of syncope and was treated by tailored ablation of the anterior right ganglionated plexus with a multielectrode irrigated catheter. She had fainted >30 times in the 5 years preceding treatment, experiencing approximately 10 severe episodes of syncope in the previous 12 months. After 3 minutes of ablation, the P-P interval was reduced by >400 milliseconds. Syncope disappeared and the patient has remained completely asymptomatic over a follow-up of 22 months. The "reset" basal P-P interval has remained unchanged (follow-up electrocardiogram at 16 months). At 6 months, there was no residual heart rate activity 16,000 beats. We believe that this case report is original for several reasons: the unusual clinical presentation; the unique structure targeted; the very limited ablation, implying much lower risks for the patient; the anatomical approach; and the different endpoint. This new "cardio-neuromodulation" approach could be useful for the treatment of patients with neurally mediated syncope. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Sleep-promoting effects of a GABA/5-HTP mixture: Behavioral changes and neuromodulation in an invertebrate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ki-Bae; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2016-04-01

    This study was to investigate the sleep promoting effects of combined γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), by examining neuronal processes governing mRNA level alterations, as well as assessing neuromodulator concentrations, in a fruit fly model. Behavioral assays were applied to investigate subjective nighttime activity, sleep episodes, and total duration of subjective nighttime sleep of two amino acids and GABA/5-HTP mixture with caffeine treated flies. Also, real-time PCR and HPLC analysis were applied to analyze the signaling pathway. Subjective nighttime activity and sleep patterns of individual flies significantly decreased with 1% GABA treatment in conjunction with 0.1% 5-HTP treatment (psleep patterns (40%, psleep in the awake model (ptreatment (2.1 fold and 1.2 fold higher than the control, respectively) and also increased 5-HTP levels (0 h: 1.01 μg/protein, 12h: 3.45 μg/protein). In this regard, we successfully demonstrated that using a GABA/5-HTP mixture modulates subjective nighttime activity, sleep episodes, and total duration of subjective nighttime sleep to a greater extent than single administration of each amino acid, and that this modulation occurs via GABAergic and serotonergic signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An Interactive, Mobile-Based Tool for Personal Social Network Data Collection and Visualization Among a Geographically Isolated and Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Population: Early-Stage Feasibility Study With Qualitative User Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddens, Katherine S; Fagan, Jesse M; Collins, Tom

    2017-06-22

    Personal social networks have a profound impact on our health, yet collecting personal network data for use in health communication, behavior change, or translation and dissemination interventions has proved challenging. Recent advances in social network data collection software have reduced the burden of network studies on researchers and respondents alike, yet little testing has occurred to discover whether these methods are: (1) acceptable to a variety of target populations, including those who may have limited experience with technology or limited literacy; and (2) practical in the field, specifically in areas that are geographically and technologically disconnected, such as rural Appalachian Kentucky. We explored the early-stage feasibility (Acceptability, Demand, Implementation, and Practicality) of using innovative, interactive, tablet-based network data collection and visualization software (OpenEddi) in field collection of personal network data in Appalachian Kentucky. A total of 168 rural Appalachian women who had previously participated in a study on the use of a self-collected vaginal swab (SCVS) for human papillomavirus testing were recruited by community-based nurse interviewers between September 2013 and August 2014. Participants completed egocentric network surveys via OpenEddi, which captured social and communication network influences on participation in, and recruitment to, the SCVS study. After study completion, we conducted a qualitative group interview with four nurse interviewers and two participants in the network study. Using this qualitative data, and quantitative data from the network study, we applied guidelines from Bowen et al to assess feasibility in four areas of early-stage development of OpenEddi: Acceptability, Demand, Implementation, and Practicality. Basic descriptive network statistics (size, edges, density) were analyzed using RStudio. OpenEddi was perceived as fun, novel, and superior to other data collection methods or tools

  20. A comparative historical and demographic study of the neuromodulation management techniques of deep brain stimulation for dystonia and cochlear implantation for sensorineural deafness in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, V E; Elniel, A; Ughratdar, I; Zebian, B; Selway, R; Lin, J P

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear implants for sensorineural deafness in children is one of the most successful neuromodulation techniques known to relieve early chronic neurodisability, improving activity and participation. In 2012 there were 324,000 recipients of cochlear implants globally. To compare cochlear implant (CI) neuromodulation with deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia in childhood and explore relations between age and duration of symptoms at implantation and outcome. Comparison of published annual UK CI figures for 1985-2009 with a retrospective cohort of the first 9 years of DBS for dystonia in children at a single-site Functional Neurosurgery unit from 2006 to 14. From 2006 to 14, DBS neuromodulation of childhood dystonia increased by a factor of 3.8 to a total of 126 cases over the first 9 years, similar to the growth in cochlear implants which increased by a factor of 4.1 over a similar period in the 1980s rising to 527 children in 2009. The CI saw a dramatic shift in practice from implantation at >5 years of age at the start of the programme towards earlier implantation by the mid-1990s. Best language results were seen for implantation 4 years, hence implantation deaf, pre-lingual children could benefit from cochlear neuromodulation if implanted early. Similar to initial CI use, the majority of children receiving DBS for dystonia in the first 9 years were 5-15 years of age, when the proportion of life lived with dystonia exceeds 90% thus limiting benefits. Early DBS neuromodulation for acquired motor disorders should be explored to maximise the benefits of dystonia reduction in a period of maximal developmental plasticity before the onset of disability. Learning from cochlear implantation, DBS can become an accepted management option in children under the age of 5 years who have a reduced proportion of life lived with dystonia, and not viewed as a last resort reserved for only the most severe cases where benefits may be at their most limited. Copyright © 2016

  1. Neuromodulation of evoked muscle potentials induced by epidural spinal-cord stimulation in paralyzed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayenko, Dimitry G; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan J; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P

    2014-03-01

    Epidural stimulation (ES) of the lumbosacral spinal cord has been used to facilitate standing and voluntary movement after clinically motor-complete spinal-cord injury. It seems of importance to examine how the epidurally evoked potentials are modulated in the spinal circuitry and projected to various motor pools. We hypothesized that chronically implanted electrode arrays over the lumbosacral spinal cord can be used to assess functionally spinal circuitry linked to specific motor pools. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional and topographic organization of compound evoked potentials induced by the stimulation. Three individuals with complete motor paralysis of the lower limbs participated in the study. The evoked potentials to epidural spinal stimulation were investigated after surgery in a supine position and in one participant, during both supine and standing, with body weight load of 60%. The stimulation was delivered with intensity from 0.5 to 10 V at a frequency of 2 Hz. Recruitment curves of evoked potentials in knee and ankle muscles were collected at three localized and two wide-field stimulation configurations. Epidural electrical stimulation of rostral and caudal areas of lumbar spinal cord resulted in a selective topographical recruitment of proximal and distal leg muscles, as revealed by both magnitude and thresholds of the evoked potentials. ES activated both afferent and efferent pathways. The components of neural pathways that can mediate motor-evoked potentials were highly dependent on the stimulation parameters and sensory conditions, suggesting a weight-bearing-induced reorganization of the spinal circuitries.

  2. Women's perspective: intra-detrusor botox versus sacral neuromodulation for overactive bladder symptoms after unsuccessful anticholinergic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balchandra, Pooja; Rogerson, Lynne

    2014-08-01

    Comprehension of women's perspective and reasons for their choice between intra-detrusor botox (botox) and sacral neuromodulation (SNM) after failed anticholinergic treatment for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) have not been evaluated and reported in the literature. Our voluntary service evaluation survey aimed to determine reasons behind individual patient choice. All women were counseled in detail regarding the two treatment options available after failed anticholinergic treatment as per the hospital trust policy. Once the decision-making process was completed, they were asked to highlight one or more of the 12 questions within the survey that influenced their decision-making process. Fifty patients, with a mean age of 61.66 years (range 38-82 years) participated in our voluntary survey. Seventy-four per cent chose Botox and 26% chose SNM. In the botox group 54.05% disliked the thought of a foreign body in the back with SNM; 45.94% quoted shorter waiting times and 43.24% said that the quicker onset of benefit (within 3-5 days) with botox compared with SNM (up to 2 weeks) helped to influence their decision towards botox. In the SNM group 61.53% were averse to the potential need for botox to be repeated at variable intervals; 46.15% chose SNM to avoid the risk of urinary retention associated with botox. The botox group seemed more likely to need quicker results with easy access to the treatment modality, whilst the SNM group seemed keener to focus on a more permanent option with a known interval for the repeat procedure. The difference in patient choice was found to be statistically significant.

  3. Changes of oscillatory activity in pitch processing network and related tinnitus relief induced by acoustic CR neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya eAdamchic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subjective tinnitus is characterized by abnormal neuronal synchronization in the central auditory system. As shown in a controlled clinical trial, acoustic coordinated reset (CR neuromodulation causes a significant relief of tinnitus symptoms along with a significant decrease of pathological oscillatory activity in a network comprising auditory and non-auditory brain areas, which is often accompanied with a significant tinnitus pitch change. Here, we studied if the tinnitus pitch change correlates with a reduction of tinnitus loudness and/or annoyance as assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS scores. Furthermore, we studied if the changes of the pattern of brain synchrony in tinnitus patients induced by 12 weeks of CR-therapy depend on whether or not the patients undergo a pronounced tinnitus pitch change. For this, we applied standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA to EEG recordings from two groups of patients with a sustained CR-induced relief of tinnitus symptoms with and without tinnitus pitch change. We found that absolute changes of VAS loudness and VAS annoyance scores significantly correlate with the modulus of the tinnitus pitch change. Moreover, as opposed to patients with weak or no pitch change we found a significantly stronger decrease in gamma power in patients with pronounced tinnitus pitch change in right parietal cortex (BA 1, 40, right frontal cortex (BA 8, 9, 46, and left frontal cortex (BA 4, 6, combined with a significantly stronger increase of alpha (10-12 Hz activity in the right anterior cingulate cortex (BA 32, 24. In addition, we revealed a significantly lower functional connectivity in the gamma band between the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9 and the right anterior cingulate cortex (BA 32 after 12 weeks of CR-therapy in patients with pronounced pitch change. Our results indicate a substantial, CR-induced reduction of tinnitus-related auditory binding in a pitch

  4. Spinal manipulation does not affect pressure pain thresholds in the absence of neuromodulators: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordon, Max K; Beattie, Paul F; D'Urso, Sarah; Scriven, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    Measurement of pressure pain threshold (PPT) is a way to determine one of the many potential treatment effects of spinal manipulative therapy. To determine how multiple spinal manipulations administered in a single-session affected PPTs at local and distal sites in asymptomatic individuals. Participants were randomly assigned into one of three groups: Group one (n = 18) received a lumbar manipulation followed by a cervical manipulation. Group two (n = 17) received a cervical manipulation followed by a lumbar manipulation. The control group (n = 19) received two bouts of five minutes of rest. At baseline and after each intervention or rest period, each participant's PPTs were obtained using a handheld algometer. The PPTs were tested bilaterally over the lateral epicondyles of the humerus and over the mid-bellies of the upper trapezius, lumbar paraspinal, and the tibialis anterior muscles. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, and its Identifier is NCT02828501. Repeated-measures ANOVAs and Kruskal-Wallis tests showed no significant within- or between-group differences in PPT. Within-group effect sizes in the changes of PPT ranged from -.48 at the left paraspinal muscles to .24 at the left lateral humeral epicondyle. Statistical power to detect significant differences at α of 0.05 was calculated to be 0.94. This study suggests that in young adults who do not have current or recent symptoms of spinal pain, multiple within-session treatments of cervical and lumbar spinal manipulation fail to influence PPTs. Changes in PPT that are observed in symptomatic individuals are likely to be primarily influenced by pain-related neuromodulators rather than by an isolated, mechanical effect of spinal manipulation.

  5. Neuromodulation and Synaptic Plasticity for the Control of Fast Periodic Movement:Energy Efficiency in Coupled Compliant Joints via PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eStratmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are multiple indications that the nervous system of animals tunes muscle output to exploit natural dynamics of the elastic locomotor system and the environment. This is an advantageous strategy especially in fast periodic movements, since the elastic elements store energy and increase energy efficiency and movement speed.Experimental evidence suggests that coordination among joints involves proprioceptive input and neuromodulatory influence originating in the brain stem. However, the neural strategies underlying the coordination of fast periodic movements remain poorly understood.Based on robotics control theory, we suggest that the nervous system implements a mechanism to accomplish coordination between joints by a linear coordinate transformation from the multi-dimensional space representing proprioceptive input at the joint level into a one-dimensional controller space. In this one-dimensional subspace, the movements of a whole limb can be driven by a single oscillating unit as simple as a reflex interneuron. The output of the oscillating unit is transformed back to joint space via the same transformation. The transformation weights correspond to the dominant principal component of the movement.In this study, we propose a biologically plausible neural network to exemplify that the central nervous system may encode our controller design. Using theoretical considerations and computer simulations, we demonstrate that spike-timing-dependent plasticity for the input mapping and serotonergic neuromodulation for the output mapping can extract the dominant principal component of sensory signals. Our simulations show that our network can reliably control mechanical systems of different complexity and increase the energy efficiency of ongoing cyclic movements.The proposed network is simple and consistent with previous biologic experiments. Thus, our controller could serve as a candidate to describe the neural control of fast, energy

  6. Collective Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    Collective Security: National Egotism (Abstract) In Danish pre-World War I defence debate the notion of collective security is missing. During the early years of the 19th century, the political work is influenced by a pervasive feeling of rising tension and danger on the continent of Europe......, but while creation of defensive alliances appears unrealistic, new defence laws appearing 1909 show strong resolve to defend Denmark’s status as a neutral power. The Great War proves that these laws provided an adequate tool to be wielded by the politicians actually in office during that conflict. Following...... World War I it is not surprising that a salient feature of the defence debate is aversion against armed conflict. The Wilsonian agenda of a new system of collective security featuring prominently in the peace talks as well as in European debate generally does indeed have ramifications in Danish...

  7. Neuromodulation of Limb Proprioceptive Afferents Decreases Apnea of Prematurity and Accompanying Intermittent Hypoxia and Bradycardia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpashri Kesavan

    Full Text Available Apnea of Prematurity (AOP is common, affecting the majority of infants born at <34 weeks gestational age. Apnea and periodic breathing are accompanied by intermittent hypoxia (IH. Animal and human studies demonstrate that IH exposure contributes to multiple pathologies, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP, injury to sympathetic ganglia regulating cardiovascular action, impaired pancreatic islet cell and bone development, cerebellar injury, and neurodevelopmental disabilities. Current standard of care for AOP/IH includes prone positioning, positive pressure ventilation, and methylxanthine therapy; these interventions are inadequate, and not optimal for early development.The objective is to support breathing in premature infants by using a simple, non-invasive vibratory device placed over limb proprioceptor fibers, an intervention using the principle that limb movements trigger reflexive facilitation of breathing.Premature infants (23-34 wks gestational age, with clinical evidence of AOP/IH episodes were enrolled 1 week after birth. Caffeine treatment was not a reason for exclusion. Small vibration devices were placed on one hand and one foot and activated in 6 hour ON/OFF sequences for a total of 24 hours. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation (SpO2, and breathing pauses were continuously collected.Fewer respiratory pauses occurred during vibration periods, relative to baseline (p<0.005. Significantly fewer SpO2 declines occurred with vibration (p<0.05, relative to control periods. Significantly fewer bradycardic events occurred during vibration periods, relative to no vibration periods (p<0.05.In premature neonates, limb proprioceptive stimulation, simulating limb movement, reduces breathing pauses and IH episodes, and lowers the number of bradycardic events that accompany aberrant breathing episodes. This low-cost neuromodulatory procedure has the potential to provide a non-invasive intervention to reduce apnea, bradycardia and

  8. Neuromodulation for fecal and urinary incontinence: functional results in 57 consecutive patients from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheron, Jean-Luc; Chodez, Marine; Boillot, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation is a recognized treatment for fecal and urinary incontinence. Few articles have been published about patients presenting with both types of incontinence. The aim of this study was to report the functional results in patients operated on for simultaneous fecal and urinary incontinence by the use of sacral nerve stimulation. This study is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The investigation was conducted in the academic departments of colorectal surgery and urology. Between January 2001 and March 2010, 57 consecutive patients (54 women) with a mean age of 58 years (range, 16-76) were included. Two-stage sacral nerve modulation (test and implant) was performed. Functional study before testing, at 6 months, and at the end of follow-up after implantation included the use of the Cleveland Clinic incontinence score, Urinary Symptoms Profile, Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life score, and the Ditrovie score. Patient satisfaction with the technique was evaluated at a median follow-up of 62.8 months. : Fecal incontinence improved from 14.1/20 to 7.2/20 at 6 months and 6.9/20 at the end of follow-up. Urinary incontinence, mainly urge incontinence (47% of patients), and urgency frequency (34% of patients) improved at 6 months and end of follow-up, but not retention and dysuria. Specific quality of life was improved for fecal and urinary incontinence at 6 months and end of follow-up. At the end of follow-up, 73% patients were highly satisfied with the technique, but 9% felt their condition had deteriorated. The reoperation rate was 29%, of which 12% were indicated because of a complication. This study was limited by its retrospective nature and the multiple causes of incontinence. Fecal and urinary incontinence, studied by symptoms scores and specific quality-of-life scores, are improved in patients receiving sacral nerve stimulation for double incontinence.

  9. Citation analysis as a tool for evaluation of information sciences collection at the Library of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjica Faletar Tanacković

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe and critically analyse the application of citation analysis in the collection evaluation in academic libraries, and to present the results of the study. The study, first of its kind in Croatia, was carried out in the information sciences collection at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Osijek. Based on many studies from abroad done in the academic environment, the citation analysis, despite its disadvantages, proved to be a valid method for the collection of indicators of real use of (library information sources. The study analysed citation patterns, characteristics of information sources used by respondents and the accessibility of these sources in the academic library. Its aim was also to test the method of citation analysis in the context of library collection evaluation. The samples used in this study were papers published in 2010 by the students and teachers of the Department of Information Sciences in Osijek. The data analysis showed that while students preferred electronic information sources, teachers preferred print sources. Also, periodicals and monographs were top two information types used in the compilation of studied publications. However, students used undefined type of web resources such as presentations and commercial and educational websites to a great extent. As far as accessibility of sources used is concerned, the results show that library offers access to 60% of periodicals used and approximately 25% of monographs. In order to minimize the limitations of this quantitative method and to obtain valid and reliable indicators of citation patterns and use of (library information sources by students and teachers at the given Department, this study should be carried out longitudinally. It should also be complemented with a qualitative study (e.g. interview with teachers and students.

  10. Genogram use as a collect tool in qualitative research / A Utilização do Genograma como instrumento de coleta de dados na pesquisa qualitativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiane Carvalho Wendt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The genogram is a graphical representation of a family and has been used in several contexts. This paper aims to highlight the genogram use relevance in qualitative research and to propose an application and analysis procedure. The information gathered by the genogram may include genetics, medical, social, behavioral, relational and cultural aspects that denote the family structure and its configuration giving indicia of its functioning and dynamics. It is proposed that the inquiries, comments and verbalizations held by the researcher during the application of the tool are classified, according to the pre-determined categories system and that the data obtained are submitted to graphical, clinical and discourse analysis for later calculus of judges' agreement.

  11. Survey Email Scheduling and Monitoring in eRCTs (SESAMe): A Digital Tool to Improve Data Collection in Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skonnord, Trygve; Steen, Finn; Skjeie, Holgeir; Fetveit, Arne; Brekke, Mette; Klovning, Atle

    2016-11-22

    Electronic questionnaires can ease data collection in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in clinical practice. We found no existing software that could automate the sending of emails to participants enrolled into an RCT at different study participant inclusion time points. Our aim was to develop suitable software to facilitate data collection in an ongoing multicenter RCT of low back pain (the Acuback study). For the Acuback study, we determined that we would need to send a total of 5130 emails to 270 patients recruited at different centers and at 19 different time points. The first version of the software was tested in a pilot study in November 2013 but was unable to deliver multiuser or Web-based access. We resolved these shortcomings in the next version, which we tested on the Web in February 2014. Our new version was able to schedule and send the required emails in the full-scale Acuback trial that started in March 2014. The system architecture evolved through an iterative, inductive process between the project study leader and the software programmer. The program was tested and updated when errors occurred. To evaluate the development of the software, we used a logbook, a research assistant dialogue, and Acuback trial participant queries. We have developed a Web-based app, Survey Email Scheduling and Monitoring in eRCTs (SESAMe), that monitors responses in electronic surveys and sends reminders by emails or text messages (short message service, SMS) to participants. The overall response rate for the 19 surveys in the Acuback study increased from 76.4% (655/857) before we introduced reminders to 93.11% (1149/1234) after the new function (Pstorage. The SESAMe software facilitates consecutive patient data collection in RCTs and can be used to increase response rates and quality of research, both in general practice and in other clinical trial settings.

