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Sample records for neurological surgeons society

  1. Navigating the Strait of Magellan: mapping a new paradigm for neurosurgical residency training. Presidential address to the Society of Neurological Surgeons, May 7, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, A John

    2008-10-01

    At the conclusion of his year as 81st president of the Society of Neurological Surgeons, the author delivered the following address at the 2007 annual meeting of the Society of Neurological Surgeons in San Francisco. In his address, Dr. Popp used the voyage of Ferdinand Magellan to illustrate the present climate affecting residency training and why the current training paradigm must be examined and, where necessary, changed. Based on this call to action the leaders of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, The American Board of Neurological Surgeons, The Congress of Neurological Surgeons, The Council of State Neurosurgical Societies, The Residency Review Committee for Neurosurgery, The Society of Neurological Surgeons, and the Washington Committee for Neurosurgery agreed to hold an unprecedented Education Summit meeting to investigate a comprehensive approach to evaluating and changing the current neurosurgical residency training model.

  2. Commentary: An Introduction to Leadership Self-Assessment at the Society of Neurological Surgeons Post-Graduate Year 1 Boot Camp: Observations and Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew A; Heilman, Carl B; Shutran, Max; Wu, Julian K

    2017-03-01

    Recent trends in graduate medical education have emphasized the mastery of nontechnical skills, especially leadership, for neurosurgical trainees. Accordingly, we introduced leadership development and self-awareness training to interns attending the Society of Neurological Surgeons Post-Graduate Year 1 Boot Camp in the Northeast (New England/New York/New Jersey) region in 2015. Feedback about the session was collected from interns. While neurosurgical interns conveyed a desire to receive more information on improving their leadership skills, most indicated that guidance seemed to be lacking in this critical area. We discuss some of the professional development needs uncovered during this process. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  3. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... STS The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr About STS Governance and Leadership ... All Events » Tweets by @STS_CTsurgery Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr Footer menu Home Contact Us ...

  4. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ... Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ...

  5. Society of Neurological Surgeons boot camp courses: knowledge retention and relevance of hands-on learning after 6 months of postgraduate year 1 training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Nathan R; Anderson, Valerie C; McCartney, Shirley; Origitano, Thomas C; Burchiel, Kim J; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2013-09-01

    In July 2010, the Society of Neurological Surgeons (SNS) introduced regional courses to promote patient safety and teach fundamental skills and knowledge to all postgraduate Year 1 (PGY1) trainees entering Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited US neurosurgery residency programs. Data from these courses demonstrated significant didactic learning and high faculty and resident satisfaction with hands-on training. Here, the authors evaluated the durability of learning from and the relevance of participation in SNS PGY1 courses as measured midway through PGY1 training. Resident participants were resurveyed 6 months after boot camp course attendance to assess knowledge retention and course effectiveness. Exposure to relevant hands-on experiences during PGY1 training and the subjective value of pre-residency simulated training in the courses were assessed. Ninety-four percent of all residents entering US PGY1 neurosurgical training participated in the 2010 SNS boot camp courses. One hundred sixty-four (88%) of these resident participants responded to the survey. Six months after course completion, 99% of respondents believed the boot camp courses benefited beginning neurosurgery residents and imparted skills and knowledge that would improve patient care. The PGY1 residents' knowledge of information taught in the courses was retained 6 months after initial testing (p < 0.0001). The learning and other benefits of participation in a national curriculum for residents entering PGY1 neurosurgical training were maintained 6 months after the courses, halfway through the initial training year.

  6. Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Minimizing Bile Duct Injuries: Adopting a Universal Culture of Safety in Cholecystectomy https://www.youtube.com/ ... Surgeons: The New SAGES Course Endorsement System The Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) recognizes that ...

  7. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder: systematic review and evidence-based guideline sponsored by the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) and endorsed by the CNS and American Association of Neurological Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamani, Clement; Pilitsis, Julie; Rughani, Anand I; Rosenow, Joshua M; Patil, Parag G; Slavin, Konstantin S; Abosch, Aviva; Eskandar, Emad; Mitchell, Laura S; Kalkanis, Steven

    2014-10-01

    It is estimated that 40% to 60% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) continue to experience symptoms despite adequate medical management. For this population of treatment-refractory patients, promising results have been reported with the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS). To conduct a systematic review of the literature and develop evidence-based guidelines on DBS for OCD. A systematic literature search was undertaken using the PubMed database for articles published between 1966 and October 2012 combining the following words: "deep brain stimulation and obsessive-compulsive disorder" or "electrical stimulation and obsessive-compulsive disorder." Of 353 articles, 7 were retrieved for full-text review and analysis. The quality of the articles was assigned to each study and the strength of recommendation graded according to the guidelines development methodology of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons Joint Guidelines Committee. Of the 7 studies, 1 class I and 2 class II double-blind, randomized, controlled trials reported that bilateral DBS is more effective in improving OCD symptoms than sham treatment. Based on the data published in the literature, the following recommendations can be made: (1) There is Level I evidence, based on a single class I study, for the use of bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD. (2) There is Level II evidence, based on a single class II study, for the use of bilateral nucleus accumbens DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD. (3) There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation for the use of unilateral DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD.

  9. [An opinion for a gender-equal society of surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Miki

    2014-09-01

    The number of female surgeon is continuously increasing, while the total number of surgeon is decreasing. The author has faced many difficulties while working as a pediatric surgeon and a mother of three children. Those difficulties were caused by the traditional sexual role in our society and by a fixed idea that the priority for a surgeon should be his or her profession. Here, the author addressed some suggestions which could lead the society of surgeons to a gender-equal one, and could make surgery a great appeal to female surgeons and to the young generations which consider private life as important as their professions as well. Suggestions include a change the relationship between a female surgeon and her partner, a supplement of surgeons so that hospitals could change the traditional system of surgery. The author proposed to increase female managers intentionally, so that the sense of sexual difference would be diminished and proper evolution of the society would be achieved.

  10. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database 2016 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Shahian, David M; Prager, Richard L; Edwards, Fred H; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kozower, Benjamin D; Badhwar, Vinay; Thourani, Vinod H; Gaissert, Henning A; Fernandez, Felix G; Wright, Cameron D; Paone, Gaetano; Cleveland, Joseph C; Brennan, J Matthew; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Brothers, Leo; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Habib, Robert H; O'Brien, Sean M; Peterson, Eric D; Grover, Frederick L; Patterson, G Alexander; Bavaria, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The art and science of outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety continue to evolve, and cardiothoracic surgery leads many of these advances. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database is one of the principal reasons for this leadership role, as it provides a platform for the generation of knowledge in all of these domains. Understanding these topics is a professional responsibility of all cardiothoracic surgeons. Therefore, beginning in January 2016, The Annals of Thoracic Surgery began publishing a monthly series of scholarly articles on outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety. This article provides a summary of the status of the STS National Database as of October 2016 and summarizes the articles about the STS National Database that appeared in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 2016 series, "Outcomes Analysis, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety." Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. What is a Breast Surgeon Worth? A Salary Survey of the American Society of Breast Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, Eric; Wang, Li; Chen, Steven; Dickson-Witmer, Diana; Zhu, Junjia; Holmes, Dennis; Kass, Rena

    2015-10-01

    Breast surgeons negotiating employment agreements have little national data available. To reduce this knowledge gap, the Education Committee of the American Society of Breast Surgeons conducted a survey of its membership. In 2014, survey questionnaires were sent to society members. Data collected included gender, type of practice, percentage devoted to breast surgery, volume of breast cases, work relative value units, location, benefits, and salary. Descriptive statistics were provided, and a multinomial logistic regression was performed to analyze the impact of various potential factors on salary. Of the 2784 members, a total of 843 observations were included. Overall, 54% of respondents dedicated 100 % of their practice to breast surgery, 64.3% were female, and 40% were fellowship-trained in breast surgery or surgical oncology. The mean income in 2013 was $330.7k. Results from a multinomial model showed gender (p income was higher for males ($378k vs. $310k). The lowest expected income by practice setting was in solo private practice ($249.2k), followed by single-specialty private practice ($285.8k), and academic ($308.5k), with the highest being multispecialty group private practice ($346.6k) and hospital-employed practice ($368.0k). Practice 100% dedicated to breast surgery had a lower than expected income ($326k vs. $343k). Salary-specific data for breast surgeons are limited, and differences in salary were seen across geographic regions, type of practice, and gender. This type of breast-surgeon-specific data may be helpful in ensuring equitable compensation.

  12. The Plastic Surgeon as Employee: A Pilot Survey of the California Society of Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirav Bipin; Coombs, Demetrius M; Arsalai, Mena; Li, Chin-Shang; Liu, Yu; Stevenson, Thomas R; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-05-01

    Plastic surgeons endure years of training yet remain poorly equipped to negotiate first employment contracts. Our aims were to evaluate typical plastic surgeon employment contracts and assess contract comprehensiveness. We sought elements that should be included to better preserve varied interests. A brief, anonymous, e-mailed survey was sent to California Society of Plastic Surgeons members and responses collected over 2 months. We collected information such as years in practice, geographic area, types of practices and number of surgeons within them, and legal standing of partnerships. We asked whether respondents sought legal assistance and specific elements were elaborated. We asked how content they were with their contracts while allowing commentary. Our survey generated 113 responses. 50.0% of respondents reported being in practice for at least 20 years; 2.68% had been in practice for up to 5 years. 62.5% reported being in private practice and 27.7% reported being in academia. In-state geographic distribution of respondents accounted for 85.6%, whereas 14.4% reported practicing out-of-state.Practice size was diverse, with 41.4% of respondents having worked in a group practice of 3 or more, 27.9% in partnership, and 23.4% in solo practice. For partnerships, 29.9% had made formal legal arrangements, whereas 20.6% had made informal arrangements. 74.5% of respondents did not seek legal assistance.Malpractice coverage varied from 51.6% with claims-made, to 21.7% with tail, to 33.0% with no coverage at all. 63.9% reported having no group disability policy. 26.4% reported annual income of less than US $100,000; 49.1% reported US $101,000 to US $200,000; 17.9% reported US $201,000 to US $300,000; 6.60% reported greater than US $300,000. Using a 5-point scale, 7.69% of respondents reported being "extremely dissatisfied" with their first employment contracts (score of 1), whereas 24.0% were "perfectly happy" (5).Eighty-two respondents offered advice. Common themes

  13. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model: Part 2-Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Gaynor, J William; Mayer, John E; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Kim, Sunghee; Quintessenza, James A; Pizarro, Christian; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl L; Austin, Erle H; Fraser, Charles D; Tweddell, James S; Jonas, Richard A; Edwards, Fred H; Grover, Frederick L; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-09-01

    The empirically derived 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model incorporates adjustment for procedure type and patient-specific factors. The purpose of this report is to describe this model and its application in the assessment of variation in outcomes across centers. All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013) were eligible for inclusion. Isolated patent ductus arteriosus closures in patients weighing less than or equal to 2.5 kg were excluded, as were centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for key variables. The model includes the following covariates: primary procedure, age, any prior cardiovascular operation, any noncardiac abnormality, any chromosomal abnormality or syndrome, important preoperative factors (mechanical circulatory support, shock persisting at time of operation, mechanical ventilation, renal failure requiring dialysis or renal dysfunction (or both), and neurological deficit), any other preoperative factor, prematurity (neonates and infants), and weight (neonates and infants). Variation across centers was assessed. Centers for which the 95% confidence interval for the observed-to-expected mortality ratio does not include unity are identified as lower-performing or higher-performing programs with respect to operative mortality. Included were 52,224 operations from 86 centers. Overall discharge mortality was 3.7% (1,931 of 52,224). Discharge mortality by age category was neonates, 10.1% (1,129 of 11,144); infants, 3.0% (564 of 18,554), children, 0.9% (167 of 18,407), and adults, 1.7% (71 of 4,119). For all patients, 12 of 86 centers (14%) were lower-performing programs, 67 (78%) were not outliers, and 7 (8%) were higher-performing programs. The 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model facilitates description of outcomes

  14. Successful linking of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database to Social Security data to examine the accuracy of Society of Thoracic Surgeons mortality data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Edwards, Fred H; Badhwar, Vinay; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Sanchez, Juan A; Morales, David L; Prager, Richard L; Wright, Cameron D; Puskas, John D; Gammie, James S; Haan, Constance K; George, Kristopher M; Sheng, Shubin; Peterson, Eric D; Shewan, Cynthia M; Han, Jane M; Bongiorno, Phillip A; Yohe, Courtney; Williams, William G; Mayer, John E; Grover, Frederick L

    2013-04-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database has been linked to the Social Security Death Master File to verify "life status" and evaluate long-term surgical outcomes. The objective of this study is explore practical applications of the linkage of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database to Social Securtiy Death Master File, including the use of the Social Securtiy Death Master File to examine the accuracy of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons 30-day mortality data. On January 1, 2008, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database began collecting Social Security numbers in its new version 2.61. This study includes all Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database records for operations with nonmissing Social Security numbers between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, inclusive. To match records between the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database and the Social Security Death Master File, we used a combined probabilistic and deterministic matching rule with reported high sensitivity and nearly perfect specificity. Between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database collected data for 870,406 operations. Social Security numbers were available for 541,953 operations and unavailable for 328,453 operations. According to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database, the 30-day mortality rate was 17,757/541,953 = 3.3%. Linkage to the Social Security Death Master File identified 16,565 cases of suspected 30-day deaths (3.1%). Of these, 14,983 were recorded as 30-day deaths in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database (relative sensitivity = 90.4%). Relative sensitivity was 98.8% (12,863/13,014) for suspected 30-day deaths occurring before discharge and 59.7% (2120/3551) for suspected 30-day deaths occurring after discharge. Linkage to the Social Security Death Master File confirms the accuracy of

  15. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model: Part 1-Statistical Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Sean M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Gaynor, J William; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Kim, Sunghee; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-01-01

    ... after congenital cardiac operations. Included were patients of all ages undergoing cardiac operations, with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, at centers participating in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Data...

  16. American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons 2006 to 2016: Another Decade of Excellence in Education and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumit, Gaby; Totonchi, Ali; Wexler, Andy; Gosain, Arun K

    2017-09-01

    Over the past 10 years, the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons (ASMS) has continued to advance to meet its mission of being the premier organization to represent maxillofacial and pediatric plastic surgery in the United States. These advances are focused on education of its members, to include the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons basic course, the preconference symposium, the annual meeting, two basic maxillofacial courses per year, advanced maxillofacial courses, a boot camp for craniofacial fellows, a cleft course, quarterly webinars, sponsored fellowships, a visiting professorship, and the ASMS journal. In addition, the ASMS has continued to advance as the premier national organization representing maxillofacial and pediatric plastic surgery in the United States, thereby positioning the organization as a primary advocate for these surgical specialties. Outreach of the ASMS has grown over the past decade and now includes representatives to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons/Plastic Surgery Foundation, the American Board of Plastic Surgeons, the American Medical Association, and most recently a seat as a governor with the American College of Surgeons. The ASMS has also initiated an annual Summer Leadership Seminar to explore topics of relevance in a changing health care environment. The present report outlines the major initiatives of the ASMS over the past 10 years.

  17. Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, S W

    1998-03-01

    It is a marvel of words and language that such disparate entities as bacteria, culture, and surgeons often find themselves in the same dish. Yet when one lifts the magic lid and pursues the ties of etymologic affiliations, one is enchanted by the fascinating thread that runs through words from their philologic beginnings to the manifold meanings acquired on the way. How many of us think, for example, of the connotations of culture and sensitivity when we order a "C & S" for a specimen of pus, when the word culture alone could take one back to mother earth or evoke the vision of parthenons of civilization; could lead to safaris of microbe hunters or to defenders of national heritage. With this essay the World Journal of Surgery begins a new feature on the roots and genealogy of surgical terms under the editorship of Professor William Gunn, author of Dictionnaire des Secours d'Urgence and the Multilingual Dictionary of Disaster Medicine and International Relief. It is appropriate for this journal that the series should begin with the word Surgeon.

  18. 3. Neurological & Psychiatric Society of Zambia's Evidence-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ”. No evidence provided. Not evidence-based and impractical for a resource .... European Federation of. Neurological Sciences. Task Force[18]. Non-acute headache. EEG is not routinely indicated in the diagnostic evaluation of headache.

  19. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Public Reporting Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2017-01-01

    Three basic principles provide the rationale for the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD) public reporting initiative: (1) Variation in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical outcomes exist. (2) Patients and their families have the right to know the outcomes of the treatments that they will receive. (3). It is our professional responsibility to share this information with them in a format they can understand. The STS CHSD public reporting initiative facilitates the voluntary transparent public reporting of congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical outcomes using the STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model. The STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model is used to calculate risk-adjusted operative mortality and adjusts for the following variables: age, primary procedure, weight (neonates and infants), prior cardiothoracic operations, non-cardiac congenital anatomic abnormalities, chromosomal abnormalities or syndromes, prematurity (neonates and infants), and preoperative factors (including preoperative/preprocedural mechanical circulatory support [intraaortic balloon pump, ventricular assist device, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or cardiopulmonary support], shock [persistent at time of surgery], mechanical ventilation to treat cardiorespiratory failure, renal failure requiring dialysis and/or renal dysfunction, preoperative neurological deficit, and other preoperative factors). Operative mortality is defined in all STS databases as (1) all deaths, regardless of cause, occurring during the hospitalization in which the operation was performed, even if after 30 days (including patients transferred to other acute care facilities); and (2) all deaths, regardless of cause, occurring after discharge from the hospital, but before the end of the 30th postoperative day. The STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model has good model fit and discrimination with an overall C statistics of 0.875 and 0.858 in the development sample and the validation sample

  20. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society Guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy. Report of a Joint Task Force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society - first revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, Ivo N.; Leger, Jean-Marc; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Cornblath, David R.; Hadden, Robert D. M.; Koski, Carol L.; Pollard, John D.; Sommer, Claudia; Illa, Isabel; van den Bergh, Peter; van Dorrn, Pieter A.

    2010-01-01

    A European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society consensus guideline on the definition, investigation, and treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) was published in 2006. The aim is to revise this guideline. Disease experts considered references retrieved from MEDLINE

  1. Are plastic surgery advertisements conforming to the ethical codes of the american society of plastic surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilson, Sandra V; Chung, Kevin C; Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Walters, Madonna

    2002-03-01

    Cosmetic surgeons have increasingly come under fire for using advertisements that may be deceptive or intended for the solicitation of vulnerable consumers. However, aesthetic surgery is a growing business that relies heavily on advertising to survive. To prevent the use of deceptive advertisements, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons has developed a code of ethics for its physician members. We conducted a study to determine the prevalence of cosmetic surgery advertisements considered objectionable by the lay public. These advertisements were published in the Yellow Pages of the 10 largest U.S. cities. Because all of the advertisements in this study contained the American Society of Plastic Surgeons logo, we also determined whether its members are upholding the ethical code of advertising. We asked a convenience sample of 50 participants to rate 104 advertisements using four yes/no questions derived from the code of ethics and one overall yes/no question regarding whether the advertisement was objectionable. We obtained the mean percentage of "yes" responses for each advertisement, from the total sample, for each question. We found that the study participants felt that 25 percent of the advertisements used images of persons or facsimiles that falsely and deceptively created unjustified expectations of favorable results. The participants responded that 22 percent of the advertisements appealed primarily to the layperson's fears, anxieties, or emotional vulnerabilities. In addition, 18 percent of the advertisements were considered to be objectionable. Discretion is currently left up to physicians as to the ethical nature of their advertisements. Although the majority of American Society of Plastic Surgeons members uphold the ethical code of advertising, there are still a substantial number of published advertisements that the average consumer considers to be in violation of this code.

  2. The genesis and correction of unprofessional behavior in surgeons: The role of society, education and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Jamsheer Jehangir

    2016-05-01

    Most surgeons are ethical. Increasingly, however, a variety of unprofessional behaviors are surfacing. Awareness of these behaviors and their causation is required to plan their eradication. To (i) identify the prevalent causes of unprofessional behaviors amongst surgeons; and (ii) suggest corrective interventions. Literature was searched and models constructed to interpret interrelationships between causes. Unprofessional behaviors extend beyond those frequently discussed, necessitating the term 'dysprofessionalism'. Causal influences arise from (i) an overpowering society; (ii) limited education and (iii) the underdeveloped state of human nature at birth. Societies corrupt by role-modeling avarice and encouraging industry-despite consequent pollution. Society brooks no interference. Surgeons are loath to oppose, resulting in an unprofessional silence. Surgical education based on best evidence is an indoctrination, with little opportunity to deploy alternatives. Evidence based guidelines increasingly risk errors, as publication fraud increases. Effective interaction with government/legislation is not taught. Human nature and our brain remain arrested in a stage of strongly stabilized evolutionary selection. Humans are born with larval brains requiring intense educational interventions. Genetic modification holds promise as it can circumvent birth in undeveloped states, and facilitate trans-generational transfer of knowledge. CRISPR/Cas-9 techniques make this possible, necessitating ethical discussion-an urgent issue. Reforming society would otherwise be an impossible task as behaviors cannot be taught in classrooms. Instances of dysprofessionalism are unlikely to diminish using current approaches. Discussion of the ethics of genetically modifying embryos is urgently needed, as this could provide a possible shortcut to positive changes in human behavior, but risks unwanted changes and misuse. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  3. Linking the congenital heart surgery databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society: part 1--rationale and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; Williams, William G; Caldarone, Christopher A; McCrindle, Brian W; Graham, Karen E; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Shook, Gregory J; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2014-04-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) is the largest Registry in the world of patients who have undergone congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical operations. The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Database (CHSS-D) is an Academic Database designed for specialized detailed analyses of specific congenital cardiac malformations and related treatment strategies. The goal of this project was to create a link between the STS-CHSD and the CHSS-D in order to facilitate studies not possible using either individual database alone and to help identify patients who are potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies. Centers were classified on the basis of participation in the STS-CHSD, the CHSS-D, or both. Five matrices, based on CHSS inclusionary criteria and STS-CHSD codes, were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients in the STS-CHSD who meet eligibility criteria for the five active CHSS studies. The matrices were evaluated with a manual adjudication process and were iteratively refined. The sensitivity and specificity of the original matrices and the refined matrices were assessed. In January 2012, a total of 100 centers participated in the STS-CHSD and 74 centers participated in the CHSS. A total of 70 centers participate in both and 40 of these 70 agreed to participate in this linkage project. The manual adjudication process and the refinement of the matrices resulted in an increase in the sensitivity of the matrices from 93% to 100% and an increase in the specificity of the matrices from 94% to 98%. Matrices were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices have a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%. In addition to facilitating identification of patients potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies, these matrices will allow (1) estimation of the denominator of patients potentially

  4. Linking the congenital heart surgery databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society: part 2--lessons learned and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; Williams, William G; Caldarone, Christopher A; McCrindle, Brian W; Graham, Karen E; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Shook, Gregory J; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2014-04-01

    A link has been created between the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Database (CHSS-D). Five matrices have been created that facilitate the automated identification of patients who are potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices are now used to (1) estimate the denominator of patients eligible for CHSS studies and (2) compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" to assess the generalizability of CHSS studies. The matrices were applied to 40 consenting institutions that participate in both the STS-CHSD and the CHSS to (1) estimate the denominator of patients that are potentially eligible for CHSS studies, (2) estimate the completeness of enrollment of patients eligible for CHSS studies among all CHSS sites, (3) estimate the completeness of enrollment of patients eligible for CHSS studies among those CHSS institutions participating in each CHSS cohort study, and (4) compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" to assess the generalizability of CHSS studies. The matrices were applied to all participants in the STS-CHSD to identify patients who underwent frequently performed operations and compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" in following five domains: (1) age at surgery, (2) gender, (3) race, (4) discharge mortality, and (5) postoperative length of stay. Completeness of enrollment was defined as the number of actually enrolled patients divided by the number of patients identified as being potentially eligible for enrollment. For the CHSS Critical Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Study (LVOTO) study, for the Norwood procedure, completeness of enrollment at centers actively participating in the LVOTO study was 34%. For the Norwood operation, discharge mortality was 15% among 227 enrolled patients

  5. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2017 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mayer, John E; Mavroudis, Constantine; O'Brien, Sean M; Austin, Erle H; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Overman, David M; St Louis, James D; Karamlou, Tara; Pizarro, Christian; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; Becker, Susan; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Backer, Carl L; Fraser, Charles D; Tweddell, James S; Elliott, Martin J; Walters, Hal; Jonas, Richard A; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2017-03-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. It is the platform for all activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons related to the analysis of outcomes and the improvement of quality in this subspecialty. This report summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgery and reviews related activities in the areas of quality measurement, performance improvement, and transparency. The reported data about aggregate national outcomes are exemplified by an analysis of 10 benchmark operations performed from January 2012 to December 2015. This analysis documents the overall aggregate operative mortality (interquartile range among all participating programs) for the following procedural groups: off-bypass coarctation repair, 1.3% (0.0% to 1.8%); ventricular septal defect repair, 0.6% (0.0% to 0.9%); tetralogy of Fallot repair, 1.1% (0.0% to 1.4%); complete atrioventricular canal repair, 3.0% (0.0% to 4.7%); arterial switch operation, 2.7% (0.0% to 4.1%); arterial switch operation and ventricular septal defect repair, 5.3% (0.0% to 6.7%); Glenn/hemi-Fontan, 2.5% (0.0% to 4.5%); Fontan operation, 1.2% (0.0% to 1.2%); truncus arteriosus repair, 9.4% (0.0% to 16.7%); and Norwood procedure, 15.7% (8.9% to 25.0%). Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictors of Major Morbidity and Mortality After Pneumonectomy Utilizing The Society for Thoracic Surgeons General Thoracic Surgery Database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shapiro, Mark; Swanson, Scott J; Wright, Cameron D; Chin, Cynthia; Sheng, Shubin; Wisnivesky, Juan; Weiser, Todd S

    2010-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study is to identify the risk factors responsible for adverse outcomes in patients after pneumonectomy utilizing The Society of Thoracic Surgeons General Thoracic Surgery Database (STS GTDB...

  7. 2011 update to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists blood conservation clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A; Brown, Jeremiah R; Despotis, George J; Hammon, John W; Reece, T Brett; Saha, Sibu P; Song, Howard K; Clough, Ellen R; Shore-Lesserson, Linda J; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Mazer, C David; Shander, Aryeh; Stafford-Smith, Mark; Waters, Jonathan; Baker, Robert A; Dickinson, Timothy A; FitzGerald, Daniel J; Likosky, Donald S; Shann, Kenneth G

    2011-03-01

    Practice guidelines reflect published literature. Because of the ever changing literature base, it is necessary to update and revise guideline recommendations from time to time. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons recommends review and possible update of previously published guidelines at least every three years. This summary is an update of the blood conservation guideline published in 2007. The search methods used in the current version differ compared to the previously published guideline. Literature searches were conducted using standardized MeSH terms from the National Library of Medicine PUBMED database list of search terms. The following terms comprised the standard baseline search terms for all topics and were connected with the logical 'OR' connector--Extracorporeal circulation (MeSH number E04.292), cardiovascular surgical procedures (MeSH number E04.100), and vascular diseases (MeSH number C14.907). Use of these broad search terms allowed specific topics to be added to the search with the logical 'AND' connector. In this 2011 guideline update, areas of major revision include: 1) management of dual anti-platelet therapy before operation, 2) use of drugs that augment red blood cell volume or limit blood loss, 3) use of blood derivatives including fresh frozen plasma, Factor XIII, leukoreduced red blood cells, platelet plasmapheresis, recombinant Factor VII, antithrombin III, and Factor IX concentrates, 4) changes in management of blood salvage, 5) use of minimally invasive procedures to limit perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion, 6) recommendations for blood conservation related to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and cardiopulmonary perfusion, 7) use of topical hemostatic agents, and 8) new insights into the value of team interventions in blood management. Much has changed since the previously published 2007 STS blood management guidelines and this document contains new and revised recommendations. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic

  8. Analysis of regional congenital cardiac surgical outcomes in Florida using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Quintessenza, James A; Burke, Redmond P; Bleiweis, Mark S; Byrne, Barry J; Ceithaml, Eric L; Decampli, William M; Giroud, Jorge M; Perryman, Richard A; Rosenkranz, Eliot R; Wolff, Grace; Posner, Vicki; Steverson, Sue; Blanchard, William B; Schiebler, Gerry L

    2009-08-01

    Florida is the fourth largest state in the United States of America. In 2004, 218,045 live babies were born in Florida, accounting for approximately 1744 new cases of congenital heart disease. We review the initial experience of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database with a regional outcomes report, namely the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Florida Regional Report. Eight centres in Florida provide services for congenital cardiac surgery. The Children's Medical Services of Florida provide a framework for quality improvement collaboration between centres. All congenital cardiac surgical centres in Florida have voluntarily agreed to submit data to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and Duke Clinical Research Institute prepared a Florida Regional Report to allow detailed regional analysis of outcomes for congenital cardiac surgery. The report of 2007 from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database includes details of 61,014 operations performed during the 4 year data harvest window, which extended from 2003 through 2006. Of these operations, 6,385 (10.5%) were performed in Florida. Discharge mortality in the data from Florida overall, and from each Florida site, with 95% confidence intervals, is not different from cumulative data from the entire Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database, both for all patients and for patients stratified by complexity. A regional consortium of congenital heart surgery centres in Florida under the framework of the Children's Medical Services has allowed for inter-institutional collaboration with the goal of quality improvement. This experience demonstrates, first, that the database maintained by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons can provide the framework for regional analysis of outcomes, and second, that voluntary regional collaborative efforts permit the pooling of data for such analysis.

