WorldWideScience

Sample records for neurologically expressed disorders

  1. Staging neurological disorders: expressions of cognitive and motor disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Trevor; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2010-08-01

    In neurologic disorders, there are progressive losses in regional brain structural integrity, circuitry, and neuronal process that threaten individuals' ability to express functional capacity at several levels of severity. The classification of (a) patients on the basis of diagnosis, risk prognosis, and intervention outcome forms the basis of clinical staging and (b) laboratory animals on the basis of animal model of brain disorder, extent of insult and dysfunctional expression, provides the components for the clinical staging and preclinical staging, respectively, of the disease state with certain associated epidemiological, biological, and genetic characteristics. The investigation of epigenetics and biomarkers is intrinsic to any analysis of the progressive nature of the neurogenerative disorders, in the present account disorders relating to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and diabetes.

  2. Functional neurological disorders: imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, V

    2014-10-01

    Functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorder, are unexplained neurological symptoms. These symptoms are common and can be associated with significant consequences. This review covers the neuroimaging literature focusing on functional motor symptoms including motor functioning and upstream influences including self-monitoring and internal representations, voluntariness and arousal and trauma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Genetics of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mottagui-Tabar, Salim; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2004-05-01

    Neurological diseases are defined as an inappropriate function of the peripheral or central nervous system due to impaired electrical impulses throughout the brain and/or nervous system that may present with heterogeneous symptoms according to the parts of the system involved in these pathologic processes. Growing evidence on genetic components of neurological disease have been collected during recent years. Genetic studies have opened the way for understanding the underlying pathology of many neurological disorders. The outcome of current intense research into the genetics of neurological disorders will hopefully be the introduction of new diagnostic tools and the discovery of potential targets for new and more effective medications and preventive measures.

  4. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Global gene expression profiling of healthy human brain and its application in studying neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Simarjeet K; Guda, Chittibabu

    2017-04-18

    Brain function is governed by precise regulation of gene expression across its anatomically distinct structures; however, the expression patterns of genes across hundreds of brain structures are not clearly understood. Here, we describe a gene expression model, which is representative of the healthy human brain transcriptome by using data from the Allen Brain Atlas. Our in-depth gene expression profiling revealed that 84% of genes are expressed in at least one of the 190 brain structures studied. Hierarchical clustering based on gene expression profiles delineated brain regions into structurally tiered spatial groups and we observed striking enrichment for region-specific processes. Further, weighted co-expression network analysis identified 19 robust modules of highly correlated genes enriched with functional associations for neurogenesis, dopamine signaling, immune regulation and behavior. Also, structural distribution maps of major neurotransmission systems in the brain were generated. Finally, we developed a supervised classification model, which achieved 84% and 81% accuracies for predicting autism- and Parkinson's-implicated genes, respectively, using our expression model as a baseline. This study represents the first use of global gene expression profiling from healthy human brain to develop a disease gene prediction model and this generic methodology can be applied to study any neurological disorder.

  6. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  7. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a

  9. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  10. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sleep disorders in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Guryevich Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are closely associated with both nervous system diseases and mental disorders; however, such patients prefer to seek just neurological advice. Insomnia is the most common complaint in routine clinical practice. It is characterized by different impairments in sleep and daytime awakening. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is less common, but more clinically important because of its negative impact on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The common neurological disorders are restless legs syndrome and REM sleep behavior disorder, as well as narcolepsy, the major manifestations of which are impaired nocturnal sleep and daytime awakening.

  12. Acupuncture application for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyangsook; Park, Hi-Joon; Park, Jongbae; Kim, Mi-Ja; Hong, Meesuk; Yang, Jongsoo; Choi, Sunmi; Lee, Hyejung

    2007-01-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used for a range of neurological disorders. Despite its popularity, the evidence to support the use of acupuncture is contradictory. This review was designed to summarize and to evaluate the available evidence of acupuncture for neurological disorders. Most of the reviewed studies suffer from lack of methodological rigor. Owing to paucity and poor quality of the primary studies, no firm conclusion could be drawn on the use of acupuncture for epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ataxic disorders, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. For stroke rehabilitation, the evidence from recent high-quality trials and previous systematic reviews is not convincing. More rigorous trials are warranted to establish acupuncture's role in neurological disorders.

  13. Neurological disorders in children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Zavadenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During a clinical examination of children with autistic spectrum disorders, attention should be drawn to both their major clinical manifestations and neurological comorbidities. The paper considers the mechanisms of autism-induced neurological disorders, the spectrum of which may include manifestations, such as retarded and disharmonic early psychomotor development; the specific features of sensory perception/processing; rigidity and monotony of motor and psychic reactions; motor disinhibition and hyperexcitability; motor stereotypies; uncoordinated movements; developmental coordination disorders (dyspraxia; impaired expressive motor skills; speech and articulation disorders; tics; epilepsy. It describes the specific features of neurological symptoms in Asperger’s syndrome, particularly in semantic-pragmatic language disorders, higher incidence rates of hyperlexia, motor and vocal tics. The incidence rate of epilepsy in autistic spectrum disorders is emphasized to be greater than the average population one. At the same time, the risk of epilepsy is higher in mentally retarded patients with autism. Identification of neurological disorders is of great importance in determining the tactics of complex care for patients with autistic spectrum disorders

  14. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  15. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify

  16. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  17. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  18. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Tolaymat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep problems are frequently addressed as a primary or secondary concern during the visit to the pediatric neurology clinic. Sleep disorders can mimic other neurologic diseases (e.g., epilepsy and movement disorders, and this adds challenges to the diagnostic process. Sleep disorders can significantly affect the quality of life and functionality of children in general and those with comorbid neurological diseases in particular. Understanding the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, recognizing the implications of sleep disorder in children with neurologic diseases and behavioral difficulties, and early intervention continue to evolve resulting in better neurocognitive outcomes.

  19. Endocannabinoid System in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Roberta; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Marasco, Daniela; Malfitano, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Several studies support the evidence that the endocannabinoid system and cannabimimetic drugs might have therapeutic potential in numerous pathologies. These pathologies range from neurological disorders, atherosclerosis, stroke, cancer to obesity/metabolic syndrome and others. In this paper we review the endocannabinoid system signaling and its alteration in neurodegenerative disorders like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease and discuss the main findings about the use of cannabinoids in the therapy of these pathologies. Despite different etiologies, neurodegenerative disorders exhibit similar mechanisms like neuro-inflammation, excitotoxicity, deregulation of intercellular communication, mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of brain tissue homeostasis. Current treatments ameliorate the symptoms but are not curative. Interfering with the endocannabinoid signaling might be a valid therapeutic option in neuro-degeneration. To this aim, pharmacological intervention to modulate the endocannabinoid system and the use of natural and synthetic cannabimimetic drugs have been assessed. CB1 and CB2 receptor signaling contributes to the control of Ca2+ homeostasis, trophic support, mitochondrial activity, and inflammatory conditions. Several studies and patents suggest that the endocannabinoid system has neuro-protective properties and might be a target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. An overview of curcumin in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S K; Dhir, A

    2010-03-01

    Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid found in spice turmeric, has recently been studied for its active role in the treatment of various central nervous system disorders. Curcumin demonstrates neuroprotective action in Alzheimer's disease, tardive dyskinesia, major depression, epilepsy, and other related neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. The mechanism of its neuroprotective action is not completely understood. However, it has been hypothesized to act majorly through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Also, it is a potent inhibitor of reactive astrocyte expression and thus prevents cell death. Curcumin also modulates various neurotransmitter levels in the brain. The present review attempts to discuss some of the potential protective role of curcumin in animal models of major depression, tardive dyskinesia and diabetic neuropathy. These studies call for well planned clinical studies on curcumin for its potential use in neurological disorders.

  1. [Gait disorders due to neurological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Snijders, A.H.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    Gait disorders are seen frequently and often have a neurological cause. The clinical management of patients presenting with a gait disorder is often complicated due to the large number of diseases that can cause a gait disorder and to the difficulties in interpreting a specific gait disorder

  2. Axon guidance proteins in neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Battum, Eljo Y.; Brignani, Sara; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/197768814

    2015-01-01

    Many neurological disorders are characterised by structural changes in neuronal connections, ranging from presymptomatic synaptic changes to the loss or rewiring of entire axon bundles. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this perturbed connectivity are poorly understood, but recent studies

  3. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  4. [Can music therapy for patients with neurological disorders?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myskja, Audun

    2004-12-16

    Recent developments in brain research and in the field of music therapy have led to the development of music-based methods specifically aimed at relieving symptoms of Parkinson's disease and other neurologic disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation uses external rhythmic auditory cues from song, music or metronome to aid patients improving their walking functioning and has been shown to be effective both within sessions and as a result of training over time. Melodic intonation therapy and related vocal techniques can improve expressive dysphasia and aid rehabilitation of neurologic disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease, stroke and developmental disorders.

  5. [Voice disorders caused by neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Mate, M A; Cobeta, I

    To review voice disorders in neurological diseases, with special emphasis to acoustic analysis. In the first part of this article we describe data regarding neural control of voice, physiology of phonation, and examination of the patient with voice disturbances, including the use of voice laboratory, acoustic analysis fundamentals, phonetometric measures and aerodynamic measures. In the second part, we review the voice disturbances associated to neurological diseases, emphasizing into movement disorders (specially Parkinson s disease, essential tremor, and spasmodic dysphonia). A number of neurological diseases causing alterations of corticospinal pathway, cerebellum, basal ganglia and upper and/or lower motoneurons can induce voice disturbances. Voice examination using ear, nose & throat examination, endoscopy and videorecording of laryngeal movements, acoustic analysis, elecroglottography, laryngeal electromyography, and aerodynamic measures, could be useful in the clinical examination of some neurological diseases.

  6. Advances in genetic diagnosis of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, M

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenetics has developed enormously in recent years, and the genetic basis of human disorders is being unravelled rapidly. Many neurological disorders are Mendelian disorders, caused by mutations in genes involved in normal function of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves or muscles. Due to high costs and time-consuming procedures, genetic tests have normally been performed late in the diagnostic process, when clinical examination and other tests have indicated a specific gene as the likely disease cause. Many neurological phenotypes are genetically very heterogeneous, and testing of all possible disease genes has been impossible. As a result, many patients with genetic neurological disorders have remained without a specific diagnosis, even when the disease is caused by mutations in known disease genes. Recent technological advances, in particular next-generation DNA sequencing techniques, have resulted in rapid identification of genes involved in Mendelian disorders and provided new possibilities for diagnostic genetic testing. The development of methods for coupling targeted capture and massively parallel DNA sequencing has made it possible to examine a large number of genes in a single reaction. Diagnostic genetic testing can today be performed by the use of gene panels and exome sequencing. This allows a more precise diagnosis of many neurological disorders, and genetic testing should now be considered earlier in the diagnostic procedure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pilot Data Bank Networks for Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitz, Selma C.; Havekost, Charles L.; Gross, Cynthia R.

    1979-01-01

    National pilot data bank networks for stroke and traumatic coma have recently been initiated at multiple centers by the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke. The characteristics of these pilot data bank projects include: 1) the overall development and statement of research issues by a multidisciplinary team; 2) dual emphasis on patient management and clinical research; 3) the definition and use of a uniform clinical vocabulary; 4) the use of a clinically-oriented data base management system; and 5) the use of intelligent terminals for data entry, retrieval, and patient management. This paper will describe the data bank approach used by the neurological disorders programs.

  8. Sexual function in women with neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hulter, Birgitta

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study sexual function in women with neurological disorders at fairly distinct and separate locations. The dissertation comprises descriptive, retrospective, quantitative studies on sexual functioning in women with hypothalamo-pituitary disorders (HPD) (n:48), multiple sclerosis (MS)(n:47), and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) (n:42). The results werecompared with those in an age-matched control group (C) (n:42), and as reported by representat...

  9. Proton MRS in neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonavita, S.; Di Salle, F.; Tedeschi, G

    1999-05-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) permits the acquisition of the signal arising from several brain metabolites. At long echo-time (TE) {sup 1}H MRS can detect N-acetyl-aspartate containing compounds, choline containing compounds, creatine+phosphocreatine and lactate. At short TE, lipids, tryglicerides, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, GABA, scyllo-inositol, glucose, myo-inositol, carnosine and histydine are visible. {sup 1}H MRS can be performed with single-voxel, multivoxel, single slice and multislice techniques. With single voxel {sup 1}H MRS it is possible to measure metabolites relaxation time, which allows the measurement of metabolite concentrations. This technique can be useful in the study of focal lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) such as epilepsy (pre-surgical identification of epileptic focus), brain tumors (evaluation of recurrence and radiation necrosis), stroke, multiple sclerosis, etc. Single slice and multislice {sup 1}H MRS imaging ({sup 1}H MRSI) can be performed only at long TE and permits the mapping of the brain metabolites distribution which makes them particularly useful in studying diffuse diseases and heterogeneous lesions of the CNS. {sup 1}H MRS can also be useful in the evaluation of 'ischemic penumbra' of stroke; developmental (myelin and neuronal dysgenesis); head trauma (evaluation of cerebral damage not visible with MRI); degenerative disorders (identification of microscopic pathology not visible with MRI); and metabolic diseases (metabolic disturbances with specific metabolic patterns)

  10. Sleep disorders in children with neurologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, M; Bruni, O

    2001-12-01

    Pediatric neurologic diseases are often associated with different kinds of sleep disruption (mainly insomnia, less frequently hypersomnia or parasomnias). Due to the key-role of sleep for development, the effort to ameliorate sleep patterns in these children could have important prognostic benefits. Study of sleep architecture and organization in neurologic disorders could lead to a better comprehension of the pathogenesis and a better treatment of the disorders. This article focuses on the following specific neurologic diseases: nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and abnormal motor behaviors of epileptic origin, evaluating differential diagnosis with parasomnias; achondroplasia, confirming the crucial role of craniofacial deformity in determining sleep-disordered breathing; neuromuscular diseases, mainly Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and myotonic dystrophy; cerebral palsy, evaluating either the features of sleep architecture and the importance of the respiratory problems associated; headaches, confirming the strict relationships with sleep in terms of neurochemical and neurobehavioral substrates; and finally a review on the effectiveness of melatonin for sleep problems in children with neurologic syndromes and mental retardation, blindness, and epilepsy.

  11. Acupuncture for Small Animal Neurologic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roynard, Patrick; Frank, Lauren; Xie, Huisheng; Fowler, Margaret

    2018-01-01

    Modern research on traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM), including herbal medicine and acupuncture, has made evident the role of the nervous system as a cornerstone in many of the mechanisms of action of TCVM. Laboratory models and clinical research available are supportive for the use of TCVM in the management of neurologic conditions in small animals, specifically in cases of intervertebral disk disease, other myelopathies, and painful conditions. This article is meant to help guide the use of TCVM for neurologic disorders in small animals, based on available information and recommendations from experienced TCVM practitioners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stem Cell Therapy in Pediatric Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  13. Stem cell therapy in pediatric neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  14. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Nicholas S.; Chandra, Sathees B., E-mail: schandra@roosevelt.edu [Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  15. Population-Level Retrospective Study of Neurologically Expressed Disorders in Ruminants before the Onset of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Belgium, a BSE Risk III Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegerman, C.; Berkvens, D.; Claes, L.; Dewaele, A.; Coignoul, F.; Ducatelle, R.; Cassart, D.; Brochier, B.; Costy, F.; Roels, S.; Deluyker, H.; Vanopdenbosch, E.; Thiry, E.

    2005-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study (n = 7,875) of neurologically expressed disorders (NED) in ruminants before the onset of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy epidemic (years studied, 1980 to 1997) was carried out in Belgium. The archives of all veterinary laboratories and rabies and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) epidemiosurveillance networks were consulted. For all species, a significantly higher number of NED with virological causes (rabies) was reported south of the Sambre-Meuse Valley. During the period 1992 to 1997, for which the data were complete, (i) the predicted annual incidence of NED varied significantly as a function of species and area (higher numbers in areas where rabies was present) but was always above 100 cases per million, and (ii) the mean incidence of suspected TSE cases and, among them, those investigated by histopathological examination varied significantly as a function of species and area. The positive predictive value of a presumptive clinical diagnosis of NED ranged from 0.13 (game) to 0.63 (sheep). Knowledge of the positive predictive value permits the definition of a reference point before certain actions (e.g., awareness and training campaigns) are undertaken. It also shows the usefulness of a systematic necropsy or complementary laboratory tests to establish an etiological diagnosis. TSE analysis of a small, targeted historical sampling (n = 48) permitted the confirmation of one case and uncovered another case of scrapie. The results of the present study help to develop and maintain the quality of the worldwide clinical epidemiological networks for TSE, especially in countries that in the past imported live animals, animal products, and feedstuffs from countries with TSE cases. PMID:15695693

  16. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    The copper metabolism disorder Wilson's disease was first defined in 1912. Wilson's disease can present with hepatic and neurological deficits, including dystonia and parkinsonism. Early-onset presentations in infancy and late-onset manifestations in adults older than 70 years of age are now well recognised. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations are increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of Wilson's disease, and results from biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that Wilson's disease might be much more common than previously estimated. Early diagnosis of Wilson's disease is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment, but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Furthermore, Wilson's disease needs to be differentiated from other conditions that also present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with Wilson's disease, such as reduced serum ceruloplasmin concentrations. Disordered copper metabolism is also associated with other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations and the late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pattern Of Neurological Disorders In Child Neurology Clinic Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other disorders seen include acute flaccid paralysis, autism, developmental delay, headache, mental retardation, HIV encephalopathy, cranial neuropathy, Erb Duchene paralysis, deafness, cerebella ataxia, conversion disorder, polyneuritis, syncope, Tic disorder and tuberous sclerosis. Concerted effort at the training of ...

  18. [Neurological soft signs in pervasive developmental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halayem, S; Bouden, A; Halayem, M B; Tabbane, K; Amado, I; Krebs, M O

    2010-09-01

    Many studies have focused on specific motor signs in autism and Asperger's syndrome, but few has been published on the complete range of neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD). Scarce are the studies evaluating NSS in children suffering from PDD not otherwise specified (PDDNOS). This study compared performance of 11 autistic children (AD) and 10 children with PDDNOS, with controls matched on age, sex and cognitive performance on Krebs et al.'s NSS scale. Because of the duration of the assessments and specific difficulties encountered in managing some items, an adaptation of the scale had to be made during a pilot study with the agreement of the author. To be eligible, patients had to meet the following inclusion criteria: an age range of 6-16 years, a diagnosis of autistic disorder or PDDNOS based on the DSM IV criteria (American Psychiatric Association 1994). The autism diagnostic interview-revised (ADI-R) was used in order to confirm the diagnosis and to evaluate the association of the symptoms to the severity of the NSS. The childhood autism rating scale (CARS) was completed for the patients in order to evaluate symptoms at the time of the NSS examination. Cognitive ability was assessed with Raven's progressive matrices. Were excluded patients with: history of cerebral palsy, congenital anomaly of the central nervous system, epilepsy, known genetic syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, antecedent of severe head trauma, Asperger's syndrome, obvious physical deformities or sensory deficits that would interfere with neurological assessment, deep mental retardation and recent or chronic substance use or abuse. Healthy controls shared the same exclusion criteria, with no personal history of neurological, psychiatric disorder or substance abuse, no family history of psychiatric disorder and normal or retardation in schooling. All study procedures were approved by the local Ethics Committee (Comité d

  19. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classic copper metabolism disorder, Wilson disease (WD), was first defined in 1912. Both early onset presentations in infancy and late onset manifestations in adults > 70 years are now well recognized. Modern biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that WD may be considerably more common than previously appreciated. Early diagnosis of WD is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations is increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of WD. WD needs to be differentiated from other conditions that present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with WD, such as reduced serum cerulo plasmin levels. Disordered copper metabolism is also implied in an increasing number of other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations, and the common late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25496901

  20. Isoprenoid Pathway And Neurological And Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of neuronal degeneration, psychiatric manifestation, immune activation and malignant transformation has been documented in literature, suggesting a central dysfunction in the pathophysiology of these disorders. The isoprenoid pathway may be candidate in this respect, in view of the changes in the concentration of some products of this pathway in many of these disorders, however, no detailed study has been carried out in this respect. In view of this, a study was undertaken on the isoprenoid pathway in some of these disorders - primary generalized epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease (PD, schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis (MDP, CNS glioma, multiple sclerosis, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPEand a familial group with familial coexistence of schizophrenia, PD, primary generalized epilepsy, malignant neoplasia, rheumatoid arthritis and syndrome-X over three generations. The following parameters were studied in the patients of these disorders as compared to age and sex matched control subjects - ubiquinone dolichol, digoxin, activity of HMG CoA reductase in the plasma and erthyorcyte membrane Na -K--ATpase. Increase in the activity of HMG CoA reductase and in the concentration of plasma digoxin and dolichol was observed in most of these cases. On the other hand, there was decrease in the concentration of plasma ubiquinone. Decrease in the activity of erythrocyte membrane Na-K- ATpase activity for which digoxin is an inhibitor was also observed in all the cases studied. These results indicate an upregulation of the isoprenoid pathway in the neurological and psychiatric disorders studied. The implications of this change is discussed in details.

  1. Bridging Neuroanatomy, Neuroradiology and Neurology: Three-Dimensional Interactive Atlas of Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Nowinski, W. L.; Chua, B.C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. ...

  2. Clinical perspectives on medical marijuana (cannabis) for neurologic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fife, Terry D.; Moawad, Heidi; Moschonas, Constantine; Shepard, Katie; Hammond, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Neurology published an evidence-based systematic review of randomized controlled trials using marijuana (Cannabis sativa) or cannabinoids in neurologic disorders. Several cannabinoids showed effectiveness or probable effectiveness for spasticity, central pain, and painful spasms in multiple sclerosis. The review justifies insurance coverage for dronabinol and nabilone for these indications. Many insurance companies already cover these medications for other indications....

  3. Autism spectrum symptoms in children with neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryland Hilde K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of the present study were to assess symptoms associated with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD in children with neurological disorders as reported by parents and teachers on the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ, as well as the level of agreement between informants for each child. Methods The ASSQ was completed by parents and teachers of the 5781 children (11–13 years who participated in the second wave of the Bergen Child Study (BCS, an on-going longitudinal population-based study. Out of these children, 496 were reported to have a chronic illness, including 99 whom had a neurological disorder. The neurological disorder group included children both with and without intellectual disabilities. Results Children with neurological disorders obtained significantly higher parent and teacher reported ASSQ scores than did non-chronically ill children and those with other chronic illnesses (p Conclusions The ASSQ identifies a high rate of ASD symptoms in children with neurological disorders, and a large number of children screened in the positive range for ASD. Although a firm conclusion awaits further clinical studies, the present results suggest that health care professionals should be aware of potential ASD related problems in children with neurological disorders, and should consider inclusion of the ASSQ or similar screening instruments as part of their routine assessment of this group of children.

  4. Aquatic rehabilitation for the treatment of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D M

    1994-01-01

    Patients with neurological disorders present therapists with complex challenges for treatment, including weakness, hypertonicity, voluntary movement deficit, limited range of motion, sensory loss, incoordination, and postural instability. The presence of one or more of these impairments negatively influences these patients by contributing to problems in walking, transferring, and reaching. Aquatic rehabilitation offers a unique, versatile approach to the treatment of these disabilities. This article examines the problems encountered by patients with neurological disorders, general principles guiding neurotreatment, and aquatic neurorehabilitation approaches.

  5. Cocaine addiction as a neurological disorder: implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, M D

    1996-01-01

    biological psychiatry. While a majority of drug addicts are polydrug users, there seems to be a preference for a particular type of drug among different populations of addicts. Addicts who experience distress, anxious dysphoria, and turbulent anger prefer the calming actions of opiates, whereas addicts with preceding attention deficit disorder, depression, or bipolar disorder often prefer stimulants (Khantzian 1985). Figure 1 presents conceptual relationships between brain damage and cocaine/stimulant abuse. More clinical studies are needed to establish unequivocally the epidemiological relationships between preexisting neurological deficits-resulting either from genetic, developmental, traumatic, or neurotoxic factors- and vulnerability to drug addictions. Nonetheless, deducing from the results of preclinical studies, it is conceivable that individuals with neurological deficits associated with attention deficit disorder, developmental neuroanatomical abnormalities, lead poisoning, alcoholism, posttraumatic brain lesions, and PTSD may be more vulnerable to stimulant addiction. This notion has significant empirical support as preclinical studies have shown that animals with lesioned prefrontal cortex became supersensitive to cocaine (Schenk et al. 1991) and animals with lesions at the amygdala, VTA, or raphe nuclei manifest more rapid acquisition of amphetamine self-administration than control rats (Deminiere et al. 1989). The above arguments, postulating neuropathology as an intrinsic component of stimulant addiction, should be taken into consideration with the caveat that the clinical manifestations of the disease are heterogenous and addicts may express varying stages and degrees of the disease as determined by environmental and genetic factors. Therefore, it is likely that stimulant addicts who have less advanced neuropathology may recover spontaneously after detoxification with proper nutritional and psychotherapeutic support if they can sustain abstinence. (ABSTR

  6. Progress in gene therapy for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonato, Michele; Bennett, Jean; Boulis, Nicholas M; Castro, Maria G; Fink, David J; Goins, William F; Gray, Steven J; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wilson, Thomas J; Wolfe, John H; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2013-05-01

    Diseases of the nervous system have devastating effects and are widely distributed among the population, being especially prevalent in the elderly. These diseases are often caused by inherited genetic mutations that result in abnormal nervous system development, neurodegeneration, or impaired neuronal function. Other causes of neurological diseases include genetic and epigenetic changes induced by environmental insults, injury, disease-related events or inflammatory processes. Standard medical and surgical practice has not proved effective in curing or treating these diseases, and appropriate pharmaceuticals do not exist or are insufficient to slow disease progression. Gene therapy is emerging as a powerful approach with potential to treat and even cure some of the most common diseases of the nervous system. Gene therapy for neurological diseases has been made possible through progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms, particularly those involving sensory neurons, and also by improvement of gene vector design, therapeutic gene selection, and methods of delivery. Progress in the field has renewed our optimism for gene therapy as a treatment modality that can be used by neurologists, ophthalmologists and neurosurgeons. In this Review, we describe the promising gene therapy strategies that have the potential to treat patients with neurological diseases and discuss prospects for future development of gene therapy.

  7. Neurological soft signs discriminating mood disorders from first episode schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, MPM; Liddle, PF; Burgerhof, JGM; Knegtering, R; Bosch, RJ

    Objective: To investigate the specificity of neurological soft signs (NSS) for first episode schizophrenia compared with mood disorders. Method: We assessed NSS in a sample of 60 healthy controls, 191 first episode psychosis patients and 81 mood disorder patients. We used a principle component

  8. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION AND THEIR CORRECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients can be caused by both brain injury and concomitant diseases. The elucidation of the causes of neurological disorders and their effective treatment contribute to hypertensive patients’ better adherence to long-term antihypertensive therapy, which normalizes blood pressure (BP and reduces the risk of cerebral complications Objective: to study of the causes of neurological disorders in hypertensive patients and the efficiency of their correction using a new dispersible vinpocetine formulation (Cavinton® Comforte in combined therapy.Patients and methods. A total of 80 patients (men (20% and women (80%; mean age 63±12.3  years with neurological complaints in the presence of hypertension were examined. All the patients were diagnosed with dyscirculatory encephalopathy or chronic brain ischemia, whether they had vascular cognitive impairment. The examination of patients revealed that the neurological complaints were mainly due to concomitant diseases, such as migraine (12%, tension-type headache (66%, and the latter concurrent with migraine (4%.Results and  discussion. The  effective treatment of concomitant diseases in  combination with antihypertensive therapy contributed to normalization of BP and regression of complaints. The most pronounced effect was noted in 40 patients whose combination therapy included Vinpocetine (Cavinton® Comforte 10 mg thrice daily.Conclusion. The therapy resulted in the less severity of both the symptoms of cerebrovascular disease (vascular cognitive impairment and comorbid neurological disorders (headache, dizziness, etc..

  9. Hypnosis as therapy for functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Q

    2016-01-01

    Suggestion in hypnosis has been applied to the treatment of functional neurologic symptoms since the earliest descriptions of hypnosis in the 19th century. Suggestion in this sense refers to an intentional communication of beliefs or ideas, whether verbally or nonverbally, to produce subjectively convincing changes in experience and behavior. The recognition of suggestion as a psychologic process with therapeutic applications was closely linked to the derivation of hypnosis from earlier healing practices. Animal magnetism, the immediate precursor of hypnosis, arrived at a psychologic concept of suggestion along with other ideas and practices which were then incorporated into hypnosis. Before then, other forms of magnetism and ritual healing practices such as exorcism involved unintentionally suggestive verbal and nonverbal stimuli. We consider the derivation of hypnosis from these practices not only to illustrate the range of suggestive processes, but also the consistency with which suggestion has been applied to the production and removal of dissociative and functional neurologic symptoms over many centuries. Nineteenth-century practitioners treated functional symptoms with induction of hypnosis per se; imperative suggestions, or commands for specific effects; "medical clairvoyance" in hypnotic trance, in which patients diagnosed their own condition and predicted the time and manner of their recovery; and suggestion without prior hypnosis, known as "fascination" or "psychotherapeutics." Modern treatments largely involve different types of imperative suggestion with or without hypnosis. However, the therapeutic application of suggestion in hypnosis to functional and other symptoms waned in the first half of the 20th century under the separate pressures of behaviorism and psychoanalysis. In recent decades suggestion in hypnosis has been more widely applied to treating functional neurologic symptoms. Suggestion is typically applied within the context of other

  10. The hemostatic system in canine neurology: study of the fibrinolytic activity in cerebrospinal fluid in neurological disorders and evaluation of tissue factor expression, fibrin/fibrinogen deposition and fibrinolysis in canine gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    de la Fuente Hernández, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    La neurología es una de las especialidades veterinarias que más ha evolucionado en los últimos años. Los avances médicos junto a la demanda de la sociedad para diagnosticar y tratar enfermedades neurológicas en perros han contribuido a una mayor compresión de la fisiopatología de estas enfermedades. Aún así, la etiología de ciertas enfermedades sigue siendo desconocida, lo que limita el diagnóstico y tratamiento en muchos casos. La necesidad de nuevas líneas de investigación es clara. Estudio...

  11. Uroflowmetry in neurologically normal children with voiding disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Nielsen, K.K.; Kristensen, E S

    1985-01-01

    of neurological deficits underwent a complete diagnostic program including intravenous urography, voiding cystography and cystoscopy as well as spontaneous uroflowmetry, cystometry-emg and pressure-flow-emg study. The incidence of dyssynergia was 22%. However, neither the flow curve pattern nor single flow...... variables were able to identify children with dyssynergia. Consequently uroflowmetry seems inefficient in the screening for dyssynergia in neurological normal children with voiding disorders in the absence of anatomical bladder outlet obstruction....

  12. Nanotechnology Based Treatments for Neurological Disorders from Genetics Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas S. Kurek; Sathees B. Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechology involves the application, analysis and manipulation of nanomaterials. These materials have unique and medically useful properties due to their nanoscale parameters. Nanotechnology based treatments and diagnostics might eventually bring great relief to people suffering from neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disorders. A large variety of nonmaterials such as viruses, carbon nanotubes, gold and silica nanoparti...

  13. An Overview of Curcumin in Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni S; Dhir A

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid found in spice turmeric, has recently been studied for its active role in the treatment of various central nervous system disorders. Curcumin demonstrates neuroprotective action in Alzheimer′s disease, tardive dyskinesia, major depression, epilepsy, and other related neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. The mechanism of its neuroprotective action is not completely understood. However, it has been hypothesized to act majorly through its a...

  14. Zolpidem for the Treatment of Neurologic Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomalaski, Martin N; Claflin, Edward S; Townsend, Whitney; Peterson, Mark D

    2017-09-01

    Given its selective action on the ω1 subtype of the γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor, zolpidem tartrate presents a potential treatment mechanism for other neurologic disorders. To synthesize studies that used zolpidem to treat neurologic disorders. Eligibility criteria included any published English-language article that examined the use of zolpidem for noninsomnia neurologic disorders in humans for all dates up to March 20, 2015. Searched databases included PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science Core Collection, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and clinicaltrials.gov. Publication bias was mitigated by searching clinicaltrials.gov for unpublished studies. Two rounds of screening were performed based on title and then abstract, and coding was performed by 2 coders. All methods followed the PRISMA Reporting Guidelines for systematic reviews of the literature. The initial search produced 2314 articles after removing duplicates. After exclusion based on a review of abstracts, 67 articles remained for full manuscript review. Thirty-one studies treated movement disorders, 22 treated disorders of consciousness, and 14 treated other neurologic conditions, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, encephalopathy, and dementia. Study designs included case reports (n = 28), case series (n = 8), single-patient interventional (n = 13), pretest and posttest (n = 9), randomized clinical trials (n = 9), and crossover studies (n = 5). Only 11 studies had more than 10 participants. Effects of zolpidem were wide ranging (eg, improvement on the JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, and the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale) and generally lasted 1 to 4 hours before the participant returned to baseline. Sedation was the most common adverse effect. Zolpidem has been observed to transiently treat a large variety of neurologic disorders, most often related to movement disorders and disorders of consciousness. Much of what

  15. Herbal Medicines In The Treatment of Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This review will indicate the quality of the evidence supporting the clinical effects of a number of commonly used types of herbal medicines for psychiatric and neurological disorders. Method: We conducted a review of literature to understand the biochemical and evidential bases for the use of herbs in psychiatric and neurological disorders as follow: 1 Alzheimer’s disease, 2 Depression, 3 Anxiety, 4 Insomnia, 5 Substance use disorders, 6 Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, 7 Migraine. Results: Evidences support use of Ginkgo biloba, Huperzine A, Galantamine, Melissa officinalis,and Salvia officinalis for Alzheimer’s disease; St. John’s wort, Lavender, and Saffron for depression; Passionflower, and Kava, for anxiety disorders; Valerian, and English Lavender for sleep disorders; Hypericum for substance related disorders; Ginkgo biloba, and Passionflower for ADHD; and feverfew, and Butterbur root for migraine. The highest level of confidence derives from well-designed, randomized, double blind controlled studies. Conclusion: Herbs may have beneficial effects in variety of psychiatric and neurological disorder; however we must consider their potential side effects and drug-drug interactions.

  16. Hypocretin/orexin disturbances in neurological disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Baumann, C.R.; Lammers, G.J.; Bassetti, C.L.; Overeem, S.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) system plays a crucial role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. The strongest evidence for this is the fact that the primary sleep disorder narcolepsy is caused by disrupted hypocretin signaling in humans as well as various animal models. There is a

  17. Therapeutic potential of fluoxetine in neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, Jop P.; Koch, Marcus W.; Heerings, Marco; Heersema, Dorothea J.; De Keyser, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine, which is registered for a variety of psychiatric disorders, has been found to stimulate the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), increase the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) and the neurotrophic peptide

  18. Multiple roles of metalloproteinases in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Hill, Jeff W; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    Once thought to mainly act in brain to remodel the extracellular matrix, the family of metalloproteinases is important in many normal and pathological processes in the nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are the two major families of metalloproteinases in the brain. MMPs are comprised of several related enzymes that act on extracellular molecules. Normally, they are important in angiogenesis and neurogenesis in development. In neuroinflammatory illnesses, they disrupt the basal lamina and tight junction proteins to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB). ADAMs are important in neuroinflammation through activation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and their action as secretases that modulate the action of receptors on the cell surface. Four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are the main inhibitors of the MMPs and ADAMs. Recently, MMPs were found to affect DNA repair processes by an unexpected intranuclear action. MMPs and ADAMs have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and vascular cognitive impairment. Growing literature on the functions of MMPs and ADAMs in the central nervous system is opening up new and exciting areas of research that may lead to novel approaches to treatment of neurological diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bireley, William R. [University of Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Van Hove, Johan L.K. [University of Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Gallagher, Renata C. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Fenton, Laura Z. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions. (orig.)

  20. Managing patients with neurologic disorders who participate in sports activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Kevin E

    2014-12-01

    Patients with neurologic conditions have been discouraged from participating in organized sports because of theoretical detrimental effects of these activities to their underlying conditions. The purpose of this article is to review known risks associated with three specific clinical conditions most commonly encountered in a sports neurology clinic (epilepsy, migraines, and multiple sclerosis and to add to the neurologist's toolkit suggested interventions regarding management of athletes with these disorders. Increased participation in sports and athletics has positive benefits for patients with neurologic conditions and can be safely integrated into the lives of these patients with proper supervision from their treating neurologists. Patients with neurologic conditions can and should be encouraged to participate in organized sports as a method of maintaining their overall fitness, improving their overall level of function, and reaping the physical and psychological benefits that athletic competition has to offer.

  1. Outbreak of neurological disorder associated with Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two, 8 week old piglets from a large-scale pig multiplication unit in Nairobi, Kenya was referred to Department of Veterinary Pathology, Microbiology and Parasitology for necropsy and laboratory analyses. Clinically, the piglets expressed nervous signs comprising inco-ordination, tremors, nystagmus and paralysis. Out of ...

  2. Neurological disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tapas K; Hazra, Avijit; Biswas, Atanu; Ray, Jayanta; Roy, Trishit; Raut, Deepak K; Chaudhuri, Arijit; Das, Shyamal K

    2009-02-01

    To ascertain the prevalence of active epilepsy, febrile seizures (FS), cerebral palsy (CP) and tic disorders (TD) in aged 19 years or less. This was a cross-sectional observational study conducted as a two-stage door-to-door survey of a stratified randomly selected population in 2003-04. Trained field workers screened the population followed by case examination by the field neurologist. A total of 16979 (male 8898, female 8081) subjects aged Indian studies. Birth anoxia is a common cause of CP and educational underachievement is frequent.

  3. Telerehabilitation, Virtual Therapists, and Acquired Neurologic Speech and Language Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Cherney, Leora R.; van Vuuren, Sarel

    2012-01-01

    Telerehabilitation (telererehab) offers cost effective services that potentially can improve access to care for those with acquired neurologic communication disorders. However, regulatory issues including licensure, reimbursement, and threats to privacy and confidentiality hinder the routine implementation of telerehab services into the clinical setting. Despite these barriers, rapid technological advances and a growing body of research regarding the use of telerehab applications support its ...

  4. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  5. Neurological disorders in rural Africa - a systematic approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aims of our study were to assess the hospital-based prevalence of neurological disorders in a rural African setting and to describe the pattern of disease by using a systematic approach. Methods The study was conducted at the Haydom Lutheran Hospital in northern Tanzania, Manyara region. Over a period of eight ...

  6. Minor neurological dysfunction in children with autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Marianne; Punt, Marja; De Groot, Erik; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Aim The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of brain function in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in relation to minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method We studied MNDs in 122 children (93 males, 29 females; mean age 8y 1mo, SD 2y 6mo) who, among a total cohort of

  7. SIRP/CD47 signaling in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyue; Li, Fengwu; Yang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Jun; Hu, Xiaoming

    2015-10-14

    Microglia play important roles in the process of neuronal injury and recovery. Numeous surface receptors have been described to regulate microglial activation. These receptors tightly mediate normal microglial functions including cell mobility, phagocytosis, and production of inflammatory mediators or trophic factors. In recent years, significant progresses have been achieved for understanding the signaling mechanisms underlying these receptors. Their specific roles in neurological diseases have been documented. This review will focus on the signal regulatory protein (SIRP) and its ligand CD47, two surface receptors expressed on microglia and other cells in the central nervous system (CNS) such as neurons. We will discuss the involvement of SIRP/CD47 signaling in microglial activation and in the interplay between microglia and other CNS cells. Current studies reveal the importance of CD47 and SIRPα in the process of neuroinflammation in the CNS disorders. The dual and contradictory role of CD47 suggests that targeting the SIRPα/CD47 signaling may achieve different effects depending on disease stage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prion proteins: physiological functions and role in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Kieseier, Bernd; Frohman, Elliot; Eagar, Todd N; Rosenberg, Roger N; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Stüve, Olaf

    2008-01-15

    Stanley Prusiner was the first to promote the concept of misfolded proteins as a cause for neurological disease. It has since been shown by him and other investigators that the scrapie isoform of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) functions as an infectious agent in numerous human and non-human disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). Interestingly, other organ systems appear to be less affected, and do not appear to lead to major co-morbidities. The physiological function of the endogenous cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is much less clear. It is intriguing that PrP(c) is expressed on most tissues in mammals, suggesting not only biological functions outside the CNS, but also a role other than the propagation of its misfolded isotype. In this review, we summarize accumulating in vitro and in vivo evidence regarding the physiological functions of PrP(C) in the nervous system, as well as in lymphoid organs.

  9. Disruptive technology disorder: A past, present, and future neurologic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Donald F

    2017-07-25

    Based upon an analysis of 6 major historical technological advances over the last 150 years, a new syndrome, disruptive technology disorder (DTD), is introduced. DTD describes the human health ailments that accompany the implementation of disruptive technologies. Elevator sickness, railway spine, and bicycle face are representative examples. Though the underlying causative disruptive technologies may differ, many neurologic symptoms (headache, dizziness, weakness) are common to multiple DTDs. Born of technology-driven societal change, DTDs manifest as a complex interplay between biological and psychological symptoms. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. [Brain-machine interface (BMI) - application to neurological disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Hirata, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) is a new technology to receive input from the brain which is translated to operate a computer or other external device in real time. After significant progress during the recent 10 years, this technology is now very close to the clinical use to restore neural functions of patients with severe neurologic impairment. This technology is also a strong tool to investigate the mode of neuro-signal processing in the brain and to understand the mechanism of neural dysfunction which leads to the development of novel neurotechnology for the treatment of various sorts of neurological disorders.

  11. Neurologic disorders associated with weight lifting and bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    Weight lifting and other forms of strength training are becoming more common because of an increased awareness of the need to maintain individual physical fitness. Emergency room data indicate that injuries caused by weight training have become more universal over time, likely because of increased participation rates. Neurologic injuries can result from weight lifting and related practices. Although predominantly peripheral nervous system injuries have been described, central nervous system disease may also occur. This article illustrates the types of neurologic disorders associated with weight lifting.

  12. Clinical perspectives on medical marijuana (cannabis) for neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Terry D; Moawad, Heidi; Moschonas, Constantine; Shepard, Katie; Hammond, Nancy

    2015-08-01

    The American Academy of Neurology published an evidence-based systematic review of randomized controlled trials using marijuana (Cannabis sativa) or cannabinoids in neurologic disorders. Several cannabinoids showed effectiveness or probable effectiveness for spasticity, central pain, and painful spasms in multiple sclerosis. The review justifies insurance coverage for dronabinol and nabilone for these indications. Many insurance companies already cover these medications for other indications. It is unlikely that the review will alter coverage for herbal marijuana. Currently, no payers cover the costs of herbal medical marijuana because it is illegal under federal law and in most states. Cannabinoid preparations currently available by prescription may have a role in other neurologic conditions, but quality scientific evidence is lacking at this time.

  13. Spasmodic dysphonia: description of the disease and associated neurologic disorders

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    Coelho, Marina Serrato

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spasmodic dysphonia (SD is a problem that affects speech and vocalization, one of the most devastating disorders of oral communication. It is characterized by vocal quality tensaestrangulada, harshly and / or interspersed with abrupt vocal attack and a great tension in the vocal tract. The etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear. Some authors point to psychogenic causes, neurological or even unknown. Objective: To assess the prevalence of muscular dystonias and other neurological symptoms in patients with ED. Method: A retrospective study of 10 cases with diagnosis of ED for symptoms and neurological disorders associated. Results: There was a significant predominance of the disease in females (9:1. The average age of onset of symptoms was 32 years, ranging between 14 and 60 years. The mean disease duration was 10 years. Among the patients, 87.5% had a diagnosis of disorders of movement made by a neurologist, including orofacial dystonias (50%, essential tremor (50% and spastic paraparesis (12%. Conclusion: The presence of movement disorders followed almost all cases of spasmodic dysphonia. More studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiological basis of disease.

  14. Neurological Disorders in Medical Use of Cannabis: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimini, Renata; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Medical cannabis is increasingly used as a treatment or adjunct treatment with different levels of efficacy in several neurological disorders or related symptoms (such as multiple sclerosis, autism, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease, Tourette's syndrome, Huntington's disease, neuropathic pain, epilepsy, headache), as well as in other medical conditions (e.g. nausea and vomiting, glaucoma, appetite stimulation, cancer, inflammatory conditions, asthma). Nevertheless, a number of neurological adverse effects from use of medical cannabis on the short- and on the longterm have been reported, in addition to other adverse health events. It has been noticed that the use of medical cannabis can lead to a paradoxical effects depending on the amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) -like cannabinoids the preparation contain. Accordingly, some neurological disorders or symptoms (e.g. multiple sclerosis, seizures, epilepsy, headache) may be caused or exacerbated by the same treatment supposed to cure them. The current review presents an update of the neurological adverse effects resulting from the use of cannabis for medical purposes, highlighting the need to weigh the benefits and risks, when using cannabinoidbased treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Retromer in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and other neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Scott A; Petsko, Gregory A

    2015-03-01

    Retromer is a protein assembly that has a central role in endosomal trafficking, and retromer dysfunction has been linked to a growing number of neurological disorders. First linked to Alzheimer disease, retromer dysfunction causes a range of pathophysiological consequences that have been shown to contribute to the core pathological features of the disease. Genetic studies have established that retromer dysfunction is also pathogenically linked to Parkinson disease, although the biological mechanisms that mediate this link are only now being elucidated. Most recently, studies have shown that retromer is a tractable target in drug discovery for these and other disorders of the nervous system.

  16. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaloyan Kamenov

    Full Text Available Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality.

  17. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenov, Kaloyan; Cabello, Maria; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Cieza, Alarcos; Sabariego, Carla; Raggi, Alberto; Anczewska, Marta; Pitkänen, Tuuli; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness) and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality. PMID:26900847

  18. Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanotechnology Based Treatments for Neurological Disorders from Genetics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S. Kurek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechology involves the application, analysis and manipulation of nanomaterials. These materials have unique and medically useful properties due to their nanoscale parameters. Nanotechnology based treatments and diagnostics might eventually bring great relief to people suffering from neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disorders. A large variety of nonmaterials such as viruses, carbon nanotubes, gold and silica nanoparticles, nanoshells, quantum dots, genetic material and proteins as well as hordes of other forms of nanotechnology have been researched in order to determine their potential in enhancing disease treatments and diagnostics. Nanotechnology has shown countless applications and might eventually be used in every biotech/health industry. Nevertheless, many nanomaterials may pose some safety risks and whether their benefits overweigh the risk is still being debated. Once the proper ethical and safety protocols are established and enough research is completed, nanotechnology is expected to benefit the mankind enormously. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many ways in which, nanotechnology based treatments and diagnostics will be used to help people with neurological disorders through the methods that we currently have at our disposal. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 12-32

  20. Neurobehavioral, neurologic, and neuroimaging characteristics of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Leila; Ware, Ashley L; Mattson, Sarah N

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can have deleterious consequences for the fetus, including changes in central nervous system development leading to permanent neurologic alterations and cognitive and behavioral deficits. Individuals affected by prenatal alcohol exposure, including those with and without fetal alcohol syndrome, are identified under the umbrella of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). While studies of humans and animal models confirm that even low to moderate levels of exposure can have detrimental effects, critical doses of such exposure have yet to be specified and the most clinically significant and consistent consequences occur following heavy exposure. These consequences are pervasive, devastating, and can result in long-term dysfunction. This chapter summarizes the neurobehavioral, neurologic, and neuroimaging characteristics of FASD, focusing primarily on clinical research of individuals with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure, although studies of lower levels of exposure, particularly prospective, longitudinal studies, will be discussed where relevant. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Telerehabilitation, virtual therapists, and acquired neurologic speech and language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Leora R; van Vuuren, Sarel

    2012-08-01

    Telerehabilitation (telerehab) offers cost-effective services that potentially can improve access to care for those with acquired neurologic communication disorders. However, regulatory issues including licensure, reimbursement, and threats to privacy and confidentiality hinder the routine implementation of telerehab services into the clinical setting. Despite these barriers, rapid technological advances and a growing body of research regarding the use of telerehab applications support its use. This article reviews the evidence related to acquired neurologic speech and language disorders in adults, focusing on studies that have been published since 2000. Research studies have used telerehab systems to assess and treat disorders including dysarthria, apraxia of speech, aphasia, and mild Alzheimer disease. They show that telerehab is a valid and reliable vehicle for delivering speech and language services. The studies represent a progression of technological advances in computing, Internet, and mobile technologies. They range on a continuum from working synchronously (in real-time) with a speech-language pathologist to working asynchronously (offline) with a stand-in virtual therapist. One such system that uses a virtual therapist for the treatment of aphasia, the Web-ORLA™ (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL) system, is described in detail. Future directions for the advancement of telerehab for clinical practice are discussed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Induced pluripotent stem cells for modeling neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Fabiele B; Cugola, Fernanda R; Fernandes, Isabella R; Pignatari, Graciela C; Beltrão-Braga, Patricia C B

    2015-01-01

    Several diseases have been successfully modeled since the development of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology in 2006. Since then, methods for increased reprogramming efficiency and cell culture maintenance have been optimized and many protocols for differentiating stem cell lines have been successfully developed, allowing the generation of several cellular subtypes in vitro. Gene editing technologies have also greatly advanced lately, enhancing disease-specific phenotypes by creating isogenic cell lines, allowing mutations to be corrected in affected samples or inserted in control lines. Neurological disorders have benefited the most from iPSC-disease modeling for its capability for generating disease-relevant cell types in vitro from the central nervous system, such as neurons and glial cells, otherwise only available from post-mortem samples. Patient-specific iPSC-derived neural cells can recapitulate the phenotypes of these diseases and therefore, considerably enrich our understanding of pathogenesis, disease mechanism and facilitate the development of drug screening platforms for novel therapeutic targets. Here, we review the accomplishments and the current progress in human neurological disorders by using iPSC modeling for Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, duchenne muscular dystrophy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders, which include Timothy syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Phelan-McDermid, Rett syndrome as well as Nonsyndromic Autism. PMID:26722648

  3. Pathology of neurologic disorders of raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamir, Amir N

    2011-09-01

    The raccoon (Procyon lotor) is almost ubiquitous in North America. In recent times, it was introduced in many parts of the world where it has now become largely feral. Since the outbreak of raccoon rabies epizootic in eastern United States and Canada, most diagnostic laboratories have had increased numbers of raccoon carcasses or raccoon brain submissions for diagnosis of rabies. However, since a number of other diseases that affect the central nervous system and have similar clinical signs as rabies have been documented in this species, the current review attempts to bring together the published information on neurologic disorders of raccoons.

  4. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  5. Architects of the genome: CHD dysfunction in cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangzhi; Mills, Alea A

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is vital to normal cells, and its deregulation contributes to a spectrum of human ailments. An emerging concept is that aberrant chromatin regulation culminates in gene expression programs that set the stage for the seemingly diverse pathologies of cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes. However, the mechanisms responsible for such common etiology have been elusive. Recent evidence has implicated lesions affecting chromatin-remodeling proteins in cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes, suggesting a common source for these different pathologies. Here, we focus on the chromodomain helicase DNA binding chromatin-remodeling family and the recent evidence for its deregulation in diverse pathological conditions, providing a new perspective on the underlying mechanisms and their implications for these prevalent human diseases.

  6. EFhd2, a Protein Linked to Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Irving E

    2016-01-01

    EFhd2 is a conserved calcium binding protein linked to different neurological disorders and types of cancer. Although, EFhd2 is more abundant in neurons, it is also found in other cell types. The physiological function of this novel protein is still unclear, but it has been shown in vitro to play a role in calcium signaling, apoptosis, actin cytoskeleton, and regulation of synapse formation. Recently, EFhd2 was shown to promote cell motility by modulating the activity of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA. Although, EFhd2's role in promoting cell invasion and metastasis is of great interest in cancer biology, this review focusses on the evidence that links EFhd2 to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurological disorders. Altered expression of EFhd2 has been documented in AD, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and schizophrenia, indicating that Efhd2 gene expression is regulated in response to neuropathological processes. However, the specific role that EFhd2 plays in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders is still poorly understood. Recent studies demonstrated that EFhd2 has structural characteristics similar to amyloid proteins found in neurological disorders. Moreover, EFhd2 co-aggregates and interacts with known neuropathological proteins, such as tau, C9orf72, and Lrrk2. These results suggest that EFhd2 may play an important role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the understanding of EFhd2's role in health and disease could lead to decipher molecular mechanisms that become activated in response to neuronal stress and degeneration.