  12. Neuromodulation of Prefrontal Cortex in Non-Human Primates by Dopaminergic Receptors during Rule-Guided Flexible Behavior and Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayraghavan, Susheel; Major, Alex J.; Everling, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is indispensable for several higher-order cognitive and executive capacities of primates, including representation of salient stimuli in working memory (WM), maintenance of cognitive task set, inhibition of inappropriate responses and rule-guided flexible behavior. PFC networks are subject to robust neuromodulation from ascending catecholaminergic systems. Disruption of these systems in PFC has been implicated in cognitive deficits associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. Over the past four decades, a considerable body of work has examined the influence of dopamine on macaque PFC activity representing spatial WM. There has also been burgeoning interest in neuromodulation of PFC circuits involved in other cognitive functions of PFC, including representation of rules to guide flexible behavior. Here, we review recent neuropharmacological investigations conducted in our laboratory and others of the role of PFC dopamine receptors in regulating rule-guided behavior in non-human primates. Employing iontophoresis, we examined the effects of local manipulation of dopaminergic subtypes on neuronal activity during performance of rule-guided pro- and antisaccades, an experimental paradigm sensitive to PFC integrity, wherein deficits in performance are reliably observed in many neuropsychiatric disorders. We found dissociable effects of dopamine receptors on neuronal activity for rule representation and oculomotor responses and discuss these findings in the context of prior studies that have examined the role of dopamine in spatial delayed response tasks, attention, target selection, abstract rules, visuomotor learning and reward. The findings we describe here highlight the common features, as well as heterogeneity and context dependence of dopaminergic neuromodulation in regulating the efficacy of cognitive functions of PFC in health and disease. PMID:29259545

  13. Collective behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Robert L; Gureckis, Todd M

    2009-07-01

    The resurgence of interest in collective behavior is in large part due to tools recently made available for conducting laboratory experiments on groups, statistical methods for analyzing large data sets reflecting social interactions, the rapid growth of a diverse variety of online self-organized collectives, and computational modeling methods for understanding both universal and scenario-specific social patterns. We consider case studies of collective behavior along four attributes: the primary motivation of individuals within the group, kinds of interactions among individuals, typical dynamics that result from these interactions, and characteristic outcomes at the group level. With this framework, we compare the collective patterns of noninteracting decision makers, bee swarms, groups forming paths in physical and abstract spaces, sports teams, cooperation and competition for resource usage, and the spread and extension of innovations in an online community. Some critical issues surrounding collective behavior are then reviewed, including the questions of "Does group behavior always reduce to individual behavior?"Is 'group cognition' possible?" and "What is the value of formal modeling for understanding group behavior?" Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  14. A Web-Based Tool for Automatic Data Collection, Curation, and Visualization of Complex Healthcare Survey Studies including Social Network Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Benítez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great concern nowadays regarding alcohol consumption and drug abuse, especially in young people. Analyzing the social environment where these adolescents are immersed, as well as a series of measures determining the alcohol abuse risk or personal situation and perception using a number of questionnaires like AUDIT, FAS, KIDSCREEN, and others, it is possible to gain insight into the current situation of a given individual regarding his/her consumption behavior. But this analysis, in order to be achieved, requires the use of tools that can ease the process of questionnaire creation, data gathering, curation and representation, and later analysis and visualization to the user. This research presents the design and construction of a web-based platform able to facilitate each of the mentioned processes by integrating the different phases into an intuitive system with a graphical user interface that hides the complexity underlying each of the questionnaires and techniques used and presenting the results in a flexible and visual way, avoiding any manual handling of data during the process. Advantages of this approach are shown and compared to the previous situation where some of the tasks were accomplished by time consuming and error prone manipulations of data.

  15. A Web-Based Tool for Automatic Data Collection, Curation, and Visualization of Complex Healthcare Survey Studies including Social Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, José Alberto; Labra, José Emilio; Quiroga, Enedina; Martín, Vicente; García, Isaías; Marqués-Sánchez, Pilar; Benavides, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    There is a great concern nowadays regarding alcohol consumption and drug abuse, especially in young people. Analyzing the social environment where these adolescents are immersed, as well as a series of measures determining the alcohol abuse risk or personal situation and perception using a number of questionnaires like AUDIT, FAS, KIDSCREEN, and others, it is possible to gain insight into the current situation of a given individual regarding his/her consumption behavior. But this analysis, in order to be achieved, requires the use of tools that can ease the process of questionnaire creation, data gathering, curation and representation, and later analysis and visualization to the user. This research presents the design and construction of a web-based platform able to facilitate each of the mentioned processes by integrating the different phases into an intuitive system with a graphical user interface that hides the complexity underlying each of the questionnaires and techniques used and presenting the results in a flexible and visual way, avoiding any manual handling of data during the process. Advantages of this approach are shown and compared to the previous situation where some of the tasks were accomplished by time consuming and error prone manipulations of data.

  16. Combined motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promotes corticospinal system functional and structural plasticity and motor function after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiguo; Amer, Alzahraa; Ryan, Daniel; Martin, John H

    2016-03-01

    An important strategy for promoting voluntary movements after motor system injury is to harness activity-dependent corticospinal tract (CST) plasticity. We combine forelimb motor cortex (M1) activation with co-activation of its cervical spinal targets in rats to promote CST sprouting and skilled limb movement after pyramidal tract lesion (PTX). We used a two-step experimental design in which we first established the optimal combined stimulation protocol in intact rats and then used the optimal protocol in injured animals to promote CST repair and motor recovery. M1 was activated epidurally using an electrical analog of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS). The cervical spinal cord was co-activated by trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) that was targeted to the cervical enlargement, simulated from finite element method. In intact rats, forelimb motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were strongly facilitated during iTBS and for 10 min after cessation of stimulation. Cathodal, not anodal, tsDCS alone facilitated MEPs and also produced a facilitatory aftereffect that peaked at 10 min. Combined iTBS and cathodal tsDCS (c-tsDCS) produced further MEP enhancement during stimulation, but without further aftereffect enhancement. Correlations between forelimb M1 local field potentials and forelimb electromyogram (EMG) during locomotion increased after electrical iTBS alone and further increased with combined stimulation (iTBS+c-tsDCS). This optimized combined stimulation was then used to promote function after PTX because it enhanced functional connections between M1 and spinal circuits and greater M1 engagement in muscle contraction than either stimulation alone. Daily application of combined M1 iTBS on the intact side and c-tsDCS after PTX (10 days, 27 min/day) significantly restored skilled movements during horizontal ladder walking. Stimulation produced a 5.4-fold increase in spared ipsilateral CST terminations. Combined neuromodulation achieves optimal motor

  17. A Utilização do Genograma como instrumento de coleta de dados na pesquisa qualitativa Genogram use as a collect tool in qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiane Carvalho Wendt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O Genograma é uma representação gráfica da família e tem sido utilizado em diversos contextos. Este artigo visa destacar a relevância da utilização do genograma na pesquisa qualitativa e propor um procedimento de aplicação e análise do mesmo. As informações reunidas pelo genograma podem incluir aspectos genéticos, médicos, sociais, comportamentais, relacionais e culturais, que denotam a estrutura e configuração da família dando indícios de seu funcionamento e dinâmica. Propõe-se que os questionamentos, comentários e verbalizações realizados pelo pesquisador durante a aplicação do instrumento sejam classificados de acordo com o sistema de categorias pré-determinado, e que os dados obtidos sejam submetidos às análises gráfica, clínica e do discurso, com posterior encaminhamento para cálculo de acordo entre juízes.The genogram is a graphical representation of a family and has been used in several contexts. This paper aims to highlight the genogram use relevance in qualitative research and to propose an application and analysis procedure. The information gathered by the genogram may include genetics, medical, social, behavioral, relational and cultural aspects that denote the family structure and its configuration giving indicia of its functioning and dynamics. It is proposed that the inquiries, comments and verbalizations held by the researcher during the application of the tool are classified, according to the pre-determined categories system and that the data obtained are submitted to graphical, clinical and discourse analysis for later calculus of judges' agreement.

  18. Metabolic Profiling as a Screening Tool for Cytotoxic Compounds: Identification of 3-Alkyl Pyridine Alkaloids from Sponges Collected at a Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vent Site North of Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eydis Einarsdottir

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-eight sponge specimens were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal vent site north of Iceland. Extracts were prepared and tested in vitro for cytotoxic activity, and eight of them were shown to be cytotoxic. A mass spectrometry (MS-based metabolomics approach was used to determine the chemical composition of the extracts. This analysis highlighted clear differences in the metabolomes of three sponge specimens, and all of them were identified as Haliclona (Rhizoniera rosea (Bowerbank, 1866. Therefore, these specimens were selected for further investigation. Haliclona rosea metabolomes contained a class of potential key compounds, the 3-alkyl pyridine alkaloids (3-APA responsible for the cytotoxic activity of the fractions. Several 3-APA compounds were tentatively identified including haliclamines, cyclostellettamines, viscosalines and viscosamines. Among these compounds, cyclostellettamine P was tentatively identified for the first time by using ion mobility MS in time-aligned parallel (TAP fragmentation mode. In this work, we show the potential of applying metabolomics strategies and in particular the utility of coupling ion mobility with MS for the molecular characterization of sponge specimens.

  19. Wyoming greater sage-grouse habitat prioritization: a collection of multi-scale seasonal models and geographic information systems land management tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Doherty, Kevin E.; Fedy, Bradley C.

    2015-01-01

    With rapidly changing landscape conditions within Wyoming and the potential effects of landscape changes on sage-grouse habitat, land managers and conservation planners, among others, need procedures to assess the location and juxtaposition of important habitats, land-cover, and land-use patterns to balance wildlife requirements with multiple human land uses. Biologists frequently develop habitat-selection studies to identify prioritization efforts for species of conservation concern to increase understanding and help guide habitat-conservation efforts. Recently, the authors undertook a large-scale collaborative effort that developed habitat-selection models for Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) across large landscapes in Wyoming, USA and for multiple life-stages (nesting, late brood-rearing, and winter). We developed these habitat models using resource selection functions, based upon sage-grouse telemetry data collected for localized studies and within each life-stage. The models allowed us to characterize and spatially predict seasonal sage-grouse habitat use in Wyoming. Due to the quantity of models, the diversity of model predictors (in the form of geographic information system data) produced by analyses, and the variety of potential applications for these data, we present here a resource that complements our published modeling effort, which will further support land managers.

  20. Wyoming greater sage-grouse habitat prioritization: A collection of multi-scale seasonal models and geographic information systems land management tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Doherty, Kevin E.; Fedy, Bradley C.

    2015-01-01

    With rapidly changing landscape conditions within Wyoming and the potential effects of landscape changes on sage-grouse habitat, land managers and conservation planners, among others, need procedures to assess the location and juxtaposition of important habitats, land-cover, and land-use patterns to balance wildlife requirements with multiple human land uses. Biologists frequently develop habitat-selection studies to identify prioritization efforts for species of conservation concern to increase understanding and help guide habitat-conservation efforts. Recently, the authors undertook a large-scale collaborative effort that developed habitat-selection models for Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) across large landscapes in Wyoming, USA and for multiple life-stages (nesting, late brood-rearing, and winter). We developed these habitat models using resource selection functions, based upon sage-grouse telemetry data collected for localized studies and within each life-stage. The models allowed us to characterize and spatially predict seasonal sage-grouse habitat use in Wyoming. Due to the quantity of models, the diversity of model predictors (in the form of geographic information system data) produced by analyses, and the variety of potential applications for these data, we present here a resource that complements our published modeling effort, which will further support land managers.

  1. Movement Disorders and Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Shipton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are neurological conditions affecting speed, fluency, quality, and ease of movement. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is used to treat advanced Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Possible target sites for DBS include the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus, the globus pallidus internus, and the subthalamic nucleus. High-frequency DBS leads to a kind of functional deafferentation of the stimulated structure and to the modulation of cortical activity. This has a profound effect on the efficiency of movement. Indications for the use of DBS include the need to improve function, reduce medication dependency, and avoid ablative neurosurgery. Appropriate patient selection is critical for success. The implantation technique is briefly described. Programming stimulation parameters are performed via telemetry. The adverse effects of DBS are discussed. The future should see the development of “closed-loop” systems. Its use has promoted interdisciplinary team work and provided an improved understanding of the complex neurocircuitry associated with these disorders. DBS is a highly effective, safe, and reversible surgical treatment for advanced Parkinson’s disease, tremor, and dystonia. It is a useful therapeutic option in carefully selected patients that significantly improves motor symptoms, functional status, and quality of life.

  2. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ...

  3. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Dias, Ana Sofia; Pelletier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders. PMID:25210228

  4. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders.

  5. Characteristics Associated with Treatment Response and Satisfaction in Women Undergoing OnabotulinumtoxinA and Sacral Neuromodulation for Refractory Urgency Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Holly E; Amundsen, C L; Erickson, S W; Jelovsek, J E; Komesu, Y; Chermansky, C; Harvie, H S; Albo, M; Myers, D; Gregory, W T; Wallace, D

    2017-10-01

    We sought to identify clinical and demographic characteristics associated with treatment response and satisfaction in women undergoing onabotulinumtoxinA and sacral neuromodulation therapies. We analyzed data from the ROSETTA (Refractory Overactive Bladder: Sacral NEuromodulation versus BoTulinum Toxin Assessment) trial. Baseline participant characteristics and clinical variables were associated with 2 definitions of treatment response, including 1) a reduction in mean daily urgency incontinence episodes during 6 months and 2) a 50% or greater decrease in urgency incontinence episodes across 6 months. The OAB-S (Overactive Bladder-Satisfaction) questionnaire was used to assess satisfaction. A greater reduction in mean daily urgency incontinence episodes was associated with higher HUI-3 (Health Utility Index-3) scores in the onabotulinumtoxinA group and higher baseline incontinence episodes (each p incontinence episodes in the 2 groups (p incontinence episodes after each treatment. Greater age (adjusted OR 0.44/10 years, 95% CI 0.30-0.65) and a higher functional comorbidity index (adjusted OR 0.84/1 point, 95% CI 0.71-0.99) were associated with reduced achievement of a 50% or greater decrease in urgency incontinence episodes in the onabotulinumtoxinA group only (p incontinence. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 78 FR 49288 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Geospatial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Geospatial Capabilities Survey... Collection: Establishment survey and initial approval of collection. (2) Title of Form/Collection: Geospatial... effort that provides an ability to determine, in detail, the geospatial tools, techniques, and practices...

  7. Basal Ganglia Neuromodulation Over Multiple Temporal and Structural Scales—Simulations of Direct Pathway MSNs Investigate the Fast Onset of Dopaminergic Effects and Predict the Role of Kv4.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lindroos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia are involved in the motivational and habitual control of motor and cognitive behaviors. Striatum, the largest basal ganglia input stage, integrates cortical and thalamic inputs in functionally segregated cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic loops, and in addition the basal ganglia output nuclei control targets in the brainstem. Striatal function depends on the balance between the direct pathway medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs that express D1 dopamine receptors and the indirect pathway MSNs that express D2 dopamine receptors. The striatal microstructure is also divided into striosomes and matrix compartments, based on the differential expression of several proteins. Dopaminergic afferents from the midbrain and local cholinergic interneurons play crucial roles for basal ganglia function, and striatal signaling via the striosomes in turn regulates the midbrain dopaminergic system directly and via the lateral habenula. Consequently, abnormal functions of the basal ganglia neuromodulatory system underlie many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Neuromodulation acts on multiple structural levels, ranging from the subcellular level to behavior, both in health and disease. For example, neuromodulation affects membrane excitability and controls synaptic plasticity and thus learning in the basal ganglia. However, it is not clear on what time scales these different effects are implemented. Phosphorylation of ion channels and the resulting membrane effects are typically studied over minutes while it has been shown that neuromodulation can affect behavior within a few hundred milliseconds. So how do these seemingly contradictory effects fit together? Here we first briefly review neuromodulation of the basal ganglia, with a focus on dopamine. We furthermore use biophysically detailed multi-compartmental models to integrate experimental data regarding dopaminergic effects on individual membrane conductances with the aim to explain the resulting

  8. Combination of a Short Cognitive Training and tDCS to Enhance Visuospatial Skills: A Comparison Between Online and Offline Neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldrati, Viola; Colombo, Barbara; Antonietti, Alessandro

    2017-10-07

    Visuospatial skills can be enhanced thanks to specific intervention programs, but the additional benefits of neuromodulation on these skills have not been fully investigated yet, although transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has demonstrated to boost the effects of cognitive trainings. When combining cognitive intervention with neuromodulation, the time-window of tDCS application in relation to task execution has to be taken into account since it has been shown to affect stimulation outcomes. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the influence of tDCS in enhancing the effects of a training for visuospatial skills. We hypothesized that tDCS applied during training execution (online) would improve the cognitive performance at a larger extent than tDCS applied before training execution (offline). Participants received anodal tDCS over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during (online) or before (offline) the completion of the training. A control sham condition was included. Visuospatial abilities were measured 24 hours before (day 1, pre-test) and 24 hours after (day 3, post-test) the stimulation and training session (day 2). tDCS enhanced gains for mental folding performance when applied during the execution of the training (online). Participants' mental rotation and mental folding performance improved from pre-test to post-test regardless of the stimulation condition. However participants in the online tDCS condition showed the largest improvement in mental folding performance. Findings indicate that tDCS enhanced the effects of the training when applied during its execution, showing cumulative positive aftereffects on visuospatial performance 24 hours after the stimulation session. The time-dependent effect points out the importance of the time-window of tDCS application in influencing behavior when combined with cognitive programs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Collective drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Grossa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is referred to the experiences run at Iuav in the framework of the EU-FSE founded Courses of Collaborative Composition. In these courses we built up some work/game thought as meaning of a distance collaborative game. Rally around these games, we delivered specific knowledge and portions of technical knowledge referred to the issue of formal structure, shape grammar, and codify of “behaviours role” for a networked distance collaboration. The subject of this didactic experience is the composition and of a collective figurative opera (an image processed by the whole group of students. The themes of the image have been different in each Course: a figurative opera, a facade of an urban street or a small square. The students shared a repertory of figures coming from the break down of paintings or pictures of palaces and used the repertory as a source in order to compose the final collective opera. On the other side we worked on the shape grammar roles, experimented tools and protocols of communication, analysed the best practice in this field and defined evaluation systems.