  9. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines-Anticoagulation During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A; Ferraris, Victor A; Greilich, Philip E; Fitzgerald, David; Roman, Philip; Hammon, John W

    2018-02-01

    Despite more than a half century of "safe" cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the evidence base surrounding the conduct of anticoagulation therapy for CPB has not been organized into a succinct guideline. For this and other reasons, there is enormous practice variability relating to the use and dosing of heparin, monitoring heparin anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation, and the use of alternative anticoagulants. To address this and other gaps, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and the American Society of Extracorporeal Technology developed an Evidence Based Workgroup. This was a group of interdisciplinary professionals gathered to summarize the evidence and create practice recommendations for various aspects of CPB. To date, anticoagulation practices in CPB have not been standardized in accordance with the evidence base. This clinical practice guideline was written with the intent to fill the evidence gap and to establish best practices in anticoagulation therapy for CPB using the available evidence. To identify relevant evidence, a systematic review was outlined and literature searches were conducted in PubMed using standardized medical subject heading (MeSH) terms from the National Library of Medicine list of search terms. Search dates were inclusive of January 2000 to December 2015. The search yielded 833 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Once accepted into the full manuscript review stage, two members of the writing group evaluated each of 286 full papers for inclusion eligibility into the guideline document. Ninety-six manuscripts were included in the final review. In addition, 17 manuscripts published before 2000 were included to provide method, context, or additional supporting evidence for the recommendations as these papers were considered sentinel publications. Members of the writing group wrote and developed recommendations based on review of the articles obtained and achieved

  10. Predictors, Quality Markers, and Economics of Volunteering Internationally: Results from a Comprehensive Survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Joyce K; Schoenbrunner, Anna R; Kelley, Kristen D; Gosman, Amanda A

    2017-09-01

    Plastic surgeons have a long history of international volunteer work. To date, there have been no outcome-based studies among surgeons who volunteer internationally. The purpose of this study was to describe predictors of volunteering, clinical quality markers, and economics of international volunteering among American plastic surgeons. A cross-sectional validated e-mail survey tool was sent to all board-certified plastic surgeons by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The survey response rate was 15 percent (745 total individuals), of which 283 respondents traveled within the past 5 years. Analysis was performed in R. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the predictors of death/complication. Respondents reported high use of medical records, follow-up care, and host affiliation. Fewer than half of all respondents reported use of international safety surgery guidelines, and the majority of respondents reported volunteering abroad outside of their scope of practice. The majority of children younger than 5 years were not cared for by a pediatric anesthesiologist. The majority of participants reported personally spending more than $1000 on their last trip and performing surgery estimated to be worth on average $28,000 each. International surgical volunteer trips attempt to ease the global burden of surgical disease. The authors' study reports variation in quality of care provided on these trips. Most significantly, the majority of children younger than 5 years were not cared for by a pediatric anesthesiologist, and many plastic surgeons operated outside of their scope of practice.

  11. Results of the 2015 Scoliosis Research Society Survey on Single Versus Dual Attending Surgeon Approach for Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Sethi, Rajiv K; Hey, Lloyd A; LaGrone, Michael O; Keefe, Malla; Aryan, Henry E; Errico, Thomas J; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert A; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Daubs, Michael D; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-06-15

    An electronic survey administered to Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) membership. To characterize surgeon practices and views regarding the use of two attending surgeons for adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. The use of two experienced attending surgeons can decrease the operative time, estimated blood loss, and perioperative complication rates. However, the current practice patterns for the use of two attending surgeons remains unknown. An electronic, 27-question survey regarding single/dual attending surgeons was administered to the SRS membership. Determinants included: surgeon/practice demographics, assistant type/level of training, and questions regarding use of two attending surgeons. Overall reporting and comparisons between groups were made: US versus international, academic versus private practice, and experience 15 years. A total of 199 surgeons responded from 27 different countries. Overall and between the groups, the respondents significantly reported believing that two attending spine surgeons improves safety, decreases complications, and improves outcomes (P < 0.01). Approximately, 67.3% reported using a second attending ≤25% of the time (33.2% do not), and 24.1% use one ≥51% of the time (similar between groups); 51.1% that have a second attending feel it's limited by reimbursement and access concerns and 71.9% have difficulty getting the second attending reimbursed. 72.3% use a second attending for ALL of the following reasons (no difference between groups): "it's safer/reduces complications," "it decreases operative time," "it decreases blood loss," "it results in improved outcomes," "it's less work and stress for me." If reimbursement was equal/assured for a second attending, 67.5% would use one "more often" or "always." The respondents feel that having a second attending surgeon improves patient care, however most do not use one often. Reasons include reimbursement/access concerns and the majority would use one if reimbursement was

  12. Congress of Neurological Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graduate Medical Education Guidelines MACRA Medical Liability Reform Medical Research Neurosurgery & Health Care Reform Other Resources Patient Safety & Quality Improvement Reimbursement Legislative Affairs Archives CNS Press Room Annual Meeting CNS Podcasts Grants & ...

  13. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines-Anticoagulation During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A; Ferraris, Victor A; Greilich, Philip E; Fitzgerald, David; Roman, Philip; Hammon, John W

    2018-02-01

    Despite more than a half century of "safe" cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the evidence base surrounding the conduct of anticoagulation therapy for CPB has not been organized into a succinct guideline. For this and other reasons, there is enormous practice variability relating to the use and dosing of heparin, monitoring heparin anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation, and the use of alternative anticoagulants. To address this and other gaps, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and the American Society of Extracorporeal Technology developed an Evidence Based Workgroup. This was a group of interdisciplinary professionals gathered to summarize the evidence and create practice recommendations for various aspects of CPB. To date, anticoagulation practices in CPB have not been standardized in accordance with the evidence base. This clinical practice guideline was written with the intent to fill the evidence gap and to establish best practices in anticoagulation therapy for CPB using the available evidence. To identify relevant evidence, a systematic review was outlined and literature searches were conducted in PubMed using standardized medical subject heading (MeSH) terms from the National Library of Medicine list of search terms. Search dates were inclusive of January 2000 to December 2015. The search yielded 833 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Once accepted into the full manuscript review stage, two members of the writing group evaluated each of 286 full papers for inclusion eligibility into the guideline document. Ninety-six manuscripts were included in the final review. In addition, 17 manuscripts published before 2000 were included to provide method, context, or additional supporting evidence for the recommendations as these papers were considered sentinel publications. Members of the writing group wrote and developed recommendations based on review of the articles obtained and achieved

  14. Lung volume reduction surgery since the National Emphysema Treatment Trial: study of Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Marquita R; Leverson, Glen E; Jaoude, Wassim Abi; Maloney, James D

    2014-12-01

    The National Emphysema Treatment Trial demonstrated that lung volume reduction surgery is an effective treatment for emphysema in select patients. With chronic lower respiratory disease being the third leading cause of death in the United States, this study sought to assess practice patterns and outcomes for lung volume reduction surgery on a national level since the National Emphysema Treatment Trial. Aggregate statistics on lung volume reduction surgery reported in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database from January 2003 to June 2011 were analyzed to assess procedure volume, preoperative and operative characteristics, and outcomes. Comparisons with published data from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial were made using chi-square and 2-sided t tests. In 8.5 years, 538 patients underwent lung volume reduction surgery, with 20 to 118 cases reported in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database per year. When compared with subjects in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial, subjects in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database were younger (P volume in 1 second was 31% versus 28% of predicted (P lung volume reduction surgery. It underscores the need for dedicated centers to increasingly address the heavy burden of chronic lower respiratory disease in the United States in a multidisciplinary fashion, particularly for preoperative evaluation and postoperative management of emphysema. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Consensus statement on the treatment of multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Merino, A; Ramón Ara Callizo, J; Fernández Fernández, O; Landete Pascual, L; Moral Torres, E; Rodríguez-Antigüedad Zarrantz, A

    2017-03-01

    With the advent of new disease-modifying drugs, the treatment of multiple sclerosis is becoming increasingly complex. Using consensus statements is therefore advisable. The present consensus statement, which was drawn up by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases, updates previous consensus statements on the disease. The present study lists the medications currently approved for multiple sclerosis and their official indications, and analyses such treatment-related aspects as activity, early treatment, maintenance, follow-up, treatment failure, changes in medication, and special therapeutic situations. This consensus statement includes treatment recommendations for a wide range of demyelinating diseases, from isolated demyelinating syndromes to the different forms of multiple sclerosis, as well as recommendations for initial therapy and changes in drug medication, and additional comments on induction and combined therapy and practical aspects of the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. European Society of Pediatric Endoscopic Surgeons (ESPES) guidelines for training program in pediatric minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Ciro; Escolino, Maria; Saxena, Amulya; Montupet, Philippe; Chiarenza, Fabio; De Agustin, Juan; Draghici, Isabela Magdalena; Cerulo, Mariapina; Sagaon, Mario Mendoza; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Settimi, Alessandro; Najmaldin, Azad

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to propose structured guidelines for a European pediatric MIS training program created by ESPES. A questionnaire, focused on how the pediatric training program in MIS has to be structured, was proposed to all participants at the ESPES Congress in Marseille in 2013. We received 178 questionnaires but only 139 questionnaires were fully completed and analyzed. All respondents agree that the training program has to be divided into 4 steps: (1) theoretical part: 2 theoretical courses in laparoscopy (101/139 respondents, 72.7 %), 1 theoretical course in retroperitoneoscopy (99/139 respondents, 71.2 %) and 1 in thoracoscopy (91/139 respondents, 65.5 %); (2) experimental part: 10-20 h of training on pelvic trainer (103/139 respondents, 74.1 %) and 10 h of training on animal models (91/139 respondents, 65.5 %); (3) stages in European centers of reference for MIS: a 1-3 months stage (96/139 respondents, 69.1 %); (4) personal experience: 30 procedures as cameraman (98/139 respondents, 70.5 %) and >50 basic MIS procedures as main surgeon under supervision (114/139 respondents, 82 %). On the basis of our survey ESPES MIS training curriculum for pediatric surgeons must contain the following educational components: (1) theoretical knowledge; (2) practice-based learning and improvement in experimental setting; (3) stages in European centers of reference for MIS; (4) personal operative experience. At the end of the training program, ESPES will analyze the candidate training booklet and release for each applicant an ESPES certification after an exam.

  17. The importance of patient-specific preoperative factors: an analysis of the society of thoracic surgeons congenital heart surgery database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Kim, Sunghee; Gaynor, J William; Tchervenkov, Christo Ivanov; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Edwards, Fred H; Grover, Frederick L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis

    2014-11-01

    The most common forms of risk adjustment for pediatric and congenital heart surgery used today are based mainly on the estimated risk of mortality of the primary procedure of the operation. The goals of this analysis were to assess the association of patient-specific preoperative factors with mortality and to determine which of these preoperative factors to include in future pediatric and congenital cardiac surgical risk models. All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) during 2010 through 2012 were eligible for inclusion. Patients weighing less than 2.5 kg undergoing patent ductus arteriosus closure were excluded. Centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for discharge mortality or other key variables were excluded. Rates of discharge mortality for patients with or without specific preoperative factors were assessed across age groups and were compared using Fisher's exact test. In all, 25,476 operations were included (overall discharge mortality 3.7%, n=943). The prevalence of common preoperative factors and their associations with discharge mortality were determined. Associations of the following preoperative factors with discharge mortality were all highly significant (psurgery could lead to increased precision in predicting risk of operative mortality and comparison of observed to expected outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society - first revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, P. Y. K.; Hadden, R. D. M.; Bouche, P.; Cornblath, D. R.; Hahn, A.; Illa, I.; Koski, C. L.; Léger, J.-M.; Nobile-Orazio, E.; Pollard, J.; Sommer, C.; van Doorn, P. A.; van Schaik, I. N.

    2010-01-01

    Consensus guidelines on the definition, investigation, and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) have been previously published in European Journal of Neurology and Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System. To revise these guidelines. Disease experts,

  19. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass—Temperature Management during Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A.; Likosky, Donald S.; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: To improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendation. PMID:26543248

  20. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass--Temperature Management during Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A; Likosky, Donald S; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W

    2015-09-01

    To improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendation.

  1. Society of U.S. Air Force Surgeons’ 2010 State of the Flight Surgeon Survey: The Medical Treatment Facility Commander’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    filling an active billet as a flight surgeon may be very short (i.e., immediate), as in the case of a general medical officer ( GMO ), or very long...Inexperience (9/19) • The two assigned flight surgeons are general medical officers ( GMOs ). It is difficult to complete the necessary training at a...other two are newly assigned GMOs , who are motivated but are still in the learning phase. I have no doubt they will eventually grow into outstanding

  2. Mortality Trends in Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: An Analysis of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; He, Xia; Mayer, John E; Austin, Erle H; Quintessenza, James A; Karl, Tom R; Vricella, Luca; Mavroudis, Constantine; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Husain, S Adil; Overman, David M; St Louis, James D; Han, Jane M; Shahian, David M; Cameron, Duke; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-10-01

    Previous analyses of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Adult Cardiac Surgery Database have demonstrated a reduction over time of risk-adjusted operative mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting. The STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) was queried to assess multiinstitutional trends over time in discharge mortality and postoperative length of stay (PLOS). Since 2009, operations in the STS CHSD have been classified according to STAT (The Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery) Congenital Heart Surgery Mortality Categories. The five STAT Mortality Categories were chosen to be optimal with respect to minimizing variation within categories and maximizing variation between categories. For this study, all index cardiac operations from 1998 to 2014, inclusive, were grouped by STAT Mortality Category (exclusions: patent ductus arteriosus ligation in patients weighing less than or equal to 2.5 kg and operations that could not be assigned to a STAT Mortality Category). End points were discharge mortality and PLOS in survivors for the entire period and for 4-year epochs. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to test the null hypothesis that the mortality was the same across epochs, by STAT Mortality Category. The analysis encompassed 202,895 index operations at 118 centers. The number of centers participating in STS CHSD increased in each epoch. Overall discharge mortality was 3.4% (6,959 of 202,895) for 1998 to 2014 and 3.1% (2,308 of 75,337) for 2011 to 2014. Statistically significant improvement in discharge mortality was seen in STAT Mortality Categories 2, 3, 4, and 5 (p values for STAT Mortality Categories 1 through 5 are 0.060, <0.001, 0.015, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). PLOS in survivors was relatively unchanged over the same time intervals. Sensitivity analyses reveal that the finding of declining risk-stratified rates of discharge mortality over time is not simply attributable to the addition

  3. Guide to research in academic global surgery: A statement of the Society of University Surgeons Global Academic Surgery Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Saurabh; Nwomeh, Benedict; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Holterman, AiXuan L; Jawa, Randeep S; Jayaraman, Sudha; Juillard, Catherine; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Rickard, Jennifer; Weiser, Thomas G; Yang, George P; Shrime, Mark G

    2017-12-05

    Global surgery is an emerging academic discipline that is developing in tandem with numerous policy and advocacy initiatives. In this regard, academic global surgery will be crucial for measuring the progress toward improving surgical care worldwide. However, as a nascent academic discipline, there must be rigorous standards for the quality of work that emerges from this field. In this white paper, which reflects the opinion of the Global Academic Surgery Committee of the Society for University Surgeons, we discuss the importance of research in global surgery, the methodologies that can be used in such research, and the challenges and benefits associated with carrying out this research. In each of these topics, we draw on existing examples from the literature to demonstrate our points. We conclude with a call for continued, high-quality research that will strengthen the discipline's academic standing and help us move toward improved access to and quality of surgical care worldwide. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Current practices in the management of malignant pleural effusions: a survey among members of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarci, Marco; Caruana, Edward; Bertolaccini, Luca; Bedetti, Benedetta; Brunelli, Alessandro; Varela, Gonzalo; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Kuzdzal, Jaroslaw; Massard, Gilbert; Ruffini, Enrico; Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Opitz, Isabelle; Batirel, Hasan; Toker, Alper; Rocco, Gaetano

    2017-03-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) commonly complicates advanced malignancy and their exact management is still undefined. We undertook a survey to determine the current practice among members of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). A cross-sectional survey focused on the current practice of management of MPE was developed by the authors. The questions were outlined after a review of the literature and circulated in an Internet-based survey format. Computed tomography (125, 92%) and chest X-ray (106, 78%) are the most common imaging modalities performed in the initial evaluation. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for washout and pleurodesis (93, 68%) was reported as the preferred approach to patients with uncomplicated MPE. Sixty-one (45%) of the responding colleagues routinely use large bore chest tubes for draining malignant effusions. Forty-nine (35%) surgeons would not apply suction to the drainage system, whilst 50 (37%) would use -2 kPa or less. Talc (124, 91%) is the most commonly used sclerosing agent for pleurodesis in the context of malignant pleural effusion. The practice of 76 (56%) of the respondents is not informed by any clinical guidelines, whilst 60 (44%) reported adhering to the 2010 British Thoracic Society Pleural Disease Guideline. Seventy-one (52%) declared that the guidance was in need of updating or revision. This survey demonstrates the lacking adoption of the existing clinical guidance in this field, as well as the need for more contemporary guidelines for a better-informed practice. The ESTS Working Group on the management of MPE has been established for this purpose.

  5. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?

  6. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Expert Consensus for the Resuscitation of Patients Who Arrest After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Task Force on Resuscitation After Cardiac Surgery provides this professional society perspective on resuscitation in patients who arrest after cardiac surgery. This document was created using a multimodal methodology for evidence generation and includes information from existing guidelines, from the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, from our own structured literature reviews on issues particular to cardiac surgery, and from an international survey on resuscitation hosted by CTSNet. In gathering evidence for this consensus paper, searches were conducted using the MEDLINE keywords "cardiac surgery," "resuscitation," "guideline," "thoracic surgery," "cardiac arrest," and "cardiac massage." Weight was given to clinical studies in humans, although some case studies, mannequin simulations of potential protocols, and animal models were also considered. Consensus was reached using a modified Delphi method consisting of two rounds of voting until 75% agreement on appropriate wording and strength of the opinions was reached. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Workforce on Critical Care was enlisted in this process to provide a wider variety of experiences and backgrounds in an effort to reinforce the opinions provided. We start with the premise that external massage is ineffective for an arrest due to tamponade or hypovolemia (bleeding), and therefore these subsets of patients will receive inadequate cerebral perfusion during cardiac arrest in the absence of resternotomy. Because these two situations are common causes for an arrest after cardiac surgery, the inability to provide effective external cardiopulmonary resuscitation highlights the importance of early emergency resternotomy within 5 minutes. In addition, because internal massage is more effective than external massage, it should be used preferentially if other quickly reversible causes are not found. We present a protocol for the cardiac arrest situation that

  7. Publication Rate and Impact Factor for Society of Military Orthopedic Surgeons. Annual Meeting Presentations, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Justin; Dunn, John C; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Fares, Austin B; Waterman, Brian R; Garcia, E'stephan; Pallis, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons (SOMOS) is a robust academic organization with more than 1,000 members and has held annual academic scientific meetings since 1958. Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding the volume and quality of orthopaedic surgery presentations accepted for peer-reviewed publication. The purpose of this study was to answer the following questions: (1) What is the publication acceptance rate for abstract presented at SOMOS meetings? (2) What is the distribution by orthopaedic subspecialty for SOMOS presentations accepted for publication? (3) What is the overall quality of these publications? Abstracts of podium presentations at SOMOS were reviewed from 2009 to 2013. Author institutional information was obtained. Abstracts were then queried in PubMed to obtain publication status, time to publication, and impact factor of the journal in which the manuscript was successfully published. From 2009 to 2013, 592 abstracts were presented at the SOMOS conference. Overall, 59% of abstracts went on to publication at a mean of 18.1 months. Published manuscripts appeared in 59 journals with a mean impact factor of 2.6. The subspecialties of spine (67%) and basic science (66%) achieved the highest abstract publication rate while sports had the highest mean impact factor (3.3). The annual SOMOS meeting is a productive academic event, producing quality presentations resulting in a high manuscript publication rate in every orthopaedic surgery subspecialty. This is the first series to demonstrate overall productivity of a general orthopaedic surgery scientific meeting as well as the subspecialty-specific impact factors of published investigations. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. Workload and quality of life of surgeons. Results and implications of a large-scale survey by the German Society of Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, Thomas; Koller, Michael; Schlitt, Hans Juergen; Bauer, Hartwig

    2011-06-01

    Quality of life is of vital importance for patients undergoing surgery. However, little is known about the quality of life of surgeons who are facing a stressful and dramatically changing working environment. For this reason, this large-scale study investigated the quality of life (QL) of surgeons in Germany in the context of occupational, private, and system-related risk factors. The study population consisted of attendees (surgeons, non-surgical physicians, medical students) of the nine major annual conferences of the German Society of Surgery between 2008 and 2009. Participants filled in a single questionnaire including study-specific questions (demographic variables, professional position, and occupational situation) and a standardized quality of life instrument (Profiles of quality of life of the chronically ill, PLC). Surgeons' responses with regard to their professional situation and their quality of life were contrasted with those of the two controls (non-surgical physicians, medical students). Furthermore, PLC scores were compared with German population reference data and with reference data of several patient groups. Individuals (3,652) (2,991 surgeons, 561 non-surgical physicians, 100 medical students) participated in this study. The average age of surgeons and non-surgeons was in the low forties. In terms of professional qualifications, the majority of surgeons were residents (30%) and the majority of non-surgeons consultants in private practice (38%). Sixty-eight percent of the surgeons, only 39% of the non-surgeons worked more than 60 h per week on average (p work overload, more so than non-surgeons (74% vs. 59%, p working environment (beta = 0.057 to 0.235), lack of opportunities for continuing education (beta = 0.108 to 0.161), and inadequate salary (beta = 0.036 to 0.172). Improving the working conditions for surgeons requires a concerted action of all relevant parties, including hospital administrators, insurance companies, and

  9. Consensus Statement on medication use in multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Merino, A; Fernández, O; Montalbán, X; de Andrés, C; Oreja-Guevara, C; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Arbizu, T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments for multiple sclerosis therapy are rapidly evolving. It is believed that new drugs will be approved in the near future, thereby changing current indications for treatment. In this context, the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group on demyelinating diseases, which evaluates medication use in MS, has decided to draw up a consensus statement on the current indications and guidelines for multiple sclerosis treatment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do amazing things. SLS is dedicated to Improving Outcomes in Minimally Invasive Surgery. SLS is the largest ... awarded a fellowship by The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology to research and write this important ...

  11. Emergency surgery and Limitation of therapeutic effort in relation to neurologic deterioration in elderly patients – a survey of European surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Păduraru

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. In emergency surgery, a very heterogeneous approach is required in the decision making process, especially when considering the patient’s postoperative quality of life as well as medical, ethical, and legal factors. In some cases, the presence of an Advance Directive (AD form may potentially help resolve the surgeon’s dilemma. Objectives. The primary objective of this survey was to investigate the opinions of surgeons across a representative cross-section of European countries regarding the decision making process using a specific case scenario so as to identify similarities and differences in practice. A secondary objective was to identify the possibility of establishing a more uniform approach and best practice. Method. A survey was conducted of surgeons from a range of European countries. Questionnaires were designed to obtain an overview of decision making in relation to the Limitation of Therapeutic Effort (LTE using a specific case study and the level of awareness and practical use of ADs. Surveys were distributed via email to the members of the ESTES (European Society for Trauma and Emergency Surgery and AEC (Association of Spanish surgeons, with voluntary, anonymous participation. Conclusions. Clear and additional support in the form of legal and ethical guidance with clinical protocols for surgical practice in such case scenarios is necessary. Wider use of ADs, together with education about their role and support for patients and relatives, would benefit the type of patient described in our scenario. A multidisciplinary team should play a more active role in decision making in order to avoid surgical procedures that are potentially futile. The concepts of LTE and Quality of life need a broader understanding among surgeons as well as more consistent application.

  12. [Physician Counseling about Physical and Sports Activity in Neurological Practices in Germany: Results of a Survey Among Members of the German Neurological Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, C D; Reuter, I; Straube, A; Tettenborn, B; Braumann, K M; Reimers, A K

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major but modifiable risk factor for morbidity and mortality. Regular physical activity has preventive and therapeutic effects on numerous diseases including neurological disorders. Therefore, it is desirable that physicians motivate their patients to increase their physical and sports activities and that they help them to overcome barriers to exercising. The present study is a survey of neurologists who are members of the German Neurological Society with their own practices; they were asked whether they advised their patients on the benefits of physical activity. Details on physician counseling on physical activity were obtained, such as the frequency of counseling, the neurological disorders considered by the practitioners to be worth the effort of counseling, and the barriers to exercise on the part of patients. More than 80 % of the participants who responded to the survey stated that they frequently provide their patients with advice on the preventive and therapeutic aspects of physical activity. Almost all of them recommended endurance sports; this was followed by Far Eastern types of sport such as tai chi or yoga (70 % of all physicians who advice sports activities). The frequency of counseling about physical activity significantly correlated to the physician's own sports activity. Frequency of counseling was reduced if the physician assessed the patients to be incapable of adopting and maintaining a lifestyle of habitual physical activity. Lack of time as well as an insufficient reimbursement of the counseling, however, did not significantly influence the frequency of counseling. The physician's own sports activity matched that of individuals with similar social status. Thus, a selection bias does not seem to be of importance regarding the results of the survey. However, since only 169 of the 784 invited neurologists (21.6 %) responded to the questionnaire, the representativeness of the survey may be limited. Counseling about

  13. Electronic Communication in Plastic Surgery: Guiding Principles from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Health Policy Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Perdikis, Galen; Damitz, Lynn; Krochmal, Dan J; Kalliainen, Loree K; Bonawitz, Steven C

    2018-02-01

    With the advancement of technology, electronic communication has become an important mode of communication within plastic and reconstructive surgery. This can take the form of e-mail, text messaging, video conferencing, and social media, among others. There are currently no defined American Society of Plastic Surgeons guidelines for appropriate professional use of these technologies. A search was performed on PubMed and the Cochrane database; terms included "telemedicine," "text messaging," "HIPAA," "metadata," "video conferencing," "photo sharing," "social media," "Facebook," "Twitter," and "Instagram." Initial screening of all identified articles was performed; the level of evidence, limitations, and recommendations were evaluated and articles were reviewed. A total of 654 articles were identified in the level I screening process; after more comprehensive review, 41 articles fit inclusion criteria: social networking, 12; telemedicine, 11; text messaging, 10; metadata, four; video conferencing, three; and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, one. General themes were identified from these articles and guidelines proposed. Electronic communication can provide an efficient method of information exchange for professional purposes within plastic surgery but should be used thoughtfully and with all professional, legal, and ethical considerations.