  7. Herb-Drug Interactions in Neurological Disorders: A Critical Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Vinu; Maulik, Subir Kumar

    2017-10-31

    Herbal drugs are being used worldwide in a variety of disorders with the misguided belief that they are absolutely safe compared to drugs of modern medicine. This trend is also evident in debilitating neurological and psychiatric disorders such as cerebrovascular accident, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. However, unlike drugs of modern medicine, herbal drugs are complex products containing multiple pharmacologically active constituents. The nature and relative amounts of these constituents vary due to diverse factors such as but not limited to source of the plant(s), local environmental conditions, parts of the plant used, storage, method of extract preparation, accidental contamination or intentional adulteration. Further, they are handled by the human body like modern drugs and subjected to the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. In each of these processes, they can potentially interact with modern drugs due to sharing of similar transport proteins, metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes and uptake / efflux pumps. Moreover, herbal drugs can also inhibit or induce CYP450 enzymes or inactivate transporters leading to Herb-Drug interactions (HDIs). Though reported scarcely, many pharmacodynamic HDIs are also being unraveled. In this review, we have analyzed the clinically reported as well as potential HDIs between 10 common herbal drugs and modern medicines used in neurological and psychiatric disorders with their proven or postulated underlying mechanism(s). Physicians and patients should exercise caution when using herbal drugs and modern medicines concomitantly so that the recognized serious HDIs can be avoided. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Genetic testing and reproductive choice in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Omay; Porteous, Mary

    2017-08-01

    Genetic testing is increasingly important for investigating suspected inherited neurological conditions. A genetic diagnosis can have a huge impact on patients and also their families. It is important for neurologists to appreciate the presymptomatic and prenatal testing options available to patients and their at-risk relatives once a genetic disorder is diagnosed. Asymptomatic family members can experience considerable psychological distress from the knowledge that they might have inherited a neurodegenerative condition. They may also be concerned about the risk of their children inheriting the condition. Information on reproductive options can provide hope and reassurance. This paper reviews the principles of genetic testing in neurological practice, and how they can be applied in prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. We explain the basis for direct and exclusion testing, use case examples to illustrate the process by which families are counselled and discuss the ethical implications of reproductive technologies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. [Depressive disorder in cardiovascular, neurological and oncologic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesková, E

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of antidepressants meant undoubtedly a revolution in psychiatry. The development of antidepressants has changed the image of psychiatry, brought a progress in the treatment and became a stimulus for investigations of mental illnesses ethiopathogenesis. Nowadays it is becoming evident, that many biologic, psychologic and with high probability also social aspects are common for the depression and for somatic disorders. The more prominent is the association of depression with cardiovascular disease. Neurological disease, mainly the epilepsy, Parkinson disease an stroke represent further common sphere. Historically, association between cancer and depression was identified first. The article presents epidemiological data and analyses possible common mechanisms of somatic disease and depression. In the last part the actual data about the treatment of depression in individual somatic diseases are described.

  10. The prospect of molecular therapy for Angelman syndrome and other monogenic neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Angelman syndrome is a monogenic neurologic disorder that affects 1 in 15,000 children, and is characterized by ataxia, intellectual disability, speech impairment, sleep disorders, and seizures. The disorder is caused by loss of central nervous system expression of UBE3A, a gene encoding a ubiquitin ligase. Current treatments focus on the management of symptoms, as there have not been therapies to treat the underlying molecular cause of the disease. However, this outlook is evolving with advances in molecular therapies, including artificial transcription factors a class of engineered DNA-binding proteins that have the potential to target a specific site in the genome. Results Here we review the recent progress and prospect of targeted gene expression therapies. Three main issues that must be addressed to advance toward human clinical trials are specificity, toxicity, and delivery. Conclusions Artificial transcription factors have the potential to address these concerns on a level that meets and in some cases exceeds current small molecule therapies. We examine the possibilities of such approaches in the context of Angelman syndrome, as a template for other single-gene, neurologic disorders. PMID:24946931

  11. The therapeutic value of yoga in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shri K Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ancient mind and body healing methods of yoga recently sparked fervor in the scientific community as an alternative and complementary means of therapy. Since the World Health Organization officially began promoting yoga in developing countries in 1978, yoga has been cited for its therapeutic potential and has been widely recognized in Western culture. However, as an increasing number of people practice yoga for remedial purposes, researchers raise two important questions: 1 Is yoga a valid complementary management and rehabilitation treatment modality? 2 What conditions show promise of treatment with this intervention?. Objective: This review article uses comprehensive scientific, evidence-based studies to analyze the efficacy of various basic and applied aspects of yoga in disease prevention and health promotion. It specifically intends to expose the effects of yoga in neurological disorders, particularly epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer′s disease, peripheral nervous system disease, and fibromyalgia. Materials and Methods: Information was gathered from various resources including PubMed, Ovid, MD-Consult, USC, and U.C.L.A. libraries. Studies were selected and reviewed on the basis of sample size, control, randomization, double-blinding, and statistical analysis of results. Results: The pratice of yoga and meditation demonstrates statistically encouraging physiological and psychological improvements in the aforementioned neurological disorders. However, there were certain flaws and inadequacies in the study designs employed to evaluate the same. A critical analysis of these studies is presented. Conclusions: With the aim to focus attention on this widespread yet largely unexamined treatment modality, this paper seeks to provide direction and support for further research necessary to validate yoga as an integrative, alternative, and complementary therapy.

  12. Evidence-based guideline update: Plasmapheresis in neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, I.; Chaudhry, V.; So, Y.T.; Cantor, F.; Cornblath, D.R.; Rae-Grant, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To reassess the role of plasmapheresis in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Methods: We evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review for relevant articles from 1995 through September 2009. In addition, due to revision of the definitions of classification of evidence since the publication of the previous American Academy of Neurology assessment in 1996, the evidence cited in that manuscript was reviewed and reclassified. Results and Recommendations: Plasmapheresis is established as effective and should be offered in severe acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP)/Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and in the short-term management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Class I studies, Level A). Plasmapheresis is established as ineffective and should not be offered for chronic or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) (Class I studies, Level A). Plasmapheresis is probably effective and should be considered for mild AIDP/GBS, as second-line treatment of steroid-resistant exacerbations in relapsing forms of MS, and for neuropathy associated with immunoglobulin A or immunoglobulin G gammopathy, based on at least one Class I or 2 Class II studies (Level B). Plasmapheresis is probably not effective and should not be considered for neuropathy associated with immunoglobulin M gammopathy, based on one Class I study (Level B). Plasmapheresis is possibly effective and may be considered for acute fulminant demyelinating CNS disease (Level C). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of plasmapheresis for myasthenia gravis, pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infection, and Sydenham chorea (Class III evidence, Level U). PMID:21242498

  13. Cerebral circulation, neurological and neuropsychological disorders in idiopathic arterial hypotension

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    Andrei Viktorovich Fonyakin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the cerebral circulation in idiopathic arterial hypotension (IAH in relation to neurological and neuropsychological disorders. Patients and methods. Sixty-five patients (mean age 40.2 [8, 14] years with prolonged IAH were examined. Neuropsychological examination was made using the procedure adapted by A.R. Luria; different psychic functions (memory, speech, gnosis, praxis, thinking, attention, counting, writing, and reading were studied. Cerebral hemodynamics was investigated using duplex scanning of the brachiocephalic arteries (BCA, middle cerebral arteries (MCA, internal jugular (IJV and vertebral veins (VV. The patients were assigned to 2 groups: 1 19 (29% patients with somatoform disorders, 2 46 (71% patients with signs of the initial manifestations of chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency. Group 2 patients were older and had a longer history of IAH. Results. In all the patients, cerebral blood supply in the carotid system showed moderately lower arterial blood inflow with a compensatory vascular resistance decrease and balanced venous outflow reduction with increased vascular resistance. Group 2 patients had a substantial (to the lower normal range blood flow decline in the vertebral artery along with increased peripheral resistance in the VV. The degree of neuropsychological derangement was inversely proportional to blood flow velocity in BCA and MCA and to blood outflow in IJV and VV.

  14. Time perception distortion in neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Silmar; Machado, Sergio; Paes, Flavia; Velasques, Bruna; Silva, Julio Guilherme; Sanfim, Antonio L; Minc, Daniel; Anghinah, Renato; Menegaldo, Luciano L; Salama, Mohamed; Cagy, Mauricio; Nardi, Antonio E; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan; Szelag, Elzbieta; Ribeiro, Pedro; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2013-08-01

    There is no sense organ specifically dedicated to time perception, as there is for other senses such as hearing and vision. However, this subjective sense of time is fundamental to our conception of reality and it creates the temporal course of events in our lives. Here, we explored neurobiological relations from the clinical perspective, examining timing ability in patients with different neurological and psychiatric conditions (e.g. Parkinson's disease, depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders and schizophrenia). The neural bases of present distortions in time perception and temporal information processing still remain poorly understood. We reviewed: a) how the brain is capable of encoding time in different environments and multiple tasks, b) different models of interval timing, c) brain structures and neurotransmitters associated with time perception, d) the relationship between memory and time perception, e) neural mechanisms underlying different theories in neural and mental processes, and f) the relationship between different mental diseases and time perception. Bibliographic research was conducted based on publications over the past thirteen years written in English in the databases Scielo, Pubmed/MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge. The time perceptions research are executed to evaluate time perception in mental diseases and can provide evidence for future clinical applications.

  15. Construction of standardized Arabic questionnaires for screening neurological disorders (dementia, stroke, epilepsy, movement disorders, muscle and neuromuscular junction disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Tallawy HN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hamdy N El Tallawy,1 Wafaa MA Farghaly,1 Tarek A Rageh,1 Ahmed O Saleh,2 Taha AH Mestekawy,3 Manal MM Darwish,4 Mohamed A Abd El Hamed,1 Anwar M Ali,1 Doaa M Mahmoud1 1Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, 2Psychology Department, Faculty of Education, 3Psychology Department, Faculty of Arts, 4Public Health Department, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt Abstract: A screening questionnaire is an important tool for early diagnosis of neurological disorders, and for epidemiological research. This screening instrument must be both feasible and valid. It must be accepted by the community and must be sensitive enough. So, the aim of this study was to prepare different Arabic screening questionnaires for screening different neurological disorders. This study was carried out in three stages. During the first stage, construction of separate questionnaires designed for screening the five major neurological disorders: cerebrovascular stroke, dementias, epilepsy, movement disorders, and muscle and neuromuscular disorders were done. Validation of the screening questionnaires was carried out in the second stage. Finally, questionnaire preparation was done in the third stage. Questions with the accepted sensitivity and specificity in each questionnaire formed the refined separate questionnaires. Keywords: screening questionnaires, neurological disorders

  16. Influenza vaccination in children with neurologic or neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael; Peacock, Georgina; Uyeki, Timothy M; Moore, Cynthia

    2015-05-11

    Children with neurologic or neurodevelopmental disorders (NNDDs) are at increased risk of complications from influenza. Although the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recognized NNDDs as high-risk conditions for influenza complications since 2005, little is known about influenza vaccination practices in this population. CDC collaborated with Family Voices, a national advocacy group for children with special healthcare needs, to recruit parents of children with chronic medical conditions. Parents were surveyed about their knowledge, attitudes, and practices surrounding influenza vaccination. The primary outcome of interest was parental report of vaccination, or intent to vaccinate, at the time of survey participation. CDC also collaborated with the American Academy of Pediatrics to recruit primary care and specialty physicians who provide care for high-risk children, specifically those with neurologic conditions. The primary outcome was physician recognition of ACIP high-risk influenza conditions. 2138 surveys were completed by parents of children with high-risk conditions, including 1143 with at least one NNDD. Overall, 50% of children with an NNDD were vaccinated, or their parents planned to have them vaccinated against influenza. Among all 2138 children, in multivariable analysis, the presence of a respiratory condition and prior seasonal influenza vaccination was significantly associated with receipt or planned current season influenza vaccination, but the presence of an NNDD was not. 412 pediatricians completed the provider survey. Cerebral palsy was recognized as a high-risk influenza condition by 74% of physician respondents, but epilepsy (51%) and intellectual disability (46%) were less commonly identified. Our estimates of influenza vaccination in children with NNDDs are comparable to published reports of vaccination in healthy children, which continue to be suboptimal. Education of parents of children with NNDDs and healthcare

  17. Upper limb impairments associated with spasticity in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirbagheri Mehdi M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While upper-extremity movement in individuals with neurological disorders such as stroke and spinal cord injury (SCI has been studied for many years, the effects of spasticity on arm movement have been poorly quantified. The present study is designed to characterize the nature of impaired arm movements associated with spasticity in these two clinical populations. By comparing impaired voluntary movements between these two groups, we will gain a greater understanding of the effects of the type of spasticity on these movements and, potentially a better understanding of the underlying impairment mechanisms. Methods We characterized the kinematics and kinetics of rapid arm movement in SCI and neurologically intact subjects and in both the paretic and non-paretic limbs in stroke subjects. The kinematics of rapid elbow extension over the entire range of motion were quantified by measuring movement trajectory and its derivatives; i.e. movement velocity and acceleration. The kinetics were quantified by measuring maximum isometric voluntary contractions of elbow flexors and extensors. The movement smoothness was estimated using two different computational techniques. Results Most kinematic and kinetic and movement smoothness parameters changed significantly in paretic as compared to normal arms in stroke subjects (p Conclusion The findings suggest that although the cause and location of injury are different in spastic stroke and SCI subjects, the impairments in arm voluntary movement were similar in the two spastic groups. Our results also suggest that the non-paretic arm in stroke subjects was not distinguishable from the normal, and might therefore be used as an appropriate control for studying movement of the paretic arm.

  18. Limiting exercise inhibits neuronal recovery from neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan S Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients who are bedridden often suffer from muscular atrophy due to reduced daily activities and can become depressed. However, patients who undergo physical therapy sometimes demonstrate positive benefits including a reduction of stressful and depressed behavior. Regenerative medicine has seen improvements in two stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system disorders. One therapy is through the transfer of exogenous stem cells. The other therapy is a more natural method and focuses on the increasing endogenous neurogenesis and restoring the neurological impairments. This study overviews how immobilization-induced disuse atrophy affects neurogenesis in rats, specifically hypothesizing that immobilization diminishes circulating trophic factor levels, like vascular endothelial growth factors or brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which in turn limits neurogenesis. This hypothesis requires the classification of the stem cell microenvironment by probing growth factors in addition to other stress-related proteins that correlate with exercise-induced neurogenesis. There is research examining the effects of increased exercise on neurogenesis while limiting exercise, which better demonstrates the pathological states of immobile stroke patients, remains relatively unexplored. To examine the effects of immobilization on neurogenesis quantitative measurements of movements, 5-bromo-2deoxyuridine labeling of proliferative cells, biochemical assays of serum, cerebrospinal fluid and neurological levels of trophic factors, growth factors, and stress-related proteins will indicate levels of neurogenesis. In further research, studies are needed to show how in vivo stimulation, or lack thereof, affects stem cell microenvironments to advance treatment procedures for strengthening neurogenesis in bedridden patients. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the references section. The datasets supporting the

  19. 76 FR 2129 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke... who plan to attend and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation or other...

  20. Biological and perceived stress in motor functional neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apazoglou, Kalliopi; Mazzola, Viridiana; Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Polara, Giulia Frasca; Aybek, Selma

    2017-11-01

    Current models explaining motor functional neurological disorders (FND) integrate both the neurobiological mechanisms underlying symptoms production and the role of psychosocial stressors. Imaging studies have suggested abnormal motor control linked to impaired emotional and stress regulation. However, little is known on the biological stress regulation in FND. Our aim was to study the biological and perceived response to stress in patients with motor FND. Sixteen patients with motor FND (DSM-5 criteria) and fifteen healthy controls underwent the Trier Social Stress Test. Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) response was evaluated with salivary cortisol and autonomous sympathetic response with salivary alpha-amylase. Area under the curve was computed to reflect background levels (AUCg) and change over time (AUCi). Life adversities and perceived subjective stress on a visual analog scale (VAS) were correlated with biological responses. FND patients had significantly higher background levels (AUCg) of both stress markers (cortisol and amylase) than controls. The biological response (AUCi) to stress did not differ between groups for both markers but the subjective response showed an interaction effect with patients reporting higher levels of stress than controls. After stress, controls showed a strong correlation between subjective and objective sympathetic values (amylase) but not patients. The number and subjective impact of adverse life events correlated with cortisol AUCg in patients only. This study confirms a baseline HPA-axis and sympathetic hyperarousal state in motor FND related to life adversities. During a social stress, dissociation between perceived stress and biological markers was observed in patients only, reflecting a dysregulation of interoception capacity, which might represent an endophenotype of this disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weick, Jason P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks we provide significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. Furthermore, a logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons, can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  2. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James B.; Weick, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks has provided significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. A logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons, can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  3. Impaired movement timing in neurological disorders: rehabilitation and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove, Michael J; Keller, Peter E

    2015-03-01

    Timing abnormalities have been reported in many neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). In PD, motor-timing impairments are especially debilitating in gait. Despite impaired audiomotor synchronization, PD patients' gait improves when they walk with an auditory metronome or with music. Building on that research, we make recommendations for optimizing sensory cues to improve the efficacy of rhythmic cuing in gait rehabilitation. Adaptive rhythmic metronomes (that synchronize with the patient's walking) might be especially effective. In a recent study we showed that adaptive metronomes synchronized consistently with PD patients' footsteps without requiring attention; this improved stability and reinstated healthy gait dynamics. Other strategies could help optimize sensory cues for gait rehabilitation. Groove music strongly engages the motor system and induces movement; bass-frequency tones are associated with movement and provide strong timing cues. Thus, groove and bass-frequency pulses could deliver potent rhythmic cues. These strategies capitalize on the close neural connections between auditory and motor networks; and auditory cues are typically preferred. However, moving visual cues greatly improve visuomotor synchronization and could warrant examination in gait rehabilitation. Together, a treatment approach that employs groove, auditory, bass-frequency, and adaptive (GABA) cues could help optimize rhythmic sensory cues for treating motor and timing deficits. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Cannabinoid-based medicines for neurological disorders--clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Whereas the cannabis plant has a long history of medicinal use, it is only in recent years that a sufficient understanding of the pharmacology of the main plant constituents has allowed for a better understanding of the most rational therapeutic targets. The distribution of cannabinoid receptors, both within the nervous system and without, and the development of pharmacological tools to investigate their function has lead to a substantial increase in efforts to develop cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Concomitant with these efforts, the understanding of the pharmacology of plant cannabinoids at receptor and other systems distinct from the cannabinoid receptors suggests that the therapeutic applications of plant-derived cannabinoids (and presumably their synthetic derivatives also) may be diverse. This review aims to discuss the clinical evidence investigating the use of medicines derived, directly or indirectly, from plant cannabinoids with special reference to neurological disorders. Published studies suggest that the oral administration of cannabinoids may not be the preferred route of administration and that plant extracts show greater evidence of efficacy than synthetic compounds. One of these, Sativex (GW Pharmaceuticals), was approved as a prescription medicine in Canada in 2005 and is currently under regulatory review in the EU.

  5. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  6. Dysregulation of gene expression as a cause of Cockayne syndrome neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Chakravarty, Probir; Ranes, Michael; Kelly, Gavin; Brooks, Philip J; Neilan, Edward; Stewart, Aengus; Schiavo, Giampietro; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2014-10-07

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder with severe neurological symptoms. The majority of CS patients carry mutations in Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Indeed, because various repair pathways are compromised in patient cells, CS is widely considered a genome instability syndrome. Here, we investigate the connection between the neuropathology of CS and dysregulation of gene expression. Transcriptome analysis of human fibroblasts revealed that even in the absence of DNA damage, CSB affects the expression of thousands of genes, many of which are neuronal genes. CSB is present in a significant subset of these genes, suggesting that regulation is direct, at the level of transcription. Importantly, reprogramming of CS fibroblasts to neuron-like cells is defective unless an exogenous CSB gene is introduced. Moreover, neuroblastoma cells from which CSB is depleted show defects in gene expression programs required for neuronal differentiation, and fail to differentiate and extend neurites. Likewise, neuron-like cells cannot be maintained without CSB. Finally, a number of disease symptoms may be explained by marked gene expression changes in the brain of patients with CS. Together, these data point to dysregulation of gene regulatory networks as a cause of the neurological symptoms in CS.

  7. Disorder of written expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder Reading disorder ADHD Symptoms Symptoms may include: Errors in grammar and punctuation Poor handwriting Poor spelling Poorly organized writing Has to say words aloud when writing Exams and Tests Other causes of learning disabilities must be ruled out before ...

  8. Global, regional, and national burden of neurological disorders during 1990-2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Comparable data on the global and country-specific burden of neurological disorders and their trends are crucial for health-care planning and resource allocation. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) Study provides such information but does not routinely......-specific prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), years of life lost (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) for various neurological disorders that in the GBD classification have been previously spread across multiple disease groupings. The more inclusive grouping of neurological...... aggregate results that are of interest to clinicians specialising in neurological conditions. In this systematic analysis, we quantified the global disease burden due to neurological disorders in 2015 and its relationship with country development level. METHODS: We estimated global and country...

  9. Neurological associations in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder: Results from a tertiary hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Lepcha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To find out the prevalence and types of neurological abnormalities associated in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder in a large tertiary referral center. Settings and Design: A prospective clinical study was conducted on all patients diagnosed with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder in the ear, nose, and throat (ENT and neurology departments during a 17-month period. Patients with neurological abnormalities on history and examination were further assessed by a neurologist to determine the type of disorder present. Results: The frequency of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was 1.12%. Sixty percent were found to have neurological involvement. This included cerebral palsy in children, peripheral neuropathy (PN, spinocerebellar ataxia, hereditary motor-sensory neuropathy, spastic paresis, and ponto-bulbar palsy. Neurological lesions did not present simultaneously with hearing loss in most patients. Sixty-six percent of patients with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder were born of consanguineous marriages. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of neurological lesions in auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder which has to be kept in mind while evaluating such patients. Follow-up and counselling regarding the appearance of neuropathies is therefore important in such patients. A hereditary etiology is indicated in a majority of cases of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder.

  10. Frontiers in therapeutic development of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W. Irwin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Allopregnanolone (Allo, a neurosteroid, has emerged as a promising promoter of endogenous regeneration in brain. In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, Allo induced neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, white matter generation and cholesterol homeostasis while simultaneously reducing β-amyloid and neuroinflammatory burden. Allo activates signaling pathways and gene expression required for regeneration of neural stem cells and their differentiation into neurons. In parallel, Allo activates systems to sustain cholesterol homeostasis and reduce β-amyloid generation. To advance Allo into studies for chronic human neurological conditions, we examined translational and clinical parameters: dose, regimen, route, formulation, outcome measures, and safety regulations. A treatment regimen of once per week at sub-sedative doses of Allo was optimal for regeneration and reduction in Alzheimer’s pathology. This regimen had a high safety profile following chronic exposure in aged normal and Alzheimer’s mice. Formulation of Allo for multiple routes of administration has been developed for both preclinical and clinical testing. Preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy of Allo spans multiple neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, Niemann-Pick, diabetic neuropathy, status epilepticus, and traumatic brain injury. To successfully translate Allo as a therapeutic for multiple neurological disorders, it will be necessary to tailor dose and regimen to the targeted therapeutic mechanisms and disease etiology. Treatment paradigms conducted in accelerated disease models in young animals have a low probability of successful translation to chronic diseases in adult and aged humans. Gender, genetic risks, stage and burden of disease are critical determinants of efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in development of Allo for Alzheimer’s disease that have the potential to accelerate therapeutic translation for

  11. 77 FR 19024 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel; Diversity Research Education in Neuroscience. Date...: National Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852... Review Branch, Division of Extramural Research, NINDS/ NIH/DHHS/Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Blvd...

  12. 78 FR 39299 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special, Emphasis Panel, Collaborative Research on Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Delayed Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury. Date: July 19, 2013. Time: 1:30 p.m...

  13. Vocal acoustic analysis as a biometric indicator of information processing: implications for neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alex S; Dinzeo, Thomas J; Donovan, Neila J; Brown, Caitlin E; Morrison, Sean C

    2015-03-30

    Vocal expression reflects an integral component of communication that varies considerably within individuals across contexts and is disrupted in a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. There is reason to suspect that variability in vocal expression reflects, in part, the availability of "on-line" resources (e.g., working memory, attention). Thus, understanding vocal expression is a potentially important biometric index of information processing, not only across but within individuals over time. A first step in this line of research involves establishing a link between vocal expression and information processing systems in healthy adults. The present study employed a dual attention experimental task where participants provided natural speech while simultaneously engaged in a baseline, medium or high nonverbal processing-load task. Objective, automated, and computerized analysis was employed to measure vocal expression in 226 adults. Increased processing load resulted in longer pauses, fewer utterances, greater silence overall and less variability in frequency and intensity levels. These results provide compelling evidence of a link between information processing resources and vocal expression, and provide important information for the development of an automated, inexpensive and uninvasive biometric measure of information processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychiatry and the Necker Cube. Neurological and Psychological Conceptions of Psychiatric Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rogers

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological and psychological conceptions of psychiatric disorder are in conflict at the present time. This conflict is considered in the context of the history of psychiatry and the philosophy of science. Its practical consequences are considered for the motor disorder of schizophrenia, the cognitive impairment in psychiatric illnesses, the use of the terms organic and functional and the association of neurological disorder with psychotic and neurotic disorders. The conflict is also examined in individual cases and the implications for treatment assessed.

  15. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinzen, E.L.; Arzimanoglou, A.; Brashear, A.; Clapcote, S.J.; Gurrieri, F.; Goldstein, D.B; Johannesson, S.H.; Mikati, M.A.; Neville, B.; Nicole, S.; Ozelius, L.J.; Poulsen, H.; Schyns, T.; Sweadner, K.J.; Maagdenberg, A. van den; Vilsen, B.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the alpha3 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological

  16. The Clinical Spectrum Of Paediatric Neurological Disorders In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant neurologic morbidities included: cerebral palsy (42.4%), epilepsy (27.8%), febrile seizure (6.5%), mental retardation(6.2%), microcephaly (5.6%), behavioral problems (5.6%), poliomyelitis (4.5%), hydrocephalus (4.2%), visual impairment (2.8%), down syndrome (1.7%), and attention deficit hyperactivity ...

  17. An Analysis of Disorders seen at the Paediatric Neurology Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    METHODS: All children presenting at the paediatric neurology clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria over a period of 20 months were prospectively studied. Diagnoses were made from detailed history, thorough physical examination, with particular emphasis on the central nervous system and appropriate ...

  18. Study of the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging on neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokezu, Youichi (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-05-01

    One hundred and ten patients with several neurological disorders including cerebrovascular diseases (CVD), degenerative diseases, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies, diseases of the spine or spinal cord and myelopathy were studied by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Superconductive magnetic systems of 0.5 T, 1.0 T or 1.5 T were used for this study. MRI could show the lesions clearly in many neurological disorders such as CVD, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies and myeloythy. However, MRI could not necessarily show the lesions cleary in neurodegenerative disease and bone or calcified lesions such as ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. MRI is better than CT in spatial and tissue resolution. MRI study is expected to be the more beneficial procedure in neurological disorders, if a much shorter scanning time can be achieved. (author).

  19. Neurological disorders in Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Carone, Marco; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Al-Saedy, Huda; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Burnham, Gilbert

    2012-04-01

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) recognizes 43.7 million forcibly displaced persons and asylum seekers due to conflict and persecution worldwide. Neurological disorders have rarely been described in displaced persons but likely pose a significant burden of disease. We describe the disease spectrum and health service utilization of Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers with neurological disorders using an information system developed by the UNHCR. Neurological disorders were actively monitored among the 7,642 UNHCR-registered Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers who received health and humanitarian assistance using a pilot, centralized, database called the Refugee Assistance Information System (RAIS) in the Kingdom of Jordan in 2010. There were 122 neurological diagnoses reported in 1,328 refugees (mean age 41 years, 49% female, 10% disabled, 43% with pending resettlement applications) in 2,659 health visits, accounting for 17% of all refugees who sought health assistance in RAIS. Referral to a neurologist occurred in 178 cases (13.4%). The most frequent ICD-10 neurological diagnoses were dorsalgia (back pain) (29.7% of individuals with neurological disorders), headache (13.1%), and epilepsy (12.6%). Approximately 1 in 20 Iraqi refugees with a neurological diagnosis self-reported a history of torture, which was higher than Iraqi refugees without a history of torture [66/1,328 versus 196/6,314, odds ratio (OR) = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-2.18]. Neurological disease affects a high proportion of Iraqi refugees, including victims of torture and the disabled. Refugees require dedicated care for treatment of neurological disease with a focus on pain disorders and epilepsy.

  20. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L

    2012-01-01

    always require assisted reproductive techniques including intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The method of choice depends largely on the number of motile sperm in the ejaculate.Asian Journal of Andrology advance online publication, 5...... is managed by medications to reverse the condition in mild cases and in bladder harvest of semen after ejaculation in more severe cases. Anejaculation might also be managed by medication in mild cases while assisted ejaculatory techniques including penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation are used......Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic...

  1. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J.; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B.; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na+/K+-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  2. Increased pediatric functional neurological symptom disorders after the Boston marathon bombings: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Réjean M; Pier, Danielle B; de Gusmão, Claudio M; Bernson-Leung, Miya E; Maski, Kiran P; Urion, David K; Waugh, Jeff L

    2014-11-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorders are frequently the basis for acute neurological consultation. In children, they are often precipitated by high-frequency everyday stressors. The extent to which a severe traumatic experience may also precipitate functional neurological abnormalities is unknown. For the 2-week period after the Boston Marathon bombings, we prospectively collected data on patients whose presentation suggested a functional neurological symptom disorder. We assessed clinical and demographic variables, duration of symptoms, extent of educational impact, and degree of connection to the Marathon bombing. We contacted all patients at 6 months after presentation to determine the outcome and accuracy of the diagnosis. In a parallel study, we reported a baseline of 2.6 functional neurological presentations per week in our emergency room. In the week after the Marathon bombings, this frequency tripled. Ninety-one percent of presentations were delayed by 1 week, with onset around the first school day after a city-wide lockdown. Seventy-three percent had a history of a prior psychiatric diagnosis. At the 6 months follow-up, no functional neurological symptom disorder diagnoses were overturned and no new organic diagnosis was made. Pediatric functional neurological symptom disorder may be precipitated by both casual and high-intensity stressors. The 3.4-fold increase in incidence after the Boston Marathon bombings and city-wide lockdown demonstrates the marked effect that a community-wide tragedy can have on the mental health of children. Care providers must be aware of functional neurological symptom disorders after stressful community events in vulnerable patient populations, particularly those with prior psychiatric diagnoses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Household food insecurity and symptoms of neurologic disorder in Ethiopia: An observational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessema Fasil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food insecurity (FI has been shown to be associated with poor health both in developing and developed countries. Little is known about the relation between FI and neurological disorder. We assessed the relation between FI and risk for neurologic symptoms in southwest Ethiopia. Methods Data about food security, gender, age, household assets, and self-reported neurologic symptoms were collected from a representative, community-based sample of adults (N = 900 in Jimma Zone, Ethiopia. We calculated univariate statistics and used bivariate chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression models to assess the relation between FI and risk of neurologic symptoms including seizures, extremity weakness, extremity numbness, tremors/ataxia, aphasia, carpal tunnel syndrome, vision dysfunction, and spinal pain. Results In separate multivariate models by outcome and gender, adjusting for age and household socioeconomic status, severe FI was associated with higher odds of seizures, movement abnormalities, carpal tunnel, vision dysfunction, spinal pain, and comorbid disorders among women. Severe FI was associated with higher odds of seizures, extremity numbness, movement abnormalities, difficulty speaking, carpal tunnel, vision dysfunction, and comorbid disorders among men. Conclusion We found that FI was associated with symptoms of neurologic disorder. Given the cross-sectional nature of our study, the directionality of these associations is unclear. Future research should assess causal mechanisms relating FI to neurologic symptoms in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. The "urban myth" of the association between neurological disorders and vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Panatto, D; Lai, P L; Amicizia, D

    2015-06-10

    In modern society, a potentially serious adverse event attributed to a vaccination is likely to be snapped up by the media, particularly newspapers and television, as it appeals to the emotions of the public. The widespread news of the alleged adverse events of vaccination has helped to create the "urban myth" that vaccines cause serious neurological disorders and has boosted antivaccination associations. This speculation is linked to the fact that the true causes of many neurological diseases are largely unknown. The relationship between vaccinations and the onset of serious neuropsychiatric diseases is certainly one of coincidence rather than causality. This claim results from controlled studies that have excluded the association between vaccines and severe neurological diseases, therefore it can be said, with little risk of error, that the association between modern vaccinations and serious neurological disorders is a true "urban myth". © Copyright by Pacini Editore SpA, Pisa, Italy.

  5. The Spanish Burden of Disease 2010: Neurological, mental and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Elvira; Garin, Noé; Ferrari, Alize J; Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Olaya, Beatriz; Sànchez-Riera, Lidia; Whiteford, Harvey A; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    We used data from the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 to report on the burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in Spain. The summary measure of burden used in the study was the disability-adjusted life-year (DALY), which sums of the years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs) and the years lived with disability (YLDs). DALYs were adjusted for comorbidity and estimated with 95% uncertainty intervals. The burden of neuropsychiatric disorders accounted for 18.4% of total all-cause DALYs generated in Spain for 2010. Within this group, the top five leading causes of DALYs were: depressive disorders, Alzheimer's disease, migraine, substance-use disorders, and anxiety disorder, which accounted for 70.9% of all DALYs due to neuropsychiatric disorders. Neurological disorders represented 5.03% of total all cause YLLs, whereas mental and substance-use disorders accounted for 0.8%. Mental and substance-use disorders accounted for 22.4% of total YLDs, with depression being the most disabling disorder. Neurological disorders represented 8.3% of total YLDs. Neuropsychiatric disorders were one of the leading causes of disability in 2010. This finding contributes to our understanding of the burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in the Spanish population and highlights the importance of prioritising neuropsychiatric disorders in the Spanish public health system. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Current perspectives on deep brain stimulation for severe neurological and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocabicak E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ersoy Kocabicak,1–3 Yasin Temel,1,2 Anke Höllig,4 Björn Falkenburger,5 Sonny KH Tan2,4 1Department of Neurosurgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 2Department of Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 3Department of Neurosurgery, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun, Turkey; 4Department of Neurosurgery, 5Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany Abstract: Deep brain stimulation (DBS has become a well-accepted therapy to treat movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Long-term follow-up studies have demonstrated sustained improvement in motor symptoms and quality of life. DBS offers the opportunity to selectively modulate the targeted brain regions and related networks. Moreover, stimulation can be adjusted according to individual patients’ demands, and stimulation is reversible. This has led to the introduction of DBS as a treatment for further neurological and psychiatric disorders and many clinical studies investigating the efficacy of stimulating various brain regions in order to alleviate severe neurological or psychiatric disorders including epilepsy, major depression, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In this review, we provide an overview of accepted and experimental indications for DBS therapy and the corresponding anatomical targets. Keywords: deep brain stimulation, movement disorders, neurological disorders, psychiatric disorders, Parkinson’s disease

  7. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L; Ohl, Dana A; Lynne, Charles M; Sønksen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperitoneal surgery, diabetes, congenital spinal abnormalities, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Erectile dysfunction can be managed by an increasingly invasive range of treatments including medications, injection therapy and the surgical insertion of a penile implant. Retrograde ejaculation is managed by medications to reverse the condition in mild cases and in bladder harvest of semen after ejaculation in more severe cases. Anejaculation might also be managed by medication in mild cases while assisted ejaculatory techniques including penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation are used in more severe cases. If these measures fail, surgical sperm retrieval can be attempted. Ejaculation with penile vibratory stimulation can be done by some spinal cord injured men and their partners at home, followed by in-home insemination if circumstances and sperm quality are adequate. The other options always require assisted reproductive techniques including intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The method of choice depends largely on the number of motile sperm in the ejaculate. PMID:22138899

  8. Neurological disorders and dependence of nursing care in patients with brain tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Guzzo Souza, Renata; K. Olm Cunha, Isabel Cristina; Franchini Reichert, Magaly Cecília; Diccini,Solange

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify neurological disorders in 32 patients with diagnosis of brain tumor, and to evaluate the dependency of nursing care before and after the surgery. This study was carried out at the Neurosurgery Unit of São Paulo Hospital, Brazil, from June to December, 2004. One instrument was used to collect physical and neurological data, and another to evaluate the dependence degree. An increase of the dependence degree was observed after surgical intervention, which th...

  9. Gait variability in people with neurological disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yaejin; Sung, JongHun; An, Ruopeng; Hernandez, Manuel E; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing evidence showing gait variability provides unique information about gait characteristics in neurological disorders. This study systemically reviewed and quantitatively synthesized (via meta-analysis) existing evidence on gait variability in various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), cerebellar ataxia (CA), Huntington's disease (HD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Keyword search were conducted in PubMed, Web of science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Cochrane Library. Meta-analysis was performed to estimate the pooled effect size for gait variability for each neurological group. Meta-regression was performed to compare gait variability across multiple groups with neurological diseases. Gait variability of 777 patients with AD, ALS, CA, HD, MS, or PD participating in 25 studies was included in meta-analysis. All pathological groups had increased amount of gait variability and loss of fractal structure of gait dynamics compared to healthy controls, and gait variability differentiated distinctive neurological conditions. The HD groups had the highest alterations in gait variability among all pathological groups, whereas the PD, AD and MS groups had the lowest. Interventions that aim to improve gait function in patients with neurological disorders should consider the heterogeneous relationship between gait variability and neurological conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An Analysis of Disorders seen at the Paediatric Neurology Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    daddy

    45.3%), cerebral palsy (36.0%), neuro-muscular disorders (4.5%) and mental retardation. (4.5%). ... Correspondence: Dr I. A. Lagunju, Department of Paediatrics, University College Hospital, Ibadan. ... considerable burden on the family, society.

  11. Neurological Soft Signs In Psychoses A Comparison Between Schizophrenia & Other Psychotic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahsavand. E. Noroozian. M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most important and disabling mental disorders in the world. Males and females are equally affected. Diagnosis is a very difficult problem in this disorder. Because the diagnostic systems such as ICD-10 and DSM-IV are mainly subjective, they are not valid and reliable. Essentially, in the future, we will need to more objective criteria in psychiatry especially in diagnosis of schizophrenia. Neurological soft signs are an example of these objective criteria. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of neurological soft signs in schizophrenic patients and compared it with the prevalence of these signs in other psychotic patients (except mood disorders with psychotic features and normal subjects."nMethods: We compared the neurological soft signs (sensory motor integration, motor. Coordination, consequent complex motor acts, primary reflexes, and eye movements in 30 schizophrenic patients, 30 other psychotic patients (other than mood disorders with psychotic features and 30 normal subjects. Diagnosis of schizophrenia and also other psychoses were based on DSM-IN criteria. Normal subjects have been selected form the staff of Roozbeh hospital randomly."nResults: The difference between the means of motor coordination subscale of neurological soft signs in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders (other than mood disorders with psychotic features were significant (P value < 0.04. There were no significant differences between the means of other subscales of neurological soft signs in two groups of patients."nConclusion: There are some disturbances of motor coordination subscale of neurological soft signs in patients with schizophrenia. It seems that, these disturbances are evidence of involvements of basal ganglia, motor cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. So it may be suggested that motor coordination as a marker can be used in differentiation between the schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.

  12. Occurrence of communication and swallowing problems in neurological disorders: analysis of forty patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Mansi Pankaj; Gore, Geeta Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Communication and swallowing problems are common as a result of neurological conditions like stroke, traumatic brain injury, neoplasms of the nervous systems, viral encephalitis, diseases affecting neuromuscular junction and neuro degenerative conditions. The most frequently encountered problems are dysarthria, aphasia, dysphagia and apraxia of speech. Although these disorders are mentioned in literature, very few studies describing the occurrence in different neurological conditions are available in Indian context. Hence, a need was felt to carry out such a study. A heterogenous group of forty patients with neurological conditions were assessed for presence of speech, language and swallowing problems. A percent analysis was carried out to determine the occurrence of aphasia, dysarthria and dysphagia in general, in specific diseases and also to describe type of aphasia and dysarthria according to the characteristics presented. It was seen that the most frequently occurring disorder was dysarthria (60%), followed by dysphagia (55%) and aphasia (18%). It was also noted that dysarthria and dysphagia co-existed in around 45% patients with neurological diseases. It can be concluded that speech, language and swallowing problems are frequent in individuals with neurological conditions. Speech language pathologist plays an important role as a member of the rehabilitation team in a neurological setup with respect to identifying these problems and initiating intervention at the earliest. Hence, it is necessary for speech language pathologist to be well versed with the features each disorder may present with in terms of communication and swallowing.

  13. A Comprehensive Atlas of E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutations in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene J. George

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is a posttranslational modification that plays an integral part in mediating diverse cellular functions. The process of protein ubiquitination requires an enzymatic cascade that consists of a ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2 and an E3 ubiquitin ligase (E3. There are an estimated 600–700 E3 ligase genes representing ~5% of the human genome. Not surprisingly, mutations in E3 ligase genes have been observed in multiple neurological conditions. We constructed a comprehensive atlas of disrupted E3 ligase genes in common (CND and rare neurological diseases (RND. Of the predicted and known human E3 ligase genes, we found ~13% were mutated in a neurological disorder with 83 total genes representing 70 different types of neurological diseases. Of the E3 ligase genes identified, 51 were associated with an RND. Here, we provide an updated list of neurological disorders associated with E3 ligase gene disruption. We further highlight research in these neurological disorders and discuss the advanced technologies used to support these findings.

  14. Manipulations of MeCP2 in glutamatergic neurons highlight their contributions to Rett and other neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many postnatal onset neurological disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and intellectual disability are thought to arise largely from disruption of excitatory/inhibitory homeostasis. Although mouse models of Rett syndrome (RTT), a postnatal neurological disorder caused by loss-of-functi...

  15. Advantages of Structure-Based Drug Design Approaches in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarthy, Murali; Panwar, Umesh; Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2017-11-14

    The purpose of the review is to portray the theoretical concept on neurological disorders from research data. The freak changes in chemical response of nerve impulse causes neurological disorders. The research evidence of the effort done in the older history suggests that the biological drug targets and their effective feature with responsive drugs could be valuable in promoting the future development of health statistics structure for improved treatment for curing the nervous disorders. In this review, we summarized the most iterative theoretical concept of structure based drug design approaches in various neurological disorders to unfathomable understanding of reported information for future drug design and development. On the premise of reported information we analyzed the model of theoretical drug designing process for understanding the mechanism and pathology of the neurological diseases which covers the development of potentially effective inhibitors against the biological drug targets. Finally, it also suggests the management and implementation of the current treatment in improving the human health system behaviors. With the survey of reported information we concluded the development strategies of diagnosis and treatment against neurological diseases which leads to supportive progress in the drug discovery. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Review on Graph Clustering and Subgraph Similarity Based Analysis of Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jaya; Seo, Dongmin; Sael, Lee

    2016-06-01

    How can complex relationships among molecular or clinico-pathological entities of neurological disorders be represented and analyzed? Graphs seem to be the current answer to the question no matter the type of information: molecular data, brain images or neural signals. We review a wide spectrum of graph representation and graph analysis methods and their application in the study of both the genomic level and the phenotypic level of the neurological disorder. We find numerous research works that create, process and analyze graphs formed from one or a few data types to gain an understanding of specific aspects of the neurological disorders. Furthermore, with the increasing number of data of various types becoming available for neurological disorders, we find that integrative analysis approaches that combine several types of data are being recognized as a way to gain a global understanding of the diseases. Although there are still not many integrative analyses of graphs due to the complexity in analysis, multi-layer graph analysis is a promising framework that can incorporate various data types. We describe and discuss the benefits of the multi-layer graph framework for studies of neurological disease.

  17. Fibrinolytic activity in cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with different neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, C; Monreal, L; Cerón, J; Pastor, J; Viu, J; Añor, S

    2012-01-01

    Fibrinolytic activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is activated in humans by different pathologic processes. To investigate fibrinolytic activity in the CSF of dogs with neurological disorders by measuring CSF D-dimer concentrations. One hundred and sixty-nine dogs with neurological disorders, 7 dogs with systemic inflammatory diseases without central nervous system involvement (SID), and 7 healthy Beagles were included in the study. Dogs with neurological disorders included 11 with steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA), 37 with other inflammatory neurological diseases (INF), 38 with neoplasia affecting the central nervous system (NEO), 28 with spinal compressive disorders (SCC), 15 with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), and 40 with noninflammatory neurological disorders (NON-INF). Prospective observational study. D-dimers and C-reactive protein (CRP) were simultaneously measured in paired CSF and blood samples. D-dimers and CRP were detected in 79/183 (43%) and in 182/183 (99.5%) CSF samples, respectively. All dogs with IE, SID, and controls had undetectable concentrations of D-dimers in the CSF. CSF D-dimer concentrations were significantly (P dogs with SRMA than in dogs with other diseases and controls. CSF CRP concentration in dogs with SRMA was significantly (P dogs of other groups and controls, except for the SID group. No correlation was found between blood and CSF D-dimer concentrations. Intrathecal fibrinolytic activity seems to be activated in some canine neurological disorders, and it is high in severe meningeal inflammatory diseases. CSF D-dimer concentrations may be considered a diagnostic marker for SRMA. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  18. Stress, childhood trauma, and cognitive functions in functional neurologic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, K.; Pasman, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) has traditionally been ascribed to psychologic factors such as trauma, stress, or emotional conflict. Although reference to the psychologic origin of CD has been removed from the criteria list in DSM-5, many theories still incorporate CD as originating from adverse events.

  19. Potential of robots as next-generation technology for clinical assessment of neurological disorders and upper-limb therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott, Stephen H; Dukelow, Sean P

    2011-01-01

    .... Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for clinically assessing sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments in stroke and other neurological disorders...

  20. Optimization of nutritional correction treatment for neurological disorders in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Tekebaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of a study project at the Infant Neurology Department, which has shown the urgency of nutritional rehabilitation in children aged 3 months to 5 years with infantile cerebral paralysis. Thirty patients were followed up to study the causes of malnutrition, to assess and correct their nutritional status, and to show the efficiency of the measures implemented. A diet corrected by a nutritionist was combined with nonsurgical interventions, such as positioning, a decision on the transition to nasogastric tube feeding, and maternal work. The complementary foods were FrutoNyanya products as the latter are low-immunogenic, cause no allergic reactions, and may be used both in the feeding of high-risk group children and as ingredients of a therapeutic diet for patients with different diseases. This resulted in 305-g weight gain within 7-10 day of hospital stay in those whose underweight averaged 28%. The emotional status of the patients and their caregivers was improved by 2-3 scores on 5-point rating scale. There were improvements in their emotional tone (in 75%, chewing (in 28%, and swallowing (in 35% and reductions in reflux episodes (in 19% and stress in the caregivers (in 86%.

  1. Hypnosis as a model of functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Q

    2016-01-01

    In the 19th century it was recognized that neurologic symptoms could be caused by "morbid ideation" as well as organic lesions. The subsequent observation that hysteric (now called "functional") symptoms could be produced and removed by hypnotic suggestion led Charcot to hypothesize that suggestion mediated the effects of ideas on hysteric symptoms through as yet unknown effects on brain activity. The advent of neuroimaging 100 years later revealed strikingly similar neural correlates in experiments matching functional symptoms with clinical analogs created by suggestion. Integrative models of suggested and functional symptoms regard these alterations in brain function as the endpoint of a broader set of changes in information processing due to suggestion. These accounts consider that suggestions alter experience by mobilizing representations from memory systems, and altering causal attributions, during preconscious processing which alters the content of what is provided to our highly edited subjective version of the world. Hypnosis as a model for functional symptoms draws attention to how radical alterations in experience and behavior can conform to the content of mental representations through effects on cognition and brain function. Experimental study of functional symptoms and their suggested counterparts in hypnosis reveals the distinct and shared processes through which this can occur. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Application of Adsorption Therapy for Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    松尾, 秀徳; Hidenori, Matsuo; 国立療養所川棚病院神経内科; Department of Neurology, Kawatana National Hospital

    2000-01-01

    Immunoadsorption plasmapheresis (IAPP) has been widely applied for the treatment of neuroimmunological disorders, including myasthenia gravis (MG). Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), chronic iuflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). and multiple sclerosis (MS). In antibody-mediated autoimmune disease. such as MG, IAPP seems more rational and efficiently removes causative autoantibodies without need for replacement fluid. On the other hand, in T cell mediated neuroimmunological disease, th...

  3. [Psychosocial adjustment difficulties among hospitalized adolescents with neurological and physical disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostautas, Antanas; Pakrosnis, Rytis; Krikscionaityte, Simona; Endziniene, Milda; Sergutina, Irina; Glamba, Vitalijus

    2006-01-01

    Psychosocial adjustment of adolescents with health disorders has been studied extensively. However, it is unclear whether different health disorders have specific impact on adjustment, or disorder in general relates to the development of adjustment difficulties as a factor limiting adolescent's physical and social activity. This study was aimed to identify peculiarities of psychosocial adjustment difficulties among hospitalized adolescents with neurological and physical disorders and secondary school students. The sample consisted of 738 adolescents (aged 12-18 years), of which 100 had neurological and 94 - physical disorders, and 544 secondary school students. Psychosocial adjustment difficulties were evaluated using Standardized Interview for the Evaluation of Adolescents' Problems. Results show that emotional-mood difficulties and low self-esteem are more prevalent and severe in the clinical groups comparing with the healthy controls, while the prevalence and the severity of conflicts are higher among students. Comparison of both clinical groups shows that neurological disorders are related to higher prevalence of difficulties in emotional and cognitive functioning and higher severity of suicidal tendencies, while physical disorders relate to higher prevalence of behavior difficulties.

  4. Current perspectives on deep brain stimulation for severe neurological and psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabicak, Ersoy; Temel, Yasin; Höllig, Anke; Falkenburger, Björn; Tan, Sonny KH

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a well-accepted therapy to treat movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. Long-term follow-up studies have demonstrated sustained improvement in motor symptoms and quality of life. DBS offers the opportunity to selectively modulate the targeted brain regions and related networks. Moreover, stimulation can be adjusted according to individual patients’ demands, and stimulation is reversible. This has led to the introduction of DBS as a treatment for further neurological and psychiatric disorders and many clinical studies investigating the efficacy of stimulating various brain regions in order to alleviate severe neurological or psychiatric disorders including epilepsy, major depression, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In this review, we provide an overview of accepted and experimental indications for DBS therapy and the corresponding anatomical targets. PMID:25914538

  5. The Significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Akansha; Roberto, Aaron J; Mohan, Abhishek; Lorenzo, Aileen; Jones, Kathryn; Carney, Martin J; Liogier-Weyback, Luis; Hwang, Soonjo; Lapidus, Kyle A B

    2016-03-01

    The relationship of cortical structure and specific neuronal circuitry to global brain function, particularly its perturbations related to the development and progression of neuropathology, is an area of great interest in neurobehavioral science. Disruption of these neural networks can be associated with a wide range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Herein we review activity of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy (Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - TLE), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and mood disorders. We discuss the implications of DMN disruptions and their relationship to the neurocognitive model of each disease entity, the utility of DMN assessment in clinical evaluation, and the changes of the DMN following treatment.

  6. Detection and analysis of Borna disease virus in Chinese patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Wang, Z; Zhu, D; Xu, M; Chen, X; Peng, D; Iwata, Y; Xie, P

    2009-03-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus that is known to cause neurological disturbances in various animal species, potentially even humans. However, the association between BDV infection and human neurological disorders remains unclear. Between August 2005 and March 2006, 65 patients with neurological disorders were enrolled into our study. The presence of BDV p24 RNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated by using nested reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay. Borna disease virus p24 RNA was detected from PBMCs in six patients with viral encephalitis by using nested RT-PCR assay. However, BDV p24 RNA was not detected in patients with multiple sclerosis or peripheral nerve diseases. There might be possible associations between BDV infection and human viral encephalitis.

  7. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7–11 years (27 males, six females and twenty five adults participants aged 21–29 years old (19 males, six females participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD.

  8. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, PY; Musisi, S; Frehywot, S; Patel, V

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers...

  9. 78 FR 70310 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Stroke Special Emphasis Panel; Neuroscience Research Education (R25). Date: December 16, 2013. Time: 2:00... Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (Telephone Conference Call..., Clinical Research Related to Neurological Disorders; 93.854, Biological Basis Research in the Neurosciences...

  10. 76 FR 10381 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... cycle (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.853, Clinical Research Related to Neurological Disorders; 93.854, Biological Basis Research in the Neurosciences, National Institutes of Health... Emphasis Panel; Medicinal Chemistry. Date: February 28, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and...

  11. 75 FR 64315 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    .... [email protected] . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.853, Clinical Research Related to Neurological Disorders; 93.854, Biological Basis Research in the Neurosciences, National... Emphasis Panel, Medicinal Chemistry. Date: November 9-10, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review...

  12. Population-based studies on risk of fracture in patients with neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34158990X

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with neurological disorders may be at an increased risk of fracture via multiple causal pathways, including increases in the risk of falls, changes in bone mineral density and quality of bone microarchitecture. Risk of fracture may be increased by the disease itself, by

  13. Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD detected in neurologic disorders Iraqi children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Kareem

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion In the absence of newborn screening, MSUD is not uncommon in neurologically disorder patients where MSUD was still diagnosed clinically, but delayed. The importance of clinical awareness and accurate biochemical analysis were the key tools for diagnosis and the necessity for a comprehensive national newborn screening program.