  10. ThermoFit: A Set of Software Tools, Protocols and Schema for the Organization of Thermodynamic Data and for the Development, Maintenance, and Distribution of Internally Consistent Thermodynamic Data/Model Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorso, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Internally consistent thermodynamic databases are critical resources that facilitate the calculation of heterogeneous phase equilibria and thereby support geochemical, petrological, and geodynamical modeling. These 'databases' are actually derived data/model systems that depend on a diverse suite of physical property measurements, calorimetric data, and experimental phase equilibrium brackets. In addition, such databases are calibrated with the adoption of various models for extrapolation of heat capacities and volumetric equations of state to elevated temperature and pressure conditions. Finally, these databases require specification of thermochemical models for the mixing properties of solid, liquid, and fluid solutions, which are often rooted in physical theory and, in turn, depend on additional experimental observations. The process of 'calibrating' a thermochemical database involves considerable effort and an extensive computational infrastructure. Because of these complexities, the community tends to rely on a small number of thermochemical databases, generated by a few researchers; these databases often have limited longevity and are universally difficult to maintain. ThermoFit is a software framework and user interface whose aim is to provide a modeling environment that facilitates creation, maintenance and distribution of thermodynamic data/model collections. Underlying ThermoFit are data archives of fundamental physical property, calorimetric, crystallographic, and phase equilibrium constraints that provide the essential experimental information from which thermodynamic databases are traditionally calibrated. ThermoFit standardizes schema for accessing these data archives and provides web services for data mining these collections. Beyond simple data management and interoperability, ThermoFit provides a collection of visualization and software modeling tools that streamline the model/database generation process. Most notably, ThermoFit facilitates the

  11. Evaluating Mobile Survey Tools (MSTs for Field-Level Monitoring and Data Collection: Development of a Novel Evaluation Framework, and Application to MSTs for Rural Water and Sanitation Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Fisher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Information and communications technologies (ICTs such as mobile survey tools (MSTs can facilitate field-level data collection to drive improvements in national and international development programs. MSTs allow users to gather and transmit field data in real time, standardize data storage and management, automate routine analyses, and visualize data. Dozens of diverse MST options are available, and users may struggle to select suitable options. We developed a systematic MST Evaluation Framework (EF, based on International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC software quality modeling standards, to objectively assess MSTs and assist program implementers in identifying suitable MST options. The EF is applicable to MSTs for a broad variety of applications. We also conducted an MST user survey to elucidate needs and priorities of current MST users. Finally, the EF was used to assess seven MSTs currently used for water and sanitation monitoring, as a validation exercise. The results suggest that the EF is a promising method for evaluating MSTs.

  12. Evaluating Mobile Survey Tools (MSTs) for Field-Level Monitoring and Data Collection: Development of a Novel Evaluation Framework, and Application to MSTs for Rural Water and Sanitation Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Michael B; Mann, Benjamin H; Cronk, Ryan D; Shields, Katherine F; Klug, Tori L; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2016-08-23

    Information and communications technologies (ICTs) such as mobile survey tools (MSTs) can facilitate field-level data collection to drive improvements in national and international development programs. MSTs allow users to gather and transmit field data in real time, standardize data storage and management, automate routine analyses, and visualize data. Dozens of diverse MST options are available, and users may struggle to select suitable options. We developed a systematic MST Evaluation Framework (EF), based on International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC) software quality modeling standards, to objectively assess MSTs and assist program implementers in identifying suitable MST options. The EF is applicable to MSTs for a broad variety of applications. We also conducted an MST user survey to elucidate needs and priorities of current MST users. Finally, the EF was used to assess seven MSTs currently used for water and sanitation monitoring, as a validation exercise. The results suggest that the EF is a promising method for evaluating MSTs.

  13. Simulation tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, F

    2006-01-01

    In the last two decades, simulation tools made a significant contribution to the great progress in development of power electronics. Time to market was shortened and development costs were reduced drastically. Falling costs, as well as improved speed and precision, opened new fields of application. Today, continuous and switched circuits can be mixed. A comfortable number of powerful simulation tools is available. The users have to choose the best suitable for their application. Here a simple rule applies: The best available simulation tool is the tool the user is already used to (provided, it can solve the task). Abilities, speed, user friendliness and other features are continuously being improved—even though they are already powerful and comfortable. This paper aims at giving the reader an insight into the simulation of power electronics. Starting with a short description of the fundamentals of a simulation tool as well as properties of tools, several tools are presented. Starting with simplified models ...

  14. 78 FR 64013 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Geospatial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Geospatial Capabilities Survey...: Establishment survey and initial approval of collection. (2) Title of Form/Collection: Geospatial Capabilities... effort that provides an ability to determine, in detail, the geospatial tools, techniques, and practices...

  15. Does a Combination of Virtual Reality, Neuromodulation and Neuroimaging Provide a Comprehensive Platform for Neurorehabilitation? - A Narrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Wei-Peng; Muthalib, Makii; Yamin, Sami; Hendy, Ashlee M; Bramstedt, Kelly; Kotsopoulos, Eleftheria; Perrey, Stephane; Ayaz, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, virtual reality (VR) training has been used extensively in video games and military training to provide a sense of realism and environmental interaction to its users. More recently, VR training has been explored as a possible adjunct therapy for people with motor and mental health dysfunctions. The concept underlying VR therapy as a treatment for motor and cognitive dysfunction is to improve neuroplasticity of the brain by engaging users in multisensory training. In this review, we discuss the theoretical framework underlying the use of VR as a therapeutic intervention for neurorehabilitation and provide evidence for its use in treating motor and mental disorders such as cerebral palsy, Parkinson's disease, stroke, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and other related clinical areas. While this review provides some insights into the efficacy of VR in clinical rehabilitation and its complimentary use with neuroimaging (e.g., fNIRS and EEG) and neuromodulation (e.g., tDCS and rTMS), more research is needed to understand how different clinical conditions are affected by VR therapies (e.g., stimulus presentation, interactivity, control and types of VR). Future studies should consider large, longitudinal randomized controlled trials to determine the true potential of VR therapies in various clinical populations.

  16. Does a Combination of Virtual Reality, Neuromodulation and Neuroimaging Provide a Comprehensive Platform for Neurorehabilitation? – A Narrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Wei-Peng; Muthalib, Makii; Yamin, Sami; Hendy, Ashlee M.; Bramstedt, Kelly; Kotsopoulos, Eleftheria; Perrey, Stephane; Ayaz, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, virtual reality (VR) training has been used extensively in video games and military training to provide a sense of realism and environmental interaction to its users. More recently, VR training has been explored as a possible adjunct therapy for people with motor and mental health dysfunctions. The concept underlying VR therapy as a treatment for motor and cognitive dysfunction is to improve neuroplasticity of the brain by engaging users in multisensory training. In this review, we discuss the theoretical framework underlying the use of VR as a therapeutic intervention for neurorehabilitation and provide evidence for its use in treating motor and mental disorders such as cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and other related clinical areas. While this review provides some insights into the efficacy of VR in clinical rehabilitation and its complimentary use with neuroimaging (e.g., fNIRS and EEG) and neuromodulation (e.g., tDCS and rTMS), more research is needed to understand how different clinical conditions are affected by VR therapies (e.g., stimulus presentation, interactivity, control and types of VR). Future studies should consider large, longitudinal randomized controlled trials to determine the true potential of VR therapies in various clinical populations. PMID:27445739

  17. A novel treatment modality in patients with premature ejaculation resistant to conventional methods: the neuromodulation of dorsal penile nerves by pulsed radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal, Seref; Goktas, Serdar; Ergin, Atilla; Yildirim, Ibrahim; Atim, Abdulkadir; Tahmaz, Lutfi; Dayanc, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual problem experienced by men, and it affects 20%-30% of them. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) neuromodulation has been shown to be an effective treatment for a wide range of pain conditions. We used PRF to treat PE by desensitizing dorsal penile nerves in patients resistant to conventional treatments. Fifteen patients with a lifelong history of PE, defined as an intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) of IELT and sexual satisfaction score (SSS; for patients and their partners) were obtained. The mean IELTs before and 3 weeks after procedure were 18.5 +/- 17.9 and 139.9 +/- 55.1 seconds, respectively. Side effects did not occur. Mean SSSs of patients before and after treatment were 1.3 +/- 0.3 and 4.6 +/- 0.5, and mean SSSs of partners before and after treatment were 1.3 +/- 0.4 and 4.4 +/- 0.5, respectively. In all cases, IELT and SSS were significantly increased (P < .05). None of the patients or their wives reported any treatment failure during the follow-up period. The mean follow-up time was 8.3 +/- 1.9 months. It is early to conclude that this new treatment modality might be used widely for the treatment of PE; however, because it is an innovative modality, placebo-controlled studies (eg, sham procedure), with larger numbers of patients and including assessment of penile sensitivity (eg, biothesiometry), are needed.

  18. Collection Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Libraries in Canada, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Includes 21 articles that discuss collection development in Canadian school libraries. Topics include digital collections in school library media centers; print and electronic library resources; library collections; collaborative projects; print-disabled students; informing administrators of the importance of collection development; censorship;…

  19. Collective agreements as a tool for achieving gender equality in the workplace. Case study: the chemical industry in Tarragona / Los convenios colectivos como herramienta para alcanzar la igualdad de género en el trabajo. Estudio de caso: la industria química en Tarragona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Pontón Merino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gender equality and collective bargaining are the key elements of the analysis presented in this paper. Collective agreements and collective bargaining are some of the tools to achieve the goal of equality between women and men at work. The incorporation of equality issues in bargaining debate is something relatively new, which is crucial to reach real labor equality. In Spain, since 2007, the collective agreements that include clauses on equality have grown exponentially. Nevertheless, the incorporation of contents on equality between women and men in collective agreements is slow and limited. Changes in legislation and the contents incorporated in the agreements do not stop being functional measures for a system based on the sexual division of labor that is not sufficiently criticized. In this paper we analyze the existing collective agreements of the Asociación Empresarial Química de Tarragona, in south Catalonia, that demonstrate these affirmations.

  20. Clean Cities Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-12-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities offers a large collection of Web-based tools on the Alternative Fuels Data Center. These calculators, interactive maps, and data searches can assist fleets, fuels providers, and other transportation decision makers in their efforts to reduce petroleum use.

  1. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collections for modern drug discovery. Bakker gave an account of the tantalising possibilities for molecular systematics and other research in the use of herbarium collections, which have opened up for a plethora of additional data to be extracted from dried plant collections. The final talk was Blackmore......The symposium Tropical Plant Collections: Legacies from the past? Essential tools for the future? was held on 19th–21st May 2015 with botanists from eighteen countries. Balslev and Friis introduced the themes and voiced their concern about negligence of tropical plant collections in many European......-colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants...

  2. Collection Evaluation and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Ted; Kozimor, John

    2017-01-01

    We will review metadata evaluation tools and share results from our most recent CMR analysis. We will demonstrate results using Google spreadsheets and present new results in terms of number of records that include specific content. We will show evolution of UMM-compliance over time and also show results of comparing various CMR collections (NASA, non-NASA, and SciOps).

  3. Quick Fixes: Collection Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabb, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    The Do It Yourself (DIY) section is an essential and well-used part of the public library's collection and must be kept up-to-date to remain valuable, since tools, materials, and building codes are always changing. Current economic decline has increased the topic's popularity as homeowners choose to remodel rather than buy, or attempt to make…

  4. N-acyl amino acids and N-acyl neurotransmitter conjugates: neuromodulators and probes for new drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Mark; Vaughan, Chris W; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2010-08-01

    The myriad functions of lipids as signalling molecules is one of the most interesting fields in contemporary pharmacology, with a host of compounds recognized as mediators of communication within and between cells. The N-acyl conjugates of amino acids and neurotransmitters (NAANs) have recently come to prominence because of their potential roles in the nervous system, vasculature and the immune system. NAAN are compounds such as glycine, GABA or dopamine conjugated with long chain fatty acids. More than 70 endogenous NAAN have been reported although their physiological role remains uncertain, with various NAAN interacting with a low affinity at G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) and ion channels. Regardless of their potential physiological function, NAAN are of great interest to pharmacologists because of their potential as flexible tools to probe new sites on GPCRs, transporters and ion channels. NAANs are amphipathic molecules, with a wide variety of potential fatty acid and headgroup moieties, a combination which provides a rich source of potential ligands engaging novel binding sites and mechanisms for modulation of membrane proteins such as GPCRs, ion channels and transporters. The unique actions of subsets of NAAN on voltage-gated calcium channels and glycine transporters indicate that the wide variety of NAAN may provide a readily exploitable resource for defining new pharmacological targets. Investigation of the physiological roles and pharmacological potential of these simple lipid conjugates is in its infancy, and we believe that there is much to be learnt from their careful study.

  5. Neuromodulation integrating rTMS and neurofeedback for the treatment of autism spectrum disorder: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhadze, Estate M.; El-Baz, Ayman S.; Tasman, Allan; Sears, Lonnie L.; Wang, Yao; Lamina, Eva V.; Casanova, Manuel F.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by deficits in social interaction, language, stereotyped behaviors, and restricted range of interests. In previous studies low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used, with positive behavioral and electrophysiological results, for the experimental treatment in ASD. In this study we combined prefrontal rTMS sessions with electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback (NFB) to prolong and reinforce TMS-induced EEG changes. The pilot trial recruited 42 children with ASD (~14.5 yrs). Outcome measures included behavioral evaluations and reaction time test with event-related potential (ERP) recording. For the main goal of this exploratory study we used rTMS-neurofeedback combination (TMS-NFB, N=20) and waitlist (WTL, N=22) groups to examine effects of 18 sessions of integrated rTMS-NFB treatment or wait period) on behavioral responses, stimulus and response-locked ERPs, and other functional and clinical outcomes. The underlying hypothesis was that combined TMS-NFB will improve executive functions in autistic patients as compared to the waitlist group. Behavioral and ERP outcomes were collected in pre- and post-treatment tests in both groups. Results of the study supported our hypothesis by demonstration of positive effects of combined TMS-NFB neurotherapy in active treatment group as compared to control waitlist group, as the TMS-NFB group showed significant improvements in behavioral and functional outcomes as compared to the waitlist group. PMID:25267414

  6. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The symposium Tropical Plant Collections: Legacies from the past? Essential tools for the future? was held on 19th–21st May 2015 with botanists from eighteen countries. Balslev and Friis introduced the themes and voiced their concern about negligence of tropical plant collections in many European......-colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants...... in the USA over the past two hundred years. Sebsebe Demissew taked about the situation in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly problems related to building and maintaining plant collections in new and poor nations. Onana outlined the history of botanical collections in Cameroon, covering a colonial period...

  7. Developing a Learning Analytics tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Christian; Belle, Gianna; Clemmensen, Anita Lykke

    This poster describes how learning analytics and collective intelligence can be combined in order to develop a tool for providing support and feedback to learners and teachers regarding students self-initiated learning activities.......This poster describes how learning analytics and collective intelligence can be combined in order to develop a tool for providing support and feedback to learners and teachers regarding students self-initiated learning activities....

  8. 2017 SmartWay Logistics Tool Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EPA presentation provides information on the SmartWay Logistics Carrier Tool: its background and development, participation in the program, application process, emission metrics, tool demonstration, data collection, and schedule for 2017.

  9. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  10. Spinal neuromodulation as a novel surgical option for failed back surgery syndrome following rhBMP exuberant bony growth in instrumented lumbar fusion: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Ramsis F; Lissounov, Alexei; Tverdohleb, Tatiana; Kohanchi, David; Candido, Kenneth D; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenic protein (BMP) for instrumented lumbar fusion was approved in 2002, and since then has led to an increasing incidence of BMP-related neuropathic pain. These patients are usually resistant to conventional medical therapy and frequently undergo multiple surgical revisions without any pain relief. A 58-year-old male was referred to the author's outpatient clinic after four lumbar surgeries did not provide satisfactory pain relief. During his 10 years of suffering from low back pain after an injury, the patient was resistant to conventional and interventional treatment options. He was experiencing severe back pain rated 10/10, as well as right lower extremity pain, numbness, tingling, and motor deficits. Outside spine specialists had performed revision surgeries for BMP-related exuberant bone formation at L5-S1, which included the removal of the ipsilateral hardware and debridement of intradiscal and intraforamina heterotrophic exuberant bony formation. The author implanted the patient with a permanent continuous spinal cord stimulator, after which he achieved complete pain relief (0/10) and restoration of motor, sensory, autonomic, and sphincter functions. This is the first reported case of restorative function with neuromodulation therapy in a BMP-induced postoperative complication, which is considered as a primarily inflammatory process, rather than nerve root compression due to exuberant bony formation. We hypothesize that neuromodulation may enhance blood flow and interfere with inflammatory processes, in addition to functioning by the accepted gate control theory mechanism. The neuromodulation therapy should be strongly considered as a therapeutic approach, even with confirmed BMP-induced postoperative radiculitis, rather than proposing multiple surgical revisions.

  11. Design tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton TenWolde; Mark T. Bomberg

    2009-01-01

    Overall, despite the lack of exact input data, the use of design tools, including models, is much superior to the simple following of rules of thumbs, and a moisture analysis should be standard procedure for any building envelope design. Exceptions can only be made for buildings in the same climate, similar occupancy, and similar envelope construction. This chapter...

  12. Collective Enumeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a…

  13. Social Data Analytics Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Abid; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, development and demonstrative case studies of the Social Data Analytics Tool, SODATO. Adopting Action Design Framework [1], the objective of SODATO [2] is to collect, store, analyze, and report big social data emanating from the social media engagement of and social...... media conversations about organizations. We report and discuss results from two demonstrative case studies that were conducted using SODATO and conclude with implications and future work....

  14. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    is of importance to global change studies. Queenborough showed how herbarium collections can be used to study plant functional traits, and Antonelli documented the importance of herbarium voucher specimens for molecular phylogenetic studies and in comparative biogeography. Soberón gave a sobering account of ‘big......The symposium Tropical Plant Collections: Legacies from the past? Essential tools for the future? was held on 19th–21st May 2015 with botanists from eighteen countries. Balslev and Friis introduced the themes and voiced their concern about negligence of tropical plant collections in many European......-colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants...

  15. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -colonial and early colonial periods. With the presentation by Cribb on the botany of the British Empire we were fully into the colonial period, focussing on the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The situation in North America was treated by Funk, who illustrated the development of collections of tropical plants......The symposium Tropical Plant Collections: Legacies from the past? Essential tools for the future? was held on 19th–21st May 2015 with botanists from eighteen countries. Balslev and Friis introduced the themes and voiced their concern about negligence of tropical plant collections in many European...... and American institutions and the dire conditions of funding and staffing in many tropical herbaria and botanical gardens. This happens at the same time as the collections become increasingly important for a series of modern approaches to evolutionary and biodiversity research and the needs of the biodiversity...

  16. Culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Appropriate Prolonged Sacral Neuromodulation Testing in Improving Implantation Rate of a Permanent Implantable Pulse Generator in Patients with Refractory Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunctions in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Wu, Li-Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2017-02-20

    Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) has become an effective method for treating lower urinary tract voiding dysfunction during the past 20 years. Because of the expensive cost, the number of implantable pulse generator (IPG) implantations per year in China is far lower than that in Western developed countries since 2012. This study was to summarize the effects of the appropriate prolonged SNM testing time in improving the implantation rate of a permanent IPG in patients with refractory lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in mainland China. From January 2013 to June 2016, 51 patients with refractory LUTS received SNM therapy. In this study, we compared the conversion rate 2 weeks after the Stage I test and final actual conversion rate. We also observed the complications (such as pain, infection, and electrode displacement) and effectiveness. We tried to improve an appropriate prolonged test time which was favorable for improving the SNM conversion rate while ensuring safety and effectiveness. Among 51 patients receiving SNM therapy, 19 patients (mean age 45.0 ± 16.9 years) had poor Stage I test results, and on an average, the electrode was removed 27.4 ± 9.6 days after the surgery. In one patient, the electrode was removed within 2 weeks; when the remaining 18 patients were questioned 2 weeks after testing, none of the patients wanted to terminate the test, and all the 18 patients desired to prolong the testing time to further observe the treatment effect. The remaining 32 patients (mean age 46.7 ± 15.3 years) received Stage II permanent implantation at 19.6 ± 10.4 days after the surgery. The overall Stage I-II conversion was 62.7% (32/51) in this study. Within 2 weeks after the surgery, only eight patients received Stage II permanent implantation, and the conversion rate was only 15.7% (8/51), which was much lower than the overall conversion rate of 62.7%. Nearly 84.4% (27/32) of the patients received Stage II implantation within 4 weeks. None of the patients had

  18. [Input data collection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Julie

    2017-05-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care depends notably on the collection of data. In Quebec, there is a tool which aims to improve the organisation of care in accident and emergency departments. Nurses are on the frontline in the initial assessment of the patient. Unfortunately, their recognition is not on a par with their responsibility. Crown Copyright © 2017. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Sphenopalatine ganglion neuromodulation in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sabrina; Schoenen, Jean; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    has gained increasing interest within recent years, as current treatment strategies often fail to provide adequate relief from this debilitating headache. Common migraine symptoms include lacrimation, nasal congestion, and conjunctival injection, all parasympathetic manifestations. In addition......, studies have suggested that parasympathetic activity may also contribute to the pain of migraineurs. The SPG is the largest extracranial parasympathetic ganglion of the head, innervating the meninges, lacrimal gland, nasal mucosa, and conjunctiva, all structures involved in migraine with cephalic...