  14. A national survey of educational resources utilized by the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Nina E; Kulaylat, Afif N; Zheng, Feibi; Glarner, Carly E; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Hamed, Osama H; Bittner, James G; Sakran, Joseph V; Winfield, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary surgical education includes online resources, mobile platform applications, and simulation training. The aim of this study was to characterize educational tools used by surgical residents. An anonymous web-based survey was distributed to 9,913 members of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons. We received 773 completed surveys. To prepare for examinations and expand fund of knowledge, most respondents used printed textbooks, online textbooks, and Surgical Council on Resident Education modules, respectively. Respondents used online textbooks and journal articles most often to investigate timely patient care issues. In contrast, mobile platform applications and online videos/lectures were used least. Fewer than half of respondents used simulators, limited by clinical duties, absence of feedback/supervision, and lack of working supplies. Traditional educational resources dominate trainee preferences, although utilization of the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum continues to grow. Simulators remain a required tool for laparoscopic training, and incorporation of structured feedback and improved supervision may improve utilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Forensic medical examinations and teaching: disagreements and discussions within the Brazilian Society of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Forensic Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Ede

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe the influence wielded by forensic medicine in the development of the field of psychiatry in Brazil, this research note analyzes the debates that took place from May to July 1918 within the Brazilian Society of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Forensic Medicine over the use of forensic medical examinations as course material in the study of Public Medicine at the Rio de Janeiro School of Medicine. The focus is on how the controversy unfolded within the Society and how this scientific organization influenced the institution of the theoretical and practical training of medical experts.

  16. Linking the Congenital Heart Surgery Databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons’ Society: Part 1—Rationale and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J. William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C.; Williams, William G.; Caldarone, Christopher A.; McCrindle, Brian W.; Graham, Karen E.; Dokholyan, Rachel S.; Shook, Gregory J.; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V.; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E.; Jonas, Richard A.; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) is the largest Registry in the world of patients who have undergone congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical operations. The Congenital Heart Surgeons’ Society Database (CHSS-D) is an Academic Database designed for specialized detailed analyses of specific congenital cardiac malformations and related treatment strategies. The goal of this project was to create a link between the STS-CHSD and the CHSS-D in order to facilitate studies not possible using either individual database alone and to help identify patients who are potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies. Methods Centers were classified on the basis of participation in the STS-CHSD, the CHSS-D, or both. Five matrices, based on CHSS inclusionary criteria and STS-CHSD codes, were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients in the STS-CHSD who meet eligibility criteria for the five active CHSS studies. The matrices were evaluated with a manual adjudication process and were iteratively refined. The sensitivity and specificity of the original matrices and the refined matrices were assessed. Results In January 2012, a total of 100 centers participated in the STS-CHSD and 74 centers participated in the CHSS. A total of 70 centers participate in both and 40 of these 70 agreed to participate in this linkage project. The manual adjudication process and the refinement of the matrices resulted in an increase in the sensitivity of the matrices from 93% to 100% and an increase in the specificity of the matrices from 94% to 98%. Conclusion Matrices were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices have a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%. In addition to facilitating identification of patients potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies, these matrices will allow (1) estimation of

  17. American Association of Neurological Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CME Accreditation and Joint Providership Call for Scientific Programming background-image - a woman looking at a screen Publications The Journal of Neurosurgery AANS 360 Mobile App AANS Neurosurgeon AANS Updates Neurosurgery Blog AANS ...

  18. Readability of neurosurgery-related patient education materials provided by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Paul J; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2013-11-01

    Most professional organizations now provide patient information material, and not all of this material is appropriate for the average American adult to comprehend. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the United States Department of Health and Human Services recommend that patient education materials be written at the sixth-grade level. Our aim was to assess the readability of neurosurgery-related patient education material and compare it with The American Medical Association, NIH, and United States Department of Health and Human Services recommendations. Materials provided by the American Association of Neurologic Surgeons (AANS) and the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and National Institutes of Health were assessed with the Flesch-Kincaid grade level and Flesch Reading Ease score with Microsoft Office Word software. None of the articles had Flesch-Kincaid grade levels at or below the sixth-grade level. All articles on the AANS Conditions and Treatments section were written at or above the ninth-grade level; three of the AANS Camera-Ready Fact Sheets and four of the NIH/NLM articles were written between the seventh- and eighth-grade levels. Current patient education material provided by the AANS is written well above the recommended level. Material from the NLM and NIH performed better, but was still above the recommended sixth-grade level. Education materials should contain information relevant to patients' conditions, be accurate in the information they present, and be written with the average patient in mind. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan: results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part 1: Working style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Kazumi; Nomura, Kyoko; Tominaga, Ryuji; Iwase, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Ikuko; Shimada, Mitsuo; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Takeshita, Emiko; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Hanashi, Tomoko; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kokudo, Norihiro; Maeda, Kotaro

    2018-01-01

    To assess the working styles of men and women working as surgeons in Japan. In July, 2014, the Japan Surgical Society invited all their members (n = 29,861), through an internet campaign, to participate in a nationwide survey of surgeons. The items investigated in this descriptive study included demographic information and working styles, based on a questionnaire. In total, 6211 surgeons participated (response rate 20.8%, 5586 men and 625 women). The largest age stratum was 40-49 years for men and 30-39 years for women. Overall, respondents identified their labor contract, including salary and work hours, as the highest priority for improvement. Women with children were more likely to be part-time employees, work fewer hours, and take fewer house calls/on-calls than their male counterparts. Moreover, women of all ages earned a lower annual income than men, irrespective of whether they had children. Perception scores for discrimination related to work and promotion were significantly higher among women than men (p women working as surgeons in Japan.

  20. Analysis of gender-based differences among surgeons in Japan: results of a survey conducted by the Japan Surgical Society. Part. 2: personal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Kazumi; Nomura, Kyoko; Tominaga, Ryuji; Iwase, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Ikuko; Shimada, Mitsuo; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Takeshita, Emiko; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Hanashi, Tomoko; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kokudo, Norihiro; Maeda, Kotaro

    2017-09-18

    To assess the true conditions and perceptions of the personal lives of men and women working as surgeons in Japan. In 2014, all e-mail subscribed members of the Japan Surgical Society (JSS, n = 29,861) were invited to complete a web-based survey. The questions covered demographic information, work environment, and personal life (including marital status, childcare, and nursing care for adult family members). In total, 6211 surgeons (5586 men and 625 women) returned the questionnaires, representing a response rate of 20.8%. Based on the questionnaire responses, surgeons generally prioritize work and spend most of their time at work, although women with children prioritize their family over work; men spend significantly fewer hours on domestic work/childcare than do their female counterparts (men 0.76 h/day vs. women 2.93 h/day, p differed significantly according to gender and whether they have children. The conservative idea that women should bear primary responsibility for the family still pertains for both men and women working as surgeons in Japan.

  1. Recommendations from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) regarding computed tomography screening for lung cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Rzyman, Witold; Veronesi, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    In order to provide recommendations regarding implementation of computed tomography (CT) screening in Europe the ESTS established a working group with eight experts in the field. On a background of the current situation regarding CT screening in Europe and the available evidence, ten recommendati......In order to provide recommendations regarding implementation of computed tomography (CT) screening in Europe the ESTS established a working group with eight experts in the field. On a background of the current situation regarding CT screening in Europe and the available evidence, ten...... reports). Thoracic Surgeons will play a key role in this process and therefore the ESTS is committed to providing guidance and facilitating this process for the benefit of patients and surgeons....

  2. A History of the Council of State Neurosurgical Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Hasan A; Tumialán, Luis M; Rosenow, Joshua M; Colen, Chaim B; Stroink, Ann R; Linskey, Mark; Schirmer, Clemens M; Watridge, Clarence

    2017-01-01

    As neurological surgery evolved into its own subspecialty early in the 20th century, a need arose to create an environment for communication and education among those surgeons working in this burgeoning surgical discipline. As the socioeconomic climate in health care began to change in the United States, an unforeseen need arose that was outside the scope of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and Society of Neurological Surgeons. The capacity to understand and address the evolving socioeconomic landscape and to offer a platform for advocacy required a new entity. Grassroots efforts of neurosurgeons at the state level ultimately yielded a formal organization of state neurosurgical societies to fill this void by recognizing, understanding, and addressing socioeconomic factors affecting the practice of neurological surgery. This formal organization became the Council of State Neurosurgical Societies (CSNS). The CSNS provides a forum in which state societies can meet to identify, understand, and advocate for policies on behalf of organized neurosurgery. The purpose of this paper is to detail the history of the formation of the CSNS. By understanding this history and the need for the development of the CSNS, it is hoped that its evolving role as a voice for neurological surgeons in the modern era of health care will be made clear. Copyright © 2016 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  3. Training, credentialing, proctoring and medicolegal risks of robotic urological surgery: recommendations of the society of urologic robotic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Kevin C; Gautam, Gagan; Shalhav, Arieh L; Clayman, Ralph V; Ahlering, Thomas E; Albala, David M; Lee, David I; Sundaram, Chandru P; Matin, Surena F; Castle, Erik P; Winfield, Howard N; Gettman, Matthew T; Lee, Benjamin R; Thomas, Raju; Patel, Vipul R; Leveillee, Raymond J; Wong, Carson; Badlani, Gopal H; Rha, Koon H; Eggener, Scott E; Wiklund, Peter; Mottrie, Alex; Atug, Fatih; Kural, Ali R; Joseph, Jean V

    2009-09-01

    With the exponential growth of robotic urological surgery, particularly with robot assisted radical prostatectomy, guidelines for safe initiation of this technology are a necessity. Currently no standardized credentialing system exists to our knowledge to evaluate surgeon competency and safety with robotic urological surgery performance. Although proctoring is a modality by which such competency can be evaluated, other training tools and guidelines are needed to ensure that the requisite knowledge and technical skills to perform this procedure have been acquired. We evaluated the current status of proctoring and credentialing in other surgical specialties to discuss and recommend its application and implementation specifically for robot assisted radical prostatectomy. We reviewed the literature on safety and medicolegal implications of proctoring and the safe introduction of surgical procedures to develop recommendations for robot assisted radical prostatectomy proctoring and credentialing. Proctoring is an essential mechanism for robot assisted radical prostatectomy institutional credentialing and should be a prerequisite for granting unrestricted privileges on the robot. This should be differentiated from preceptoring, wherein the expert is directly involved in hands-on training. Advanced technology has opened new avenues for long-distance observation through teleproctoring. Although the medicolegal implications of an active surgical intervention by a proctor are not clearly defined, the role as an observer should grant immunity from malpractice liability. The implementation of guidelines and proctoring recommendations is necessary to protect surgeons, proctors, institutions and, above all, the patients who are associated with the institutional introduction of a robot assisted radical prostatectomy program. With no current guidelines we anticipate this article will serve as a catalyst of interorganizational discussion to initiate regulatory oversight of surgeon

  4. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass--Temperature Management During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A; Likosky, Donald S; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including: 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendations: CLASS I RECOMMENDATIONS: a)The oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature is recommended to be utilized as a surrogate for cerebral temperature measurement during CPB. (Class I, Level C) b)To monitor cerebral perfusate temperature during warming, it should be assumed that the oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature under-estimates cerebral perfusate temperature. (Class I, Level C) c)Surgical teams should limit arterial outlet blood temperature to<37°C to avoid cerebral hyperthermia. (Class 1, Level C) d)Temperature gradients between the arterial outlet and venous inflow on the oxygenator during CPB cooling should not exceed 10°C to avoid generation of gaseous emboli. (Class 1, Level C) e)Temperature gradients between the arterial outlet and venous inflow on the oxygenator during CPB rewarming should not exceed 10°C to avoid out-gassing when blood is returned to the patient. (Class 1, Level C) CLASS IIa a)Pulmonary artery or nasopharyngeal temperature recording is reasonable for weaning and immediate post-bypass temperature measurement. (Class IIa, Level C)b)Rewarming when arterial blood outlet temperature ≥30° C: i.To achieve the desired temperature for separation from bypass, it is reasonable to maintain a temperature gradient between

  5. The effect of the perioperative blood transfusion and blood conservation in cardiac surgery Clinical Practice Guidelines of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists upon clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likosky, Donald S; FitzGerald, Daniel C; Groom, Robert C; Jones, Dwayne K; Baker, Robert A; Shann, Kenneth G; Mazer, C David; Spiess, Bruce D; Body, Simon C

    2010-06-01

    The 2007 Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Clinical Practice Guideline for Perioperative Blood Transfusion and Blood Conservation in Cardiac Surgery was recently promulgated and has received much attention. Using a survey of cardiac anesthesiologists and perfusionists' clinical practice, we assessed the current practices of perfusion, anesthesia, and surgery, as recommended by the Guidelines and also determined the role the Guidelines had in changing these practices. Nontrainee members of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, the American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion, the Canadian Society of Clinical Perfusion, and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology were surveyed using a standardized survey instrument that examined clinical practices and responses to the Guidelines. One thousand four hundred and two surveys from 1,061 institutions principally in the United States (677 institutions) and Canada (34 institutions) were returned, with a 32% response rate. There was wide distribution of the Guidelines with 78% of anesthesiologists and 67% of perfusionists reporting having read all, part, or a summary of the Guidelines. However, only 20% of respondents reported that an institutional discussion had taken place as a result of the Guidelines, and only 14% of respondents reported that an institutional monitoring group had been formed. There was wide variability in current preoperative testing, perfusion, surgical, and pharmacological practices reported by respondents. Twenty-six percent of respondents reported one or more practice changes in response to the Guidelines.The changes made were reported to be highly (9%) or somewhat effective (31%) in reducing overall transfusion rates. Only four of 38 Guideline recommendations were reported by more than 5% of respondents to have been changed in response to the Guidelines. Wide variation in clinical practices of cardiac surgery was reported. Little

  6. Effect of the perioperative blood transfusion and blood conservation in cardiac surgery clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists upon clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likosky, Donald S; FitzGerald, Daniel C; Groom, Robert C; Jones, Dwayne K; Baker, Robert A; Shann, Kenneth G; Mazer, C David; Spiess, Bruce D; Body, Simon C

    2010-08-01

    The 2007 Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Clinical Practice Guideline for Perioperative Blood Transfusion and Blood Conservation in Cardiac Surgery was recently promulgated and has received much attention. Using a survey of cardiac anesthesiologists and perfusionists' clinical practice, we aimed to assess the current practices of perfusion, anesthesia, and surgery, as recommended by the Guidelines, and to also determine the role the Guidelines had in changing these practices. Nontrainee members of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, the American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion, the Canadian Society of Clinical Perfusion, and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology were surveyed using a standardized survey instrument that examined clinical practices and responses to the Guidelines. A total of 1402 surveys from 1061 institutions principally in the United States (677 institutions) and Canada (34 institutions) were returned, a 32% response rate. There was wide distribution of the Guidelines with 78% of anesthesiologists and 67% of perfusionists reporting having read all, part, or a summary of the Guidelines. However, only 20% of respondents reported that an institutional discussion had taken place as a result of the Guidelines, and only 14% of respondents reported that an institutional monitoring group had been formed. There was wide variability in current preoperative testing, perfusion, surgical, and pharmacological practices reported by respondents. Twenty-six percent of respondents reported 1 or more practice changes in response to the Guidelines. The changes made were reported to be highly (9%) or somewhat (31%) effective in reducing overall transfusion rates. Only 4 of 38 Guideline recommendations were reported by >5% of respondents to have been changed in response to the Guidelines. Wide variation in clinical practices of cardiac surgery was reported. Little change in clinical practices

  7. Recommendations of «not-to-do»: Proposals of the Spanish Association of Surgeons to the project «Commitment to quality of scientific societies».

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Aledo, Víctor; Romero Simó, Manuel; Balibrea, José M; Badia, Josep M

    2016-10-01

    The initiative of the Spanish Ministry of Health «Commitment to quality of scientific societies», aims to reduce unnecessary interventions of healthcare professionals. The Spanish Association of Surgeons has selected 22 experts from the different sections that have participated in the identification of 26 proposals «do not do» to be ordered by the expected impact its implementation would have according to the GRADE methodology. From these proposals, the Delphi technique was used to select 5 recommendations presented in more detail in this article. The 5 selected recommendations are: Do not perform cholecystectomy in patients with asymptomatic cholelithiasis; do not keep bladder catheterization more than 48hours; do not extend antibiotic prophylaxis treatments more than 24hours after a surgical procedure; do not perform routine antibiotic prophylaxis for uncomplicated clean and no prosthetic surgery; and do not use antibiotics postoperatively after uncomplicated appendicitis. The Spanish Association of Surgeons's participation in this campaign has allowed a reflection on those activities that do not add value in the field of surgery and it is expected that the spread of this process serves to reduce its performance. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Expert Consensus of the Association of Cardiovascular Interventions of the Polish Cardiac Society and the Polish Society of Cardio-Thoracic Surgeons, approved by the Board of the Polish Cardiac Society….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, Radosław; Zembala, Michał O; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Jagielak, Dariusz; Witkowski, Adam; Suwalski, Piotr; Dudek, Dariusz; Olszówka, Piotr; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Przybylski, Roman; Gil, Robert; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Lesiak, Maciej; Sadowski, Jerzy; Dobrzycki, Sławomir; Ochała, Andrzej; Hoffman, Piotr; Kapelak, Bogusław; Kaźmierczak, Jarosław; Jasiński, Marek; Stępińska, Janina; Szymański, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Kochman, Janusz; Grygier, Marek; Zembala, Marian; Legutko, Jacek; Różański, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis have a poor prognosis with medical management alone, and surgical aortic valve replacement can improve symptoms and survival. In recent years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been demonstrated to improve survival in inoperable patients and to be an alternative treatment in patients in whom the risk of surgical morbidity or mortality is high or intermediate. A representative expert committee, summoned by the Association of Cardiovascular Interventions of the Polish Cardiac Society (ACVI) and the Polish Society of Cardio-Thoracic Surgeons, devel-oped this Consensus Statement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation. It endorses the important role of a multi-disciplinary "TAVI team" in selecting patients for TAVI and defines operator and institutional requirements fundamental to the establish-ment of a successful TAVI programme. The article summarises current evidence and provides specific recommendations on organisation and conduct of transcatheter treatment of patients with aortic valve disease in Poland.

  9. Working Conditions and Lifestyle of Female Surgeons Affiliated to the Japan Neurosurgical Society: Findings of Individual and Institutional Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Takamitsu; Shibui, Soichiro; Kato, Yoko; Matsumura, Akira; Yamasaki, Mami; Date, Isao; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Satoshi; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Nakao, Naoyuki; Sakurada, Kaori; Shimokawa, Shoko; Kayama, Takamasa

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the working conditions of female neurosurgeons in Japan, two surveys were conducted by The Japan Neurosurgical Society: one involving female neurosurgeons themselves and the other involving the chiefs of neurosurgical departments. The responses were received from 224 (43.8%) female neurosurgeons and 496 (61.2%) departmental chiefs. About half (50.2%) of the female neurosurgeons were married and 39.2% had children (average number of children, 1.27). Their work was full-time in 80.6% of cases; on average, they worked 51.9 h per week, had night duty 2.8 times per month, and had 5.7 days off per month. Many of them stated that they were satisfied with their job status, but about half of them reported difficulty in maintaining a correct work-life balance. Among the institutions surveyed, 29% had female neurosurgeons. The survey of departmental chiefs revealed that the proxies for maternity leave were not available at most institutions, and that there was only limited availability of night child care (41%) or sick child care (39%); female neurosurgeons did not appear to be well-informed of these support systems. These findings suggest that apart from systematic approaches already in place, female neurosurgeons would prefer to have more understanding from their peers and chiefs.

  10. [Final declaration of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology concerning the participation of psychiatrists in executions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    To begin with, this author has reviewed papers addressing the issue around the participation of psychiatrists in legal executions. The questions of reasoning for the exclusion of the mentally incompetent from execution, what exactly constitutes "competency to be executed," and whether to assess a criminal's competency for execution or to offer treatment to death row inmates who have been found incompetent are under debate. Then, making known the temporary declaration of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology, the author has told that it should insist in the final declaration as follows: First, the secretiveness with which the Ministry of Justice and the correctional facilities in Japan handle the death penalty cases should be abolished. Second, in the present situation of the medical care in Japanese penal facilities, the employed psychiatrists should not be involved in the examination or the treatment of the death row inmates. Third, nevertheless the psychiatrist should not examine whether the inmate is competent to be executed in principle, this indifference may bring on the execution of the incompetent in present situation of Japan. Forth, it is not permitted ethically to offer the medical treatment to restore the inmate's competency. Fifth, because the Japanese death penalty confronts the false charges, if the capital punishment case requesting for retrial or preparing it reveal mentally abnormal and the condition is so severe that the inmate cannot assist legal counsel appropriately, the inmate should be transferred to hospital to be provided treatment. And finally the inmate whose competency is doubted should automatically be commuted to life imprisonment.

  11. Readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganta, Abhishek; Yi, Paul H; Hussein, Khalil; Frank, Rachel M

    2014-04-01

    Although studies have revealed high readability levels of orthopedic patient education materials, no study has evaluated sports medicine-related patient education materials. We conducted a study to assess the readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). All sports medicine patient education articles available online in 2012 from the AAOS and the AOSSM, including the Stop Sports Injuries Campaign (STOP), were identified, and their readability was assessed with the Flesch-Kinkaid (FK) readability test. Mean overall FK grade level of the 170 articles reviewed (104 from AAOS, 36 from AOSSM, 30 from STOP) was 10.2. Mean FK levels for the 3 sources were 9.5 (AAOS), 11.0 (AOSSM), and 11.5 (STOP) (P = .16). Fifteen (8.8%) of the 170 articles had a readability level at or below eighth grade (average reading level of US adults); only 2 (1.2%) of the 170 articles were at or below the recommended sixth-grade level. The majority of sports medicine-related patient education materials from AAOS and AOSSM had reading levels higher than recommended, indicating that the majority of the patient population may find it difficult to comprehend these articles.

  12. Solving the organ shortage crisis: the 7th annual American Society of Transplant Surgeons' State-of-the-Art Winter Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, E A; Sung, R S; Allan, J; Kinkhabwala, M; Melancon, J K; Roberts, J P

    2008-04-01

    The 2007 American Society of Transplant Surgeons' (ASTS) State-of-the-Art Winter Symposium entitled, 'Solving the Organ Shortage Crisis' explored ways to increase the supply of donor organs to meet the challenge of increasing waiting lists and deaths while awaiting transplantation. While the increasing use of organs previously considered marginal, such as those from expanded criteria donors (ECD) or donors after cardiac death (DCD) has increased the number of transplants from deceased donors, these transplants are often associated with inferior outcomes and higher costs. The need remains for innovative ways to increase both deceased and living donor transplants. In addition to increasing ECD and DCD utilization, increasing use of deceased donors with certain types of infections such as Hepatitis B and C, and increasing use of living donor liver, lung and intestinal transplants may also augment the organ supply. The extent by which donors may be offered incentives for donation, and the practical, ethical and legal implications of compensating organ donors were also debated. The expanded use of nonstandard organs raises potential ethical considerations about appropriate recipient selection, informed consent and concerns that the current regulatory environment discourages and penalizes these efforts.

  13. Does patient gender affect outcomes after concomitant coronary artery bypass graft and aortic valve replacement? An Australian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons Database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Akshat; Poh, Chin-Leng; Dinh, Diem T; Reid, Christopher M; Smith, Julian A; Shardey, Gilbert C; Newcomb, Andrew E

    2011-01-01

    Women undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery have been previously shown to be at an independently increased risk for post-operative morbidity and mortality. However, there are considerably less data on whether this trend remains true in patients undergoing concomitant aortic valve replacement (AVR) and CABG surgery. The aim of our study was to investigate this pertinent issue. Data obtained between June 2001 and December 2009 by the Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons Cardiac Surgery Database Program were retrospectively analysed. Demographic, operative data and post-operative complications were compared between male and female patients using χ(2) and t tests. Long-term survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and the log-rank test. Independent risk factors for short- and long-term mortality were identified using binary logistic and Cox regression, respectively. Concomitant AVR and CABG surgery was undertaken in 2,563 patients; 31.8% were female. Female patients were older (mean age 76 vs. 73 years; p gender was independently associated with post-operative myocardial infarction (p = 0.022) and red blood cell transfusion (p difference in long-term survival between men and women on multivariate analysis (p = 0.413). Female gender is not associated with poorer short- or long-term outcomes after concomitant CABG and AVR surgery. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Quality criteria in bariatric surgery: Consensus review and recommendations of the Spanish Association of Surgeons and the Spanish Society of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabench Pereferrer, Fátima; Domínguez-Adame Lanuza, Eduardo; Ibarzabal, Ainitze; Socas Macias, María; Valentí Azcárate, Víctor; García Ruiz de Gordejuela, Amador; García-Moreno Nisa, Francisca; González Fernández, Jesús; Vilallonga Puy, Ramón; Vilarrasa García, Nuria; Sánchez Santos, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has proven to be highly effective in controlling obesity and metabolic syndrome; the results of this surgery are not only expressed in terms of weight loss, but also in terms of resolution of comorbidities, improved quality of life and complications. The different parameters used to measure these outcomes require uniformity and reference patterns. Therefore, it is essential to identify those indicators and quality criteria that are helpful in defining the «best practice» principles in bariatric surgery. In this regard, the Section of Obesity of the Spanish Association of Surgeons, in collaboration with the Spanish Society for Bariatric Surgery (SECO), present as an objective to identify the key points that define «quality» in this type of surgery. We describe the main indicators based on the published literature as well as the criteria for referral of the main comorbidities according to the evidence found and grades of recommendation. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. A benchmarking project on the quality of previous guidelines about the management of malignant pleural effusion from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Pleural Diseases Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolaccini, Luca; Bedetti, Benedetta; Brunelli, Alessandro; Marinova, Katerina; Raveglia, Federico; Rocco, Gaetano; Shargall, Yaron; Solli, Piergiorgio; Varela, Gonzalo; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Kuzdzal, Jaroslaw; Massard, Gilbert; Ruffini, Enrico; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Martinez-Barenys, Carlos; Opitz, Isabelle; Batirel, Hasan F; Toker, Alper; Scarci, Marco

    2017-08-01

    In the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) survey about management of malignant pleural effusions (MPE), 56% of respondents are not informed of any relevant clinical guidelines and 52%, who are aware of the existence of guidelines, declared that they are in need of updating or revision. The ESTS Pleural Diseases Working Group developed a benchmarking project on quality of previous guidelines on the management of MPE. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument was used to assess each guideline. Each item was scored on a 7-point scale. Scores for each domain were calculated. Economic data for the nations which have issued the guidelines were collected from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development health statistics database. Six guidelines fitted the inclusion criteria and were assessed. Five out of 6 guidelines were produced by a multinational collaboration. Observers would recommend only 2 guidelines with minimal modification. Two areas that received the best score were clarity of presentation and scope and purpose (objectives and health questions target population). The applicability of guideline domain had the lowest score. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that clarity of presentation, international guidelines and publication through medical journal were related to improved scores. A strong correlation was observed between the measures of economic status. The quality of guidelines assessed by the AGREE II criteria was found to be extremely variable. Guidelines achieving higher AGREE II scores were more likely to come from the European Union with the direct involvement of scientific societies in their development. It was also recognized that some fundamental unanswered questions remain about the management of MPE.