  14. 75 FR 57971 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ..., Review Group, Neurological Sciences and Disorders A. Date: November 3, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Embassy Suites Hotel, 4300 Military Road... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  15. Common gene-network signature of different neurological disorders and their potential implications to neuroAIDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Sagar

    Full Text Available The neurological complications of AIDS (neuroAIDS during the infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are symptomized by non-specific, multifaceted neurological conditions and therefore, defining a specific diagnosis/treatment mechanism(s for this neuro-complexity at the molecular level remains elusive. Using an in silico based integrated gene network analysis we discovered that HIV infection shares convergent gene networks with each of twelve neurological disorders selected in this study. Importantly, a common gene network was identified among HIV infection, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and age macular degeneration. An mRNA microarray analysis in HIV-infected monocytes showed significant changes in the expression of several genes of this in silico derived common pathway which suggests the possible physiological relevance of this gene-circuit in driving neuroAIDS condition. Further, this unique gene network was compared with another in silico derived novel, convergent gene network which is shared by seven major neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Age Macular Degeneration, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Vascular Dementia, and Restless Leg Syndrome. These networks differed in their gene circuits; however, in large, they involved innate immunity signaling pathways, which suggests commonalities in the immunological basis of different neuropathogenesis. The common gene circuits reported here can provide a prospective platform to understand how gene-circuits belonging to other neuro-disorders may be convoluted during real-time neuroAIDS condition and it may elucidate the underlying-and so far unknown-genetic overlap between HIV infection and neuroAIDS risk. Also, it may lead to a new paradigm in understanding disease progression, identifying biomarkers, and developing therapies.

  16. Current Issues in the Neurology and Genetics of Learning-Related Traits and Disorders: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilger, Jeffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article briefly describes each of the following eight articles in this special issue on the neurology and genetics of learning related disorders. It notes the greater appreciation of learning disability as a set of complex disorders with broad and intricate neurological bases and of the large individual differences in how these…

  17. Stress, childhood trauma, and cognitive functions in functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, K; Pasman, J

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) has traditionally been ascribed to psychologic factors such as trauma, stress, or emotional conflict. Although reference to the psychologic origin of CD has been removed from the criteria list in DSM-5, many theories still incorporate CD as originating from adverse events. This chapter provides a critical review of the literature on stressful life events in CD and discusses current cognitive and neurobiologic models linking psychologic stressors with conversion symptomatology. In addition, we propose a neurobiologic stress model integrating those cognitive models with neuroendocrine stress research and propose that stress and stress-induced changes in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function may result in cognitive alterations, that in turn contribute to experiencing conversion symptoms. Experimental studies indeed suggest that basal as well as stress-induced changes in HPA axis responding lead to alterations in attentional processing in CD. Although those changes are stronger in traumatized patients, similar patterns have been observed in patients who do not report a history of traumatic events. We conclude that, whereas adverse events may play an important role in many cases of CD, a substantial proportion of patients do not report a history of traumatization or recent stressful events. Studies integrating effects of stress on cognitive functioning in CD are scarce. We propose that, instead of focusing research on defining etiologic events in terms of symptom-eliciting events, future research should work towards an integrated mechanistic account, assessing alterations in cognitive and biologic stress systems in an integrated manner in patients with CD. Such an account may not only serve early symptom detection, it might also provide a starting point for better-targeted interventions. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuroactive compounds obtained from arthropod venoms as new therapeutic platforms for the treatment of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Fuentes, Victoria; Gomes, Flávia Maria Medeiros; Campos, Gabriel Avohay Alves; Silva, Juliana de Castro; Biolchi, Andréia Mayer; Dos Anjos, Lilian Carneiro; Gonçalves, Jacqueline Coimbra; Lopes, Kamila Soares; Mortari, Márcia Renata

    2015-01-01

    The impact of neurological disorders in society is growing with alarming estimations for an incidence increase in the next decades. These disorders are generally chronic and can affect individuals early during productive life, imposing real limitations on the performance of their social roles. Patients can have their independence, autonomy, freedom, self-image, and self-confidence affected. In spite of their availability, drugs for the treatment of these disorders are commonly associated with side effects, which can vary in frequency and severity. Currently, no effective cure is known. Nowadays, the biopharmaceutical research community widely recognizes arthropod venoms as a rich source of bioactive compounds, providing a plethora of possibilities for the discovery of new neuroactive compounds, opening up novel and attractive opportunities in this field. Several identified molecules with a neuropharmacological profile can act in the central nervous system on different neuronal targets, rendering them useful tools for the study of neurological disorders. In this context, this review aims to describe the current main compounds extracted from arthropod venoms for the treatment of five major existing neurological disorders: stroke, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and pathological anxiety.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological and Ischemic Disorders Employing Carbon Nanotube Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Komane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research on carbon nanotubes has been conducted due to their excellent physicochemical properties. Based on their outstanding physicochemical properties, carbon nanotubes have the potential to be employed as theranostic tools for neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease including ischemic stroke diagnosis and treatment. Stroke is currently regarded as the third root cause of death and the leading source of immobility around the globe. The development and improvement of efficient and effective procedures for central nervous system disease diagnosis and treatment is necessitated. The main aim of this review is to discuss the application of nanotechnology, specifically carbon nanotubes, to the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders with an emphasis on ischemic stroke. Areas covered include the conventional current diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders, as well as a critical review of the application of carbon nanotubes in the diagnosis and treatment of ischemic stroke, covering areas such as functionalization of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-based biosensors. A broad perspective on carbon nanotube stimuli-responsiveness, carbon nanotube toxicity, and commercially available carbon nanotubes is provided. Potential future studies employing carbon nanotubes have been discussed, evaluating their extent of advancement in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and ischemic disorders.

  20. [Neurological disorders after cardiac surgery: Diagnosis of cerebral tumors in the postoperative period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Álvarez, A; Rodríguez Fernández, P; Román Fernández, A; Filgueira Dávila, E; Gálvez Gómez, D; González Monzón, V

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of neurologic disorders in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery is high and usually due to a combination of pre- and intraoperative factors. We present 2 patients with brain tumors diagnosed in the immediate postoperative period after sudden onset of neurologic dysfunction. Image studies yielded clinically useful information in these 2 cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The ketogenic diet as a treatment paradigm for diverse neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Carl E; Rho, Jong M

    2012-01-01

    Dietary and metabolic therapies have been attempted in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including epilepsy, headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism, pain, and multiple sclerosis. The impetus for using various diets to treat - or at least ameliorate symptoms of - these disorders stems from both a lack of effectiveness of pharmacological therapies, and also the intrinsic appeal of implementing a more "natural" treatment. The enormous spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the aforementioned diseases would suggest a degree of complexity that cannot be impacted universally by any single dietary treatment. Yet, it is conceivable that alterations in certain dietary constituents could affect the course and impact the outcome of these brain disorders. Further, it is possible that a final common neurometabolic pathway might be influenced by a variety of dietary interventions. The most notable example of a dietary treatment with proven efficacy against a neurological condition is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) used in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. While the mechanisms through which the KD works remain unclear, there is now compelling evidence that its efficacy is likely related to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. The concept that many neurological conditions are linked pathophysiologically to energy dysregulation could well provide a common research and experimental therapeutics platform, from which the course of several neurological diseases could be favorably influenced by dietary means. Here we provide an overview of studies using the KD in a wide panoply of neurologic disorders in which neuroprotection is an essential component.

  2. Oscillatory Activities in Neurological Disorders of Elderly: Biomarkers to Target for Neuromodulation

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    Giovanni Assenza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS has been under investigation as adjunct treatment of various neurological disorders with variable success. One challenge is the limited knowledge on what would be effective neuronal targets for an intervention, combined with limited knowledge on the neuronal mechanisms of NIBS. Motivated on the one hand by recent evidence that oscillatory activities in neural systems play a role in orchestrating brain functions and dysfunctions, in particular those of neurological disorders specific of elderly patients, and on the other hand that NIBS techniques may be used to interact with these brain oscillations in a controlled way, we here explore the potential of modulating brain oscillations as an effective strategy for clinical NIBS interventions. We first review the evidence for abnormal oscillatory profiles to be associated with a range of neurological disorders of elderly (e.g., Parkinson’s disease (PD, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, stroke, epilepsy, and for these signals of abnormal network activity to normalize with treatment, and/or to be predictive of disease progression or recovery. We then ask the question to what extent existing NIBS protocols have been tailored to interact with these oscillations and possibly associated dysfunctions. Our review shows that, despite evidence for both reliable neurophysiological markers of specific oscillatory dis-functionalities in neurological disorders and NIBS protocols potentially able to interact with them, there are few applications of NIBS aiming to explore clinical outcomes of this interaction. Our review article aims to point out oscillatory markers of neurological, which are also suitable targets for modification by NIBS, in order to facilitate in future studies the matching of technical application to clinical targets.

  3. THE KETOGENIC DIET AS A TREATMENT PARADIGM FOR DIVERSE NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Min Rho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary and metabolic therapies have been attempted in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including epilepsy, headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism, pain, and multiple sclerosis. The impetus for using various diets to treat – or at least ameliorate symptoms of – these disorders stems from both a lack of effectiveness of pharmacological therapies, and also the intrinsic appeal of implementing a more natural treatment. The enormous spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the aforementioned diseases would suggest a degree of complexity that cannot be impacted universally by any single dietary treatment. Yet, it is conceivable that alterations in certain dietary constituents could affect the course and impact the outcome of these brain disorders. Further, it is possible that a final common neurometabolic pathway might be influenced by a variety of dietary interventions. The most notable example of a dietary treatment with proven efficacy against a neurological condition is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD used in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. While the mechanisms through which the KD works remain unclear, there is now compelling evidence that its efficacy is likely related to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. The concept that many neurological conditions are linked pathophysiologically to energy dysregulation could well provide a common research and experimental therapeutics platform, from which the course of several neurological diseases could be favorably influenced by dietary means. Here we provide an overview of studies using the KD in a wide panoply of neurologic disorders in which neuroprotection is an essential component.

  4. Prevalence of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India: a systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Amanda J; Charlson, Fiona J; Cheng, Hui G; Shidhaye, Rahul; Ferrari, Alize J; Whiteford, Harvey A

    2016-09-01

    Population-representative prevalence data for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders are essential for evidence-based decision making. As a background to the China-India Mental Health Alliance Series, we aim to examine the availability of data and report prevalence for the most common mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India from the Global Burden of Disease study 2013 (GBD 2013). In this systematic analysis, data sources were identified from GBD 2013 for the prevalence of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India published up to Dec 31, 2013. We calculated the proportion of the population represented by the data with the adjusted population coverage (APC) method adjusting for age, sex, and population size. We developed prevalence models with DisMod-MR 2.0, a Bayesian meta-regression instrument used to pool population-representative epidemiological data as part of GBD 2013. We report estimates and 95% uncertainly intervals (95% UI) for 15 mental, neurological, and substance use disorders for China and India in 1990 and 2013, and benchmark these against those for other BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, and South Africa) in 2013. Few population-representative data were found for the disorders, with an average coverage of 15% of the population of the Chinese mainland and 1% of the population of India. For men in both China and India, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and alcohol dependence were the most common mental, neurological, and substance use disorders. Prevalence of major depressive disorder was 2·2% (95% UI 1·5-2·8) in Chinese men and 3·5% (2·4-4·6) in Indian men; prevalence of anxiety disorders was 2·0% (1·1-3·2) and 1·9% (1·2-2·3), respectively. For women, anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, and dysthymia were the most common. Prevalence of major depressive disorder was 3·3% (2·3-4·1) in Chinese women and 4·7% (95% UI 3·3-6·2) in Indian women; prevalence

  5. Robotic gait rehabilitation and substitution devices in neurological disorders: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Cacciola, Alberto; Bertè, Francesco; Manuli, Alfredo; Leo, Antonino; Bramanti, Alessia; Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Bramanti, Placido

    2016-04-01

    Gait abnormalities following neurological disorders are often disabling, negatively affecting patients' quality of life. Therefore, regaining of walking is considered one of the primary objectives of the rehabilitation process. To overcome problems related to conventional physical therapy, in the last years there has been an intense technological development of robotic devices, and robotic rehabilitation has proved to play a major role in improving one's ability to walk. The robotic rehabilitation systems can be classified into stationary and overground walking systems, and several studies have demonstrated their usefulness in patients after severe acquired brain injury, spinal cord injury and other neurological diseases, including Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy. In this review, we want to highlight which are the most widely used devices today for gait neurological rehabilitation, focusing on their functioning, effectiveness and challenges. Novel and promising rehabilitation tools, including the use of virtual reality, are also discussed.

  6. Anti-ganglioside antibodies in patients with Guillain Barré syndrome and other neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vaishnavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed on 59 Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS cases, 58 neurological controls (NC and 60 non-neurological controls (NNC to investigate the association of anti-ganglioside antibodies in GBS and other neurological disorders. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from 5.7% of GBS patients. Anti-ganglioside immunoglobulin G was present in 82% and immunoglobulin M in 46% in acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients, 70% and 44% respectively in acute motor axonal neuropathy subgroup and 38% each in acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy subgroup. Though high intensity of anti-gangliosides was present in the GBS patients, the NC patients also had adequate anti-gangliosides compared with the NNC group.

  7. Novel OPA1 missense mutation in a family with optic atrophy and severe widespread neurological disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskova, Petra; Ulmanova, Olga; Tesina, Petr; Melsova, Hana; Diblik, Pavel; Hansikova, Hana; Tesarova, Marketa; Votruba, Marcela

    2013-05-01

    To identify the underlying molecular genetic cause in a Czech family with optic atrophy, deafness, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, polyneuropathy and ataxia transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Ophthalmological and neurological examination followed by molecular genetic analyses. Seven family members were clinically affected. There was a variable but progressive visual, hearing and neurological disability across the family as a whole. The majority of subjects presented with impairment of visual function and a variable degree of ptosis and/or ophthalmoplegia from the first to the third decade of life. Deafness, neuropathy and ataxia appeared later, in the third and fourth decade. Migraine, tachycardia, intention tremor, nystagmus and cervical dystonia were observed in isolated individuals. A significant overall feature was the high level of neurological disability leading to 3 of 4 members being unable to walk or stand unaided before the age of 60 years. A novel missense mutation c.1345A>C (p.Thr449Pro) in OPA1 segregating with the disease phenotype over three generations was detected. In silico analysis supported pathogenicity of the identified sequence variant. Our work expands the spectrum of mutation in OPA1, which may lead to severe multisystem neurological disorder. The molecular genetic cause of dominant optic atrophy in the Czech population is reported for the first time. We propose that regular cardiac follow-up in patients diagnosed with dominant optic atrophy and widespread neurological disease should be considered. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  8. Quantitative Evaluation of the Use of Actigraphy for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative and objective evaluation of disease severity and/or drug effect is necessary in clinical practice. Wearable accelerometers such as an actigraph enable long-term recording of a patient’s movement during activities and they can be used for quantitative assessment of symptoms due to various diseases. We reviewed some applications of actigraphy with analytical methods that are sufficiently sensitive and reliable to determine the severity of diseases and disorders such as motor and nonmotor disorders like Parkinson’s disease, sleep disorders, depression, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD for vascular dementia (VD, seasonal affective disorder (SAD, and stroke, as well as the effects of drugs used to treat them. We believe it is possible to develop analytical methods to assess more neurological or psychopathic disorders using actigraphy records.

  9. Marine natural product drug discovery: Leads for treatment of inflammation, cancer, infections, and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Francisco A; Gerwick, Lena

    2010-06-01

    Natural products, secondary metabolites, isolated from plants, animals and microbes are important sources for bioactive molecules that in many cases have been developed into treatments for diseases. This review will focus on describing the potential for finding new treatments from marine natural products for inflammation, cancer, infections, and neurological disorders. Historically terrestrial natural products have been studied to a greater extent and such classic drugs as aspirin, vincristine and many of the antibiotics are derived from terrestrial natural products. The need for new therapeutics in the four areas mentioned is dire. Within the last 30 years marine natural products, with their unique structures and high level of halogenation, have shown many promising activities against the inflammatory response, cancer, infections and neurological disorders. The review will outline examples of such compounds and activities.

  10. Severe neurological disorders and refractory aspergillosis in an adolescent treated by vincristine and voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Y; Bodeau, S; Lutun, A; Gourmel, A; Solas, C; Quaranta, S; Guillaume, N; Chouaki, T; Lemaire-Hurtel, A-S; Masmoudi, K

    2017-08-10

    Voriconazole and vincristine are major therapeutics in paediatric haematology. However, the risk-benefit ratio of the treatment of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole in patients receiving vincristine-based chemotherapy remains unclear. We report severe peripheral and central neurological disorders in a 14-year-old girl with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and pulmonary aspergillosis. The case describes a strong exacerbation by voriconazole of the vincristine-induced neuropathic pains. It shows the high variability of the trough serum concentration of voriconazole leading to antifungal treatment failure and suggests that its own central neurotoxicity could also be potentiated by vincristine. Given the risk of either insufficient antifungal efficacy or excessive neurological disorders, this case warns on a probable unfavourable risk-benefit profile of voriconazole during vincristine-based chemotherapy in adolescents. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. 5-HT2A Agonists: A Novel Therapy for Functional Neurological Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Alexander; Carter, Olivia; Norman, Trevor; Kanaan, Richard

    2017-05-01

    Functional neurological disorders are frequently encountered in clinical practice. They have a poor prognosis and treatment options are limited. Their etiology is unknown, but leading theories propose a disturbance of somatic self-representation: the mind perceives dysfunction of a body region despite intact motor and sensory pathways. Central to this model is the concept of an abnormal top-down cognitive influence upon sensorimotor function. There is growing interest in the use of 5-HT2A agonists in the management of neuropsychiatric conditions. Recent studies have shown that these agents induce changes in neural activity that disrupt hierarchical brain dynamics and modulate networks subserving self-related processing. Converging evidence suggests they may hold unique therapeutic potential in functional neurological disorders. This is of importance given the considerable personal and societal burden of this condition and we argue a clinical trial to test this hypothesis is warranted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  12. Comparative Study of Neurological Soft Signs in Patients with Schizophrenia or Obsessive-compulsive Disorder, and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R; Soni, A; Tyagi, A; Mehta, S; Gupta, S

    2015-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder compared with patients with schizophrenia and a control group in the Indian setting. The secondary objective was to find any correlation between age at onset and neurological soft signs scores, as well as that between severity of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms (total Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale score) and neurological soft signs scores. This was a cross-sectional hospital-based study of 135 individuals (45 patients with schizophrenia, 45 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder who were attending the psychiatric outpatient department of Sawai Man Singh Medical College, Jaipur, India, and 45 matched healthy controls) from 20 June 2013 to 22 December 2014. After applying strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, the participants completed the study instruments (Cambridge Neurological Inventory [Part 2] and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale). Their socio-demographic data were also recorded. The neurological soft signs total score and domain scores (motor coordination, sensory integration, and disinhibition) were significantly higher in patients with schizophrenia (p disorder group or the control group. The obsessive-compulsive disorder group did not significantly differ from the control group in terms of neurological soft signs scores. No correlation was found between neurological soft signs scores and age at onset as well as that between neurological soft signs scores and total Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale score. Neurological soft signs assessed by the Cambridge Neurological Inventory and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, which discriminate patients with schizophrenia from controls, appear to be relatively specific to schizophrenia. Further studies are required to explore neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  13. Synaptic Interactome Mining Reveals p140Cap as a New Hub for PSD Proteins Involved in Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Alfieri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Altered synaptic function has been associated with neurological and psychiatric conditions including intellectual disability, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Amongst the recently discovered synaptic proteins is p140Cap, an adaptor that localizes at dendritic spines and regulates their maturation and physiology. We recently showed that p140Cap knockout mice have cognitive deficits, impaired long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD, and immature, filopodia-like dendritic spines. Only a few p140Cap interacting proteins have been identified in the brain and the molecular complexes and pathways underlying p140Cap synaptic function are largely unknown. Here, we isolated and characterized the p140Cap synaptic interactome by co-immunoprecipitation from crude mouse synaptosomes, followed by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We identified 351 p140Cap interactors and found that they cluster to sub complexes mostly located in the postsynaptic density (PSD. p140Cap interactors converge on key synaptic processes, including transmission across chemical synapses, actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell-cell junction organization. Gene co-expression data further support convergent functions: the p140Cap interactors are tightly co-expressed with each other and with p140Cap. Importantly, the p140Cap interactome and its co-expression network show strong enrichment in genes associated with schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, intellectual disability and epilepsy, supporting synaptic dysfunction as a shared biological feature in brain diseases. Overall, our data provide novel insights into the molecular organization of the synapse and indicate that p140Cap acts as a hub for postsynaptic complexes relevant to psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  14. Guidelines for uniform reporting of body fluid biomarker studies in neurologic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Hegen, Harald; Khalil, Michael

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of these guidelines is to make the process of reporting body fluid biomarker studies in neurologic disorders more uniform and transparent, in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. Although biomarkers have been around for decades, there a......OBJECTIVE: The aim of these guidelines is to make the process of reporting body fluid biomarker studies in neurologic disorders more uniform and transparent, in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. Although biomarkers have been around for decades......, there are concerns over the high attrition rate of promising candidate biomarkers at later phases of development. METHODS: BioMS-eu consortium, a collaborative network working toward improving the quality of biomarker research in neurologic disorders, discussed the merits of standardizing the reporting of body fluid...... biomarker research. A checklist of items integrating the results of other published guidances, literature, conferences, regulatory opinion, and personal expertise was created to ultimately form a structured summary guidance incorporating the key features. RESULTS: The summary guidance is comprised of a 10...

  15. Semantic Pattern Analysis for Verbal Fluency Based Assessment of Neurological Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Ainsworth, Keela C [ORNL; Brown, Tyler C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present preliminary results of semantic pattern analysis of verbal fluency tests used for assessing cognitive psychological and neuropsychological disorders. We posit that recent advances in semantic reasoning and artificial intelligence can be combined to create a standardized computer-aided diagnosis tool to automatically evaluate and interpret verbal fluency tests. Towards that goal, we derive novel semantic similarity (phonetic, phonemic and conceptual) metrics and present the predictive capability of these metrics on a de-identified dataset of participants with and without neurological disorders.

  16. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Y. Collins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders.

  17. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pamela Y; Musisi, Seggane; Frehywot, Seble; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders.

  18. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and neurological and psychiatric disorders: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; Nevola, Riccardo; Lus, Giacomo; Restivo, Luciano; Guerrera, Barbara; Romano, Ciro; Zampino, Rosa; Rinaldi, Luca; Sellitto, Ausilia; Giordano, Mauro; Marrone, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is considered a systemic disease because of involvement of other organs and tissues concomitantly with liver disease. Among the extrahepatic manifestations, neuropsychiatric disorders have been reported in up to 50% of chronic HCV infected patients. Both the central and peripheral nervous system may be involved with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Main HCV-associated neurological conditions include cerebrovascular events, encephalopathy, myelitis, encephalomyelitis, and cognitive impairment, whereas “brain fog”, depression, anxiety, and fatigue are at the top of the list of psychiatric disorders. Moreover, HCV infection is known to cause both motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy in the context of mixed cryoglobulinemia, and has also been recently recognized as an independent risk factor for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are independent of severity of the underlying chronic liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. The brain is a suitable site for HCV replication, where the virus may directly exert neurotoxicity; other mechanisms proposed to explain the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders in chronic HCV infection include derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, alterations in neurotransmitter circuits, autoimmune disorders, and cerebral or systemic inflammation. A pathogenic role for HCV is also suggested by improvement of neurological and psychiatric symptoms in patients achieving a sustained virologic response following interferon treatment; however, further ad hoc trials are needed to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and specific antiviral treatments on associated neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25741133

  19. [Neurological disorders in the narrative works of Benito Pérez Galdós].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, L C; Martín del Burgo, A

    2007-06-01

    Benito Pérez Galdós was a realistic writer. As such, he was devoted to displaying reality in its full complexity. He shared the traits of experimental medicine of Claude Bernard (Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale). The writer was a close friend of famous contemporary doctors (Gregorio Marañón, Manuel Tolosa Latour), had textbooks with neurological content, and was familiar with Charcot. With this background, we have foreseen neurological descriptions in his works. To search for them, we have reviewed three paramount novels: Fortunata y Jacinta, La de Bringas and Tormento. We found: a) headache, usually migraine with and without aura; common precipitants and inheritance are present. The novelist himself suffered from severe migraine; b) movement disorders: Parkinson syndrome and hemifacial spasm; c) convulsive and non-convulsive epilepsy in a girl as well as syncope and psychogenic loss of consciousness; d) congenital syphilis, based on a typical physical appearance in a character with madness (paranoid schizophrenia); the reason was probably that syphilis was regarded as the most common cause of "dementia praecox"; e) alcoholism: acute intoxication, deprivation, behavior disorders, hepatic encephalopathy and a likely pellagra; f) sleep disorders: parasomnias (somnambulism, somniloquy) and sleep paralysis, and g) stroke and also inverted metamorphopsia of psychogenic origin. Ailments and disease pervaded life in the 19th century. Neurological disorders were highly prevalent and are fully integrated into Galdos realistic works. Many of them fulfill criteria of disorders contemplated according to degeneration theories. Nevertheless, humanitarian features raise the characters above their tragic destiny. Biographical factors, particularly his many love affairs and his political implication as a liberal, could have contributed to the plethora of precise descriptions.

  20. Aerobic exercise to improve cognitive function in adults with neurological disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Michelle N; Smith, Ashleigh E; Mackintosh, Shylie F

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate whether aerobic exercise improves cognition in adults diagnosed with neurologic disorders. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, EMBASE, PEDro, AMED, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Google Scholar, with the last search performed in December 2010. We included controlled clinical trials and randomized controlled trials with adults diagnosed with a neurologic disorder. Studies were included if they compared a control group with a group involved in an aerobic exercise program to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and if they measured cognition as an outcome. Two reviewers independently extracted data and methodologic quality of the included trials. From the 67 trials reviewed, a total of 7 trials, involving 249 participants, were included. Two trials compared the effectiveness of yoga and aerobic exercise in adults with multiple sclerosis. Two trials evaluated the effect of exercise on patients with dementia, and 2 trials evaluated the effectiveness of exercise to improve cognition after traumatic brain injury. One trial studied the effect of a cycling program in people with chronic stroke. Lack of commonality between measures of cognition limited meta-analyses. Results from individual studies show that aerobic exercise improved cognition in people with dementia, improved attention and cognitive flexibility in patients with traumatic brain injury, improved choice reaction time in people with multiple sclerosis, and enhanced motor learning in people with chronic stroke. There is limited evidence to support the use of aerobic exercise to improve cognition in adults with neurologic disorders. Of the 67 studies retrieved, less than half included cognition as an outcome, and few studies continued the aerobic exercise program long enough to be considered effective. Further studies investigating the effect of aerobic exercise interventions on cognition in people with neurologic conditions are required. Copyright

  1. The Ability of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 to Detect Aspiration in Patients With Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Selen Serel; Demir, Numan; Kılınç, Hasan E; Karaduman, Aynur A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Dysphagia is common in patients with neurological disorders. There is a need to identify patients at risk early by a useful clinical tool to prevent its serious complications. The study aims to determine the ability of the Turkish version of Eating Assessment Tool-10 (T-EAT-10) to detect aspiration in patients with neurological disorders. Methods Two hundred fifty-nine patients with neurological disorders who had complaints about swallowing difficulty and referred for a swallowing evaluation were included. Oropharyngeal dysphagia was evaluated with the T-EAT-10 and videofluoroscopic swallowing study in the same day. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) was used to document the penetration and aspiration severity. Results The mean age of the patients was 59.72 ± 17.24 years (minimum [min] = 18, maximum [max] = 96), of which 57.1% were male. The mean T-EAT-10 of patients who had aspiration (PAS > 5) was 25.91 ± 10.31 (min = 1, max = 40) and the mean T-EAT-10 of patients who did not have aspiration (PAS < 6) was 15.70 ± 10.54 (min = 0, max = 40) (P < 0.001). Patients with a T-EAT-10 score higher than 15 were 2.4 times more likely to aspirate. A linear correlation was found between T-EAT-10 and PAS scores of the patients (r = 0.416, P < 0.001). The sensitivity of a T-EAT-10 higher than 15 in detecting aspiration was 81.0% and the specificity was 58.0%. A T-EAT-10 score of higher than 15 has a positive predictive value of 72.0% and a negative predictive value of 69.0%. Conclusion The T-EAT-10 can be used to detect unsafe airway protection in neurology clinics to identify and refer dysphagic patients for further evaluation. PMID:28545185

  2. Computational profiling of the gut-brain axis: microflora dysbiosis insights to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovrolis, Nikolas; Kolios, George; Spyrou, George M; Maroulakou, Ioanna

    2017-11-27

    Almost 2500 years after Hippocrates' observations on health and its direct association to the gastrointestinal tract, a paradigm shift has recently occurred, making the gut and its symbionts (bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses) a point of convergence for studies. It is nowadays well established that the gut microflora's compositional diversity regulates via its genes (the microbiome) the host's health and provides preliminary insights into disease progression and regulation. The microbiome's involvement is evident in immunological and physiological studies that link changes in its biodiversity to its contributions to the host's phenotype but also in neurological investigations, substantiating the aptly named gut-brain axis. The definitive mechanisms of this last bidirectional interaction will be our main focus because it presents researchers with a new conundrum. In this review, we prospect current literature for computational analysis methodologies that accommodate the need for better understanding of the microbiome-gut-brain interactions and neurological disorder onset and progression, through cross-disciplinary systems biology applications. We will present bioinformatics tools used in exploring these synergies that help build and interpret microbial 16S ribosomal RNA data sets, produced by shotgun and high-throughput sequencing of healthy and neurological disorder samples stored in biological databases. These approaches provide alternative means for researchers to form hypotheses to their inquests faster, cheaper and swith precision. The goal of these studies relies on the integration of combined metagenomics and metabolomics assessments. An accurate characterization of the microbiome and its functionality can support new diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neurological disorders, customized for each individual host. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Zinc in Gut-Brain Interaction in Autism and Neurological Disorders

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    Guillermo Vela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing amount of research indicates that abnormalities in the gastrointestinal (GI system during development might be a common factor in multiple neurological disorders and might be responsible for some of the shared comorbidities seen among these diseases. For example, many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD have symptoms associated with GI disorders. Maternal zinc status may be an important factor given the multifaceted effect of zinc on gut development and morphology in the offspring. Zinc status influences and is influenced by multiple factors and an interdependence of prenatal and early life stress, immune system abnormalities, impaired GI functions, and zinc deficiency can be hypothesized. In line with this, systemic inflammatory events and prenatal stress have been reported to increase the risk for ASD. Thus, here, we will review the current literature on the role of zinc in gut formation, a possible link between gut and brain development in ASD and other neurological disorders with shared comorbidities, and tie in possible effects on the immune system. Based on these data, we present a novel model outlining how alterations in the maternal zinc status might pathologically impact the offspring leading to impairments in brain functions later in life.

  4. A decade from discovery to therapy: Lingo-1, the dark horse in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jessica L; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2015-09-01

    Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing protein (Lingo-1) is a potent negative regulator of neuron and oligodendrocyte survival, neurite extension, axon regeneration, oligodendrocyte differentiation, axonal myelination and functional recovery; all processes highly implicated in numerous brain-related functions. Although playing a major role in developmental brain functions, the potential application of Lingo-1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of neurological disorders has so far been under-estimated. A number of preclinical studies have shown that various methods of antagonizing Lingo-1 results in neuronal and oligodendroglial survival, axonal growth and remyelination; however to date literature has only detailed applications of Lingo-1 targeted therapeutics with a focus primarily on myelination disorders such as multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury; omitting important information regarding Lingo-1 signaling co-factors. Here, we provide for the first time a complete and thorough review of the implications of Lingo-1 signaling in a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, and critically examine its potential as a novel therapeutic target for these disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coraco- or Costoclavicular Paraosteoarthropathies in Patients with Severe Central Neurological Disorders

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    Lacout, A.; Mompoint, D.; Perrier, Y.; Vallee, C.A.; Carlier, R.Y. (Service de Radiologie, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France))

    2008-03-15

    Background: Paraosteoarthropathy (POA) is a frequent disabling orthopedic complication after severe central neurological impairment. The hip is the most frequently affected joint (32.1%) followed by the elbow and the shoulder (25%). Purpose: To evaluate coraco- and costoclavicular paraosteoarthropathy in patients with severe central neurological disorders. Material and Methods: We report a series of five consecutive patients with severe central neurological disorders who developed a POA of the clavicular region (coracoclavicular or costoclavicular POA). Every patient underwent a clinical, radiological, and computed tomographic (CT) examination of the shoulder region. Results: Four patients had a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and one an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). They developed POA of the clavicular region, although not around the glenohumeral joint. The patients complained of shoulder pain and of moderate limitation of movements. Radiological and CT examinations showed the presence of a bony formation in the coracoclavicular space in four cases and extending from the clavicle to the first rib around the costoclavicular joint in one case. Conclusion: In patients with severe brain lesions suffering from shoulder pain and moderate limitation of joint movements, POAs of the clavicular region are rare but should be considered

  6. Improving access to essential medicines for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa: workshop summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pankevich, Diana E; Norris, Sheena M. Posey; Wizemann, Theresa M; Altevogt, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    "In 2011 the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health initiative identified priorities that have the potential to make a significant impact on the lives of people with mental, neurological, and substance use disorders...

  7. CT and MR findings of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jee Young; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Bum Soo; Hahn, Seong Tae [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    The onset of pregnancy may predispose women to a variety of neurological diseases due to changes in their hemodynamics, hormonal effects, and complications associated with childbirth. The spectrum of neurological disorders associated with pregnancy and childbirth include hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhaging, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) (secondary to eclampsia), Wernicke encephalopathy, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, Sheehan's syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (secondary to pulmonary amniotic fluid embolism), multifocal infarctions, and extra-potine myelinolysis. The recognition of the various imaging findings of these diseases, along with the clinical presentations should aid in their early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The purpose of this pictorial assay is to describe the characteristic CT and MR findings of these diseases with a literature review to explain the mechanisms and clinical symptoms.

  8. Psychiatric and neurological disorders in late adolescence and risk of convictions for violent crime in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Tomas; Stenbacka, Marlene; Tengström, Anders; Jönsson, Erik G; Nordström, Peter; Jokinen, Jussi

    2015-11-23

    The relationship between mental illness and violent crime is complex because of the involvement of many other confounding risk factors. In the present study, we analysed psychiatric and neurological disorders in relation to the risk of convictions for violent crime, taking into account early behavioural and socio-economic risk factors. The study population consisted of 49,398 Swedish men, who were thoroughly assessed at conscription for compulsory military service during the years 1969-1970 and followed in national crime registers up to 2006. Five diagnostic groups were analysed: anxiety-depression/neuroses, personality disorders, substance-related disorders, mental retardation and neurological conditions. In addition, eight confounders measured at conscription and based on the literature on violence risk assessment, were added to the analyses. The relative risks of convictions for violent crime during 35 years after conscription were examined in relation to psychiatric diagnoses and other risk factors at conscription, as measured by odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) from bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. In the bivariate analyses there was a significant association between receiving a psychiatric diagnosis at conscription and a future conviction for violent crime (OR = 3.83, 95 % CI = 3.47-4.22), whereas no significant association between neurological conditions and future violent crime (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI = 0.48-2.21) was found. In the fully adjusted multivariate logistic regression model, mental retardation had the strongest association with future violent crime (OR = 3.60, 95 % CI = 2.73-4.75), followed by substance-related disorders (OR = 2.81, 95 % CI = 2.18-3.62), personality disorders (OR = 2.66, 95 % CI = 2.21-3.19) and anxiety-depression (OR = 1.29, 95 % CI = 1.07-1.55). Among the other risk factors, early behavioural problem had the strongest association with

  9. Prevalence and risk factors for neurological disorders in children aged 6 months to 2 years in northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rashmi; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Agarwal, Girdhar G

    2013-04-01

    To study prevalence and risk factors for neurological disorders--epilepsy, global developmental delay, and motor, vision, and hearing defects--in children aged 6 months to 2 years in northern India. A two-stage community survey for neurological disorders was conducted in rural and urban areas of Lucknow. After initial screening with a new instrument, the Lucknow Neurodevelopment Screen, screen positives and a random proportion of screen negatives were validated using predefined criteria. Prevalence was calculated by weighted estimates. Demographic, socio-economic, and medical risk factors were compared between validated children who were positive and negative for neurological disorders by univariate and logistic regression analysis. Of 4801 children screened (mean age [SD] 15.32mo [5.96]; 2542 males, 2259 females), 196 were positive; 190 screen positives and 269 screen negatives were validated. Prevalence of neurological disorders was 27.92 per 1000 (weighted 95% confidence interval 12.24-43.60). Significant risk factors (p≤0.01) for neurological disorders were higher age in months (p=0.010), lower mean number of appliances in the household (p=0.001), consanguineous marriage of parents (p=0.010), family history of neurological disorder (p=0.001), and infants born exceptionally small (parental description; p=0.009). On logistic regression, the final model included age (p=0.0193), number of appliances (p=0.0161), delayed cry at birth (p=0.0270), postneonatal meningoencephalitis (p=0.0549), and consanguinity (p=0.0801). Perinatal factors, lower socio-economic status, and consanguinity emerged as predictors of neurological disorders. These factors are largely modifiable. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Using deep learning to investigate the neuroimaging correlates of psychiatric and neurological disorders: Methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sandra; Pinaya, Walter H L; Mechelli, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Deep learning (DL) is a family of machine learning methods that has gained considerable attention in the scientific community, breaking benchmark records in areas such as speech and visual recognition. DL differs from conventional machine learning methods by virtue of its ability to learn the optimal representation from the raw data through consecutive nonlinear transformations, achieving increasingly higher levels of abstraction and complexity. Given its ability to detect abstract and complex patterns, DL has been applied in neuroimaging studies of psychiatric and neurological disorders, which are characterised by subtle and diffuse alterations. Here we introduce the underlying concepts of DL and review studies that have used this approach to classify brain-based disorders. The results of these studies indicate that DL could be a powerful tool in the current search for biomarkers of psychiatric and neurologic disease. We conclude our review by discussing the main promises and challenges of using DL to elucidate brain-based disorders, as well as possible directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Hippotherapy acute impact on heart rate variability non-linear dynamics in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiddu, Ramona; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Trimer, Renata; Trimer, Vitor; Ricci, Paula Angélica; Italiano Monteiro, Clara; Camargo Magalhães Maniglia, Marcela; Silva Pereira, Ana Maria; Rodrigues das Chagas, Gustavo; Carvalho, Eliane Maria

    2016-05-15

    Neurological disorders are associated with autonomic dysfunction. Hippotherapy (HT) is a therapy treatment strategy that utilizes a horse in an interdisciplinary approach for the physical and mental rehabilitation of people with physical, mental and/or psychological disabilities. However, no studies have been carried out which evaluated the effects of HT on the autonomic control in these patients. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single HT session on cardiovascular autonomic control by time domain and non-linear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). The HRV signal was recorded continuously in twelve children affected by neurological disorders during a HT session, consisting in a 10-minute sitting position rest (P1), a 15-minute preparatory phase sitting on the horse (P2), a 15-minute HT session (P3) and a final 10-minute sitting position recovery (P4). Time domain and non-linear HRV indices, including Sample Entropy (SampEn), Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), were calculated for each treatment phase. We observed that SampEn increased during P3 (SampEn=0.56±0.10) with respect to P1 (SampEn=0.40±0.14, p<0.05), while DFA decreased during P3 (DFA=1.10±0.10) with respect to P1 (DFA=1.26±0.14, p<0.05). A significant SDRR increase (p<0.05) was observed during the recovery period P4 (SDRR=50±30ms) with respect to the HT session period P3 (SDRR=30±10ms). Our results suggest that HT might benefit children with disabilities attributable to neurological disorders by eliciting an acute autonomic response during the therapy and during the recovery period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intestinal helminthiasis in children with chronic neurological disorders in Benin City, Nigeria: intensity and behavioral risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaneri, Damia Uchechukwu; Ibadin, Michael Okoeguale; Ofovwe, Gabriel Egberue; Sadoh, Ayebo Evawere

    2013-05-01

    Behavioral aberrations such as nail biting, finger sucking, and pica have been postulated as risk factors that enhance helminths ova transmission. These aberrations may present commonly in children with chronic neurological disorders and predispose them to heavy intensity of intestinal helminthiasis. This comparative cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence, intensity, and behavioral risk factors for intestinal helminthiasis in children with chronic neurological disorders and apparently healthy controls. Fresh stool samples from 155 children (2-17 years) with chronic neurological disorders seen at the child neurology clinic and 155 age and sex matched controls from nursery and primary schools in Benin City were analyzed using the Kato-Katz technique for detection of ova of helminths from November 2008 to April 2009. The prevalence of intestinal helminthiasis (31.0%) was significantly higher in children with chronic neurological disorders compared with the controls (19.4%) (P=0.03). The intensity of infections in both groups was light ranging 24-144 eggs per gram. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm were the intestinal helminths isolated in both groups. Behavioral aberrations were significantly more represented in the subjects than in the controls (Pworming exercise were practices significantly associated with decreased prevalence of intestinal helminthiasis in the subjects and controls. Behavioral modification in children with chronic neurological disorders should be an integral part of the control program for intestinal helminthiasis.

  13. Systematic review: Efficacy and safety of medical marijuana in selected neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Barbara S.; Brust, John C.M.; Fife, Terry; Bronstein, Jeff; Youssof, Sarah; Gronseth, Gary; Gloss, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of medical marijuana in several neurologic conditions. Methods: We performed a systematic review of medical marijuana (1948–November 2013) to address treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), epilepsy, and movement disorders. We graded the studies according to the American Academy of Neurology classification scheme for therapeutic articles. Results: Thirty-four studies met inclusion criteria; 8 were rated as Class I. Conclusions: The following were studied in patients with MS: (1) Spasticity: oral cannabis extract (OCE) is effective, and nabiximols and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are probably effective, for reducing patient-centered measures; it is possible both OCE and THC are effective for reducing both patient-centered and objective measures at 1 year. (2) Central pain or painful spasms (including spasticity-related pain, excluding neuropathic pain): OCE is effective; THC and nabiximols are probably effective. (3) Urinary dysfunction: nabiximols is probably effective for reducing bladder voids/day; THC and OCE are probably ineffective for reducing bladder complaints. (4) Tremor: THC and OCE are probably ineffective; nabiximols is possibly ineffective. (5) Other neurologic conditions: OCE is probably ineffective for treating levodopa-induced dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson disease. Oral cannabinoids are of unknown efficacy in non–chorea-related symptoms of Huntington disease, Tourette syndrome, cervical dystonia, and epilepsy. The risks and benefits of medical marijuana should be weighed carefully. Risk of serious adverse psychopathologic effects was nearly 1%. Comparative effectiveness of medical marijuana vs other therapies is unknown for these indications. PMID:24778283

  14. Neurological Soft Signs in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Standardised Assessment and Comparison with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bolton

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available While several studies have detected raised levels of neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD, the specificity of these abnormalities remains uncertain. This study used a new standardised measure, the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI, to assess soft signs in 51 subjects with OCD. Comparison was made with data on patients with schizophrenia and a non-clinical control group from a previously reported study. Individuals with OCD showed raised levels of soft signs compared with non-clinical controls in many categories of the CNI: Motor Coordination, Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes, Extrapyramidal Signs, and Failure of Suppression. Compared with patients with schizophrenia, the OCD group had lower levels of neurological signs in some CNI categories: Hard Signs, Motor Co-ordination, Tardive Dyskinesia, Catatonic Signs, and Extrapyramidal Signs. However, levels of soft signs in the OCD group did not significantly differ from those in the schizophrenia group in other CNI categories: Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes and Failure of Suppression. The significance of these patterns of findings is discussed.

  15. Pattern of traditional medicine use by adult Saudi patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Yousef; Al-Ahmari, Ahmed; Al-Dashash, Fahad; Al-Hussain, Fawaz; Al-Masnour, Firas; Masoud, Abdullah; Jradi, Hoda

    2015-04-01

    Traditional medicine (TM) has been established as a two-edged sword. On one edge numerous forms of TM have been proven safe and effective, while on the other edge various modes of TM have been shown to be futile and potentially dangerous. Resorting to TM, especially for chronic diseases, is common world-wide and includes Saudi Arabia. Most neurological diseases are chronic. No data is available on the utilization of TM among patients with neurological disorders. We conducted this study to assess for the prevalence, pattern, perception and triggers for TM use by the adult Saudi patients with neurological disorders. A survey written in Arabic and comprised of 15 questions was used to collect data on the practice of TM among the neurology patients of King Saud University Ambulatory Clinic. The questions in the survey pertain mainly to the frequency of TM practice, its form and the patient's opinion of this practice. The data was collected through a face to face interview by three medical students who were instructed on the survey questions prior to the launch of the study. 292 patients completed the survey (35.9% males and 64.0% females). 67% (n = 196) of the sample used TM. Cupping or what is commonly known as "hojamah" was the most prevalent method (45.4%) followed by herbs, skin cauterization and the Reciting of the Holy Quran (42.3%, 33.7% and 20.4% respectively). The prevalence of TM use did not differ across gender (chi-sq = 2.02; p-value = 0.15), level of education (chi-sq = 4.02; p-value = 0.40), health status (chi-sq = 2.29; p-value = 0.68), age groups (chi-sq = 5.12; p-value = 0.16), or perception toward TM (chi-sq = 2.67; p-value = 0.26) in this population. The practice of TM is common among the neurology patients of Saudi Arabia. Cupping, herbs, and skin cauterization, which can be harmful when wrongly employed, are frequently utilized in this patient population. Measures and policies to endorse the appropriate use of TM by Saudi society must be

  16. Conversion Disorder, Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder, and Chronic Pain: Comorbidity, Assessment, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Patricia; Deptula, Andrew; Yuan, Derek Y

    2017-06-01

    This paper examines the overlap of conversion disorder with chronic pain conditions, describes ways to assess for conversion disorder, and provides an overview of evidence-based treatments for conversion disorder and chronic pain, with a focus on conversion symptoms. Conversion disorder is a significant problem that warrants further study, given that there are not many well-established guidelines. Accurate and timely assessment should help move treatment in a more fruitful direction and avoid unnecessary medical interventions. Advances in neuroimaging may also help further our understanding of conversion disorder. Creating a supportive environment and a collaborative treatment relationship and improving understanding of conversion symptoms appear to help individuals diagnosed with conversion disorder engage in appropriate treatments. Novel uses of earlier treatments, such as hypnosis and psychodynamic approaches, could potentially be beneficial and require a more vigorous and systematic study. There are treatments that produce significant improvements in functioning and reduction of physical symptoms from conversion disorder even for very severe cases. Hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and inpatient multidisciplinary treatment with intensive physiotherapy for severe cases have the most evidence to support reduction of symptoms. Components of treatment for conversion disorder overlap with treatments for chronic pain and can be used together to produce therapeutic effects for both conditions. Treatment needs to be tailored for each individual's specific symptoms.

  17. The Neurological Sequelae of Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia: Definitions, Diagnosis and Treatment of the Kernicterus Spectrum Disorders (KSDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Riordan, Sean M; Watchko, Jon; Shapiro, Steven M

    2017-01-01

    Despite its lengthy history, the study of jaundice, hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus suffers from a lack of clarity and consistency in the key terms used to describe both the clinical and pathophysiological nature of these conditions. For example, the term Bilirubin-induced Neurological Dysfunction (BIND) has been used to refer to all neurological sequelae caused by exposure to high levels of bilirubin, to only mild neurological sequelae, or to scoring systems that quantitate the progressive stages of Acute Bilirubin Encephalopathy (ABE). We seek to clarify and simplify terminology by introducing, defining, and proposing new terms and diagnostic criteria for kernicterus. We propose a systematic nomenclature based on pathophysiological and clinical criteria, presenting a logical argument for each term. Acknowledging observations that kernicterus is symptomatically broad and diverse, we propose the use of the overarching term Kernicterus Spectrum Disorders (KSDs) to encompass all the neurological sequelae of bilirubin neurotoxicity including Acute Bilirubin Neurotoxicity (ABE). We further suggest subclassification of KSDs based on the principal disabling features of kernicterus (motor, auditory). Finally, we suggest the term subtle KSD to designate a child with a history of significant bilirubin neurotoxicity with mild or subtle developmental delays. We conclude with a brief description of the limited treatments currently available for KSD, thereby underscoring the importance of further research. We believe that adopting a systematic nomenclature for the spectrum of clinical consequences of hyperbilirubinemia will help unify the field and promote more effective research in both prevention and treatment of KSDs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. [Conversion disorder: from DSM IV to DSM 5 or from a psychiatric to a neurological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, M; Willems, M H A

    2015-01-01

    According to one of the diagnostic criteria of the dsm iv for conversion disorder there has to be a temporal relationship between psychological factors and the onset, or the worsening, of the symptoms. This criterion has been omitted in the dsm-5. Another criterion, namely that the symptoms are not produced intentionally, has also been abandoned. A new recommendation is that therapists should look for neurological symptoms that support the diagnosis. To investigate whether studies support the changes in the criteria. We searched literature using PubMed. When the symptoms first appear, trauma or stress in 37% of patients is of a physical rather than a psychological nature. Different forms of stress were found in equal proportions (20%) in patients with or without conversion disorder. There are no specific stressors, except possibly in patients with dysphonia. The percentages of childhood abuse vary widely, namely from 0 to 85%. The characteristic phenomenon of 'la belle indifference' occurs in only 3% of patients with conversion disorder versus only 2% of controls. Most of the 'positive' clinical tests for partial paralysis and sensory and gait disorders are highly specific. There are no reliable tests for distinguishing conversion disorder from simulation. The changes of the criteria are supported by recent studies.

  19. Copper mediated neurological disorder: visions into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer and Menkes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Anami; Dev, Kapil; Tanwar, Ranjeet S; Selwal, Krishan K; Tyagi, Pankaj K

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a vital redox dynamic metal that is possibly poisonous in superfluous. Metals can traditionally or intricately cause propagation in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accretion in cells and this may effect in programmed cell death. Accumulation of Cu causes necrosis that looks to be facilitated by DNA damage, followed by activation of P53. Cu dyshomeostasis has also been concerned in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Menkes disease and is directly related to neurodegenerative syndrome that usually produces senile dementia. These mortal syndromes are closely related with an immense damage of neurons and synaptic failure in the brain. This review focuses on copper mediated neurological disorders with insights into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer and Menkes disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Ketogenic diet and childhood neurological disorders other than epilepsy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Iapadre, Giulia; Pisano, Simone; Coppola, Giangennaro

    2017-05-01

    In the last years, ketogenic diet (KD) has been experimentally utilized in various childhood neurologic disorders such as mitochondriopathies, alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), brain tumors, migraine, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of this review is to analyze how KD can target these different medical conditions, highlighting possible mechanisms involved. Areas covered: We have conducted an analysis on literature concerning KD use in mitochondriopathies, AHC, brain tumors, migraine, and ASD. Expert commentary: The role of KD in reducing seizure activity in some mitochondriopathies and its efficacy in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is known. Recently, few cases suggest the potentiality of KD in decreasing paroxysmal activity in children affected by AHC. A few data support its potential use as co-adjuvant and alternative therapeutic option for brain cancer, while any beneficial effect of KD on migraine remains unclear. KD could improve cognitive and social skills in a subset of children with ASD.

  1. Door-to-door survey of major neurological disorders (project in Al Quseir City, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Tallawy HN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hamdy NA El Tallawy,1 Wafaa MA Farghaly,1 Tarek A Rageh,1 Ghaydaa A Shehata,1 Reda Badry,1 Nabil A Metwally,2 Esam A El Moselhy,2 Mahmoud Hassan,2 Mohamed A Sayed,3 Ahmed A Waris,1 Yaser Hamed,2 Islam Shaaban,2 Mohamed A Hamed,1 Mahmoud Raafat Kandil11Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 2Department of Neurology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University (Assiut branch, Assiut, Egypt; 3Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, EgyptAbstract: A door-to-door survey, including every household, was conducted for all inhabitants of Al Quseir City (33,283, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt by three specialists of neurology as well as nine senior staff members of neurology and 15 female social workers to assess the epidemiology of major neurological disorders. Over six phases, from July 1, 2009 to January 31, 2012, screening of all eligible people in the population was carried out, by which case ascertainment of all major neurological disorders included in the study was done according to the accepted definitions and diagnostic criteria of the World Health Organization. The order of frequency of prevalence of the studied neurological disorders was dementia (3.83% for those aged > 60 years, migraine (2.8% for those aged > 8 years, stroke (6.2/1000 for those aged > 20 years, epilepsy (5.5/1000, Parkinson’s disease (452.1/100,000 for those aged > 40 years, cerebral palsy (3.6/1000 among children 37 years, chorea (21.03/100,000, athetosis (15/100,000, and multiple sclerosis (13.74/100,000. The incidence rates of stroke, epilepsy, and Bell’s palsy were 181/100,000, 48/100,000, and 98.9/100,000 per year, respectively.Keywords: prevalence, incidence, neurological disorders

  2. Prevalence nutritional disorders among patients hospitalised for stroke and discopathy in the neurology department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Sierżantowicz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional disorders pose a huge health problem worldwide. In Poland, symptoms of malnutrition are found on admission to hospital in approximately 30% of patients. Among neurological disorders that predispose to malnutrition, brain injuries are the most frequent. The disease leads to difficulties with self-care, disorientation, reduced intellectual capacity, and dysphagia. Acute spinal pain syndromes affect weight loss because of persistent severe pain, and frequent dizziness and headaches accompanying cervical discopathy. Aim of the research: To assess the degree of malnutrition in patients with stroke and discopathy hospitalised in the neurology ward. Material and methods : The study group consisted of 141 patients, including 90 with stroke and 51 with discopathy, hospitalised in the neurology ward. Research material was collected based on medical records and a proprietary questionnaire. Body mass index (BMI was calculated and assessed for each patient on admission and after hospitalisation. Results and conclusions: The study sample consisted of a similar group of women (49% and men (51% aged from 30 to over 70 years. Ischaemic stroke was diagnosed more often in women (66.2%, whereas discopathy was more common in men (43.4%. The differences in BMI present on admission and after hospitalisation in men and women indicated a falling tendency. A slightly greater drop in BMI was found in women after hospital stay (from 24.1 to 23.3 kg/m 2 . The lowest BMI on admission was observed in students and pensioners. Long-term hospitalisation significantly affected weight reduction – the longer the patients were hospitalised, the lower their BMI was. Preliminary assessment of the nutrition status on admission to a hospital ward and customising individual diets may help reduce the effects of malnutrition.