  20. Neuromodulation of the Suprascapular Nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurt, E.; Eijk, T. van; Henssen, D.J.H.A.; Arnts, I.; Steegers, M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intractable shoulder pain (CISP) is defined as shoulder pain which is present for longer than 6 months and does not respond to standard treatments like medication, physical therapy, rehabilitation, selective nerve blocks and local infiltrations, or orthopedic procedures. The etiology of CISP

  1. Locals Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Hastings-King

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A locals collection is a set of parameters that are used to delimit data-mining operations. This piece uses a collection of locals from around Essex Massachusetts to shape and delimit an interrogation of post-reality in contemporary America. It explores the notion of crisis, the possibility of a crisis of empire that may or may not emerge in a media-space that does not allow crisis of empire to be mentioned and relations this maybe-crisis to the various levels of economic dysfunction that have become evident since late 2008. But mostly this piece explores ways in which particular stories about particular people do and do not link/link to these larger-scale narratives. This is the first of a potential series of locals collections that will mine the American post-real.

  2. FFI: A software tool for ecological monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan C. Lutes; Nathan C. Benson; MaryBeth Keifer; John F. Caratti; S. Austin Streetman

    2009-01-01

    A new monitoring tool called FFI (FEAT/FIREMON Integrated) has been developed to assist managers with collection, storage and analysis of ecological information. The tool was developed through the complementary integration of two fire effects monitoring systems commonly used in the United States: FIREMON and the Fire Ecology Assessment Tool. FFI provides software...

  3. Fostering collective intelligence education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Meza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available New educational models are necessary to update learning environments to the digitally shared communication and information. Collective intelligence is an emerging field that already has a significant impact in many areas and will have great implications in education, not only from the side of new methodologies but also as a challenge for education. This paper proposes an approach to a collective intelligence model of teaching using Internet to combine two strategies: idea management and real time assessment in the class. A digital tool named Fabricius has been created supporting these two elements to foster the collaboration and engagement of students in the learning process. As a result of the research we propose a list of KPI trying to measure individual and collective performance. We are conscious that this is just a first approach to define which aspects of a class following a course can be qualified and quantified.

  4. Collective intentions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunin-Keplicz, B; Verbrugge, L.C.

    In this paper the notion of collective intention in teams of agents involved in cooperative problem solving (CPS) in multiagent systems (MAS) is investigated. Starting from individual intentions, goals, and beliefs defining agents' local asocial motivational and informational attitudes, we arrive at

  5. Hydrogen sulfide: a worthwhile tool in the design of new multitarget drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestito, Simona; Nesi, Giulia; Pi, Rongbiao; Macchia, Marco; Rapposelli, Simona

    2017-09-01

    H2S is a gaseous molecule able to trigger a plethora of central physiological and pharmacological effects as antioxidant, pro- and anti-inflammatory, pro- and anti-nociceptive, neuromodulator, and cytoprotective. The polypharmacology of H2S depends on the wide variety of targets implicated, but, despite the efforts, the mechanisms of action that should clarify its activity are still not completely unrevealed. Nevertheless, many attempts to exploit the multifaceted profile of this molecule have already been accomplished and many chemical entities containing an H2S-releasing pharmacophore have been synthetized. Here we discuss recent investigations on multitarget molecules able to release H2S, with a particular focus on the combinations of "native drug" with moieties structurally able to release H2S and their applications as therapeutic tools in bone disease, gastrointestinal system and neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Neuromodulación de raíces sacras como tratamiento de la incontinencia fecal: Resultados preliminares Sacral root neuromodulation as treatment for fecal incontinence: Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Navarro

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos nuestra experiencia inicial en el tratamiento de la incontinencia fecal (IF mediante neuromodulación de raíces sacras (NRS, a través de los resultados de un estudio prospectivo realizado con 26 pacientes en el que se comparan los valores basales en la escala de continencia de Wexner-Cleveland y en la capacidad para el retraso de la defecación, con los obtenidos tras un año de terapia con NRS. El estudio inicial de cada paciente incluía anamnesis, exploración general, ecografía y manometría rectal, así como unos diarios de continencia y de calidad de vida específicos para la IF de 3 semanas. Antes de la terapia con NRS, el valor medio en la escala Wexner-Cleveland fue de 15,00 ± 1,81 y el 62,50% de los pacientes tenía una capacidad de retraso de la defecación menor de 1 minuto. Tras un año de terapia con NRS, el valor medio en la escala de Wexner-Cleveland fue de 4,87 ± 2,54 (p = 0,0031 y el 75,01% de los pacientes presentaba una capacidad de retraso defecatorio mayor de 15 minutos (p = 0,0018. Hacemos, además, una descripción detalla de la técnica quirúrgica de la NRS, haciendo referencia a sus indicaciones y finalizamos revisando las distintas opciones terapéuticas para la IF mostrando nuestro algoritmo terapéutico para esta patología. La NRS es una técnica eficaz para el tratamiento de la IF en pacientes seleccionados que no han respondido a tratamiento conservador, biofeedback o correcciones anatómicas (esfinteroplastia, con una mínima morbilidad y susceptible de realizarse en un programa de cirugía ambulatoria.We present our initial experience in the treatment of fecal incontinence (FI with sacral root neuromodulation (SRN by reporting the results of a prospective study with 26 patients where baseline Wexner-Cleveland scale scores and ability to delay defecation were compard to results after one year with SRN. The initial study of patients included history taking, general examination, anal

  7. UTV Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fierro, Ricardo D.; Hansen, Per Christian; Hansen, Peter Søren Kirk

    1999-01-01

    We describe a Matlab 5.2 package for computing and modifying certain rank-revealing decompositions that have found widespread use in signal processing and other applications. The package focuses on algorithms for URV and ULV decompositions, collectively known as UTV decompositions. We include...... algorithms for the ULLV decomposition, which generalizes the ULV decomposition to a pair of matrices. For completeness a few algorithms for computation of the RRQR decomposition are also included. The software in this package can be used as is, or can be considered as templates for specialized...

  8. Performance Analysis using CPN Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wells, Lisa Marie

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of new facilities for performance analysis using Coloured Petri Nets and the tool CPN Tools. Coloured Petri Nets is a formal modeling language that is well suited for modeling and analyzing large and complex systems. The new facilities include support for collecting...... data during simulations, for generating different kinds of performance-related output, and for running multiple simulation replications. A simple example of a network protocol is used to illustrate the flexibility of the new facilities....

  9. A System Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.; ESPINOZA,JUAN

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we describe a tool for analyzing systems. The analysis is based on program slicing. It answers the following question for the software: if the value of a particular variable changes, what other variable values also change, and what is the path in between? program slicing was developed based on intra-procedure control and data flow. It has been expanded commercially to inter-procedure flow. However, we extend slicing to collections of programs and non-program entities, which we term multi-domain systems. The value of our tool is that an analyst can model the entirety of a system, not just the software, and we believe that this makes for a significant increase in power. We are building a prototype system.

  10. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors) 304 refs., 53 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. "Research Tools": Tools for supporting research and publications

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2014-01-01

    “Research Tools” can be defined as vehicles that broadly facilitate research and related activities. “Research Tools” enable researchers to collect, organize, analyze, visualize and publicized research outputs. Dr. Nader has collected over 700 tools that enable students to follow the correct path in research and to ultimately produce high-quality research outputs with more accuracy and efficiency. It is assembled as an interactive Web-based mind map, titled “Research Tools”, which is updated ...

  12. Collective Success or Collective Failure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fayyaz, Anjum

    In this article, I make a contribution to the literature on how industrial clusters in developing countries respond to corporate responsibility demands from international buyers in Europe and North America. I outline an analytical framework that integrates insights from the global value chain......, industrial cluster, and corporate social responsibility literatures with the aim of explaining why collective cluster action through industry associations and/or public private partnerships succeed or fail in facilitating cluster-wide compliance with CSR standards. I then use this framework to analyze a case...

  13. 78 FR 19695 - Agency Information Collection Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ..., and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection... the Excess Personal Property Furnished to Non- Federal Recipients and the Exchange/Sale Report is collected using GSA's Personal Property Reporting Tool and can be found at the following link: https://gsa...

  14. QR Codes: Taking Collections Further

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    With some thought and direction, QR (quick response) codes are a great tool to use in school libraries to enhance access to information. From March through April 2013, Caitlin Ahearn interned at Sanborn Regional High School (SRHS) under the supervision of Pam Harland. As a result of Harland's un-Deweying of the nonfiction collection at SRHS,…

  15. An Intelligence Collection Management Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    classification of inteligence collection requirements in terms of. the a-.- metnodo"c, .ev--e in Chaster Five. 116 APPgENDIX A A METHOD OF RANKING...of Artificial Intelligence Tools and Technigues to!TN’X n~l is n rs aa~emfft-.3-ufnyva: ’A TZ Ashby W. Ecss. An Introduction to Cybernetics. New York

  16. Crash course in collection development

    CERN Document Server

    Disher, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    This professional volume covers all aspects of collection development and management in the public library, from gathering statistics to design a collection that meets community needs, to selecting materials, managing vendor relations, understanding the publishing industry, and handling complaints. Author Wayne Disher provides public librarians-especially those without the benefit of academic training-access to the tools to make them successful, and their collections beneficial to the public they serve. The second edition features two new chapters on digital curation and cooperative colle

  17. Comparison of select reference management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingting

    2012-01-01

    Bibliographic management tools have been widely used by researchers to store, organize, and manage their references for research papers, theses, dissertations, journal articles, and other publications. There are a number of reference management tools available. In order for users to decide which tool is best for their needs, it is important to know each tool's strengths and weaknesses. This article compares four reference management tools, one of which is licensed by University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey libraries and the other three are open source and freely available. They were chosen based on their functionality, ease of use, availability to library users, and popularity. These four tools are EndNote/EndNote Web, Zotero, Connotea, and Mendeley Desktop/Mendeley Web. Each tool is analyzed in terms of the following features: accessing, collecting, organizing, collaborating, and citing/formatting. A comparison table is included to summarize the key features of these tools. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  18. Identifying factors of comfort in using hand tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijt-Evers, L.F.M.; Groenesteijn, L.; Looze, M.P.de; Vink, P.

    2004-01-01

    To design comfortable hand tools, knowledge about comfort/discomfort in using hand tools is required. We investigated which factors determine comfort/discomfort in using hand tools according to users. Therefore, descriptors of comfort/discomfort in using hand tools were collected from literature and

  19. ViSIT: Visitor Survey Information Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The national survey was...

  20. CoC GIS Tools (GIS Tool)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This tool provides a no-cost downloadable software tool that allows users to interact with professional quality GIS maps. Users access pre-compiled projects through...

  1. Mathematical tools for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical Tools for Physisists is a unique collection of 18 review articles, each one written by a renowned expert of its field. Their professional style will be beneficial for advanced students as well as for the scientist at work. The first may find a comprehensive introduction while the latter use it as a quick reference.The contributions range from fundamental methods right up to the latest applications, including:Algebraic/ analytic / geometric methodsSymmetries and conservation lawsMathematical modellingQuantum computationGreat attention was paid to ensuring fast access to the information, and each carefully reviewed article features:an abstracta detailed table of contentscontinuous cross-referencingreferences to the most relevant publications in the field, andsuggestions for further reading, both introductory as well as highly specialized.In addition, a comprehensive index provides easy access to the enormous number of key words beyond the headlines

  2. The ALICE Configuration Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccioli, M.; Carena, F.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Lechman, M.; Jusko, A.; Pinazza, O.; ALICE Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It includes 18 different sub-detectors and 5 online systems, each one made of many different components and developed by different teams inside the collaboration. The operation of a large experiment over several years to collect billions of events acquired in well defined conditions requires predictability and repeatability of the experiment configuration. The logistics of the operation is also a major issue and it is mandatory to reduce the size of the shift crew needed to operate the experiment. Appropriate software tools are therefore needed to automate daily operations. This ensures minimizing human errors and maximizing the data taking time. The ALICE Configuration Tool (ACT) is ALICE first step to achieve a high level of automation, implementing automatic configuration and calibration of the sub-detectors and online systems. This presentation describes the goals and architecture of the ACT, the web-based Human Interface and the commissioning performed before the start of the collisions. It also reports on the first experiences with real use in daily operations, and finally it presents the road-map for future developments.

  3. Collective Code Bookmarks for Program Comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzzi, A.; Hattori, L.; Lanza, M.; Pinzger, M.; Van Deursen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The program comprehension research community has been developing useful tools and techniques to support developers in the time-consuming activity of understanding software artifacts. However, the majority of the tools do not bring collective benefit to the team: After gaining the necessary

  4. Route Availabililty Planning Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Route Availability Planning Tool (RAPT) is a weather-assimilated decision support tool (DST) that supports the development and execution of departure management...

  5. STUDIES ON TOOL WEAR CONDITION MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Metin ERTUNÇ

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, wear mechanisms on cutting tools, especially for the drill bits, during the cutting operation have been investigated. As the importance of full automation in industry has gained substantial importance, tool wear condition monitoring during the cutting operation has been the subject of many investigators. Tool condition monitoring is very crucial in order to change the tool before breakage. Because tool breakage can cause considerable economical damage to both the machine tool and workpiece. In this paper, the studies on the monitoring of drill bit wear in literature have been introduced; the direct/indirect techniques used and sensor fusion techniques have been summarized. The methods which were proposed to determine tool wear evolution as processing the sensor signals collected have been provided and their references have been given for detailed information.

  6. 78 FR 53464 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... (FRCoP): User Registration Page (DHS Form 10059 (9/09)). The FRCoP web based tool collects profile... of Practice Web site found at . The user will complete the form online and submit it through the Web... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Extension...

  7. 75 FR 16134 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ..., health plan accreditation and quality improvement. The CAHPS Health Plan Survey is a tool for collecting... directly from the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). The data is collected by NCQA from those... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities...

  8. PAT tools for fermentation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Gernaey, Krist

    2012-01-01

    The publication of the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) guidance has been one of the most important milestones for pharmaceutical production during the past ten years. The ideas outlined in the PAT guidance are also applied in other industries, for example the fermentation industry. Process knowledge is central in PAT projects. This presentation therefore gives a brief overview of a number of PAT tools for collecting process knowledge on fermentation processes: - On-line sensors, where for...

  9. Chemical Tool Peer Review Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashion, Avery Ted [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cieslewski, Grzegorz [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Chemical tracers are commonly used to characterize fracture networks and to determine the connectivity between the injection and production wells. Currently, most tracer experiments involve injecting the tracer at the injection well, manually collecting liquid samples at the wellhead of the production well, and sending the samples off for laboratory analysis. While this method provides accurate tracer concentration data, it does not provide information regarding the location of the fractures conducting the tracer between wellbores. The goal of this project is to develop chemical sensors and design a prototype tool to help understand the fracture properties of a geothermal reservoir by monitoring tracer concentrations along the depth of the well. The sensors will be able to detect certain species of the ionic tracers (mainly iodide) and pH in-situ during the tracer experiment. The proposed high-temperature (HT) tool will house the chemical sensors as well as a standard logging sensor package of pressure, temperature, and flow sensors in order to provide additional information on the state of the geothermal reservoir. The sensors and the tool will be able to survive extended deployments at temperatures up to 225 °C and high pressures to provide real-time temporal and spatial feedback of tracer concentration. Data collected from this tool will allow for the real-time identification of the fractures conducting chemical tracers between wellbores along with the pH of the reservoir fluid at various depths.

  10. Partonic collectivity at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shusu

    2009-10-01

    The measurement of event anisotropy, often called v2, provides a powerful tool for studying the properties of hot and dense medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. The important discoveries of partonic collectivity and the brand-new process for hadronization - quark coalescence were obtained through a systematic analysis of the v2 for 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC [1]. However, early dynamic information might be masked by later hadronic rescatterings. Multistrange hadrons (φ, ξ and φ) with their large mass and presumably small hadronic cross sections should be less sensitive to hadronic rescattering in the later stage of the collisions and therefore a good probe of the early stage of the collision. We will present the measurement of v2 of π, p, KS^0, λ, ξ, φ and φ in heavy ion collisions. In minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV, a significant amount of elliptic flow, almost identical to other mesons and baryons, is observed for φ and φ. Experimental observations of pT dependence of v2 of identified particles at RHIC support partonic collectivity. [4pt] [1] B. I. Abelev et al., (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. C 77, 054901 (2008).

  11. DRT accessibility tool (P1) : user guide (P2) : workshop materials (P3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This is a collection of workshop materials, collected in August 2014, pertaining to a DRT Accessibility Tool developed for the Texas : Department of Transportation. This tool addresses some of the challenges of operating : a demand-responsive transit...

  12. UNLV Special Collections in the Twenty-First Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sommer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV Special Collections is consistently striving to provide several avenues of discovery to its diverse range of patrons. Specifically, UNLV Special Collections has planned and implemented several online tools to facilitate unearthing treasures in the collections. These online tools incorporate Web 2.0 features as well as searchable interfaces to collections.

  13. Neuromodulation approaches for the treatment of major depression: challenges and recommendations from a working group meeting Estratégias de neuromodulação para o tratamento da depressão maior: desafios e recomendações de uma força-tarefa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Russowsky Brunoni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of neuromodulation as a treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD has recently attracted renewed interest due to development of other non-pharmacological therapies besides electroconvulsive therapy (ECT such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, deep brain stimulation (DBS, and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS. METHOD: We convened a working group of researchers to discuss the updates and key challenges of neuromodulation use for the treatment of MDD. RESULTS: The state-of-art of neuromodulation techniques was reviewed and discussed in four sections: [1] epidemiology and pathophysiology of MDD; [2] a comprehensive overview of the neuromodulation techniques; [3] using neuromodulation techniques in MDD associated with non-psychiatric conditions; [4] the main challenges of neuromodulation research and alternatives to overcome them. DISCUSSION: ECT is the first-line treatment for severe depression. TMS and tDCS are strategies with a relative benign profile of side effects; however, while TMS effects are comparable to antidepressant drugs for treating MDD; further research is needed to establish the role of tDCS. DBS and VNS are invasive strategies with a possible role in treatment-resistant depression. In summary, MDD is a chronic and incapacitating condition with a high prevalence; therefore clinicians should consider all the treatment options including invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation approaches.O uso de técnicas de neuromodulação para o tratamento do transtorno depressivo maior (TDM tem despertado um renovado interesse nos últimos anos com o desenvolvimento de outras intervenções não-farmacólogicas além da eletroconvulsoterapia (ECT, como a estimulação magnética transcraniana (EMT, a estimulação transcraniana por corrente continua (ETCC, a estimulação cerebral profunda (DBS e a estimulação de nervo vago (VNS. MÉTODO: Nós organizamos um grupo de trabalho com v

  14. Nanocomposites for Machining Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Sidorenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Machining tools are used in many areas of production. To a considerable extent, the performance characteristics of the tools determine the quality and cost of obtained products. The main materials used for producing machining tools are steel, cemented carbides, ceramics and superhard materials. A promising way to improve the performance characteristics of these materials is to design new nanocomposites based on them. The application of micromechanical modeling during the elaboration of composite materials for machining tools can reduce the financial and time costs for development of new tools, with enhanced performance. This article reviews the main groups of nanocomposites for machining tools and their performance.

  15. Improved tool grinding machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, C.E. Sr.

    The present invention relates to an improved tool grinding mechanism for grinding single point diamond cutting tools to precise roundness and radius specifications. The present invention utilizes a tool holder which is longitudinally displaced with respect to the remainder of the grinding system due to contact of the tool with the grinding surface with this displacement being monitored so that any variation in the grinding of the cutting surface such as caused by crystal orientation or tool thicknesses may be compensated for during the grinding operation to assure the attainment of the desired cutting tool face specifications.