  16. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem; Dehmer, Greg J; Doherty, John U; Schoenhagen, Paul; Amin, Zahid; Bashore, Thomas M; Boyle, Andrew; Calnon, Dennis A; Carabello, Blase; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Conte, John; Desai, Milind; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Ferrari, Victor A; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Mehrotra, Praveen; Nazarian, Saman; Reece, T Brett; Tamarappoo, Balaji; Tzou, Wendy S; Wong, John B; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2017-10-20

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities. Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario. The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  17. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem

    2017-12-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities.Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario.The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  18. The Perioperative Use of Dexmedetomidine in Pediatric Patients with Congenital Heart Disease: An Analysis from the Congenital Cardiac Anesthesia Society-Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Disease Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lawrence I; Twite, Mark; Gulack, Brian; Hill, Kevin; Kim, Sunghee; Vener, David F

    2016-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a selective α-2 receptor agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic for pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Although several smaller, single-center studies suggest that dexmedetomidine use is gaining traction in the perioperative setting in children with CHD, there are limited multicenter data, with little understanding of the variation in use across age ranges, procedural complexity, and centers. The aim of this study was to use the Congenital Cardiac Anesthesia Society-Society of Thoracic Surgeons (CCAS-STS) registry to describe patient- and center-level variability in the use of dexmedetomidine in the perioperative setting in children with heart disease. To describe the use of dexmedetomidine in patients for CHD surgery, we analyzed all index cardiopulmonary bypass operations entered in the CCAS-STS database from 2010 to 2013. Patient and operative characteristics were compared between those who received intraoperative dexmedetomidine and those who did not. Selective outcomes associated with dexmedetomidine use were also described. Of the 12,142 operations studied, 3600 (29.6%) received perioperative dexmedetomidine (DEX) and 8542 did not receive the drug (NoDEX). Patient characteristics were different between the 2 groups with the DEX group generally exhibiting both lower patient and procedural risk factors. Patients who received dexmedetomidine were more likely to have a lower level of Society of Thoracic Surgeons mortality complexity than patient who did not receive it. Consistent with their overall lower risk profile, children in the DEX group also demonstrated improved outcomes compared with patients who did not receive dexmedetomidine. We described the growing use of dexmedetomidine in children anesthetized for surgical repair of CHD. Dexmedetomidine appears to be preferentially given to older and larger children who are undergoing less complex CHD surgery. We believe

  19. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Emerging Therapies for the Treatment of Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gompel, Jamie J; Agazzi, Siviero; Carlson, Matthew L; Adewumi, Dare A; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G; Uhm, Joon H; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2017-12-20

    vestibular schwannomas. Level 3: Preoperative vestibular rehabilitation is recommended to aid in postoperative mobility after vestibular schwannoma surgery. Level 3: Preoperative gentamicin ablation of the vestibular apparatus should be considered to improve postoperative mobility after vestibular schwannoma surgery. Does endoscopic assistance make a difference in resection or outcomes in patients with vestibular schwannomas? Vestibular schwannoma patients, who are surgical candidates. Inclusion in this analysis required resection utilizing the endoscope, either as the primary operative visualization or microscopic assistance with more than 20 patients treated. Level 3: Endoscopic assistance is a surgical technique that the surgeon may choose to use in order to aid in visualization.  The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients-vestibular-schwannoma/chapter_9.

  20. Readability of patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarudeen, Sameer; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2008-01-01

    While experts recommend that the readability of patient education materials should be less than the sixth grade level, the available information pertaining to orthopaedic diseases may be excessively complex for some to read and comprehend. The Flesch-Kincaid grade level is the most widely used tool to evaluate the readability score of a given text, with a lower grade level suggesting easier readability. The goal of our study was to assess the readability of pediatric orthopaedic patient education materials that were developed by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) and were accessible to the general public through the Internet. All articles from the "Children" section of the patient education library, "Your Orthopaedic Connection," on the AAOS web site and the "Parent/Patient" section on the POSNA web site were identified. The Flesch-Kincaid grade level of each article was determined with use of Microsoft Office Word software. The mean grade levels of articles that were available in 2001 were compared with those accessible in 2007. Fifty-seven unique articles were available in 2007 on both web sites compared with twenty-five articles available in 2001. The readability score of only one (2%) of the currently available articles was less than sixth grade level. The mean Flesch-Kincaid grade level of the currently available articles was 8.9 compared with 8.7 for the articles available in 2001 (p = 0.71). Our findings suggest that most of the pediatric orthopaedic patient education materials available on the AAOS and POSNA web sites have readability scores that may be too high, making comprehension difficult for a substantial portion of the United States population.

  1. Ongoing evolution of practice gaps in gastrointestinal and endoscopic surgery: 2014 report from the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) Continuing Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Elisabeth C; Paige, John T; Bergman, Simon; Hori, Yumi; Schwarz, Erin; Farrell, Timothy M

    2015-11-01

    In an effort to fulfill the charge to develop and maintain a comprehensive educational program to serve the members of the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES), the SAGES Continuing Education Committee reports a summary of findings related to the evaluation of the 2014 SAGES annual meeting. All attendees to the 2014 annual meeting had the opportunity to complete an immediate post-meeting questionnaire as part of their continuing medical education (CME) certification, and identify up to two learning themes, answer questions related to potential practice change items based on these learning themes, and complete a needs assessment for relevant learning topics for future meetings. In addition, participants in the postgraduate and hands-on courses were asked to complete questions about case volume and comfort level related to procedures/topics in those courses. All respondents to this initial survey were sent a 3-month follow-up questionnaire in which they were asked how successful they had been in the implementation of the targeted practice changes and what, if any, barriers were encountered. Descriptive statistical analysis of de-identified data was undertaken. SAGES University attendees respond to a post-test and post-activity evaluation. Response rates were 43 and 31 % for CME-eligible attendees/respondents for the immediate post-meeting and 3-month follow-up questionnaires, respectively. Top learning themes for respondents were foregut, hernia, bariatric, and colorectal. Improving minimally invasive surgical (MIS) technique and managing complications related to MIS procedures were top intended practice changes. Partial implementation was common with top barriers including lack of resources and lack of time. Desired topics for future meetings included management of complications, enhanced recovery after surgery, introduction of new procedures into clinical practice, and re-operative surgery. The SAGES 2014 annual meeting analysis

  2. Evolution of practice gaps in gastrointestinal and endoscopic surgery: 2012 report from the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) Continuing Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, John T; Farrell, Timothy M; Bergman, Simon; Selim, Niazy; Harzman, Alan E; Schwarz, Erin; Hori, Yumi; Levine, Jason; Scott, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    In an effort to fulfill its charge to develop and maintain a comprehensive educational program to serve the members of the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES), the SAGES Continuing Education Committee (CEC) reports a summary of findings related to its evaluation of the 2012 SAGES annual meeting. All attendees to the 2012 annual meeting had the opportunity to complete an immediate postmeeting questionnaire as part of their continuing medical education (CME) certification in which they identified up to two learning themes, answered questions related to potential practice change items that are based on those learning themes, and complete a needs assessment related to important learning topics for future meetings. In addition, participants in the postgraduate and hands-on courses were asked to complete questions about case volume and comfort levels related to procedures/topics in those courses. All respondents to this initial survey were sent a 3-month follow-up questionnaire in which they were asked how successfully they had implemented the intended practice changes and what, if any, barriers they encountered. Postgraduate and hands-on course participants completed case volume and comfort level questions. Descriptive statistical analysis of this deidentified data was undertaken. Response rates were 42% and 56% for CME-eligible attendees/respondents for the immediate postmeeting and 3-month follow-up questionnaires, respectively. Top learning themes for respondents were Bariatric, Hernia, Foregut, and Colorectal. Improving minimally invasive surgical (MIS) technique and managing complications related to MIS procedures were top intended practice changes. Partial implementation was common with top barriers including cost restrictions, lack of institutional support, and lack of time. The 2012 annual meeting analysis provides insight into educational needs among respondents and will help with planning content for future meetings.

  3. Contemporary impact of state certificate-of-need regulations for cardiac surgery: an analysis using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' National Cardiac Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSesa, Verdi J; O'Brien, Sean M; Welke, Karl F; Beland, Sarah M; Haan, Constance K; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary S; Peterson, Eric D

    2006-11-14

    Prior research using administrative data associated certificate-of-need (CON) regulation for open heart surgery with higher hospital coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) volume and lower CABG operative mortality rates in elderly patients. It is unclear whether these findings apply in a general population and after controlling for detailed clinical characteristics and region. Using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' (STS) National Cardiac Surgery Database, we examined isolated CABG surgery volume, operative mortality, and the composite end point of operative mortality or major morbidity for the years 2000 to 2003. The presence of CON regulations for open heart surgery was ascertained from the National Directory of the American Health Policy Association and by contacting CON administrators. Results were analyzed nationally, by state, and by region (West, Northeast, Midwest, South) and were adjusted for clinical factors and both population density and region with mixed-effects hierarchical logistic regression models. During 2000 to 2003, there were 314,710 isolated CABG surgeries performed at 294 STS hospitals in CON states (n=27, including Washington, DC) and 280 512 procedures at 343 STS hospitals in non-CON states (n=24). Patient clinical characteristics were similar among CON and non-CON hospitals. States with CON regulations tended to have higher population densities and had significantly higher median hospital annual CABG volumes in each of the years 2000 to 2003 (Pnational Medicare database. CON states have significantly higher hospital CABG surgery volumes but similar mortality compared with non-CON states. CON regulation alone is not a sufficient mechanism to ensure quality of care for CABG surgery.

  4. A risk score to predict the incidence of prolonged air leak after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy: An analysis from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Cecilia; Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Salati, Michele; Szanto, Zalan; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    The study objective was to develop an aggregate risk score for predicting the occurrence of prolonged air leak after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy from patients registered in the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons database. A total of 5069 patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (July 2007 to August 2015) were analyzed. Exclusion criteria included sublobar resections or pneumonectomies, lung resection associated with chest wall or diaphragm resections, sleeve resections, and need for postoperative assisted mechanical ventilation. Prolonged air leak was defined as an air leak more than 5 days. Several baseline and surgical variables were tested for a possible association with prolonged air leak using univariable and logistic regression analyses, determined by bootstrap resampling. Predictors were proportionally weighed according to their regression estimates (assigning 1 point to the smallest coefficient). Prolonged air leak was observed in 504 patients (9.9%). Three variables were found associated with prolonged air leak after logistic regression: male gender (P classes with an incremental risk of prolonged air leak (P class A (score 0 points, 1493 patients) 6.3% with prolonged air leak, class B (score 1 point, 2240 patients) 10% with prolonged air leak, class C (score 2 points, 1219 patients) 13% with prolonged air leak, and class D (score >2 points, 117 patients) 25% with prolonged air leak. An aggregate risk score was created to stratify the incidence of prolonged air leak after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy. The score can be used for patient counseling and to identify those patients who can benefit from additional intraoperative preventative measures. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Variation in ventilation time after coronary artery bypass grafting: an analysis from the society of thoracic surgeons adult cardiac surgery database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; He, Xia; O'Brien, Sean M; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Ferraris, Victor A; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M

    2013-09-01

    Short postoperative ventilation times are accepted as a marker of quality. This analysis assesses center level variation in postoperative ventilation time in a subset of patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In 2009 and 2010, 325,129 patients in the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database underwent isolated CABG. Patients were excluded if they were intubated before entering the operating room, required ventilation for greater than 24 hours, or had missing data on key covariates. The final study cohort was 274,231 isolated CABG patients from 1,008 centers. Bayesian hierarchical models were used to assess between-center variation in ventilation time and to explore the effect of center-level covariates. Analyses were performed with and without adjusting for case mix. After adjusting for case mix, the ratio of median ventilator time at the 90th percentile of the center-level distribution compared with the tenth percentile was 9.0:5.0=1.8 (95% credible interval: 1.79 to 1.85). This ratio illustrates the scale of between-center differences: centers above the 90th percentile have a ventilation time of at least 1.8 times that of centers below the tenth percentile. Smaller hospital volume, presence of a residency program, and some census regions were associated with longer ventilation times. After adjustment for severity of illness, substantial inter-center variation exists in postoperative ventilation time in this subset of patients undergoing isolated CABG. This finding represents an opportunity for multi-institutional quality improvement initiatives designed to limit variations in ventilator management and achieve the shortest possible ventilation times for all patients, thus benefiting both clinical outcomes and resource utilization. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 2016 Laboratory guidelines for postvasectomy semen analysis: Association of Biomedical Andrologists, the British Andrology Society and the British Association of Urological Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P; Woodward, B J; Muneer, A; Kirkman-Brown, J C

    2016-07-01

    Post-vasectomy semen analysis (PVSA) is the procedure used to establish whether sperm are present in the semen following a vasectomy. PVSA is presently carried out by a wide variety of individuals, ranging from doctors and nurses in general practitioner (GP) surgeries to specialist scientists in andrology laboratories, with highly variable results.Key recommendations are that: (1) PVSA should take place a minimum of 12 weeks after surgery and after a minimum of 20 ejaculations. (2) Laboratories should routinely examine samples within 4 h of production if assessing for the presence of sperm. If non-motile sperm are observed, further samples must be examined within 1 h of production. (3) Assessment of a single sample is acceptable to confirm vasectomy success if all recommendations and laboratory methodology are met and no sperm are observed. Clearance can then be given. (4) The level for special clearance should be <100 000/mL non-motile sperm. Special clearance cannot be provided if any motile sperm are observed and should only be given after assessment of two samples in full accordance with the methods contained within these guidelines. Surgeons are responsible both preoperatively and postoperatively for the counselling of patients and their partners regarding complications and the possibility of late recanalisation after clearance. These 2016 guidelines replace the 2002 British Andrology Society (BAS) laboratory guidelines and should be regarded as definitive for the UK in the provision of a quality PVSA service, accredited to ISO 15189:2012, as overseen by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. The Spanish Society of Neurology's official clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy. Special considerations in epilepsy: comorbidities, women of childbearing age, and elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri Llerda, J A; Suller Marti, A; de la Peña Mayor, P; Martínez Ferri, M; Poza Aldea, J J; Gomez Alonso, J; Mercadé Cerdá, J M

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of some population groups (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly) may limit epilepsy management. Antiepileptic treatment in these patients may require adjustments. We searched articles in Pubmed, clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy, and recommendations by the most relevant medical societies regarding epilepsy in special situations (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly). Evidence and recommendations are classified according to the prognostic criteria of Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine (2001) and the European Federation of Neurological Societies (2004) for therapeutic interventions. Epilepsy treatment in special cases of comorbidities must be selected properly to improve efficacy with the fewest side effects. Adjusting antiepileptic medication and/or hormone therapy is necessary for proper seizure management in catamenial epilepsy. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AED) during pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects and may affect fetal growth and/or cognitive development. Postpartum breastfeeding is recommended, with monitoring for adverse effects if sedative AEDs are used. Finally, the elderly are prone to epilepsy, and diagnostic and treatment characteristics in this group differ from those of other age groups. Although therapeutic limitations may be more frequent in older patients due to comorbidities, they usually respond better to lower doses of AEDs than do other age groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulatory Advocacy Update: American Society of Plastic Surgeons Comments in Response to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance Documents on Human Cell and Tissue Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, J Peter; D'Amico, Richard A; Rodriguez, Ricardo; Coleman, Sydney R; Cederna, Paul; Glasberg, Scot; Neumeister, Michael; Song, David H; Butler, Charles; Hume, Keith M

    2017-05-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration released draft guidance documents on human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products regulations. These proposed guidance documents can impact the practice of plastic surgery in the area of tissue grafting procedures. This article describes the relevant issues in these draft guidance documents, and presents the comments provided to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

  9. A Decade’s Experience With Quality Improvement in Cardiac Surgery Using the Veterans Affairs and Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Frederick L.; Shroyer, A. Laurie W.; Hammermeister, Karl; Edwards, Fred H.; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Dziuban, Stanley W.; Cleveland, Joseph C.; Clark, Richard E.; McDonald, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Objective To review the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) national databases over the past 10 years to evaluate their relative similarities and differences, to appraise their use as quality improvement tools, and to assess their potential to facilitate improvements in quality of cardiac surgical care. Summary Background Data The VA developed a mandatory risk-adjusted database in 1987 to monitor outcomes of cardiac surgery at all VA medical centers. In 1989 the STS developed a voluntary risk-adjusted database to help members assess quality and outcomes in their individual programs and to facilitate improvements in quality of care. Methods A short data form on every veteran operated on at each VA medical center is completed and transmitted electronically for analysis of unadjusted and risk-adjusted death and complications, as well as length of stay. Masked, confidential semiannual reports are then distributed to each program’s clinical team and the associated administrator. These reports are also reviewed by a national quality oversight committee. Thus, VA data are used both locally for quality improvement and at the national level with quality surveillance. The STS dataset (217 core fields and 255 extended fields) is transmitted for each patient semiannually to the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) for warehousing, analysis, and distribution. Site-specific reports are produced with regional and national aggregate comparisons for unadjusted and adjusted surgical deaths and complications, as well as length of stay for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valvular procedures, and valvular/CABG procedures. Both databases use the logistic regression modeling approach. Data for key processes of care are also captured in both databases. Research projects are frequently carried out using each database. Results More than 74,000 and 1.6 million cardiac surgical patients have been entered into the VA and STS databases

  10. Evidence-based guideline update: medical treatment of infantile spasms. Report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Committee of the Child Neurology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, C Y; Mackay, M T; Weiss, S K; Stephens, D; Adams-Webber, T; Ashwal, S; Snead, O C

    2012-06-12

    To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology/Child Neurology Society practice parameter on treatment of infantile spasms in children. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 2002 to 2011 and searches of reference lists of retrieved articles were performed. Sixty-eight articles were selected for detailed review; 26 were included in the analysis. RECOMMENDATIONS were based on a 4-tiered classification scheme combining pre-2002 evidence and more recent evidence. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether other forms of corticosteroids are as effective as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. However, low-dose ACTH is probably as effective as high-dose ACTH. ACTH is more effective than vigabatrin (VGB) for short-term treatment of children with infantile spasms (excluding those with tuberous sclerosis complex). There is insufficient evidence to show that other agents and combination therapy are effective for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. Short lag time to treatment leads to better long-term developmental outcome. Successful short-term treatment of cryptogenic infantile spasms with ACTH or prednisolone leads to better long-term developmental outcome than treatment with VGB. Low-dose ACTH should be considered for treatment of infantile spasms. ACTH or VGB may be useful for short-term treatment of infantile spasms, with ACTH considered preferentially over VGB. Hormonal therapy (ACTH or prednisolone) may be considered for use in preference to VGB in infants with cryptogenic infantile spasms, to possibly improve developmental outcome. A shorter lag time to treatment of infantile spasms with either hormonal therapy or VGB possibly improves long-term developmental outcomes.

  11. Do plastic surgeons have cosmetic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Gurunluoglu, Aslin

    2009-12-01

    Thoughts and attitudes of plastic surgeons about having cosmetic surgery on themselves remain obscure for the most part and pose an attractive subject to study. A survey was distributed to a random sample of 2635 American Society of Plastic Surgeons member and candidate member surgeons to determine plastic surgeons' interest in both minimally invasive cosmetic procedures and cosmetic surgical procedures, selection of facility type, selection of surgeon, and their satisfaction level. There were 276 responses. Sixty-two percent of the plastic surgeons had undergone at least one type of minimally invasive cosmetic procedure. Female plastic surgeons had significantly more minimally invasive cosmetic procedures compared with male plastic surgeons (84.9 versus 57 percent; p cosmetic surgery. The most common cosmetic surgical procedure was liposuction of the trunk and/or extremity (18.6 percent). Male plastic surgeons were more likely to have a procedure than men in the general population, and female plastic surgeons were less likely to have breast augmentation than the general population. The percentage of operations conducted by a plastic surgeon was 88.2 percent. The percentage performed by a nationally known surgeon was 45.3 percent; 75.9 percent of plastic surgeons selected a surgeon who was certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. The satisfaction rate was 90 percent. The survey provides insight on the stance of American Society of Plastic Surgeons member and candidate member surgeons on the subject. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first survey designed for this purpose.

  12. [Aetiological classification of ischaemic strokes: comparison of the new A-S-C-O classification and the classification by the Spanish Society of Neurology's Cerebrovascular Disease Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino García, P; García Pastor, A; García Arratibel, A; Vicente Peracho, G; Rodriguez Cruz, P M; Pérez Sánchez, J R; Díaz Otero, F; Vázquez Alén, P; Villanueva Osorio, J A; Gil Núñez, A

    2013-09-01

    The A-S-C-O classification may be better than other methods for classifying ischaemic stroke by aetiology. Our aims are to describe A-S-C-O phenotype distribution (A: atherosclerosis, S: small vessel disease, C: cardiac source, O: other causes; 1: potential cause, 2: causality uncertain, 3: unlikely to be a direct cause although disease is present) and compare them to the Spanish Society of Neurology's Cerebrovascular Disease Study Group (GEECV/SEN) classification. We will also find the degree of concordance between these classification methods and determine whether using the A-S-C-O classification delivers a smaller percentage of strokes of undetermined cause. We analysed those patients with ischaemic stroke admitted to our stroke unit in 2010 with strokes that were classified according to GEECV/SEN and A-S-C-O criteria. The study included 496 patients. The percentages of strokes caused by atherosclerosis and small vessel disease according to GEECV/SEN criteria were higher than the percentages for potential atherosclerotic stroke (A1) (14.1 vs. 11.9%; P=.16) and potential small vessel stroke (S1) (14.3 vs. 3%; P0.8 (unusual causes and O1). Our results show that GEECV/SEN and A-S-C-O classifications are neither fully comparable nor consistent. Using the A-S-C-O classification provided additional information on co-morbidities and delivered a smaller percentage of strokes classified as having an undetermined cause. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. The ageing surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Edward A

    2011-03-01

    Why do some surgeons retire (or not), and perhaps more importantly, when should some surgeons retire? Interviews were conducted with 21 senior plastic surgeons to determine why plastic surgeons choose not to retire. In an effort to answer the second question (When should surgeons retire?), an analogy is constructed between surgeons and commercial airline pilots.

  14. Surgeons and cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J C; Ellis, C; Hamdorf, J

    2003-01-01

    The surgical mind is geared to make important decisions and perform highly skilled tasks. The aim of this review is to explore the cognitive processes that link these actions. The core of this review is derived from a literature search of a computer database (Medline). The surgical image is one of action. However, the effective performance of surgery requires more than mere manual dexterity and it is evident that competent surgeons exhibit the cognitive traits that are held by all experts. The changes that are occurring in surgery indicate a need to place greater emphasis on the cognitive processes that underpin the practice of surgery. It is important that surgeons do not become victims of their own cult image. Copyright 2002 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  16. Robotic surgery training with commercially available simulation systems in 2011: a current review and practice pattern survey from the society of urologic robotic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallas, Costas D; Davis, John W

    2012-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulation has the potential to standardize surgical training for robotic surgery. We sought to evaluate all commercially available VR robotic simulators. A MEDLINE(®) literature search was performed of all applicable keywords. Available VR simulators were evaluated with regard to face, content, and construct validation. Additionally, a survey was e-mailed to all members of the Endourological Society, querying the pervasiveness of VR simulators in robotic surgical training. Finally, each company was e-mailed to ask for a price quote for their respective system. There are four VR robotic surgical simulators currently available: RoSS™, dV-Trainer™, SEP Robot™, and da Vinci(®) Skills Simulator™. Each system is represented in the literature and all possess varying degrees of face, content, and construct validity. Although all systems have basic skill sets with performance analysis and metrics software, most do not contain procedural components. When evaluating the results of our survey, most respondents did not possess a VR simulator although almost all believed there to be great potential for these devices in robotic surgical training. With the exception of the SEP Robot, all VR simulators are similar in price. VR simulators have a definite role in the future of robotic surgical training. Although the simulators target technical components of training, their largest impact will be appreciated when incorporated into a comprehensive educational curriculum.

  17. Thromboprophylaxis among Australasian colorectal surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Philip; Burbury, Kate; Lingaratnam, Senthil; Lynch, A Craig; Mackay, John; Heriot, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Thromboembolism is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with colorectal cancer, but thromboprophylaxis (TP) is underutilized. Current guidelines do not make specific recommendations for colorectal cancer patients and provide minimal guidance for the ambulatory setting, although emerging evidence suggests TP may be warranted during chemoradiotherapy or in the extended post-operative phase. A survey of Australasian colorectal surgeons was therefore performed to assess current TP practice and attitudes. An online survey was sent to 204 surgeons who were members of the Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand. One hundred twenty-eight surgeons (63%) completed the survey. Most surgeons consult available guidelines, and where recommendations are made, current practice is in line with them. Lack of data, lack of ownership, logistical issues and an absence of guideline recommendations currently prevent surgeons from instituting TP in the neoadjuvant treatment period. Fifty-four per cent of surgeons currently prescribe TP after hospital discharge; those that do not, cite logistical issues as the main constraint. More data on thromboembolism risk during various treatment phases are required and should be promulgated in tumour-specific guidelines. Logistical barriers to adopting TP in the ambulatory setting should be addressed. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Adult Spinal Deformity Knowledge in Orthopedic Spine Surgeons: Impact of Fellowship Training, Experience, and Practice Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabel, Zachary J; Hart, Robert A; Clark, Aaron P; Park, Sara Heejung; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Justin S; Kelly, Michael P; DePasse, J Mason; Gupta, Munish C; Ames, Christopher P; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-01-01

    Survey study. The purpose of this paper was to assess the level of adult spine deformity (ASD) knowledge among orthopedic spine surgeons and identify areas for improvement in spine surgery training. ASD is increasingly encountered in spine surgery practice. While ASD knowledge among neurosurgeons has been evaluated, ASD knowledge among orthopedic spine surgeons has not previously been reported. A survey of orthopedic spine surgeon members of North American Spine Society (NASS) was conducted to assess level of spine surgery training, practice experience, and spinal deformity knowledge base. The survey used was previously completed by a group of neurologic surgeons with published results. The survey used 11 questions developed and agreed upon by experienced spinal deformity surgeons. Complete responses were received from 413 orthopedic spine surgeons. The overall correct-answer rate was 69.0%. Surgeons in practice for less than 10 years had a higher correct-answer rate compared to those who have practiced for 10 years or more (74% vs. 67%; p = .000003). Surgeons with 75% or more of their practice dedicated to spine had a higher overall correct rate compared to surgeons whose practice is less than 75% spine (71% vs. 63%; p = .000029). Completion of spine fellowship was associated with a higher overall correct-answer rate compared to respondents who did not complete a spine fellowship (71% vs. 59%; p spine fellowship and having a dedicated spine surgery practice were significantly associated with improved performance on this ASD knowledge survey. Unlike neurosurgeons, orthopedic spine surgeons who have practiced for less than 10 years performed better than those who have practiced for more than 10 years. Ongoing emphasis on spine deformity education should be emphasized to improve adult spinal deformity knowledge base. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-10-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes and stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing SIHD and acute coronary syndromes individually. This document presents the AUC for SIHD.Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice. These scenarios included information on symptom status; risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing; coronary disease burden; and, in some scenarios, fractional flow reserve testing, presence or absence of diabetes, and SYNTAX score. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt were affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization.A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range of 4 to 6 indicate that

  20. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  1. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/EACTS/HVS/SCA/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for the Treatment of Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Robert O; Brown, Alan S; Gillam, Linda D; Kapadia, Samir R; Kavinsky, Clifford J; Lindman, Brian R; Mack, Michael J; Thourani, Vinod H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bonow, Robert O; Lindman, Brian R; Beaver, Thomas M; Bradley, Steven M; Carabello, Blase A; Desai, Milind Y; George, Isaac; Green, Philip; Holmes, David R; Johnston, Douglas; Leipsic, Jonathon; Mick, Stephanie L; Passeri, Jonathan J; Piana, Robert N; Reichek, Nathaniel; Ruiz, Carlos E; Taub, Cynthia C; Thomas, James D; Turi, Zoltan G; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology collaborated with the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to develop and evaluate Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This is the first AUC to address the topic of AS and its treatment options, including surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). A number of common patient scenarios experienced in daily practice were developed along with assumptions and definitions for those scenarios, which were all created using guidelines, clinical trial data, and expert opinion in the field of AS. The 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines(1) and its 2017 focused update paper (2) were used as the primary guiding references in developing these indications. The writing group identified 95 clinical scenarios based on patient symptoms and clinical presentation, and up to 6 potential treatment options for those patients. A separate, independent rating panel was asked to score each indication from 1 to 9, with 1-3 categorized as "Rarely Appropriate," 4-6 as "May Be Appropriate," and 7-9 as "Appropriate." After considering factors such as symptom status, left ventricular (LV) function, surgical risk, and the presence of concomitant coronary or other valve disease, the rating panel determined that either SAVR or TAVR is Appropriate in most patients with symptomatic AS at intermediate or high surgical risk; however, situations

  2. Pope John Paul II and the neurological standard for the determination of death: A critical analysis of his address to the Transplantation Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Doyen

    2017-05-01

    The introduction of the "brain death" criterion constitutes a significant paradigm shift in the determination of death. The perception of the public at large is that the Catholic Church has formally endorsed this neurological standard. However, a critical reading of the only magisterial document on this subject, Pope John Paul II's 2000 address, shows that the pope's acceptance of the neurological criterion is conditional in that it entails a twofold requirement. It requires that certain medical presuppositions of the neurological standard are fulfilled, and that its philosophical premise coheres with the Church's teaching on the body-soul union. This article demonstrates that the medical presuppositions are not fulfilled, and that the doctrine of the brain as the central somatic integrator of the body does not cohere either with the current holistic understanding of the human organism or with the Church's Thomistic doctrine of the soul as the form of the body. The concept of "brain death" (the neurological basis for legally declaring a person dead) has caused much controversy since its inception. In this regard, it has been generally perceived that the Catholic Church has officially affirmed the "brain death" criterion. The address of Pope John Paul II in 2000 shows, however, that he only gave it a conditional acceptance, one which requires that several medical and philosophical presuppositions of the "brain death" standard be fulfilled. This article demonstrates, taking into consideration both the empirical evidence and the Church's Thomistic anthropology, that the presuppositions have not been fulfilled.