  3. Neonatal neurological disorders involving the brainstem: neurosonographic approaches through the squamous suture and the foramen magnum

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    Tu, Yi-Fang [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan); Chen, Cheng-Yu [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Lin, Yuh-Jey [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); Chang, Ying-Chao [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Children Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); Huang, Chao-Ching [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan)

    2005-09-01

    Brainstem damage which often indicates a critical condition is usually underestimated by trans-anterior-fontanel neurosonography (NS) owing to the far-field limitations. Instead, NS alternately scanning through the squamous suture of the temporal bones and the foramen magnum could provide a better visualization of the brainstem structures. The NS characteristics of brainstem lesions caused by various neonatal neurological disorders, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), metabolic encephalopathy, birth trauma and bacterial meningoencephalitis, can be depicted at the acute stage. An echogenic change in the midbrain was found in patients with HIE or metabolic encephalopathy. In addition to the echogenic change, bilateral transtentorial temporal lobe herniation distorting the contour of the midbrain was observed in a patient with group B streptococcus meningoencephalitis, whereas echogenic changes at the level of the pons and/or the medulla oblongata, mainly localized in the dorsal part, could be observed in newborns with severe HIE, maple syrup urine disease or birth trauma. In this pictorial assay, we demonstrate the feasibility of NS imaging in evaluating the entire brainstem structure of critically ill neonates in the near field and illustrate the characteristic features of brainstem involvement in various neonatal neurological disorders along with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging correlation. (orig.)

  4. Lost in Translation: Defects in Transfer RNA Modifications and Neurological Disorders

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    Andrea Bednářová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are key molecules participating in protein synthesis. To augment their functionality they undergo extensive post-transcriptional modifications and, as such, are subject to regulation at multiple levels including transcription, transcript processing, localization and ribonucleoside base modification. Post-transcriptional enzyme-catalyzed modification of tRNA occurs at a number of base and sugar positions and influences specific anticodon–codon interactions and regulates translation, its efficiency and fidelity. This phenomenon of nucleoside modification is most remarkable and results in a rich structural diversity of tRNA of which over 100 modified nucleosides have been characterized. Most often these hypermodified nucleosides are found in the wobble position of tRNAs, where they play a direct role in codon recognition as well as in maintaining translational efficiency and fidelity, etc. Several recent studies have pointed to a link between defects in tRNA modifications and human diseases including neurological disorders. Therefore, defects in tRNA modifications in humans need intensive characterization at the enzymatic and mechanistic level in order to pave the way to understand how lack of such modifications are associated with neurological disorders with the ultimate goal of gaining insights into therapeutic interventions.

  5. Cohort Study on Respiratory and Neurological Disorders among Workers in a Bone Glue Factory in Egypt

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    MA Al-Batanony

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glues are strong, liquid adhesive derived from animal tissues. It has been shown that glue sniffing is associated with demyelinating polyneuropathy. The low molecular weight agents which cause occupational lung disease have generally included the isocyanates exposure to which could result in asthma among workers. Toluene is also used widely in glue and adhesive industry and households where toluene exposure and abuse can occur. Objectives: To study some respiratory and neurological disorders that may arise in workers in a bone glue factory in Queisna industrial zone, Menoufyia governorate, Egypt. Methods: In a historical cohort study, the exposed participants (n=50 were recruited from workers in a bone glue factory in Queisna industrial zone, Menoufyia governorate. The unexposed group was selected from workers' relatives who had never worked in glue industry. All participants completed a pre-designed questionnaire on personal and occupational histories. Pulmonary function tests as well as electromyography (EMG were performed for all participants. Urinary hippuric acid was also measure in all participants. Results: The prevalence of cough, asthmatic attacks and paresthesia were significantly higher among exposed than unexposed participants. Abnormal spirometric measurements (particularly towards obstruction, abnormal EMG and positive urinary hippuric acid were significantly more prevalent among exposed than unexposed group. Conclusion: Spirometry and EMG should be included in the periodic medical examination for exposed workers for early detection of respiratory and neurological disorders. Urinary hippuric acid could be a useful indicator of the nerve conduction abnormalities and should be measured periodically for these workers.

  6. Video Analysis of Human Gait and Posture to Determine Neurological Disorders

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    Ivan Lee

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the application of digital image processing techniques to the detection of neurological disorder. Visual information extracted from the postures and movements of a human gait cycle can be used by an experienced neurologist to determine the mental health of the person. However, the current visual assessment of diagnosing neurological disorder is based very much on subjective observation, and hence the accuracy of diagnosis heavily relies on experience. Other diagnostic techniques employed involve the use of imaging systems which can only be operated under highly constructed environment. A prototype has been developed in this work that is able to capture the subject's gait on video in a relatively simple setup, and from which to process the selected frames of the gait in a computer. Based on the static visual features such as swing distances and joint angles of human limbs, the system identifies patients with Parkinsonism from the test subjects. To our knowledge, it is the first time swing distances are utilized and identified as an effective means for characterizing human gait. The experimental results have shown a promising potential in medical application to assist the clinicians in diagnosing Parkinsonism.

  7. Devices for Ambulatory Monitoring of Sleep-Associated Disorders in Children with Neurological Diseases

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    Adriana Ulate-Campos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Good sleep quality is essential for a child’s wellbeing. Early sleep problems have been linked to the later development of emotional and behavioral disorders and can negatively impact the quality of life of the child and his or her family. Sleep-associated conditions are frequent in the pediatric population, and even more so in children with neurological problems. Monitoring devices can help to better characterize sleep efficiency and sleep quality. They can also be helpful to better characterize paroxysmal nocturnal events and differentiate between nocturnal seizures, parasomnias, and obstructive sleep apnea, each of which has a different management. Overnight ambulatory detection devices allow for a tolerable, low cost, objective assessment of sleep quality in the patient’s natural environment. They can also be used as a notification system to allow for rapid recognition and prompt intervention of events like seizures. Optimal monitoring devices will be patient- and diagnosis-specific, but may include a combination of modalities such as ambulatory electroencephalograms, actigraphy, and pulse oximetry. We will summarize the current literature on ambulatory sleep devices for detecting sleep disorders in children with neurological diseases.

  8. Assessment of speech in neurological disorders: development of a Swahili screening test.

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    Miller, Nick; Mshana, Gerry; Msuya, Oliva; Dotchin, Catherine; Walker, Richard; Aris, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Assessments for acquired motor-speech disorders that look at movements of the articulators would appear at first glance to be universal. This may be true for the most basic non-speech aspects of movement. We argue that assessments for speech motor control must be attuned to language-specific variables to be fully valid. We describe the rationale for, and development of a motor-speech-disorder screening test for Swahili speakers which includes impairment measures as well as measures of intelligibility and speech-voice naturalness. We further describe its initial validation in terms of content validity, feasibility of administration and scoring without requirements for lengthy training and technical expertise and application to groups of people with and without Parkinson's disease in Tanzania. Results indicate that the protocol is ready to use in so far as it is acceptable to users (clinicians, patients), is feasible to use, shows good interrater reliability, and is capable of differentiating performance in healthy speakers and those whose speech is disordered. We highlight needs for further development, including issues around training, development of local norms for healthy speakers and for speakers with a variety of neurological disturbances, and extension of the tool to cover culturally valid assessment of impact of communication disorders.

  9. Clinical Utility and Lifespan Profiling of Neurological Soft Signs in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

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    Chan, Raymond C. K.; Xie, Weizhen; Geng, Fu-lei; Wang, Ya; Lui, Simon S. Y.; Wang, Chuan-yue; Yu, Xin; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Rosenthal, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSSs) bear the promise for early detection of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, the sensitivity and specificity of NSSs in the psychosis continuum remains a topic of controversy. It is also unknown how NSSs reveal neurodevelopmental abnormality in schizophrenia. We investigated the effect sizes of NSSs in differentiating individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders from individuals with other psychiatric conditions and from covariate-matched healthy subjects. We also investigated the partitioned age-related variations of NSSs in both schizophrenia and healthy individuals. NSSs were assessed by the abridged version of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 3105 participants, consisting of healthy individuals (n =1577), unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (n = 155), individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (n = 256), schizophrenia patients (n = 738), and other psychiatric patients (n = 379). Exact matching and propensity score matching procedures were performed to control for covariates. Multiple regression was used to partition age-related variations. Individuals along the schizophrenia continuum showed elevated levels of NSSs, with moderate effect sizes, in contrast to other psychiatric patients who had minimal NSSs, as well as matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the age-and-NSS relationship in schizophrenia patients was represented by a flat but overall elevated pattern, in contrast to a U-shaped pattern in healthy individuals. In sum, NSSs capture a moderate portion of psychosis proneness with reasonable specificity. Lifespan profiling reveals an abnormal developmental trajectory of NSSs in schizophrenia patients, which supports the endophenotype hypothesis of NSSs by associating it with the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. PMID:26712863

  10. Disrupted avoidance learning in functional neurological disorder: Implications for harm avoidance theories.

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    Morris, Laurel S; To, Benjaman; Baek, Kwangyeol; Chang-Webb, Yee-Chien; Mitchell, Simon; Strelchuk, Daniela; Mikheenko, Yevheniia; Phillips, Wendy; Zandi, Michael; Jenaway, Allison; Walsh, Cathy; Voon, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Functional neurological disorder (FND) is an elusive disorder characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms alongside aberrant cognitive processing and negative affect, often associated with amygdala reactivity. We examined the effect of negative conditioning on cognitive function and amygdala reactivity in 25 FND patients and 20 healthy volunteers (HV). Participants were first conditioned to stimuli paired with negative affective or neutral (CS +/CS -) information. During functional MRI, subjects then performed an instrumental associative learning task to avoid monetary losses in the context of the previously conditioned stimuli. We expected that FND patients would be better at learning to avoid losses when faced with negatively conditioned stimuli (increased harm avoidance). Multi-echo resting state fMRI was also collected from the same subjects and a robust denoising method was employed, important for removing motion and physiological artifacts. FND subjects were more sensitive to the negative CS + compared to HV, demonstrated by a reinforcement learning model. Contrary to expectation, FND patients were generally more impaired at learning to avoid losses under both contexts (CS +/CS -), persisting to choose the option that resulted in a negative outcome demonstrated by both behavioural and computational analyses. FND patients showed enhanced amygdala but reduced dorsolateral prefrontal cortex responses when they received negative feedback. Patients also had increased resting state functional connectivity between these two regions. FND patients had impaired instrumental avoidance learning, findings that parallel previous observations of impaired action-outcome binding. FND patients further show enhanced behavioural and neural sensitivity to negative information. However, this did not translate to improved avoidance learning. Put together, our findings do not support the theory of harm avoidance in FND. We highlight a potential mechanism by which

  11. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Hitting the Bull's-Eye for Neurological Disorders

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    Zhao Zhong Chong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and its associated cell signaling pathways have garnered significant attention for their roles in cell biology and oncology. Interestingly,the explosion of information in this field has linked mTOR to neurological diseases with promising initial studies. mTOR, a 289 kDa serine/threonine protein kinase, plays an important role in cell growth and proliferation and is activated through phosphorylation in response to growth factors, mitogens and hormones. Growth factors, amino acids, cellular nutrients and oxygen deficiency can downregulate mTOR activity. The function of mTOR signaling is mediated primarily through two mTOR complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 initiates cap-dependent protein translation, a rate-limiting step of protein synthesis, through the phosphorylation of the targets eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K. In contrast, mTORC2 regulates development of the cytoskeleton and also controls cell survival. Although closely tied to tumorigenesis, mTOR and the downstream signaling pathways are significantly involved in the central nervous system (CNS with synaptic plasticity, memory retention, neuroendocrine regulation associated with food intake and puberty and modulation of neuronal repair following injury. The signaling pathways of mTOR also are believed to be a significant component in a number of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and Huntington disease, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, fragile X syndrome, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and ischemic stroke. Here we describe the role of mTOR in the CNS and illustrate the potential for new strategies directed against neurological disorders.

  12. The use of ketogenic diet in special situations: expanding use in intractable epilepsy and other neurologic disorders

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    Munhyang Lee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet has been widely used and proved to be effective for intractable epilepsy. Although the mechanisms underlying its antiepileptic effects remain to be proven, there are increasing experimental evidences for its neuroprotective effects along with many researches about expanding use of the diet in other neurologic disorders. The first success was reported in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome, in which the diet served as an alternative metabolic source. Many neurologic disorders share some of the common pathologic mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction, altered neurotransmitter function and synaptic transmission, or abnormal regulation of reactive oxygen species, and the role of the ketogenic diet has been postulated in these mechanisms. In this article, we introduce an overview about the expanding use and emerging trials of the ketogenic diet in various neurologic disorders excluding intractable epilepsy and provide explanations of the mechanisms in that usage.

  13. The use of ketogenic diet in special situations: expanding use in intractable epilepsy and other neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The ketogenic diet has been widely used and proved to be effective for intractable epilepsy. Although the mechanisms underlying its anti-epileptic effects remain to be proven, there are increasing experimental evidences for its neuroprotective effects along with many researches about expanding use of the diet in other neurologic disorders. The first success was reported in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome, in which the diet served as an alternative metabolic source. Many neurologic disorders share some of the common pathologic mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction, altered neurotransmitter function and synaptic transmission, or abnormal regulation of reactive oxygen species, and the role of the ketogenic diet has been postulated in these mechanisms. In this article, we introduce an overview about the expanding use and emerging trials of the ketogenic diet in various neurologic disorders excluding intractable epilepsy and provide explanations of the mechanisms in that usage. PMID:23049588

  14. Effectiveness of Music Therapy as an aid to Neurorestoration of children with severe neurological disorders

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    Maria L Bringas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was a two-armed parallel group design aimed at testing real world effectiveness of a music therapy (MT intervention for children with severe neurological disorders. The control group received only the standard neurorestoration program and the experimental group received an additional MT Auditory Attention plus Communication (ACC protocol just before the usual occupational and speech therapy. Multivariate Item Response Theory (MIRT identified a neuropsychological status-latent variable manifested in all children and which exhibited highly significant changes only in the experimental group. Changes in brain plasticity also occurred in the experimental group, as evidenced using a Mismatch Event Related paradigm which revealed significant post intervention positive responses in the latency range between 308 and 400 ms in frontal regions. LORETA EEG source analysis identified prefrontal and midcingulate regions as differentially activated by the MT in the experimental group. Taken together, our results showing improved attention and communication as well as changes in brain plasticity in children with severe neurological impairments, highlight/comfort the importance of MT for the rehabilitation of patients across a wide range of dysfunctions.

  15. [The role of experience in the neurology of facial expression of emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Fernando; Pérez, Miguel A; Arana, José M; Mestas, Lilia; López, Rafael M

    2015-04-01

    Facial expression of emotion has an important social function that facilitates interaction between people. This process has a neurological basis, which is not isolated from the context, or the experience of the interaction between people in that context. Yet, to date, the impact that experience has on the perception of emotions is not completely understood. To discuss the role of experience in the recognition of facial expression of emotions and to analyze the biases towards emotional perception. The maturation of the structures that support the ability to recognize emotion goes through a sensitive period during adolescence, where experience may have greater impact on emotional recognition. Experiences of abuse, neglect, war, and stress generate a bias towards expressions of anger and sadness. Similarly, positive experiences generate a bias towards the expression of happiness. Only when people are able to use the facial expression of emotions as a channel for understanding an expression, will they be able to interact appropriately with their environment. This environment, in turn, will lead to experiences that modulate this capacity. Therefore, it is a self-regulatory process that can be directed through the implementation of intervention programs on emotional aspects.

  16. Childhood developmental disorders: an academic and clinical convergence point for psychiatry, neurology, psychology and pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Allan L

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances in understanding brain development and behavior have not been accompanied by revisions of traditional academic structure. Disciplinary isolation and a lack of meaningful interdisciplinary opportunities are persistent barriers in academic medicine. To enhance clinical practice, research, and training for the next generation, academic centers will need to take bold steps that challenge traditional departmental boundaries. Such change is not only desirable but, in fact, necessary to bring about a truly innovative and more effective approach to treating disorders of the developing brain. I focus on developmental disorders as a convergence point for transcending traditional academic boundaries. First, the current taxonomy of developmental disorders is described with emphasis on how current diagnostic systems inadvertently hinder research progress. Second, I describe the clinical features of autism, a phenomenologically defined condition, and Rett and fragile X syndromes, neurogenetic diseases that are risk factors for autism. Finally, I describe how the fields of psychiatry, psychology, neurology, and pediatrics now have an unprecedented opportunity to promote an interdisciplinary approach to training, research, and clinical practice and, thus, advance a deeper understanding of developmental disorders. Research focused on autism is increasingly demonstrating the heterogeneity of individuals diagnosed by DSM criteria. This heterogeneity hinders the ability of investigators to replicate research results as well as progress towards more effective, etiology-specific interventions. In contrast, fragile X and Rett syndromes are 'real' diseases for which advances in research are rapidly accelerating towards more disease-specific human treatment trials. A major paradigm shift is required to improve our ability to diagnose and treat individuals with developmental disorders. This paradigm shift must take place at all levels - training, research and clinical

  17. First report of persistent dengue-1-associated autoimmune neurological disturbance: neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccioni-Sohler, Marzia; Ornelas, Alice M M; de Souza, Andrea S; Cabral-Castro, Mauro Jorge; Ramos, Jessyca T M A; Rosadas, Carolina; Salgado, Maria Cecilia F; Castiglione, Alexandre A; Ferry, Fernando; Peralta, Jose Mauro; Voloch, Carolina Moreira; Tanuri, Amilcar; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2017-10-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes immune-mediated diseases. Neurological involvement represents a severe condition that is rarely observed in DENV-1 infection. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO)/NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) are idiopathic immune-mediated demyelinating syndromes of the central nervous system. We report a 17-year-old female with oligosymptomatic DENV-1 viremia, diagnosed as NMOSD. Magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord and brainstem lesions. Antibody for aquaporin 4 was negative. DENV-1 RNA infection was detected by serial RT-PCR and confirmed by phylogenetic analysis in serum. Although there are some reports of NMO post-dengue infection, there are not any published accounts of NMOSD with coexistent and persistent DENV-1 infection.

  18. Current Perspectives on the Beneficial Role of Ginkgo biloba in Neurological and Cerebrovascular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kevin M.; Shah, Zahoor A.

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract is an alternative medicine available as a standardized formulation, EGb 761®, which consists of ginkgolides, bilobalide, and flavonoids. The individual constituents have varying therapeutic mechanisms that contribute to the pharmacological activity of the extract as a whole. Recent studies show anxiolytic properties of ginkgolide A, migraine with aura treatment by ginkgolide B, a reduction in ischemia-induced glutamate excitotoxicity by bilobalide, and an alternative antihypertensive property of quercetin, among others. These findings have been observed in EGb 761 as well and have led to clinical investigation into its use as a therapeutic for conditions such as cognition, dementia, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular diseases. This review explores the therapeutic mechanisms of the individual EGb 761 constituents to explain the pharmacology as a whole and its clinical application to cardiovascular and neurological disorders, in particular ischemic stroke. PMID:26604665

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Genome-Wide Transcriptomic, Methylomic, and Network Perturbations in Brain and Blood Predicting Neurological Disorders

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    Qingying Meng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the traumatic brain injury (TBI pathology, particularly concussive injury, is a serious obstacle for diagnosis, treatment, and long-term prognosis. Here we utilize modern systems biology in a rodent model of concussive injury to gain a thorough view of the impact of TBI on fundamental aspects of gene regulation, which have the potential to drive or alter the course of the TBI pathology. TBI perturbed epigenomic programming, transcriptional activities (expression level and alternative splicing, and the organization of genes in networks centered around genes such as Anax2, Ogn, and Fmod. Transcriptomic signatures in the hippocampus are involved in neuronal signaling, metabolism, inflammation, and blood function, and they overlap with those in leukocytes from peripheral blood. The homology between genomic signatures from blood and brain elicited by TBI provides proof of concept information for development of biomarkers of TBI based on composite genomic patterns. By intersecting with human genome-wide association studies, many TBI signature genes and network regulators identified in our rodent model were causally associated with brain disorders with relevant link to TBI. The overall results show that concussive brain injury reprograms genes which could lead to predisposition to neurological and psychiatric disorders, and that genomic information from peripheral leukocytes has the potential to predict TBI pathogenesis in the brain.

  20. Molecular tracking of antigen-specific T cell clones in neurological immune-mediated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Paolo A.; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bielekova, Bibiana; Gran, Bruno; Marques, Adriana; Utz, Ursula; McFarland, Henry F.; Jacobson, Steve; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Summary T cells recognizing self or microbial antigens may trigger or reactivate immune-mediated diseases. Monitoring the frequency of specific T cell clonotypes to assess a possible link with the course of disease has been a difficult task with currently available technology. Our goal was to track individual candidate pathogenic T cell clones, selected on the basis of previous extensive studies from patients with immune-mediated disorders of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis, HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/ TSP) and chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. We developed and applied a highly specific and sensitive technique to track single CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones through the detection and quantification of T cell receptor (TCR) α or β chain complementarity-determining region 3 transcripts by real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. We examined the frequency of the candidate pathogenic T cell clones in the peripheral blood and CSF during the course of neurological disease. Using this approach, we detected variations of clonal frequencies that appeared to be related to clinical course, significant enrichment in the CSF, or both. By integrating clono-type tracking with direct visualization of antigen-specific staining, we showed that a single T cell clone contributed substantially to the overall recognition of the viral peptide/MHC complex in a patient with HAM/ TSP. T cell clonotype tracking is a powerful new technology enabling further elucidation of the dynamics of expansion of autoreactive or pathogen-specific T cells that mediate pathological or protective immune responses in neurological disorders. PMID:12477694

  1. Targeting Astrocytes for Treating Neurological Disorders: Carbon Monoxide and Noradrenaline-Induced Increase in Lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Anemari; Vardjan, Nina; Zorec, Robert

    2017-06-22

    There are at least three reasons why brain astrocytes represent a new target for treating neurological disorders. First, although the human neocortex represents over 80% of brain mass, neurons are outnumbered by non-neuronal cells, including astrocytes, a neuroglial cell type. Second, as in neurons, vesicle-based release of transmitters is present in astrocytes, however with much slower kinetics than in neurons. Third, astrocytes contain glycogen, which can be transformed to L-lactate in glycolysis. L-lactate is considered to be a fuel and a signalling molecule involved in cognition and neuroprotection. The mechanisms of neuroprotection are unclear but may be linked to carbon monoxide, a product of the heme oxygenase, an evolutionarily conserved cellular cytoprotectant. Increased levels of local carbon monoxide arising from heme oxygenase activity may increase L-lactate, but direct measurements of cytosolic L-lactate are lacking. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanosensor selective for L-lactate was used to monitor cytosolic levels of L-lactate while cultured astrocytes were exposed to carbon monoxide. The results revealed that in astrocytes exposed to carbon monoxide there is no significant increase in L-lactate, however, when noradrenaline, a potent glycogenolytic agent, is applied, cytosolic levels of L-lactate are increased, but strongly attenuated in astrocytes pretreated with carbon monoxide. These first measurements of carbon monoxide-modulated L-lactate levels in astrocytes provide evidence that the L-lactate and heme oxygenase neuroprotective systems may interact. In conclusion, not only the abundance of astrocytes but their signalling capacity using vesicles and metabolites, such as L-lactate, are valid targets for neurological disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Insights into the Pathology of the α2-Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in Neurological Disorders; Lessons from Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Toke J; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    A functional Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase consists of a catalytic α subunit and a regulatory β subunit. Four α isoforms of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase are found in mammals, each with a unique expression pattern and catalytic activity. The α2 isoform, encoded by the ATP1A2 gene, is primarily found in the central nervous system (CNS) and in heart-, skeletal- and smooth muscle tissues. In the CNS, the α2 isoform is mainly expressed in glial cells. In particular, the α2 isoform is found in astrocytes, important for astrocytic K(+) clearance and, consequently, the indirect uptake of neurotransmitters. Both processes are essential for proper brain activity, and autosomal dominantly mutations in the ATP1A2 gene cause the neurological disorder Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2). FHM2 is a severe subtype of migraine with aura including temporary numbness or weakness, and affecting only one side of the body. FHM2 patients often suffer from neurological comorbidities such as seizures, sensory disturbances, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric manifestations. The functional consequences of FHM2 disease mutations leads to a partial or complete loss of function of pump activity; however, a clear phenotype-genotype correlation has yet to be elucidated. Gene-modified mouse models targeting the Atp1a2 gene have proved instrumental in the understanding of the pathology of FHM2. Several Atp1a2 knockout (KO) mice targeting different exons have been reported. Homozygous Atp1a2 KO mice die shortly after birth due to respiratory malfunction resulting from abnormal Cl(-) homeostasis in brainstem neurons. Heterozygous KO mice are viable, but display altered behavior and neurological deficits such as altered spatial learning, decreased motor activity and enhanced fear/anxiety compared to wild type mice. FHM2 knock-in (KI) mouse models carrying the human in vivo disease mutations W887R and G301R have also been reported. Both models display altered cortical spreading depression (CSD) and point

  3. INSIGHTS INTO THE PATHOLOGY OF THE α2-Na+/K+-ATPase IN NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS; LESSONS FROM ANIMAL MODELS

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    Toke Jost Isaksen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A functional Na+/K+-ATPase consists of a catalytic α subunit and a regulatory β subunit. Four α isoforms of the Na+/K+-ATPase are found in mammals, each with a unique expression pattern and catalytic activity. The α2 isoform, encoded by the ATP1A2 gene, is primarily found in the central nervous system (CNS and in heart-, skeletal- and smooth muscle tissues. In the CNS, the α2 isoform is mainly expressed in neuroglial cells. In particular, the α2 isoform is found in astrocytes, and is important for astrocytic K+ clearance and, consequently, the indirect uptake of neurotransmitters. Both processes are essential for proper brain activity, and autosomal dominantly mutations in the ATP1A2 gene cause the neurological disorder Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2. FHM2 is a severe subtype of migraine with aura that involving temporary numbness or weakness, and affecting only one side of the body. FHM2 patients often suffer from neurological comorbidities such as seizures, sensory disturbances, cognitive impairment and psychiatric manifestations. The functional consequences of FHM2 disease mutations leads to a partial or complete loss of function of pump activity; however a clear phenotype-genotype correlation has yet to be elucidated. Gene-modified mouse models targeting the Atp1a2 gene have proved instrumental in the understanding of the pathology of FHM2. Several Atp1a2 knockout (KO mice targeting different exons have been reported. Homozygous Atp1a2 KO mice die shortly after birth due to respiratory malfunction resulting from abnormal Cl- homeostasis in brainstem neurons. Heterozygous KO mice are viable, but display altered behavior and neurological deficits such as altered spatial learning, decreased motor activity and enhanced fear/anxiety compared to wild type mice. FHM2 knock-in (KI mouse models carrying the human in vivo disease mutations W887R and G301R have also been reported. Both models display altered cortical spreading

  4. Interleukin-6 analysis of 572 consecutive CSF samples from neurological disorders: A special focus on neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzawa, Akiyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Masuda, Hiroki; Ohtani, Ryohei; Uchida, Tomohiko; Sawai, Setsu; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    Elevation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) interleukin (IL)-6 has been reported in various neurological disorders but has never been systematically analyzed. Our main objectives are to compare the CSF IL-6 levels among various neurological disorders and to evaluate the significance of CSF IL-6 measurements for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We retrospectively investigated the IL-6 levels of 572 consecutive CSF samples in patients with various neurological disorders. Additionally, the associations between clinical manifestations in NMO patients and CSF IL-6 levels were closely investigated. Among the neurological disorders, patients with NMO had the highest CSF IL-6 level. Receiver operating characteristic analysis found the optimal cutoff CSF IL-6 value for diagnosing NMO as 7.8pg/ml, and the sensitivity and specificity were 0.7317 and 0.7694, respectively. In NMO, CSF IL-6 levels were correlated with the length of the spinal cord lesion and anti-aquaporin-4 antibody-positivity and decreased after treatment. CSF IL-6 can be high in various inflammatory and non-inflammatory CNS disorders, but its upregulation appears to be the most remarkable in NMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Systematic review: efficacy and safety of medical marijuana in selected neurologic disorders: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Barbara S; Brust, John C M; Fife, Terry; Bronstein, Jeff; Youssof, Sarah; Gronseth, Gary; Gloss, David

    2014-04-29

    To determine the efficacy of medical marijuana in several neurologic conditions. We performed a systematic review of medical marijuana (1948-November 2013) to address treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), epilepsy, and movement disorders. We graded the studies according to the American Academy of Neurology classification scheme for therapeutic articles. Thirty-four studies met inclusion criteria; 8 were rated as Class I. The following were studied in patients with MS: (1) Spasticity: oral cannabis extract (OCE) is effective, and nabiximols and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are probably effective, for reducing patient-centered measures; it is possible both OCE and THC are effective for reducing both patient-centered and objective measures at 1 year. (2) Central pain or painful spasms (including spasticity-related pain, excluding neuropathic pain): OCE is effective; THC and nabiximols are probably effective. (3) Urinary dysfunction: nabiximols is probably effective for reducing bladder voids/day; THC and OCE are probably ineffective for reducing bladder complaints. (4) Tremor: THC and OCE are probably ineffective; nabiximols is possibly ineffective. (5) Other neurologic conditions: OCE is probably ineffective for treating levodopa-induced dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson disease. Oral cannabinoids are of unknown efficacy in non-chorea-related symptoms of Huntington disease, Tourette syndrome, cervical dystonia, and epilepsy. The risks and benefits of medical marijuana should be weighed carefully. Risk of serious adverse psychopathologic effects was nearly 1%. Comparative effectiveness of medical marijuana vs other therapies is unknown for these indications.

  6. Plasma Signature of Neurological Disease in the Monogenetic Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md. Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Yi, Sue; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Safeukui, Innocent; Haldar, Kasturi

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neurological disorders would greatly improve their management and treatment. A major hurdle is that inflammatory products of cerebral disease are not easily detected in blood. Inflammation in multiple organs and heterogeneity in disease present additional challenges in distinguishing the extent to which a blood-based marker reflects disease in brain or other afflicted organs. Murine models of the monogenetic disorder Niemann-Pick Type C present aggressive forms of cerebral and liver inflammatory disease. Microarray analyses previously revealed age-dependent changes in innate immunity transcripts in the mouse brain. We have now validated four putative secretory inflammatory markers that are also elevated in mouse liver. We include limited, first time analysis of human Niemann-Pick Type C liver and cerebellum. Furthermore, we utilized 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD, an emerging therapeutic) administered intraperitoneally in mice, which abrogates inflammatory pathology in the liver but has limited effect on the brain. By analyzing the corresponding effects on inflammatory plasma proteins, we identified cathepsin S as a lead indicator of liver disease. In contrast, lysozyme was a marker of both brain and liver disease. 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin had no effect on transcripts of neuron-specific 24-hydroxylase, and its product 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol was not a useful indicator in mouse plasma. Our data suggest that dual analysis of levels of the inflammatory markers lysozyme and cathepsin S may enable detection of multiple distinct states of neurodegeneration in plasma. PMID:24488491

  7. [Meta-analytic assessment of parenteral cytoflavin effectiveness in different neurologic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazin, P V; Sheshunov, I V; Mazina, N K

    To carry out an integral quantitative assessment of the clinical efficacy of parenteral use of cytoflavin in treatment of patients with CNS disorders based on the systemic selection of published controlled clinical trials and their meta-analysis. Twenty-one high evidence-based studies on the efficacy of parenteral use of cytoflavin in different CNS disorders (4314 patients) have been analyzed. Comparisons with basic treatment groups were undertaken to clarify the drug clinical effects adjusted for heterogeneity and variability of response parameters. An analysis of formalized efficacy indicators (increase in the absolute and relative value, odds ratio (OR) etc.) has demonstrated the advantages of cytoflavin. Group combination has increased the statistical power of the meta-analysis. Two models with fixed (Mantel-Haenszel amendment) and random effects were used. All the estimation protocols in different clinical groups of patients with neurologic diseases provided similar results and confirmed the stability of calculated values irrespective of heterogeneity of data arrays. OR of positive outcomes in neuropathologies treated with cytoflavin was 3,02 with χ2 heterogeneity 427,3 and p = 0,000…, I2= 85,7% (82%; 88%).

  8. Stiff Person Syndrome: A Rare Neurological Disorder, Heterogeneous in Clinical Presentation and Not Easy to Treat

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    Susanne Buechner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stiff person syndrome (SPS is a rare neurological disorder characterized by progressive rigidity of axial and limb muscles associated with painful spasms. SPS can be classified into classic SPS, paraneoplastic SPS, and SPS variants. Its underlying pathogenesis is probably autoimmune, as in most cases antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD are observed. Similarly, paraneoplastic SPS is usually linked to anti-amphiphysin antibodies. Treatment is based on drugs enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA transmission and immunomodulatory agents. Case Series. Patient 1 is a 45-year-old male affected by the classic SPS, Patient 2 is a 73-year-old male affected by paraneoplastic SPS, and Patient 3 is a 68-year-old male affected by the stiff limb syndrome, a SPS variant where symptoms are confined to the limbs. Symptoms, diagnostic findings, and clinical course were extremely variable in the three patients, and treatment was often unsatisfactory and not well tolerated, thus reducing patient compliance. Clinical manifestations also included some unusual features such as recurrent vomiting and progressive dysarthria. Conclusions. SPS is a rare disorder that causes significant disability. Because of its extensive clinical variability, a multitask and personalized treatment is indicated. A clearer understanding of uncommon clinical features and better-tolerated therapeutic strategies are still needed.

  9. Next generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of neurological disorders using ataxias as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Andrea H; Kwasniewska, Alexandra C; Lise, Stefano; Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Becker, Esther B E; Bera, Katarzyna D; Shanks, Morag E; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Zameel Cader, M; Talbot, Kevin; de Silva, Rajith; Fletcher, Nicholas; Hastings, Rob; Jayawant, Sandeep; Morrison, Patrick J; Worth, Paul; Taylor, Malcolm; Tolmie, John; O'Regan, Mary; Valentine, Ruth; Packham, Emily; Evans, Julie; Seller, Anneke; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2013-10-01

    Many neurological conditions are caused by immensely heterogeneous gene mutations. The diagnostic process is often long and complex with most patients undergoing multiple invasive and costly investigations without ever reaching a conclusive molecular diagnosis. The advent of massively parallel, next-generation sequencing promises to revolutionize genetic testing and shorten the 'diagnostic odyssey' for many of these patients. We performed a pilot study using heterogeneous ataxias as a model neurogenetic disorder to assess the introduction of next-generation sequencing into clinical practice. We captured 58 known human ataxia genes followed by Illumina Next-Generation Sequencing in 50 highly heterogeneous patients with ataxia who had been extensively investigated and were refractory to diagnosis. All cases had been tested for spinocerebellar ataxia 1-3, 6, 7 and Friedrich's ataxia and had multiple other biochemical, genetic and invasive tests. In those cases where we identified the genetic mutation, we determined the time to diagnosis. Pathogenicity was assessed using a bioinformatics pipeline and novel variants were validated using functional experiments. The overall detection rate in our heterogeneous cohort was 18% and varied from 8.3% in those with an adult onset progressive disorder to 40% in those with a childhood or adolescent onset progressive disorder. The highest detection rate was in those with an adolescent onset and a family history (75%). The majority of cases with detectable mutations had a childhood onset but most are now adults, reflecting the long delay in diagnosis. The delays were primarily related to lack of easily available clinical testing, but other factors included the presence of atypical phenotypes and the use of indirect testing. In the cases where we made an eventual diagnosis, the delay was 3-35 years (mean 18.1 years). Alignment and coverage metrics indicated that the capture and sequencing was highly efficient and the consumable cost

  10. A role for myosin Va in cerebellar plasticity and motor learning: a possible mechanism underlying neurological disorder in myosin Va disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Mariko; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Tanaka, Masahiko; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Hirashima, Naohide; Murata, Yoshiharu; Kano, Masanobu; Takagishi, Yoshiko

    2011-04-20

    Mutations of the myosin Va gene cause the neurological diseases Griscelli syndrome type 1 and Elejalde syndrome in humans and dilute phenotypes in rodents. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the neurological disorders in myosin Va diseases, we conducted an integrated analysis at the molecular, cellular, electrophysiological, and behavioral levels using the dilute-neurological (d-n) mouse mutant. These mice manifest an ataxic gait and clonic seizures during postnatal development, but the neurological disorders are ameliorated in adulthood. We found that smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) rarely extended into the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells (PCs) of young d-n mice, and there were few, if any, IP(3) receptors. Moreover, long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC synapses was abolished, consistent with our previous observations in juvenile lethal dilute mutants. Young d-n mice exhibited severe impairment of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. In contrast, adult d-n mice showed restoration of motor learning and LTD, and these neurological changes were associated with accumulation of SER and IP(3) receptors in some PC spines and the expression of myosin Va proteins in the PCs. RNA interference-mediated repression of myosin Va caused a reduction in the number of IP(3) receptor-positive spines in cultured PCs. These findings indicate that myosin Va function is critical for subsequent processes in localization of SER and IP(3) receptors in PC spines, LTD, and motor learning. Interestingly, d-n mice had defects of motor coordination from young to adult ages, suggesting that the role of myosin Va in PC spines is not sufficient for motor coordination.

  11. Differential diagnosis between dementia and psychiatric disorders: Diagnostic criteria and supplementary exams. Recommendations of the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Cássio M C; de Pádua, Analuiza Camozzato; Smid, Jerusa; Areza-Fegyveres, Renata; Novaretti, Tânia; Bahia, Valeria S

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology published recommendations for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease These recommendations were updated following a review of evidence retrieved from national and international studies held on PUBMED, SCIELO and LILACS medical databases. The main aims of this review article are as follows: 1) to present the evidence found on Brazilian (LILACS, SCIELO) and International (MEDLINE) databases from articles published up to May 2011, on the differential diagnosis of these psychiatric disorders and dementia, with special focus on Dementia due to Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, including a review of supplementary exams which may facilitate the diagnostic process; and2) to propose recommendations for use by clinicians and researchers involved in diagnosing patients with dementia. Differential diagnosis between dementia and other neuropsychiatric disorders should always include assessments for depression, delirium, and use of psychoactive substances, as well as investigate the use of benzodiazepines, anti-epileptics and pattern of alcohol consumption.

  12. Evidence-based guideline update: Plasmapheresis in neurologic disorders: report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, I; Chaudhry, V; So, Y T; Cantor, F; Cornblath, D R; Rae-Grant, A

    2011-01-18

    To reassess the role of plasmapheresis in the treatment of neurologic disorders. We evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review for relevant articles from 1995 through September 2009. In addition, due to revision of the definitions of classification of evidence since the publication of the previous American Academy of Neurology assessment in 1996, the evidence cited in that manuscript was reviewed and reclassified. Plasmapheresis is established as effective and should be offered in severe acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP)/Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and in the short-term management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Class I studies, Level A). Plasmapheresis is established as ineffective and should not be offered for chronic or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) (Class I studies, Level A). Plasmapheresis is probably effective and should be considered for mild AIDP/GBS, as second-line treatment of steroid-resistant exacerbations in relapsing forms of MS, and for neuropathy associated with immunoglobulin A or immunoglobulin G gammopathy, based on at least one Class I or 2 Class II studies (Level B). Plasmapheresis is probably not effective and should not be considered for neuropathy associated with immunoglobulin M gammopathy, based on one Class I study (Level B). Plasmapheresis is possibly effective and may be considered for acute fulminant demyelinating CNS disease (Level C). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of plasmapheresis for myasthenia gravis, pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infection, and Sydenham chorea (Class III evidence, Level U).

  13. Differential diagnosis between dementia and psychiatric disorders: Diagnostic criteria and supplementary exams Recommendations of the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio M.C. Bottino

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2005, the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology published recommendations for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease These recommendations were updated following a review of evidence retrieved from national and international studies held on PUBMED, SCIELO and LILACS medical databases. The main aims of this review article are as follows: 1 to present the evidence found on Brazilian (LILACS, SCIELO and International (MEDLINE databases from articles published up to May 2011, on the differential diagnosis of these psychiatric disorders and dementia, with special focus on Dementia due to Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, including a review of supplementary exams which may facilitate the diagnostic process; and 2 to propose recommendations for use by clinicians and researchers involved in diagnosing patients with dementia. Differential diagnosis between dementia and other neuropsychiatric disorders should always include assessments for depression, delirium, and use of psychoactive substances, as well as investigate the use of benzodiazepines, anti-epileptics and pattern of alcohol consumption.

  14. Common data elements for clinical research in mitochondrial disease: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaa, A.; Rahman, S.; Lombes, A.; Yu-Wai-Man, P.; Sheikh, M.K.; Alai-Hansen, S.; Cohen, B.H.; Dimmock, D.; Emrick, L.; Falk, M.J.; McCormack, S.; Mirsky, D.; Moore, T.; Parikh, S.; Shoffner, J.; Taivassalo, T.; Tarnopolsky, M.; Tein, I.; Odenkirchen, J.C.; Goldstein, A.; Koene, S.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The common data elements (CDE) project was developed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to provide clinical researchers with tools to improve data quality and allow for harmonization of data collected in different research studies. CDEs have been

  15. An Overview of Multiple Sclerosis: Medical, Psychosocial, and Vocational Aspects of a Chronic and Unpredictable Neurological Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.; Roessler, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common neurological disorders in the western hemisphere. Medical and psychosocial aspects of the disease such as causes and risk factors, diagnosis, incidence and prevalence, symptoms, courses, and treatment are described. Existing research regarding the employment…

  16. Gene expression profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant in severity of autism reveals differential regulation of neurologically relevant genes

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    Lee Norman H

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autism spectrum encompasses a set of complex multigenic developmental disorders that severely impact the development of language, non-verbal communication, and social skills, and are associated with odd, stereotyped, repetitive behavior and restricted interests. To date, diagnosis of these neurologically based disorders relies predominantly upon behavioral observations often prompted by delayed speech or aberrant behavior, and there are no known genes that can serve as definitive biomarkers for the disorders. Results Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant with respect to severity of autism and/or language impairment exhibit differential gene expression patterns on DNA microarrays. Furthermore, we show that genes important to the development, structure, and/or function of the nervous system are among the most differentially expressed genes, and that many of these genes map closely in silico to chromosomal regions containing previously reported autism candidate genes or quantitative trait loci. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that novel candidate genes for autism may be differentially expressed in lymphoid cell lines from individuals with autism spectrum disorders. This finding further suggests the possibility of developing a molecular screen for autism based on expressed biomarkers in peripheral blood lymphocytes, an easily accessible tissue. In addition, gene networks are identified that may play a role in the pathophysiology of autism.

  17. Cingulo-insular structural alterations associated with psychogenic symptoms, childhood abuse and PTSD in functional neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L; Matin, Nassim; Barsky, Arthur; Costumero-Ramos, Victor; Makaretz, Sara J; Young, Sigrid S; Sepulcre, Jorge; LaFrance, W Curt; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-06-01

    Adverse early-life events are predisposing factors for functional neurological disorder (FND) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cingulo-insular regions are implicated in the biology of both conditions and are sites of stress-mediated neuroplasticity. We hypothesised that functional neurological symptoms and the magnitude of childhood abuse would be associated with overlapping anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular volumetric reductions, and that FND and PTSD symptoms would map onto distinct cingulo-insular areas. This within-group voxel-based morphometry study probes volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptoms, adverse life events and PTSD symptoms in 23 mixed-gender FND patients. Separate secondary analyses were also performed in the subset of 18 women with FND to account for gender-specific effects. Across the entire cohort, there were no statistically significant volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptom severity or childhood abuse. In women with FND, however, parallel inverse associations were observed between left anterior insular volume and functional neurological symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 and the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms Conversion Disorder subscale. Similar inverse relationships were also appreciated between childhood abuse burden and left anterior insular volume. Across all subjects, PTSD symptom severity was inversely associated with dorsal ACC volume, and the magnitude of lifetime adverse events was inversely associated with left hippocampal volume. This study reveals distinct cingulo-insular alterations for FND and PTSD symptoms and may advance our understanding of FND. Potential biological convergence between stress-related neuroplasticity, functional neurological symptoms and reduced insular volume was identified. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017

  18. Decoding Crucial LncRNAs Implicated in Neurogenesis and Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayana, R; Singh, Shailja; Pati, Soumya

    2017-04-15

    Unraveling transcriptional heterogeneity and the labyrinthine nature of neurodevelopment can probe insights into neuropsychiatric disorders. It is noteworthy that adult neurogenesis is restricted to the subventricular and subgranular zones of the brain. Recent studies suggest long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as an avant-garde class of regulators implicated in neurodevelopment. But, paucity exists in the knowledge regarding lncRNAs in neurogenesis and their associations with neurodevelopmental defects. To address this, we extensively reviewed the existing literature databases as well as performed relevant in-silico analysis. We utilized Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) differential search module and generated a catalogue of ∼30,000 transcripts specific to the neurogenic zones, including coding and non-coding transcripts. To explore the existing lncRNAs reported in neurogenesis, we performed extensive literature mining and identified 392 lncRNAs. These degenerate lncRNAs were mapped onto the ABA transcript list leading to detection of 20 lncRNAs specific to neurogenic zones (Dentate gyrus/Lateral ventricle), among which 10 showed associations to several neurodevelopmental disorders following in-silico mapping onto brain disease databases like Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, AutDB, and lncRNADisease. Notably, using ABA correlation module, we could establish lncRNA-to-mRNA coexpression networks for the above 10 candidate lncRNAs. Finally, pathway prediction revealed physical, biochemical, or regulatory interactions for nine lncRNAs. In addition, ABA differential search also revealed 54 novel significant lncRNAs from the null set (∼30,000). Conclusively, this review represents an updated catalogue of lncRNAs in neurogenesis and neurological diseases, and overviews the field of OMICs-based data analysis for understanding lncRNome-based regulation in neurodevelopment.

  19. Survey of Japanese pediatricians on vaccination of children with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Takuya; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Arai, Hiroshi; Imaishi, Hidenori; Uno, Risa; Tanaka, Junko; Nagai, Toshisaburou; Nishida, Masaru; Awaya, Yutaka; Maekawa, Kihei

    2011-10-01

    Primary care physicians in Japan are often unwilling to vaccinate children with neurological disorders. The aim of the present study was to determine the state of vaccination in children who are severely handicapped and/or have convulsive disorders, in order to increase the vaccination rate in this patient population. Six hundred and eighty pediatricians belonging to Osaka Shonika Ikai were asked to answer a questionnaire, and 359 doctors responded. Two hundred and thirty-four doctors consulted for febrile seizures (Fs), 190 for epilepsy and 145 for conditions affecting severely handicapped children, responded that they refused to vaccinate. The reasons for reluctance to vaccinate these children were short interval since the last seizure, including febrile (226 doctors) and epileptic (121 doctors) seizures. It was especially likely that a child with a past history of status epilepticus would be refused vaccination. Primary care doctors are very cautious about the indications for vaccination, especially the inoculation of live vaccines, because they often induce post-vaccination fever-associated convulsions. Intractable daily epileptic seizures was the most common reason for refusal to vaccinate severely handicapped children. Examples of inadequate decision-making as regards the indications for vaccination were: "need more than 6 months observation since last seizure whether Fs or epileptic", "need EEG examination for Fs", "contraindication because of low bodyweight and/or chronic wheezing in severely handicapped children". There is a need to provide correct information about the adverse effects of vaccination and for greater cooperation between primary care doctors and pediatric neurologists. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Neurologic abnormalities in mouse models of the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and mucolipidosis III γ.

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    Rachel A Idol

    Full Text Available UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β, while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ. Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 in myasthenia gravis compared to other neurological disorders and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, Steven P; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Romi, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    MMP-3 is capable of degrading a variety of proteins, including agrin, which plays a critical role in neuromuscular signaling by controlling acetylcholine receptor clustering. High MMP-3 levels in a proportion of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients have been reported. A pathogenic role of MMP-3 in other neurological disorders has been suggested but not proven. We have therefore examined the levels of MMP-3 in 124 MG patients and compared them to 59 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, 74 epilepsy patients, 33 acute stroke patients, and 90 healthy controls. 15.3% of the patients in the MG group were MMP-3-positive (defined as higher than cutoff value 48 ng/mL) with very high mean MMP-3 concentration (79.9 ng/mL), whereas the proportion of MMP-3 positive patients in the MS (3.4%), epilepsy (6.7%), stroke (0%), and the control group (4.4%) was significantly lower. Mean MMP-3 concentration in the total MG group (25.5 ng/mL) was significantly higher than in the MS (16.6 ng/mL) and stroke (11.7 ng/mL) groups, but did not differ significantly from the epilepsy (19.4 ng/mL) and the control group (23.4 ng/mL). MMP-3 may have a specific pathogenic effect in MG in addition to being associated with autoimmune diseases in general.

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 in Myasthenia Gravis Compared to Other Neurological Disorders and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven P. Luckman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available MMP-3 is capable of degrading a variety of proteins, including agrin, which plays a critical role in neuromuscular signaling by controlling acetylcholine receptor clustering. High MMP-3 levels in a proportion of myasthenia gravis (MG patients have been reported. A pathogenic role of MMP-3 in other neurological disorders has been suggested but not proven. We have therefore examined the levels of MMP-3 in 124 MG patients and compared them to 59 multiple sclerosis (MS patients, 74 epilepsy patients, 33 acute stroke patients, and 90 healthy controls. 15.3% of the patients in the MG group were MMP-3-positive (defined as higher than cutoff value 48 ng/mL with very high mean MMP-3 concentration (79.9 ng/mL, whereas the proportion of MMP-3 positive patients in the MS (3.4%, epilepsy (6.7%, stroke (0%, and the control group (4.4% was significantly lower. Mean MMP-3 concentration in the total MG group (25.5 ng/mL was significantly higher than in the MS (16.6 ng/mL and stroke (11.7 ng/mL groups, but did not differ significantly from the epilepsy (19.4 ng/mL and the control group (23.4 ng/mL. MMP-3 may have a specific pathogenic effect in MG in addition to being associated with autoimmune diseases in general.

  3. Detection of enteroviruses in cases of neurological disorders in the State of Pará, Brazil

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    GOMES Maria de Lourdes Contente

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-one cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples mainly from cases of aseptic meningitis and motor deficiency syndrome were sent to the Virology Section of Evandro Chagas Institute, Belém Pará, in the period of January 1995 to January 1996 in order to isolate viruses. All samples were inoculated onto HEp-2 cell culture and newborn mice, with negative results. The probability of isolating viruses by these methods is reduced because of the low concentration of viral particles in these specimens. In order to obtain more information about the etiology of these cases, a group of 23 samples were selected to be tested by a more sensitive technique than the virus isolation - the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Specific primers directed to conserved regions in the enterovirus genome were used, considering that this group of viruses is frequently associated with these neurological disorder. The age of the patients ranged from 1 to 55 years and nearly all of them lived in Belém, State of Pará, North of Brazil. Of 15 samples analyzed by RT PCR nine (60% were positive; of these, 6 (66.6% had motor deficiency and 3 (33.3% developed aseptic meningitis. These results show that it is important to investigate enterovirus as cause of these syndromes.

  4. A novel predicted calcium-regulated kinase family implicated in neurological disorders.

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    Małgorzata Dudkiewicz

    Full Text Available The catalogues of protein kinases, the essential effectors of cellular signaling, have been charted in Metazoan genomes for a decade now. Yet, surprisingly, using bioinformatics tools, we predicted protein kinase structure for proteins coded by five related human genes and their Metazoan homologues, the FAM69 family. Analysis of three-dimensional structure models and conservation of the classic catalytic motifs of protein kinases present in four out of five human FAM69 proteins suggests they might have retained catalytic phosphotransferase activity. An EF-hand Ca(2+-binding domain in FAM69A and FAM69B proteins, inserted within the structure of the kinase domain, suggests they may function as Ca(2+-dependent kinases. The FAM69 genes, FAM69A, FAM69B, FAM69C, C3ORF58 (DIA1 and CXORF36 (DIA1R, are by large uncharacterised molecularly, yet linked to several neurological disorders in genetics studies. The C3ORF58 gene is found deleted in autism, and resides in the Golgi. Unusually high cysteine content and presence of signal peptides in some of the family members suggest that FAM69 proteins may be involved in phosphorylation of proteins in the secretory pathway and/or of extracellular proteins.

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological and Ischemic Disorders Employing Carbon Nanotube Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrick P. Komane; Yahya E. Choonara; Lisa C. du Toit; Pradeep Kumar; Pierre P. D. Kondiah; Girish Modi; Viness Pillay

    2016-01-01

    .... Based on their outstanding physicochemical properties, carbon nanotubes have the potential to be employed as theranostic tools for neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's...