  16. Nanocomposites for Machining Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidorenko, Daria; Loginov, Pavel; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2017-01-01

    . A promising way to improve the performance characteristics of these materials is to design new nanocomposites based on them. The application of micromechanical modeling during the elaboration of composite materials for machining tools can reduce the financial and time costs for development of new tools......Machining tools are used in many areas of production. To a considerable extent, the performance characteristics of the tools determine the quality and cost of obtained products. The main materials used for producing machining tools are steel, cemented carbides, ceramics and superhard materials......, with enhanced performance. This article reviews the main groups of nanocomposites for machining tools and their performance....

  17. Nanocomposites for Machining Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Daria; Loginov, Pavel; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny

    2017-10-13

    Machining tools are used in many areas of production. To a considerable extent, the performance characteristics of the tools determine the quality and cost of obtained products. The main materials used for producing machining tools are steel, cemented carbides, ceramics and superhard materials. A promising way to improve the performance characteristics of these materials is to design new nanocomposites based on them. The application of micromechanical modeling during the elaboration of composite materials for machining tools can reduce the financial and time costs for development of new tools, with enhanced performance. This article reviews the main groups of nanocomposites for machining tools and their performance.

  18. Nanocomposites for Machining Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, Pavel; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    Machining tools are used in many areas of production. To a considerable extent, the performance characteristics of the tools determine the quality and cost of obtained products. The main materials used for producing machining tools are steel, cemented carbides, ceramics and superhard materials. A promising way to improve the performance characteristics of these materials is to design new nanocomposites based on them. The application of micromechanical modeling during the elaboration of composite materials for machining tools can reduce the financial and time costs for development of new tools, with enhanced performance. This article reviews the main groups of nanocomposites for machining tools and their performance. PMID:29027926

  19. Tools of radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Thomas L; Hüttemeister, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This 6th edition of “Tools of Radio Astronomy”, the most used introductory text in radio astronomy, has been revised to reflect the current state of this important branch of astronomy. This includes the use of satellites, low radio frequencies, the millimeter/sub-mm universe, the Cosmic Microwave Background and the increased importance of mm/sub-mm dust emission. Several derivations and presentations of technical aspects of radio astronomy and receivers, such as receiver noise, the Hertz dipole and  beam forming have been updated, expanded, re-worked or complemented by alternative derivations. These reflect advances in technology. The wider bandwidths of the Jansky-VLA and long wave arrays such as LOFAR and mm/sub-mm arrays such as ALMA required an expansion of the discussion of interferometers and aperture synthesis. Developments in data reduction algorithms have been included. As a result of the large amount of data collected in the past 20 years, the discussion of solar system radio astronomy, dust em...

  20. Collective memory: conceptual foundations and theoretical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertsch, James V; Roediger, Henry L

    2008-04-01

    In order to outline the conceptual landscape that frames discussions of collective memory, three oppositions are proposed: collective memory versus collective remembering; history versus collective memory; and individual memory versus collective remembering. From this perspective collective remembering is viewed as an active process that often involves contention and contestation among people rather than a static body of knowledge that they possess. Collective remembering is also viewed as privileging identity formation and contestation over the sort of objective representation of the past that is the aspiration of formal historical analysis. And finally, while collective remembering involves individual minds, it also suggests something more in the form of socially situated individuals, a claim that can usefully be formulated in terms of how members of a groups share a common set of cultural tools (e.g., narrative forms) and similar content.

  1. Challenge Course Facilitator Technical Skills Assessment Tool Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, William Quinn

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to develop a technical skills assessment tool for the training and development of challenge course facilitators. Researchers accessed two professional on-line listserves to collect a sample size of twenty-seven currently used technical skills assessment tools. The assessment tools were critically analysed by three independent…

  2. Software Tools Streamline Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    -Based Document Management (QBDM) is a tool that enables content or context searches, either simple or hierarchical, across a variety of databases. The system enables users to specify notification subscriptions where they associate "contexts of interest" and "events of interest" to one or more documents or collection(s) of documents. Based on these subscriptions, users receive notification when the events of interest occur within the contexts of interest for associated document or collection(s) of documents. Users can also associate at least one notification time as part of the notification subscription, with at least one option for the time period of notifications.

  3. OOTW COST TOOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

    1998-09-01

    This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

  4. Tools of online Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, M. S.; Rahman, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Online marketing is the most crucial issue in the modern marketing era but there was no previous research that could identify the tools of internet marketing before this study and it was the first study on the field of online marketing tools. This research was descriptive in nature and it has attempted to identify the major tools of internet marketing from the concepts of traditional marketing tools. Worldwide network is known as Internet that can exchange information between use...

  5. Useful design tools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2005-01-01

    Tools for design management are on the agenda in building projects in order to set targets, to choose and prioritise between alternative environmental solutions, to involve stakeholders and to document, evaluate and benchmark. Different types of tools are available, but what can we learn from...... of a new sustainable settlement. The use of design tools is discussed in relation to innovation and stakeholder participation, and it is stressed that the usefulness of design tools is context dependent....

  6. Tools for Understanding Identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creese, Sadie; Gibson-Robinson, Thomas; Goldsmith, Michael; Hodges, Duncan; Kim, Dee DH; Love, Oriana J.; Nurse, Jason R.; Pike, William A.; Scholtz, Jean

    2013-12-28

    into account the difficulty of the inferences, allowing the user to consider different scenarios depending on the perceived resources of the attacker, or to prioritize lines of investigation. It also has a number of interesting visualizations that are designed to aid the user in understanding the model. The tool works by considering the inferences as a graph and runs various graph-theoretic algorithms, with some novel adaptations, in order to deduce various properties. Using the Model To help investigators exploit the model to perform identity attribution, we have developed the Identity Map visualization. For a user-provided set of known starting elements and a set of desired target elements for a given identity, the Identity Map generates investigative workflows as paths through the model. Each path consists of a series of elements and inferences between them that connect the input and output elements. Each path also has an associated confidence level that estimates the reliability of the resulting attribution. Identity Map can help investigators understand the possible ways to make an identification decision and guide them toward the data-collection or analysis steps required to reach that decision.

  7. Pro Tools HD

    CERN Document Server

    Camou, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    An easy-to-follow guide for using Pro Tools HD 11 effectively.This book is ideal for anyone who already uses ProTools and wants to learn more, or is new to Pro Tools HD and wants to use it effectively in their own audio workstations.

  8. Software engineering tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, L L; Pinkert, J R

    1994-01-01

    We have looked at general descriptions and illustrations of several software development tools, such as tools for prototyping, developing DFDs, testing, and maintenance. Many others are available, and new ones are being developed. However, you have at least seen some examples of powerful CASE tools for systems development.

  9. Systematic medical data collection of intentional injuries during armed conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Abdel-Jabbar Al-Qadi, Ashraf Hasan; Al-Jabriri, Jalal

    2004-01-01

    A study was undertaken on implementing medical data collection as a tool to assess the relative number and character of intentional injuries before and during an armed conflict.......A study was undertaken on implementing medical data collection as a tool to assess the relative number and character of intentional injuries before and during an armed conflict....

  10. 78 FR 72151 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request on Information Collection Tools Relating to Qualitative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, invites the general public and other Federal agencies... sector. Executive Order 13571 expands on this concept to include recent developments in private sector advances in internet customer service technologies. In order to work continuously to ensure that our online...

  11. 78 FR 6847 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ...-64. Abstract: Notice 97-64 describes temporary regulations that will permit Regulated Investment Companies (RICs) and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) to distribute multiple classes of capital gain... which contribute to exempt black lung trusts. Current Actions: There are no changes being made to the...

  12. 78 FR 9454 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... information required by the Internal Revenue Service in its tax compliance efforts to assist employers and... for Recognition of Exemption Under Section 501(a); Form 8038-T, Arbitrage Rebate and Penalty in Lieu... exemption from Federal income tax under Internal Revenue Code section 501(a) as an organization described in...

  13. 77 FR 61832 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ...-FSC), Transfer Price or Commission; Form 8288-B, Application for Withholding Certificate for... Schedule P (Form 1120-FSC), Transfer Price or Commission. OMB Number: 1545-0935. Form Number: 1120-FSC and...

  14. 78 FR 3499 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request on Information Collection Tools Relating to Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... Customer Satisfaction Surveys AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request... comments concerning an existing Customer Satisfaction Surveys previously approved under OMB approval number..., reporting, and record-keeping requirements: Title: IRS Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Number: 1545-NEW...

  15. 77 FR 61833 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Patrono--La Contribucion Federal Para El Desempleo (FUTA); Form 990-PF, Return of Private Foundation or... Del Patrono-La Contribucion Federal Para El Desempleo (FUTA) (Form 940-PR). OMB Number: 1545-0028...

  16. 77 FR 61830 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Structured Settlement Factoring Transactions; Form 944-SS, Employer's ANNUAL Federal Tax Return (American... la Declaracion ANNUAL de la Cotribucion Federal del Patrono; Form 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income... Settlement Factoring Transactions. OMB Number: 1545-1826. Form Number: 8876. Abstract: Form 8876 is used to...

  17. 77 FR 60025 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Information Collection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... regulation, INTL-485-89 (TD 8400), Taxation of Gain or Loss from Certain Nonfunctional Currency Transactions (Section 988 Transactions) (Sections 1.988-0 through 1.988-5); Form 1120-W, Estimated Tax for Corporations; and Form 944, Employer's Annual Employment Tax Return, Form 944(SP), Declaracion Federal Anual de...

  18. Dynamic Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic hurricane data analysis tool allows users of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) to analyze data over a Web medium. The TCIS software is described in the previous article, Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) (NPO-45748). This tool interfaces with the TCIS database to pull in data from several different atmospheric and oceanic data sets, both observed by instruments. Users can use this information to generate histograms, maps, and profile plots for specific storms. The tool also displays statistical values for the user-selected parameter for the mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values. There is little wait time, allowing for fast data plots over date and spatial ranges. Users may also zoom-in for a closer look at a particular spatial range. This is version 1 of the software. Researchers will use the data and tools on the TCIS to understand hurricane processes, improve hurricane forecast models and identify what types of measurements the next generation of instruments will need to collect.

  19. Práticas inovadoras em saúde coletiva: ferramenta re-leitora do processo saúde-doença Prácticas innovadoras en salud colectiva: herramienta re-lectora del proceso salud enfermedad Innovator practices in collective health: re-reading tool of the health disease process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Regina Cubas

    2007-12-01

    categorías sociales, el instrumento permitió visualizar el aspecto colectivo de familias y grupos sociales.This study aims to present the basis to build a re-reading tool of the Health-Disease Process which relies on dialogical relation among social categories and the functional variables found in the a consultation instrument. The tool is an analytical model for decision support that intends the development of data warehousing. Data from the electronic records of nursing consultation were related to the categories: need, social class, gender, race and generation, unveil the social aspects of the health - disease process and assign degrees of vulnerability to homogeneous social groups. Four degrees of vulnerability can be observed that are qualified by eleven markers. The tool lead to the reflection that inequalities are reproduced as time goes by and transforms groups in targets from the social immobility. Although there are some gaps for the visualization of the social categories, the tool enables to visualize the collective face of families and social groups.

  20. Machine tool structures

    CERN Document Server

    Koenigsberger, F

    1970-01-01

    Machine Tool Structures, Volume 1 deals with fundamental theories and calculation methods for machine tool structures. Experimental investigations into stiffness are discussed, along with the application of the results to the design of machine tool structures. Topics covered range from static and dynamic stiffness to chatter in metal cutting, stability in machine tools, and deformations of machine tool structures. This volume is divided into three sections and opens with a discussion on stiffness specifications and the effect of stiffness on the behavior of the machine under forced vibration c

  1. Tree Transduction Tools for Cdec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Matthews

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a collection of open source tools for learning tree-to-string and tree-to-tree transducers and the extensions to the cdec decoder that enable translation with these. Our modular, easy-to-extend tools extract rules from trees or forests aligned to strings and trees subject to different structural constraints. A fast, multithreaded implementation of the Cohn and Blunsom (2009 model for extracting compact tree-to-string rules is also included. The implementation of the tree composition algorithm used by cdec is described, and translation quality and decoding time results are presented. Our experimental results add to the body of evidence suggesting that tree transducers are a compelling option for translation, particularly when decoding speed and translation model size are important.

  2. Collecting Artists' Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalberto, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of increase in library collections of artists' books (artwork conceived in book form and designed entirely by artists) highlights reasons to collect artists' books, major collections, establishing a collection, housing and preservation, organization, outreach, and networking. Collection policy and procedures of Virginia Commonwealth…

  3. Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    In order to facilitate Earth science data access, the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) has developed a web prototype, the Hurricane Data Analysis Tool (HDAT; URL: http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/HDAT), to allow users to conduct online visualization and analysis of several remote sensing and model datasets for educational activities and studies of tropical cyclones and other weather phenomena. With a web browser and few mouse clicks, users can have a full access to terabytes of data and generate 2-D or time-series plots and animation without downloading any software and data. HDAT includes data from the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the NASA Quick Scatterometer(QuikSCAT) and NECP Reanalysis, and the NCEP/CPC half-hourly, 4-km Global (60 N - 60 S) IR Dataset. The GES DISC archives TRMM data. The daily global rainfall product derived from the 3-hourly multi-satellite precipitation product (3B42 V6) is available in HDAT. The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) sea surface temperature from the Remote Sensing Systems is in HDAT as well. The NASA QuikSCAT ocean surface wind and the NCEP Reanalysis provide ocean surface and atmospheric conditions, respectively. The global merged IR product, also known as, the NCEP/CPC half-hourly, 4-km Global (60 N -60 S) IR Dataset, is one of TRMM ancillary datasets. They are globally-merged pixel-resolution IR brightness temperature data (equivalent blackbody temperatures), merged from all available geostationary satellites (GOES-8/10, METEOSAT-7/5 & GMS). The GES DISC has collected over 10 years of the data beginning from February of 2000. This high temporal resolution (every 30 minutes) dataset not only provides additional background information to TRMM and other satellite missions, but also allows observing a wide range of meteorological phenomena from space, such as, hurricanes, typhoons, tropical cyclones, mesoscale convection system, etc. Basic functions include selection of area of

  4. The Effect of Tool Dimension, Tool Overhang and Cutting Parameters Towards Tool Vibration and Surface Roughness on Turning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuingli Santo Bandaso

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Turning process is the removal of metal from the outer diameter of a rotating cylindrical workpiece. Turning is used to reduce the diameter of the workpiece, usually to a specified dimension, and to produce a smooth finish on the metal. This research investigates the effect of feed rate, spindle speed, tool overhang and tool dimensions toward vibration amplitude and surface roughness on turning process. This study uses both statistical and graphical analysis of the data collected. The experimentation was carried out on conventional lathe machine with straight turning operation. Material used as workpiece was St.60 carbon steel which was turned with HSS tool bit with the dimension of 3/8 Inches and ½ Inches. Cutting parameters varied by spindle speed, feed rate, and tool overhang, while the depth of cut is maintained at a depth of 0.5 mm. The vibration data of cutting tool obtained from a transducer (vibrometer mounted at a distance of 10 mm from the tip of the cutting tool during the cutting process takes place, whereas the surface roughness data obtained from measurements of surface roughness apparatus after turning process. The results showed that, The effect of feed rate, spindle speed, tool overhang, and tool dimension simultaneously towards vibration amplitude and surface roughness has a grater effects on the use of 3/8 inches cutting tool than ½ inches cutting tool. With the use of the same tool dimensions obtained that, The most influential parameters on the vibration amplitude is tool overhang while the most influential parameter on surface roughness value is feed rate.

  5. Towards a posthuman collective: ontology, epistemology, ethics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietta Radomska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at reconstruction of the basic ontological, epistemological and ethical premises of the posthumanist project (called also the posthumanist theory or the posthumanist tool, while analysing the theoretical propositions of Karen Barad, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari as well as Donna Haraway. It is only by such meticulous definition of theoretical tool that one may be able to pose the question of the posthuman collective and posthumanist politics.

  6. The tools of mathematical reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Lakins, Tamara J

    2016-01-01

    This accessible textbook gives beginning undergraduate mathematics students a first exposure to introductory logic, proofs, sets, functions, number theory, relations, finite and infinite sets, and the foundations of analysis. The book provides students with a quick path to writing proofs and a practical collection of tools that they can use in later mathematics courses such as abstract algebra and analysis. The importance of the logical structure of a mathematical statement as a framework for finding a proof of that statement, and the proper use of variables, is an early and consistent theme used throughout the book.

  7. PAT tools for fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Bolic, Andrijana; Svanholm, Bent

    2012-01-01

    The publication of the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) guidance has been one of the most important milestones for pharmaceutical production during the past ten years. The ideas outlined in the PAT guidance are also applied in other industries, for example the fermentation industry. Process...... knowledge is central in PAT projects. This manuscript therefore gives a brief overview of a number of PAT tools for collecting process knowledge on fermentation processes: on-line sensors, mechanistic models and small-scale equipment for high-throughput experimentation. The manuscript ends with a short...

  8. PAT tools for fermentation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    The publication of the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) guidance has been one of the most important milestones for pharmaceutical production during the past ten years. The ideas outlined in the PAT guidance are also applied in other industries, for example the fermentation industry. Process...... knowledge is central in PAT projects. This presentation therefore gives a brief overview of a number of PAT tools for collecting process knowledge on fermentation processes: - On-line sensors, where for example spectroscopic measurements are increasingly applied - Mechanistic models, which can be used...

  9. Leaf Collection Posting Log

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains leaf collection dates for area and subarea where leaf collection service is provided by Montgomery County Department of Transportation. Update...

  10. Tools for Healthy Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischhacker, Sheila; Byrd, Randi R.; Ramachandran, Gowri; Vu, Maihan; Ries, Amy; Bell, Ronny A.; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing recognition that policymakers can promote access to healthy, affordable foods within neighborhoods, schools, childcare centers, and workplaces. Despite the disproportionate risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes among American Indian children and adults, comparatively little attention has been focused on the opportunities tribal policymakers have to implement policies or resolutions to promote access to healthy, affordable foods. This paper presents an approach for integrating formative research into an action-oriented strategy of developing and disseminating tribally led environmental and policy strategies to promote access to and consumption of healthy, affordable foods. This paper explains how the American Indian Healthy Eating Project evolved through five phases and discusses each phase’s essential steps involved, outcomes derived, and lessons learned. Using community-based participatory research and informed by the Social Cognitve Theory and ecologic frameworks, the American Indian Healthy Eating Project was started in fall 2008 and has evolved through five phases: (1) starting the conversation; (2) conducting multidisciplinary formative research; (3) strengthening partnerships and tailoring policy options; (4) disseminating community-generated ideas; and (5) accelerating action while fostering sustainability. Collectively, these phases helped develop and disseminate Tools for Healthy Tribes—a toolkit used to raise awareness among participating tribal policymakers of their opportunities to improve access to healthy, affordable foods. Formal and informal strategies can engage tribal leaders in the development of culturally appropriate and tribe-specific sustainable strategies to improve such access, as well as empower tribal leaders to leverage their authority toward raising a healthier generation of American Indian children. PMID:22898161

  11. O uso de diários como ferramenta de intervenção da Análise Institucional: potencializando reflexões no cotidiano da Saúde Bucal Coletiva The use of diaries as tools for intervention in institutional analysis: reflections on everyday work in collective oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane M. Pezzato

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available É significativo o numero de estudos de natureza qualitativa que utilizam a técnica do diário em trabalho de campo. Tendo em vista as diferentes abordagens teórico-metodológicas às quais tais investigações se vinculam, este artigo tem como objetivo discutir as potencialidades de diferentes formas de produção de diários, quando utilizados como uma ferramenta de intervenção da Análise Institucional na Saúde Coletiva. Este estudo inscreve-se no contexto de uma pesquisa que analisou o trabalho de um grupo de profissionais da Saúde Bucal dispostos a propor estratégias inovadoras no modo de produção do cuidado presente em seus cotidianos na atenção básica do SUS Campinas-SP. Realizar esses registros possibilitou aos diaristas uma reflexão acerca da própria prática, desnaturalizando-a, o que permitiu explorar a complexidade do trabalho em saúde bucal na atenção básica. Mostrou, também, ser um caminho possível para dar sentido às suas "práticas", sejam elas individuais ou coletivas.This paper discusses the potential of different ways of producing diaries when used in collective health as tools for intervention through institutional analysis. The text and its argument are based on an analysis of many different studies that use the technique of diaries in fieldwork. Several theoretical and methodological approaches are considered in this study, which was related to academic work for the attainment of a doctoral degree. The work of a group of oral health professionals interested in proposing innovative strategies for developing types of care in their work in the public health system in Campinas city, SP, Brazil. The practice of writing diaries allowed the professionals to reflect on their everyday work and experiences. Complex and often conflictive situations in basic activities in oral health are described and elaborated on, and the method has proved to be a feasible manner for these professionals to give meaning and form

  12. Flow Analysis Tool White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscia, Nichole K.

    2012-01-01

    Faster networks are continually being built to accommodate larger data transfers. While it is intuitive to think that implementing faster networks will result in higher throughput rates, this is often not the case. There are many elements involved in data transfer, many of which are beyond the scope of the network itself. Although networks may get bigger and support faster technologies, the presence of other legacy components, such as older application software or kernel parameters, can often cause bottlenecks. Engineers must be able to identify when data flows are reaching a bottleneck that is not imposed by the network and then troubleshoot it using the tools available to them. The current best practice is to collect as much information as possible on the network traffic flows so that analysis is quick and easy. Unfortunately, no single method of collecting this information can sufficiently capture the whole endto- end picture. This becomes even more of a hurdle when large, multi-user systems are involved. In order to capture all the necessary information, multiple data sources are required. This paper presents a method for developing a flow analysis tool to effectively collect network flow data from multiple sources and provide that information to engineers in a clear, concise way for analysis. The purpose of this method is to collect enough information to quickly (and automatically) identify poorly performing flows along with the cause of the problem. The method involves the development of a set of database tables that can be populated with flow data from multiple sources, along with an easyto- use, web-based front-end interface to help network engineers access, organize, analyze, and manage all the information.