  3. What is in a name? Oral and maxillofacial surgeon versus oral surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Andre V; Altamirano, Alessandra; Brown, Eric; Shin, Christina J; Tajik, Katayoun; Fu, Emily; Dean, Jeffrey; Herford, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In 1975, the American Society of Oral Surgeons officially changed its name to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. This change was intended to address the specialty's expanding surgical scope. However, today, many health care professionals continue to use the term oral surgeon. This study was undertaken to determine if students' perception of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon's (OMS) surgical scope would change when oral and maxillofacial surgeon was used instead of oral surgeon. This cross-sectional study surveyed undergraduate and dental students' choice of specialist to treat 21 different conditions. The independent variable was the specialty term (oral and maxillofacial surgeon vs oral surgeon). The dependent variables were specialists chosen for the procedure (ear, nose, and throat surgeon; plastic surgeon; OMS or oral surgeon; periodontist; other). The test of proportions (z test) with the Yates correction was performed for data analysis. Of the 280 senior dental students who were surveyed, 258 surveys were included in the study. Dental students' perception of the OMS's surgical scope increased significantly from 51% to 55% when oral and maxillofacial surgeon was used instead of oral surgeon. Of the 530 undergraduate upper division science students who were surveyed, 488 surveys were included in the study. Undergraduate upper division science students' perception of the OMS's surgical scope increased significantly from 23% to 31% when oral and maxillofacial surgeon was used as an option instead of oral surgeon. The use of oral and maxillofacial surgeon increased students' perception of the OMS's surgical scope. This study also suggested that students were not fully aware of the magnitude of the OMS's scope of practice. The current dichotomy and inconsistent use of the specialty's official term adds to the confusion and to misunderstanding. Therefore, OMSs should universally refer to themselves as oral and maxillofacial surgeons and

  4. European risk models for morbidity (EuroLung1) and mortality (EuroLung2) to predict outcome following anatomic lung resections: an analysis from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Salati, Michele; Rocco, Gaetano; Varela, Gonzalo; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Decaluwe, Herbert; Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    To develop models of 30-day mortality and cardiopulmonary morbidity from data on anatomic lung resections deposited in the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) database. Retrospective analysis of 47 960 anatomic lung resections from the ESTS database (July 2007-August 2015) (36 376 lobectomies, 2296 bilobectomies, 5040 pneumonectomies and 4248 segmentectomies). Logistic regression analyses were used to test the association between baseline and surgical variables and morbidity or mortality. Bootstrap resampling was used for internal validation and to check predictors of stability. Variables that occurred in more than 50% of the bootstrap samples were deemed reliable. User-friendly aggregate scores were then created by assigning points to each variable in the model by proportionally weighting the regression coefficients. Patients were grouped in classes of incremental risk according to their scores. Cardiopulmonary morbidity and 30-day mortality rates were 18.4% (8805 patients) and 2.7% (1295 patients). The following variables were reliably associated with morbidity after logistic regression analysis (C-index 0.68): male sex ( P  morbidity risk ( P  morbidity and mortality models can be used to define risk-adjust outcome indicators for auditing quality of care and to counsel patients about their surgical risk.

  5. Management of Recurrent Delayed Neurologic Deficit After Thoracoabdominal Aortic Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutrous, Mina L; Afifi, Rana O; Safi, Hazim J; Estrera, Anthony L

    2016-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit (DND) is a devastating adverse event after thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Multiple adjuncts have been devised to counteract the development of DND, most notably cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman in whom DND developed four times during the first 10 days after her thoracoabdominal aortic operation. This necessitated lumbar drain "weaning" to allow for a slowly rising CSF pressure and preservation of lower extremity motor function. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Find a Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Click here to find out more. Find a Surgeon Locate a surgeon using address, city or ... lead to gum disease. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is a serious and life-threatening condition Learn the risks ...

  7. Effect of Obesity and Underweight Status on Perioperative Outcomes of Congenital Heart Operations in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: An Analysis of Data From the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Michael L; Kim, Sunghee; Hornik, Christoph P; Yerokun, Babatunde A; Matsouaka, Roland A; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Jonas, Richard A

    2017-08-22

    Extreme body mass index (BMI; either very high or very low) has been associated with increased risk of adverse perioperative outcome in adults undergoing cardiac surgery. The effect of BMI on perioperative outcomes in congenital heart disease patients has not been evaluated. A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed studying patients 10 to 35 years of age undergoing a congenital heart disease operation in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2015. The primary outcomes were operative mortality and a composite outcome (1 or more of operative mortality, major adverse event, prolonged hospital length of stay, and wound infection/dehiscence). The associations between age- and sex-adjusted BMI percentiles and these outcomes were assessed, with adjustment for patient-level risk factors, with multivariate logistic regression. Of 18 337 patients (118 centers), 16% were obese, 15% were overweight, 53% were normal weight, 7% were underweight, and 9% were severely underweight. Observed risks of operative mortality (P=0.04) and composite outcome (Pobese subjects. Severely underweight BMI was associated with increased unplanned cardiac operation and reoperation for bleeding. Obesity was associated with increased risk of wound infection. In multivariable analysis, the association between BMI and operative mortality was no longer significant. Obese (odds ratio, 1.28; P=0.008), severely underweight (odds ratio, 1.29; PObesity and underweight BMI were associated with increased risk of composite adverse outcome independently of other risk factors. Further research is necessary to determine whether BMI represents a modifiable risk factor for perioperative outcome. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. How and when to refer patients diagnosed with primary headache and craniofacial neuralgia in the Emergency department or Primary Care: Recommendations of the Spanish Society of Neurology's Headache Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Veiga, A B; García-Azorín, D; Mas-Sala, N; Ordás, C M; Ruiz-Piñero, M; Torres-Ferrús, M; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    2017-09-01

    When a patient is diagnosed with primary headache or craniofacial neuralgia in the emergency department or in primary care, and is referred to a neurologist due to the complexity of the case, it is useful to know whether additional examination should be sought and the priority (urgent, preferential or normal) with which the patient should be seen. This will avoid unnecessary delays in patients with disabling headache and where organic causes are suspected. In order to issue recommendations on this matter, the Spanish Society of Neurology's Headache Study Group has decided to create a series of agreed recommendations constituting a referral protocol for patients with headache and/or craniofacial neuralgia. Young neurologists with an interest and experience in headache were invited to draft a series of practical guidelines in collaboration with Spanish Society of Neurology's Headache Study Group Executive Committee. For practical reasons, the document was divided into 2 articles: this first article focuses on primary headaches and craniofacial neuralgias and the second on secondary headaches. In order for the recommendations to be helpful for daily practice they follow a practical approach, with tables summarising referral criteria, examinations to be performed, and referral to other specialists. We hope to offer a guide and tools to improve decision-making regarding patients with headache, identifying complementary tests to prioritise and referral pathways to be followed, in order to avoid duplicated consultations and delayed diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. [Improving the surgeon's image: introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Tomoo

    2004-05-01

    The number of medical students who aspire to become surgeons has been decreasing in recent years. With a vicious spiral in the decreasing number and the growing deterioration of surgeons' working conditions, there is fear of deterioration of surgical care and subsequent disintegration of overall health care in Japan. The purpose of this issue is to devise a strategy for improving surgeons' image and their working conditions to attract future medical students. However, we cannot expect a quick cure for the problem of the decreasing number of applicants for surgery since this issue is deeply related to many fundamental problems in the health care system in Japan. The challenge for surgical educators in coming years will be to solve the problem of chronic sleep deprivation and overwork of surgery residents and to develop an efficient program to meet the critical educational needs of surgical residents. To solve this problem it is necessary to ensure well-motivated surgical residents and to develop an integrated research program. No discussion of these issues would be complete without attention to the allocation of scarce medical resources, especially in relation to financial incentives for young surgeons. The authors, who are conscientious representatives of this society, would like to highlight these critical problems and issues that are particularly relevant to our modern surgical practice, and it is our sincere hope that all members of this society fully recognize these critical issues in the Japanese health care system to take leadership in improving the system. With the demonstration of withholding unnecessary medical conducts we may be able to initiate a renewal of the system and eventually to fulfill our dreams of Japan becoming a nation that can attract many patients from all over the world. Furthermore, verification of discipline with quality control and effective surgical treatment is needed to avoid criticism by other disciplines for being a self

  10. Time out for surgeons: when is the attending surgeon too tired?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoem, Scott R; Finck, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Pediatric surgical subspecialty workforce shortages are here to stay without any expected solution for the short-term. Individual surgeons, hospital administrators, risk management and patient-safety teams need to recognize that patient safety must take precedence over clinical productivity and financial "bottom lines." Pushing attending surgeon work hours beyond the limits of exhaustion impairs patient safety. Just as resident surgeon work hours have been appropriately curtailed in the name of patient safety, so must attending surgeon work hours. This issue needs to be addressed by hospital patient safety committees, professional societies, and by state and national regulating authorities.

  11. Neurologic Diseases and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Chokroverty, Sudansu

    2017-03-01

    Sleep disorders and neurologic illness are common and burdensome in their own right; when combined, they can have tremendous negative impact at an individual level as well as societally. The socioeconomic burden of sleep disorders and neurologic illness can be identified, but the real cost of these conditions lies far beyond the financial realm. There is an urgent need for comprehensive care and support systems to help with the burden of disease. Further research in improving patient outcomes in those who suffer with these conditions will help patients and their families, and society in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker

    2012-05-29

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research.

  13. How and when to refer patients diagnosed with secondary headache and other craniofacial pain in the Emergency Department and Primary Care: Recommendations of the Spanish Society of Neurology's Headache Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Veiga, A B; Díaz de Terán, J; González-García, N; González-Oria, C; González-Quintanilla, V; Minguez-Olaondo, A; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    2017-09-01

    When secondary headache is suspected and the patient is referred to the emergency department or to the outpatient neurology clinic, it is important to know which are the appropriate complementary examinations to perform and the suitable referral pathway for patients to follow. In order to establish recommendations on this matter, the Spanish Society of Neurology's Headache Study Group (GECSEN) has decided to issue a series of agreed recommendations constituting a referral protocol for patients with headache and/or craniofacial neuralgias. Young neurologists with an interest and experience in headache were invited to draft a series of practical guidelines in collaboration with GECSEN's Executive Committee. For practical reasons, the document was divided into 2 articles: the first focuses on primary headaches and craniofacial neuralgias and this second article on secondary headaches and other craniofacial pain. In order for the recommendations to be helpful for daily practice, they follow a practical approach, with tables summarising referral criteria, examinations to be performed, and referral to other specialists. We hope to offer a guide and tools to improve decision-making regarding patients with headache, identifying complementary tests to prioritise and referral pathways to be followed, in order to avoid duplicated consultations and delayed diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  14. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  15. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  16. Ethics and the pediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallat, Mary E; Caniano, Donna A; Fecteau, Annie H

    2007-01-01

    Care of infants and children with life-impairing or life-threatening congenital and acquired disorders often raises ethical concerns for pediatric surgeons. The purpose of this survey was to determine the level of interest in clinical ethics and how respondents would manage ethical dilemmas within several clinical case scenarios. A 12-item validated questionnaire developed by the Ethics and Advocacy Committee was provided for the American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA; www.eapsa.org) members on the organizational website. General categories of questions included informed consent, patient privacy, and what constitutes research. The survey was completed by 235 of the 825 APSA members; a response rate of 28.4%. The majority (62%) were in academic practice, 22% had additional education or an advanced degree in ethics, and 11% were members of a hospital ethics committee. There was a clear majority response for seven questions. Topics generating the most controversy included the impact of consent by minors, decision making in the neurologically devastated child, what constitutes research in pediatric surgery, the use of interpreters for consent, and patient privacy. Respondents chose a well-referenced manuscript as the preferred modality for ethics education of the APSA members. Pediatric surgeons have a general interest in clinical ethics as it relates to the care of their patients. An important mission of the Ethics and Advocacy Committee can be to provide education that gives guidance and knowledge to the members of APSA on timely topics in surgical ethics.

  17. Income, productivity, and satisfaction of breast surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendorf, David C; Helmer, Stephen D; Osland, Jacqueline S; Tenofsky, Patty L

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how the practice patterns of breast surgeons affect their income and job satisfaction. A 19-question survey regarding practice patterns and income and job satisfaction was mailed to all active US members of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. There were 772 responses. An increasing percentage of breast care was associated with lower incomes (P=.0001) and similar income satisfaction (P=.4517) but higher job satisfaction (P=.0001). The increasing proportion of breast care was also associated with fewer hours worked per week (P=.0001). Although incomes were lower in surgeons with a higher proportion of their practice in breast care, income satisfaction was not affected. Although cause and effect relationships between income and breast surgery are difficult to establish, several trends do emerge. Most significantly, we found that dedicated breast surgeons have higher job satisfaction ratings and similar income satisfaction despite lower incomes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Civil Surgeon Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — USCIS designates certain doctors (also known as civil surgeons) to perform the medical exam required for most Green Card applicants. This data set represents the...

  19. Physicians and Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... classrooms, taking courses such as anatomy, biochemistry, pharmacology, psychology, medical ethics, and in the laws governing medicine. ... Surgeons, All Other Preventive Medicine Physicians Psychiatrists Radiologists Sports Medicine ... <- Similar Occupations Suggested citation: ...

  20. Librarians, surgeons, and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Thalia; Brice, Anne

    2006-02-01

    are indicative of the ferment of change brought about by the digital revolution, and of the continuing determination of health information professionals to rise to the challenges involved in supporting surgeons and everyone in the surgical team, as they endeavor to provide the best possible care for their patients. Libraries as we know them have changed, and are changing. The scholarly communications process is also undergoing profound transformation. The authors discuss these changes and their implications for surgeons.

  1. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-07-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Adults with pneumococcal meningitis have the highest risk of developing focal neurological deficits, which are most commonly caused by cerebral infarction, but can also be due to cerebritis, subdural empyema, cerebral abscess or intracerebral bleeding. Focal deficits may improve during clinical course and even after discharge, but a proportion of patients will have persisting focal neurological deficits that often interfere in patient's daily life. Hearing loss occurs in a high proportion of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and has been associated with co-existing otitis. Children and adults recovering from bacterial meningitis without apparent neurological deficits are at risk for long-term cognitive deficits. Early identification of neurological sequelae is important for children to prevent additional developmental delay, and for adults to achieve successful return in society after the disease. Neurological sequelae occur in a substantial amount of patients following bacterial meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Cervical myelopathy from an aspect of a neurological surgeon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, T

    1994-12-01

    More than 65 per cent of intramedurally tumors and intradural extramedurally tumors were located in cervical region. They enact a cause of cervical myelopathy. A special attention should be paid to solitaly intramedurally vascular malformations, when the patients show an acute progressive myelopathy. In very rare cases of syringomyelia, intramedurally tumors such as hemangioblastoma or ependymoma could be found, so that enhanced MRI or angiography should be done if necessary. In cases of a herniated disc, cervical spondylosis and OPLL, the distance between articulo-pillar line and spinolaminal line must be measured. If the distance of both lines is near or the same, that means narrow cervical canal. In rare cases the form of the vertebral body is round. This is a rare cause of a type of narrow canal.

  3. Interventional neurology: a reborn subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Randall C; Alshekhlee, Amer; Yavagal, Dileep R; Vora, Nirav; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2012-10-01

    Neurologists have a long history of involvement in cerebral angiography; however, the roots of neurologist involvement in therapeutic endovascular procedures have not been previously documented. As outlined in this article, it has taken the efforts of several early pioneers to lay the ground work for interventional neurology, a specialty that has become one of the fastest growing neurological subspecialties. The ground work, along with a great clinical need, has allowed the modern interventional neurologist to tackle some of the most intractable diseases, especially those affecting the cerebral vasculature. The institutionalization of interventional neurology as a subspecialty was first advocated in 1995 in an article entitled, "Interventional Neurology, a subspecialty whose time has come." The institutions created in the wake of this article have provided the framework that has allowed interventional neurology to transition from "a subspecialty whose time has come" to a subspecialty that is here to stay and thrive. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  4. Online Patient Ratings of Hand Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; DeFrancesco, Christopher J; Nguyen, Joseph T; Charalel, Resmi A; Daluiski, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate factors associated with positive online patient ratings and written comments regarding hand surgeons. We randomly selected 250 hand surgeons from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand member directory. Surgeon demographic and rating data were collected from 3 physician review Web sites (www.HealthGrades.com, www.Vitals.com, and www.RateMDs.com). Written comments were categorized as being related to professional competence, communication, cost, overall recommendation, staff, and office practice. Online presence was defined by 5 criteria: professional Web site, Facebook page, Twitter page, and personal profiles on www.Healthgrades.com and/or www.Vitals.com. A total of 245 hand surgeons (98%) had at least one rating among the 3 Web sites. Mean number of ratings for each surgeon was 13.4, 8.3, and 1.9, respectively, and mean overall ratings were 4.0 out of 5, 3.3 out of 4, and 3.8 out of 5 stars on www.HealthGrades.com, www.Vitals.com, and www.RateMDs.com, respectively. Positive overall ratings were associated with a higher number of ratings, Castle Connolly status, and increased online presence. No consistent correlations were observed among online ratings and surgeon age, sex, years in practice, practice type (ie, private practice vs academics), and/or geographic region. Finally, positive written comments were more often related to factors dependent on perceived surgeon competence, whereas negative comments were related to factors independent of perceived competence. Physician review Web sites featured prominently on Google, and 98% of hand surgeons were rated online. This study characterized hand surgeon online patient ratings as well as identified factors associated with positive ratings and comments. In addition, these findings highlight how patients assess care quality. Understanding hand surgeon online ratings and identifying factors associated with positive ratings are important for both patients and surgeons because of the recent growth in

  5. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  7. 14 CFR 67.309 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified...

  8. 14 CFR 67.109 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified...

  9. 14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified...

  10. Managers as social surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, M

    1992-01-01

    Deals with the Health Service manager's problems of pruning staff in NHS Trust applications. Compares handling staff with a surgeon handling patients pre-, during and post-operations. Concludes that the Health Service manager must consider the key issues of communication, involvement, unambiguity and encouraging the free expression of dissent.

  11. Bridging the generation gap-dilemmas of a cosmetic surgeon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    ... infections and drug addictions. According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) statistics, 63,623 cosmetic surgical procedures and 155,941 cosmetic minimally invasive procedures were performed in the US among teenagers aged 13-19 years.

  12. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of opinions regarding industry-sponsored educational events and surgeon teaching: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Dvorak, Marcel F; Lee, Robert S; Hartig, Dennis; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-03-01

    Conflict of interest (COI) as it applies to medical education and training has become a source of considerable interest, debate, and regulation in the last decade. Companies often pay surgeons as faculty for educational events and often sponsor and give financial support to major professional society meetings. Professional medical societies, industry, and legislators have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the inclusion of patient opinion along with best available evidence and expert opinion. The primary goal of this study was to assess the opinion of the general population regarding surgeon-industry COI for education-related events. A Web-based survey was administered, with special emphasis on the surgeon's role in industry-sponsored education and support of professional societies. A survey was constructed to sample opinions on reimbursement, disclosure, and funding sources for educational events. There were 501 completed surveys available for analysis. More than 90% of respondents believed that industry funding for surgeons' tuition and travel for either industry-sponsored or professional society educational meetings would either not affect the quality of care delivered or would cause it to improve. Similar results were generated for opinions on surgeons being paid by industry to teach other surgeons. Moreover, the majority of respondents believed it was ethical or had no opinion if surgeons had such a relationship with industry. Respondents were also generally in favor of educational conferences for surgeons regardless of funding source. Disclosures of a surgeon-industry relationship, especially if it involves specific devices that may be used in their surgery, appears to be important to respondents. The vast majority of respondents in this study do not believe that the quality of their care will be diminished due to industry funding of educational events, for surgeon

  13. Neurologic complications of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Weimer, Louis H

    2014-06-01

    This review serves as an overview of neurologic conditions associated with alcohol abuse or withdrawal, including epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic approach, and treatment. Frequent alcohol abuse and frank alcoholism are very common among adults in the United States. Although rates decline with each decade, as many as 10% of the elderly drink excessively. Given the ubiquitous nature of alcoholism in society, its complications have been clinically recognized for generations, with recent advances focusing on improved understanding of ethanol's biochemical targets and the pathophysiology of its complications. The chronic effects of alcohol abuse are myriad and include neurologic complications through both direct and indirect effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. These disorders include several encephalopathic states related to alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, and related nutritional deficiencies; acute and chronic toxic and nutritional peripheral neuropathies; and myopathy. Although prevention of alcoholism and its neurologic complications is the optimal strategy, this article reviews the specific treatment algorithms for alcohol withdrawal and its related nutritional deficiency states.

  14. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Mathematics and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crank, J.

    1976-01-01

    The surgeon uses elementary mathematics just as much as any other educated layman. In his professional life, however, much of the knowledge and skill on which he relies has had a mathematical strand in its development, possibly woven into the supporting disciplines such as physics, chemistry, biology, and bioengineering. The valves and limitations of mathematical models are examined briefly in the general medical field and particularly in relation to the surgeon. Arithmetic and statistics are usually regarded as the most immediately useful parts of mathematics. Examples are cited, however, of medical postgraduate work which uses other highly advanced mathematical techniques. The place of mathematics in postgraduate and postexperience teaching courses is touched on. The role of a mathematical consultant in the medical team is discussed. PMID:942167

  16. Surgeon-performed ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todsen, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Surgeons are increasingly using ultrasonography (US) in their clinical management of patients. However, US is a very user-dependent imaging modality and proper skills of the US operator are needed to ensure quality in patient care. This thesis explores the validity evidence for assessment...... accuracy on patients. However, the RESULTS also indicated that following an initial course, additional training is needed for physicians to achieve competence in US. Research paper III evaluated validity evidence supporting an OSAUS score used to establish pass/fail standards for head & neck US skills...... by a receiver operator characteristic curve for different pass/fail standards of head & neck US skills. In summary this PhD thesis established sources of validity evi-dence supporting the interpretation of the OSAUS scale to evalu-ate surgeon-performed US skills of the abdominal and head & neck diseases. We...

  17. Wilfred Trotter: surgeon, philosopher

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Irving B.

    2006-01-01

    There is no significant biography that records the accomplishments of Sir Wilfred Trotter, who was a general surgeon in its pure sense at a time when surgical specialization was in its infancy. Trotter was born in the 1870s in England. Despite being bedridden during his childhood with a musculoskeletal condition he was able to study medicine at London University, and eventually became Professor and Chair of Surgery at the University College Hospital, a position he held until his death in Nove...

  18. Burnout in the Plastic Surgeon: Implications and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Christina; Ketteler, Erika; Evans, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    A career as a plastic surgeon is both rewarding and challenging. The road to becoming a surgeon is a long arduous endeavor and can bring significant challenges not only to the surgeon but their family. A study by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) suggested that over 40% of surgeons experience burnout and a recent survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) showed that more than one-fourth of plastic surgeons have signs of professional burnout. Burnout is a state of physical and mental exhaustion. The three main components of burnout are emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. Exhaustion occurs as a result of emotional demands. Depersonalization refers to a cynical, negative or a detached response to patient care. The reduced accomplishment refers to a belief that one can no longer work effectively. There has been a recent explosion in the literature characterizing burnout within the surgical profession. Reports of burnout, burnout victims, and burnout syndrome are filling the medical literature, books, blogs, and social media across all different specialties. Burnout in a plastic surgeon has negative and potentially fatal repercussions to the surgeon, their family, their patients, their staff, colleagues, coworkers, and their organization. To date, there are a limited number of publications addressing burnout in the plastic surgery community. The goals of this paper are to review the symptoms of burnout, its effect on plastic surgeons, and discuss potential solutions for burnout prevention and physician wellness.

  19. Reexcision Surgery for Breast Cancer: An Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MasterySM Database Following the SSO-ASTRO "No Ink on Tumor" Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Amanda M; Mirrielees, Jennifer A; Leverson, Glen; Landercasper, Jeffrey; Greenberg, Caprice; Wilke, Lee G

    2017-01-01

    In February 2014 , the Society of Surgical Oncology and the American Society for Radiation Oncology released guidelines standardizing a negative margin after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) as "no ink on tumor" in patients with early-stage invasive cancer. We sought to determine whether reexcision rates after initial BCS decreased after guideline publication, using the ASBrS MasterySM of Breast Surgery Program. Between January 2013 and June 2015, data from the ASBrS MasterySM database was analyzed to determine reexcision rates pre and post guideline publication. Reasons for reexcision were evaluated as were the associations with patient and provider characteristics. Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test, ANOVA, and multivariable logistic regression were used as appropriate. All analyses were performed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS, with p value ASTRO "no ink on tumor" guideline publication, a reduction in overall reexcision rates and reexcision rates for close margins after initial BCS was observed in the ASBrS MasterySM database. More widespread implementation outside this group of early adopters is anticipated with ongoing dissemination.

  20. Advocacy in neurology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauranik, Apoorva

    2008-01-01

    ...), launched the Neurological Alliance of Ireland, a nationwide coalition of patient advocacy groups and physicians and authored Standards of Care, the "blueprint" for the development of neurological...