  6. Neuroprotective Effects of Exercise on Brain Edema and Neurological Movement Disorders Following the Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Erfani, Soheila; Fereidoni, Masoud; Shahbazi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia and reperfusion causes physiological and biochemical changes in the neuronal cells that will eventually lead to cell damage. Evidence indicates that exercise reduces the ischemia and reperfusion-induced brain damages in animal models of stroke. In the present study, the effect of exercise preconditioning on brain edema and neurological movement disorders following the cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats was investigated. Twenty-one adult male wistar rats (weighing 260-300 g) were randomly divided into three groups: sham operated, exercise plus ischemia, and ischemia group (7 rats per group). The rats in exercise group were trained to run on a treadmill 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Transient focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion were induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 60 minutes, followed by reperfusion for 23 hours. After 24 hours ischemia, movement disorders were tested by a special neurological examination. Also, cerebral edema was assessed by determining the brain water content. The results showed that pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced brain edema (Pexercise preconditioning decreased the neurological movement disorders caused by brain ischemia and reperfusion (Pexercise had neuroprotective effects against brain ischemia and reperfusion-induced edema and movement disorders. Thus, it could be considered as a useful strategy for prevention of ischemic injuries, especially in people at risk.

  7. The feasibility of home polysomnographic recordings prescribed for sleep-related neurological disorders: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, N; Jonas, J; Schaff, J-L; Koessler, L; Maillard, L; Vespignani, H

    2014-09-01

    Home polysomnography is being increasingly developed for sleep studies, with various grades of quality. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of affordable, high quality home polysomnographic recordings prescribed for suspected sleep-related neurological disorders. We prospectively screened all patients referred to the specialist sleep disorders clinic in Nancy University Hospital between May 2011 and August 2011. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they required polysomnography for the diagnosis of a sleep-related neurological disorder. One-night, polysomnography was performed in each patient's home by a trained sleep technician. Financial cost was determined prior to inclusion. A recording was considered as satisfactory if all the following criteria were present: at least, one EEG channel with continuous signal allowing determination of sleep stages and wake during more than 66% of sleep time; at least, one usable respiratory channel (airflow or either band) during more than 66% of sleep time; and usable oximetry during more than 66% of sleep time. Forty-eight of the 139 screened patients were included. Among the 48 home polysomnography recordings, 35 (72.9%) were satisfactory. Thirteen (27.1%) tracings displayed an unsatisfactory loss of EEG data, including seven (14.6%) tracings with an unsatisfactory loss of respiratory data. Home polysomnography prescribed for suspected sleep-related neurological disorders is feasible, with affordable costs, whilst maintaining high quality recording. Further studies are needed to measure the real medico-economic impact of promoting outpatient domiciliary explorations for sleep-related neurological disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Phosphorylated neurofilament H (pNF-H) as a potential diagnostic marker for neurological disorders in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intan-Shameha, A R; Divers, Thomas J; Morrow, Jennifer K; Graves, Amy; Olsen, Emil; Johnson, Amy L; Mohammed, Hussni O

    2017-10-01

    The current study aimed at the investigating the potential use of phosphorylated neurofilament H (pNF-H) as a diagnostic biomarker for neurologic disorders in the horse. Paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples (n=88) and serum only (n=30) were obtained from horses diagnosed with neurologic disorders and clinically healthy horses as control. The neurologic horses consisted of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) (38 cases) and cervical vertebral malformation (CVM) (23 cases). Levels of pNF-H were determined using an ELISA. The correlation between CSF and serum concentrations of pNF-H was evaluated using Spearman's Rank test and the significance of the difference among the groups was assessed using a nonparametric test. Horses had higher pNF-H levels in the CSF than serum. Horses afflicted with EPM had significantly higher serum pNF-H levels in comparison to controls or CVM cases. The correlation between CSF and serum pNF-H levels was poor in both the whole study population and among subgroups of horses included in the study. There was significant association between the likelihood of EPM and the concentrations of pNF-H in either the serum or CSF. These data suggest that pNF-H could be detected in serum and CSF samples from neurologic and control horses. This study demonstrated that pNF-H levels in serum and CSF have the potential to provide objective information to help in the early diagnosis of horses afflicted with neurologic disorders. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Additional Virtual Reality Sitting Balance Training Using XBox Kinect™ in Patients with Neurological Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xina Henry Quadros

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sitting balance is a prerequisite to upper extremity function, standing and walking, which is affected in various neurological diseases. It is important to attain a good level of sitting balance before one can proceed to standing. In recent years, virtual reality game training has gained a widespread application. Aim: This pilot study aimed to examine the role of additional virtual reality sitting balance training using a commercial interactive virtual reality system- Xbox Kinect™ in patients with neurological disorders. Materials and Methods: Four patients with sitting balance impairments following neurological disorders received two weeks of virtual reality based therapy along with the conventional physiotherapy. Sitting balance was evaluated using FIST (Function In Sitting Test scores at baseline, one week and after two weeks of intervention. Results: All four patients showed clinically significant improvement in FIST score between the pre and post intervention. Percentage of improvement in FIST score was approximately 27% with a minimum change of 10 points in the FIST score Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID=6.5. Conclusion: Additional virtual reality training may improve sitting balance control in neurological patients with balance impairments. It can be used as an adjunct in routine neurorehabilitation.

  10. Computerized Functional Reach Test to Measure Balance Stability in Elderly Patients With Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scena, Silvio; Steindler, Roberto; Ceci, Moira; Zuccaro, Stefano Maria; Carmeli, Eli

    2016-10-01

    The ability to maintain static and dynamic balance is a prerequisite for safe walking and for obtaining functional mobility. For this reason, a reliable and valid means of screening for risk of falls is needed. The functional reach test (FRT) is used in many countries, yet it does not provide some kinematic parameters such as shoulder or pelvic girdles translation. The purpose was to analyze video records measuring of distance, velocity, time length, arm direction and girdles translation while doing FRT. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted where the above variables were correlated to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) for mental status and the Tinetti balance assessment test, which have been validated, in order to computerize the FRT (cFRT) for elderly patients with neurological disorders. Eighty patients were tested and 54 were eligible to serve as experimental group. The patients underwent the MMSE, the Tinetti test and the FRT. LAB view software was used to record the FRT performances and to process the videos. The control group consisted of 51 healthy subjects who had been previously tested. The experimental group was not able to perform the tests as well as the healthy control subjects. The video camera provided valuable kinematic results such as bending down while performing the forward reach test. Instead of manual measurement, we proposed to use a cheap with fair resolution web camera to accurately estimate the FRT. The kinematic parameters were correlated with Tinetti and MMSE scores. The performance values established in this study indicate that the cFRT is a reliable and valid assessment, which provides more accurate data than "manual" test about functional reach.

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of Exercise on Brain Edema and Neurological Movement Disorders Following the Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Erfani, Soheila; Fereidoni, Masoud; Shahbazi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral ischemia and reperfusion causes physiological and biochemical changes in the neuronal cells that will eventually lead to cell damage. Evidence indicates that exercise reduces the ischemia and reperfusion-induced brain damages in animal models of stroke. In the present study, the effect of exercise preconditioning on brain edema and neurological movement disorders following the cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats was investigated. Methods: Twenty-one adult male wis...

  12. An Evaluation of Educational Neurological Eye Movement Disorder Videos Posted on Internet Video Sharing Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Simon J

    2016-03-01

    Internet video sharing sites allow the free dissemination of educational material. This study investigated the quality and educational content of videos of eye movement disorders posted on such sites. Educational neurological eye movement videos were identified by entering the titles of the eye movement abnormality into the search boxes of the video sharing sites. Also, suggested links were followed from each video. The number of views, likes, and dislikes for each video were recorded. The videos were then rated for their picture and sound quality. Their educational value was assessed according to whether the video included a description of the eye movement abnormality, the anatomical location of the lesion (if appropriate), and the underlying diagnosis. Three hundred fifty-four of these videos were found on YouTube and Vimeo. There was a mean of 6,443 views per video (range, 1-195,957). One hundred nineteen (33.6%) had no form of commentary about the eye movement disorder shown apart from the title. Forty-seven (13.3%) contained errors in the title or in the text. Eighty (22.6%) had excellent educational value by describing the eye movement abnormality, the anatomical location of the lesion, and the underlying diagnosis. Of these, 30 also had good picture and sound quality. The videos with excellent educational value had a mean of 9.84 "likes" per video compared with 2.37 for those videos without a commentary (P educational value with good picture and sound quality had a mean of 10.23 "likes" per video (P = 0.004 vs videos with no commentary). There was no significant difference in the mean number of "dislikes" between those videos that had no commentary or which contained errors and those with excellent educational value. There are a large number of eye movement videos freely available on these sites; however, due to the lack of peer review, a significant number have poor educational value due to having no commentary or containing errors. The number of "likes

  13. Beyond neural cubism: promoting a multidimensional view of brain disorders by enhancing the integration of neurology and psychiatry in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joseph J; Williams, Nolan R; George, Mark S

    2015-05-01

    Cubism was an influential early-20th-century art movement characterized by angular, disjointed imagery. The two-dimensional appearance of Cubist figures and objects is created through juxtaposition of angles. The authors posit that the constrained perspectives found in Cubism may also be found in the clinical classification of brain disorders. Neurological disorders are often separated from psychiatric disorders as if they stemmed from different organ systems. Maintaining two isolated clinical disciplines fractionalizes the brain in the same way that Pablo Picasso fractionalized figures and objects in his Cubist art. This Neural Cubism perpetuates a clinical divide that does not reflect the scope and depth of neuroscience. All brain disorders are complex and multidimensional, with aberrant circuitry and resultant psychopharmacology manifesting as altered behavior, affect, mood, or cognition. Trainees should receive a multidimensional education based on modern neuroscience, not a partial education based on clinical precedent. The authors briefly outline the rationale for increasing the integration of neurology and psychiatry and discuss a nested model with which clinical neuroscientists (neurologists and psychiatrists) can approach and treat brain disorders.

  14. Beyond Neural Cubism: Promoting a Multidimensional View of Brain Disorders by Enhancing the Integration of Neurology and Psychiatry in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joseph J.; Williams, Nolan R.; George, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Cubism was an influential early 20th century art movement characterized by angular, disjointed imagery. The two-dimensional appearance of Cubist figures and objects is created through juxtaposition of angles. The authors posit that the constrained perspectives found in Cubism may also be found in the clinical classification of brain disorders. Neurological disorders are often separated from psychiatric disorders as if they stem from different organ systems. Maintaining two isolated clinical disciplines fractionalizes the brain in the same way that Pablo Picasso fractionalized figures and objects in his Cubist art. This Neural Cubism perpetuates a clinical divide that does not reflect the scope and depth of neuroscience. All brain disorders are complex and multidimensional, with aberrant circuitry and resultant psychopharmacology manifesting as altered behavior, affect, mood or cognition. Trainees should receive a multidimensional education based on modern neuroscience, not a partial education based on clinical precedent. The authors briefly outline the rationale for increasing the integration of neurology and psychiatry and discuss a nested model with which clinical neuroscientists (neurologists and psychiatrists) can approach and treat brain disorders. PMID:25340364

  15. Neurologic disorders, in-hospital deaths, and years of potential life lost in the USA, 1988-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Kelly, Michael L; Kshettry, Varun R; Weil, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    Premature mortality is a public health concern that can be quantified as years of potential life lost (YPLL). Studying premature mortality can help guide hospital initiatives and resource allocation. We investigated the categories of neurologic and neurosurgical conditions associated with in-hospital deaths that account for the highest YPLL and their trends over time. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), we calculated YPLL for patients hospitalized in the USA from 1988 to 2011. Hospitalizations were categorized by related neurologic principal diagnoses. An estimated 2,355,673 in-hospital deaths accounted for an estimated 25,598,566 YPLL. The traumatic brain injury (TBI) category accounted for the highest annual mean YPLL at 361,748 (33.9% of total neurologic YPLL). Intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral ischemia, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and anoxic brain damage completed the group of five diagnoses with the highest YPLL. TBI accounted for 12.1% of all inflation adjusted neurologic hospital charges and 22.4% of inflation adjusted charges among neurologic deaths. The in-hospital mortality rate has been stable or decreasing for all of these diagnoses except TBI, which rose from 5.1% in 1988 to 7.8% in 2011. Using YPLL, we provide a framework to compare the burden of premature in-hospital mortality on patients with neurologic disorders, which may prove useful for informing decisions related to allocation of health resources or research funding. Considering premature mortality alone, increased efforts should be focused on TBI, particularly in and related to the hospital setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnosis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Its Behavioral, Neurological, and Genetic Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common developmental disorder often associated with other developmental disorders including speech, language, and reading disorders. Here, we review the principal features of ADHD and current diagnostic standards for the disorder. We outline the ADHD subtypes, which are based upon the dimensions…

  17. Efficacy of modafinil on fatigue and excessive daytime sleepiness associated with neurological disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modafinil is a novel wake-promoting agent approved by the FDA ameliorating excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS in three disorders: narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder and obstructive sleep apnea. Existing trials of modafinil for fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders provided inconsistent results. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess drug safety and effects of modafinil on fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders. METHODS: A comprehensive literature review was conducted in order to identify published studies assessing the effects of modafinil on fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders. Primary outcomes included fatigue and EDS. Secondary outcomes included depression and adverse effects. FINDINGS: Ten randomized controlled trials were identified including 4 studies of Parkinson's disease (PD, 3 of multiple sclerosis (MS, 2 of traumatic brain injury (TBI and 1 of post-polio syndrome (PPS. A total of 535 patients were enrolled. Our results suggested a therapeutic effect of modafinil on fatigue in TBI (MD -0.82 95% CI -1.54 - -0.11 p=0.02, I(2=0%, while a beneficial effect of modafinil on fatigue was not confirmed in the pooled studies of PD or MS. Treatment results demonstrated a clear beneficial effect of modafinil on EDS in patients with PD (MD -2.45 95% CI -4.00 - -0.91 p=0.002 I(2=14%, but not with MS and TBI. No difference was seen between modafinil and placebo treatments in patients with PPS. Modafinil seemed to have no therapeutic effect on depression. Adverse events were similar between modafinil and placebo groups except that more patients were found with insomnia and nausea in modafinil group. CONCLUSIONS: Existing trials of modafinil for fatigue and EDS associated with PD, MS, TBI and PPS provided inconsistent results. The majority of the studies had small sample sizes. Modafinil is not yet sufficient to be recommended for these medical conditions until solid data are available.

  18. Efficacy of modafinil on fatigue and excessive daytime sleepiness associated with neurological disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ping; Hou, Lijun; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Xiaowen; Huang, Chengguang; Yu, Mingkun; Han, Xi; Dong, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Modafinil is a novel wake-promoting agent approved by the FDA ameliorating excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in three disorders: narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder and obstructive sleep apnea. Existing trials of modafinil for fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders provided inconsistent results. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess drug safety and effects of modafinil on fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders. A comprehensive literature review was conducted in order to identify published studies assessing the effects of modafinil on fatigue and EDS associated with neurological disorders. Primary outcomes included fatigue and EDS. Secondary outcomes included depression and adverse effects. Ten randomized controlled trials were identified including 4 studies of Parkinson's disease (PD), 3 of multiple sclerosis (MS), 2 of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 1 of post-polio syndrome (PPS). A total of 535 patients were enrolled. Our results suggested a therapeutic effect of modafinil on fatigue in TBI (MD -0.82 95% CI -1.54 - -0.11 p=0.02, I(2)=0%), while a beneficial effect of modafinil on fatigue was not confirmed in the pooled studies of PD or MS. Treatment results demonstrated a clear beneficial effect of modafinil on EDS in patients with PD (MD -2.45 95% CI -4.00 - -0.91 p=0.002 I(2)=14%), but not with MS and TBI. No difference was seen between modafinil and placebo treatments in patients with PPS. Modafinil seemed to have no therapeutic effect on depression. Adverse events were similar between modafinil and placebo groups except that more patients were found with insomnia and nausea in modafinil group. Existing trials of modafinil for fatigue and EDS associated with PD, MS, TBI and PPS provided inconsistent results. The majority of the studies had small sample sizes. Modafinil is not yet sufficient to be recommended for these medical conditions until solid data are available.

  19. Inertial Sensors to Assess Gait Quality in Patients with Neurological Disorders: A Systematic Review of Technical and Analytical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliénor Vienne

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gait disorders are major causes of falls in patients with neurological diseases. Understanding these disorders allows prevention and better insights into underlying diseases. InertiaLocoGraphy (ILG –the quantification of gait by using inertial measurement units (IMUs –shows great potential to address this public health challenge, but protocols vary widely and normative values of gait parameters are still unavailable. This systematic review critically compares ILG protocols, questions features extracted from inertial signals and proposes a semeiological analysis of clinimetric characteristics for use in neurological clinical routine. For this systematic review, PubMed, Cochrane and EMBASE were searched for articles assessing gait quality by using IMUs that were published from January 1, 2014 to August 31, 2016. ILG was used to assess gait in a wide range of neurological disorders – including Parkinson disease, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer disease, cerebral palsy, and cerebellar atrophy – as well as in the faller or frail older population and in people presenting rheumatological pathologies. However, results have not yet been driving changes in clinical practice. One reason could be that studies mainly aimed at comparing pathological gait to healthy gait, but there is stronger need for semiological descriptions of gait perturbation, severity or prognostic assessment. Furthermore, protocols used to assess gait using IMUs are too many. Likely, outcomes are highly heterogeneous and difficult to compare across large panels of studies. Therefore, homogenization is needed to foster the use of ILG to assess gait quality in neurological routine practice. The pros and cons of each protocol are emphasized so that a compromise can be reached. As well, analysis of seven complementary clinical criteria (springiness, sturdiness, smoothness, steadiness, stability, symmetry, synchronization is advocated.

  20. Inertial Sensors to Assess Gait Quality in Patients with Neurological Disorders: A Systematic Review of Technical and Analytical Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienne, Aliénor; Barrois, Rémi P; Buffat, Stéphane; Ricard, Damien; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Gait disorders are major causes of falls in patients with neurological diseases. Understanding these disorders allows prevention and better insights into underlying diseases. InertiaLocoGraphy (ILG) -the quantification of gait by using inertial measurement units (IMUs) -shows great potential to address this public health challenge, but protocols vary widely and normative values of gait parameters are still unavailable. This systematic review critically compares ILG protocols, questions features extracted from inertial signals and proposes a semeiological analysis of clinimetric characteristics for use in neurological clinical routine. For this systematic review, PubMed, Cochrane and EMBASE were searched for articles assessing gait quality by using IMUs that were published from January 1, 2014 to August 31, 2016. ILG was used to assess gait in a wide range of neurological disorders - including Parkinson disease, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer disease, cerebral palsy, and cerebellar atrophy - as well as in the faller or frail older population and in people presenting rheumatological pathologies. However, results have not yet been driving changes in clinical practice. One reason could be that studies mainly aimed at comparing pathological gait to healthy gait, but there is stronger need for semiological descriptions of gait perturbation, severity or prognostic assessment. Furthermore, protocols used to assess gait using IMUs are too many. Likely, outcomes are highly heterogeneous and difficult to compare across large panels of studies. Therefore, homogenization is needed to foster the use of ILG to assess gait quality in neurological routine practice. The pros and cons of each protocol are emphasized so that a compromise can be reached. As well, analysis of seven complementary clinical criteria (springiness, sturdiness, smoothness, steadiness, stability, symmetry, synchronization) is advocated.

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological Disorders by Millimeter-Wave Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter H.; Pikov, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, millimeter waves are being employed for telecomm, radar, and imaging applications. To date in the U.S, however, very few investigations on the impact of this radiation on biological systems at the cellular level have been undertaken. In the beginning, to examine the impact of millimeter waves on cellular processes, researchers discovered that cell membrane depolarization may be triggered by low levels of integrated power at these high frequencies. Such a situation could be used to advantage in the direct stimulation of neuronal cells for applications in neuroprosthetics and diagnosing or treating neurological disorders. An experimental system was set up to directly monitor cell response on exposure to continuous-wave, fixed-frequency, millimeter-wave radiation at low and modest power levels (0.1 to 100 safe exposure standards) between 50 and 100 GHz. Two immortalized cell lines derived from lung and neuronal tissue were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) that locates on the inside of the cell membrane lipid bi-layer. Oxonol dye was added to the cell medium. When membrane depolarization occurs, the oxonal bound to the outer wall of the lipid bi-layer can penetrate close to the inner wall where the GFP resides. Under fluorescent excitation (488 nm), the normally green GFP (520 nm) optical signal quenches and gives rise to a red output when the oxonol comes close enough to the GFP to excite a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with an output at 620 nm. The presence of a strong FRET signature upon exposures of 30 seconds to 2 minutes at 5-10 milliwatts per square centimeter RF power at 50 GHz, followed by a return to the normal 520-nm GFP signal after a few minutes indicating repolarization of the membrane, indicates that low levels of RF energy may be able to trigger non-destructive membrane depolarization without direct cell contact. Such a mechanism could be used to stimulate neuronal cells in the cortex without the need for

  2. Global, regional, and national burden of neurological disorders during 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Comparable data on the global and country-specific burden of neurological disorders and their trends are crucial for health-care planning and resource allocation. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) Study provides such information but does not routinely aggregate results that are of interest to clinicians specialising in neurological conditions. In this systematic analysis, we quantified the global disease burden due to neurological disorders in 2015 and its relationship with country development level. We estimated global and country-specific prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), years of life lost (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) for various neurological disorders that in the GBD classification have been previously spread across multiple disease groupings. The more inclusive grouping of neurological disorders included stroke, meningitis, encephalitis, tetanus, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, migraine, tension-type headache, medication overuse headache, brain and nervous system cancers, and a residual category of other neurological disorders. We also analysed results based on the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a compound measure of income per capita, education, and fertility, to identify patterns associated with development and how countries fare against expected outcomes relative to their level of development. Neurological disorders ranked as the leading cause group of DALYs in 2015 (250·7 [95% uncertainty interval (UI) 229·1 to 274·7] million, comprising 10·2% of global DALYs) and the second-leading cause group of deaths (9·4 [9·1 to 9·7] million], comprising 16·8% of global deaths). The most prevalent neurological disorders were tension-type headache (1505·9 [UI 1337·3 to 1681·6 million cases]), migraine (958·8 [872·1 to 1055·6] million), medication overuse headache (58·5 [50·8 to 67·4 million

  3. 76 FR 69747 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001.../NIH/DHHS/Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Blvd., Suite 3208, MSC 9529, Bethesda, MD 20892, (301... Special Emphasis Panel; NINDS Research Education Programs for Residents and Fellows in Neurology...

  4. 75 FR 3475 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... Emphasis Panel; Pediatric Neurology Training Review. Date: February 8-9, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ] Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Embassy Suites Hotel, 1250 22nd Street... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  5. Epigenetic regulation of memory by acetylation and methylation of chromatin: implications in neurological disorders, aging, and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Nilkantha

    2015-06-01

    Synaptic plasticity is one of the most fundamental properties of neurons that underlie the formation of the memory in brain. In recent years, epigenetic modification of both DNA and histones such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation and methylation emerges as a potential regulatory mechanism that governs the transcription of several genes responsible for memory formation and behavior. Furthermore, the recent identification of nitrosylation of proteins has shown to either activate or repress gene transcription by modulating histone methylation or acetylation status in mature neuron. Recent studies suggest that the use of major substrates of abuse, e.g., cocaine, induces alterations in molecular and cellular mechanisms of epigenetics that underlie long-term memories in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. Moreover, downregulation of genes due to alterations in epigenetics leads to cognitive deficiencies associated with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, psychiatric disorder such as Rett's syndrome and aging. In this review, I will discuss the evidence for several epigenetic mechanisms in the coordination of complex memory formation and storage. In addition, I will address the current literature highlighting the role of acetylation and methylation of chromatin in memory impairment associated with several neurological disorders, aging, and addiction.

  6. The neurology of proverbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, D

    1990-01-01

    Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are "concrete", recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests) point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH). Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  7. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  8. Detection of meningococcal meningitis in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurological disorders in government hospitals of Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taj, Aneela; Jamil, Nusrat

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the microbiological yield from the apparently transparent cerebrospinal fluid samples of in-patients with suspected neurological disorders. Samples of CSF were collected from Neurology and Neurosurgery Wards of the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre and the Civil Hospital, Karachi, from December 2007 to March 2012, and comprised cerebrospinal fluid samples collected from neurologically compromised patients through lumbar puncture. The processing of the samples was done at the Department of Microbiology, University of Karachi. Moreover, 10ml of each sample was streaked separately on different culture media, i.e. Nutrient Agar, Blood Agar and Chocolate Agar, for the isolation of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Of the 92 samples, bacterial meningitis was found in 21(22.8%), whereas 71(77.1%) samples did not yield any bacterial aetiology. Besides, 1(4.7%) sample revealed Gram-positive rods of L. monocytogenes while Gram-negative kidney-shaped N. meningitidis was found in 20(95.24%) samples. Present study highlighted that apparently clear CSF samples predominantly revealed meningococcal meningitis. It is important to note that extracellular bacterial growth in CSF is not always the primary goal of pathogenesis, therefore establishing a fact that turbidity of CSF is not the cardinal symptom for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

  9. Is Expressive Language Disorder an Accurate Diagnostic Category?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Laurence B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To propose that the diagnostic category of "expressive language disorder" as distinct from a disorder of both expressive and receptive language might not be accurate. Method: Evidence that casts doubt on a pure form of this disorder is reviewed from several sources, including the literature on genetic findings, theories of language…

  10. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  11. Mapping of brain function with positron emission tomography for pathophysiological analysis of neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nariai, Tadashi [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). Graduate School

    2001-02-01

    The role of PET is discussed mainly through author's clinical experience in patients with brain lesions from the view of mapping of brain function. Procedure for PET concept in clinical practice is summarized. PET using tracers like [{sup 15}O]water and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose for mapping of the function has been used in combination with MRI, MEG (magnetoencephalography), SPECT and other imaging means for morphological identification. Actual those images before and after surgery are presented in cases of epilepsy, moyamoya disease, stegnosis of cervical artery, arteriovenous malformation and oligodendroglioma. Images of [{sup 11}C]flumazenil in epilepsies are also presented to show the neurological dysfunctions. PET evaluation of neurological functions is concluded to become more important in parallel with the advancement of therapeutics. (K.H.)

  12. Plasmapheresis in neurological disorders: six years experience from University Clinical center Tuzla

    OpenAIRE

    Osman Sinanović; Sanela Zukić; Adnan Burina; Nermina Pirić; Renata Hodžić; Mirza Atić; Mirna Alečković-Halilović; Enisa Mešić

    2017-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is an extracorporeal blood purification technique that is designed to remove substances with a large molecular weight. The TPE procedure includes removal of antibodies, alloantibodies, immune complexes, monoclonal protein, toxins or cytokines, and involves the replenishment of a specific plasma factor. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical response to TPE in various neurological patients, and to assess the clinical response to this the...

  13. Integral Characterization of Defective BDNF/TrkB Signalling in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders Leads the Way to New Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Gonzalo S.; Díaz-Guerra, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Enhancement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling has great potential in therapy for neurological and psychiatric disorders. This neurotrophin not only attenuates cell death but also promotes neuronal plasticity and function. However, an important challenge to this approach is the persistence of aberrant neurotrophic signalling due to a defective function of the BDNF high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), or downstream effectors. Such changes have been already described in several disorders, but their importance as pathological mechanisms has been frequently underestimated. This review highlights the relevance of an integrative characterization of aberrant BDNF/TrkB pathways for the rational design of therapies that by combining BDNF and TrkB targets could efficiently promote neurotrophic signalling. PMID:28134845

  14. Reducing the treatment gap for mental, neurological and substance use disorders in Africa: lessons from the Friendship Bench in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibanda, D

    2017-08-01

    Mental, neurological and substance use disorders (MNS) are a leading cause of disability in Africa. In response to the large treatment gap for MNS, a growing body of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) is emerging from Africa; however, there is a dearth of knowledge on how to scale up EBT. The Friendship Bench intervention is a brief psychological treatment delivered through the primary health care system in Zimbabwe by trained lay health workers. It has contributed significantly towards narrowing the treatment gap for common mental disorders in Zimbabwe where it has been scaled up to over 70 primary health care facilities. A three-pronged approach consisting of community engagement, use of EBTs and a government endorsed scale-up plan is described as part of the key strategy leading to the scale up of the Friendship Bench.

  15. Neurological soft signs, dissociation and alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapancı, Zafer; Yıldırım, Abdullah; Boysan, Murat

    2017-11-21

    A body of evidence has supported that patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have increased rates of various neurological soft signs (NSS) compared to controls. Various lines of research has documented robust relationships between OCD and dissociative symptomatology. The study aimed to examine the associations between obsessive-compulsive symptoms, dissociative experiences alexithymia, and NSS. The study included thirty OCD patients and thirty healthy controls, matched for age, marital status, education, and income. The Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES), Padua Inventory-Revised (PI-R), Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) were administered. In comparison to healthy controls, patients with OCD had difficulty sequencing for complex motor acts and greater absorption/ imaginative involvement. Using latent class analysis, the study sample was classified into two homogenous subsets as mild NSS (n = 45) and severe NSS (n = 15). Majority of the participants who were grouped into severe NSS latent class were OCD patient (n = 14, 93.3%). Furthermore, those with severe NSS reported greater levels of alexithymia and more severe obsessive-compulsive symptoms, particularly precision. We concluded that relationships between OCD severity and NSS appear to be of crucial importance. Our data along with accumulated evidence suggest that OCD associated with pronounced NSS may represent a specific subtype of the disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Occurrence of complications and survival rates in elderly with neurological disorders undergoing enteral nutrition therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Aline Stangherlin; Rezende, Nilton Alves de; Torres, Henrique Oswaldo da Gama

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of complications, as well as the survival rates, in elderly people having neurological diseases and undergoing enteral nutrition therapy (ENT). Patients aged over 60 years, assisted by a home medical service from a healthcare plan in the city of Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were thoroughly evaluated. The mentioned evaluation occurred at their homes after hospital discharge with enteral nutrition (EN) after a three-month period, a six-month period, and at the end of the study. A nutritional assessment was performed along with data collection performed on the patients' electronic medical records, and interviews performed with patients' family members and caregivers. Seventy-nine patients aged 82.9 ± 10.4 years old were evaluated; of these, 49.4% presented dementia, and 50.6% presented other neurological diagnoses. 100% of patients presented a high dependence level, assessed by the Katz index. The majority of patients (91.2%) presented some complications such as: pneumonia, catheter loss, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, fluid leakage, periostotomy, tube obstruction, reflux, and myiasis. Pneumonia was the most frequent complication, occurring in 55.9% of cases. The mortality rates were 15.2% at a three-month period, 22.8% at a six-month period, and 43% at the end of study. The median survival after starting EN was 364 days. Differences among the mortality rate and neurological diagnosis, EN routes of access, and complications were not observed. The survival rate was lower in patients having inadequate nutritional status and albumin levels nutritional status according to the clinical assessment and albumin levels lower than 3.5 mg/dL significantly influenced the survival rates.

  17. Assessment of speech in neurological disorders: development of a Swahili screening test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nick Miller; Gerry Mshana; Oliva Msuya; Catherine Dotchin; Richard Walker; Eric Aris

    2012-01-01

    .... We describe the rationale for, and development of a motor-speech-disorder screening test for Swahili speakers which includes impairment measures as well as measures of intelligibility and speech-voice naturalness...

  18. Efficient CNS targeting in adult mice by intrathecal infusion of single-stranded AAV9-GFP for gene therapy of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, K; Ciron, C; Dubreil, L; Deniaud, J; Ledevin, M; Cristini, J; Blouin, V; Aubourg, P; Colle, M-A

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy constitutes a powerful tool for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. While AAVs are generally administered systemically to newborns in preclinical studies of neurological disorders, in adults the maturity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) must be considered when selecting the route of administration. Delivery of AAVs into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) represents an attractive approach to target the central nervous system (CNS) and bypass the BBB. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of intra-CSF delivery of a single-stranded (ss) AAV9-CAG-GFP vector in adult mice via intracisternal (iCist) or intralumbar (it-Lumb) administration. It-Lumb ssAAV9 delivery resulted in greater diffusion throughout the entire spinal cord and green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression mainly in the cerebellum, cortex and olfactory bulb. By contrast, iCist delivery led to strong GFP expression throughout the entire brain. Comparison of the transduction efficiency of ssAAV9-CAG-GFP versus ssAAV9-SYN1-GFP following it-Lumb administration revealed widespread and specific GFP expression in neurons and motoneurons of the spinal cord and brain when the neuron-specific synapsin 1 (SYN1) promoter was used. Our findings demonstrate that it-Lumb ssAAV9 delivery is a safe and highly efficient means of targeting the CNS in adult mice.

  19. Development of a Kinect-based exergaming system for motor rehabilitation in neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, A.; Sponton Piriz, S.; Albornoz, E.; Martínez, C.

    2016-04-01

    The development of videogames for physical therapy, known as exergames, has gained much interest in the last years. In this work, a sytem for rehabilitation and clinical evaluation of neurological patients is presented. The Microsoft Kinect device is used to track the full body of patients, and three games were developed to exercise and assess different aspects of balance and gait rehabilitation. The system provides visual feedback by means of an avatar that follows the movements of the patients, and sound and visual stimuli for giving orders during the experience. Also, the system includes a database and management tools for further analysis and monitoring of therapies. The results obtained show, on the one side, a great reception and interest of patients to use the system. On the other side, the specialists considered very useful the data collected and the quantitative analysis provided by the system, which was then adopted for the clinical routine.

  20. Evolution of language assessment in patients with acquired neurological disorders in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice de Mattos Pimenta Parente

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to describe the evolution of language assessments in patients with acquired neurological diseases over a period of around 45 years from 1970, when interdisciplinarity in Neuropsychology first began in Brazil, to the present day. The first twenty years of data was based on memories of Speech Pathology University Professors who were in charge of teaching aphasia. We then show the contributions of Linguistics, Cognitive Psychology, as well as Psycholinguistic and Psychometric criteria, to language evaluation. Finally, the current panorama of adaptations and creations of validated and standardized instruments is given, based on a search of the databases Pubmed, Scopus and Lilacs. Our closing remarks highlight the diversity in evaluation approaches and the recent tendency of language evaluations linked to new technologies such as brain imaging and computational analysis.

  1. Evolution of language assessment in patients with acquired neurological disorders in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Maria Alice de Mattos Pimenta; Baradel, Roberta Roque; Fonseca, Rochele Paz; Pereira, Natalie; Carthery-Goulart, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to describe the evolution of language assessments in patients with acquired neurological diseases over a period of around 45 years from 1970, when interdisciplinarity in Neuropsychology first began in Brazil, to the present day. The first twenty years of data was based on memories of Speech Pathology University Professors who were in charge of teaching aphasia. We then show the contributions of Linguistics, Cognitive Psychology, as well as Psycholinguistic and Psychometric criteria, to language evaluation. Finally, the current panorama of adaptations and creations of validated and standardized instruments is given, based on a search of the databases Pubmed, Scopus and Lilacs. Our closing remarks highlight the diversity in evaluation approaches and the recent tendency of language evaluations linked to new technologies such as brain imaging and computational analysis.

  2. Neurological disorder associated with pestivirus infection in sheep in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pescador Caroline Argenta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-month-old lamb showing signs of severe neurological disease characterized by muscular tremors, hypermetria, and motor incoordination was submitted to the Veterinary Pathology Laboratory - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. At necropsy, the major findings were a marked reduction of the size of the cerebellum and bilateral dilatation of the lateral ventricles. Microscopically, areas of cellular disorganization in the cerebellar cortex, reduction of the granular layer of cerebellum associated with decreased density of cells, and the presence of large cytoplasmic vacuoles in the molecular layer were observed. Neurons of the gray matter of the brain and macrophages of the mesenteric lymph nodes stained positively by the immunohistochemistry test using the monoclonal antibody 15C5 against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus. Taken together, those results are consistent with a pestivirus infection, either Border Disease Virus (BDV or BVDV.

  3. Guided self-help interventions for mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sophie; Heyman, Isobel; Coughtrey, Anna; Simmonds, Jess; Varadkar, Sophia; Stephenson, Terence; DeJong, Margaret; Shafran, Roz

    2016-11-04

    Rates of mental health disorders are significantly greater in children with physical illnesses than in physically well children. Children with neurological conditions, such as epilepsy, are known to have particularly high rates of mental health disorders. Despite this, mental health problems in children with neurological conditions have remained under-recognised and under-treated in clinical settings. Evidence-based guided self-help interventions are efficacious in reducing symptoms of mental health disorders in children, but their efficacy in reducing symptoms of common mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions has not been investigated. We aim to pilot a guided self-help intervention for the treatment of mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions. A pilot randomised controlled trial with 18 patients with neurological conditions and mental health disorders will be conducted. Participants attending specialist neurology clinics at a National UK Children's Hospital will be randomised to receive guided self-help for common mental health disorders or to a 12-week waiting list control. Participants in the treatment group will receive 10 sessions of guided self-help delivered over the telephone. The waiting list control group will receive the intervention after a waiting period of 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure is reduction in symptoms of mental health disorders. Exclusion criteria are limited to those at significant risk of harm to self or others, the presence of primary mental health disorder other than anxiety, depression or disruptive behaviour (e.g. psychosis, eating disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder) or intellectual disability at a level meaning potential participants would be unable to access the intervention. The study has ethical approval from the Camden and Islington NHS Research Ethics Committee, registration number 14.LO.1353. Results will be disseminated to patients, the wider public, clinicians and

  4. A combined analysis of genome-wide expression profiling of bipolar disorder in human prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinglu; Qu, Susu; Wang, Weixiao; Guo, Liyuan; Zhang, Kunlin; Chang, Suhua; Wang, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Numbers of gene expression profiling studies of bipolar disorder have been published. Besides different array chips and tissues, variety of the data processes in different cohorts aggravated the inconsistency of results of these genome-wide gene expression profiling studies. By searching the gene expression databases, we obtained six data sets for prefrontal cortex (PFC) of bipolar disorder with raw data and combinable platforms. We used standardized pre-processing and quality control procedures to analyze each data set separately and then combined them into a large gene expression matrix with 101 bipolar disorder subjects and 106 controls. A standard linear mixed-effects model was used to calculate the differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Multiple levels of sensitivity analyses and cross validation with genetic data were conducted. Functional and network analyses were carried out on basis of the DEGs. In the result, we identified 198 unique differentially expressed genes in the PFC of bipolar disorder and control. Among them, 115 DEGs were robust to at least three leave-one-out tests or different pre-processing methods; 51 DEGs were validated with genetic association signals. Pathway enrichment analysis showed these DEGs were related with regulation of neurological system, cell death and apoptosis, and several basic binding processes. Protein-protein interaction network further identified one key hub gene. We have contributed the most comprehensive integrated analysis of bipolar disorder expression profiling studies in PFC to date. The DEGs, especially those with multiple validations, may denote a common signature of bipolar disorder and contribute to the pathogenesis of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Common data elements for clinical research in mitochondrial disease: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaa, Amel; Rahman, Shamima; Lombès, Anne; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Sheikh, Muniza K; Alai-Hansen, Sherita; Cohen, Bruce H; Dimmock, David; Emrick, Lisa; Falk, Marni J; McCormack, Shana; Mirsky, David; Moore, Tony; Parikh, Sumit; Shoffner, John; Taivassalo, Tanja; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tein, Ingrid; Odenkirchen, Joanne C; Goldstein, Amy

    2017-05-01

    The common data elements (CDE) project was developed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to provide clinical researchers with tools to improve data quality and allow for harmonization of data collected in different research studies. CDEs have been created for several neurological diseases; the aim of this project was to develop CDEs specifically curated for mitochondrial disease (Mito) to enhance clinical research. Nine working groups (WGs), composed of international mitochondrial disease experts, provided recommendations for Mito clinical research. They initially reviewed existing NINDS CDEs and instruments, and developed new data elements or instruments when needed. Recommendations were organized, internally reviewed by the Mito WGs, and posted online for external public comment for a period of eight weeks. The final version was again reviewed by all WGs and the NINDS CDE team prior to posting for public use. The NINDS Mito CDEs and supporting documents are publicly available on the NINDS CDE website ( https://commondataelements.ninds.nih.gov/ ), organized into domain categories such as Participant/Subject Characteristics, Assessments, and Examinations. We developed a comprehensive set of CDE recommendations, data definitions, case report forms (CRFs), and guidelines for use in Mito clinical research. The widespread use of CDEs is intended to enhance Mito clinical research endeavors, including natural history studies, clinical trial design, and data sharing. Ongoing international collaboration will facilitate regular review, updates and online publication of Mito CDEs, and support improved consistency of data collection and reporting.

  6. Diabetic db/db mice exhibit central nervous system and peripheral molecular alterations as seen in neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, A; Sharma, A N; Elased, K M; Guest, P C; Rahmoune, H; Bahn, S

    2013-01-01

    The db/db mouse is a widely used preclinical model in diabetes research. Recent studies have shown that these mice also display aspects of psychosis and depression-like behaviors as seen in some psychiatric disorders. Here, we have performed multiplex immunoassay and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry profiling of the plasma and brain samples from db/db and control mice to identify altered pathways, which could be related to these behavioral abnormalities. This is the first study to carry out profiling of the brain proteome in this model. Plasma from the db/db mice had increased levels of leptin and insulin, decreased levels of peptide YY, glucagon and prolactin and alterations in inflammation-related proteins, compared with control mice. Frontal cortex tissue from the db/db mice showed changes in proteins involved in energy metabolism, cellular structure and neural functioning, and the hippocampus had changes in proteins involved in the same pathways, with additional effects on cellular signalling proteins. The overlap of these findings with effects seen in type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease might contribute to a common endophenotype seen in metabolic and neurological disorders. PMID:23715298

  7. Mixed methods inquiry into traditional healers’ treatment of mental, neurological and substance abuse disorders in rural South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Carolyn M.; Ngobeni, Sizzy; Graves, Erin; Wagner, Ryan G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional healers are acceptable and highly accessible health practitioners throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Patients in South Africa often seek concurrent traditional and allopathic treatment leading to medical pluralism. Methods & findings We studied the cause of five traditional illnesses known locally as “Mavabyi ya nhloko” (sickness of the head), by conducting 27 in-depth interviews and 133 surveys with a randomly selected sample of traditional healers living and working in rural, northeastern South Africa. These interviews were carried out to identify treatment practices of mental, neurological, and substance abuse (MNS) disorders. Participating healers were primarily female (77%), older in age (median: 58.0 years; interquartile range [IQR]: 50–67), had very little formal education (median: 3.7 years; IQR: 3.2–4.2), and had practiced traditional medicine for many years (median: 17 years; IQR: 9.5–30). Healers reported having the ability to successfully treat: seizure disorders (47%), patients who have lost touch with reality (47%), paralysis on one side of the body (59%), and substance abuse (21%). Female healers reported a lower odds of treating seizure disorders (Odds Ratio (OR):0.47), patients who had lost touch with reality (OR:0.26; p-valuedisorders, patients who have lost touch with reality, paralysis of one side of the body, and substance abuse. Healers charged a median of 500 South African Rand (~US$35) to treat substance abuse, 1000 Rand (~US$70) for seizure disorders or paralysis of one side of the body, and 1500 Rand (~US$105) for patients who have lost touch with reality. Conclusions While not all healers elect to treat MNS disorders, many continue to do so, delaying allopathic health services to acutely ill patients. PMID:29261705

  8. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  9. Combining Non-Pharmacological Treatments with Pharmacotherapies for Neurological Disorders: A Unique Interface of the Brain, Drug–Device, and Intellectual Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities, and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music, and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug–device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent–independent protection, which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies), and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offer incentives to chronically ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries. PMID:25071711

  10. Combining non-pharmacological treatments with pharmacotherapies for neurological disorders: a unique interface of the brain, drug-device, and intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Mobile medical applications (mHealth), music, and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engages an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities, and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music, and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug-device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent-independent protection, which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies), and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offer incentives to chronically ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries.

  11. Combining Non-pharmacological Treatments with Pharmacotherapies for Neurological Disorders: a Unique Interface of the Brain, Drug-Device and Intellectual Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz eBulaj

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile medical applications (mHealth, music and video games are being developed and tested for their ability to improve pharmacotherapy outcomes and medication adherence. Pleiotropic mechanism of music and gamification engage an intrinsic motivation and the brain reward system, supporting therapies in patients with neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, depression, anxiety, or neurodegenerative disorders. Based on accumulating results from clinical trials, an innovative combination treatment of epilepsy seizures, comorbidities and the medication non-adherence can be designed, consisting of antiepileptic drugs and disease self-management software delivering clinically beneficial music. Since creative elements and art expressed in games, music and software are copyrighted, therefore clinical and regulatory challenges in developing copyrighted, drug-device therapies may be offset by a value proposition of the exclusivity due to the patent-independent protection which can last for over 70 years. Taken together, development of copyrighted non-pharmacological treatments (e-therapies, and their combinations with pharmacotherapies, offers incentives to chronically-ill patients and outcome-driven health care industries.

  12. The role of placebo in the diagnosis and treatment of functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, K S

    2016-01-01

    Placebo therapy can produce meaningful, clinical relief for a variety of conditions. While placebos are not without their ethically fraught history, they continue to be used, largely covertly, even today. Because the prognosis for psychogenic disorders is often poor and recovery may be highly dependent on the patient's belief in the diagnosis and treatment regimen, some physicians find placebo therapy for psychogenic disorders compelling, but also particularly contentious. Yet placebos also have a long tradition of being used for provocative diagnosis (wherein placebo is used to elicit and/or terminate the symptoms as a way of diagnosing symptoms as "psychogenic"). In this chapter we discuss cases describing placebo as therapy for psychogenic disorders and the challenges related to embedded Cartesian beliefs in Western medicine. The legitimate ethical reservations against placebo therapy, in general, have been related to assumptions about their "inertness" and a requirement for deception, both which are being refuted by emerging data. In this chapter, we also re-evaluate the concerns associated with placebo therapy for psychogenic disorders by asking, "Are we harming patients by withholding placebo treatment?" © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A population genetic approach to mapping neurological disorder genes using deep resequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Myers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Deep resequencing of functional regions in human genomes is key to identifying potentially causal rare variants for complex disorders. Here, we present the results from a large-sample resequencing (n  =  285 patients study of candidate genes coupled with population genetics and statistical methods to identify rare variants associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Schizophrenia. Three genes, MAP1A, GRIN2B, and CACNA1F, were consistently identified by different methods as having significant excess of rare missense mutations in either one or both disease cohorts. In a broader context, we also found that the overall site frequency spectrum of variation in these cases is best explained by population models of both selection and complex demography rather than neutral models or models accounting for complex demography alone. Mutations in the three disease-associated genes explained much of the difference in the overall site frequency spectrum among the cases versus controls. This study demonstrates that genes associated with complex disorders can be mapped using resequencing and analytical methods with sample sizes far smaller than those required by genome-wide association studies. Additionally, our findings support the hypothesis that rare mutations account for a proportion of the phenotypic variance of these complex disorders.

  14. Clinical Case of Newly Diagnosed Hypoglycemic Paroxysm Complicated by Severe Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Shkala

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a case of hypoglycemic paroxysm, manifested as epilepsy, in 53-year-old man, suffering from diabetes mellitus type 1, complicated by steatohepatosis following excretory and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, disorders of renal excretory function, triggered by the lack of food after insulin administration.

  15. Hemolytic anemia following high dose intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with chronic neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, L H; Christiansen, Ingelise; Harbo, T

    2014-01-01

    High dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an established treatment for various neuromuscular disorders. Recently, cases of hemolytic anemia following IVIG have been observed. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of anemia and hemolysis after IVIG and its relationship...... to the AB0 blood type system....

  16. Development of visual-motor perception in pupils with expressive writing disorder and pupils without expressive writing disorder: a comparative statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Background Learning disability is one of the most noticed subjects for behavioral specialists. Most of thelearning difficulties are caused by senso-motor development and neurological organization. The main purposeof the present research is to examine the role of delayed perceptual-motor development and brain damage inorigination of expressive writing disorder (EWD). Methods The studied sample is 89 pupils divided into two groups, one of which is pupils with expressivewriting disorder (n=43) and the other is pupils without expressive writing disorder (n=46), consisted of secondand third grade elementary school students. First of all, students with EWD are selected through dictation testand intelligence test, and then the two groups, students with and without EWD, would take the Bender Gestalttest. The average score of perceptual visual-motor development and brain damage of two groups is comparedusing T test for independent groups and χ2 test. Results Results show that there is a significant difference in perceptual visual-motor development betweenstudents with EWD and students without EWD (p 0.05). Conclusion Based on our findings it could be concluded that those who are relatively more developed thantheir peers, in terms of visual-motor perception, are more successful in education, especially in expressive writing. PMID:24791121

  17. Forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3) expression serves as an early chronic inflammation marker of squamous cell differentiation and aggressive pathology of urothelial carcinomas in neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phé, Véronique; Rouprêt, Morgan; Cussenot, Olivier; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Gamé, Xavier; Compérat, Eva

    2015-04-01

    To establish whether the expression of forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3) provides specific diagnostic information about neurological patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). UCB tissue samples from neurological patients were retrieved and compared with control samples. The expression of Foxp3 was analysed via immunohistochemistry of microarray tissue sections. The correlation between Foxp3 expression, histological parameters and tumour stage was assessed. Overall, 20 UCB tissue samples and 20 others without UCB from neurological patients, and 46 UCB tissue samples from non-neurological patients were analysed. The distribution of pT of UCB in the neurological patients was as follows: one low-grade pTa (5%), three high-grade pTa (15%), three pT1(15%), one pT2(5%), seven pT3(35%) and five pT4(25%). Squamous cell differentiation was seen in nine UCB samples (45%). Foxp3 expression was detected in tumour tissues, including one pTa high grade, one pT1, one pT2, five pT3 and five pT4 tumours. Foxp3 was expressed in 11/13 muscle-invasive tumours. All tumours displaying squamous cell differentiation expressed Foxp3. Foxp3 was not expressed in the pT3 tumours that displayed sarcomatoid and micropapillary properties. Among the bladder samples without UCB from neurological patients, no expression of Foxp3 was observed. Among the UCB samples from the non-neurological patients, only seven displayed squamous cell differentiation. All tumours that displayed squamous cell differentiation expressed Foxp3, including one pTa high grade, four pT3 and two pT4 tumours. Other tumours displaying urothelial differentiation did not express Foxp3. The expression of Foxp3 correlated to squamous cell differentiation in neurological (P = 0.004) and non-neurological UCB tissue (P differentiation. Targeting Foxp3 may represent a novel strategy to improve anti-tumour immunotherapy for UCB. © 2015 The Authors. BJU International © 2015 BJU International.

  18. Validation of the Persian version of the dysphagia handicap index in patients with neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar-Bafrooei, Ebrahim; Bakhtiary, Jalal; Khatoonabadi, Ahmad Reza; Fatehi, Farzad; Maroufizadeh, Saman; Fathali, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia as a common condition affecting many aspects of the patient’s life. The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI) is a reliable self-reported questionnaire developed specifically to measure the impact of dysphagia on the patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to translate the questionnaire to Persian and to measure its validity and reliability in patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia. Methods: A formal forward-backward translation of DHI was performed based on the guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures. A total of 57 patients with neurogenic dysphagia who were referred to the neurology clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, participated in this study. Internal consistency reliability of the DHI was examined using Cronbach’s alpha, and test-retest reliability of the scale was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The internal consistency of the Persian DHI (P-DHI) was considered to be good; Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the total P-DHI was 0.88. The test-retest reliability for the total and three subscales of the P-DHI ranged from 0.95 to 0.98 using ICC. Conclusion: The P-DHI demonstrated a good reliability, and it can be a valid instrument for evaluating the dysphagia effects on quality of life among Persian language population. PMID:27648173

  19. Venous hemodynamics in neurological disorders: an analytical review with hydrodynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Venous abnormalities contribute to the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions. This paper reviews the literature regarding venous abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS), leukoaraiosis, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The review is supplemented with hydrodynamic analysis to assess the effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and cerebral blood flow (CBF) of venous hypertension in general, and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in particular. CCSVI-like venous anomalies seem unlikely to account for reduced CBF in patients with MS, thus other mechanisms must be at work, which increase the hydraulic resistance of the cerebral vascular bed in MS. Similarly, hydrodynamic changes appear to be responsible for reduced CBF in leukoaraiosis. The hydrodynamic properties of the periventricular veins make these vessels particularly vulnerable to ischemia and plaque formation. Venous hypertension in the dural sinuses can alter intracranial compliance. Consequently, venous hypertension may change the CSF dynamics, affecting the intracranial windkessel mechanism. MS and NPH appear to share some similar characteristics, with both conditions exhibiting increased CSF pulsatility in the aqueduct of Sylvius. CCSVI appears to be a real phenomenon associated with MS, which causes venous hypertension in the dural sinuses. However, the role of CCSVI in the pathophysiology of MS remains unclear. PMID:23724917

  20. The assessment and treatment of prosodic disorders and neurological theories of prosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Joshua J; Paul, Rhea

    2009-08-01

    In this article, we comment on specific aspects of Peppé (Peppé, 2009). In particular, we address the assessment and treatment of prosody in clinical settings and discuss current theory on neurological models of prosody. We argue that in order for prosodic assessment instruments and treatment programs to be clinical effective, we need assessment instruments that: (1) have a representative normative comparison sample and strong psychometric properties; (2) are based on empirical information regarding the typical sequence of prosodic acquisition and are sensitive to developmental change; (3) meaningfully subcategorize various aspects of prosody; (4) use tasks that have ecological validity; and (5) have clinical properties, such as length and ease of administration, that allow them to become part of standard language assessment batteries. In addition, we argue that current theories of prosody processing in the brain are moving toward network models that involve multiple brain areas and are crucially dependent on cortical communication. The implications of these observations for future research and clinical practice are outlined.