  13. Tool steels. 5. edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, G.; Krauss, G.; Kennedy, R.

    1998-12-31

    The revision of this authoritative work contains a significant amount of new information from the past nearly two decades presented in an entirely new outline, making this a must have reference for engineers involved in tool-steel production, as well as in the selection and use of tool steels in metalworking and other materials manufacturing industries. The chapter on tool-steel manufacturing includes new production processes, such as electroslag refining, vacuum arc remelting, spray deposition processes (Osprey and centrifugal spray), and powder metal processing. The seven chapters covering tool-steel types in the 4th Edition have been expanded to 11 chapters covering nine main groups of tool steels as well as other types of ultrahigh strength steels sometimes used for tooling. Each chapter discusses in detail processing, composition, and applications specific to the particular group. In addition, two chapters have been added covering surface modification and trouble shooting production and performance problems.

  14. Open Health Tools: Tooling for Interoperable Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skip McGaughey

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The Open Health Tools initiative is creating an ecosystem focused on the production of software tooling that promotes the exchange of medical information across political, geographic, cultural, product, and technology lines. At its core, OHT believes that the availability of high-quality tooling that interoperates will propel the industry forward, enabling organizations and vendors to build products and systems that effectively work together. This will ?raise the interoperability bar? as a result of having tools that just work. To achieve these lofty goals, careful consideration must be made to the constituencies that will be most affected by an OHT-influenced world. This document outlines a vision of OHT?s impact to these stakeholders. It does not explain the OHT process itself or how the OHT community operates. Instead, we place emphasis on the impact of that process within the health industry. The catchphrase ?code is king? underpins this document, meaning that the manifestation of any open source community lies in the products and technology it produces.

  15. Calculation Tool for Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Lampinen, Samuli

    2016-01-01

    The Study was conducted as qualitative research for K-S Konesuunnittelu Oy. The company provides mechanical engineering for technology suppliers in the Finnish export industries. The main objective was to study if the competitiveness of the case company could be improved using a self-made Calculation Tool (Excel Tool). The mission was to clarify processes in the case company to see the possibilities of Excel Tool and to compare it with other potential calculation applications. In addition,...

  16. A GRB tool shed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Hakkila, Jon; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Mallozzi, Robert

    2000-09-01

    We describe the design of a suite of software tools to allow users to query Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data and perform data mining expeditions. We call this suite of tools a shed (SHell for Expeditions using Datamining). Our schedule is to have a completed prototype (funded via the NASA AISRP) by February, 2002. Meanwhile, interested users will find a partially functioning tool shed at http:/grb.mankato.msus.edu. .

  17. Instant Spring Tool Suite

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A tutorial guide that walks you through how to use the features of Spring Tool Suite using well defined sections for the different parts of Spring.Instant Spring Tool Suite is for novice to intermediate Java developers looking to get a head-start in enterprise application development using Spring Tool Suite and the Spring framework. If you are looking for a guide for effective application development using Spring Tool Suite, then this book is for you.

  18. Java Power Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, John

    2008-01-01

    All true craftsmen need the best tools to do their finest work, and programmers are no different. Java Power Tools delivers 30 open source tools designed to improve the development practices of Java developers in any size team or organization. Each chapter includes a series of short articles about one particular tool -- whether it's for build systems, version control, or other aspects of the development process -- giving you the equivalent of 30 short reference books in one package. No matter which development method your team chooses, whether it's Agile, RUP, XP, SCRUM, or one of many other

  19. Manifold tool guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, A.

    1982-07-08

    A tool guide that makes possible the insertion of cleaning and/or inspection tools into a manifold pipe that will dislocate and extract the accumulated sediment in such manifold pipes. The tool guide basically comprises a right angled tube (or other angled tube as required) which can be inserted in a large tube and locked into a radially extending cross pipe by adjustable spacer rods and a spring-loaded cone, whereby appropriate cleaning tools can be inserted into to cross pipe for cleaning, inspection, etc.

  20. Agreement Workflow Tool (AWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Agreement Workflow Tool (AWT) is a role-based Intranet application used for processing SSA's Reimbursable Agreements according to SSA's standards. AWT provides...

  1. Qlikview Audit Tool (QLIKVIEW) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This tool supports the cyclical financial audit process. Qlikview supports large volumes of financial transaction data that can be mined, summarized and presented to...

  2. Simulating Collective Effects on GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2095754; Arbenz, Peter

    Computer simulations are an important tool to study the dynamics of charged particles in particle accelerators, with new hardware solutions such as GPUs providing a vast increase in computing power. In the accelerator physics domain simulations are used to understand instabilities arising due to collective e↵ects in high intensity beams which limit the accelerator performance. In this thesis PyHEADTAIL, a code to study collective effects in synchrotrons, is ported to GPUs using PyCUDA. The goal is to achieve a significant speedup while at the same time producing a simple interface for users and other developers. A speedup of 6 compared to the CPU version is achieved on a typical simulation study of instabilities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  3. Electronic collection management

    CERN Document Server

    Mcginnis, Suzan D

    2013-01-01

    Build and manage your collection of digital resources with these successful strategies! This comprehensive volume is a practical guide to the art and science of acquiring and organizing electronic resources. The collections discussed here range in size from small college libraries to large research libraries, but all are facing similar problems: shrinking budgets, increasing demands, and rapidly shifting formats. Electronic Collection Management offers new ideas for coping with these issues. Bringing together diverse aspects of collection development, Electronic Collection

  4. Scheme Program Documentation Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses two different Scheme documentation tools. The first is SchemeDoc, which is intended for documentation of the interfaces of Scheme libraries (APIs). The second is the Scheme Elucidator, which is for internal documentation of Scheme programs. Although the tools...

  5. Tools for negotiating meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Seale

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of ALT-J we have seven articles that explore how we as learning technologists can use a variety of tools to explore, evaluate, develop and understand our practice and experience. These tools include concepts, theories, symbols and metaphors and are used to:

  6. Broken Links Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of these tools can be used on Drupal pages that are not published yet, or on non-Drupal content. Some, such as the Bookmarklet tools, can help make checking and correcting your links easier when used alongside Drupal's link reports.

  7. Design mentoring tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 a design engineer on-line mentoring tool was developed and implemented The purpose of the tool was to assist senior engineers : mentoring new engineers to the INDOT design process and improve their technical competency. This approach saves se...

  8. Evaluating meeting support tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, W.M.; Huis in 't Veld, M. M.A.; Boogaard, S.A.A. van den

    2007-01-01

    Many attempts are underway for developing meeting support tools, but less attention is paid to the evaluation of meetingware. This article describes the development and testing of an instrument for evaluating meeting tools. First, we specified the object of evaluation -meetings- by means of a set of

  9. Evaluating meeting support tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, W.M.; Huis in't Veld, M.A.A.; Boogaard, S.A.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Many attempts are underway for developing meeting support tools, but less attention is paid to the evaluation of meetingware. This article describes the development and testing of an instrument for evaluating meeting tools. First, we specified the object of evaluation - meetings - by means of a set

  10. Maailma suurim tool

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    AS Tartu näitused, Tartu Kunstikool ja ajakiri 'Diivan' korraldavad 9.-11. III Tartu messikeskuse I paviljonis näituse 'Tool 2000'. Eksponeeritakse 2000 tooli, mille hulgast valitakse TOP 12. Messikeskuse territooriumile on kavas püstitada maailma suurim tool. Samal ajal II paviljonis kaksikmess 'Sisustus 2000' ja 'Büroo 2000'.

  11. Pneumatically actuated hand tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cool, J.C.; Rijnsaardt, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract of NL 9401195 (A) Pneumatically actuated hand tool for carrying out a mechanical operation, provided with an exchangeable gas cartridge in which the gas which is required for pneumatic actuation is stored. More particularly, the hand tool is provided with at least one pneumatic motor, at

  12. Techniques for collecting blood from the domestic chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lisa M; Alworth, Leanne C

    2013-10-01

    As the use of chickens in biomedical research is increasing, demand is growing for technical skills involving poultry, particularly techniques such as venipuncture. Phlebotomy (blood collection) is an important diagnostic tool for determining causes of morbidity and mortality and for collection of other research-relevant data. This column describes four standard methods of blood collection from the domestic chicken.

  13. Culture collections in the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D; Ryan, M J

    2001-06-01

    Culture collections conserve the living tools for biotechnology. Without them there would be no reference organisms, and no stocks of crucial or rare microorganisms that are so valuable for biotechnology and biomedical research. The expertise that drives these collections is under threat, but the collections themselves may survive by pooling their knowledge.

  14. Usage-Based Collection Evaluation with a Curricular Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evaluation of a library's collection can be a useful tool for collection development. After reviewing three evaluation methods and their usefulness for our small academic library, I undertook a usage-based evaluation, focusing on narrow segments of our collection that served specific undergraduate courses. For each section, I collected…

  15. Tools for Creating Mobile Applications for Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Considerations and tools for developing mobile applications for Extension include evaluating the topic, purpose, and audience. Different computing platforms may be used, and apps designed as modified Web pages or implicitly programmed for a particular platform. User privacy is another important consideration, especially for data collection apps.…

  16. Experts' Opinion: A Powerful Evaluation Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, David

    Experts' opinion is proposed as a valuable evaluation tool. Advantages of this method include the relative cost effectiveness when compared with other data collection methods. It is a time-saving method important in formative evaluation when a decision must be made concerning implementation of a course of action. When experts are carefully…

  17. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce Hardison [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  18. Language Management Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    This paper offers a review of existing literature on the topic of language management tools – the means by which language is managed – in multilingual organisations. By drawing on a combination of sociolinguistics and international business and management studies, a new taxonomy of language...... management tools is proposed, differentiating between three categories of tools. Firstly, corporate policies are the deliberate control of issues pertaining to language and communication developed at the managerial level of a firm. Secondly, corporate measures are the planned activities the firm’s leadership...... may deploy in order to address the language needs of the organisation. Finally, front-line practices refer to the use of informal, emergent language management tools available to staff members. The language management tools taxonomy provides a framework for operationalising the management of language...

  19. Collective Agreements for the Clearance of Copyrights – The Case of Collective Management and Extended Collective Licenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen; Riis, Thomas; Rognstad, Ole-Andreas

    2016-01-01

    hailed as a promising tool to solve some of copyright’s problems relating to mass uses of works. It is pointed out how ECL builds on users generated rights managements structures (CMOs) but owes its specific effectiveness to a legislator’s willingness to provide a third-party effect of the collective...

  20. OOTW Force Design Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  1. Collective Agreements for the Clearance of Copyrights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen; Riis, Thomas; Rognstad, Ole-Andreas

    2016-01-01

    hailed as a promising tool to solve some of copyright’s problems relating to mass uses of works. It is pointed out how ECL builds on users generated rights managements structures (CMOs) but owes its specific effectiveness to a legislator’s willingness to provide a third-party effect of the collective...

  2. 78 FR 52925 - Agency Information Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ...--Quantitative outcome measures will come from an extraction of medical record data and direct observations... Total Form name respondents per response burden respondent hours Pilot Test of the Emergency Department... collection project: ``Pilot Test of an Emergency Department Discharge Tool.'' In accordance with the...

  3. Evacuation performance evaluation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Sharon; Miller, Elaine T; Gneuhs, Matthew; Timm, Nathan; Li, Gengxin; Simon, Ashley; Brady, Whittney

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals conduct evacuation exercises to improve performance during emergency events. An essential aspect in this process is the creation of reliable and valid evaluation tools. The objective of this article is to describe the development and implications of a disaster evacuation performance tool that measures one portion of the very complex process of evacuation. Through the application of the Delphi technique and DeVellis's framework, disaster and neonatal experts provided input in developing this performance evaluation tool. Following development, content validity and reliability of this tool were assessed. Large pediatric hospital and medical center in the Midwest. The tool was pilot tested with an administrative, medical, and nursing leadership group and then implemented with a group of 68 healthcare workers during a disaster exercise of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The tool has demonstrated high content validity with a scale validity index of 0.979 and inter-rater reliability G coefficient (0.984, 95% CI: 0.948-0.9952). The Delphi process based on the conceptual framework of DeVellis yielded a psychometrically sound evacuation performance evaluation tool for a NICU.

  4. AN Fitting Reconditioning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jason

    2011-01-01

    A tool was developed to repair or replace AN fittings on the shuttle external tank (ET). (The AN thread is a type of fitting used to connect flexible hoses and rigid metal tubing that carry fluid. It is a U.S. military-derived specification agreed upon by the Army and Navy, hence AN.) The tool is used on a drill and is guided by a pilot shaft that follows the inside bore. The cutting edge of the tool is a standard-size replaceable insert. In the typical Post Launch Maintenance/Repair process for the AN fittings, the six fittings are removed from the ET's GUCP (ground umbilical carrier plate) for reconditioning. The fittings are inspected for damage to the sealing surface per standard operations maintenance instructions. When damage is found on the sealing surface, the condition is documented. A new AN reconditioning tool is set up to cut and remove the surface damage. It is then inspected to verify the fitting still meets drawing requirements. The tool features a cone-shaped interior at 36.5 , and may be adjusted at a precise angle with go-no-go gauges to insure that the cutting edge could be adjusted as it wore down. One tool, one setting block, and one go-no-go gauge were fabricated. At the time of this reporting, the tool has reconditioned/returned to spec 36 AN fittings with 100-percent success of no leakage. This tool provides a quick solution to repair a leaky AN fitting. The tool could easily be modified with different-sized pilot shafts to different-sized fittings.

  5. Recent developments in optical neuromodulation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Aron; Loohuis, Nikkie F Olde; Glennon, Jeffrey C; Celikel, Tansu; Martens, Gerard J M; Tiesinga, Paul H; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2013-02-01

    The emergence of optogenetics technology facilitated widespread applications for interrogation of complex neural networks, such as activation of specific axonal pathways, previously found impossible with electrical stimulation. Consequently, within the short period of its application in neuroscience research, optogenetics has led to findings of significant importance both during normal brain function as well as in disease. Moreover, the optimization of optogenetics for in vivo studies has allowed the control of certain behavioral responses such as motility, reflex, and sensory responses, as well as more complex emotional and cognitive behaviors such as decision-making, reward seeking, and social behavior in freely moving animals. These studies have produced a wide variety of animal models that have resulted in fundamental findings and enhanced our understanding of the neural networks associated with behavior. The increasing number of opsins available for this technique enabled even broader regulation of neuronal activity. These advancements highlight the potential of this technique for future treatment of human diseases. Here, we provide an overview of the recent developments in the field of optogenetics technology that are relevant for a better understanding of several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and may pave the way for future therapeutic interventions.

  6. H2O2: A Dynamic Neuromodulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an intra- and intercellular signaling molecule that can influence processes from embryonic development to cell death. Most research has focused on relatively slow signaling, on the order of minutes to days, via second messenger cascades. However, H2O2 can also mediate subsecond signaling via ion channel activation. This rapid signaling has been examined most thoroughly in the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) pathway, which plays a key role in facilitating movement mediated by the basal ganglia. In DA neurons of the substantia nigra, endogenously generated H2O2 activates ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels that inhibit DA neuron firing. In the striatum, H2O2 generated downstream from glutamatergic AMPA receptor activation in medium spiny neurons acts as a diffusible messenger that inhibits axonal DA release, also via KATP channels. The source of dynamically generated H2O2 is mitochondrial respiration; thus, H2O2 provides a novel link between activity and metabolism via KATP channels. Additional targets of H2O2 include transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. In contrast to the inhibitory effect of H2O2 acting via KATP channels, TRP channel activation is excitatory. This review describes emerging roles of H2O2 as a signaling agent in the nigrostriatal pathway and other basal ganglia neurons. PMID:21666063

  7. Neuromodulation of Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    sonism-dementia complex (Hoffman et a., fluence of a particular region of the CNS on 1978) illustrate that diseases of the CNS ae the growth of some...depression, (Bartrop et al., 1977), and emo- tion of the tuberoinfundibular region of the tional stress also exhibit impaired immunel -hypothalamus. Survival...cyrocoziity in Stein M (1983): Suppression of lymphocyte stimula- Huntington’s Disease. Adv Neurel 23:443. tion following bereavement. JAMA M.0374-377. S

  8. Neuromodulation and plasticity in an autonomous robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf; Alexander, William H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we implement a computational model of a neuromodulatory system in an autonomous robot. The output of the neuromodulatory system acts as a value signal, modulating widely distributed synaptic changes. The model is based on anatomical and physiological properties of midbrain diffuse ascending systems, in particular parts of the dopamine and noradrenaline systems. During reward conditioning, the model learns to generate tonic and phasic signals that represent predictions and prediction errors, including precisely timed negative signals if expected rewards are omitted or delayed. We test the robot's learning and behavior in different environmental contexts and observe changes in the development of the neuromodulatory system that depend upon environmental factors. Simulation of a computational model incorporating both reward-related and aversive stimuli leads to the emergence of conditioned reward and aversive behaviors. These studies represent a step towards investigating computational aspects of neuromodulatory systems in autonomous robots.

  9. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy': Neurodegeneration versus Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Puerta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The amphetamine analogue 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’ is widely abused as a recreational drug due to its unique psychological effects. Of interest, MDMA causes long-lasting deficits in neurochemical and histological markers of the serotonergic neurons in the brain of different animal species. Such deficits include the decline in the activity of tryptophan hydroxylase in parallel with the loss of 5-HT and its main metabolite 5-hydoxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA along with a lower binding of specific ligands to the 5-HT transporters (SERT. Of concern, reduced 5-HIAA levels in the CSF and SERT density have also been reported in human ecstasy users, what has been interpreted to reflect the loss of serotonergic fibers and terminals. The neurotoxic potential of MDMA has been questioned in recent years based on studies that failed to show the loss of the SERT protein by western blot or the lack of reactive astrogliosis after MDMA exposure. In addition, MDMA produces a long-lasting down-regulation of SERT gene expression; which, on the whole, has been used to invoke neuromodulatory mechanisms as an explanation to MDMA-induced 5-HT deficits. While decreased protein levels do not necessarily reflect neurodegeneration, the opposite is also true, that is, neuroregulatory mechanisms do not preclude the existence of 5-HT terminal degeneration.