  1. Patients' Opinions about Polish Surgeons and Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakowski, Marek; Hładoń, Aleksandra; Seweryn, Mariusz; Ciosek, Jakub; Świątkiewicz, Wojciech

    2016-10-01

    In Polish society Stereotypes about the surgeons are deeply rooted, which could really affect their relationship with the patient and the entire treatment process. The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of an opinion survey on the image of the surgeon and operative treatment. Between 1 January and 30 October 2012, 1000 patients were examined by use of a original questionnaire containing 25 questions. Results were analyzed statistically by STATISTICA test. Differences between groups were tested using Chi-square test (X2) with Yates modification, adopting the significance level α = 0.05. The study group consisted of 1000 patients, including 56% of women (n = 560) and 44% of men (n = 440). The media image of Polish surgeon was identified as positive by 78% of respondents. A majority of patients (74%) considered that the Polish surgeons had equal level of competence and skills as foreign specialists. The greatest trust of the respondents (n = 537) had surgeons in middle age (40-60 years). For the majority of patients (n = 649) a sex of the surgeon had no significance. Respondents clearly stated that a surgeon performing the operation should not have additional financial rewards. Almost all respondents in medical emergencies without hesitation declared their agreement to surgery (n = 974). Present knowledge of Polish patients about surgeons and surgical treatment is high. The surgeon has a high social prestige, respect and appreciation, and his image in the opinion of the vast majority of respondents is positive.

  2. Diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Williams, Sankey; Dallas, Paul; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to help clinicians diagnose known or suspected stable ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. This guideline includes 28 recommendations that address the following issues: the initial diagnosis of the patient who might have stable ischemic heart disease, cardiac stress testing to assess the risk for death or myocardial infarction in patients diagnosed with stable ischemic heart disease, and coronary angiography for risk assessment.

  3. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases: S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto- Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaar, Oliver; Bachert, Claus; Bufe, Albrecht; Buhl, Roland; Ebner, Christof; Eng, Peter; Friedrichs, Frank; Fuchs, Thomas; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hartwig-Bade, Doris; Hering, Thomas; Huttegger, Isidor; Jung, Kirsten; Klimek, Ludger; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Merk, Hans; Rabe, Uta; Saloga, Joachim; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Schuster, Antje; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Sitter, Helmut; Umpfenbach, Ulrich; Wedi, Bettina; Wöhrl, Stefan; Worm, Margitta; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Kaul, Susanne; Schwalfenberg, Anja

    , Ebner C, Eng P, Friedrichs F, Fuchs T, Hamelmann E, Hartwig-Bade D, Hering T, Huttegger I, Jung K, Klimek L, Kopp MV, Merk H, Rabe U, Saloga J, Schmid-Grendelmeier P, Schuster A, Schwerk N, Sitter H, Umpfenbach U, Wedi B, Wöhrl S, Worm M, Kleine-Tebbe J. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases - S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD). Allergo J Int 2014;23:282-319.

  4. On-line Ratings of Spine Surgeons: Analysis of 208 surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Omar, Adan; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-11-14

    Observational study OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate the online ratings of spine surgeons and variables that may affect online ratings. Physician review websites (PRW) are rapidly growing for-profit businesses. Most Orthopaedic surgeons are rated on at least one PRW as are other surgical specialists. To date the online ratings of spine surgeons have not been evaluated. Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS) surgeon ratings on 5 physician rating websites were performed in April 2016: 'healthgrade.com', 'vitals.com', 'ratemd.com', 'webmd.com' and 'yelp.com'. Numeric ratings from the PRWs were standardized on a scale of 0 to 100 with a higher score indicating positive ratings. Sex, practice sector (academic or private), specialty (orthopaedics or neurosurgery), geographic location, and years of practice were also collected. 209 spine surgeons were included in our study. 208 of the 209 (99.52%) were rated at least once in one of the five PRWs. Average number of ratings per surgeon was 2.96. Average rating was 80 (40 to 100). There were 4 female (1.92%) and 204 male surgeons (98.1%). There were 121 (58.2%) in academic practice and 87 (41.8%) in private practice. There were 175 (84.1%) orthopaedic surgeons and 33 (15.9%) neurosurgeons. Most of the surgeons were Caucasian 163 (78.4%) and worked in the South and Northeast 135 (64.9%). Those in academic practice had significantly higher ratings (81.6 versus 77.65; p = 0.026). Number of years in practice was significantly associated with ratings (p = 0.0003) with those in practice for 21 or more years having significantly lower ratings. In this first study evaluating the online ratings of spine surgeons, we found that 99.5% of spine surgeon had at least one rating on a PRW. The average score, 80, indicated mostly positive ratings. Being in practice for twenty years or less and being in academic practice significantly associated with higher ratings. 4.

  5. Surgeon-family perioperative communication: surgeons' self-reported approaches to the "surgeon-family relationship".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Aubrey L; Rojnica, Marko; Siegler, Mark; Angelos, Peter; Langerman, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Family members are important in the perioperative care of surgical patients. During the perioperative period, communication about the patient occurs between surgeons and family members. To date, however, surgeon-family perioperative communication remains unexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the surgical faculty of an academic hospital to participate in an interview regarding their approach to speaking with family members during and immediately after an operative procedure. An iterative process of transcription and theme development among 3 researchers was used to compile a well-defined set of qualitative themes. Thirteen surgeons were interviewed and described what informs their communication, how they practice surgeon-family perioperative communication, and how the skills integral to perioperative communication are taught. Surgeons saw perioperative communication with family members as having a special role of providing support and anxiety alleviation that is distinct from the role of communication during clinic or postoperative visits. Wide variability exists in how interviewed surgeons practice perioperative communication, including who communicates with the family, and the frequency and content of the communication. Surgeons universally reported that residents' instruction in perioperative communication with families was lacking. Surgeons recognize perioperative communication with family members to be a part of their role and responsibility to the patient. However, during the perioperative period, they also acknowledge an independent responsibility to alleviate family members' anxieties. This independent responsibility supports the existence of a distinct "surgeon-family relationship." Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  7. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  8. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  9. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neurology and Follow-up"

    OpenAIRE

    --- Various Authors

    2017-01-01

    Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR), European Society for Neonatology (ESN), Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS), European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI)ORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmer...

  10. International electives in neurology training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L.; Coleman, Mary E.; Engstrom, John W.

    2014-01-01

    of Canadian programs that responded allow international electives, likely due to clearer guidelines from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada compared to the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education. However, the number of both Canadian and US neurology trainees venturing abroad remains a minority. Most program directors are interested in learning more information related to global health electives for neurology residents. PMID:24319037

  11. Improving risk literacy in surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Cokely, Edward T; Wicki, Barbara; Joeris, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    To effectively practice evidence-based medicine, surgeons need to understand and be able to communicate health-relevant numerical information. We present the first study examining risk literacy in surgeons by assessing numeracy and surgical risk comprehension. Our study also investigated whether visual aids improve risk comprehension in surgeons with limited numeracy. Participants were 292 surgeons from 60 countries who completed an instrument measuring numeracy and evaluated the results of a randomized controlled trial including post-surgical side-effects. Half of the surgeons received this information in numbers. The other half received the information represented visually. Accuracy of risk estimation, reading latency, and estimate latency (i.e., deliberation) were assessed. Some surgeons have low numeracy and could not correctly interpret surgical risks without additional support. Visual aids made risks transparent and eliminated differences in risk understanding between more and less numerate surgeons, increasing the amount of time that less numerate surgeons spent deliberating about risks. Visual aids can be an efficient and inexpensive means of improving risk comprehension and clinical judgement in surgeons with low numerical and statistical skills. Programs designed to help professionals represent and communicate health-relevant numerical information in simple transparent graphs may unobtrusively promote informed decision making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  13. The surgeon and casemix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J A; Wallace, D

    1998-10-19

    Casemix funding has markedly increased surgeons' awareness of the economies of the activities they undertake. Surgery has become a major focus at all large public hospitals, because of its high earning potential, and this pressure to maximise funding could influence surgical practice. Casemix funding's emphasis on length of hospital stay has encouraged forward planning for earlier discharge after surgical procedures. Patients are now assessed in pre-admission clinics, educated about their condition and their hospital stay, and a plan formulated for their discharge and rehabilitation. Funding for major surgical procedures of long duration in patients with complex conditions should reflect the higher level of resource utilisation. Tertiary referral centres, because of their commitment to training and research and their more severely ill patient population, are less cost-effective and require funding to ensure their viability. The improved information that casemix generates should be used to evaluate outcomes and improve patient care; efficiency must not take precedence over quality of care and compassion.

  14. [Neurorehabilitation, neurology, rehabilitation medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbán, Edina; Szél, István; Fáy, Veronika; Dénes, Zoltán; Lippai, Zoltán; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-05-30

    We have read several publications of great authority on the neurological profession in the last two years in which were expressed assessments of the current situation combined with opinions about neurology and the necessity to reorganize neurological patient care. These articles took up the question of neurorehabilitation too. The authors, who on a daily basis, deal with the rehabilitation of people with disabilities as a consequence of neurological conditions, summarize some important definitions of rehabilitation medicine and the present system of neurological rehabilitation, as it is defined by the rehabilitation profession.

  15. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  16. [Needs and specialization for pediatric surgeons in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Aguiar, Alexandre Santos; de Campos, Maria do Socorro Mendonça; Baratella, José Roberto de Sousa; Ketzer, João Carlos; Mastroti, Roberto Antônio; Amarante, Antônio Carlos M

    2009-08-01

    To define the distribution of Pediatric Surgeons in Brazil and the distribution of job offered for specialists in the country. To compare the professional profile of Brazilian Pediatric Surgeons with other countries. Statistical data derived from Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), Brazilian Medical Council (CFM) and Brazilian Society of Pediatric Surgery (CIPE) were used to define the professional profile of pediatric surgeons in Brazil. Eight-hundred-and-five pediatric surgeons are needed in Brazil only to treat neonates and toddlers. Professionals are excessively concentrated in South and Southeast and insufficient numbers are found in North and Northeast. Data about the number of pediatric surgeons working in Brazil are conflicting: data obtained from FIOCRUZ differ from those from CFM and CIPE. The working routine of Brazilian pediatric surgeons is different from that of North-American and European specialists, from where the major part of our references is extracted. Brazil needs a minimum of 805 pediatric surgeons working full time only to treat nenonates and toddlers. Specialists are not well distributed throughout the country. The southeast is a training center and exports specialists to the rest of the country. Epidemiological data concerning the distribution of professionals in Brazil are conflicting.

  17. Association Between Surgeon Scorecard Use and Operating Room Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Valencia, Victoria; Moriates, Christopher; Boscardin, Christy K; Catschegn, Sereina; Rajkomar, Alvin; Bozic, Kevin J; Soo Hoo, Kent; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pitts, Lawrence; Lawton, Michael T; Dudley, R Adams; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Despite the significant contribution of surgical spending to health care costs, most surgeons are unaware of their operating room costs. To examine the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room. The OR Surgical Cost Reduction (OR SCORE) project was a single-health system, multihospital, multidepartmental prospective controlled study in an urban academic setting. Intervention participants were attending surgeons in orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and neurological surgery (n = 63). Control participants were attending surgeons in cardiothoracic surgery, general surgery, vascular surgery, pediatric surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, ophthalmology, and urology (n = 186). From January 1 to December 31, 2015, each surgeon in the intervention group received standardized monthly scorecards showing the median surgical supply direct cost for each procedure type performed in the prior month compared with the surgeon's baseline (July 1, 2012, to November 30, 2014) and compared with all surgeons at the institution performing the same procedure at baseline. All surgical departments were eligible for a financial incentive if they met a 5% cost reduction goal. The primary outcome was each group's median surgical supply cost per case. Secondary outcome measures included total departmental surgical supply costs, case mix index-adjusted median surgical supply costs, patient outcomes (30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and discharge status), and surgeon responses to a postintervention study-specific health care value survey. The median surgical supply direct costs per case decreased 6.54% in the intervention group, from $1398 (interquartile range [IQR], $316-$5181) (10 637 cases) in 2014 to $1307 (IQR, $319-$5037) (11 820 cases) in 2015. In contrast, the median surgical supply direct cost increased 7.42% in the control group, from $712 (IQR, $202-$1602) (16 441 cases

  18. Management of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Dallas, Paul; Williams, Sankey; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to present the available evidence on the management of stable known or suspected ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. The guideline includes 48 specific recommendations that address the following issues: patient education, management of proven risk factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity body weight, and smoking), risk factor reduction strategies of unproven benefit, medical therapy to prevent myocardial infarction and death and to relieve symptoms, alternative therapy, revascularization to improve survival and symptoms, and patient follow-up.

  19. What Is a Cardiothoracic Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Pleural Diseases Mesothelioma Heart and Lung Transplantation Organ failure and transplantation ... she feels that you could benefit from specialized treatment. How a Thoracic Surgeon differs from a Cardiologist ...

  20. Occupational hazards facing orthopedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, J D; Hsu, S; Ahmad, C S

    2012-03-01

    Physicians are exposed to occupational hazards of which they are often unaware. Orthopedic surgery has a particularly hazardous work environment in which surgeons are at increased risk for exposure to infection, radiation, smoke, chemicals, excessive noise, musculoskeletal injuries, as well as emotional and psychological disturbances. Understanding these risks and the precautions that can be taken to avoid them will help protect orthopedic surgeons from potential harm.

  1. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  2. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding.

  3. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neurology and Follow-up"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR, European Society for Neonatology (ESN, Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS, European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNIORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann (President of ESPR, Morten Breindahl (President of ESN, Manuel Sánchez Luna (President of UENPS, Silke Mader (Chairwoman of the Executive Board and Co-Founder of EFCNISCIENTIFIC COMMITTEEVirgilio P. Carnielli (Congress President Chair, Pierre Gressens (Past Scientific President, Umberto Simeoni, Manon Benders, Neil Marlow, Ola D. Saugstad, Petra Hüppi, Agnes van den HoogenSession "Neurology and Follow-up"ABS 1. PRETERM BIRTH AND THE TIMING OF PUBERTY • E. James, C. Wood, H. Nair, T. WilliamsABS 2. NEONATAL PAIN, OPIOID AND ANAESTHETIC EXPOSURE; WHAT REMAINS IN THE HUMAN BRAIN AFTER THE WHEELS OF TIME? • G.E. van den Bosch, D. Tibboel, J.C. de Graaff, H. El Marroun, A. van der Lugt, T. White, M. van DijkABS 3. DEPRESSION DURING PREGNANCY AND DNA METHYLATION CHANGES IN CORD BLOOD • A.-C. Viuff, G. Sharp, D. Raj, K.J. Kyng, L.H. Pedersen, T.B. Henriksen, C.L. ReltonABS 4. PREVENTION OF CEREBRAL PALSY: FEASIBILITY OF UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD STEM CELLS AND UMBILICAL CORD MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS • H. Shintaku, M. Nabetani, T. Hamazaki, S. Kusuda, M. Tamura, S. Watabe, M. Hayakawa, Y. Sato, M. Tsuji, A. Taguchi, H. Ichiba, O. Akira, R. Mori, A.Taki, T. Mukai, T. Nagamura-InoueABS 5. NO GENDER-RELATED DIFFERENCES IN FETAL CORPUS CALLOSUM THICKNESS: IN-UTERO MRI STUDY • R. Bercovitz, R. Achiron, C. Hoffmann, A. AchironABS 6. NEUROMOTOR PROFILE OF HIGH-RISK INFANTS AT TERM OR NEAR TERM • I. Ereno, W.Y. TehABS 7. THE PREDICTIVE VALUE OF SEVERE BRONCHOPULMONARY

  4. [Meaningful advanced training concepts for surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansorg, J; Krüger, M; Vallböhmer, D

    2012-04-01

    A state of the art surgical training is crucial for the attraction of surgery as a medical profession. The German surgical community can only succeed in overcoming the shortage of young surgeons by the development of an attractive and professional training environment. Responsibility for surgical training has to be taken by the heads of department as well as by the surgical societies. Good surgical training should be deemed to be part of the corporate strategy of German hospitals and participation in external courses has to be properly funded by the hospital management. On the other hand residents are asked for commitment and flexibility and should keep records in logbooks and take part in assessment projects to gain continuing feedback on their learning progress. The surgical community is in charge of developing a structured but flexible training curriculum for each of the eight surgical training trunks. A perfect future curriculum has to reflect and cross-link local hospital training programs with a central training portfolio of a future Academy of German Surgeons, such as workshops, courses and e-learning projects. This challenge has to be dealt with in close cooperation by all surgical boards and societies. A common sense of surgery as a community in diversity is crucial for the success of this endeavour.

  5. Genetics of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mottagui-Tabar, Salim; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2004-05-01

    Neurological diseases are defined as an inappropriate function of the peripheral or central nervous system due to impaired electrical impulses throughout the brain and/or nervous system that may present with heterogeneous symptoms according to the parts of the system involved in these pathologic processes. Growing evidence on genetic components of neurological disease have been collected during recent years. Genetic studies have opened the way for understanding the underlying pathology of many neurological disorders. The outcome of current intense research into the genetics of neurological disorders will hopefully be the introduction of new diagnostic tools and the discovery of potential targets for new and more effective medications and preventive measures.

  6. Focal neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or head Electromyogram (EMG), nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap Alternative Names Neurological deficits - focal Images Brain References Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  7. [The Medical Information Systems Project clinical coding and surgeons: why should surgeons code and how?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensadoun, H

    2001-02-01

    The clinical coding system recently instituted in France, the PMSI (Projet de Médicalisation du Système d'Information), has become an unavoidable element in funding allocations for short-term private and public hospitalization centers. Surgeons must take into serious consideration this controversial medicoeconomic instrument. Coding is a dire time-consuming task but, like the hospitalization or surgery report, is an essential part of the discharge procedure. Coding can in the long run be used to establish pricing by pathology. Surgeons should learn the rules and the logic behind this coding system: which, not being based on a medical rationale, may be somewhat difficult to understand. Choosing the right main diagnosis and the comobidity Items is crucial. Quality homogeneous coding is essential if one expects the health authorities to make good use of the system. Our medical societies have a role to play in promoting and harmonizing the coding technique.

  8. Television Violence: Where the Surgeon General's Study Leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, George A.

    When judiciously interpreted, the findings of the Report to the Surgeon General on Television and Social Behavior cannot support any conclusion other than that televised violence is a cause of aggressiveness in children and young people. Given this interpretation, policy guidance research into the effects of television on society should include…

  9. The surgeon and the child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    For many reasons pediatric surgeons have been asked to do all general and thoracic procedures in children. The profession has responded by training more, but the core of special cases requiring pediatric surgical expertise has not changed, and there is concern that the many surgeons now in training will not each do enough cases to attain and maintain operative expertise. This presentation examines the psychological, educational, and surgical literature on the development of expertise, especially operative expertise. From this I conclude that individual surgeon volume when gained in deliberate practice with a coach and with effort is essential, and that several technologies hold promise for allowing deliberate practice in simulation environments. I propose that in order to avoid a decline in pediatric surgical operative expertise we must reorganize pediatric surgical training and practice to align with Optimal Resources for Children's Surgery and the evolution of training in general surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. European Stroke Organization guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis - endorsed by the European Academy of Neurology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferro, J. M.; Bousser, M.-G.; Canhão, P.; Coutinho, J. M.; Crassard, I.; Dentali, F.; di Minno, M.; Maino, A.; Martinelli, I.; Masuhr, F.; Aguiar de Sousa, D.; Stam, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Current guidelines on cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) diagnosis and management were issued by the European Federation of Neurological Societies in 2010. We aimed to update the previous European Federation of Neurological Societies guidelines using a clearer and

  11. Functional neurological disorders: imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, V

    2014-10-01

    Functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorder, are unexplained neurological symptoms. These symptoms are common and can be associated with significant consequences. This review covers the neuroimaging literature focusing on functional motor symptoms including motor functioning and upstream influences including self-monitoring and internal representations, voluntariness and arousal and trauma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS × What research is being done? The National Institute of Neurological ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS See More About Research The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke ( ...

  13. Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations: A survey of 822 surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lily; Yin, Donglei; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-07-01

    The relationships between industry and medical professionals are controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate surgeons' current opinions regarding the industry-surgery partnership, in addition to self-reported industry ties. After institutional review board approval, a survey was sent via RedCap to 3,782 surgeons across the United States. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the responses. The response rate was 23%. From the 822 responders, 226 (27%) reported at least one current relationship with industry, while 297 (36.1%) had at least one such relationship within the past 3 years. There was no difference between general surgery versus other surgical specialties (P = .5). Among the general surgery subspecialties, respondents in minimally invasive surgery/foregut had greater ties to industry compared to other subspecialties (P = .001). In addition, midcareer surgeons, male sex, and being on a reviewer/editorial board were associated with having industry ties (P industry are important for innovation. Our study showed that relationships between surgeons and industry are common, because more than a quarter of our responders reported at least one current relationship. Industry relations are perceived as necessary for operative innovation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Determining preferred educational methods for neurological surgery residents regarding organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G; McGaw, J

    1998-03-01

    Design and implementation of professional education, especially physician education, continues to challenge procurement professionals. At the request of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, the United Network for Organ Sharing undertook a project to develop educational materials for neurological surgery residents. A survey tool was developed and administered on site at 11 neurological surgery residency programs in the United States. The survey explored the types of learning environments, teaching methods, educational resources, and audiovisual aids that neurological surgery residents typically experience during their residency programs. In addition, the survey sought to uncover the residents' informational needs regarding organ and tissue donation presentations as well as their educational program preferences. Based on our findings, neurological surgery residents prefer presentations that are brief and to the point, that are easily understood, that require no reading, that contain limited important information, and that always include food.

  15. Prospects for neurology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, W M; Kandel, E R

    2001-02-07

    Neurological and psychiatric illnesses are among the most common and most serious health problems in developed societies. The most promising advances in neurological and psychiatric diseases will require advances in neuroscience for their elucidation, prevention, and treatment. Technical advances have improved methods for identifying brain regions involved during various types of cognitive activity, for tracing connections between parts of the brain, for visualizing individual neurons in living brain preparations, for recording the activities of neurons, and for studying the activity of single-ion channels and the receptors for various neurotransmitters. The most significant advances in the past 20 years have come from the application to the nervous system of molecular genetics and molecular cell biology. Discovery of the monogenic disorder responsible for Huntington disease and understanding its pathogenesis can serve as a paradigm for unraveling the much more complex, polygenic disorders responsible for such psychiatric diseases as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness, and borderline personality disorder. Thus, a new degree of cooperation between neurology and psychiatry is likely to result, especially for the treatment of patients with illnesses such as autism, mental retardation, cognitive disorders associated with Alzheimer and Parkinson disease that overlap between the 2 disciplines.

  16. Operating Room Costs of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Does Surgeon Volume Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ching Chung

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Very few studies have addressed the issue of surgeon volume on cost savings of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC in Asian countries. The objectives of the study were to analyze LC operating-room (OR costs between two study hospitals and to examine the effect of surgeon volume on OR costs. Patients diagnosed with gallbladder disease who underwent LC in October through December 2002 at two acute tertiary-care hospitals were included. Patient demographics and clinical information were derived from patient charts. Cost information was obtained from purchasing departments or specific cost centers. Three multivariate linear regression models were performed to examine the association between surgeon volume, cost, and utilization. There were no significant differences in patient demographics and disease severity between the two hospitals. Hospital A consumed fewer resources than did hospital B (NT$21,674 vs NT$26,417. Direct materials cost, direct professional costs, and indirect costs varied significantly by study hospital and by surgeon volume. High-volume surgeons incurred lower costs and shorter stay as compared with low-volume surgeons. Patients who scored in the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA PS 3 incurred significantly higher costs and longer hospital stays than did patients with ASA PS 1. The present study supports the proposal that hospital management and experience of surgeons are of equal importance in maintaining the standing of hospitals in competitive positions. In addition to the differences in hospital management and surgeon volume, the patient severity of illness also needs to be taken into consideration in cost containment.

  17. Predicting the need for vascular surgeons in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Shamim; Jetty, Prasad; Petrcich, William; Hajjar, George; Hill, Andrew; Kubelik, Dalibor; Nagpal, Sudhir; Brandys, Tim

    2017-03-01

    With the introduction of direct entry (0+5) residency programs in addition to the traditional (5+2) programs, the number of vascular surgery graduates across Canada is expected to increase significantly during the next 5 to 10 years. Society's need for these newly qualified surgeons is unclear. This study evaluated the predicted requirement for vascular surgeons across Canada to 2021. A program director survey was also performed to evaluate program directors' perceptions of the 0+5 residency program, the expected number of new trainees, and faculty recruitment and retirement. The estimated and projected Canadian population numbers for each year between 2013 and 2021 were determined by the Canadian Socio-economic Information and Management System (CANSIM), Statistics Canada's key socioeconomic database. The number of vascular surgery procedures performed from 2008 to 2012 stratified by age, gender, and province was obtained from the Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database. The future need for vascular surgeons was calculated by two validated methods: (1) population analysis and (2) workload analysis. In addition, a 12-question survey was sent to each vascular surgery program director in Canada. The estimated Canadian population in 2013 was 35.15 million, and there were 212 vascular surgeons performing a total of 98,339 procedures. The projected Canadian population by 2021 is expected to be 38.41 million, a 9.2% increase from 2013; however, the expected growth rate in the age group 60+ years, who are more likely to require vascular procedures, is expected to be 30% vs 3.4% in the age group Canada by 2021; however, using workload analysis modeling (which accounts for the more rapid growth and larger proportion of procedures performed in the 60+ age group), there will be a deficit of 11 vascular surgeons by 2021. Program directors in Canada have a positive outlook on graduating 0+5 residents' skill, and the majority of programs will be

  18. Kant and the cosmetic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J S

    1989-07-01

    Philosophers know that modern philosophy owes a great debt to the intellectual contributions of the 18th century philosopher Immanuel Kant. This essay attempts to show how cosmetic surgeons, and all surgeons at that, could learn much from his work. Not only did Kant write about the structure of human reasoning and how it relates to appearances but he also wrote about the nature of duties and other obligations. His work has strongly influenced medical ethics. In a more particular way, Kant wrote the most important work on aesthetics. His theory still influences how philosophers understand the meaning of the beautiful and how it pertains to the human figure. This essay presents an exercise in trying to apply Kantian philosophy to aesthetic plastic surgery. Its intention is to show cosmetic surgeons some of the implicit and explicit philosophical principles and potential arguments undergirding their potential surgical evaluations. It is meant to challenge the surgeon to reconsider how decisions are made using philosophical reasoning instead of some of the more usual justifications based on psychology or sociology.

  19. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Smartphone apps for orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Orrin I

    2011-07-01

    The use of smartphones and their associated applications (apps) provides new opportunities for physicians, and specifically orthopaedic surgeons, to integrate technology into clinical practice. The purpose of this study was twofold: to review all apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgeons and to survey orthopaedic residents and surgeons in the United States to characterize the need for novel apps. The five most popular smartphone app stores were searched for orthopaedic-related apps: Blackberry, iPhone, Android, Palm, and Windows. An Internet survey was sent to ACGME-accredited orthopaedic surgery departments to assess the level of smartphone use, app use, and desire for orthopaedic-related apps. The database search revealed that iPhone and Android platforms had apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgery with a total of 61 and 13 apps, respectively. Among the apps reviewed, only one had greater than 100 reviews (mean, 27), and the majority of apps had very few reviews, including AAOS Now and AO Surgery Reference, apps published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and AO Foundation, respectively. The national survey revealed that 84% of respondents (n = 476) have a smartphone, the majority (55%) have an iPhone, and that 53% of people with smartphones already use apps in clinical practice. Ninety-six percent of respondents who use apps reported they would like more orthopaedic apps and would pay an average of nearly $30 for useful apps. The four most requested categories of apps were textbook/reference, techniques/guides, OITE/board review, and billing/coding. The use of smartphones and apps is prevalent among orthopaedic care providers in academic centers. However, few highly ranked apps specifically related to orthopaedic surgery are available, and the types of apps available do not appear to be the categories most desired by residents and surgeons.