  1. Astrocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells: new tools for neurological disorder research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinaya Chandrasekaran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have a central role in brain development and function, and so have gained increasing attention over the past two decades. Consequently, our knowledge about their origin, differentiation and function has increased significantly, with new research showing that astrocytes cultured alone or co-cultured with neurons have the potential to improve our understanding of various central nervous system (CNS diseases, such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease or Alexander disease. The generation of astrocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs opens up a new area for studying neurologic diseases in vitro; these models could be exploited to identify and validate potential drugs by detecting adverse effects in the early stages of drug development. However, as it is now known that a range of astrocyte populations exist in the brain, it will be important in vitro to develop standardized protocols for the in vitro generation of astrocyte subsets with defined maturity status and phenotypic properties. This will then open new possibilities for co-cultures with neurons and the generation of neural organoids for research purposes. The aim of this review article is to compare and summarize the currently available protocols and their strategies to generate human astrocytes from PSCs. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of human-induced PSCs derived astrocytes in disease modeling.

  2. Brain disease, connectivity, plasticity and cognitive therapy: A neurological view of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrini, G; Martín-Montes, A; Díez-Ascaso, O; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2017-04-25

    Our conception of the mind-brain relationship has evolved from the traditional idea of dualism to current evidence that mental functions result from brain activity. This paradigm shift, combined with recent advances in neuroimaging, has led to a novel definition of brain functioning in terms of structural and functional connectivity. The purpose of this literature review is to describe the relationship between connectivity, brain lesions, cerebral plasticity, and functional recovery. Assuming that brain function results from the organisation of the entire brain in networks, brain dysfunction would be a consequence of altered brain network connectivity. According to this approach, cognitive and behavioural impairment following brain damage result from disrupted functional organisation of brain networks. However, the dynamic and versatile nature of these circuits makes recovering brain function possible. Cerebral plasticity allows for functional reorganisation leading to recovery, whether spontaneous or resulting from cognitive therapy, after brain disease. Current knowledge of brain connectivity and cerebral plasticity provides new insights into normal brain functioning, the mechanisms of brain damage, and functional recovery, which in turn serve as the foundations of cognitive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Convection-Enhanced Delivery for the Treatment of Pediatric Neurologic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Debbie K.; Lonser, Russell R.

    2013-01-01

    Direct perfusion of specific regions of the central nervous system by convection-enhanced delivery is becoming more widely used for the delivery of compounds in the research and treatment of various neural disorders. In contrast to other currently available central nervous system delivery techniques, convection-enhanced delivery relies on bulk flow for distribution of solute. This allows for safe, targeted, reliable, and homogeneous delivery of small- and large-molecular-weight substances over clinically relevant volumes in a manner that bypasses the blood-central nervous system barrier. Recent studies have also shown that coinfused imaging surrogate tracers can be used to monitor and control the convective distribution of therapeutic agents in vivo. The unique features of convection-enhanced delivery, including the ability to monitor distribution in real-time, provide an opportunity to develop new research and treatment paradigms for pediatric patients with a variety of intrinsic central nervous system disorders. PMID:18952590

  4. Disrupted avoidance learning in functional neurological disorder: Implications for harm avoidance theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel S. Morris

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: FND patients had impaired instrumental avoidance learning, findings that parallel previous observations of impaired action-outcome binding. FND patients further show enhanced behavioural and neural sensitivity to negative information. However, this did not translate to improved avoidance learning. Put together, our findings do not support the theory of harm avoidance in FND. We highlight a potential mechanism by which negative contexts interfere with adaptive behaviours in this under-explored disorder.

  5. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: crossroads between neurology, psychiatry and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalho, Paulo; Oliveira-Maia, Albino J

    2013-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms contribute significantly to Parkinson's disease (PD) related disability. Impulse control disorders (ICDs) have been recently added to the behavioural spectrum of PD-related non-motor symptoms. Such behaviours are characterized by an inappropriate drive to conduct repetitive behaviours that are usually socially inadequate or result in harmful consequences. Parkinson disease impulse control disorders (PD-ICDs) have raised significant interest in the scientific and medical community, not only because of their incapacitating nature, but also because they may represent a valid model of ICDs beyond PD and a means to study the physiology of drive, impulse control and compulsive actions in the normal brain. In this review, we discuss some unresolved issues regarding PD-ICDs, including the association with psychiatric co-morbidities such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and with dopamine related side effects, such as hallucinations and dyskinesias; the relationship with executive cognitive dysfunction; and the neural underpinnings of ICDs in PD. We also discuss the contribution of neuroscience studies based on animal-models towards a mechanistic explanation of the development of PD-ICDs, specifically regarding corticostriatal control of goal directed and habitual actions.

  6. [Neurorehabilitation, neurology, rehabilitation medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbán, Edina; Szél, István; Fáy, Veronika; Dénes, Zoltán; Lippai, Zoltán; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-05-30

    We have read several publications of great authority on the neurological profession in the last two years in which were expressed assessments of the current situation combined with opinions about neurology and the necessity to reorganize neurological patient care. These articles took up the question of neurorehabilitation too. The authors, who on a daily basis, deal with the rehabilitation of people with disabilities as a consequence of neurological conditions, summarize some important definitions of rehabilitation medicine and the present system of neurological rehabilitation, as it is defined by the rehabilitation profession.

  7. Detection and molecular analysis of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum from dogs with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langoni, Helio; Matteucci, Guilherme; Medici, Bruno; Camossi, Lucilene Granuzio; Richini-Pereira, Virgínia Bodelão; Silva, Rodrigo Costa da

    2012-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum are related Apicomplexa parasites responsible for systemic diseases in many species of animals, including dogs. This study aimed to determine the occurrence of T. gondii and N. caninum infections in 50 dogs with neurological signs that were admitted to the Veterinary Hospital of Universidade Estadual Paulista, City of Botucatu, Brazil. All animals were screened for antibodies using an immunofluorescent antibody test for both parasites. Tissues of positive animals were bioassayed in mice (T. gondii) and gerbils (N. caninum), and DNA was analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Positive samples for T. gondii by PCR were typed using restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR for 11 markers: SAG1, SAG2 (5'-3'-SAG2 and alt.SAG2), SAG3, Btub, GRA6, L358, c22-8, c29-6, PK1 and Apico, and CS3 marker for virulence analysis. Specific antibodies were detected in 11/50 (22%; 95% confidence interval (CI95%), 12.8-35.3%) animals for T. gondii and 7/50 (14%; CI95%, 7.02-26.3%) for N. caninum. In the bioassay and PCR, 7/11 (63.6%; CI95%, 34.9-84.8%) samples were positive for T. gondii and 3/7 (42.9%; CI95%I, 15.7-75.5%) samples were positive for N. caninum. Three different genotypes were identified, but only 1 was unique. These data confirm the presence of T. gondii and N. caninum in dogs from Brazil, indicating the importance of this host as a sentinel of T. gondii for human beings, and the genotypic variation of this parasite in Brazil.

  8. Inertial Sensor-Based Robust Gait Analysis in Non-Hospital Settings for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Tunca

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The gold standards for gait analysis are instrumented walkways and marker-based motion capture systems, which require costly infrastructure and are only available in hospitals and specialized gait clinics. Even though the completeness and the accuracy of these systems are unquestionable, a mobile and pervasive gait analysis alternative suitable for non-hospital settings is a clinical necessity. Using inertial sensors for gait analysis has been well explored in the literature with promising results. However, the majority of the existing work does not consider realistic conditions where data collection and sensor placement imperfections are imminent. Moreover, some of the underlying assumptions of the existing work are not compatible with pathological gait, decreasing the accuracy. To overcome these challenges, we propose a foot-mounted inertial sensor-based gait analysis system that extends the well-established zero-velocity update and Kalman filtering methodology. Our system copes with various cases of data collection difficulties and relaxes some of the assumptions invalid for pathological gait (e.g., the assumption of observing a heel strike during a gait cycle. The system is able to extract a rich set of standard gait metrics, including stride length, cadence, cycle time, stance time, swing time, stance ratio, speed, maximum/minimum clearance and turning rate. We validated the spatio-temporal accuracy of the proposed system by comparing the stride length and swing time output with an IR depth-camera-based reference system on a dataset comprised of 22 subjects. Furthermore, to highlight the clinical applicability of the system, we present a clinical discussion of the extracted metrics on a disjoint dataset of 17 subjects with various neurological conditions.

  9. Inertial Sensor-Based Robust Gait Analysis in Non-Hospital Settings for Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Can; Pehlivan, Nezihe; Ak, Nağme; Arnrich, Bert; Salur, Gülüstü; Ersoy, Cem

    2017-01-01

    The gold standards for gait analysis are instrumented walkways and marker-based motion capture systems, which require costly infrastructure and are only available in hospitals and specialized gait clinics. Even though the completeness and the accuracy of these systems are unquestionable, a mobile and pervasive gait analysis alternative suitable for non-hospital settings is a clinical necessity. Using inertial sensors for gait analysis has been well explored in the literature with promising results. However, the majority of the existing work does not consider realistic conditions where data collection and sensor placement imperfections are imminent. Moreover, some of the underlying assumptions of the existing work are not compatible with pathological gait, decreasing the accuracy. To overcome these challenges, we propose a foot-mounted inertial sensor-based gait analysis system that extends the well-established zero-velocity update and Kalman filtering methodology. Our system copes with various cases of data collection difficulties and relaxes some of the assumptions invalid for pathological gait (e.g., the assumption of observing a heel strike during a gait cycle). The system is able to extract a rich set of standard gait metrics, including stride length, cadence, cycle time, stance time, swing time, stance ratio, speed, maximum/minimum clearance and turning rate. We validated the spatio-temporal accuracy of the proposed system by comparing the stride length and swing time output with an IR depth-camera-based reference system on a dataset comprised of 22 subjects. Furthermore, to highlight the clinical applicability of the system, we present a clinical discussion of the extracted metrics on a disjoint dataset of 17 subjects with various neurological conditions. PMID:28398224

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Orbital Frontal Cortex in Rats Following Extended Exposure to Caffeine Reveals Extensive Changes to Protein Expression: Implications for Neurological Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jane L; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Wearne, Travis A; Homewood, Judi; Goodchild, Ann K; Haynes, Paul A; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2016-05-06

    Caffeine is a plant-derived psychostimulant and a common additive found in a wide range of foods and pharmaceuticals. The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is rapidly activated by flavours, integrates gustatory and olfactory information, and plays a critical role in decision-making, with dysfunction contributing to psychopathologies and neurodegenerative conditions. This study investigated whether long-term consumption of caffeine causes changes to behavior and protein expression in the OFC. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were treated for 26 days with either water or a 0.6 g/L caffeine solution. Locomotor behavior was measured on the first and last day of treatment, then again after 9 days treatment free following exposure to a mild stressor. When tested drug free, caffeine-treated animals were hyperactive compared to controls. Two hours following final behavioral testing, brains were rapidly removed and prepared for proteomic analysis of the OFC. Label free shotgun proteomics found 157 proteins differentially expressed in the caffeine-drinking rats compared to control. Major proteomic effects were seen for cell-to-cell communication, cytoskeletal regulation, and mitochondrial function. Similar changes have been observed in neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia.

  11. Asynchronous telemedicine applications in rehabilitation of acquired speech-language disorders in neurologic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beijer L

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lilian Beijer,1 Toni Rietveld2 1Sint Maartenskliniek, 2Centre of Language Studies, Radboud University of Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Abstract: In this time of an aging population in the Western world and a concomitant need for cost reduction, there is an obvious need for innovative health care delivery. One of the consequences is that a growing number of telemedicine applications are emerging in different health care domains. Also in the area of speech-language (SL disorders, particularly neurogenic disorders, telemedicine is rapidly gaining interest. In this paper, we place applications for neurogenic SL disorders in a telemedicine taxonomy in order to establish common features along the dimensions of functionality, application, and technology, and their components. Thus, we aim at identifying common features in a wide variety of telemedicine applications and to establish common interests of stakeholders in health care for classified groups of telemedicine applications. This may facilitate decision-making with regard to expansion of innovative products, and give directions to measures needed for upscaling and structural embedding of feasible and effective SL telemedicine applications in health care. Common interests of stakeholders in health care, established using telemedicine taxonomy, is a key factor in decision-making with regard to which telemedicine applications should be given priority for genuine utilization. Priorities of health care institutions, patients, and reimbursement companies are also leading for researchers aiming at solid scientific evidence for the beneficial effects of target applications. That is, although research results tend to indicate the potential of telemedicine in the area of SL pathology, the alleged benefits of most applications have not been confirmed according to the accepted standards for clinical outcome testing as yet. Methodologic obstacles and the lack of adequate speech materials and suitable

  12. The Role of TREM2 in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmoor, Faris; Noorsaeed, Ahmed; Alsaggaf, Samar; Aljohani, Waleed; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia worldwide. Late-onset AD (LOAD), is the most common form of Alzheimer's disease, representing about >95% of cases and early-onset AD represents apolipoprotein (apo) E4 allele. Recently, rare variants of TREM2 have been reported as a significant risk factor for LOAD, comparable to inheritance of apoE4. In this review we will focus on the role(s) of TREM2 in AD as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin; Hartings, Jed A; Graf, Rudolf; Strong, Anthony John

    2011-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and depolarization waves are associated with dramatic failure of brain ion homeostasis, efflux of excitatory amino acids from nerve cells, increased energy metabolism and changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). There is strong clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma. The consequences of these intrinsic mechanisms are intimately linked to the composition of the brain extracellular microenvironment and to the level of brain perfusion and in consequence brain energy supply. This paper summarizes the evidence provided by novel invasive techniques, which implicates CSD as a pathophysiological mechanism for this group of acute neurological disorders. The findings have implications for monitoring and treatment of patients with acute brain disorders in the intensive care unit. Drawing on the large body of experimental findings from animal studies of CSD obtained during decades we suggest treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves.

  14. Republished: Addressing the burden of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS disorders increased by 41% between 1990 and 2010 and now accounts for one in every 10 lost years of health globally. This sobering statistic does not take into account the substantial excess mortality associated with these disorders or the social and economic consequences of MNS disorders on affected persons, their caregivers, and society. A wide variety of effective interventions, including drugs, psychological treatments, and social interventions, can prevent and treat MNS disorders. At the population-level platform of service delivery, best practices include legislative measures to restrict access to means of self-harm or suicide and to reduce the availability of and demand for alcohol. At the community-level platform, best practices include life-skills training in schools to build social and emotional competencies. At the health-care-level platform, we identify three delivery channels. Two of these delivery channels are especially relevant from a public health perspective: self-management (eg, web-based psychological therapy for depression and anxiety disorders and primary care and community outreach (eg, non-specialist health worker delivering psychological and pharmacological management of selected disorders. The third delivery channel, hospital care, which includes specialist services for MNS disorders and first-level hospitals providing other types of services (such as general medicine, HIV, or paediatric care, play an important part for a smaller proportion of cases with severe, refractory, or emergency presentations and for the integration of mental health care in other health-care channels, respectively. The costs of providing a significantly scaled up package of specified cost-effective interventions for prioritised MNS disorders in low-income and lower-middle-income countries is estimated at US$3-4 per head of population per year. Since a substantial proportion of MNS

  15. Addressing the burden of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Chisholm, Dan; Parikh, Rachana; Charlson, Fiona J; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dua, Tarun; Ferrari, Alize J; Hyman, Steve; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Carol; Lund, Crick; Medina Mora, María Elena; Petersen, Inge; Scott, James; Shidhaye, Rahul; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Thornicroft, Graham; Whiteford, Harvey

    2016-04-16

    The burden of mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders increased by 41% between 1990 and 2010 and now accounts for one in every 10 lost years of health globally. This sobering statistic does not take into account the substantial excess mortality associated with these disorders or the social and economic consequences of MNS disorders on affected persons, their caregivers, and society. A wide variety of effective interventions, including drugs, psychological treatments, and social interventions, can prevent and treat MNS disorders. At the population-level platform of service delivery, best practices include legislative measures to restrict access to means of self-harm or suicide and to reduce the availability of and demand for alcohol. At the community-level platform, best practices include life-skills training in schools to build social and emotional competencies. At the health-care-level platform, we identify three delivery channels. Two of these delivery channels are especially relevant from a public health perspective: self-management (eg, web-based psychological therapy for depression and anxiety disorders) and primary care and community outreach (eg, non-specialist health worker delivering psychological and pharmacological management of selected disorders). The third delivery channel, hospital care, which includes specialist services for MNS disorders and first-level hospitals providing other types of services (such as general medicine, HIV, or paediatric care), play an important part for a smaller proportion of cases with severe, refractory, or emergency presentations and for the integration of mental health care in other health-care channels, respectively. The costs of providing a significantly scaled up package of specified cost-effective interventions for prioritised MNS disorders in low-income and lower-middle-income countries is estimated at US$3-4 per head of population per year. Since a substantial proportion of MNS disorders run a

  16. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS × What research is being done? The National Institute of Neurological ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS See More About Research The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke ( ...

  17. Mixed methods inquiry into traditional healers' treatment of mental, neurological and substance abuse disorders in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Carolyn M; Ngobeni, Sizzy; Graves, Erin; Wagner, Ryan G

    2017-01-01

    Traditional healers are acceptable and highly accessible health practitioners throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Patients in South Africa often seek concurrent traditional and allopathic treatment leading to medical pluralism. We studied the cause of five traditional illnesses known locally as "Mavabyi ya nhloko" (sickness of the head), by conducting 27 in-depth interviews and 133 surveys with a randomly selected sample of traditional healers living and working in rural, northeastern South Africa. These interviews were carried out to identify treatment practices of mental, neurological, and substance abuse (MNS) disorders. Participating healers were primarily female (77%), older in age (median: 58.0 years; interquartile range [IQR]: 50-67), had very little formal education (median: 3.7 years; IQR: 3.2-4.2), and had practiced traditional medicine for many years (median: 17 years; IQR: 9.5-30). Healers reported having the ability to successfully treat: seizure disorders (47%), patients who have lost touch with reality (47%), paralysis on one side of the body (59%), and substance abuse (21%). Female healers reported a lower odds of treating seizure disorders (Odds Ratio (OR):0.47), patients who had lost touch with reality (OR:0.26; p-valuesubstance abuse (OR:0.36) versus males. Each additional year of education received was found to be associated with lower odds, ranging from 0.13-0.27, of treating these symptoms. Each additional patient seen by healers in the past week was associated with roughly 1.10 higher odds of treating seizure disorders, patients who have lost touch with reality, paralysis of one side of the body, and substance abuse. Healers charged a median of 500 South African Rand (~US$35) to treat substance abuse, 1000 Rand (~US$70) for seizure disorders or paralysis of one side of the body, and 1500 Rand (~US$105) for patients who have lost touch with reality. While not all healers elect to treat MNS disorders, many continue to do so, delaying allopathic

  18. Mixed methods inquiry into traditional healers' treatment of mental, neurological and substance abuse disorders in rural South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M Audet

    Full Text Available Traditional healers are acceptable and highly accessible health practitioners throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Patients in South Africa often seek concurrent traditional and allopathic treatment leading to medical pluralism.We studied the cause of five traditional illnesses known locally as "Mavabyi ya nhloko" (sickness of the head, by conducting 27 in-depth interviews and 133 surveys with a randomly selected sample of traditional healers living and working in rural, northeastern South Africa. These interviews were carried out to identify treatment practices of mental, neurological, and substance abuse (MNS disorders. Participating healers were primarily female (77%, older in age (median: 58.0 years; interquartile range [IQR]: 50-67, had very little formal education (median: 3.7 years; IQR: 3.2-4.2, and had practiced traditional medicine for many years (median: 17 years; IQR: 9.5-30. Healers reported having the ability to successfully treat: seizure disorders (47%, patients who have lost touch with reality (47%, paralysis on one side of the body (59%, and substance abuse (21%. Female healers reported a lower odds of treating seizure disorders (Odds Ratio (OR:0.47, patients who had lost touch with reality (OR:0.26; p-value<0.05, paralysis of one side of the body (OR:0.36, and substance abuse (OR:0.36 versus males. Each additional year of education received was found to be associated with lower odds, ranging from 0.13-0.27, of treating these symptoms. Each additional patient seen by healers in the past week was associated with roughly 1.10 higher odds of treating seizure disorders, patients who have lost touch with reality, paralysis of one side of the body, and substance abuse. Healers charged a median of 500 South African Rand (~US$35 to treat substance abuse, 1000 Rand (~US$70 for seizure disorders or paralysis of one side of the body, and 1500 Rand (~US$105 for patients who have lost touch with reality.While not all healers elect to treat MNS

  19. Quality of clinical trials for selected priority mental and neurological disorders in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulugeta A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anwar Mulugeta,1 Girmay Medhin,2 Getnet Yimer,1 Rahimush Jemal,3 Abebaw Fekadu,4,5 1Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, 2Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, 3Department of Pharmacy, Tikur Anbesa Hospital, 4Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 5Department of Psychological Medicine, Centre for Affective Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, UK Background: There is a developing consensus on the effectiveness of various interventions for mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries, and it has been proposed that the main task is to scale up these interventions. In this context, we aimed to review the quality and extent of intervention trials for selected priority mental and neurological disorders in sub-Saharan Africa.Methods: Medline and African Journals Online databases were used for searching relevant articles. Both randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials for the treatment of schizophrenia, depression, maternal depression, bipolar disorder, and epilepsy/seizure disorders that involve pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and physical therapy were included. An extensive list of search terms that identified locations, disorders, interventions, and study types were employed. The qualities of the trials were appraised using the single-component quality assessment of the consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT statement and the Jadad scale.Results: From 1,136 studies identified, only 34 trials that fulfilled inclusion criteria were used for quality analysis. Most studies were clinical trials of treatments for epilepsy and were conducted after 2006. In terms of region, the majority of studies were conducted in South Africa (22 of the 34 studies. Approximately half of the trials (53% were conducted in single center and the majority

  20. Mechanisms of action for the medium-chain triglyceride ketogenic diet in neurological and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Katrin; Khabbush, Aziza; Williams, Sophie; Eaton, Simon; Orford, Michael; Cross, J Helen; Heales, Simon J R; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2018-01-01

    High-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, known as ketogenic diets, have been used as a non-pharmacological treatment for refractory epilepsy. A key mechanism of this treatment is thought to be the generation of ketones, which provide brain cells (neurons and astrocytes) with an energy source that is more efficient than glucose, resulting in beneficial downstream metabolic changes, such as increasing adenosine levels, which might have effects on seizure control. However, some studies have challenged the central role of ketones because medium-chain fatty acids, which are part of a commonly used variation of the diet (the medium-chain triglyceride ketogenic diet), have been shown to directly inhibit AMPA receptors (glutamate receptors), and to change cell energetics through mitochondrial biogenesis. Through these mechanisms, medium-chain fatty acids rather than ketones are likely to block seizure onset and raise seizure threshold. The mechanisms underlying the ketogenic diet might also have roles in other disorders, such as preventing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease, the proliferation and spread of cancer, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Analysing medium-chain fatty acids in future ketogenic diet studies will provide further insights into their importance in modified forms of the diet. Moreover, the results of these studies could facilitate the development of new pharmacological and dietary therapies for epilepsy and other disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnesium/calcium related neurological disorders in the ALS focus of the Kii Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Masayuki; Yoshida, Munehito; Tamaki, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Yasunori; Minamide, Akihito; Ota, Kiichiro [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan); Sasajima, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Current epidemiological surveys in the Western Pacific area and Kii Peninsula have suggested that low calcium(Ca), magnesium(Mg) and high aluminum(Al) and manganese(Mn) in river, soil and drinking water may be implicated in the pathogenetic process of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) and Parkinsonism-dementia(PD). The condition of unbalanced minerals was experimentally mimicked in this study using rats. Male Wistar rats, weighing 200 g, were maintained for 90 days on the following diets: (A) standard diet, (B) low Ca diet, (C) low Ca-Mg diet, (D) low Ca-Mg diet with high Al. In the groups maintained on unbalanced mineral diets, Ca and Mg contents of the bones were lower than standard diet. On the other hand, Ca content of CNS showed higher values in the unbalanced diet groups than those in the standard diet group. This was determined by neutron activation analysis(NAA) at KUR. Also, Ca content in soft tissues of rats given unbalanced mineral diets was higher than those on standard diet. Mg content of soft tissues and spinal cord of rats was markedly lower in the low Ca-Mg plus high Al diet group than the other three groups as determined by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry(ICP). Six Kii cases with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) also showed higher Ca and lower Mg contents in the CNS tissues than those of neurologically normal controls. The calcification of the spinal ligaments(CSL) has been reported in only 120 cases in the world and 28 cases of CSL in the Kii Peninsula have been found in the same foci as ALS. We analyzed Mg content of 7 spinal bones and 10 ligaments of the CSL and Ca content of 5 spinal bones compared with controls. The CSL showed lower values of Mg contents in bones and ligaments compared to controls. The Ca content in bones of CSL was significantly lower than that of controls. This suggests that the environmental factor may contribute to the pathogenesis of CSL due to low Ca and Mg intake as well as for ALS. (J.P.N.)

  2. Expressive Incoherence and Alexithymia in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Andreia P.; Steffgen, Georges; Samson, Andrea C.

    2017-01-01

    Expressive incoherence can be implicated in socio-emotional communicative problems in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study examined expressive incoherence in 37 children with ASD and 41 typically developing (TD) children aged 3-13 years old during a frustration task. The role of alexithymia in expressive incoherence was also assessed.…

  3. Combined detection of depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients using the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy and the World Health Organization well-being index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Pilebæk; Amiri, Moshgan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the Danish version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E), and compare it with the World Health Organization index for psychological well-being (WHO-5) as screening tests for depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients. METHODS: Epilepsy...

  4. Neurologic and neuromuscular functional disorders of the pharynx and esophagus; Neurologisch bedingte und neuromuskulaere Funktionsstoerungen des Pharynx und Oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany); Hannig, C. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Neurologic swallowing disorders are an increasing diagnostic problem in our overaged population. Undiagnosed chronic aspiration pneumonia is the cause of death in 20-40% of all inhabitants of nursing homes. In neurologic diseases of the pharynx, the physiologic interaction of pharyngeal contraction, closure of the pharynx, and esophageal motility are frequently disturbed. This may be due to cortical, bulbar, or cerebellar brain damage of ischemic or traumatic origin. Furthermore diseases or peripheral nerves, muscles, and synapses cause disturbances. The most life-threatening complication of these disturbances is tracheal aspiration, which requires an iso-osmolar contrast medium for imaging studies that cause no or minimal pulmonary problems. Utilizing fast dynamic documentation we can analyze the swallowing act in 35 images within the passage time of 0.7 s. This requires digital frame sequences from 15-50 images/s, which can be provided by DSI or videofluoroscopy. Neurologic and neuromuscular patterns are demonstrated with and without tracheal aspiration. The differentiation of aspiration in a so-called pre-, intra-, and postdeglutitive form is possible. We distinguish four grades of severity of aspiration, which is also of great clinical impact for the differential rehabilitation therapy. The efficiency of the rehabilitation protocol can be assessed by the dynamic swallowing studies. (orig.) [German] Neurologische Schluckstoerungen stellen mit zunehmender Ueberalterung der Bevoelkerung ein wachsendes diagnostisches Problem dar. 20-40% aller Alter- und Pflegeheiminsassen versterben an einer nicht erkannten aspirationsbedingten Pneumonie. Gerade bei den neurologischen Erkrankungen des Pharynx und der Speiseroehre ist die physiologische Interaktion zwischen Pharynxkontraktion, Larynxschluss und oesophagealer Motilitaet haeufig gestoert. Hierbei koennen sowohl kortikale, bulbaere sowie zerebellaere Hirnschaeden ischaemischer oder traumatischer Genese, Erkrankungen

  5. Systemic and neurologic abnormalities distinguish the lysosomal disorders sialidosis and galactosialidosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geest, Natalie; Bonten, Erik; Mann, Linda; de Sousa-Hitzler, Jean; Hahn, Christopher; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2002-06-01

    Neuraminidase initiates the hydrolysis of sialo-glycoconjugates by removing their terminal sialic acid residues. In humans, primary or secondary deficiency of this enzyme leads to two clinically similar neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders: sialidosis and galactosialidosis (GS). Mice nullizygous at the Neu1 locus develop clinical abnormalities reminiscent of early-onset sialidosis in children, including severe nephropathy, progressive edema, splenomegaly, kyphosis and urinary excretion of sialylated oligosaccharides. Although the sialidosis mouse model shares clinical and histopathological features with GS mice and GS patients, we have identified phenotypic abnormalities that seem specific for sialidosis mice. These include progressive deformity of the spine, high incidence of premature death, age-related extramedullary hematopoiesis, and lack of early degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells. The differences and similarities identified in these sialidosis and GS mice may help to better understand the pathophysiology of these diseases in children and to identify more targeted therapies for each of these diseases.

  6. Maternal Factors that Induce Epigenetic Changes Contribute to Neurological Disorders in Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Avijit; Kandilya, Deepika; Ramya, Seshadri; Stünkel, Walter; Chong, Yap Seng; Dheen, S Thameem

    2017-05-24

    It is well established that the regulation of epigenetic factors, including chromatic reorganization, histone modifications, DNA methylation, and miRNA regulation, is critical for the normal development and functioning of the human brain. There are a number of maternal factors influencing epigenetic pathways such as lifestyle, including diet, alcohol consumption, and smoking, as well as age and infections (viral or bacterial). Genetic and metabolic alterations such as obesity, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and thyroidism alter epigenetic mechanisms, thereby contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) such as embryonic neural tube defects (NTDs), autism, Down's syndrome, Rett syndrome, and later onset of neuropsychological deficits. This review comprehensively describes the recent findings in the epigenetic landscape contributing to altered molecular profiles resulting in NDs. Furthermore, we will discuss potential avenues for future research to identify diagnostic markers and therapeutic epi-drugs to reverse these abnormalities in the brain as epigenetic marks are plastic and reversible in nature.

  7. Endurance training remodels sperm-borne small RNA expression and methylation at neurological gene hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Lars R; Donkin, Ida; Fabre, Odile

    2018-01-01

    Remodeling of the sperm epigenome by lifestyle factors before conception could account for altered metabolism in the next generation offspring. Here, we hypothesized that endurance training changes the epigenome of human spermatozoa. Using small RNA (sRNA) sequencing and reduced representation...... bisulfite sequencing (RRBS), we, respectively, investigated sRNA expression and DNA methylation in pure fractions of motile spermatozoa collected from young healthy individuals before, after 6 weeks of endurance training and after 3 months without exercise. Expression of 8 PIWI interacting RNA were changed...... by exercise training. RRBS analysis revealed 330 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) after training and 303 DMRs after the detraining period, which were, in both conditions, enriched at close vicinity of transcription start sites. Ontology analysis of genes located at proximity of DMRs returned terms...

  8. Differential gene expression in multiple neurological, inflammatory and connective tissue pathways in a spontaneous model of human small vessel stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Emma L; McBride, Martin W; Beattie, Wendy; McClure, John D; Graham, Delyth; Dominiczak, Anna F; Sudlow, Cathie L M; Smith, Colin; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) causes a fifth of all strokes plus diffuse brain damage leading to cognitive decline, physical disabilities and dementia. The aetiology and pathogenesis of SVD are unknown, but largely attributed to hypertension or microatheroma. We used the spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rat (SHRSP), the closest spontaneous experimental model of human SVD, and age-matched control rats kept under identical, non-salt-loaded conditions, to perform a blinded analysis of mRNA microarray, qRT-PCR and pathway analysis in two brain regions (frontal and mid-coronal) commonly affected by SVD in the SHRSP at age five, 16 and 21 weeks. We found gene expression abnormalities, with fold changes ranging from 2.5 to 59 for the 10 most differentially expressed genes, related to endothelial tight junctions (reduced), nitric oxide bioavailability (reduced), myelination (impaired), glial and microglial activity (increased), matrix proteins (impaired), vascular reactivity (impaired) and albumin (reduced), consistent with protein expression defects in the same rats. All were present at age 5 weeks thus predating blood pressure elevation. 'Neurological' and 'inflammatory' pathways were more affected than 'vascular' functional pathways. This set of defects, although individually modest, when acting in combination could explain the SHRSP's susceptibility to microvascular and brain injury, compared with control rats. Similar combined, individually modest, but multiple neurovascular unit defects, could explain susceptibility to spontaneous human SVD. © 2014 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Neuropathological Society.

  9. Neurological diseases and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequentl...

  10. The role of nanotechnology and nano and micro-electronics in monitoring and control of cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has been broadly defined as the one for not only the creation of functional materials and devices as well as systems through control of matter at the scale of 1-100 nm, but also the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the same scale. Growing needs in the point-of-care (POC) that is an increasing market for improving patient's quality of life, are driving the development of nanotechnologies for diagnosis and treatment of various life threatening diseases. This paper addresses the recent development of nanodiagnostic sensors and nanotherapeutic devices with functionalized carbon nanotube and/or nanowire on a flexible organic thin film electronics to monitor and control of the three leading diseases namely 1) neurodegenerative diseases, 2) cardiovascular diseases, and 3) diabetes and metabolic diseases. The sensors developed include implantable and biocompatible devices, light weight wearable devices in wrist-watches, hats, shoes and clothes. The nanotherapeutics devices include nanobased drug delivery system. Many of these sensors are integrated with the wireless systems for the remote physiological monitoring. The author's research team has also developed a wireless neural probe using nanowires and nanotubes for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease. Light weight and compact EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system in a hat developed is capable of monitoring real time epileptic patients and patients with neurological and movement disorders using the Internet and cellular network. Physicians could be able to monitor these signals in realtime using portable computers or cell phones and will give early warning signal if these signals cross a pre-determined threshold level. In addition the potential impact of nanotechnology for applications in medicine is that, the devices can be designed to interact with cells and tissues at the molecular level, which allows high degree of functionality. Devices engineered at nanometer scale imply a

  11. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle ( pre- & post- transcriptional maturation and protein turnover : Implications in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALAV SUCHIN TRIVEDI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, as well as due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions. Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic. This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition and behavior. Thus a regulatory switch, controlling the lifespan, maturation and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at 1.The pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA (pre-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and 2. the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins (RNP and RNA binding proteins (RNABP in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione antioxidant levels, the redox status of neurons might be the central regulatory switch for methylation

  12. Mannose-binding Lectin Mediated Complement Pathway in Autoimmune Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Mehrdad; Dabirzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Dastravan, Nastaran; Etemadifar, Masoud; Ghadimi, Keyvan; Saadatpour, Zahra; Rezaei, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with variable phenotypic presentations, while Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is the prototypic acute inflammatory disorder that affects the peripheral nervous system. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a T cell dependent and antibody mediated autoimmune disease. Although it has been shown that complement plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of MS, GBS, and MG, the role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) as a biomarker of immunopathogensis of these diseases and also its association with the severity of them have been poorly investigated. Therefore, in this study we aimed to measure plasma levels of MBL in patients with MS, GBS, and MG. In a case-control study, plasma was obtained from healthy controls (n=100) and also patients with MS (n=120), GBS (n=30), and MG (n=30). Plasma level measurement of MBL was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mean serum level of MBL was significantly different between groups of patients and healthy controls (p<0.001). We also found a positive correlation between plasma levels of MBL and severity scores of MS, MG, and GBS patients including: expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (r=+0.60 and p=<0.001), quantitative myasthenia gravis score (QMGS) (r=+0.56 and p=0.01), and GBS disability scale (GDS) (r=+0.37 and p=0.04). Taken together, our findings suggest that complement activation mediated by MBL contributes to the pathogenesis and also severity of MS, MG, and GBS. However, because the lectin pathway can be involved in several phases of the immune response, further evidence will be required to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  13. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Berk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    studies, showing no alteration between bipolar disorder patients and control individuals. Conclusions:  There is evidence of some genes exhibiting state-related alterations in expression in bipolar disorder; however, this finding is limited by the lack of replication across studies. Further prospective...

  14. LINGO-1 and AMIGO3, potential therapeutic targets for neurological and dysmyelinating disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Foale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat proteins have gained considerable interest as therapeutic targets due to their expression and biological activity within the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has received particular attention since it inhibits axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in a RhoA dependent manner while inhibiting leucine rich repeat and immunoglobulin-like domain-containing protein 1 (LINGO-1 disinhibits neuron outgrowth. Furthermore, LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production. Inhibiting the action of LINGO-1 encourages remyelination both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, LINGO-1 antagonists show promise as therapies for demyelinating diseases. An analogous protein to LINGO-1, amphoterin-induced gene and open reading frame-3 (AMIGO3, exerts the same inhibitory effect on the axonal outgrowth of central nervous system neurons, as well as interacting with the same receptors as LINGO-1. However, AMIGO3 is upregulated more rapidly after spinal cord injury than LINGO-1. We speculate that AMIGO3 has a similar inhibitory effect on oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production as with axogenesis. Therefore, inhibiting AMIGO3 will likely encourage central nervous system axonal regeneration as well as the production of myelin from local oligodendrocyte precursor cell, thus providing a promising therapeutic target and an area for future investigation.

  15. LINGO-1 and AMIGO3, potential therapeutic targets for neurological and dysmyelinating disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foale, Simon; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Fulton, Daniel; Ahmed, Zubair

    2017-08-01

    Leucine rich repeat proteins have gained considerable interest as therapeutic targets due to their expression and biological activity within the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has received particular attention since it inhibits axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in a RhoA dependent manner while inhibiting leucine rich repeat and immunoglobulin-like domain-containing protein 1 (LINGO-1) disinhibits neuron outgrowth. Furthermore, LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production. Inhibiting the action of LINGO-1 encourages remyelination both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, LINGO-1 antagonists show promise as therapies for demyelinating diseases. An analogous protein to LINGO-1, amphoterin-induced gene and open reading frame-3 (AMIGO3), exerts the same inhibitory effect on the axonal outgrowth of central nervous system neurons, as well as interacting with the same receptors as LINGO-1. However, AMIGO3 is upregulated more rapidly after spinal cord injury than LINGO-1. We speculate that AMIGO3 has a similar inhibitory effect on oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production as with axogenesis. Therefore, inhibiting AMIGO3 will likely encourage central nervous system axonal regeneration as well as the production of myelin from local oligodendrocyte precursor cell, thus providing a promising therapeutic target and an area for future investigation.

  16. Jisuikang, a Chinese herbal formula, increases neurotrophic factor expression and promotes the recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese medicine compound, Jisuikang, can promote recovery of neurological function by inhibiting lipid peroxidation, scavenging oxygen free radicals, and effectively improving the local microenvironment after spinal cord injury. However, the mechanism remains unclear. Thus, we established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using a modified version of Allen's method. Jisuikang (50, 25, and 12.5 g/kg/d and prednisolone were administered 30 minutes after anesthesia. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor scale scores and the oblique board test showed improved motor function recovery in the prednisone group and moderate-dose Jisuikang group compared with the other groups at 3–7 days post-injury. The rats in the moderate-dose Jisuikang group recovered best at 14 days post-injury. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy showed that the survival rate of neurons in treatment groups increased after 3–7 days of administration. Further, the structure of neurons and glial cells was more distinct, especially in prednisolone and moderate-dose Jisuikang groups. Western blot assay and immunohistochemistry showed that expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in injured segments was maintained at a high level after 7–14 days of treatment. In contrast, expression of nerve growth factor (NGF was down-regulated at 7 days after spinal cord injury. Real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that expression of BDNF and NGF mRNA was induced in injured segments by prednisolone and Jisuikang. At 3–7 days after injury, the effect of prednisolone was greater, while 14 days after injury, the effect of moderate-dose Jisuikang was greater. These results confirm that Jisuikang can upregulate BDNF and NGF expression for a prolonged period after spinal cord injury and promote repair of acute spinal cord injury, with its effect being similar to prednisolone.

  17. Strokes with minor symptoms: an exploratory analysis of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recombinant tissue plasminogen activator trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Pooja; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Yeatts, Sharon D; Saver, Jeffrey L; Levine, Steven R; Lyden, Patrick D; Moomaw, Charles J; Palesch, Yuko Y; Jauch, Edward C; Broderick, Joseph P

    2010-11-01

    The pivotal National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recombinant tissue plasminogen activator trials excluded patients with ischemic stroke with specific minor presentations or rapidly improving symptoms. The recombinant tissue plasminogen activator product label notes that its use for minor neurological deficit or rapidly improving stroke symptoms has not been evaluated. As a result, patients with low National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores are not commonly treated in clinical practice. We sought to further characterize the patients with minor stroke who were included in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke trials. Minor strokes were defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≤ 5 at baseline for this retrospective analysis, because this subgroup is most commonly excluded from treatment in clinical practice and trials. Clinical stroke syndromes were defined based on prespecified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale item score clusters. Clinical outcomes were reviewed generally and within these cluster subgroups. Only 58 cases had National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores of 0 to 5 in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke trials (42 recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and 16 placebo), and 2971 patients were excluded from the trials due to "rapidly improving" or "minor symptoms" as the primary reason. No patients were enrolled with isolated motor symptoms, isolated facial droop, isolated ataxia, dysarthria, isolated sensory symptoms, or with only symptoms/signs not captured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (ie, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale=0). There were ≤ 3 patients with each of the other isolated deficits enrolled in the trial. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke trials excluded a substantial number of strokes with minor presentations, those that were included were small in number, and conclusions

  18. Postulating that our neurological models for musculoskeletal support, movement, and emotional expression come from archetypal forms in early organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, John A

    2006-01-01

    The ability for humans, in principle, to almost effortlessly support themselves against gravity, to move with grace, and to express themselves in subtle and beautiful ways is amazing, given the number of moveable joints, variety of obstacles and intentions, and possible emotions to express. The actual mechanics are obviously astonishing but the models for these activities, in origin, must be simple. The basic hypotheses concerning these models are the following: The neurological model for the control of our musculoskeletal system is a simple support system from early organisms. This model involves a complementary relationship between the dorsal and ventral surfaces. There are three functionally distinct parts of the body, though not visually observable. These parts, named here "the director, motor, and rudder segments," are functionally distinct in optimal posture and movement. Healthy balance, posture, and movement result from their relatively independent yet coordinated actions. Forms of locomotion used by early organisms: peristalsis, lateral undulation, and dorsal-ventral undulation are present in us yet. Four frozen phases of the dorsal-ventral wave, for example, constitute four distinct postural and personality styles. I present these hypotheses together in this short paper as an introduction to a new illustration-dependent way to conceive some of our psychophysical realities. The hypotheses came from efforts to develop mental imagery to assist students in learning the Alexander technique (AT). In addition, a little known theory concerning four basic emotions and personality types, called the Fusion Theory, provided an initial concept of personality types. Four fixed postural patterns that I observed in teaching AT linked well to this personality typology. There is research that supports the use of mental imagery to affect change in body use, mostly in the sports and dance fields, but none exists addressing the specific imagery derived from these hypotheses

  19. A preliminary investigation of sleep quality in functional neurological disorders: Poor sleep appears common, and is associated with functional impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christopher D; Kyle, Simon D

    2017-07-15

    Functional neurological disorders (FND) are disabling conditions for which there are few empirically-supported treatments. Disturbed sleep appears to be part of the FND context; however, the clinical importance of sleep disturbance (extent, characteristics and impact) remains largely unknown. We described sleep quality in two samples, and investigated the relationship between sleep and FND-related functional impairment. We included a sample recruited online via patient charities (N=205) and a consecutive clinical sample (N=20). Participants completed validated measures of sleep quality and sleep characteristics (e.g. total sleep time, sleep efficiency), mood, and FND-related functional impairment. Poor sleep was common in both samples (89% in the clinical range), which was characterised by low sleep efficiency (M=65.40%) and low total sleep time (M=6.05h). In regression analysis, sleep quality was negatively associated with FND-related functional impairment, accounting for 16% of the variance and remaining significant after the introduction of mood variables. These preliminary analyses suggest that subjective sleep disturbance (low efficiency, short sleep) is common in FND. Sleep quality was negatively associated with the functional impairment attributed to FND, independent of depression. Therefore, sleep disturbance may be a clinically important feature of FND. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Common Data Elements for Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Research: A National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Alai, Sherita; Anderson, Kim; Charlifue, Susan; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael; Flanders, Adam E.; Jones, Linda; Kleitman, Naomi; Lans, Aria; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Odenkirchen, Joanne; Steeves, John; Tansey, Keith; Widerström-Noga, Eva; Jakeman, Lyn B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a comprehensive set of common data elements (CDEs), data definitions, case report forms and guidelines for use in spinal cord injury (SCI) clinical research, as part of the CDE project at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) of the USA National Institutes of Health. Setting International Working Groups Methods Nine working groups composed of international experts reviewed existing CDEs and instruments, created new elements when needed, and provided recommendations for SCI clinical research. The project was carried out in collaboration with and cross-referenced to development of the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) International SCI Data Sets. The recommendations were compiled, subjected to internal review, and posted online for external public comment. The final version was reviewed by all working groups and the NINDS CDE team prior to release. Results The NINDS SCI CDEs and supporting documents are publically available on the NINDS CDE website and the ISCoS website. The CDEs span the continuum of SCI care and the full range of domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Conclusions Widespread use of common data elements can facilitate SCI clinical research and trial design, data sharing, and retrospective analyses. Continued international collaboration will enable consistent data collection and reporting, and will help ensure that the data elements are updated, reviewed and broadcast as additional evidence is obtained. PMID:25665542

  1. Reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (C-NDDI-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi; Chen, Zhe-Meng; Zhang, Yin-Xi; Ge, Ye-Bo; Shen, Chun-Hong; Ding, Yao; Wang, Shuang; Tang, Ye-Lei; Ding, Mei-Ping

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (C-NDDI-E). A total of 248 Chinese patients with epilepsy underwent psychometric tests, including the Chinese version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (C-MINI), the Chinese version of the Beck Depression Inventory - II (C-BDI-II), and the C-NDDI-E. None of the patients had difficulties understanding or completing the C-NDDI-E. Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.824. At a cutoff score of ≥14, the C-NDDI-E had a sensitivity of 0.854, a specificity of 0.899, a positive predictive value of 0.625, and a negative predictive value of 0.969. The scores for the C-NDDI-E were positively correlated with those for the C-BDI-II (Pdepression in Chinese patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antidepressants in Parkinson's disease. Recommendations by the movement disorder study group of the Neurological Association of Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, E; Mata, M; López-Manzanares, L; Kurtis, M; Eimil, M; Martínez-Castrillo, J C; Navas, I; Posada, I J; Prieto, C; Ruíz-Huete, C; Vela, L; Venegas, B

    2016-03-19

    Although antidepressants are widely used in Parkinson's disease (PD), few well-designed studies to support their efficacy have been conducted. These clinical guidelines are based on a review of the literature and the results of an AMN movement disorder study group survey. Evidence suggests that nortriptyline, venlafaxine, paroxetine, and citalopram may be useful in treating depression in PD, although studies on paroxetine and citalopram yield conflicting results. In clinical practice, however, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are usually considered the treatment of choice. Duloxetine may be an alternative to venlafaxine, although the evidence for this is less, and venlafaxine plus mirtazapine may be useful in drug-resistant cases. Furthermore, citalopram may be indicated for the treatment of anxiety, atomoxetine for hypersomnia, trazodone and mirtazapine for insomnia and psychosis, and bupropion for apathy. In general, antidepressants are well tolerated in PD. However, clinicians should consider the anticholinergic effect of tricyclic antidepressants, the impact of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on blood pressure, the extrapyramidal effects of antidepressants, and any potential interactions between monoamine oxidase B inhibitors and other antidepressants. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Antioxidant and anticholinesterase investigations of Rumex hastatus D. Don: potential effectiveness in oxidative stress and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rumex species are traditionally used for the treatment of neurological disorders including headache, migraine, depression, paralysis etc. Several species have been scientifically validated for antioxidant and anticholinestrase potentials. This study aims to investigate Rumex hastatus D. Don crude methanolic extract, subsequent fractions, saponins and flavonoids for acetylcholinestrase, butyrylcholinestrase inhibition and diverse antioxidant activities to validate its folkloric uses in neurological disorders. Rumexhastatus crude methanolic extract (Rh. Cr, subsequent fractions; n-hexane (Rh. Hex, chloroform (Rh. Chf, ethyl acetate (Rh. EtAc, aqueous fraction (Rh. Aq, crude saponins (Rh. Sp and flavonoids (Rh. Fl were investigated against acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE at various concentrations (125, 250, 500,1000 μg/mL using Ellman's spectrophotometric analysis. Antioxidant potentials of Rh. Sp and Rh. Fl were evaluated using DPPH, H2O2 and ABTS free radical scavenging assays at 62.5, 125, 250, 500, 1000 μg/mL. RESULTS: All the test samples showed concentration dependent cholinesterase inhibition and radicals scavenging activity. The AChE inhibition potential of Rh. Sp and Rh. Fl were most prominent i.e., 81.67 ± 0.88 and 91.62 ± 1.67 at highest concentration with IC50 135 and 20 μg/mL respectively. All the subsequent fractions exhibited moderate to high AChE inhibition i.e., Rh. Cr, Rh. Hex, Rh. Chf, Rh. EtAc and Rh. Aq showed IC50 218, 1420, 75, 115 and 1210 μg/mL respectively. Similarly, against BChE various plant extracts i.e., Rh. Sp, Rh. Fl, Rh. Cr, Rh. Hex, Rh. Chf, Rh. EtAc and Rh. Aq resulted IC50 165,175, 265, 890, 92, 115 and 220 μg/mL respectively. In DPPH free radical scavenging assay, Rh. Sp and Rh. Fl showed comparable results with the positive control i.e., 63.34 ± 0.98 and 76.93 ± 1.13% scavenging at 1 mg/mL concentration (IC50 312 and 104 μg/mL respectively. The percent ABTS

  4. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  5. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Application of psychophysics to neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2008-04-01

    Although psychophysics has already been used in many neurological evaluations including the visual and hearing tests, the use of psychophysics has been limited to the evaluation of sensory disorders. In this review paper, however, the author introduced recent attempts to apply psychophysics to the evaluation of higher cognitive functions such as perception of scenes and facial expressions. Psychophysics was also used to measure visual hypersensitivity in a patient with migraine. The benefits of the use of psychophysics in neurological and neuropsychological settings would be as follows. (1) We can evaluate higher cognitive functions quantitatively. (2) We can measure performance both above and below the normal range by the same method. (3) We can use the same stimulus and task as other research areas such as neuroscience and neuroimaging, and compare results between research areas.

  7. Peroxisomal disorders in neurology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.; Heymans, H. S.; Schutgens, R. B.; Barth, P. G.; van den Bosch, H.; Tager, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Although peroxisomes were initially believed to play only a minor role in mammalian metabolism, it is now clear that they catalyse essential reactions in a number of different metabolic pathways and thus play an indispensable role in intermediary metabolism. The metabolic pathways in which

  8. Normal neurologic and developmental outcome after an accidental intravenous infusion of expressed breast milk in a neonate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C Anthony

    2012-02-03

    Here we describe a premature male infant who was accidentally given 10 mL of expressed breast milk intravenously over a 3.5-hour period. Having survived this event with supportive care, this boy was attending regular school with no obvious neurologic or learning difficulties at 6 years of age. In 1998, after a query on an e-mail discussion group for health care providers in neonatology (NICU-net), we were informed of 8 similar events that proved fatal in 3 infants. A root-cause analysis revealed that accidental intravenous administration of breast milk or formula can be avoided by the use of color-coded enteral-administration sets with Luer connections that are not compatible with intravenous cannulas. The addition of methylene blue to feeds, or bolus enteral feeds (instead of continuous gastric feedings), may also help prevent such errors. These cases show the value of gathering information about rare but important events through a neonatal network. In addition, they confirm that prevention of medical error should focus on faulty systems rather than faulty people.

  9. How music training enhances working memory: a cerebrocerebellar blending mechanism that can lead equally to scientific discovery and therapeutic efficacy in neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Vandervert, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Background Following in the vein of studies that concluded that music training resulted in plastic changes in Einstein’s cerebral cortex, controlled research has shown that music training (1) enhances central executive attentional processes in working memory, and (2) has also been shown to be of significant therapeutic value in neurological disorders. Within this framework of music training-induced enhancement of central executive attentional processes, the purpose of this article is to argue...