  10. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia eHeijnen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the neuromodular underpinnings of aerobic exercise. More research using longitudinal studies and considering individual differences is necessary to determine actual benefits. We suggest that, in order to succeed, aerobic exercise programs should include optimal periodization, prevent overtraining and be tailored to interindividual differences, including neuro-developmental and genetically-based factors.

  11. Recent developments in optical neuromodulation technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, A.; Loohuis, N.F.; Glennon, J.C.; Celikel, T.; Martens, G.J.M.; Tiesinga, P.H.E.; Aschrafi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of optogenetics technology facilitated widespread applications for interrogation of complex neural networks, such as activation of specific axonal pathways, previously found impossible with electrical stimulation. Consequently, within the short period of its application in neuroscience

  12. Neuromodulation of Aerobic Exercise—A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia eHeijnen; Bernhard eHommel; Armin eKibele; Lorenza S Colzato

    2016-01-01

    Running, and aerobic exercise in general, is a physical activity that increasingly many people engage in but that also has become popular as a topic for scientific research. Here we review the available studies investigating whether and to which degree aerobic exercise modulates hormones, amino acids, and neurotransmitters levels. In general, it seems that factors such as genes, gender, training status, and hormonal status need to be taken into account to gain a better understanding of the ne...

  13. Interactive knowledge acquisition tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, Martin J.; Feinstein, Jerald L.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of designing practical tools to aid the knowledge engineer and general applications used in performing knowledge acquisition tasks are discussed. A particular approach was developed for the class of knowledge acquisition problem characterized by situations where acquisition and transformation of domain expertise are often bottlenecks in systems development. An explanation is given on how the tool and underlying software engineering principles can be extended to provide a flexible set of tools that allow the application specialist to build highly customized knowledge-based applications.

  14. Walkability Audit Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Letha

    2015-09-01

    Walking is one of the simplest lifestyle changes workers can make to improve their health. Research shows a wealth of health benefits. Often, occupational and environmental health nurses are in charge of implementing walking programs. A tool is needed to continuously improve a company's walking program whether in the beginning stages or to an already established program. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Walkability Audit Tool for a healthier worksite is an easy seven-step audit tool that occupational and environmental health nurses can easily implement. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Machine Tool Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A NASA-developed software package has played a part in technical education of students who major in Mechanical Engineering Technology at William Rainey Harper College. Professor Hack has been using (APT) Automatically Programmed Tool Software since 1969 in his CAD/CAM Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing curriculum. Professor Hack teaches the use of APT programming languages for control of metal cutting machines. Machine tool instructions are geometry definitions written in APT Language to constitute a "part program." The part program is processed by the machine tool. CAD/CAM students go from writing a program to cutting steel in the course of a semester.

  16. Benchmarking expert system tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gary

    1988-01-01

    As part of its evaluation of new technologies, the Artificial Intelligence Section of the Mission Planning and Analysis Div. at NASA-Johnson has made timing tests of several expert system building tools. Among the production systems tested were Automated Reasoning Tool, several versions of OPS5, and CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System), an expert system builder developed by the AI section. Also included in the test were a Zetalisp version of the benchmark along with four versions of the benchmark written in Knowledge Engineering Environment, an object oriented, frame based expert system tool. The benchmarks used for testing are studied.

  17. Collective Agreements for the Clearance of Copyrights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This contribution analyses and discusses the use of collective management organizations (CMOs) in copyright. More concretely, it examines the use and effects of extended collective licenses (ECL). This model of rights management has been developed in the Nordic countries and has for some time been...... hailed as a promising tool to solve some of copyright’s problems relating to mass uses of works. It is pointed out how ECL builds on users generated rights managements structures (CMOs) but owes its specific effectiveness to a legislator’s willingness to provide a third-party effect of the collective...

  18. Towards modern petrological collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriegsman, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Petrological collections result from sampling for academic research, for aesthetic or commercial reasons, and to document natural diversity. Selection criteria for reducing and enhancing collections include adequate documentation, potential for future use, information density, time and money

  19. Collective Intelligence in Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büscher, Monika; Liegl, Michael; Thomas, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    . By examining these dynamics with the concept of social collective intelligence, important opportunities and challenges can be examined. In this chapter we focus on socio-technical aspects of social collective intelligence in crises to discuss positive and negative frictions and avenues for innovation....... Of particular interest are ways of bridging between collective intelligence in crises and official emergency response efforts....

  20. Calibrating collective commitments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunin-Keplicz, B; Verbrugge, R; Marik,; Muller, J; Pechoucek, M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we aim to formally model the strongest motivational attitude occurring in teamwork, collective commitment. First, building on our previous work, a logical framework is sketched in which social commitments and collective intentions are formalized. Then, different versions of collective

  1. Young children's tool innovation across culture: Affordance visibility matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neldner, Karri; Mushin, Ilana; Nielsen, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Young children typically demonstrate low rates of tool innovation. However, previous studies have limited children's performance by presenting tools with opaque affordances. In an attempt to scaffold children's understanding of what constitutes an appropriate tool within an innovation task we compared tools in which the focal affordance was visible to those in which it was opaque. To evaluate possible cultural specificity, data collection was undertaken in a Western urban population and a remote Indigenous community. As expected affordance visibility altered innovation rates: young children were more likely to innovate on a tool that had visible affordances than one with concealed affordances. Furthermore, innovation rates were higher than those reported in previous innovation studies. Cultural background did not affect children's rates of tool innovation. It is suggested that new methods for testing tool innovation in children must be developed in order to broaden our knowledge of young children's tool innovation capabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  3. Neighborhood Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This tool assists the public and Choice Neighborhoods applicants to prepare data to submit with their grant application by allowing applicants to draw the exact...

  4. EEI: A Survival Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    The economic equivalency index (EEI) is a statistical construct used for quantifying the value of leisure experiences to the individual and is a potentially valuable tool in justifying leisure service expenditures in park and recreation systems. (MJB)

  5. Green Infrastructure Modeling Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling tools support planning and design decisions on a range of scales from setting a green infrastructure target for an entire watershed to designing a green infrastructure practice for a particular site.

  6. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  7. TENCompetence tool demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijfhout, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Kluijfhout, E. (2009). TENCompetence tool demonstration. Presented at Zorgacademie Parkstad (Health Academy Parkstad), Limburg Leisure Academy, Life Long Learning Limburg and a number of regional educational institutions. May, 18, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands,

  8. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  9. Chatter and machine tools

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Focussing on occurrences of unstable vibrations, or Chatter, in machine tools, this book gives important insights into how to eliminate chatter with associated improvements in product quality, surface finish and tool wear. Covering a wide range of machining processes, including turning, drilling, milling and grinding, the author uses his research expertise and practical knowledge of vibration problems to provide solutions supported by experimental evidence of their effectiveness. In addition, this book contains links to supplementary animation programs that help readers to visualise the ideas detailed in the text. Advancing knowledge in chatter avoidance and suggesting areas for new innovations, Chatter and Machine Tools serves as a handbook for those desiring to achieve significant reductions in noise, longer tool and grinding wheel life and improved product finish.

  10. Cash Reconciliation Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CART is a cash reconciliation tool that allows users to reconcile Agency cash disbursements with Treasury fund balances; track open unreconciled items; and create an...

  11. Landscape Water Budget Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense created the Water Budget Tool as one option to help builders, landscape professionals, and irrigation professionals certified by a WaterSense labeled program meet the criteria specified in the WaterSense New Home Specification.

  12. NWRS Survey Prioritization Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A SMART Tool and User's Guide for aiding NWRS Station staff when prioritizing their surveys for an Inventory and Monitoring Plan. This guide describes a process and...

  13. Clean Energy Finance Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    This tool is for state and local governments interested in developing a financing program to support energy efficiency and clean energy improvements for large numbers of buildings within their jurisdiction.

  14. Autism Teaching Tool

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    CERN pattern recognition technologies transferred to Austistic children learning tool. The state of the art of pattern recognition technology developed at CERN for High Energy Physics are transferred to Computer Vision domain and are used to develop a new

  15. Game development tool essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Berinstein, Paula; Ardolino, Alessandro; Franco, Simon; Herubel, Adrien; McCutchan, John; Nedelcu, Nicusor; Nitschke, Benjamin; Olmstead, Don; Robinet, Fabrice; Ronchi, Christian; Turkowski, Rita; Walter, Robert; Samour, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Offers game developers new techniques for streamlining the critical game tools pipeline. Inspires game developers to share their secrets and improve the productivity of the entire industry. Helps game industry practitioners compete in a hyper-competitive environment.

  16. Tools and their uses

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    Teaches names, general uses, and correct operation of all basic hand and power tools, fasteners, and measuring devices you are likely to need. Also, grinding, metal cutting, soldering, and more. 329 illustrations.

  17. Chemical Data Access Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This tool is intended to aid individuals interested in learning more about chemicals that are manufactured or imported into the United States. Health and safety...

  18. ATO Resource Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Cru-X/ART is a shift management tool designed for?use by operational employees in Air Traffic Facilities.? Cru-X/ART is used for shift scheduling, shift sign in/out,...

  19. New tools for JCB

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Elizabeth H; Misteli, Tom

    2011-01-01

    .... JCB continues its support of innovation in publishing with the launch of Tools, a new article type for the description of methods and high-throughput datasets, and of a new interface for the JCB...

  20. Personal Wellness Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clubhouse at FacingUs.org is home to a wealth of customizable, personal wellness tools to help you ... DBSA envisions wellness for people who live with depression and bipolar disorder. Because DBSA was created for ...

  1. Tools to aid navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Rovira, Cristòfol

    2001-01-01

    The problem of disorientation brought about by hypertext navigation can be solved by efficient tools to aid navigation such as summaries, indexes or navigation maps. In the article we analyse the main tools to aid navigation used in the Internet web, going futher into those which use knowledge representation to carry out their faction. We propose new ways of making navigation maps to favour access and understanding of information for hypertext environments in teaching-learning.

  2. Stochastic tools in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lumey, John L

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Tools in Turbulence discusses the available mathematical tools to describe stochastic vector fields to solve problems related to these fields. The book deals with the needs of turbulence in relation to stochastic vector fields, particularly, on three-dimensional aspects, linear problems, and stochastic model building. The text describes probability distributions and densities, including Lebesgue integration, conditional probabilities, conditional expectations, statistical independence, lack of correlation. The book also explains the significance of the moments, the properties of the

  3. VDC Monitoring Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Porat, Itay Gershon

    2017-01-01

    Electron drift velocity is an important parameter for muon path reconstruction capabilities of CMS drift tube chambers. The parameter is monitored independently by six dedicated drift velocity chambers (VDC). This report presents monitoring tools developed to study key VDC parameters such as anode voltage and current, as well as gas source. These graphical tools can be used to learn about VDC operation and performance, and contribute to understanding anode wire aging in the systems.

  4. Tools used for hand deburring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-03-01

    This guide is designed to help in quick identification of those tools most commonly used to deburr hand size or smaller parts. Photographs and textual descriptions are used to provide rapid yet detailed information. The data presented include the Bendix Kansas City Division coded tool number, tool description, tool crib in which the tool can be found, the maximum and minimum inventory requirements, the cost of each tool, and the number of the illustration that shows the tool.

  5. Key characteristics relevant for selecting knowledge management software tools

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smuts, H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available phenomenon that makes the use of technology not an option, but a necessity. Software tools in knowledge management are a collection of technologies and are not necessarily acquired as a single software solution. Furthermore, these knowledge management...

  6. The Health Impact Assessment (HIA) Resource and Tool Compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The compilation includes tools and resources related to the HIA process and can be used to collect and analyze data, establish a baseline profile, assess potential health impacts, and establish benchmarks and indicators for monitoring and evaluation.

  7. Data Center IT Equipment Energy Assessment Tools: Current State of Commercial Tools, Proposal for a Future Set of Assessment Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Ben D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); National Univ., San Diego, CA (United States). School of Engineering

    2012-06-30

    This research project, which was conducted during the Summer and Fall of 2011, investigated some commercially available assessment tools with a focus on IT equipment to see if such tools could round out the DC Pro tool suite. In this research, the assessment capabilities of the various tools were compiled to help make “non-biased” information available to the public. This research should not be considered to be exhaustive on all existing vendor tools although a number of vendors were contacted. Large IT equipment OEM’s like IBM and Dell provide their proprietary internal automated software which does not work on any other IT equipment. However, found two companies with products that showed promise in performing automated assessments for IT equipment from different OEM vendors. This report documents the research and provides a list of software products reviewed, contacts and websites, product details, discussions with specific companies, a set of recommendations, and next steps. As a result of this research, a simple 3-level approach to an IT assessment tool is proposed along with an example of an assessment using a simple IT equipment data collection tool (Level 1, spreadsheet). The tool has been reviewed with the Green Grid and LBNL staff. The initial feedback has been positive although further refinement to the tool will be necessary. Proposed next steps include a field trial of at least two vendors’ software in two different data centers with an objective to prove the concept, ascertain the extent of energy and computational assessment, ease of installation and opportunities for continuous improvement. Based on the discussions, field trials (or case studies) are proposed with two vendors – JouleX (expected to be completed in 2012) and Sentilla.

  8. Phyx: phylogenetic tools for unix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joseph W; Walker, Joseph F; Smith, Stephen A

    2017-06-15

    The ease with which phylogenomic data can be generated has drastically escalated the computational burden for even routine phylogenetic investigations. To address this, we present phyx : a collection of programs written in C ++ to explore, manipulate, analyze and simulate phylogenetic objects (alignments, trees and MCMC logs). Modelled after Unix/GNU/Linux command line tools, individual programs perform a single task and operate on standard I/O streams that can be piped to quickly and easily form complex analytical pipelines. Because of the stream-centric paradigm, memory requirements are minimized (often only a single tree or sequence in memory at any instance), and hence phyx is capable of efficiently processing very large datasets. phyx runs on POSIX-compliant operating systems. Source code, installation instructions, documentation and example files are freely available under the GNU General Public License at https://github.com/FePhyFoFum/phyx. eebsmith@umich.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. A Tool for Monitoring of YouTube Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lashari, Intzar Ali; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2014-01-01

    in abundance from social media is difficult. This paper describes a new tool that can collect, monitor, and mine data from YouTube. The tool is part of a larger framework aimed at monitoring various social media including Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. A specific case focusing on “Islamic Jihad Holy War...

  10. Tools for the Knowledge-Based Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2002-01-01

    it with the information held by its computers. Knowledge specialists cannot be managed and directed in the classical sense. The organization needs to be rehumanized and conditions for reflection, learning and autonomy enhanced, so that its collective knowledge may be better used to create real value for its stakeholders....... • To help organizations do this, tools need to be researched, sophisticated or invented. Broadly conceived, tools include ideas, such as theories, missions and business plans, practices, such as procedures and behaviors, and instruments, such as questionnaires, indicators, agendas and methods...

  11. Large Crater Clustering tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Jason; Skinner, James A.; Hunter, Marc A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present the Large Crater Clustering (LCC) tool set, an ArcGIS plugin that supports the quantitative approximation of a primary impact location from user-identified locations of possible secondary impact craters or the long-axes of clustered secondary craters. The identification of primary impact craters directly supports planetary geologic mapping and topical science studies where the chronostratigraphic age of some geologic units may be known, but more distant features have questionable geologic ages. Previous works (e.g., McEwen et al., 2005; Dundas and McEwen, 2007) have shown that the source of secondary impact craters can be estimated from secondary impact craters. This work adapts those methods into a statistically robust tool set. We describe the four individual tools within the LCC tool set to support: (1) processing individually digitized point observations (craters), (2) estimating the directional distribution of a clustered set of craters, back projecting the potential flight paths (crater clusters or linearly approximated catenae or lineaments), (3) intersecting projected paths, and (4) intersecting back-projected trajectories to approximate the local of potential source primary craters. We present two case studies using secondary impact features mapped in two regions of Mars. We demonstrate that the tool is able to quantitatively identify primary impacts and supports the improved qualitative interpretation of potential secondary crater flight trajectories.

  12. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collections for modern drug discovery. Bakker gave an account of the tantalising possibilities for molecular systematics and other research in the use of herbarium collections, which have opened up for a plethora of additional data to be extracted from dried plant collections. The final talk was Blackmore...... crisis. Friis gave a broad overview of the history of herbaria and botanical gardens and the changing conceptual frameworks behind their existence. Baldini talked about early Italian botanical collectors and the fate of their collections. Baas accounted for the Golden Age of Dutch botany during pre...... in the USA over the past two hundred years. Sebsebe Demissew taked about the situation in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly problems related to building and maintaining plant collections in new and poor nations. Onana outlined the history of botanical collections in Cameroon, covering a colonial period...

  13. Guess the score, fostering collective intelligence in the class

    OpenAIRE

    Monguet, Josep M.; Jaime Meza

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of serious games as a tool to enhance collective intelligence of undergraduate and graduate students. The development of social skills of individuals in a group is related to the performance of the collective intelligence of the group manifested through the shared and collaborative development of intellectual tasks [1]. Guess the Score GS, is a serious game implemented by means of an online tool, created to foster the development, collaboration and engagement of st...

  14. Image tools for UNIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, David C.

    1994-01-01

    This talk features two simple and useful tools for digital image processing in the UNIX environment. They are xv and pbmplus. The xv image viewer which runs under the X window system reads images in a number of different file formats and writes them out in different formats. The view area supports a pop-up control panel. The 'algorithms' menu lets you blur an image. The xv control panel also activates the color editor which displays the image's color map (if one exists). The xv image viewer is available through the internet. The pbmplus package is a set of tools designed to perform image processing from within a UNIX shell. The acronym 'pbm' stands for portable bit map. Like xv, the pbm plus tool can convert images from and to many different file formats. The source code and manual pages for pbmplus are also available through the internet. This software is in the public domain.

  15. New Conceptual Design Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugnale, Alberto; Holst, Malene; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss recent approaches in using more and more frequently computer tools as supports for the conceptual design phase of the architectural project. The present state-of-the-art about software as conceptual design tool could be summarized in two parallel tendencies. On the one...... hand, the main software houses are trying to introduce powerful and effective user-friendly applications in the world of building designers, that are more and more able to fit their specific requirements; on the other hand, some groups of expert users with a basic programming knowledge seem to deal...... the most recent studies about digital conceptual design tools. The combined use of Rhinoceros™, a powerful threedimensional modeller diffused among designers, and Rhinoscript™, its implemented programming environment, is here presented as a possible effective way to deal with computer technologies...

  16. C-TOOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup; Hutchings, Nicholas John

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a significant component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Changes in SOC storage affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations on decadal to centennial timescales. The C-TOOL model was developed to simulate farm- and regional-scale effects of management on medium- to long......-term SOC storage in the profile of well-drained agricultural mineral soils. C-TOOL uses three SOC pools for both the topsoil (0–25 cm) and the subsoil (25–100 cm), and applies temperature-dependent first order kinetics to regulate C turnover. C-TOOL also enables the simulation of 14C turnover. The simple...... model structure facilitates calibration and requires few inputs (mean monthly air temperature, soil clay content, soil C/N ratio and C in organic inputs). The model was parameterised using data from 19 treatments drawn from seven long-term field experiments in the United Kingdom, Sweden and Denmark...

  17. Collecting Taxes Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Collecting Taxes Database contains performance and structural indicators about national tax systems. The database contains quantitative revenue performance...

  18. RSP Tooling Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-11-20

    RSP Tooling{trademark} is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The general concept involves converting a mold design described by a CAD file to a tooling master using a suitable rapid prototyping (RP) technology such as stereolithography. A pattern transfer is made to a castable ceramic, typically alumina or fused silica (Figure 1). This is followed by spray forming a thick deposit of a tooling alloy on the pattern to capture the desired shape, surface texture, and detail. The resultant metal block is cooled to room temperature and separated from the pattern. The deposit's exterior walls are machined square, allowing it to be used as an insert in a standard mold base. The overall turnaround time for tooling is about 3 to 5 days, starting with a master. Molds and dies produced in this way have been used in high volume production runs in plastic injection molding and die casting. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Grupo Vitro has been established to evaluate the feasibility of using RSP Tooling technology for producing molds and dies of interest to Vitro. This report summarizes results from Phase I of this agreement, and describes work scope and budget for Phase I1 activities. The main objective in Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling method to produce molds for the manufacture of glass and other components of interest to Vitro. This objective was successfully achieved.