  3. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  4. The global health workforce shortage: role of surgeons and other providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, George F; Ricketts, Thomas C; Charles, Anthony; King, Jennifer; Fraher, Erin P; Meyer, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The debate over the status of the physician workforce seems to be concluded. It now is clear that a shortage of physicians exists and is likely to worsen. In retrospect it seems obvious that a static annual production of physicians, coupled with a population growth of 25 million persons each decade, would result in a progressively lower physician to population ratio. Moreover, Cooper has demonstrated convincingly that the robust economy of the past 50 years correlates with demand for physician services. The aging physician workforce is an additional problem: one third of physicians are over 55 years of age, and the population over the age of 65 years is expected to double by 2030. Signs of a physician and surgeon shortage are becoming apparent. The largest organization of physicians in the world (119,000 members), the American College of Physicians, published a white paper in 2006 titled, "The Impending Collapse of Primary Care Medicine and Its Implications for the State of the Nation's Health Care" [37]. The American College of Surgeons, the largest organization of surgeons, has published an article on access to emergency surgery [38], and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science has published a book on the future of emergency care (Fig. 10). The reports document diminished involvement and availability of emergency care by general surgeons, neurologic surgeons, orthopedists, hand surgeons, plastic surgeons, and others. The emergency room has become the primary care physician after 5 PM for much of the population. A survey done by the Commonwealth Fund revealed that less than half of primary care practices have an on-call arrangement for after-hours care. Other evidence of evolving shortage are reports of long wait times for appointments, the hospitalist movement, and others. The policies for the future should move beyond dispute over whether or not a shortage exists. The immediate need is for the United States, as a society, to commit to

  5. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  6. Neurological diseases and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequentl...

  7. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chapter 48: history of neurology in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Paul B; Storey, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    In comparison with most Western countries, neurology as a recognized medical specialty has a relatively brief history in Australia: the national body for neurologists, the Australian (since 2006: and New Zealand) Association of Neurologists, was founded only in 1950. The development of neurology in both countries was heavily influenced by British neurology, and until recently a period in the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London was regarded as essential to specialist training in neurology. Nevertheless, Australians have made significant contributions to international neurology since the early 20th century, commencing with the neuroanatomical research of the colorful expatriate Grafton Elliot Smith (1871-1937). Other Australian physicians who attracted early international attention through their work in clinical neuroscience included William John Adie (1886-1935), the anatomist John Irvine Hunter (1898-1924) and the surgeon Norman Royle (1888-1944). The first Australian physician to unambiguously commit himself to neurology was Alfred Walter Campbell (1868-1938), a remarkable personality who established an imposing reputation as neurocytologist and neuropathologist. The chapter provides a concise overview of the development of neurology as a clinical and academic specialty in Australia and New Zealand.

  9. Job Recruitment - Dermatologists & Mohs Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Of Medicine, Uc David

    2017-01-15

    The University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, is recruiting for four academic dermatologists in the Clinical X series or Health Sciences Clinical Professor (HSCP) series at the Assistant/Associate/Professor level based on experience and qualifications. Three of these positions are for general medical dermatologists, and one is for a fellowship-trained Mohs surgeon/procedural dermatologist. The appointments may be made up to 100%.

  10. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  11. Intraoperative Epi-Aortic Scans Reduce Adverse Neurological Sequelae in Elderly, High Risk Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery - a Propensity Matched, Cumulative Sum Control Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Suvitesh; Leiva Juarez, Miguel M; Tahir, Zaheer; Yiu, Patrick

    2017-07-01

    Adverse neurological sequelae are a major cause of morbidity and mortality after coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery, due to manipulation of an atherosclerotic aorta. The purpose of this study is to measure the impact of intraoperative epi-aortic scanning in reducing neurologic sequelae after CABG, and the patient subgroups that are benefitted the most. Patients that underwent first-time CABG from July 2010 to March 2014 (n=1,989) were retrospectively reviewed and stratified by history of intraoperative epi-aortic scan (n=350) or no scan (n=1,639). Baseline characteristics, rates of adverse neurological events, and overall survival were compared among groups in both matched and unmatched cohorts and tested using Student's t-test, chi(2) test, or log-rank test, respectively. Multivariable analysis using logistic regression was performed to identify potential predictors for neurological sequelae. Cumulative summation plots (CUSUM) were constructed to display the number of preventable adverse neurological events per consecutive patient that underwent CABG. A p≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. The use of epi-aortic scan (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.09-0.99, p=0.48) was an independent predictor of adverse events. Overall rates of stroke (0.29% vs 0.55%), postoperative confusional state (1.43% vs 3.42%), or both (1.71% vs 3.72%) were lower in those scanned. CUSUM scores were higher in scanned patients, especially in those with an age above 70 years or logistic Euroscore >2. Intraoperative epi-aortic scan is an effective assessment tool for atherosclerotic burden in the ascending aorta and can guide surgical strategy to decrease adverse neurological outcomes, particularly in high risk and elderly patients. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). All rights reserved.

  12. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  13. Occupational Hazards among Dental Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, S S; Pandey, S S

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess and increase the level of awareness of occupational hazards among the dental surgeons of Indian Navy. The data was obtained using a self-administrated questionnaire from 17 serving dental surgeons that included questions on personal data, awareness of occupational hazards, safety measures practiced and experience of occupational hazard while in practice. All the respondents were aware of the occupational hazards at workplace and had been vaccinated against Hepatitis B infection. 82.3% had regular exposure to dental amalgam. Backache was the commonest hazard in 70.59% members of the study. This study shows that although there appears to be a high level of awareness of exposure to occupational hazards among the dental surgeons of the Indian Navy, the practical steps to prevent them needs to be reinforced. Increased awareness must be created about the dangers of chronic mercury poisoning, its prevention, the importance of regular monitoring of blood mercury levels and the mercury vapour levels in the clinic.

  14. EEG in Sarcoidosis Patients Without Neurological Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin Topçuoğlu, Özgür; Kavas, Murat; Öztaş, Selahattin; Arınç, Sibel; Afşar, Gülgün; Saraç, Sema; Midi, İpek

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease affecting nervous system in 5% to 10% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as the most sensitive method for detecting neurosarcoidosis. However, the most common findings in MRI are the nonspecific white matter lesions, which may be unrelated to sarcoidosis and can occur because of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and other inflammatory or infectious disorders, as well. Autopsy studies report more frequent neurological involvement than the ante mortem studies. The aim of this study is to assess electroencephalography (EEG) in sarcoidosis patients without neurological findings in order to display asymptomatic neurological dysfunction. We performed EEG on 30 sarcoidosis patients without diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis or prior neurological comorbidities. Fourteen patients (46.7%) showed intermittant focal and/or generalized slowings while awake and not mentally activated. Seven (50%) of these 14 patients with EEG slowings had nonspecific white matter changes while the other half showed EEG slowings in the absence of MRI changes. We conclude that EEG slowings, when normal variants (psychomotor variant, temporal theta of elderly, frontal theta waves) are eliminated, may be an indicator of dysfunction in brain activity even in the absence of MRI findings. Hence, EEG may contribute toward detecting asymptomatic neurological dysfunction or probable future neurological involvement in sarcoidosis patients. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2016.

  15. A survey of general surgeons regarding laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: practice patterns, barriers, and educational needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisonno, M; Kaneva, P; Watanabe, Y; Fried, G M; Feldman, L S; Lebedeva, E; Vassiliou, M C

    2015-10-01

    Practice patterns for inguinal hernia repair vary significantly among surgeons. The purpose of this study was to identify perceived indications for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (LIHR), and to identify barriers to its adoption and educational needs for surgeons. A web-based survey was sent to general surgery members of several North American surgical societies, and to surgical residents through program directors. The 33-item survey was divided in 4 sections: demographics, utilization of techniques, management based on 11 clinical scenarios, reasons for not performing LIHR and educational needs for those who want to learn. Six hundred and ninety-seven general surgeons and 206 general surgery residents responded to the survey. Surgeons with MIS fellowships, and surgeons at the beginning of their careers are more likely to perform LIHR. Out of the 11 clinical scenarios, surgeons preferred a laparoscopic approach (totally extraperitoneal or transabdominal preperitoneal) for bilateral (48 %) and recurrent (44 %) hernias. However, 46 % of respondents never perform LIHR. Of these, 70 % consider the benefits of laparoscopy to be minimal, 59 % said they lack the requisite training, and 26 % are interested in learning. Surgeons (70 %) and residents (73 %) agreed that the best educational method would be a course followed by expert proctoring. Surgeons remain divided on the utility of laparoscopic surgery for inguinal hernia repair. Nearly half of responding surgeons never perform LIHR, and the other half offer it selectively. One quarter of surgeons who do not perform LIHR are interested in learning. This reveals a knowledge gap that could be addressed with educational programs.

  16. [Improving comprehensive quality of gastrointestinal surgeons to cope with complicated medical environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xin-yu

    2012-01-01

    The doctor-patient relationship has become increasingly tense. The requirement of the society for physicians, especially surgeons is higher. Apart from fine professional skills, surgeons must learn some other skills, such as communication, the ability of self-decompression, and the awareness of public relationship to deal with inculpation from the media and society. The medical record is more and more important nowadays, surgeons should pay enough attention to it. The public misunderstanding of the medical profession will surely harm both doctors and patients in the end.

  17. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  18. Suicide in Neurologic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, David B.; Anderson, C. Alan

    2002-11-01

    The risk of attempted or completed suicide is increased in patients with migraine with aura, epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and Huntington's disease. Contrary to the general perception that the risk of suicide among patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing conditions is low, several reports suggest that the risk of suicide in these patients increases relative to the general population. Some patients at risk for neurologic disorders are also at increased risk for suicide; in particular, the risk of suicide is increased among persons at risk for Huntington's disease, independent of the presence or absence of the Huntington's gene mutation. The risk of attempted or completed suicide in neurologic illness is strongly associated with depression, feelings of hopelessness or helplessness, and social isolation. Additional suicide risk factors in persons with neurologic illness include cognitive impairment, relatively younger age (under 60 years), moderate physical disability, recent onset or change in illness, a lack of future plans or perceived meaning in life, recent losses (personal, occupational, or financial), and prior history of psychiatric illness or suicidal behavior. Substance dependence, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, and some personality disorders (eg, borderline personality disorder) may also contribute to increased risk of suicide among persons with neurologic illnesses. Identification and aggressive treatment of psychiatric problems, especially depression, as well as reduction of modifiable suicide risk factors among patients with neurologic illness is needed to reduce the risk of attempted and completed suicide in this population.

  19. Neurologic manifestations of achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jacqueline T; Bodensteiner, John B; Butler, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the best described and most common form of the congenital short-limbed dwarfing conditions. Achondroplasia is apparent at birth and has a birth prevalence of 1 in 20000-30000 live-born infants. Achondroplasia is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition, although 80% of cases occur sporadically as new events in their families. Achondroplasia is caused, in virtually all of the cases, by a G380R mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Patients with achondroplasia should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians including geneticists, neurologists, and orthopedists, since there are numerous bony and neurological complications. The most severe complication results from craniocervical stenosis and medullary and upper spinal cord compression, which can have devastating and even lethal sequelae during early childhood. In subsequent decades, including adolescence, spinal cord and nerve compression are more prominent. The neurological complications of achondroplasia have been recognized in adults for more than a century and are attributed to bony defects, connective tissue structures, or both. Similar neurological complications are now appreciated in infants, young children, and teenagers with achondroplasia. Defective connective tissue elements in achondroplasia frequently lead to ligamentous laxity, which can aggravate the complications associated with bony stenosis. Bony abnormalities are known to cause neurological morbidity and lead to a shortened lifespan. Neurological complications associated with achondroplasia are reviewed, including recommendations for the evaluation and management of these clinical problems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  1. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  2. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The neurology literature 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoujah, Danya; Chang, Wan-Tsu W; Abraham, Michael K

    2017-09-06

    Emergency neurology is a complex and rapidly changing field. Its evolution can be attributed in part to increased imaging options, debates about optimal treatment, and simply the growth of emergency medicine as a specialty. Every year, a number of articles published in emergency medicine or other specialty journals should become familiar to the emergency physician. This review summarizes neurology articles published in 2016, which the authors consider crucial to the practice of emergency medicine. The articles are categorized according to disease process, with the understanding that there can be significant overlap among articles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgeons' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2012-02-01

    The importance of non-technical skills to surgical performance is gaining wide acceptance. This article discusses the core cognitive and social skills categories thought to underpin medical knowledge and surgical expertise, and describes the rise of non-technical skill models of assessment in surgery. Behavior rating systems such as NOTSS (Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons) have been developed to support education and assessment in this regard. We now understand more about these critical skills and how they impact surgery. The challenge in the future is to incorporate them into undergraduate teaching, postgraduate training, workplace assessment, and perhaps even selection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Perinatal pharmacology: applications for neonatal neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Anne; Allegaert, Karel

    2011-11-01

    The principles of clinical pharmacology also apply to neonates, but their characteristics warrant a tailored approach. We focus on aspects of both developmental pharmacokinetics (concentration/time relationship) and developmental pharmacodynamics (concentration/effect relationship) in neonates. We hereby aimed to link concepts used in clinical pharmacology with compound-specific observations (anti-epileptics, analgosedatives) in the field of neonatal neurology. Although in part anecdotal, we subsequently illustrate the relevance of developmental pharmacology in the field of neonatal neurology by a specific intervention (e.g. whole body cooling), specific clinical presentations (e.g. short and long term outcome following fetal exposure to antidepressive agents, the development of new biomarkers for fetal alcohol syndrome) and specific clinical needs (e.g. analgosedation in neonates, excitocytosis versus neuro-apoptosis/impaired synaptogenesis). Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ... more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  7. Non-technical skills of surgical trainees and experienced surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, H; Marlow, N; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P J; Kiermeier, A; Babidge, W; Altree, M; Pena, G; Maddern, G

    2017-05-01

    In addition to technical expertise, surgical competence requires effective non-technical skills to ensure patient safety and maintenance of standards. Recently the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons implemented a new Surgical Education and Training (SET) curriculum that incorporated non-technical skills considered essential for a competent surgeon. This study sought to compare the non-technical skills of experienced surgeons who completed their training before the introduction of SET with the non-technical skills of more recent trainees. Surgical trainees and experienced surgeons undertook a simulated scenario designed to challenge their non-technical skills. Scenarios were video recorded and participants were assessed using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) scoring system. Participants were divided into subgroups according to years of experience and their NOTSS scores were compared. For most NOTSS elements, mean scores increased initially, peaking around the time of Fellowship, before decreasing roughly linearly over time. There was a significant downward trend in score with increasing years since being awarded Fellowship for six of the 12 NOTSS elements: considering options (score -0·015 units per year), implementing and reviewing decisions (-0·020 per year), establishing a shared understanding (-0·014 per year), setting and maintaining standards (-0·024 per year), supporting others (-0·031 per year) and coping with pressure (-0·015 per year). The drop in NOTSS score was unexpected and highlights that even experienced surgeons are not immune to deficiencies in non-technical skills. Consideration should be given to continuing professional development programmes focusing on non-technical skills, regardless of the level of professional experience. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Neurological aspects of eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dejana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficult types of preeclampsia and eclampsia are presented with the neurological symptoms. The break of cerebral autoregulation mechanism plays the most important role in pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm. Nevertheless eclampsia isn’t just an ordinary hypertensive encephalopathy because other pathogenic mechanisms are involved in its appearance. The main neuropathologic changes are multifocal vasogenic edema, perivascular multiple microinfarctions and petechial hemorrhages. Neurological clinical manifestations are convulsions, headache, visual disturbances and rarely other discrete focal neurological symptoms. Eclampsia is a high-risk factor for onset of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. This is a reason why neurological diagnostic tests are sometimes needed. The method of choice for evaluation of complicated eclampsia is computerized brain topography that shows multiple areas of hypodensity in occipitoparietal regions. These changes are focal vasogenic cerebral edema. For differential diagnosis of eclampsia and stroke other diagnostic methods can be used - fundoscopic exam, magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebral angiography and cerebrospinal fluid exam. The therapy of eclampsia considers using of magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive, anticonvulsive and antiedematous drugs.

  9. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a

  10. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. The paediatric surgeon and his working conditions in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnassingbé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study described the current conditions of work of paediatric surgeons in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa (FSSA and set the debate at the level of the humanist thinking in medicine. Patients and Methods: This was a multicentre study from 1 st May to 30 th October 2008. The African Society of paediatric surgeons′ directory was used to identify paediatric surgeons in the Francophone′s countries in Sub Saharan Africa. The parameters studied were number of surgeons per country, means of training, working conditions, remunerations, needs for continuous training and the research. Results: A total of 41 paediatric surgeons (68.33% responded. The average number of paediatric surgeons per country was 5. The means of training included government scholarships among 7 paediatric surgeons (17.07%, scholarship from a non-governmental organisations in 14 (34.15% and self-sponsorships in 20 (48.78%. The average salary was 450 Euros (€ (range: 120-1 400 Euros. Most of the paediatric surgeons (68.29% had internet services for continuous update courses and research. Thirty six paediatric surgeons (87.80% had no subscription to specialised scientific journals. Conclusion: The paediatric surgeon in FSSA faces many problems related to his working and living conditions that may have a negative impact on their competences.

  12. The early struggles of the fledgling American Academy of Neurology: resistance from the old guard of American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2013-01-01

    The American Neurological Association, established in 1874, was a small exclusive society comprising senior neurologists at a select number of north-eastern academic institutions. In 1948, an attempt was made to establish a second neurological society in the USA. The American Academy of Neurology was formed around a group of young neurologists who represented the country's Midwest and other regions. The American Academy of Neurology is now the larger of the two organizations, even though the American Academy of Neurology began as a small and politically vulnerable organization, arising in the shadow of the powerful and established American Neurological Association. How did the 75-year-old association react when a second, seemingly redundant, neurological association attempted to organize? This question has not been the focus of historical work, and the purpose of this study was to address this. To do so, the author studied the primary source materials in the American Academy of Neurology Historical Collection and the papers of Dr Henry Alsop Riley, an American neurologist, who was influential in both the American Neurological Association and American Academy of Neurology. On its formation, the American Academy of Neurology did not enter a vacuum. Indeed, the long-existing American Neurological Association actively resisted the new organization. There was reluctance to accept the new idea on a conceptual level, a formal attempt to hijack the new organization and discussions about punitive actions against its founder, while at the same time an attempt to bring him into the American Neurological Association leadership. Although the American Neurological Association attempted to frame itself as the patrician 'upper chamber' of American neurology, the American Academy of Neurology leadership was ultimately savvier at political manoeuvring and use of government agencies and funding organizations. The struggle of the American Academy of Neurology with the American

  13. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and television series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Martínez-Martínez, Ariadna; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    The portrayal of neurological disability and deficiency on television has not always been approached in the same way, but has instead tended to reflect the standpoint taken by society with regard to these issues and how they are dealt with according to the prevailing conceptions and values at each particular time. To address the appearance of neurological pathologies in television series and to ponder on the image they have in such contexts. Deficiency and disability of neurological origin have often been depicted on television in series, telefilms and documentaries, and in a wide variety of ways. Here we examine different television series and how they have dealt with neurological pathology, its diagnosis and its treatment, as well as the figure of the healthcare professional and social-familial adaptation. Examples cited include series such as House MD, Glee, American Horror Story, Homeland or Game of Thrones. Television series are a useful tool for making some neurological pathologies better known to the public and for dispelling the myths surrounding others, provided that the pathologies are dealt with in a realistic manner, which is not always the case. More care should be taken with regard to the way in which health professionals are portrayed in television series, as it is not always done correctly and may mislead viewers, who take what they see on the TV as being real.

  14. How do Patients Trade-Off Surgeon Choice and Waiting Times for Total Joint Replacement: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Deal, Ken; Conner-Spady, Barbara; Bohm, Eric; Hawker, Gillian; Loucks, Lynda; MacDonald, Karen V; Noseworthy, Tom

    2018-02-06

    Patients face significant waiting times for hip and knee total joint replacement (TJR) in publicly funded healthcare systems. We aimed to assess how surgeon selection and reputation affect patients' willingness to wait for TJR. We assessed patient preferences using a discrete choice experiment questionnaire with 12 choice scenarios administered to patients referred for TJR. Based on qualitative research, pre- and pilot-testing, we characterized each scenario by five attributes: surgeon reputation, surgeon selection, waiting time to surgeon visit (initial consultation), waiting time to surgery, and travel time to hospital. Preferences were assessed using hierarchical Bayes analysis and evaluated for goodness-of-fit. We conducted simulation analyses to understand how patients value surgeon reputation and surgeon selection in terms of willingness to wait for surgeon visit and surgery. Of 422 participants, 68% were referred for knee TJR. The most important attribute was surgeon reputation followed by waiting times, surgeon selection process and travel time. Patients appear willing to wait 10 months for a visit with an excellent reputation surgeon before switching to a good reputation surgeon. Patients in the highest pain category were willing to wait 7.3 months before accepting the next available surgeon, compared to 12 months for patients experiencing the least pain. Our findings confirm that patients value surgeon reputation in the context of wait times and surgeon selection. We suggest opportunities to reduce wait times by explicitly offering the next available surgeon to increase patient choice, and by reporting surgeon performance to reduce potential misinformation about reputation. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Current practice patterns and knowledge among gynecologic surgeons of InterStim® programming after implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Deslyn T G; Gaskins, Jeremy T; Frazier, LaTisha; Francis, Sean L; Kinman, Casey L; Meriwether, Kate V

    2017-10-03

    The objective of this study was to describe surgeons' current practices in InterStim® programming after initial implantation and their knowledge of programming parameters. We hypothesized that surgeons performing their own reprogramming would have increased knowledge. We administered a written survey to attendees at the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons Scientific Meeting and analyzed those on which surgeons indicated they offer InterStim® care. The survey queried surgeon characteristics, experience with InterStim® implantation and programming, and clinical opinions regarding reprogramming and tested six knowledge-based questions about programming parameters. Correct response to all six questions was the primary outcome. One hundred and thirty-five of 407 (33%) attendees returned the survey, of which 99 met inclusion criteria. Most respondents (88 of 99; 89%) were between 36 and 60 years, 27 (73%) were women, 76 (77%) practiced in a university setting, and 76 (77%) were trained in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS). Surgeons who had InterStim® programming training were more likely to perform their own programming [15/46 (32%) vs 6/47 (13%), p = 0.03]. Most answered all knowledge-based questions correctly (62/90, 69%); no surgeon characteristics were significantly associated with this outcome. Most surgeons cited patient comfort (71/80, 89%) and symptom relief (64/80, 80%) as important factors when reprogramming, but no prevalent themes emerged on how and why surgeons change certain programming parameters. Surgeons who had formal InterStim® programming training are more likely to perform programming themselves. No surgeon characteristic was associated with improved programming knowledge. We found that surgeons prioritize patient comfort and symptoms when deciding to reprogram.

  16. Burn surgeons in South Africa: A rare species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allorto, Nikki Leigh; Zoepke, Simone; Clarke, Damian L; Rode, Heinz

    2016-01-07

    The high burden of burn injuries in South Africa (SA) requires surgeons skilled in burn care. However, there are few dedicated burn surgeons and properly equipped units or centres. To quantify the involvement of surgeons in burn care in SA hospitals, identify factors that attract surgeons to pursue burn care as a career and deter them from doing so, and understand the challenges of hospitals treating burn patients around the country. This was a prospective, qualitative study. Questionnaires were handed out at the South African Burn Society Congress in September 2013 and a trade symposium in March 2014. One hundred questionnaires were handed out, and there was a 70% response rate. Twenty-six (39%) of the respondents had a specialist surgical qualification. Only half the units had registrars (48%) and interns (51%) on their staff. Only 30% of the respondents were dedicated to burn care alone, the majority being involved on a part-time basis. The most common factor respondents suggested was needed to recruit future burn care providers, cited by 76%, was better facilities and resources. Other factors included training and skills development (59%), subspecialist training (55%), development of a diploma in burn care (52%), development of research (52%) and healthcare worker psychological support (45%). We have demonstrated that current workforce resources for burn care are inadequate, the major deficit being lack of training and the resource-restricted environment. This survey provides basic information towards workforce planning, which can be used to inform the necessary strategic decisions.

  17. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  18. Do Modern Spectacles Endanger Surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Simon J.; Smith, Charlotte; Bialostocki, Adam; McEwan, Christopher N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Despite documented cases of infectious disease transmission to medical staff via conjunctival contamination and widespread recommendation of protective eyewear use during surgical procedures, a large number of surgeons rely on their prescription spectacles as sole eye protection. Modern fashion spectacles, being of increasingly slim design, may no longer be adequate in this role. Methods: A survey was conducted among the surgeons at Waikato Hospital from December 7, 2004 to February 1, 2005, to assess current operating theater eyewear practices and attitudes. Those who wore prescription spectacles were asked to assume a standardized “operating position” from which anatomic measurements were obtained. These data were mathematically analyzed to determine the degree of palebral fissure protection conferred by their spectacles. Results: Of 71 surgical practitioners surveyed, 45.1% required prescription lenses for operating, the mean spectacle age being 2.45 years; 84.5% had experienced prior periorbital blood splashes; 2.8% had previously contracted an illness attributed to such an event; 78.8% participants routinely used eye protection, but of the 27 requiring spectacles, 68.0% used these as their sole eye protection. Chief complaints about safety glasses and facial shields were of fogging, poor comfort, inability to wear spectacles underneath, and unavailability. Our model predicted that 100%, 92.6%, 77.8%, and 0% of our population were protected by their spectacles laterally, medially, inferiorly, and superiorly, respectively. Conclusions: Prescription spectacles of contemporary styling do not provide adequate protection against conjunctival blood splash injuries. Our model predicts the design adequacy of currently available purpose-designed protective eyewear, which should be used routinely. PMID:17435558

  19. The neurology of proverbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, D

    1990-01-01

    Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are "concrete", recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests) point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH). Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  20. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  1. [Vitamin D and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Éric; Camu, William

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk of multiple sclerosis and also with a higher relapse rate as well as a higher number of MRI lesions. Elders with vitamin D deficiency have worse cognitive performance. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease. Ischemic stroke are more frequent and more severe in patients with low vitamin D levels. Carotid atherosclerosis is more frequent and more severe in patients with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk and worse prognosis of Parkinson's disease. In the different neurological disorders discussed herein, gene polymorphisms that could alter vitamin D metabolism are also associated with a higher incidence or a worse disease prognosis. Despite the links between vitamin D deficiency and the risks of developing neurological disorders, there is, to date, no proof that supplementation could alter the course of these diseases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  3. Good surgeon: A search for meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopov, Andrey L; Artioukh, Dmitri Y

    2017-01-01

    The art and philosophy of surgery are not as often discussed as scientific discoveries and technological advances in the modern era of surgery. Although these are difficult to teach and pass on to the next generations of surgeons they are no less important for training good surgeons and maintaining their high standards. The authors of this review and opinion article tried to define what being a good surgeon really means and to look into the subject by analysing the essential conditions for being a good surgeon and the qualities that such a specialist should possess. In addition to a strong theoretic knowledge and practical skills and among the several described professional and personal characteristics, a good surgeon is expected to have common sense. It enables a surgeon to make a sound practical judgment independent of specialized medical knowledge and training. The possible ways of developing and/or enhancing common sense during surgical training and subsequent practice require separate analysis.

  4. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  5. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...... alongside patient safety. The present literature study supports the need for a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of an individually designed training program for surgeons performing MIS....