  10. Expansion of IL-6(+) Th17-like cells expressing TLRs correlates with microbial translocation and neurological disabilities in NMOSD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Priscila O; Dias, Aleida S O; Kasahara, Taissa M; Ornelas, Alice M M; Aguiar, Renato S; Leon, Soniza A; Ruiz, Anne; Marignier, Romain; Araújo, Ana Carolina R A; Alvarenga, Regina; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2017-06-15

    Different microbial antigens, by signaling through toll-like receptors (TLR), may contribute to Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of different Th17-like cell subsets that express TLR in NMOSD patients. For this study, the frequency of different Th17 cell subsets expressing TLR subsets in healthy individuals (n=20) and NMOSD patients (n=20) was evaluated by cytometry. The peripheral levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14) and cytokines were determined by ELISA. Our results demonstrated that the proportion of peripheral CD4(+) T cells expressing TLR2, 4 and 9 was significantly higher in NMOSD samples than in healthy subjects. In NMOSD, these cells are CD28(+)PD-1(-)CD57(-) and produce elevated levels of IL-17. Among different TLRs(+) Th17-like subsets, the proportion of those that co-express IL-17 and IL-6 was significantly higher in NMOSD patients, which was positively correlated with sCD14 levels and EDSS score. By contrast, the percentage of TLRs(+)Treg17 cells (IL-10(+)IL-17(+)) was negatively related to sCD14 and the severity of NMOSD. In conclusion, the expansion of peripheral IL-6-producing TLR(+) Th17-like cells in NMOSD patients was associated with both bacterial translocation and disease severity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. P2X7 Receptors as a Transducer in the Co-Occurrence of Neurological/Psychiatric and Cardiovascular Disorders: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Skaper

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over-stimulation of the purinergic P2X7 receptor may bring about cellular dysfunction and injury in settings of neurodegeneration, chronic inflammation, as well as in psychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. Here we speculate how P2X7 receptor over-activation may lead to the co-occurrence of neurological and psychiatric disorders with cardiovascular disorders. Presentation. We hypothesize that proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-1, are key players in the pathophysiology of neurological, psychiatric, and cardiovascular diseases. Critically, this premise is based on a role for the P2X7 receptor in triggering a rise in these cytokines. Given the broad distribution of P2X7 receptors in nervous, immune, and vascular tissue cells, this receptor is proposed as central in linking the nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. Testing. Investigate, retrospectively, whether a bidirectional link can be established between illnesses with a proinflammatory component (e.g., inflammatory and chronic neuropathic pain and cardiovascular disease, for example, hypertension, and whether patients treated with anti-inflammatory drugs have a lower incidence of disease complications. Positive outcome would indicate a prospective study to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of P2X7 receptor antagonists. Implications. It should be stressed that sufficient direct evidence does not exist at present supporting our hypothesis. However, a positive outcome would encourage the further development of P2X7 receptor antagonists and their application to limit the co-occurrence of neurological, psychiatric, and cardiovascular disorders.

  12. Suicide in Neurologic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, David B.; Anderson, C. Alan

    2002-11-01

    The risk of attempted or completed suicide is increased in patients with migraine with aura, epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and Huntington's disease. Contrary to the general perception that the risk of suicide among patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing conditions is low, several reports suggest that the risk of suicide in these patients increases relative to the general population. Some patients at risk for neurologic disorders are also at increased risk for suicide; in particular, the risk of suicide is increased among persons at risk for Huntington's disease, independent of the presence or absence of the Huntington's gene mutation. The risk of attempted or completed suicide in neurologic illness is strongly associated with depression, feelings of hopelessness or helplessness, and social isolation. Additional suicide risk factors in persons with neurologic illness include cognitive impairment, relatively younger age (under 60 years), moderate physical disability, recent onset or change in illness, a lack of future plans or perceived meaning in life, recent losses (personal, occupational, or financial), and prior history of psychiatric illness or suicidal behavior. Substance dependence, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, and some personality disorders (eg, borderline personality disorder) may also contribute to increased risk of suicide among persons with neurologic illnesses. Identification and aggressive treatment of psychiatric problems, especially depression, as well as reduction of modifiable suicide risk factors among patients with neurologic illness is needed to reduce the risk of attempted and completed suicide in this population.

  13. Post-marketing observational program of the effectiveness of fluvoxamine for the treatment of depression in patients with neurological disorders: the FRIENDS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahno NN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nikolay N Yahno,1 Anastasia V Fedotova2 1Neurology Department, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, 2Neurology Department, Additional Professional Education Faculty, Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russian Federation Abstract: In a prospective, non-blinded, uncontrolled, multicenter, post-marketing, observational study (FRIENDS; NCT02043197, fluvoxamine (50–300 mg/day for 90 days was effective for the treatment of depression in 299 adult patients (age ≥18 years with neurological disorders at baseline. The therapeutic effect of fluvoxamine was measured by means of changes in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression and anxiety scores (HADS-D and HADS-A, respectively, global severity of illness, and clinical condition (measured using the Clinical Global Improvement [CGI] scale. The mean HADS-D subscale score at baseline in the per-protocol cohort (n=296 was 11.7±3.1 points and the corresponding mean HADS-A score was 12.6±3.2. Significant (P<0.0001 improvements in both scores were recorded during fluvoxamine treatment and later follow-up. Most patients (>85% recorded reductions versus baseline in both indices. In the CGI-based assessment, most evaluated patients (>200 experienced moderate to very substantial clinical improvement, with no or limited side effects. Significant improvements were also recorded in the exploratory outcomes of sleep quality, assessed using the Insomnia Severity Index, and cognitive function, assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (P<0.0001 vs baseline for both. No death or serious adverse drug reactions were reported during the study. The results of this observational study affirm that fluvoxamine is effective and well tolerated for the treatment of depression in the context of neurological disorders. The effects on the exploratory endpoints of this research merit evaluation in controlled trials. Keywords: depression, anxiety, fluvoxamine

  14. Potential of robots as next-generation technology for clinical assessment of neurological disorders and upper-limb therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen H. Scott, PhD; Sean P. Dukelow, MD, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Robotic technologies have profoundly affected the identification of fundamental properties of brain function. This success is attributable to robots being able to control the position of or forces applied to limbs, and their inherent ability to easily, objectively, and reliably quantify sensorimotor behavior. Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for clinically assessing sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments in stroke and other neurologi-cal ...

  15. Chapter 30: historical aspects of the major neurological vitamin deficiency disorders: the water-soluble B vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    This historical review addresses major neurological disorders associated with deficiencies of water-soluble B vitamins: beriberi, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, pellagra, neural tube defects, and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. Beriberi: Beriberi was known for millennia in Asia, but was not described by a European until the 17th century when Brontius in the Dutch East Indies reported the progressive sensorimotor polyneuropathy. The prevalence of beriberi increased greatly in Asia with a change in the milling process for rice in the late 19th century. In the 1880s, Takaki demonstrated the benefits of dietary modification in sailors, and later instituted dietary reforms in the Japanese Navy, which largely eradicated beriberi from the Japanese Navy by 1887. In 1889 Eijkman in Java serendipitously identified dietary factors as a major contributor to "chicken polyneuritis," which he took to be an animal model for beriberi; the polyneuritis could be cured or prevented by feeding the chickens either unpolished rice or rice polishings. By 1901, Grijns, while continuing studies of beriberi in Java, suggested a dietary deficiency explanation for beriberi after systematically eliminating deficiencies of known dietary components and excluding a toxic effect. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: In the late 1870s, Wernicke identified a clinicopathological condition with ophthalmoparesis, nystagmus, ataxia, and encephalopathy, associated with punctate hemorrhages symmetrically arranged in the grey matter around the third and fourth ventricles and the aqueduct of Sylvius. In the late 1880s, Korsakoff described a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including a confabulatory amnestic state following an agitated delirium, occurring in conjunction with peripheral polyneuropathy. Beginning around 1900, investigators recognized the close relationship between Korsakoff's psychosis, delirium tremens, and Wernicke's encephalopathy, but not until several decades later were Wernicke

  16. It's nothing to laugh about: understanding disorders of emotional expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2007-09-01

    Sudden outbursts of laughing, crying, or other emotional expression without an apparent triggering stimulus have been recorded in the literature for decades. Confusing nomenclature and a paucity of clinical research, however, have had clinicians wondering whether this syndrome may be both under-recognized and undertreated. Treatment options, including antidepressants, levodopa, and dextromethorphan/quinidine, may show promise in ameliorating symptoms for patients plagued with disorders of emotional expression.

  17. How music training enhances working memory: a cerebrocerebellar blending mechanism that can lead equally to scientific discovery and therapeutic efficacy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervert, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Following in the vein of studies that concluded that music training resulted in plastic changes in Einstein's cerebral cortex, controlled research has shown that music training (1) enhances central executive attentional processes in working memory, and (2) has also been shown to be of significant therapeutic value in neurological disorders. Within this framework of music training-induced enhancement of central executive attentional processes, the purpose of this article is to argue that: (1) The foundational basis of the central executive begins in infancy as attentional control during the establishment of working memory, (2) In accordance with Akshoomoff, Courchesne and Townsend's and Leggio and Molinari's cerebellar sequence detection and prediction models, the rigors of volitional control demands of music training can enhance voluntary manipulation of information in thought and movement, (3) The music training-enhanced blending of cerebellar internal models in working memory as can be experienced as intuition in scientific discovery (as Einstein often indicated) or, equally, as moments of therapeutic advancement toward goals in the development of voluntary control in neurological disorders, and (4) The blending of internal models as in (3) thus provides a mechanism by which music training enhances central executive processes in working memory that can lead to scientific discovery and improved therapeutic outcomes in neurological disorders. Within the framework of Leggio and Molinari's cerebellar sequence detection model, it is determined that intuitive steps forward that occur in both scientific discovery and during therapy in those with neurological disorders operate according to the same mechanism of adaptive error-driven blending of cerebellar internal models. It is concluded that the entire framework of the central executive structure of working memory is a product of the cerebrocerebellar system which can, through the learning of internal models

  18. Treatment, expressed emotion and relapse in recent onset schizophrenic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linszen, D.; Dingemans, P.; van der Does, J. W.; Nugter, A.; Scholte, P.; Lenior, R.; Goldstein, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of in-patient and individual orientated psychosocial intervention (IPI) and in-patient and individual and family orientated intervention (IPFI) across levels of expressed emotion (EE) on relapse was compared in a group of patients with recent onset schizophrenic disorders. Patients were

  19. Neurologic Diseases and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Chokroverty, Sudansu

    2017-03-01

    Sleep disorders and neurologic illness are common and burdensome in their own right; when combined, they can have tremendous negative impact at an individual level as well as societally. The socioeconomic burden of sleep disorders and neurologic illness can be identified, but the real cost of these conditions lies far beyond the financial realm. There is an urgent need for comprehensive care and support systems to help with the burden of disease. Further research in improving patient outcomes in those who suffer with these conditions will help patients and their families, and society in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  1. Toxoplasmosis and Polygenic Disease Susceptibility Genes: Extensive Toxoplasma gondii Host/Pathogen Interactome Enrichment in Nine Psychiatric or Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    C. J. Carter

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is not only implicated in schizophrenia and related disorders, but also in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, cancer, cardiac myopathies, and autoimmune disorders. During its life cycle, the pathogen interacts with ~3000 host genes or proteins. Susceptibility genes for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, childhood obesity, Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (P??from??8.01E ? 05??(ADHD)??to??1.22E ?...

  2. Impact of depressive and anxiety disorder comorbidity on the clinical expression of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Biju; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Rajkumar, Ravi Philip; Cherian, Anish V; Kandavel, Thennarasu; Math, Suresh Bada; Reddy, Y C Janardhan

    2012-08-01

    The identification of distinct subtypes based on comorbidity offers potential utility in understanding variations in the clinical expression of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Hence, we examined the hypothesis whether patients with OCD with major depressive disorder (MDD) or anxiety disorder comorbidity would differ from those without in terms of phenomenology. A total of 545 consecutive patients who consulted a specialty OCD clinic during the period 2004 to 2009 at a psychiatric hospital in India formed the sample. They were evaluated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and the Clinical Global Impression scale. Among 545 patients, 165 (30%) had current MDD, and 114 (21%) had current anxiety disorder comorbidity. Patients with OCD with MDD were mostly women who had a greater severity of OCD symptoms, more of obsessions (especially religious), greater occurrence of miscellaneous compulsions (need to confess or need to touch), higher suicidal risk, and past suicidal attempts. Patients with OCD with anxiety disorder had an earlier onset of illness that was associated with prior life events, less of compulsions, more of aggressive and hoarding obsessions, pathologic doubts, checking, and cognitive compulsions. Obsessive-compulsive disorder, when comorbid with MDD, is more severe and is associated with higher suicidal risk. On the other hand, anxiety disorder comorbidity seems to influence not so much the morbidity but the phenotypic expression of OCD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. HTLV-1 tax specific CD8+ T cells express low levels of Tim-3 in HTLV-1 infection: implications for progression to neurological complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishomwa C Ndhlovu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The T cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (Tim-3 receptor is highly expressed on HIV-1-specific T cells, rendering them partially "exhausted" and unable to contribute to the effective immune mediated control of viral replication. To elucidate novel mechanisms contributing to the HTLV-1 neurological complex and its classic neurological presentation called HAM/TSP (HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, we investigated the expression of the Tim-3 receptor on CD8(+ T cells from a cohort of HTLV-1 seropositive asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Patients diagnosed with HAM/TSP down-regulated Tim-3 expression on both CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells compared to asymptomatic patients and HTLV-1 seronegative controls. HTLV-1 Tax-specific, HLA-A*02 restricted CD8(+ T cells among HAM/TSP individuals expressed markedly lower levels of Tim-3. We observed Tax expressing cells in both Tim-3(+ and Tim-3(- fractions. Taken together, these data indicate that there is a systematic downregulation of Tim-3 levels on T cells in HTLV-1 infection, sustaining a profoundly highly active population of potentially pathogenic T cells that may allow for the development of HTLV-1 complications.

  4. Computerised analysis of facial emotion expression in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppanen, Jenni; Dapelo, Marcela Marin; Davies, Helen; Lang, Katie; Treasure, Janet; Tchanturia, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Problems with social-emotional processing are known to be an important contributor to the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs). Diminished facial communication of emotion has been frequently reported in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN). Less is known about facial expressivity in bulimia nervosa (BN) and in people who have recovered from AN (RecAN). This study aimed to pilot the use of computerised facial expression analysis software to investigate emotion expression across the ED spectrum and recovery in a large sample of participants. 297 participants with AN, BN, RecAN, and healthy controls were recruited. Participants watched film clips designed to elicit happy or sad emotions, and facial expressions were then analysed using FaceReader. The finding mirrored those from previous work showing that healthy control and RecAN participants expressed significantly more positive emotions during the positive clip compared to the AN group. There were no differences in emotion expression during the sad film clip. These findings support the use of computerised methods to analyse emotion expression in EDs. The findings also demonstrate that reduced positive emotion expression is likely to be associated with the acute stage of AN illness, with individuals with BN showing an intermediate profile.

  5. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  6. Linking of the quality of life in neurological disorders (Neuro-QoL) to the international classification of functioning, disability and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alex W K; Lau, Stephen C L; Cella, David; Lai, Jin-Shei; Xie, Guanli; Chen, Lidian; Chan, Chetwyn C H; Heinemann, Allen W

    2017-05-05

    The quality of life in neurological disorders (Neuro-QoL) is a U.S. National Institutes of Health initiative that produced a set of self-report measures of physical, mental, and social health experienced by adults or children who have a neurological condition or disorder. To describe the content of the Neuro-QoL at the item level using the World Health Organization's international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF). We assessed the Neuro-QoL for its content coverage of functioning and disability relative to each of the four ICF domains (i.e., body functions, body structures, activities and participation, and environment). We used second-level ICF three-digit codes to classify items into categories within each ICF domain and computed the percentage of categories within each ICF domain that were represented in the Neuro-QoL items. All items of Neuro-QoL could be mapped to the ICF categories at the second-level classification codes. The activities and participation domain and the mental functions category of the body functions domain were the areas most often represented by Neuro-QoL. Neuro-QoL provides limited coverage of the environmental factors and body structure domains. Neuro-QoL measures map well to the ICF. The Neuro-QoL-ICF-mapped items provide a blueprint for users to select appropriate measures in ICF-based measurement applications.

  7. CNS penetration of intrathecal-lumbar idursulfase in the monkey, dog and mouse: implications for neurological outcomes of lysosomal storage disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calias, Pericles; Papisov, Mikhail; Pan, Jing; Savioli, Nancy; Belov, Vasily; Huang, Yan; Lotterhand, Jason; Alessandrini, Mary; Liu, Nan; Fischman, Alan J; Powell, Jan L; Heartlein, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome) is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S). I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a) warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b) may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals.

  8. CNS penetration of intrathecal-lumbar idursulfase in the monkey, dog and mouse: implications for neurological outcomes of lysosomal storage disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pericles Calias

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S. I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals.

  9. Neurologic manifestations of hypothyroidism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertalan, Abigail; Kent, Marc; Glass, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine disease in dogs. A variety of clinicopathologic abnormalities may be present; however, neurologic deficits are rare. In some instances, neurologic deficits may be the sole manifestation of hypothyroidism. Consequent ly, the diagnosis and management of the neurologic disorders associated with hypothyroidism can be challenging. This article describes several neurologic manifestations of primary hypothyroidism in dogs; discusses the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism-induced neurologic disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous systems; and reviews the evidence for the neurologic effects of hypothyroidism.

  10. Epidemiology of neurological disorders in India: review of background, prevalence and incidence of epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson's disease and tremors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gourie-Devi, M

    2014-01-01

    ...). Prevalence and incidence rates of common disorders including epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson's disease and tremors determined through population-based surveys show considerable variation across different...

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS´s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure.Epigenetics, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB, regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression.This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of

  12. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  13. Launching Effectiveness Research to Guide Practice in Neurosurgery: A National Institute Neurological Disorders and Stroke Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicke, Patricia; Abosch, Aviva; Asher, Anthony; Barker, Fred G; Ghogawala, Zoher; Harbaugh, Robert; Jehi, Lara; Kestle, John; Koroshetz, Walter; Little, Roderick; Rubin, Donald; Valadka, Alex; Wisniewski, Stephen; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2017-04-01

    This workshop addressed challenges of clinical research in neurosurgery. Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) have high internal validity, but often insufficiently generalize to real-world practice. Observational studies are inclusive but often lack sufficient rigor. The workshop considered possible solutions, such as (1) statistical methods for demonstrating causality using observational data; (2) characteristics required of a registry supporting effectiveness research; (3) trial designs combining advantages of observational studies and RCTs; and (4) equipoise, an identified challenge for RCTs. In the future, advances in information technology potentially could lead to creation of a massive database where clinical data from all neurosurgeons are integrated and analyzed, ending the separation of clinical research and practice and leading to a new "science of practice." Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  14. Heightened sensitivity to emotional expressions in generalised anxiety disorder, compared to social anxiety disorder, and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Eric; Anderson, Eric; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Campbell, Allison A; Fischer, Laura E; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Simon, Naomi M

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined potential differences between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) in the sensitivity to detect emotional expressions. The present study aims to compare the detection of emotional expressions in SAD and GAD. Participants with a primary diagnosis of GAD (n = 46), SAD (n = 70), and controls (n = 118) completed a morph movies task. The task presented faces expressing increasing degrees of emotional intensity, slowly changing from a neutral to a full-intensity happy, sad, or angry expressions. Participants used a slide bar to view the movie frames from left to right, and to stop at the first frame where they perceived an emotion. The frame selected thus indicated the intensity of emotion required to identify the facial expression. Participants with GAD detected the onset of facial emotions at lower intensity of emotion than participants with SAD (p = 0.002) and controls (p = 0.039). In a multiple regression analysis controlling for age, race, and depressive symptom severity, lower frame at which the emotion was detected was independently associated and GAD diagnosis (B = -5.73, SE = 1.74, p < 0.01). Our findings suggest that individuals with GAD exhibit enhanced detection of facial emotions compared to those with SAD or controls.

  15. Observation of Spontaneous Expressive Language (OSEL): A New Measure for Spontaneous and Expressive Language of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Hyun; Junker, Dörte; Lord, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    A new language measure, the Observation of Spontaneous Expressive Language (OSEL), is intended to document spontaneous use of syntax, pragmatics, and semantics in 2-12-year-old children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and other communication disorders with expressive language levels comparable to typical 2-5 year olds. Because the purpose of…

  16. Effect of the functional caregivers Plan implementation on the anxiety and quality of life for the family caregivers of dependent people with neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Molina Fuillerat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2005 the Andalusian Health Service Improvement Plan prepared: Caring for the Caregiver include actions to be taken to promote equity, to recognize and facilitate the work of family carers. From our perspective of formal caregivers, it seems necessary to consider not only themselves need care patients with the disease, but also makes it mandatory caring individuals usually relatives, facilitators of the provision of care. In the Unit of Neurology, the daily observation of these family situations, has guided and network relationship between the two formal and informal systems of care, and we have tried the approach of the caregivers as clients to treat them as co-participants the experience of caring. Hypothesis: The Implementation of Functional Plan caregiver positive impact on hospitalization decreased anxiety and improved quality of life of caregivers of a dependent patient. Overall objective: To determine the effect of applying functional caregiver Plan on anxiety and quality of life of family caregivers of dependent people with neurological disorders. Study Design: Experimental study of the clinical trial such an intervention group and a control group randomly assigned.

  17. [Vitamin D and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Éric; Camu, William

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk of multiple sclerosis and also with a higher relapse rate as well as a higher number of MRI lesions. Elders with vitamin D deficiency have worse cognitive performance. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease. Ischemic stroke are more frequent and more severe in patients with low vitamin D levels. Carotid atherosclerosis is more frequent and more severe in patients with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk and worse prognosis of Parkinson's disease. In the different neurological disorders discussed herein, gene polymorphisms that could alter vitamin D metabolism are also associated with a higher incidence or a worse disease prognosis. Despite the links between vitamin D deficiency and the risks of developing neurological disorders, there is, to date, no proof that supplementation could alter the course of these diseases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Modulation of Neurological Deficits and Expression of Glutamate Receptors during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis after Treatment with Selected Antagonists of Glutamate Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Sulkowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our investigation was to characterize the role of group I mGluRs and NMDA receptors in pathomechanisms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the rodent model of MS. We tested the effects of LY 367385 (S-2-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine, a competitive antagonist of mGluR1, MPEP (2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl-pyridine, an antagonist of mGluR5, and the uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists amantadine and memantine on modulation of neurological deficits observed in rats with EAE. The neurological symptoms of EAE started at 10-11 days post-injection (d.p.i. and peaked after 12-13 d.p.i. The protein levels of mGluRs and NMDA did not increase in early phases of EAE (4 d.p.i., but starting from 8 d.p.i. to 25 d.p.i., we observed a significant elevation of mGluR1 and mGluR5 protein expression by about 20% and NMDA protein expression by about 10% over the control at 25 d.p.i. The changes in protein levels were accompanied by changes in mRNA expression of group I mGluRs and NMDARs. During the late disease phase (20–25 d.p.i., the mRNA expression levels reached 300% of control values. In contrast, treatment with individual receptor antagonists resulted in a reduction of mRNA levels relative to untreated animals.

  19. Toxoplasmosis and Polygenic Disease Susceptibility Genes: Extensive Toxoplasma gondii Host/Pathogen Interactome Enrichment in Nine Psychiatric or Neurological Disorders

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    C. J. Carter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is not only implicated in schizophrenia and related disorders, but also in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, cancer, cardiac myopathies, and autoimmune disorders. During its life cycle, the pathogen interacts with ~3000 host genes or proteins. Susceptibility genes for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, childhood obesity, Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (multiple sclerosis, and autism (, but not anorexia or chronic fatigue are highly enriched in the human arm of this interactome and 18 (ADHD to 33% (MS of the susceptibility genes relate to it. The signalling pathways involved in the susceptibility gene/interactome overlaps are relatively specific and relevant to each disease suggesting a means whereby susceptibility genes could orient the attentions of a single pathogen towards disruption of the specific pathways that together contribute (positively or negatively to the endophenotypes of different diseases. Conditional protein knockdown, orchestrated by T. gondii proteins or antibodies binding to those of the host (pathogen derived autoimmunity and metabolite exchange, may contribute to this disruption. Susceptibility genes may thus be related to the causes and influencers of disease, rather than (and as well as to the disease itself.

  20. Physical activity behavior change in persons with neurologic disorders: overview and examples from Parkinson disease and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Terry; Motl, Robert W

    2013-06-01

    Persons with chronic progressive neurologic diseases such as Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) face significant declines in mobility and activities of daily living, resulting in a loss of independence and compromised health-related quality of life over the course of the disease. Such undesirable outcomes can be attenuated through participation in exercise and physical activity, yet there is profound and prevalent physical inactivity in persons with PD and MS that may initiate a cycle of deconditioning and worsening of disease consequences, independent of latent disease processes. This Special Interest article highlights the accruing evidence revealing the largely sedentary behaviors common among persons living with physically disabling conditions and summarizes the evidence on the benefits of physical activity in persons with PD and MS. We then examine the social cognitive theory as an approach to identifying the primary active ingredients for behavioral change and, hence, the targets of interventions for increasing physical activity levels. The design and efficacies of interventions based on the social cognitive theory for increasing physical activity in persons with PD and MS are discussed. Finally, a rationale for adopting a secondary prevention approach to delivering physical therapy services is presented, with an emphasis on the integration of physical activity behavior change interventions into the care of persons with chronic, progressive disabilities over the course of the disease.Video Abstract available (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A42) for more insights from the authors.

  1. Serum Amyloid P Component Ameliorates Neurological Damage Caused by Expressing a Lysozyme Variant in the Central Nervous System of Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Linda Helmfors

    Full Text Available Lysozyme amyloidosis is a hereditary disease in which mutations in the gene coding for lysozyme leads to misfolding and consequently accumulation of amyloid material. To improve understanding of the processes involved we expressed human wild type (WT lysozyme and the disease-associated variant F57I in the central nervous system (CNS of a Drosophila melanogaster model of lysozyme amyloidosis, with and without co-expression of serum amyloid p component (SAP. SAP is known to be a universal constituent of amyloid deposits and to associate with lysozyme fibrils. There are clear indications that SAP may play an important role in lysozyme amyloidosis, which requires further elucidation. We found that flies expressing the amyloidogenic variant F57I in the CNS have a shorter lifespan than flies expressing WT lysozyme. We also identified apoptotic cells in the brains of F57I flies demonstrating that the flies' neurological functions are impaired when F57I is expressed in the nerve cells. However, co-expression of SAP in the CNS prevented cell death and restored the F57I flies' lifespan. Thus, SAP has the apparent ability to protect nerve cells from damage caused by F57I. Furthermore, it was found that co-expression of SAP prevented accumulation of insoluble forms of lysozyme in both WT- and F57I-expressing flies. Our findings suggest that the F57I mutation affects the aggregation process of lysozyme resulting in the formation of cytotoxic species and that SAP is able to prevent cell death in the F57I flies by preventing accumulation of toxic F57I structures.

  2. Quality of clinical trials for selected priority mental and neurological disorders in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Mulugeta A; Medhin G; Yimer G; Jemal R; Fekadu A

    2016-01-01

    Anwar Mulugeta,1 Girmay Medhin,2 Getnet Yimer,1 Rahimush Jemal,3 Abebaw Fekadu,4,5 1Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, 2Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, 3Department of Pharmacy, Tikur Anbesa Hospital, 4Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 5Department of Psychological Medicine, Centre for Affective Disorders, Instit...

  3. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  4. Application of whole exome sequencing to a rare inherited metabolic disease with neurological and gastrointestinal manifestations: a congenital disorder of glycosylation mimicking glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Woo, Hye In; Choe, Byung-Ho; Park, Seungman; Yoon, Yeomin; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Kim, Dong Sub; Kwon, Soonhak; Park, Hyung-Doo

    2015-04-15

    Rare inherited metabolic diseases with neurological and gastrointestinal manifestations can be misdiagnosed as other diseases or remain as disorders with indeterminate etiologies. This study aims to provide evidence to recommend the utility of whole exome sequencing in clinical diagnosis of a rare inherited metabolic disease. A 4-month-old female baby visited an outpatient clinic due to poor weight gain, repeated seizure-like episodes, developmental delay, and unexplained hepatomegaly with abnormal liver function test results. Although liver biopsy revealed moderate fibrosis with a suggested diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD), no mutations were identified either by single gene approach for GSD (G6PC and GAA) or by next generation sequencing panels for GSD (including 21 genes). Whole exome sequencing of the patient revealed compound heterozygous mutations of PMM2: c.580C>T (p.Arg194*) and c.713G>C (p.Arg238Pro) which mutations were associated with congenital disorder of glycosylation Ia (CDG-Ia: PMM2-CDG). We successfully applied exome sequencing to diagnose the first reported Korean patient with CDG-Ia, which was misdiagnosed as GSD. Whole exome sequencing may prove to be the preferred strategy for analysis of clinical features that do not readily suggest a specific diagnosis, such as those observed in inherited metabolic diseases, including CDG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment: Botulinum neurotoxin for the treatment of movement disorders (an evidence-based review): report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D M; Blitzer, A; Brashear, A; Comella, C; Dubinsky, R; Hallett, M; Jankovic, J; Karp, B; Ludlow, C L; Miyasaki, J M; Naumann, M; So, Y

    2008-05-06

    To perform an evidence-based review of the safety and efficacy of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) in the treatment of movement disorders. A literature search was performed including MEDLINE and Current Contents for therapeutic articles relevant to BoNT and selected movement disorders. Authors reviewed, abstracted, and classified articles based on American Academy of Neurology criteria (Class I-IV). The highest quality literature available for the respective indications was as follows: blepharospasm (two Class II studies); hemifacial spasm (one Class II and one Class III study); cervical dystonia (seven Class I studies); focal upper extremity dystonia (one Class I and three Class II studies); focal lower extremity dystonia (one Class II study); laryngeal dystonia (one Class I study); motor tics (one Class II study); and upper extremity essential tremor (two Class II studies). Botulinum neurotoxin should be offered as a treatment option for the treatment of cervical dystonia (Level A), may be offered for blepharospasm, focal upper extremity dystonia, adductor laryngeal dystonia, and upper extremity essential tremor (Level B), and may be considered for hemifacial spasm, focal lower limb dystonia, and motor tics (Level C). While clinicians' practice may suggest stronger recommendations in some of these indications, evidence-based conclusions are limited by the availability of data.

  6. Burden and Expressed Emotion of Caregivers in Cases of Adult Substance Use Disorder with and Without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronenberg, Linda M.; Goossens, Peter J. J.; van Busschbach, Jooske T.; van Achterberg, Theo; van den Brink, Wim

    Objective To identify and compare caregiver burden and expressed emotion (EE) in adult substance use disorder (SUD) patients with and without co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To examine possible differences in correlations between

  7. Differences in quality between privately and publicly banked umbilical cord blood units: a pilot study of autologous cord blood infusion in children with acquired neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jessica; Allison, June; McLaughlin, Colleen; Sledge, Linda; Waters-Pick, Barbara; Wease, Stephen; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND A pilot study was conducted to determine the safety and feasibility of intravenous administration of autologous umbilical cord blood (CB) in young children with acquired neurologic disorders. Most CB units (CBUs) were electively stored in private CB banks. Unlike public banks, which utilize specific criteria and thresholds for banking, private banks generally store all collected CBUs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS CBUs of eligible patients containing more than 1 × 107 cells/kg were shipped to Duke from the banks of origin after confirming identity by HLA typing. On the day of infusion, CBUs were thawed and washed in dextran-albumin and infused intravenously. Patients were medicated with acetaminophen, diphenhydramine, and methylprednisolone before transfusion. Data regarding patients, infusions, and CBUs were collected retrospectively. Characteristics of CBUs were compared to existing data from CBUs publicly banked at the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank. RESULTS From March 2004 to December 2009, 184 children received 198 CB infusions. Three patients had infusion reactions, all responsive to medical therapy and stopping the infusion. Median precryopreservation volume (60 mL vs. 89 mL, p < 0.0001), total nucleated cell count (4.7 × 108 vs. 10.8 × 108, p < 0.0001), and CD34 count (1.8 × 106 vs. 3.0 × 106, p < 0.0001) were significantly lower than publicly stored CBUs. Postthaw sterility cultures were positive in 7.6% of infused CBUs. CONCLUSION IV infusion of autologous CB is safe and feasible in young children with neurologic injuries. Quality parameters of privately banked CBUs are inferior to those stored in public banks. If efficacy of autologous CB is established clinically, the quality of autologous units should be held to the same standards as those stored in public banks. PMID:20546200

  8. Transtorno da expressão emocional involuntária Involuntary emotional expression disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Cristina Santos Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: O transtorno da expressão emocional involuntária (involuntary emotional expression disorder ou IEED consiste em um transtorno do afeto, caracterizado por uma dificuldade em controlar a expressão emocional, que se apresenta por episódios breves e estereotipados de riso e/ou choro incontroláveis. Pode estar relacionado a diversas patologias encefálicas, em variadas localizações anatômicas. OBJETIVOS: Revisar aspectos clínicos, epidemiológicos e fisiopatológicos envolvidos no transtorno da expressão emocional involuntária e apresentar as opções atuais e futuras na abordagem terapêutica. MÉTODOS: Pesquisa de base de dados MEDLINE/PUBMED e LILACS utilizando os termos transtorno da expressão emocional involuntária, afeto pseudobulbar, riso e choro patológicos, acidente vascular cerebral, doença de Alzheimer, esclerose múltipla, esclerose lateral amiotrófica. RESULTADOS: No trantorno da expressão emocional involuntária, as crises de choro e/ou riso, além de serem incontroláveis, tendem a ser desproporcionais ao estímulo recebido, podendo estar completamente dissociada do estado de humor do paciente ou mesmo ser contraditória ao contexto no qual o estímulo está inserido. Outros termos são usados na nosografia desse transtorno, como afeto pseudobulbar, riso e choro patológicos, labilidade emocional, emocionalismo e desregulação emocional. Termos como choro forçado, choro involuntário, emocionalidade patológica e incontinência emocional também têm sido utilizados com menor freqüência. Os mecanismos fisiopatológicos específicos envolvidos nesse transtorno ainda não estão bem esclarecidos. Lesões que podem causá-lo estão amplamente distribuídas no encéfalo, mas parecem envolver o lobo frontal, o sistema límbico, o tronco cerebral e o cerebelo, assim como a substância branca que interconecta essa rede. Seu principal diagnóstico diferencial é a depressão. As terapias farmacológicas hoje

  9. Measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and nerve-growth-factor (NGF) concentrations in serum and urine samples of dogs with neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordass, Ulrike; Carlson, Regina; Stein, Veronika Maria; Tipold, Andrea

    2016-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to prove the hypothesis that C-reactive protein (CRP) and nerve growth factor (NGF) may be potential biomarkers for lower urinary tract disorders and may be able to distinguish between micturition dysfunctions of different origin in dogs with spinal cord diseases. NGF- and CRP- concentrations were measured in serum and urine samples using specific ELISA-Kits. Results in urine were standardized by urine-creatinine levels. CRP in serum was detectable in 32/76 and in urine samples in 40/76 patients. NGF could be measured in all serum and in 70/76 urine samples. Urinary CRP concentrations were significantly higher in dogs with micturition dysfunction (p = 0.0009) and in dogs with different neurological diseases (p = 0.0020) compared to the control group. However, comparing dogs with spinal cord disorders with and without associated micturition dysfunction no significant difference could be detected for NGF and CRP values in urine or serum samples. Additionally, levels did not decrease significantly, when measured at the time when the dogs regained the ability to urinate properly (urinary NGF p = 0.7962; urinary CRP p = 0.078). Urine samples with bacteria and/or leukocytes had no significant increase in urinary NGF (p = 0.1112) or CRP (p = 0.0534) concentrations, but higher CRP-levels in urine from dogs with cystitis were found compared to dogs without signs of cystitis. From these data we conclude that neither CRP nor NGF in urine or serum can be considered as reliable biomarkers for micturition disorders in dogs with spinal cord disorders in a clinical setting, but their production might be part of the pathogenesis of such disorders. Significantly higher levels of CRP could be found in the urine of dogs with micturition dysfunctions compared to control dogs. This phenomenon could potentially be explained by unspecific extrahepatic CRP production by smooth muscle cells in the dilated bladder.

  10. Perception of dynamic facial emotional expressions in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Spee, P.S.; Hendriks, A.W.C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown deficits in the perception of static emotional facial expressions in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but results are inconclusive. Possibly, using dynamic facial stimuli expressing emotions at different levels of intensities may produce more robust

  11. Perception of dynamic facial emotional expressions in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Spee, P.; Hendriks, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown deficits in the perception of static emotional facial expressions in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but results are inconclusive. Possibly, using dynamic facial stimuli expressing emotions at different levels of intensities may produce more robust

  12. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  13. Neurological effects of inorganic arsenic exposure: altered cysteine/glutamate transport, NMDA expression and spatial memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio A Ramos-Chávez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs is an important natural pollutant. Millions of individuals worldwide drink water with high levels of iAs. Chronic exposure to iAs has been associated with lower IQ and learning disabilities as well as memory impairment. iAs is methylated in tissues such as the brain generating mono and dimethylated species. iAs methylation requires cellular glutathione (GSH, which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system. In humans, As species cross the placenta and are found in cord blood. A CD1 mouse model was used to investigate effects of gestational iAs exposure which can lead to oxidative damage, disrupted cysteine/glutamate transport and its putative impact in learning and memory. On postnatal days (PNDs 1, 15 and 90, the expression of membrane transporters related to GSH synthesis and glutamate transport and toxicity, such as xCT, EAAC1, GLAST and GLT1, as well as LAT1, were analyzed. Also, the expression of the glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR subunits NR2A and B as well as the presence of As species in cortex and hippocampus were investigated. On PND 90, an object location task was performed to associate exposure with memory impairment. Gestational exposure to iAs affected the expression of cysteine/glutamate transporters in cortex and hippocampus and induced a negative modulation of NMDAR NR2B subunit in the hippocampus. Behavioral tasks showed significant spatial memory impairment in males while the effect was marginal in females.

  14. Neurological evaluation of the selection stage of metaphor comprehension in individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Brea; Volden, Joanne; Cribben, Ivor; Cummine, Jacqueline

    2017-10-11

    Because of their difficulties with figurative language in conversation, it is commonly thought that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not understand figurative meaning. However, recent research indicates that individuals with and without ASD are similar in the first two stages of metaphor comprehension, up to and including successful generation of the figurative meaning. In the current study, we used a sentence decision task to evaluate the subsequent stage of metaphor comprehension, the selection stage, which requires suppression/inhibition of the unintended meaning as part of selecting the intended meaning. fMRI activation and functional connectivity were used to compare the selection stage of metaphor comprehension between high-functioning individuals with ASD and carefully matched controls. Cortical and subcortical regions of interest were selected based on the basal-ganglia model of cognitive control. Compared to controls, individuals with ASD recruited greater activation in regions related to verbal memory (thalamus), semantic associations (medial temporal gyrus), and basic visual processing (middle occipital gyrus). Functional connectivity analysis revealed fewer overall connections and cortical-subcortical connections in the ASD group compared to controls. There was a novel finding of maintenance of subcortical-subcortical connectivity in the ASD group, specific to the selection condition, despite differences in cortically involved connections. Reduced cortical-subcortical connectivity in the ASD group compared to controls may reflect a more global impairment in cognitive control pathways, while consistent subcortical-subcortical connectivity may reflect systemic inflexibility or preserved subcortical function and dissociation between subcortical and cortical systems. Further investigation is required. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Does the Brief-BESTest Meet Classical Test Theory and Rasch Analysis Requirements for Balance Assessment in People With Neurological Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravini, Elisabetta; Nardone, Antonio; Godi, Marco; Guglielmetti, Simone; Franchignoni, Franco; Giordano, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The Brief Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Brief-BESTest) was recently proposed as a clinical tool for quickly measuring balance disorders, but its measurement properties warrant investigation. The study objective was to perform a detailed analysis of the psychometric properties of the Brief-BESTest by means of Classical Test Theory and Rasch analysis. This was an observational measurement study. Brief-BESTest data were collected from a sample of 244 participants. Internal consistency was analyzed with the Cronbach α and item-to-total correlations. Test-retest reliability and interrater reliability were investigated in a subgroup of 21 participants. The minimum detectable change at the 95% confidence level was calculated. Scale dimensionality was examined through Horn parallel analysis; this step was followed by exploratory factor analysis for ordinal data. Finally, data were examined using Rasch analysis (rating scale model). The Cronbach α was .89, and all item-to-total correlations were greater than .40. Test-retest reliability had an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (2,1) of .94, and interrater reliability had an ICC (2,1) of .90. The minimum detectable change at the 95% confidence level was 4.30 points. The unidimensionality of the test was confirmed, but 1 item showed low communality. Rasch analysis revealed the inadequacy of response categories, 5 misfitting items, minor mistargeting, moderate person reliability (.80), and 2 pairs of locally dependent items. The sample was a cross-section of people who had balance disorders from different neurological etiologies and were recruited consecutively at a single rehabilitation facility. The Brief-BESTest was confirmed to have some acceptable-to-good reliability indexes when calculated according to Classical Test Theory, but the scale showed fairly limited sensitivity to change. Rasch analysis indicated that item selection should be improved from a psychometric point of view. Item redundancy needs to be

  16. A census of P. longum's phytochemicals and their network pharmacological evaluation for identifying novel drug-like molecules against various diseases, with a special focus on neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Neha; Singh, Vikram

    2018-01-01

    Piper longum (P. longum, also called as long pepper) is one of the common culinary herbs that has been extensively used as a crucial constituent in various indigenous medicines, specifically in traditional Indian medicinal system known as Ayurveda. For exploring the comprehensive effect of its constituents in humans at proteomic and metabolic levels, we have reviewed all of its known phytochemicals and enquired about their regulatory potential against various protein targets by developing high-confidence tripartite networks consisting of phytochemical-protein target-disease association. We have also (i) studied immunomodulatory potency of this herb; (ii) developed subnetwork of human PPI regulated by its phytochemicals and could successfully associate its specific modules playing important role in diseases, and (iii) reported several novel drug targets. P10636 (microtubule-associated protein tau, that is involved in diseases like dementia etc.) was found to be the commonly screened target by about seventy percent of these phytochemicals. We report 20 drug-like phytochemicals in this herb, out of which 7 are found to be the potential regulators of 5 FDA approved drug targets. Multi-targeting capacity of 3 phytochemicals involved in neuroactive ligand receptor interaction pathway was further explored via molecular docking experiments. To investigate the molecular mechanism of P. longum's action against neurological disorders, we have developed a computational framework that can be easily extended to explore its healing potential against other diseases and can also be applied to scrutinize other indigenous herbs for drug-design studies.

  17. Evidence-based guideline: intravenous immunoglobulin in the treatment of neuromuscular disorders: report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwa, H S; Chaudhry, V; Katzberg, H; Rae-Grant, A D; So, Y T

    2012-03-27

    To assess the evidence for the efficacy of IV immunoglobulin (IVIg) to treat neuromuscular disorders. The MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE databases were searched (1966-2009). Selected articles were rated according to the American Academy of Neurology's therapeutic classification of evidence scheme; recommendations were based on the evidence level. IVIg is as efficacious as plasmapheresis and should be offered for treating Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in adults (Level A). IVIg is effective and should be offered in the long-term treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Level A). IVIg is probably effective and should be considered for treating moderate to severe myasthenia gravis and multifocal motor neuropathy (Level B). IVIg is possibly effective and may be considered for treating nonresponsive dermatomyositis in adults and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (Level C). Evidence is insufficient to support or refute use of IVIg in the treatment of immunoglobulin M paraprotein-associated neuropathy, inclusion body myositis, polymyositis, diabetic radiculoplexoneuropathy, or Miller Fisher syndrome, or in the routine treatment of postpolio syndrome or in children with GBS (Level U). IVIg combined with plasmapheresis should not be considered for treating GBS (Level B). More data are needed regarding IVIg efficacy as compared with other treatments/treatment combinations. Most studies concluded IVIg-related serious adverse effects were rare. Given the variable nature of these diseases, individualized treatments depending on patient need and physician judgment are important.

  18. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging correlates of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-Canadian Stroke Network vascular cognitive impairment neuropsychology protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Adrian; Wang, Defeng; Black, Sandra E; Nyenhuis, David L; Shi, Lin; Chu, Winnie C W; Xiong, Yun-yun; Au, Lisa; Lau, Alexander; Chan, Anne Y Y; Wong, Lawrence K S; Mok, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) refers to the entire spectrum of cognitive dysfunction attributable to vascular changes in the brain. The objective of this study is to evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates of performance on the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-Canadian Stroke Network (NINDS-CSN) VCI neuropsychology protocols. Fifty ischemic stroke patients and 50 normal elderly persons completed the VCI protocols and MRI. Relationships between the four cognitive domains (executive/activation, language, visuospatial, and memory) and three protocol (60-, 30-, and 5-min) summary scores with MRI measures of volumes of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and global brain and hippocampal atrophy were assessed using linear regression. All cognitive domain scores were associated with WMH volume and, with the exception of language domain, with global atrophy. Additional relationships were found between executive/activation and language domains with left hippocampal volume, visuospatial domain with right hippocampal volume, and memory domain with bilateral hippocampal volumes. All protocol summary scores showed comparable relationships with WMH and hippocampal volumes, with additional relationships found between the 60- and 30-min protocols with global brain volume. Performance on the NINDS-CSN VCI protocols reflects underlying volumetric brain changes implicated in cognitive dysfunctions in VCI.

  19. Strategies for Perceiving Facial Expressions in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer A.; Vida, Mark D.; Rutherford, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Rutherford and McIntosh (J Autism Dev Disord 37:187-196, 2007) demonstrated that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more tolerant than controls of exaggerated schematic facial expressions, suggesting that they may use an alternative strategy when processing emotional expressions. The current study was designed to test this finding…

  20. Borderline Personality Disorder as a Female Phenotypic Expression of Psychopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Jenessa; Javdani, Shabnam; Sadeh, Naomi; Newman, Joseph P.; Verona, Edelyn

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the combination of the interpersonal-affective (F1) and impulsive-antisocial (F2) features of psychopathy may be associated with borderline personality disorder (BPD), specifically among women (e.g., Coid, 1993; Hicks, Vaidyana-than, & Patrick, 2010). However, empirical research explicitly examining gendered relationships between BPD and psychopathy factors is lacking. To further inform this area of research, we investigated the hypothesis that the interplay between the two psychopathy factors is associated with BPD among women across two studies. Study 1 consisted of a college sample of 318 adults (51% women), and Study 2 consisted of a large sample of 488 female prisoners. The interpersonal-affective (F1) and impulsiveantisocial psychopathy (F2) scores, measured with self-report and clinician-rated indices, respectively, were entered as explanatory variables in regression analyses to investigate their unique contributions to BPD traits. Across two independent samples, results indicated that the interaction of high F1 and F2 psychopathy scores was associated with BPD in women. This association was found to be specific to women in Study 1. These results suggest that BPD and psychopathy, at least as they are measured by current instruments, overlap in women and, accordingly, may reflect gender-differentiated phenotypic expressions of similar dispositional vulnerabilities. PMID:22452756

  1. Phenobarbital use and neurological problems in FMR1 premutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga, Wilmar; Lein, Pamela; González Teshima, Laura Yuriko; Isaza, Carolina; Rosa, Lina; Polyak, Andrew; Hagerman, Randi; Girirajan, Santhosh; Silva, Marisol; Tassone, Flora

    2016-03-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a CGG expansion in the FMR1 gene located at Xq27.3. Patients with the premutation in FMR1 present specific clinical problems associated with the number of CGG repeats (55-200 CGG repeats). Premutation carriers have elevated FMR1 mRNA expression levels, which have been associated with neurotoxicity potentially causing neurodevelopmental problems or neurological problems associated with aging. However, cognitive impairments or neurological problems may also be related to increased vulnerability of premutation carriers to neurotoxicants, including phenobarbital. Here we present a study of three sisters with the premutation who were exposed differentially to phenobarbital therapy throughout their lives, allowing us to compare the neurological effects of this drug in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurologic complications of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Weimer, Louis H

    2014-06-01

    This review serves as an overview of neurologic conditions associated with alcohol abuse or withdrawal, including epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic approach, and treatment. Frequent alcohol abuse and frank alcoholism are very common among adults in the United States. Although rates decline with each decade, as many as 10% of the elderly drink excessively. Given the ubiquitous nature of alcoholism in society, its complications have been clinically recognized for generations, with recent advances focusing on improved understanding of ethanol's biochemical targets and the pathophysiology of its complications. The chronic effects of alcohol abuse are myriad and include neurologic complications through both direct and indirect effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. These disorders include several encephalopathic states related to alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, and related nutritional deficiencies; acute and chronic toxic and nutritional peripheral neuropathies; and myopathy. Although prevention of alcoholism and its neurologic complications is the optimal strategy, this article reviews the specific treatment algorithms for alcohol withdrawal and its related nutritional deficiency states.

  3. Comparison of facial expression in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia using the Facial Action Coding System: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersani G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Bersani,1 Francesco Saverio Bersani,1,2 Giuseppe Valeriani,1 Maddalena Robiony,1 Annalisa Anastasia,1 Chiara Colletti,1,3 Damien Liberati,1 Enrico Capra,2 Adele Quartini,1 Elisa Polli11Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, 3Department of Neuroscience and Behaviour, Section of Psychiatry, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, ItalyBackground: Research shows that impairment in the expression and recognition of emotion exists in multiple psychiatric disorders. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the way that patients with schizophrenia and those with obsessive-compulsive disorder experience and display emotions in relation to specific emotional stimuli using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS.Methods: Thirty individuals participated in the study, comprising 10 patients with schizophrenia, 10 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 10 healthy controls. All participants underwent clinical sessions to evaluate their symptoms and watched emotion-eliciting video clips while facial activity was videotaped. Congruent/incongruent feeling of emotions and facial expression in reaction to emotions were evaluated.Results: Patients with schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder presented similarly incongruent emotive feelings and facial expressions (significantly worse than healthy participants. Correlations between the severity of psychopathological condition (in particular the severity of affective flattening and impairment in recognition and expression of emotions were found.Discussion: Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia seem to present a similarly relevant impairment in both experiencing and displaying of emotions; this impairment may be seen as a chronic consequence of the same neurodevelopmental origin of the two diseases. Mimic expression could be seen as a behavioral indicator of affective

  4. Neurological and autoimmune disorders after vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) with a monovalent adjuvanted vaccine: population based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardage, Carola; Persson, Ingemar; Ortqvist, Ake; Bergman, Ulf; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Granath, Fredrik

    2011-10-12

    To examine the risk of neurological and autoimmune disorders of special interest in people vaccinated against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) with Pandemrix (GlaxoSmithKline, Middlesex, UK) compared with unvaccinated people over 8-10 months. Retrospective cohort study linking individualised data on pandemic vaccinations to an inpatient and specialist database on healthcare utilisation in Stockholm county for follow-up during and after the pandemic period. Stockholm county, Sweden. Population All people registered in Stockholm county on 1 October 2009 and who had lived in this region since 1 January 1998; 1,024,019 were vaccinated against H1N1 and 921,005 remained unvaccinated. Neurological and autoimmune diagnoses according to the European Medicines Agency strategy for monitoring of adverse events of special interest defined using ICD-10 codes for Guillain-Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, multiple sclerosis, polyneuropathy, anaesthesia or hypoaesthesia, paraesthesia, narcolepsy (added), and autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and type 1 diabetes; and short term mortality according to vaccination status. Excess risks among vaccinated compared with unvaccinated people were of low magnitude for Bell's palsy (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.48) and paraesthesia (1.11, 1.00 to 1.23) after adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and healthcare utilisation. Risks for Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis remained unchanged. The risks of paraesthesia and inflammatory bowel disease among those vaccinated in the early phase (within 45 days from 1 October 2009) of the vaccination campaign were significantly increased; the risk being increased within the first six weeks after vaccination. Those vaccinated in the early phase were at a slightly reduced risk of death than those who were unvaccinated (0.94, 0.91 to 0.98), whereas those vaccinated in the late phase

  5. Neurologic presentation of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushara, Khalafalla O

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) long has been associated with neurologic and psychiatric disorders including cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, and depression. Earlier reports mainly have documented the involvement of the nervous system as a complication of prediagnosed CD. However, more recent studies have emphasized that a wider spectrum of neurologic syndromes may be the presenting extraintestinal manifestation of gluten sensitivity with or without intestinal pathology. These include migraine, encephalopathy, chorea, brain stem dysfunction, myelopathy, mononeuritis multiplex, Guillain-Barre-like syndrome, and neuropathy with positive antiganglioside antibodies. The association between most neurologic syndromes described and gluten sensitivity remains to be confirmed by larger epidemiologic studies. It further has been suggested that gluten sensitivity (as evidenced by high antigliadin antibodies) is a common cause of neurologic syndromes (notably cerebellar ataxia) of otherwise unknown cause. Additional studies showed high prevalence of gluten sensitivity in genetic neurodegenerative disorders such as hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia and Huntington's disease. It remains unclear whether gluten sensitivity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders or whether it represents an epiphenomenon. Studies of gluten-free diet in patients with gluten sensitivity and neurologic syndromes have shown variable results. Diet trials also have been inconclusive in autism and schizophrenia, 2 diseases in which sensitivity to dietary gluten has been implicated. Further studies clearly are needed to assess the efficacy of gluten-free diet and to address the underlying mechanisms of nervous system pathology in gluten sensitivity.