  19. The Virtual Physiological Human ToolKit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jonathan; Cervenansky, Frederic; De Fabritiis, Gianni; Fenner, John; Friboulet, Denis; Giorgino, Toni; Manos, Steven; Martelli, Yves; Villà-Freixa, Jordi; Zasada, Stefan; Lloyd, Sharon; McCormack, Keith; Coveney, Peter V

    2010-08-28

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) is a major European e-Science initiative intended to support the development of patient-specific computer models and their application in personalized and predictive healthcare. The VPH Network of Excellence (VPH-NoE) project is tasked with facilitating interaction between the various VPH projects and addressing issues of common concern. A key deliverable is the 'VPH ToolKit'--a collection of tools, methodologies and services to support and enable VPH research, integrating and extending existing work across Europe towards greater interoperability and sustainability. Owing to the diverse nature of the field, a single monolithic 'toolkit' is incapable of addressing the needs of the VPH. Rather, the VPH ToolKit should be considered more as a 'toolbox' of relevant technologies, interacting around a common set of standards. The latter apply to the information used by tools, including any data and the VPH models themselves, and also to the naming and categorizing of entities and concepts involved. Furthermore, the technologies and methodologies available need to be widely disseminated, and relevant tools and services easily found by researchers. The VPH-NoE has thus created an online resource for the VPH community to meet this need. It consists of a database of tools, methods and services for VPH research, with a Web front-end. This has facilities for searching the database, for adding or updating entries, and for providing user feedback on entries. Anyone is welcome to contribute.

  20. Log-Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-05-21

    Log files are typically semi- or un-structured. To be useable for visualization and machine learning, they need to be parsed into a standard, structured format. Log-tool is a tool for facilitating the parsing, structuring, and routing of log files (e.g. intrusion detection long, web server logs, system logs). It consists of three main components: (1) Input – it will input data from files, standard input, and syslog, (2) Parser – it will parse the log file based on regular expressions into structured data (JSNO format), (3) Output – it will output structured data into commonly used formats, including Redis (a database), standard output, and syslog.

  1. The GNEMRE Dendro Tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Bion John

    2007-10-01

    The GNEMRE Dendro Tool provides a previously unrealized analysis capability in the field of nuclear explosion monitoring. Dendro Tool allows analysts to quickly and easily determine the similarity between seismic events using the waveform time-series for each of the events to compute cross-correlation values. Events can then be categorized into clusters of similar events. This analysis technique can be used to characterize historical archives of seismic events in order to determine many of the unique sources that are present. In addition, the source of any new events can be quickly identified simply by comparing the new event to the historical set.

  2. Balancing the tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroyer, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the potential of a new combination of functions in lexicographic tools for tourists. So far lexicography has focused on the communicative information needs of tourists, i.e. helping tourists decide what to say in a number of specific tourist situations......, in othe words communicative functions. However, this kind of help should not stand alone. It is argued that tourists also have experiential information needs that are lexicographically relevant. These needs can be satisfied by lexicographic tools that help tourists decide what to do in various specific...

  3. Tool nimega Sacco

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Kolmekümneseks on saanud Zanotta kott ehk tool "Sacco", mille 1968. a. disainisid P. Gatti, C. Paolini, F. Teodoro. "Sacco" - polüstüreenist graanulitega täidetud kott. Tähelepanu pälvis ka Zanotta firma täispuhutav tool "Blow" (1967, Scholari, D'Urbino, Lomazzi, De Pas). E. Lucie-Smith neist. 1968. aastale on pühendatud Düsseldorfi Kunstimuuseumi näitus "1968. a. legendid ja sümbolid", kus on eksponeeritud ligi 500 objekti ja mitu rekonstrueeritud interjööri

  4. CMS tracker visualization tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennea, M.S. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); Osborne, I. [Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Regano, A. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy); Zito, G. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica ' Michelangelo Merlin' e INFN sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173 - 70126 Bari (Italy)]. E-mail: giuseppe.zito@ba.infn.it

    2005-08-21

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  5. Guess the Score, fostering collective intelligence in the class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Monguet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of serious games as a tool to enhance collective intelligence of undergraduate and graduate students. The development of social skills of individuals in a group is related to the performance of the collective intelligence of the group manifested through the shared and collaborative development of intellectual tasks [1]. Guess the Score GS, is a serious game implemented by means of an online tool, created to foster the development, collaboration and engagement of students. It's has been designed with the intention of facilitating the development of individual’s social skills in a group in order to promote education of collective intelligence. This paper concludes that the design of learning activities using serious games as a support tool in education, generate awareness about of utilities of gaming in the collective learning environment and the fostering of collective intelligence education.

  6. Clean Cities Tools: Tools to Help You Save Money, Use Less Petroleum, and Reduce Emissions (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Clean Cities offers a large collection of Web-based tools on the Alternative Fuels Data Center. These calculators, interactive maps, and data searches can assist fleets, fuels providers, and other transportation decision makers in their efforts to reduce petroleum use.

  7. Collective Responsibility for Oppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, Titus

    2017-01-01

    Many contemporary forms of oppression are not primarily the result of formally organized collective action nor are they an unintended outcome of a combination of individual actions. This raises the question of collective responsibility. I argue that we can only determine who is responsible for

  8. Bloody Fast Blood Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brummelen, Samuel Pieter Josephus

    2017-01-01

    This thesis consists of four parts: The first part contains an introduction, the second presents approaches for the evaluation of waiting times at blood collection sites, the third uses these to present approaches that improve waiting times at blood collection sites. The final part shows the

  9. Collecting Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedford, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    How many beginning teachers struggle to create new lessons despite the fact that experienced teachers have already designed effective lessons for the same content? Shulman (1987) used the term "collective amnesia" to describe the failure of school leaders to design professional development that included the collection of its best…

  10. Husserl on Collective Intentionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szanto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    on an equal footing with contemporary analytic accounts but, indeed, helps to alleviate some of their shortcomings. In particular, I will elaborate on the differences in the social integration of individuals and collectives in terms of intersubjective, social, communal and collective intentionality...

  11. Efficient Immutable Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steindorfer, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis proposes novel and efficient data structures, suitable for immutable collection libraries, that carefully balance memory footprint and runtime performance of operations, and are aware of constraints and platform co-design challenges on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). Collection data

  12. Preparing collections for digitization

    CERN Document Server

    Bulow, Anna E

    2010-01-01

    Most libraries, archives and museums are confronting the challenges of providing digital access to their collections. This guide offers guidance covering the end-to-end process of digitizing collections, from selecting records for digitization to choosing suppliers and equipment and dealing with documents that present individual problems.

  13. Tropical Plant Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    course which he helped initiating in Manaus Brazil in the 1970s, and which still train researchers in that country. In a section on tropical plant collections and ‘big data’ Feeley demonstrated how dated herbarium records made it possible to trace elevational changes of species distributions, which...... is of importance to global change studies. Queenborough showed how herbarium collections can be used to study plant functional traits, and Antonelli documented the importance of herbarium voucher specimens for molecular phylogenetic studies and in comparative biogeography. Soberón gave a sobering account of ‘big......’ collections for modern drug discovery. Bakker gave an account of the tantalising possibilities for molecular systematics and other research in the use of herbarium collections, which have opened up for a plethora of additional data to be extracted from dried plant collections. The final talk was Blackmore...

  14. Old tropical botanical collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2017-01-01

    The early history of botanical collections is reviewed, with particular emphasis on old collections from the tropics. The information available about older and newer botanical collections from the tropics was much improved after World War Two, including better lists of validly published names, more...... detailed description of literature and better information about collections and collectors. These improvements were initially made available as publications on paper, whereas now the information has become available on the Internet, at least in part. The changed procedures for handling botanical...... collections in connection with taxonomic research is sketched, from sending specimens on loan between institutions via publishing herbaria on microfiches to providing scanned images on the Internet. Examples from different institutions and organizations of how to make digitized images of specimens and other...

  15. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  16. Change Detection Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.J.; Kuenzer, C.; Lehner, M.; Reinartz, P.; Niemeyer, I.; Nussbaum, S.; Lacroix, V.; Sequeira, V.; Stringa, E.; Schöpfer, E.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter a wide range of change detection tools is addressed. They are grouped into methods suitable for optical and multispectral data, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, and 3D data. Optical and multispectral methods include unsupervised approaches, supervised and knowledge-based

  17. Sight Application Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronevetsky, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-17

    The scale and complexity of scientific applications makes it very difficult to optimize, debug and extend them to support new capabilities. We have developed a tool that supports developers’ efforts to understand the logical flow of their applications and interactions between application components and hardware in a way that scales with application complexity and parallelism.

  18. Nitrogen Trading Tool (NTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) recently developed a prototype web-based nitrogen trading tool to facilitate water quality credit trading. The development team has worked closely with the Agriculture Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit (ARS-SPNR) and the Environmenta...

  19. THE LATEST ASSESSMENT TOOLS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anonymous

    2011-01-01

    ...-S. CONSOLIDATED DATA WAREHOUSE The OnCourse (www.oncoursesystems.com) Student Stats Data Analysis Tool is a consolidated data warehouse for all district assessment data, like state test scores, local formative and summative test results, and teacher-administered test scores.

  20. Tools for Authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G

    2008-07-09

    Many recent Non-proliferation and Arms Control software projects include a software authentication component. In this context, 'authentication' is defined as determining that a software package performs only its intended purpose and performs that purpose correctly and reliably over many years. In addition to visual inspection by knowledgeable computer scientists, automated tools are needed to highlight suspicious code constructs both to aid the visual inspection and to guide program development. While many commercial tools are available for portions of the authentication task, they are proprietary, and have limited extensibility. An open-source, extensible tool can be customized to the unique needs of each project (projects can have both common and custom rules to detect flaws and security holes). Any such extensible tool must be based on a complete language compiler infrastructure, that is, one that can parse and digest the full language through its standard grammar. ROSE is precisely such a compiler infrastructure developed within DOE. ROSE is a robust source-to-source analysis and optimization infrastructure currently addressing large, million-line DOE applications in C, C++, and FORTRAN. This year, it has been extended to support the automated analysis of binaries. We continue to extend ROSE to address a number of security-specific requirements and apply it to software authentication for Non-proliferation and Arms Control projects. We will give an update on the status of our work.

  1. Protective Woodcutting Tool Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana D. Latushkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern woodworking industry applies resource-saving, environmentally appropriate technologies, providing both the metal removal performance enhancement and functioning with the optimal economic factors. Progressive cutting parameters require the application of the high-reliability cutting tools, eliminating machine-tool equipment standstill and increased cost of the expensive tool materials. In this paper it is suggested to increase the wood-cutting tool efficiency by means of the vacuum-arc separated coating deposition process optimization. The droplets are one of the main problems while generating vacuum-arc coatings, and they have a bad influence on the quality and operational coatings characteristics. The application of the separated system, allowing minimize the droplets content, is one of the most promising ways to solve this problem. Vacuum-arc deposition technique was used in this work to generate multicomponent coatings. The coatings deposition was directly carried out on the modernized vacuum-arc plant, equipped by Y-shaped macroparticles separator.

  2. The Proteogenomic Mapping Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandass Yoginder S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput mass spectrometry (MS proteomics data is increasingly being used to complement traditional structural genome annotation methods. To keep pace with the high speed of experimental data generation and to aid in structural genome annotation, experimentally observed peptides need to be mapped back to their source genome location quickly and exactly. Previously, the tools to do this have been limited to custom scripts designed by individual research groups to analyze their own data, are generally not widely available, and do not scale well with large eukaryotic genomes. Results The Proteogenomic Mapping Tool includes a Java implementation of the Aho-Corasick string searching algorithm which takes as input standardized file types and rapidly searches experimentally observed peptides against a given genome translated in all 6 reading frames for exact matches. The Java implementation allows the application to scale well with larger eukaryotic genomes while providing cross-platform functionality. Conclusions The Proteogenomic Mapping Tool provides a standalone application for mapping peptides back to their source genome on a number of operating system platforms with standard desktop computer hardware and executes very rapidly for a variety of datasets. Allowing the selection of different genetic codes for different organisms allows researchers to easily customize the tool to their own research interests and is recommended for anyone working to structurally annotate genomes using MS derived proteomics data.

  3. Healthy Homes Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Gina; Lyon, Melinda; Russ, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Extension is focusing on healthy homes programming. Extension educators are not qualified to diagnose consumers' medical problems as they relate to housing. We cannot give medical advice. Instead, we can help educate consumers about home conditions that may affect their well-being. Extension educators need appropriate healthy homes tools to…

  4. New tools for JCB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elizabeth H; Misteli, Tom

    2011-09-05

    New technologies and approaches in cell biology research necessitate new venues for information sharing and publication. JCB continues its support of innovation in publishing with the launch of Tools, a new article type for the description of methods and high-throughput datasets, and of a new interface for the JCB DataViewer for hosting high-content screening datasets in their entirety.

  5. An Overview of the Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS)Collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, Leroy A.; Marques, Osni A.

    2005-02-02

    The ACTS Collection brings together a number of general-purpose computational tools that were developed by independent research projects mostly funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. These tools tackle a number of common computational issues found in many applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. In this article, we introduce the numerical tools in the collection and their functionalities, present a model for developing more complex computational applications on top of ACTS tools, and summarize applications that use these tools. Lastly, we present a vision of the ACTS project for deployment of the ACTS Collection by the computational sciences community.

  6. Human Capital Tracking Tool -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — AVS is now required to collect, track, and report on data from the following Flight, Business and Workforce Plan. The Human Resource Management’s Performance Target...

  7. Using XFRACAS as a PVROM database tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamman, Colin Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-04-01

    ReliaSofts XFRACAS is a tool chosen by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the purpose of collecting and organizing photovoltaic (PV) system field data that is to be used in assessing PV system reliability. It is a Web-based, closed-loop, incident (failure) reporting, analysis, and corrective action system software package designed for the acquisition, management and analysis of quality and reliability data from multiple sources. The ability to export PV system times-to-failure and times-to-suspension for ready analysis by ReliaSofts Weibull++ and RGA was a primary consideration in choosing XFRACAS as a reliability data collection tool.

  8. Spray-formed tooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be de signed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  9. UniversAAL - Tools for design and development (including Transformation and generation tools, and Conformance tools)

    OpenAIRE

    Furfari, Francesco; Lenzi, Stefano; Girolami, Michele; Stav, Erlend; Walderhaug, St?le

    2011-01-01

    This deliverable provides tool support that facilitate software development base on the universAAL platform and reuse of universAAL components. The tools will enable developers to easily develop universAAL compliant AAL applications and reuse existing universAAL platform services that are shared within the developer community. This deliverable is primarily a software deliverable, but it also contains brief tool documentation for the tool users and tool design for tool developers (as described...

  10. UniversAAL - Tools for design and development (including transformation and generation tools, and Conformance tools)

    OpenAIRE

    Furfari, Francesco; Girolami, Michele; Stav, Erlend; Walderhaug, St?le

    2011-01-01

    This deliverable provides tool support that facilitate software development base on the universAAL platform and reuse of universAAL components. The tools will enable developers to easily develop universAAL compliant AAL applications and reuse existing universAAL platform services that are shared within the developer community. This deliverable is primarily a software deliverable, but it also contains brief tool documentation for the tool users and tool design for tool developers (as described...

  11. New trends in computational collective intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Trawiński, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    This book consists of 20 chapters in which the authors deal with different theoretical and practical aspects of new trends in Collective Computational Intelligence techniques. Computational Collective Intelligence methods and algorithms are one the current trending research topics from areas related to Artificial Intelligence, Soft Computing or Data Mining among others. Computational Collective Intelligence is a rapidly growing field that is most often understood as an AI sub-field dealing with soft computing methods which enable making group decisions and processing knowledge among autonomous units acting in distributed environments. Web-based Systems, Social Networks, and Multi-Agent Systems very often need these tools for working out consistent knowledge states, resolving conflicts and making decisions. The chapters included in this volume cover a selection of topics and new trends in several domains related to Collective Computational Intelligence: Language and Knowledge Processing, Data Mining Methods an...

  12. 78 FR 25450 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities... design and evaluation of other patient-centered health IT tools. The study findings will be widely... and value of health care services including quality measurement and improvement. 42 U.S.C. 299a(a)(1...

  13. 78 FR 10175 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities... health IT implementation; (3) To identify issues for consideration in the design and evaluation of other patient-centered health IT tools. The study findings will be widely disseminated to health IT researchers...

  14. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Deliverable 1.5. Vol.1 — Analysis of the stakeholder survey: perceived priority and availability of data and tools and relation to the stakeholders' characteristics. Vol.II: Analysis of Road Safety Management in the European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadimitriou, E. Yannis, G. Muhlrad, N. Vallet, G. Butler, I. Gitelman, V. Doveh, E. Dupont, E. Thomas, P. Talbot, R. Giustiniani, G. Machata, K. & Bax, C.

    2015-01-01

    Volume I: This report is part of the ‘Policy’ Work Package of the DaCoTA project (www.dacotaproject.eu). The ‘Policy’ Work Package is designed to fill in the gap in knowledge on road safety policy making processes, their institutional framework and the data, methods and technical tools needed to

  15. Computerized tools in psychology: cross cultural and genetically informative studies of memory

    OpenAIRE

    Ismatullina V.; Zakharov I.; Nikulchev E.; Malykh S.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we presented the computerized tools for psychological studies of memory. The importance of implementing computerized automated tools for psychological studies is discussed. It has been shown that this tools can be used both for cross-cultural and genetically informative studies. The validity of these tools for cross-cultural and genetically informative studies of memory can be seen as the first step to use automated computerized tools for big data collection in psychology.

  16. Computerized tools in psychology: cross cultural and genetically informative studies of memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismatullina V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we presented the computerized tools for psychological studies of memory. The importance of implementing computerized automated tools for psychological studies is discussed. It has been shown that this tools can be used both for cross-cultural and genetically informative studies. The validity of these tools for cross-cultural and genetically informative studies of memory can be seen as the first step to use automated computerized tools for big data collection in psychology.

  17. Blind Collective Signature Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Moldovyan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the digital signature (DS scheme specified by Belarusian DS standard there are designed the collective and blind collective DS protocols. Signature formation is performed simultaneously by all of the assigned signers, therefore the proposed protocols can be used also as protocols for simultaneous signing a contract. The proposed blind collective DS protocol represents a particular implementation of the blind multisignature schemes that is a novel type of the signature schemes. The proposed protocols are the first implementations of the multisignature schemes based on Belarusian signature standard.

  18. Individual welfare analysis for collective households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchye, Laurens; Cosaert, Sam; de Rock, Bram

    We propose novel tools for the analysis of individual welfare on the basis of aggregate household demand behavior. The method assumes a collective model of household consumption with the public and private nature of goods specified by the empirical analyst. A main distinguishing feature of our...... method is that it builds on a revealed preference characterization of the collective model that is intrinsically nonparametric. We show how to identify individual money metric welfare indices from observed household demand, along with the intrahousehold sharing rule and the individuals’ willingness...

  19. Tool use by aquatic animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool use can likely be attributable to the characteristics of aquatic habitats, which are generally not conducive to tool use. Nonetheless, studying tool use by aquatic animals provides insights into the conditions that promote and inhibit tool-use behaviour across biomes. Like land-based tool users, aquatic animals tend to find tools on the substrate and use tools during foraging. However, unlike on land, tool users in water often use other animals (and their products) and water itself as a tool. Among sea otters and dolphins, the two aquatic tool users studied in greatest detail, some individuals specialize in tool use, which is vertically socially transmitted possibly because of their long dependency periods. In all, the contrasts between aquatic- and land-based tool users enlighten our understanding of the adaptive value of tool-use behaviour. PMID:24101631

  20. EVALUATION OF MACHINE TOOL QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kuric

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper deals with aspects of quality and accuracy of machine tools. As the accuracy of machine tools has key factor for product quality, it is important to know the methods for evaluation of quality and accuracy of machine tools. Several aspects of diagnostics of machine tools are described, such as aspects of reliability.