  6. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  7. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  8. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  9. Regenerative Medicine for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyuk Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual meeting of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR has always introduced us to top-notch and up-to-date approaches for regenerative medicine related to neuroscience, ranging from stem cell–based therapy to novel drugs. The 16th ASNTR meeting focused on a variety of different topics, including the unknown pathogenesis or mechanisms of specific neurodegenerative diseases, stem cell biology, and development of novel alternative medicines or devices. Newly developed stem cells, such as amniotic epithelial stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as well-known traditional stem cells, such as neural, embryonic, bone marrow mesenchymal, and human umbilical cord blood–derived stem cells, were reported. A number of commercialized stem cells were also covered at this meeting. Fetal neural tissues, such as ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and Schwann cells, were investigated for neurodegenerative diseases or spinal cord injury. A number of studies focused on novel methods for drug monitoring or graft tracking, and combination therapy with stem cells and medicine, such as cytokines or trophic factors. Finally, the National Institutes of Health guidelines for human stem cell research, clinical trials of commercialized stem cells without larger animal testing, and prohibition of medical tourism were big controversial issues that led to heated discussion.

  10. Somatization and illness behaviour in a neurology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, F; Firth, D; Timol, M; Metcalfe, R; Pollock, S

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-three female patients admitted to a neurological ward were fully investigated for the presence of organic neurological disease, and assessed for psychiatric disorder and illness behaviour, using the Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS) and the Illness Behaviour Questionnaire (IBQ). The likelihood of the presenting symptoms being due to organic disease was expressed by the neurologists on a visual analogue scale and the psychiatrists used a similar technique to describe whether the symptoms could be the result of psychiatric disorder. Many patients either had clear organic disease or somatic presentation of psychiatric disorder 'somatization', but one-third fell between these two extremes and either had a complex mixture of the two types of illness or could not be accurately diagnosed. The IBQ scores were raised in those with psychiatric disorder but did not help to explain why some patients present to the neurologists with symptoms that are unexplained by either organic disease or psychiatric disorder. Close liaison between neurologists and psychiatrists increases the detection of psychiatric disorder but some patients would require long-term follow-up to understand the true nature of the underlying disorder.

  11. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  12. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  13. Perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) promotes Tau phosphorylation in the rat brain in a GSK-3β and CDK5 dependent manner: Relevance to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąssowska, Magdalena; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Moczydłowska, Joanna; Tarnowski, Maciej; Pilutin, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Strużyńska, Lidia; Chlubek, Dariusz; Adamczyk, Agata

    2016-03-10

    Hyperphosphorylation of Tau is involved in the pathomechanism of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's diseases as well as Autism. Epidemiological data suggest the significance of early life exposure to lead (Pb) in etiology of disorders affecting brain function. However, the precise mechanisms by which Pb exerts neurotoxic effects are not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of perinatal exposure to low dose of Pb on the Tau pathology in the developing rat brain. Furthermore, the involvement of two major Tau-kinases: glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in Pb-induced Tau modification was evaluated. Pregnant female rats were divided into control and Pb-treated group. The control animals were maintained on drinking water while females from the Pb-treated group received 0.1% lead acetate (PbAc) in drinking water, starting from the first day of gestation until weaning of the offspring. During the feeding of pups, mothers from the Pb-treated group were still receiving PbAc. Pups of both groups were weaned at postnatal day 21 and then until postnatal day 28 received only drinking water. 28-day old pups were sacrificed and Tau mRNA and protein level as well as Tau phosphorylation were analyzed in forebrain cortex (FC), cerebellum (C) and hippocampus (H). Concomitantly, we examined the effect of Pb exposure on GSK-3β and CDK5 activation. Our data revealed that pre- and neonatal exposure to Pb (concentration of Pb in whole blood below 10μg/dL, considered safe for humans) caused significant increase in the phosphorylation of Tau at Ser396 and Ser199/202 with parallel rise in the level of total Tau protein in FC and C. Tau hyperphosphorylation in Pb-treated animals was accompanied by elevated activity of GSK-3β and CDK5. Western blot analysis revealed activation of GSK-3β in FC and C as well as CDK5 in C, via increased phosphorylation of Tyr-216 and calpain-dependent p25

  14. Recognition of Emotion from Facial Expressions with Direct or Averted Eye Gaze and Varying Expression Intensities in Children with Autism Disorder and Typically Developing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Tell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eye gaze direction and expression intensity effects on emotion recognition in children with autism disorder and typically developing children were investigated. Children with autism disorder and typically developing children identified happy and angry expressions equally well. Children with autism disorder, however, were less accurate in identifying fear expressions across intensities and eye gaze directions. Children with autism disorder rated expressions with direct eyes, and 50% expressions, as more intense than typically developing children. A trend was also found for sad expressions, as children with autism disorder were less accurate in recognizing sadness at 100% intensity with direct eyes than typically developing children. Although the present research showed that children with autism disorder are sensitive to eye gaze direction, impairments in the recognition of fear, and possibly sadness, exist. Furthermore, children with autism disorder and typically developing children perceive the intensity of emotional expressions differently.

  15. Recognition of Emotion from Facial Expressions with Direct or Averted Eye Gaze and Varying Expression Intensities in Children with Autism Disorder and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, Dina; Davidson, Denise; Camras, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Eye gaze direction and expression intensity effects on emotion recognition in children with autism disorder and typically developing children were investigated. Children with autism disorder and typically developing children identified happy and angry expressions equally well. Children with autism disorder, however, were less accurate in identifying fear expressions across intensities and eye gaze directions. Children with autism disorder rated expressions with direct eyes, and 50% expressions, as more intense than typically developing children. A trend was also found for sad expressions, as children with autism disorder were less accurate in recognizing sadness at 100% intensity with direct eyes than typically developing children. Although the present research showed that children with autism disorder are sensitive to eye gaze direction, impairments in the recognition of fear, and possibly sadness, exist. Furthermore, children with autism disorder and typically developing children perceive the intensity of emotional expressions differently. PMID:24804098

  16. Advocacy in neurology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauranik, Apoorva

    2008-01-01

    ...), launched the Neurological Alliance of Ireland, a nationwide coalition of patient advocacy groups and physicians and authored Standards of Care, the "blueprint" for the development of neurological...

  17. Therapeutic utility of Phosphodiesterase type I inhibitors in neurological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Esteves Medina

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal plasticity is an essential property of the brain that is impaired in different neurological conditions. Phosphodiesterase type 1 (PDE1 inhibitors can enhance levels of the second messengers cAMP/cGMP leading to the expression of neuronal plasticity-related genes, neurotrophic factors and neuroprotective molecules. These neuronal plasticity enhancement properties make PDE1 inhibitors good candidates as therapeutic agents in many neurological conditions. However, the lack of specificity of the drugs currently available poses a challenge to the systematic evaluation of the beneficial effect of these agents. The development of more specific drugs may pave the way for the use of PDE1 inhibitors as therapeutic agents in cases of neurodevelopmental conditions such as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and in degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

  18. Structure-Function Relationships behind the Phenomenon of Cognitive Resilience in Neurology: Insights for Neuroscience and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    David Rudrauf

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of cognitive resilience, that is, the dynamical preservation of normal functions despite neurological disorders, demonstrates that cognition can be highly robust to devastating brain injury. Here, cognitive resilience is considered across a range of neurological conditions. Simple computational models of structure-function relationships are used to discuss hypotheses about the neural mechanisms of resilience. Resilience expresses functional redundancies in brain networks and su...

  19. Expression of prion protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Parkinson's disease complicated with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W J; Shang, X L; Peng, J; Zhou, M H; Sun, W J

    2017-01-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and mainly manifests with decreasing numbers of dopaminergic neurons. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has an incidence of 15-47% in all PD patients. Prion proteins (PrPs), which are expressed in both neurons and glial cells of the brain, are believed to be correlated with abnormal neurological functions, although their role in PD-related sleeping disorders remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expressional profiles of PrP in PD patients with RBD. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of PrP, respectively, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of PD patients with RBD, PD patients without sleeping disorder, and healthy people (N = 23 each). We investigated the correlation between the CSF PrP level and sleeping behavior in PD patients. Patients with PD complicated with RBD had significantly elevated CSF PrP expression levels (both mRNA and protein) compared with either PD patients without sleeping disorder or healthy individuals (P < 0.05 in both cases). There is elevated expression of PrP in the CSF of PD patients with RBD. This may benefit the diagnosis of PD-related RBD.

  20. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  1. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gano, Lindsey B; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation...

  2. Characteristics of the Understanding and Expression of Emotional Prosody among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshimatsu, Yasufumi; Umino, Ayumi; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    In verbal communication with others, children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) experience difficulties with understanding jokes, irony, and other pragmatic aspects of communication. Difficulties with the understanding and expression of prosody may be one reason. In this study an understanding...

  3. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  4. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  5. Neurological implications and neuropsychological considerations on folk music and dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Vittorio A; Riva, Michele A

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and neuropsychological aspects of folk music and traditional dance have been poorly investigated by historical and scientific literature. Some of these performances could be indeed the manifestation of latent pathological conditions or the expression of liberation rituals. This chapter aimed at analyzing the relationships between traditional dance, folk music, and neurological and psychiatric disorders. Since ancient times, dance has been used in the individual or collective as treatment of some diseases, including epilepsy and movement disorders (dyskinesia, chorea, etc.). Dionysia in Ancient Greece, St. Vitus dance in the Middle Age, tarantism and other traditional dances of southern Italy and of non-Western countries might be credited as curative rituals of these neurological and psychiatric conditions. During the nineteenth century, dance was also used for the treatment of psychiatric patients; the relationship between dance and insanity could also be reflected in classical ballets and music of that period. Nowadays, neuropsychiatric manifestations could also be evidenced in modern dances (mass fainting at rock concerts, flash mobs); some ballroom dances are commonly used for the rehabilitation of patients suffering from neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. Interdisciplinary research on these subjects (ethnomusicology and cultural anthropology, clinical neurology and dynamic psychology, neuroradiology and neurophysiology, and socioneurology and neuromusicology) should be increased. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurology and literature 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2014-05-01

    Good literary fiction has the potential to move us, extend our sense of life, transform our prospective views and help us in the face of adversity. A neurological disorder is likely to be the most challenging experience a human being may have to confront in a lifetime. As such, literary recreations of illnesses have a doubly powerful effect. Study the synergies between neurology and fictional literature with particular reference to narrative based medicine (NBM). Doctors establish boundaries between the normal and the abnormal. Taking a clinical history is an act of interpretation in which the doctor integrates the science of objective signs and measurable quantities with the art of subjective clinical judgment. The more discrepancy there is between the patient's experience with the illness and the doctor's interpretation of that disease, the less likely the doctor-patient interaction is to succeed. NBM contributes to a better discernment of the meanings, thus considering disease as a biographical event rather than just a natural fact. Drawing from their own experience with disease, writers of fiction provide universal insights through their narratives, whilst neuroscientists, like Cajal, have occasionally devoted their scientific knowledge to literary narratives. Furthermore, neurologists from Alzheimer to Oliver Sacks remind us of the essential value of NBM in the clinic. Integrating NBM (the narrative of patients) and the classic holistic approach to patients with our current paradigm of evidence based medicine represents a challenge as relevant to neurologists as keeping up with technological and scientific advances. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Stimulated Gene Expression Profiles as a Blood Marker of Major Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, Sabine; Van Zanten, Jeroen S.; De Jong, Simone; Penninx, Brenda; van Dyck, Richard; Zitman, Frans G.; Smit, Jan H.; Ylstra, Bauke; Smit, August B.; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a moderately heritable disorder with a high lifetime prevalence. At present, laboratory blood tests to support MDD diagnosis are not available. Methods: We used a classifier approach on blood gene expression profiles of a unique set of unmedicated

  8. Exploring the Relevance of Expressed Emotion to the Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lopez, Luis-Joaquin; Muela, Jose M.; Espinosa-Fernandez, Lourdes; Diaz-Castela, Mar

    2009-01-01

    The role that the involvement of parents may play in the treatment outcome of their children with anxiety disorders is still under debate. Some studies dealing with other disorders have examined the role that the expressed emotion (EE) construct (parental overinvolvement, criticism and hostility) may play in treatment outcome and relapse. Given…

  9. Misinterpretation of Facial Expressions of Emotion in Verbal Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M.; Mazefsky, Carla A.; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Facial emotion perception is significantly affected in autism spectrum disorder, yet little is known about how individuals with autism spectrum disorder misinterpret facial expressions that result in their difficulty in accurately recognizing emotion in faces. This study examined facial emotion perception in 45 verbal adults with autism spectrum…

  10. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  11. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  12. Non-specialist health worker interventions for the care of mental, neurological and substance-abuse disorders in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginneken, Nadja; Tharyan, Prathap; Lewin, Simon; Rao, Girish N; Meera, S M; Pian, Jessica; Chandrashekar, Sudha; Patel, Vikram

    2013-11-19

    Many people with mental, neurological and substance-use disorders (MNS) do not receive health care. Non-specialist health workers (NSHWs) and other professionals with health roles (OPHRs) are a key strategy for closing the treatment gap. To assess the effect of NSHWs and OPHRs delivering MNS interventions in primary and community health care in low- and middle-income countries. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (including the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register) (searched 21 June 2012); MEDLINE, OvidSP; MEDLINE In Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, OvidSP; EMBASE, OvidSP (searched 15 June 2012); CINAHL, EBSCOhost; PsycINFO, OvidSP (searched 18 and 19 June 2012); World Health Organization (WHO) Global Health Library (searched 29 June 2012); LILACS; the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO); OpenGrey; the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (searched 8 and 9 August 2012); Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index (ISI Web of Knowledge) (searched 2 October 2012) and reference lists, without language or date restrictions. We contacted authors for additional studies. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies and interrupted-time-series studies of NSHWs/OPHR-delivered interventions in primary/community health care in low- and middle-income countries, and intended to improve outcomes in people with MNS disorders and in their carers. We defined an NSHW as any professional health worker (e.g. doctors, nurses and social workers) or lay health worker without specialised training in MNS disorders. OPHRs included people outside the health sector (only teachers in this review). Review authors double screened, double data-extracted and assessed risk of bias using standard formats. We grouped studies with similar interventions together. Where feasible, we combined data to obtain an overall estimate of effect. The 38

  13. A composite peripheral blood gene expression measure as a potential diagnostic biomarker in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Peijs, L; Vinberg, M

    2015-01-01

    as a diagnostic and state biomarker in bipolar disorder. First, messenger RNA levels of 19 candidate genes were assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 37 rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients in different affective states (depression, mania and euthymia) during a 6-12-month period and in 40 age......Gene expression in peripheral blood has the potential to inform on pathophysiological mechanisms and has emerged as a viable avenue for the identification of biomarkers. Here, we aimed to identify gene expression candidate genes and to explore the potential for a composite gene expression measure......- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Second, a composite gene expression measure was constructed in the first half study sample and independently validated in the second half of the sample. We found downregulation of POLG and OGG1 expression in bipolar disorder patients compared with healthy control...

  14. Relationship between intracellular Na+ concentration and reduced Na+ affinity in Na+,K+-ATPase mutants causing neurological disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Einholm, Anja P.; Schack, Vivien

    The neurological disorders familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2), alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), and rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (RDP) are caused by mutations of Na+,K+-ATPase α2 and α3 isoforms, expressed in glial and neuronal cells, respectively. Although these disorders ...

  15. The Influence of Personality Traits on Emotion Expression in Bulimic Spectrum Disorders: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Steward, Trevor; Wolz, Ines; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Tárrega, Salomé; Fernández-Formoso, José Antonio; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Menchón, José M; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Facial expressions are critical in forming social bonds and in signalling one's emotional state to others. In eating disorder patients, impairments in facial emotion recognition have been associated with eating psychopathology severity. Little research however has been carried out on how bulimic spectrum disorder (BSD) patients spontaneously express emotions. Our aim was to investigate emotion expression in BSD patients and to explore the influence of personality traits. Our study comprised 28 BSD women and 15 healthy controls. Facial expressions were recorded while participants played a serious video game. Expressions of anger and joy were used as outcome measures. Overall, BSD participants displayed less facial expressiveness than controls. Among BSD women, expressions of joy were positively associated with reward dependence, novelty seeking and self-directedness, whereas expressions of anger were associated with lower self-directedness. Our findings suggest that specific personality traits are associated with altered emotion facial expression in patients with BSD. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. Child neurology: Past, present, and future: part 1: history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millichap, John J; Millichap, J Gordon

    2009-08-18

    The founding period of child neurology occurred in 3 phases: 1) early individual contributory phase, 2) organized training phase, and 3) expansion phase. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, individuals in pediatrics, neurology, and psychiatry established clinics and made important contributions to the literature on childhood epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and pediatric neurology. The latter half of the 20th century saw the organization of training programs in pediatric neurology, with fellowships supported by the NIH. This development was followed by a rapid expansion in the number of trainees certified in child neurology and their appointment to divisions of neurology in children's hospitals. In recent years, referrals of children with neurologic disorders have increased, and disorders previously managed by pediatricians are often seen in neurology clinics. The era of subspecialization is embraced by the practicing physician. The present day status of pediatric neurology and suggestions for the future development of the specialty are subjects for further discussion.

  17. Deja vu in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The significance of deja vu is widely recognised in the context of temporal lobe epilepsy, and enquiry about deja vu is frequently made in the clinical assessment of patients with possible epilepsy. Deja vu has also been associated with several psychiatric disorders. The historical context of current understanding of deja vu is discussed. The literature reveals deja vu to be a common phenomenon consistent with normality. Several authors have suggested the existence of a "pathological" form of deja vu that differs, qualitatively or quantitatively, from "non-pathological" deja vu. The features of deja vu suggesting neurological or psychiatric pathology are discussed. Several neuroanatomical and psychological models of the deja vu experience are highlighted, implicating the perceptual, mnemonic and affective regions of the lateral temporal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala in the genesis of deja vu. A possible genetic basis for a neurochemical model of deja vu is discussed. Clinical approaches to the patient presenting with possible deja vu are proposed.

  18. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002 on the admitted cases with neurological complications after chickenpox (with rash or scar. Patients were investigated with CT/MRI, CSF study, EEG and nerve conduction studies and hematological workup. They were followed-up for 1 year and outcome assessed using modified Rankin scale. Results: The latency for the neurological complications was 4-32 days (mean: 16.32 days. There were 18 cases: 10 adults (64% and 8 children (36%. Cerebellar ataxia (normal CT/MRI was observed in 7 cases (32% (mean age: 6.85 years. One patient (6 years had acute right hemiparesis in the fifth week due to left capsular infarct. All these cases spontaneously recovered by 4 weeks. The age range of the adult patients was 13-47 years (mean: 27 years. The manifestations included cerebellar and pyramidal signs (n-4 with features of demyelination in MRI who recovered spontaneously or with methylprednisolone by 8 weeks. Patient with encephalitis recovered in 2 weeks with acyclovir. Guillain Barre syndrome of the demyelinating type (n-2 was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and they had a slow recovery by a modified Rankin scale (mRs score of 3 and 2 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. One case died after hemorrhage into the occipital infarct. There were two cases of asymmetrical neuropathy, one each of the seventh cranial and brachial neuritis. Conclusion: Spontaneous recovery occurs in post-chickenpox cerebellar ataxia. Rarely, serious complications can occur in adults. The demyelinating disorders, either of the central or peripheral

  19. Prospects for neurology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, W M; Kandel, E R

    2001-02-07

    Neurological and psychiatric illnesses are among the most common and most serious health problems in developed societies. The most promising advances in neurological and psychiatric diseases will require advances in neuroscience for their elucidation, prevention, and treatment. Technical advances have improved methods for identifying brain regions involved during various types of cognitive activity, for tracing connections between parts of the brain, for visualizing individual neurons in living brain preparations, for recording the activities of neurons, and for studying the activity of single-ion channels and the receptors for various neurotransmitters. The most significant advances in the past 20 years have come from the application to the nervous system of molecular genetics and molecular cell biology. Discovery of the monogenic disorder responsible for Huntington disease and understanding its pathogenesis can serve as a paradigm for unraveling the much more complex, polygenic disorders responsible for such psychiatric diseases as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness, and borderline personality disorder. Thus, a new degree of cooperation between neurology and psychiatry is likely to result, especially for the treatment of patients with illnesses such as autism, mental retardation, cognitive disorders associated with Alzheimer and Parkinson disease that overlap between the 2 disciplines.

  20. Evaluating Posed and Evoked Facial Expressions of Emotion from Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faso, Daniel J.; Sasson, Noah J.; Pinkham, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Though many studies have examined facial affect perception by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), little research has investigated how facial expressivity in ASD is perceived by others. Here, naïve female observers (n = 38) judged the intensity, naturalness and emotional category of expressions produced by adults with ASD (n = 6) and…

  1. Does Gaze Direction Modulate Facial Expression Processing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Hironori; Senju, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Tojo, Yoshikuni; Osanai, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) integrate relevant communicative signals, such as gaze direction, when decoding a facial expression. In Experiment 1, typically developing children (9-14 years old; n = 14) were faster at detecting a facial expression accompanying a gaze direction with a congruent…

  2. Brief Report: Representational Momentum for Dynamic Facial Expressions in Pervasive Developmental Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uono, Shota; Sato, Wataru; Toichi, Motomi

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) have difficulty with social communication via emotional facial expressions, but behavioral studies involving static images have reported inconsistent findings about emotion recognition. We investigated whether dynamic presentation of facial expression would enhance subjective perception of…

  3. Misinterpretation of facial expressions of emotion in verbal adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M; Mazefsky, Carla A; Minshew, Nancy J

    2015-04-01

    Facial emotion perception is significantly affected in autism spectrum disorder, yet little is known about how individuals with autism spectrum disorder misinterpret facial expressions that result in their difficulty in accurately recognizing emotion in faces. This study examined facial emotion perception in 45 verbal adults with autism spectrum disorder and 30 age- and gender-matched volunteers without autism spectrum disorder to identify patterns of emotion misinterpretation during face processing that contribute to emotion recognition impairments in autism. Results revealed that difficulty distinguishing emotional from neutral facial expressions characterized much of the emotion perception impairments exhibited by participants with autism spectrum disorder. In particular, adults with autism spectrum disorder uniquely misinterpreted happy faces as neutral, and were significantly more likely than typical volunteers to attribute negative valence to nonemotional faces. The over-attribution of emotions to neutral faces was significantly related to greater communication and emotional intelligence impairments in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a potential negative bias toward the interpretation of facial expressions and may have implications for interventions designed to remediate emotion perception in autism spectrum disorder. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Decreased expression of Sprouty2 in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a correlation with BDNF expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilkumar Pillai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current theories on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia suggest altered brain plasticity such as decreased neural proliferation and migration, delayed myelination, and abnormal synaptic modeling, in the brain of subjects with schizophrenia. Though functional alterations in BDNF, which plays important role in neuroplasticity, are implicated in many abnormalities found in schizophrenia, the regulatory mechanism(s involved in the abnormal signaling of BDNF in schizophrenia is not clear. The present study investigated whether Sprouty2, a regulator of growth factor signaling, is abnormally expressed in schizophrenia, and is associated with the changes in BDNF mRNA in this disorder. The potential effect of antipsychotic drugs on Sprouty2 expression was tested in adult rats. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sprouty2 and BDNF gene expression were analyzed in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from the Stanley Array Collection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of RNA in 100 individuals (35 with schizophrenia, 31 with bipolar disorder, and 34 psychiatrically normal controls showed significantly decreased expression of Sprouty2 and BDNF in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Moreover, a significant correlation between these two genes existed in control, schizophrenia and bipolar subjects. Long-term treatment with antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol and olanzapine, showed differential effects on both Sprouty2 and BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the frontal cortex of rats. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrating decreased expression of Sprouty2 associated with changes in BDNF, suggest the possibility that these decreases are secondary to treatment rather than to factors that are significant in the disease process of either schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. Further exploration of Sprouty2-related signal transduction pathways may be helpful to design novel treatment strategies for these disorders.

  5. Decreased expression of Sprouty2 in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a correlation with BDNF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anilkumar

    2008-03-12

    Current theories on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia suggest altered brain plasticity such as decreased neural proliferation and migration, delayed myelination, and abnormal synaptic modeling, in the brain of subjects with schizophrenia. Though functional alterations in BDNF, which plays important role in neuroplasticity, are implicated in many abnormalities found in schizophrenia, the regulatory mechanism(s) involved in the abnormal signaling of BDNF in schizophrenia is not clear. The present study investigated whether Sprouty2, a regulator of growth factor signaling, is abnormally expressed in schizophrenia, and is associated with the changes in BDNF mRNA in this disorder. The potential effect of antipsychotic drugs on Sprouty2 expression was tested in adult rats. Sprouty2 and BDNF gene expression were analyzed in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from the Stanley Array Collection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of RNA in 100 individuals (35 with schizophrenia, 31 with bipolar disorder, and 34 psychiatrically normal controls) showed significantly decreased expression of Sprouty2 and BDNF in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Moreover, a significant correlation between these two genes existed in control, schizophrenia and bipolar subjects. Long-term treatment with antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol and olanzapine, showed differential effects on both Sprouty2 and BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the frontal cortex of rats. These findings demonstrating decreased expression of Sprouty2 associated with changes in BDNF, suggest the possibility that these decreases are secondary to treatment rather than to factors that are significant in the disease process of either schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. Further exploration of Sprouty2-related signal transduction pathways may be helpful to design novel treatment strategies for these disorders.

  6. Genome-wide expression studies in autism spectrum disorder, Rett syndrome, and Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintas, Carla; Sacco, Roberto; Persico, Antonio M

    2012-01-01

    Though different in their aetiology, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Rett syndrome (RTT) and Down syndrome (DS) are three neurodevelopmental disorders sharing significant clinical and neuropathological overlaps. Genome-wide expression studies are reviewed and available datasets from post-mortem brains reanalyzed to identify genes and gene pathways dysregulated in all three disorders. Our results surprisingly converge upon immune, and not neurodevelopmental genes, as the most consistently shared abnormality in genome-wide expression patterns. A dysregulated immune response, accompanied by enhanced oxidative stress and abnormal mitochondrial metabolism seemingly represents the common molecular underpinning of these neurodevelopmental disorders. This conclusion may be important for the definition of pharmacological therapies able to ameliorate clinical symptoms across these disorders. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Saúde mental de cuidadores de abrigos para adolescentes com transtornos psiquiátricos ou neurológicos Mental health of caregivers working at shelters for adolescents with psychiatric or neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Cristina Muniz Bastos Moraes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como objetivo analisar como os cuidadores expressam seu sofrimento no trabalho, em abrigos, com adolescentes portadores de transtornos psíquicos ou neurológicos. Os dados derivaram do projeto de pesquisa "Violência, juventude e saúde mental" do Instituto de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, realizado em 2008/2010, e se basearam em 26 entrevistas e observações de campo com profissionais em uma das unidades de acolhimento pesquisadas. O método empregado nas entrevistas foi o da história oral, utilizando um roteiro semiestruturado. A análise dessas narrativas se fez por meio da teoria da comunicação, que permitiu a definição de categorias. Como resultado, constatou-se que as condições, a organização e os processos do trabalho nas unidades de acolhimento são adversos, gerando riscos à saúde mental dos profissionais, pelo despreparo destes para realizar seu trabalho em especial com aqueles que têm transtornos psiquiátricos ou neurológicos, o que causa grande sofrimento psíquico aos cuidadores. Por fim, verificou-se a necessidade de promover capacitações e supervisões clínicas permanentes nos abrigos tendo como base os princípios da reabilitação psicossocial - da mesma forma, maior integração das tarefas das unidades de acolhimento com as demais redes de proteção especial para esses adolescentes.This study aims to analyze how caregivers working at shelters for youth suffering from psychiatric or neurological disorders express their grief. The data come from the research project titled "Violence, Youth, and Mental Health," which was carried out from 2008 to 2010 by the Institute of Psychiatry at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, and was based on 26 interviews and field observations made with professionals at one of the surveyed shelters. The study method was that of oral stories using a semi-structured script. These narratives were analyzed based on the theory of

  8. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  9. Children with mixed language disorder do not discriminate accurately facial identity when expressions change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robel, Laurence; Vaivre-Douret, Laurence; Neveu, Xavier; Piana, Hélène; Perier, Antoine; Falissard, Bruno; Golse, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the recognition of pairs of faces (same or different facial identities and expressions) in two groups of 14 children aged 6-10 years, with either an expressive language disorder (ELD), or a mixed language disorder (MLD), and two groups of 14 matched healthy controls. When looking at their global performances, children with either expressive (ELD) or MLD have few differences from controls in either face or emotional recognition. At contrary, we found that children with MLD, but not those with ELD, take identical faces to be different if their expressions change. Since children with mixed language disorders are socially more impaired than children with ELD, we think that these features may partly underpin the social difficulties of these children.

  10. Schizophrenia modifying the expression of gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltieri, Danilo Antonio; De Andrade, Arthur Guerra

    2009-04-01

    According to the Brazilian Federal Medical Association, transsexualism is recognized as a gender identity disorder if a long-term diagnostic therapeutic process has demonstrated that the transposition of gender roles is irreversible, and if only hormonal and surgical procedures are appropriate to relieve the stress associated with the gender identity. Although such treatment will only be initiated with caution and after a long phase of intense diagnostic screening, the differentiation between pure identity disorders and transsexual feelings secondary to an ongoing psychopathologic process, such as schizophrenia, can be arduous for many health professionals. To report a case of a female patient with schizophrenia and transsexualism and the risks of a potential diagnostic confusion. A 19-year-old black woman, with an 8-year history of undifferentiated schizophrenia and intense gender dysphoria, was referred for sex reassignment surgery evaluation in the Ambulatory for the Treatment of Sexual Disorders of the ABC Medical School. After a more adequate antipsychotic treatment, her masculine behavior has persisted, but her desire to change her own genital organs has decreased. A better acceptance of the multiplicity of possible genders should neither contribute to inadequate interpretations of the signs and symptoms of our patients nor facilitate dangerous clinical or surgical recommendations.

  11. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Morbidity and Mortality Patterns among Neurological Patients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANNALS

    Abstract. Background/Objective: The morbidity and mortality of neurological patients managed in the intensive care unit reflect the causes of neurological disorders and the effectiveness of management. Method: The morbidity and mortality patterns of neurological patients admitted into the intensive care unit of the University ...

  13. Personality Features and Expressed Concerns of Adolescents with Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Tamara; Wiederman, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates differences between adolescent females diagnosed with either anorexia nervosa (n=26) or bulimia nervosa (n=30) using the Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory. About half of the participants displayed an inhibited personality style. Anorexics scored higher on the Respectful personality scale. Expressed concerns over self-concept,…

  14. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  15. Anger expression styles in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: associations with anxiety, paranoia, emotion recognition, and trauma history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Jamie M; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-12-01

    Heightened levels of anger and dysregulated expression of anger have been associated with poorer outcomes and treatment response for persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Less is known, however, about the psychological processes that determine the extent to which anger is expressed in a more versus less adaptive manner. To explore this issue, this study gathered reports of anger expression style in 88 persons with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder using the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, Second Edition. The authors additionally assessed anxiety, suspiciousness, emotion recognition, self-esteem, and cumulative trauma history. Correlations and multiple regression analyses showed that outward anger control, that is, the suppression of anger, was predicted by lower levels of suspiciousness, poorer emotion recognition, and reduced anxiety. Participants who endorsed greater anxiety and had experienced more traumatic events reported a heightened tendency to express anger both inwardly and outwardly.

  16. Gene expression in blood is associated with risperidone response in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lit, L; Sharp, F R; Bertoglio, K; Stamova, B; Ander, B P; Sossong, A D; Hendren, R L

    2012-10-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) often have severe behavioral problems. Not all children with these problems respond to atypical antipsychotic medications; therefore, we investigated whether peripheral blood gene expression before treatment with risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic, was associated with improvements in severe behavioral disturbances 8 weeks following risperidone treatment in 42 ASD subjects (age 112.7±51.2 months). Exon expression levels in blood before risperidone treatment were compared with pre-post risperidone change in Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Irritability (ABC-I) scores. Expression of exons within five genes was correlated with change in ABC-I scores across all risperidone-treated subjects: GBP6, RABL5, RNF213, NFKBID and RNF40 (αexpressed before treatment were associated with subsequent clinical response. Future studies will be needed to confirm these results and determine whether this expression profile is associated with risperidone response in other disorders, or alternative antipsychotic response within ASD.

  17. Observation of Spontaneous Expressive Language (OSEL): A New Measure for Spontaneous and Expressive Language of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Hyun; Junker, Dörte; Lord, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    A new language measure, the Observation of Spontaneous Expressive Language (OSEL), is intended to document spontaneous use of syntax, pragmatics, and semantics in 2-12-year-old children with ASD and other communication disorders with expressive language levels comparable to typical 2-5 year olds. Because the purpose of the OSEL is to provide developmental norms for use of language, the first step involves assessment of the scale’s feasibility, validity, and reliability using a sample of 180 2-5 year-old typically developing children. Pilot data from the OSEL shows strong internal consistency, high reliabilities and validity. Once replicated with a large population-based sample and in special populations, the scale should be helpful in designing appropriate interventions for children with ASD and other communication disorders. PMID:25022249

  18. Neurology and diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A NIGERIAN NEUROLOGY CLINIC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-28

    May 28, 2013 ... medication effects and psychological reactions to the illness. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a good example of a disabling neurological disorder and it is now apparent that the underlying neurodegenerative disorder is a major cause of psychiatric disturbances even though the psychological reactions to the ...

  20. The expression of depression among Javanese patients with major depressive disorder: a concept mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brintnell, E Sharon; Sommer, Ryan W; Kuncoro, Bambang; Setiawan, G Pandu; Bailey, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we explored the presentation of clinical depression in Java, Indonesia. Interviews were conducted with 20 Javanese patients (male and female) with major depressive disorder from both lower and higher socioeconomic levels. The recruited participants came from provincial and private mental health hospitals in the cities of Solo, Yogykarta (Jogja), Jakarta, and Malang on the island of Java, Indonesia. Concept mapping methodology using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify underlying themes in the expression of depressive phenomena in this Indonesian population. The results identified themes that grouped into six clusters: interpersonal relationships, hopelessness, physical/somatic, poverty of thought, discourage, and defeat. Findings give support to the view that culture influences the expression of Indonesian depressive phenomenology, which nevertheless has some common roots with Western clinical pictures of the disorder. Cultural influences may mask symptoms of the disorder to clinicians. Diagnostic and assessment tools must be carefully selected to ensure they address culturally specific expressions of depression.

  1. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  2. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo C. DiFrancesco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4 in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic and

  3. Association between toll-like receptors expression and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yi-Yung; Kang, Hong-Yo; Huang, Kai-Wei; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2014-12-15

    Accumulating evidences suggest that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. TLR4 was thought to be associated with major depressive disorder in animal model, but the others were still unknown. In order to examine TLR1-9 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood and their relationships with the psychopathology of major depressive disorder, 30 patients with major depressive disorder were compared with 29 healthy controls. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) was used to assess the severity of major depression. The mRNA expression levels of TLRs were examined in parallel with a housekeeping gene using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Analysis of covariance with age and body mass index adjustment revealed a significantly higher expression of TLR3, 4, 5 and 7 mRNA but lower expression of TLR1 and 6 in patients with major depressive disorder as compared with healthy controls. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that TLR4 was an independent risk factor relating to severity of major depression. These findings suggest that TLRs, especially TLR4, may be involved in the psychopathology of major depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder: systematic review and evidence-based guideline sponsored by the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) and endorsed by the CNS and American Association of Neurological Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamani, Clement; Pilitsis, Julie; Rughani, Anand I; Rosenow, Joshua M; Patil, Parag G; Slavin, Konstantin S; Abosch, Aviva; Eskandar, Emad; Mitchell, Laura S; Kalkanis, Steven

    2014-10-01

    It is estimated that 40% to 60% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) continue to experience symptoms despite adequate medical management. For this population of treatment-refractory patients, promising results have been reported with the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS). To conduct a systematic review of the literature and develop evidence-based guidelines on DBS for OCD. A systematic literature search was undertaken using the PubMed database for articles published between 1966 and October 2012 combining the following words: "deep brain stimulation and obsessive-compulsive disorder" or "electrical stimulation and obsessive-compulsive disorder." Of 353 articles, 7 were retrieved for full-text review and analysis. The quality of the articles was assigned to each study and the strength of recommendation graded according to the guidelines development methodology of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons Joint Guidelines Committee. Of the 7 studies, 1 class I and 2 class II double-blind, randomized, controlled trials reported that bilateral DBS is more effective in improving OCD symptoms than sham treatment. Based on the data published in the literature, the following recommendations can be made: (1) There is Level I evidence, based on a single class I study, for the use of bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD. (2) There is Level II evidence, based on a single class II study, for the use of bilateral nucleus accumbens DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD. (3) There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation for the use of unilateral DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD.

  5. Affective Reactivity in Response to Criticism in Remitted Bipolar Disorder: A Laboratory Analog of Expressed Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Amy K.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Ruggero, Camilo J.

    2010-01-01

    Potential mechanisms to explain the relationship between Expressed Emotion (EE) and poor outcome within bipolar disorder are poorly understood. One possibility is that people with bipolar disorder have difficulty regulating their affect in response to criticism. The present study examined whether participants with bipolar disorder were more affectively dysregulated than control participants when presented with a criticism by a confederate. There was a trend for people with bipolar disorder to react more negatively to the criticism, but there was also evidence that they recovered as quickly as controls. Exploratory analyses found that female gender, the perception of the criticism as more negative, being disabled, and having fewer positive relationships predicted greater reactivity to criticism among people with bipolar disorder. PMID:19459195

  6. Can Neurotypical Individuals Read Autistic Facial Expressions? Atypical Production of Emotional Facial Expressions in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Rebecca; Biotti, Federica; Catmur, Caroline; Press, Clare; Happé, Francesca; Cook, Richard; Bird, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    The difficulties encountered by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) when interacting with neurotypical (NT, i.e. nonautistic) individuals are usually attributed to failure to recognize the emotions and mental states of their NT interaction partner. It is also possible, however, that at least some of the difficulty is due to a failure of NT individuals to read the mental and emotional states of ASD interaction partners. Previous research has frequently observed deficits of typical facial emotion recognition in individuals with ASD, suggesting atypical representations of emotional expressions. Relatively little research, however, has investigated the ability of individuals with ASD to produce recognizable emotional expressions, and thus, whether NT individuals can recognize autistic emotional expressions. The few studies which have investigated this have used only NT observers, making it impossible to determine whether atypical representations are shared among individuals with ASD, or idiosyncratic. This study investigated NT and ASD participants' ability to recognize emotional expressions produced by NT and ASD posers. Three posing conditions were included, to determine whether potential group differences are due to atypical cognitive representations of emotion, impaired understanding of the communicative value of expressions, or poor proprioceptive feedback. Results indicated that ASD expressions were recognized less well than NT expressions, and that this is likely due to a genuine deficit in the representation of typical emotional expressions in this population. Further, ASD expressions were equally poorly recognized by NT individuals and those with ASD, implicating idiosyncratic, rather than common, atypical representations of emotional expressions in ASD. © 2015 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research.

  7. [Handwriting expression of 2 major neuroses: hysteria and obsessive disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmat, R; Belin, C J

    1983-01-01

    In psychopathology, an interesting approach consists of observing the essential characteristics of already recorded entities. Very few works have been devoted to the rapport existing between graphological productions, personality structure and mental illness. This work concerns the handwritings observed in hysteric patients, diagnosed as such after taking into account case history and clinical interview. Our aim is to show the essential points which characterize this particular pathological structure. The stable features of hysteria are verified in graphic items. From, movement and ordonnance of such handwritings serve as useful aides in identifying the stages of maturation of the Ego. The graphological expressions observed in patients presenting with obsessional neurosis significantly contrast, however, with those encountered in the preceding personality structure (Hy). A comparison of these two different series demonstrate the utility of this work in clinical psychiatry.

  8. Decreased Expression of Plasma MicroRNA in Patients with Methamphetamine (MA) Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Haifeng; Du, Jiang; Na, Zong; Hao, Wei; Yu, Shunying; Zhao, Min

    2016-09-01

    Recent research have revealed that circulating miRNAs may offer noninvasive biomarkers for human disease, offering the prospect for earlier diagnosis, and improved precision of diagnoses. The diagnoses of drug use disorders is still mainly based on subjective report and no objective biomarkers available. Many animal and cell studies found that miRNAs were involved in substance use disorders, including alcohol, morphine, cocaine and amphetamine use disorders. However, no study on circulating miRNAs for drug use disorders so far. We investigated the differential expression of plasma miRNAs in 124 patients with methamphetamine (MA) use disorders. Based on the preliminary results from microarray screen, plasma expression of 6 candidate miRNAs were measured by Quantitative real-time RT-PCR. We found that the expression of miR181a, miR15b, miR- let-7e, miR- let-7d in plasma were decreased compared to normal controls. The expression of the altered miRNAs were negative correlated with drug use frequencies in past months. Our findings suggested that miR-181a, miR-15b, miR-let-7e and miR-let-7d may play a potential role in the pathology of MA use disorder, and could serve as a potential peripheral biomarker for MA use disorder when confirmed by future studies. Further study are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism modulated by miRNAs and explore potential novel intervention targets.

  9. The Written Expression Abilities of Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Molitor, Stephen J.; Langberg, Joshua M.; Evans, Steve W.

    2016-01-01

    Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often experience deficits in academic achievement. Written expression abilities in this population have not been extensively studied but existing prevalence estimates suggest that rates of comorbid writing underachievement may be substantially higher than rates of comorbid reading and mathematics underachievement. The current study examined written expression abilities in a school-based sample of 326 middle school age students with...

  10. COX-2 gene expression is correlated with cognitive function in recurrent depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałecki, Piotr; Talarowska, Monika; Bobińska, Kinga; Szemraj, Janusz

    2014-02-28

    Cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) may be a key inflammatory enzyme involved in recurrent depressive disorder(rDD). In rDD group, COX-2 expression were higher and significant correlations occurred between COX-2 expression and cognitive functions. In controls there was no significant association between analysed variables. Thus, the COX-2 enzyme may be important for cognitive functioning in rDD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between intracellular Na+ concentration and reduced Na+ affinity in Na+,K+-ATPase mutants causing neurological disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Einholm, Anja P.; Schack, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    The neurological disorders familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2), alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), and rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (RDP) are caused by mutations of Na+,K+-ATPase α2- and α3-isoforms, expressed in glial and neuronal cells, respectively. Although these disorders...... mutations that increase Na+ affinity were found to reduce [Na+]i. It is concluded that the Na+ affinity of the Na+,K+-ATPase is an important determinant of [Na+]i....

  12. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    OpenAIRE

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa; Amit Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospectiv...

  13. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding.

  14. [Association between intelligence development and facial expression recognition ability in children with autism spectrum disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ning; Wu, Gui-Hua; Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Ya-Fen; Guan, Han; Xu, Cai-Juan; Jing, Jin; Jin, Yu

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the features of intelligence development, facial expression recognition ability, and the association between them in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A total of 27 ASD children aged 6-16 years (ASD group, full intelligence quotient >70) and age- and gender-matched normally developed children (control group) were enrolled. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Fourth Edition and Chinese Static Facial Expression Photos were used for intelligence evaluation and facial expression recognition test. Compared with the control group, the ASD group had significantly lower scores of full intelligence quotient, verbal comprehension index, perceptual reasoning index (PRI), processing speed index(PSI), and working memory index (WMI) (Pintelligence development compared with normally developed children and impaired expression recognition ability. Perceptual reasoning and working memory abilities are positively correlated with expression recognition ability, which suggests that insufficient perceptual reasoning and working memory abilities may be important factors affecting facial expression recognition ability in ASD children.

  15. Evolution of substance use, neurological and psychiatric symptoms in schizophrenia and substance use disorder patients: a 12-week, pilot, case-control trial with quetiapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eZhornitsky

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurological and psychiatric symptoms are consequences of substance abuse in schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia patients. The present case-control study examined changes in substance abuse/dependence and neurological and psychiatric symptoms in substance abusers with (DD group, n=26 and without schizophrenia (SUD group, n=24 and in non-abusing schizophrenia patients (SCZ group, n=23 undergoing 12-week treatment with the atypical antipsychotic, quetiapine. Neurological and psychiatric symptoms were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, the Extrapyramidal Symptoms Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale. At endpoint, DD and SCZ patients were receiving significantly higher doses of quetiapine (mean = 554mg/d and 478mg/d, respectively, relative to SUD patients (mean = 150mg/d. We found that SUD patients showed greater improvement in weekly dollars spent on alcohol and drugs and SUD severity, compared to DD patients. At endpoint, there was no significant difference in dollars spent, but DD patients still had a higher mean SUD severity. Interestingly, DD patients had significantly higher Parkinsonism and depression than SCZ patients at baseline and endpoint. On the other hand, we found that SUD patients had significantly more akathisia at baseline, improved more than SCZ patients and this was related to cannabis abuse/dependence. Finally, SUD patients improved more in PANSS positive scores than DD and SCZ patients. Taken together, our results provide evidence for increased vulnerability to the adverse effects of alcohol and drugs in schizophrenia patients. They also suggest that substance abuse/withdrawal may mimic some symptoms of schizophrenia. Future studies will need to determine the role quetiapine played in these improvements.

  16. Suicidality in patients with somatoform disorder - the speechless expression of anger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpfer, Nora; Staufenbiel, Sabine; Wegener, Ingo; Rambau, Stefanie; Urbach, Anne Sarah; Mücke, Martin; Geiser, Franziska; Conrad, Rupert

    2016-12-30

    To identify emotion-associated risk factors for suicidality in patients with somatoform disorders. A sample of 155 consecutive patients diagnosed with somatoform disorders at the Psychosomatic Ambulance of Bonn University Hospital filled in several questionnaires including the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised Version (SCL-90-R), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and the State Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). Our aim was to compare patients with suicide attempts to patients without suicide attempts via a MANCOVA (IV: Group; DV: SCL-90-R, TAS-20, STAXI; covariates: sex, age, depression, borderline personality disorder). Lifetime suicide attempts were documented in 20 patients (12.9%), current active suicidal ideation in 33.6%, and thoughts of death or dying in 55.9%. Patients with lifetime suicide attempts showed significantly more psychological distress, a significantly higher alexithymia sum score, a significantly higher score on trait anger, state anger, and a stronger tendency to express anger. Somatoform disorder patients with lifetime suicide attempts might have greater difficulties in identifying and describing emotions, and a tendency to intensely experience and express anger. Future longitudinal studies should further investigate possible links between difficulties in coping with anger and suicidality to improve prophylaxis and treatment of suicidal behaviour in somatoform disorder patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. NEUROLOGICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 9-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN FED BREAST-MILK OR FORMULA-MILK AS BABIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LANTING, CI; FIDLER, [No Value; HUISMAN, M; TOUWEN, BCL; BOERSMA, ER

    1994-01-01

    The presence of minor neurological dysfunction is associated with behavioural and cognitive development at school age. We have previously shown a relation between minor neurological dysfunction and perinatal disorders, especially abnormal neonatal neurological condition. We have now investigated the

  18. Correlation of neuter status and expression of heritable disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Janelle M; Bellumori, Thomas P; Bannasch, Danika L; Famula, Thomas R; Oberbauer, Anita M

    2017-01-01

    Gonadectomy, or neutering, is a very common surgery for dogs having many positive effects on behavior, health, and longevity. There are also certain risks associated with neutering including the development of orthopedic conditions, cognitive decline, and a predisposition to some neoplasias. This study was designed specifically to identify if a correlation exists between neuter status and inherited conditions in a large aggregate cohort of dogs representing many different breeds. Neutered dogs were at less risk for early and congenital conditions (aortic stenosis, early onset cataracts, mitral valve disease, patent ductus arteriosus, portosystemic shunt, and ventricular septal defect) than intact dogs. Neutering was also associated with reduced risk of dilated cardiomyopathy and gastric dilatation volvulus in males. Neutering was significantly associated with an increased risk for males and females for cancers (hemangiosarcoma, hyperadrenocorticism, lymphoma, mast cell tumor, and osteosarcoma), ruptured anterior cruciate ligament and epilepsy. Intervertebral disk disease was associated with increased risk in females only. For elbow dysplasia, hip dysplasia, lens luxation, and patellar luxation neutering had no significant effect on the risk for those conditions. Neutering was associated with a reduced risk of vehicular injury, a condition chosen as a control. In this retrospective study, several conditions showed an increased risk associated with neutering whereas other conditions were less likely to be expressed in neutered dogs. The complexity of the interactions between neutering and inherited conditions underscores the need for reflective consultation between the client and the clinician when considering neutering. The convenience and advantages of neutering dogs that will not be included in a breeding program must be weighed against possible risk associated with neutering.

  19. A Path Model of Expressive Vocabulary Skills in Initially Preverbal Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jena; Yoder, Paul; Watson, Linda R.

    2017-01-01

    We examined direct and indirect paths involving receptive vocabulary and diversity of key consonants used in communication (DKCC) to improve understanding of why previously identified value-added predictors are associated with later expressive vocabulary for initially preverbal children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; n = 87). Intentional…

  20. Abnormal Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex Activation to Facial Expressions in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Amy S.; Reiss, Allan L.; Howe, Meghan E.; Kelley, Ryan G.; Singh, Manpreet K.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Karchemskiy, Asya; Chang, Kiki D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) have reported greater amygdala and less dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation to facial expressions compared to healthy controls. The current study investigates whether these differences are associated with the early or late…

  1. Guanidinoacetate Methyltransferase (GAMT) Deficiency: Late Onset of Movement Disorder and Preserved Expressive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Declan J.; Ryan, Stephanie; Salomons, Gajja; Jakobs, Cornelis; Monavari, Ahmad; King, Mary D.

    2009-01-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a disorder of creatine biosynthesis, characterized by early-onset learning disability and epilepsy in most affected children. Severe expressive language delay is a constant feature even in the mildest clinical phenotypes. We report the clinical, biochemical, imaging, and treatment data of two…

  2. Identifying and Expressing Emotions: A Language Therapy Program for Behavior Disordered Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monast, Sheila; Smith, Elaine

    1987-01-01

    A language therapy program designed for use with behavior-disordered adolescents was also used with language/learning-disabled adolescents. Line drawings of facial expressions were used to teach the concepts of feelings and identify ranges of similar emotions as well as to introduce new vocabulary. Special behavior considerations with the behavior…

  3. Expression weighted cell type enrichments reveal genetic and cellular nature of major brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Gerald Skene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesised that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models.

  4. Use of routinely collected amniotic fluid for whole-genome expression analysis of polygenic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gyula Richárd; Gyõrffy, Balázs; Galamb, Orsolya; Molnár, Béla; Nagy, Bálint; Papp, Zoltán

    2006-11-01

    Neural tube defects related to polygenic disorders are the second most common birth defects in the world, but no molecular biologic tests are available to analyze the genes involved in the pathomechanism of these disorders. We explored the use of routinely collected amniotic fluid to characterize the differential gene expression profiles of polygenic disorders. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze amniotic fluid samples obtained from pregnant women carrying fetuses with neural tube defects diagnosed during ultrasound examination. The control samples were obtained from pregnant women who underwent routine genetic amniocentesis because of advanced maternal age (>35 years). We also investigated specific folate-related genes because maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation has been found to have a protective effect with respect to neural tube defects. Fetal mRNA from amniocytes was successfully isolated, amplified, labeled, and hybridized to whole-genome transcript arrays. We detected differential gene expression profiles between cases and controls. Highlighted genes such as SLA, LST1, and BENE might be important in the development of neural tube defects. None of the specific folate-related genes were in the top 100 associated transcripts. This pilot study demonstrated that a routinely collected amount of amniotic fluid (as small as 6 mL) can provide sufficient RNA to successfully hybridize to expression arrays. Analysis of the differences in fetal gene expressions might help us decipher the complex genetic background of polygenic disorders.

  5. Focal neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or head Electromyogram (EMG), nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap Alternative Names Neurological deficits - focal Images Brain References Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  6. Neurology referrals to a liaison psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, P

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the present study was to assess the activity of the Liaison Psychiatry service of Cork University Hospital in relation to all in-patient neurology referrals over a 12-month period. Of 1685 neurology admissions, 106 (6%) were referred to liaison psychiatry for assessment. 91 referrals (86%) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV, the commonest being major depression (24%) and somatoform disorder (23%). Patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy comprised nearly half of all referrals (48 cases; 45%). Approximately 20% of M.S. in-patients (21 cases) were referred for psychiatric assessment, with the corresponding figure in epilepsy being 25% (18 cases). Although only 106 (6%) neurology in-patients were referred to liaison psychiatry, psychiatric diagnoses were documented in 327 (20%) discharge forms, presumably reflecting previous diagnosis. The above findings indicate that psychiatric illness is common among neurology inpatients screened by liaison psychiatry yet referral rates are relatively low in terms of the overall number of neurology in-patients. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 86% of referrals indicating high concordance between neurologists and liaison psychiatry regarding the presence of a psychiatric disorder.

  7. Homer1a protein expression in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Stefan L; Llenos, Ida C; Miller, Christine L; Dulay, Jeannette R; Haybaeck, Johannes; Weis, Serge

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, there was growing interest in postsynaptic density proteins in the central nervous system. Of the most important candidates of this specialized region are proteins belonging to the Homer protein family. This family of scaffolding proteins is suspected to participate in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. The present study aims to compare Homer1a expression in the hippocampus and cingulate gyrus of patients with major psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze changes of Homer1a protein expression in the hippocampal formation and the cingulate gyrus from the respective disease groups. Glial cells of the cingulate gyrus gray matter showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to controls. The same results were seen when comparing cingulate gyrus gray matter glial cells in bipolar disorder with major depression. Stratum oriens glial cells of the hippocampus showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to controls and major depression. Stratum lacunosum glial cells