  6. SURGEON-REPORTED CONFLICT WITH INTENSIVISTS ABOUT POSTOPERATIVE GOALS OF CARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Olson, Terrah J.; Brasel, Karen J.; Redmann, Andrew J.; Alexander, G. Caleb; Schwarze, Margaret L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine surgeons’ experiences of conflict with intensivists and nurses about goals of care for their postoperative patients. Design Cross-sectional incentivized U.S. mail-based survey. Setting Private and academic surgical practices. Participants 2,100 vascular, neurological, and cardiothoracic surgeons. Main Outcome Measures Surgeon-reported rates of conflict with intensivists and nurses about goals of care in patients with poor post-surgical outcomes. Results The adjusted response rate was 55.6%. Forty-three percent of surgeons report sometimes or always experiencing conflict about postoperative goals of care with intensivists, and 43% report conflict with nurses. Younger surgeons report higher rates of conflict than older surgeons with both intensivists (57 vs. 32%, p=0.001) and nurses (48 vs. 33%, p=0.001). Surgeons practicing in closed ICUs report more frequent conflict than those practicing in open ICUs (60 vs. 41% p=0.005). On multivariate analysis, the odds of reporting conflict with intensivists were 2.5 times higher for surgeons with fewer years of experience as compared to their older colleagues (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.6-3.8) and 70% higher for reporting conflict with nurses (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.6). The odds of reporting conflict with intensivists about goals of postoperative care were 40% lower for surgeons who primarily manage their ICU patients than for those who work in a closed unit (OR: 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.96). Conclusions Surgeons regularly experience conflict with critical care clinicians about goals of care for patients with poor postoperative outcomes. Higher rates of conflict are associated with less experience and working in a closed ICU. PMID:23324837

  7. Surgeon perception of cancellous screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesz, Michael J; Gustafson, Peter A; Patel, Bipinchandra V; Jastifer, James R; Chess, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    The ability of surgeons to optimize screw insertion torque in nonlocking fixation constructs is important for stability, particularly in osteoporotic and cancellous bone. This study evaluated screw torque applied by surgeons during synthetic cancellous fixation. It evaluated the frequency with which screws were stripped by surgeons, factors associated with screw stripping, and ability of surgeons to recognize it. Ten surgeons assembled screw and plate fixation constructs into 3 densities of synthetic cancellous bone while screw insertion torque and axial force were measured. For each screw, the surgeon recorded a subjective rating as to whether or not the screw had been stripped. Screws were then advanced past stripping, and stripped screws were identified by comparing the insertion torque applied by the surgeon to the measured stripping torque. Surgeons stripped 109 (45.4%) of 240 screws and did not recognize stripping 90.8% of the time when it occurred. The tendency to strip screws was highly variable among individual surgeons (stripping ranging from 16.7% to 83.3%, P perception is not reliable at preventing and detecting screw stripping at clinical torque levels in synthetic cancellous bone. Less aggressive insertion or standardized methods of insertion may improve the stability of nonlocking screw and plate constructs.

  8. Danish surgeons' views on minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons [Los Angeles, CA]) due to their postulated benefits of better cosmesis, less pain, and quicker recovery. This questionnaire-based study investigated Danish surgeons' attitudes toward these new procedures. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A 26-item questionnaire was developed...... that the risk was equal to traditional laparoscopy (3%). The fraction of surgeons willing to learn SILS and NOTES was 44.6% and 32.7%, respectively. The desire to learn was higher among less experienced and surgically active surgeons. Of the responders, 68.8% considered SILS and 43.2% considered NOTES would...

  9. Reconstructive or cosmetic plastic surgery? Factors influencing the type of practice established by Canadian plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Colin W; Courtemanche, Douglas J; Verchere, Cynthia G; Bush, Kevin L; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2012-01-01

    Some argue that the specialty of plastic surgery is facing a changing identity. Challenged by factors such as increasing competition in the cosmetic marketplace and decreasing reimbursement for reconstructive procedures, many American plastic surgeons have increasingly adopted cosmetic-focused practices. The present study investigated the currently unknown practice profiles of Canadian plastic surgeons to determine the reconstructive-cosmetic mix, as well as factors that influence practice type to determine whether a similar pattern exists in Canada. An anonymous online survey regarding practice profiles was distributed to all 352 Canadian plastic surgeons with e-mail accounts registered with the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and/or the Canadian Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. The survey response rate was 34% (120 responses), of which 75% of respondents currently had a reconstructive practice and 25% had a cosmetic practice. Reconstructive surgeons had more educational debt following their training, spent more time on emergency call, academics and teaching and, when deciding which type of practice to establish, were more influenced by academic opportunities and less influenced by financial and nonfinancial metrics. Similarities between the groups included hours worked per week and academic achievements. The field of reconstructive plastic surgery appears to be thriving in Canada. While a transition from reconstructive to cosmetic practice is common, compared with their American colleagues, a greater proportion of Canadian plastic surgeons maintain reconstructive practices. Differences between reconstructive and cosmetic plastic surgeons are discussed.

  10. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  11. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences (AJNS) is owned and controlled by the Pan African Association of Neurological Sciences (PAANS). The AJNS's aim is to publish scientific papers of any aspects of Neurological Sciences. AJNS is published quarterly. Articles submitted exclusively to the AJNS are accepted if neither ...

  12. Psychoneuroimmunology and the pediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagge, Edward P; Natali, Elizabeth Lee; Lima, Evan; Leek, Dustin; Neece, Cameron L; Randall, Kiti Freier

    2013-08-01

    The mind-body connection is receiving increasing scrutiny in a large number of clinical settings, although research has lagged in the pediatric specialties. Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is a novel interdisciplinary scientific field that examines the relationship of the mind to the patient's neurologic, endocrine, and immune systems by examining critical parameters such as the effects of mental stress on wound healing and infection rates. Techniques that modify a patient's emotional and mental responses to illness and surgery have positive effects on their physiology resulting in improved recoveries and higher patient satisfaction rates. In the appropriate clinical settings, an awareness of PNI can enhance outcomes for pediatric surgical patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Burnout phenomenon in U.S. plastic surgeons: risk factors and impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Hannan A; Rawlani, Roshni; Mioton, Lauren M; Dumanian, Gregory A; Kim, John Y S; Rawlani, Vinay

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies by the American College of Surgeons reveal that nearly 40 percent of U.S. surgeons exhibit signs of burnout. The authors endeavored to quantify the incidence of burnout among U.S. plastic surgeons, determine identifiable risk factors, and evaluate its impact on quality of life. All U.S. residing members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons were invited to complete an anonymous survey between September of 2010 and August of 2011. The survey contained a validated measure of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and evaluated surgeon demographics, professional and personal risk factors, career satisfaction, self-perceived medical errors, professional impairment, and family-home conflicts. Of the 5942 surgeons invited, 1691 actively practicing U.S. plastic surgeons (28.5 percent) completed the survey. The validated rate of burnout was 29.7 percent. Significant risk factors for burnout included subspecialty, number of hours worked and night calls per week, annual income, practice setting, and academic rank. Approximately one-fourth of plastic surgeons had significantly lower quality-of-life scores than the U.S. population norm, and this risk increases in burned out surgeons. In addition to having lower career satisfaction and more work-home conflicts, plastic surgeons with burnout also had a nearly two-fold increased risk of self-reported medical errors and self-reported impairment. Over one-fourth of plastic surgeons in the United States experience validated burnout, with concomitant attenuated career satisfaction and quality of life. Multivariate analysis identified predisposing factors that may aid in better understanding risk profiles that lead to burnout; therefore, efforts to understand and thereby avoid this burnout phenomenon are warranted.

  14. Surgeon's vigilance in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Tien, Geoffrey; Atkins, Stella M; Swindells, Colin; Tanin, Homa; Meneghetti, Adam; Qayumi, Karim A; Neely, O; Panton, M

    2011-05-01

    Surgeons' vigilance regarding patient condition was assessed using eye-tracking techniques during a simulated laparoscopic procedure. Surgeons were required to perform a partial cholecystectomy in a virtual reality trainer (SurgicalSim; METI Inc, Sarasota, FL) while wearing a lightweight head-mounted eye-tracker (Locarna systems Inc, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada). Half of the patients were preprogrammed to present a mildly unstable cardiac condition during the procedure. Surgical performance (evaluated by task time, instrument trajectory, and errors), mental workload (by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index), and eye movement were recorded and compared between 13 experienced and 10 novice surgeons. Experienced surgeons took longer to complete the task and also made more errors. The overall workload reported by surgeons was similar, but expert surgeons reported a higher level of frustration and a lower level of physical demands. Surgeon workload was greater when operating on the unstable patient than on the stable patient. Novices performed faster but focused more of their attention on the surgical task. In contrast, experts glanced more frequently at the anesthetic monitor. This study shows the usefulness of using eye-tracking technology to measure a surgeon's vigilance during an operation. Eye-tracking observations can lead to inferences about a surgeon's behavior for patient safety. The unsatisfactory performance of expert surgeons on the VR simulator suggests that the fidelity of the virtual simulator needs to improve to enable surgeons to transfer their clinical skills. This, in turn, suggests using caution when having clinical experts as instructors to teach skills with virtual simulators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Standards in Neurological Rehabilitation, June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Barnes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS Scientific Panel on Neurorehabilitation established a Task Force on standards in neurological rehabilitation in June 1996. The remit for the Task Force was to: (1 produce a report on the state of neurological rehabilitation across Europe; and (2 recommend standards for the provision of neurological services for disabled people. The main conclusions of the Task Force were as follows: (1 A questionnaire circulated to each European member country has indicated a significant lack of adequate neurological rehabilitation facilities across Europe. Very few countries have any established network of neurological rehabilitation centres. Few countries have adequately trained neurological rehabilitation physicians, therapists or nurses. Such poor facilities should be seen in the context of the large numbers and increasing prevalence of people with neurological disabilities. (2 The Task Force has summarized the significant benefits that can follow from the establishment of a dedicated and cost effective neurological rehabilitation service including functional improvement, reduction of unnecessary complications, better coordination and use of limited resources, improved opportunities for education, training and research and a clear point of contact for the disabled person. (3 The Task Force recommends minimum standards for the prevention of neurological disability including access to health education, genetic counselling and emergency resources. The Task Force also encourages governments to invest in improved legislation for accident prevention. (4 The Task Force has outlined some minimum standards for the staffing of a neurological rehabilitation service including improved training both for neurologists and rehabilitation physicians. Such training could include a cross-national training programme both for physicians and other health care staff. (5 The Task Force supports a two-tier system of

  16. Neurology and literature 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2014-05-01

    Good literary fiction has the potential to move us, extend our sense of life, transform our prospective views and help us in the face of adversity. A neurological disorder is likely to be the most challenging experience a human being may have to confront in a lifetime. As such, literary recreations of illnesses have a doubly powerful effect. Study the synergies between neurology and fictional literature with particular reference to narrative based medicine (NBM). Doctors establish boundaries between the normal and the abnormal. Taking a clinical history is an act of interpretation in which the doctor integrates the science of objective signs and measurable quantities with the art of subjective clinical judgment. The more discrepancy there is between the patient's experience with the illness and the doctor's interpretation of that disease, the less likely the doctor-patient interaction is to succeed. NBM contributes to a better discernment of the meanings, thus considering disease as a biographical event rather than just a natural fact. Drawing from their own experience with disease, writers of fiction provide universal insights through their narratives, whilst neuroscientists, like Cajal, have occasionally devoted their scientific knowledge to literary narratives. Furthermore, neurologists from Alzheimer to Oliver Sacks remind us of the essential value of NBM in the clinic. Integrating NBM (the narrative of patients) and the classic holistic approach to patients with our current paradigm of evidence based medicine represents a challenge as relevant to neurologists as keeping up with technological and scientific advances. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. What Name Best Represents Our Specialty? Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Versus Oral and Facial Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Andre V; Elo, Jeffrey A; Sun, Ho-Hyun Brian; Herford, Alan S

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether changing "oral and maxillofacial surgeon" (OMS) to "oral and facial surgeon" improves the perception and awareness of the OMS's role and surgical scope of practice in undergraduate biomedical and dental students. This cross-sectional study requested undergraduate and dental students to select 1 of 5 specialists to treat 21 conditions. Two different surveys were presented: 1 designating specialists as "oral and maxillofacial surgeons" and 1 designating specialists as "oral and facial surgeons." The independent variable was the specialist "oral and maxillofacial surgeon" or "oral and facial surgeon." The dependent variables included specialists chosen for the procedure (ear, nose, and throat surgeon; OMS vs oral and facial surgeon; plastic surgeon; periodontist; and "other"). The test of proportions (z test) with the Yates correction was performed. The sample was composed of 1,671 undergraduate upper division science students and 568 senior dental students. Results showed that undergraduate students' perception of an OMS's surgical scope increased significantly from 28 to 33% when "oral and facial surgeon" was used instead of "oral and maxillofacial surgeon." Dental students' perception of an OMS's surgical scope remained the same whether "oral and maxillofacial surgeon" or "oral and facial surgeon" was used. The results of this study suggest that using "oral and facial surgeon" instead of "oral and maxillofacial surgeon" increases awareness of an OMS's surgical scope of practice in undergraduate upper division science students, which could be an important step toward increasing the recognition of the profession by the general public and other non-dental medical colleagues. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  19. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002 on the admitted cases with neurological complications after chickenpox (with rash or scar. Patients were investigated with CT/MRI, CSF study, EEG and nerve conduction studies and hematological workup. They were followed-up for 1 year and outcome assessed using modified Rankin scale. Results: The latency for the neurological complications was 4-32 days (mean: 16.32 days. There were 18 cases: 10 adults (64% and 8 children (36%. Cerebellar ataxia (normal CT/MRI was observed in 7 cases (32% (mean age: 6.85 years. One patient (6 years had acute right hemiparesis in the fifth week due to left capsular infarct. All these cases spontaneously recovered by 4 weeks. The age range of the adult patients was 13-47 years (mean: 27 years. The manifestations included cerebellar and pyramidal signs (n-4 with features of demyelination in MRI who recovered spontaneously or with methylprednisolone by 8 weeks. Patient with encephalitis recovered in 2 weeks with acyclovir. Guillain Barre syndrome of the demyelinating type (n-2 was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and they had a slow recovery by a modified Rankin scale (mRs score of 3 and 2 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. One case died after hemorrhage into the occipital infarct. There were two cases of asymmetrical neuropathy, one each of the seventh cranial and brachial neuritis. Conclusion: Spontaneous recovery occurs in post-chickenpox cerebellar ataxia. Rarely, serious complications can occur in adults. The demyelinating disorders, either of the central or peripheral

  20. [Michel Latarjet (1913-1999), surgeon explorer!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, T; Liverneaux, P

    2010-05-01

    In 1954, Michel Latarjet, anatomist and surgeon of Lyon, developed an original surgical technique to treat the unstable shoulder . This technique since kept his name: "Latarjet". He was a character in 1000 facets: highly skilled anatomist, skillful surgeon, talented sportsman, accomplished musician, big traveler, and many others... An eclectic life, symbol of an abundant XXth century. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. William Cheselden: anatomist, surgeon, and medical illustrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M A

    1999-11-01

    William Cheselden was Great Britain's foremost surgeon/scientist in the first half of the 18th century. Cheselden directly challenged the Company of Barber-Surgeons' exclusive right to control dissection in London by being the first to conduct a regular series of anatomy lectures and demonstrations outside of the Company's Hall. He incorporated his lecture syllabus into a handbook of anatomy, The Anatomy of the Humane Body, which was used by students for nearly 100 years. Cheselden also wrote the text and drew the illustrations for a majestic atlas of comparative osteology, the Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones. Cheselden used his superior knowledge of anatomy to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with perineal lithotomy, one of the few operations possible in his era. Sagacious and pragmatic, Cheselden recognized that the enlightened practice of surgery beginning to take root in 18th-century London could flourish only under an autonomous body of surgeons. Cheselden used his personal funds and political skills to urge Parliament to pass legislation for the dissolution of the combined Company of Barber-Surgeons and the establishment of separate and distinct Surgeons' and Barbers' Companies. After disjoinder of the two groups on May 2, 1745, Cheselden served as one of the Wardens of the new Company of Surgeons--a predecessor of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In 1746, Cheselden, who helped design the first Surgeons' Hall, served as the Company's Master.

  2. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  3. FOUNDING SOCIETIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry Petroski

    2008-01-01

      [...] with the development of the railroads, the telegraph, and other marvels of the Industrial Revolution, a civil engineering society did not provide a sufficiently broad umbrella under which mining...

  4. Aura and Other Neurologic Dysfunction in or with Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoon, Narayan R; Cutrer, Fred Michael

    2017-07-01

    Migraine can present with a wide range of neurological symptoms. Based on currently available data, the symptoms of typical migraine aura are most likely related to cortical spreading depression (CSD), and evidence supports that CSD can lead to trigeminovascular activation resulting in the headache phase of migraine. An alternative diagnosis to migraine aura should be considered if migrainous headaches present with transient neurological symptoms that have features inconsistent with aura. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  5. Neurological aspects of grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Adriana C; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flavia; Nardi, Antonio E; Machado, Sergio; Pessoa, Tamires M

    2014-01-01

    Despite grief being a universal experience and the increased scientific attention paid to grief and bereavement in recent years, studies that seek to better understand the role of the neurological aspects of grief are still scarce. We found 5 studies that discussed the relationship between the neurological aspects of grief due to the death of a loved one. All studies showed an activation of common areas, i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), insula and amygdala. These findings could indicate that there is a group of areas working together and responding to generate the symptomatology of grief. Because grief is a universal experience, it is essential that the necessary and effective support can be provided to those who experience the loss of someone considered important in their lives, and this requires understanding grief's manifestation, its differential diagnosis in reference to other clinical conditions, mainly psychiatric ones, and adequate forms of intervention and treatment when necessary. Proper understanding and support can help prevent the emergence of more serious health problems.

  6. Surgeon specialty and outcomes after elective spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andreea; Alan, Nima; Seicean, Sinziana; Neuhauser, Duncan; Benzel, Edward C; Weil, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective cohort analysis of prospectively collected clinical data. To compare outcomes of elective spine fusion and laminectomy when performed by neurological and orthopedic surgeons. The relationship between primary specialty training and outcome of spinal surgery is unknown. We analyzed the 2006 to 2012 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database of 50,361 patients, 33,235 (66%) of which were operated on by a neurosurgeon. We eliminated all differences in preoperative and intraoperative risk factors between surgical specialties by matching 17,126 patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (OS) to 17,126 patients who underwent neurosurgery (NS) on propensity scores. Regular and conditional logistic regressions were used to predict adverse postoperative outcomes in the full sample and matched sample, respectively. The effect of perioperative transfusion on outcomes was further assessed in the matched sample. Diagnosis and procedure were the only factors that were found to be significantly different between surgical subspecialties in the full sample. We found that compared with patients who underwent NS, patients who underwent OS were more than twice as likely to experience prolonged length of stay (LOS) (odds ratio: 2.6, 95% confidence interval: 2.4-2.8), and significantly more likely to receive a transfusion perioperatively, have complications, and to require discharge with continued care. After matching, patients who underwent OS continued to have slightly higher odds for prolonged LOS, and twice the odds for receiving perioperative transfusion compared with patients who underwent NS. Taking into account perioperative transfusion did not eliminate the difference in LOS between patients who underwent OS and those who underwent NS. Patients operated on by OS have twice the odds for undergoing perioperative transfusion and slightly increased odds for prolonged LOS. Other differences between surgical specialties in 30-day

  7. Primary care perceptions of neurology and neurology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Angela M; Wade, Carrie; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-06-01

    Neurophobia (fear of neural sciences) and evaluation of independent sector contracts in neurology have seldom been examined among general practitioners (GPs). A questionnaire determined GPs' perceptions of neurology compared with other medical specialties. GP experiences of neurology services with independent sector companies and the local National Health Service (NHS) were compared. Areas of potential improvement in NHS neurology services were recorded from thematic analyses. Among 76 GPs neurology was perceived to be as interesting as other medical specialties. GPs reported less knowledge, more difficulty and less confidence in neurology compared with other medical specialties. There was a preference for a local NHS neurology service (pneurology services provided better patient satisfaction. GPs prefer local NHS neurology services to independent sector contracts. GPs' evaluations should inform commissioning of neurology services. Combating neurophobia should be an integral part of responsive commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Satisfaction with career choice among U.S. plastic surgeons: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streu, Rachel; Hawley, Sarah; Gay, Ashley; Salem, Barbara; Abrahamse, Paul; Alderman, Amy K

    2010-08-01

    The authors' purpose was to describe patterns and correlates of satisfaction with career choice among U.S. plastic surgeons. A mailed, self-administered survey was sent to 708 U.S. plastic surgeons who were randomly sampled from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons registry (71 percent response rate, n = 505). The dependent variable was satisfaction with the decision to become a plastic surgeon, which was created from a scale of four validated questions measuring decisional satisfaction and decisional regret. The independent variables included surgeon and practice characteristics. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between satisfaction with the decision to become a plastic surgeon and independent factors. Few respondents (4 percent) regretted becoming plastic surgeons. Factors independently associated with greater satisfaction with the decision to become a plastic surgeon included group practice compared with solo practice (odds ratio, 1.65; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.0 to 2.71), resident educator (odds ratio, 1.88; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.06 to 3.31), and a highly cosmetic practice mix: primarily cosmetic versus primarily reconstructive (odds ratio, 2.42; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.25 to 4.66) and mixed versus primarily reconstructive (odds ratio, 1.59, 95 percent confidence interval, 0.92 to 2.76). Demographic factors such as age and gender were not associated with surgeon satisfaction. Overall, the majority of plastic surgeons are satisfied with their career choice despite the current health care and economic environment. Factors significantly associated with greater satisfaction with career choice included group practice, involvement in resident education, and a highly elective cosmetic practice.

  9. The Future of Basic Science in Academic Surgery: Identifying Barriers to Success for Surgeon-scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Moles, Chad M; Morowitz, Michael; Zeh, Herbert; Kuo, John S; Levine, Matthew H; Cheng, Lily S; Hackam, David J; Ahuja, Nita; Goldstein, Allan M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the challenges confronting surgeons performing basic science research in today's academic surgery environment. Multiple studies have identified challenges confronting surgeon-scientists and impacting their ability to be successful. Although these threats have been known for decades, the downward trend in the number of successful surgeon-scientists continues. Clinical demands, funding challenges, and other factors play important roles, but a rigorous analysis of academic surgeons and their experiences regarding these issues has not previously been performed. An online survey was distributed to 2504 members of the Association for Academic Surgery and Society of University Surgeons to determine factors impacting success. Survey results were subjected to statistical analyses. We also reviewed publicly available data regarding funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH data revealed a 27% decline in the proportion of NIH funding to surgical departments relative to total NIH funding from 2007 to 2014. A total of 1033 (41%) members responded to our survey, making this the largest survey of academic surgeons to date. Surgeons most often cited the following factors as major impediments to pursuing basic investigation: pressure to be clinically productive, excessive administrative responsibilities, difficulty obtaining extramural funding, and desire for work-life balance. Surprisingly, a majority (68%) did not believe surgeons can be successful basic scientists in today's environment, including departmental leadership. We have identified important barriers that confront academic surgeons pursuing basic research and a perception that success in basic science may no longer be achievable. These barriers need to be addressed to ensure the continued development of future surgeon-scientists.

  10. Deja vu in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The significance of deja vu is widely recognised in the context of temporal lobe epilepsy, and enquiry about deja vu is frequently made in the clinical assessment of patients with possible epilepsy. Deja vu has also been associated with several psychiatric disorders. The historical context of current understanding of deja vu is discussed. The literature reveals deja vu to be a common phenomenon consistent with normality. Several authors have suggested the existence of a "pathological" form of deja vu that differs, qualitatively or quantitatively, from "non-pathological" deja vu. The features of deja vu suggesting neurological or psychiatric pathology are discussed. Several neuroanatomical and psychological models of the deja vu experience are highlighted, implicating the perceptual, mnemonic and affective regions of the lateral temporal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala in the genesis of deja vu. A possible genetic basis for a neurochemical model of deja vu is discussed. Clinical approaches to the patient presenting with possible deja vu are proposed.

  11. Consciousness: A Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking.

  12. Neurology and diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Are neurology residents interested in headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Veiga, A B; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    The years of residency are the pillars of the subsequent practice in every medical specialty. The aim of our study is to evaluate the current situation, degree of involvement, main interests, and perceived quality of the training received by Spanish residents of neurology, specifically in the area of headache. A self-administered survey was designed by the Headache Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology (GECSEN) and was sent via e-mail to all residents who were members of the Society as of May 2015. Fifty-three residents completed the survey (N = 426, 12.4%): 6% were first year residents, 25.5% second year, 23.5% third year, and 45% fourth year residents, all from 13 different Spanish autonomous communities. The areas of greatest interest are, in this order: Vascular neurology, headache, and epilepsy. Of them, 85% believe that the area of headache is undervalued. More than half of residents (52.8%) do not rotate in specific Headache Units and only 35.8% complete their training dominating anaesthetic block and toxin infiltration techniques. Of them, 81.1% believe that research is scarce or absent; 69.8% have never made a poster/presentation, 79.3% have not published and only 15% collaborate on research projects in this area. Lastly, 40% believe that they have not received adequate training. Headache is among the areas that interest our residents the most; however, we believe that we must improve their training both at a patient healthcare level and as researchers. Thus, increasing the number of available courses, creating educational web pages, involving residents in research, and making a rotation in a specialised unit mandatory are among the fundamental objectives of the GECSEN. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. [Future directions of neurology - breakthrough to the next stage ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-11-01

    The 51st Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Neurology was held in Tokyo (Tokyo International Forum) from Thursday, May 20 to Saturday, May 22, 2010 with as many as 5,471 attendants. Our Society has been celebrating its 50th anniversary during the period from 2009 through 2010. At the 51st Annual Meeting in 2010, we looked toward the future, as we celebrate our 50th anniversary together with distinguished guests closely related to our Society. The theme for the 51st Annual Meeting was set as "Future of Neurology-Breakthrough to the next stage-." As represented in the theme, I hope that the Annual Meeting provided an excellent opportunity for all of us to look ahead to the future of Neurology and our Society in the next half-century. We have achieved tremendous advances in better understanding neurological diseases and developing more efficacious treatment over the last half century. Great strides have been made in all areas, of which diagnostic imaging, molecular genetics, immunology and physiology are just a few examples, and understanding of diseases has similarly taken a great leap forward. In Japan, the aging of society coupled with the declining birthrate has placed ever-increasing expectations on neurologists to provide better care for dementia, cerebrovascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Given this situation our Society is required to provide outstanding education in both the pre- and post-graduate context, and, furthermore, to ensure that excellent training programs are available for young neurologists preparing for Board certification. Looking towards the future of neurology, we should continue to anticipate new, ground-breaking achievements for better understanding neurological diseases and establishing more effective treatment through our ongoing endeavors.

  15. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  16. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  17. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  18. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  19. Splicing Regulation in Neurologic Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Licatalosi, Donny D; Darnell, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    .... It is becoming evident that alternative splicing plays a particularly important role in neurologic disease, which is perhaps not surprising given the important role splicing plays in generating...

  20. Action ethical dilemmas in surgery: an interview study of practicing surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordam Ann

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to describe the kinds of ethical dilemmas surgeons face during practice. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a University hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of physicians and nurses about ethically difficult situations in surgical units. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No gender differences were found in the kinds of ethical dilemmas identified among male and female surgeons. The main finding was that surgeons experienced ethical dilemmas in deciding the right treatment in different situations. The dilemmas included starting or withholding treatment, continuing or withdrawing treatment, overtreatment, respecting the patients and meeting patients' expectations. The main focus in the narratives was on ethical dilemmas concerning the patients' well-being, treatment and care. The surgeons narrated about whether they should act according to their own convictions or according to the opinions of principal colleagues or colleagues from other departments. Handling incompetent colleagues was also seen as an ethical dilemma. Prioritization of limited resources and following social laws and regulations represented ethical dilemmas when they contradicted what the surgeons considered was in the patients' best interests. Conclusion The surgeons seemed confident in their professional role although the many ethical dilemmas they experienced in trying to meet the expectations of patients, colleagues and society also made them professionally and personally vulnerable.

  1. Action ethical dilemmas in surgery: an interview study of practicing surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torjuul, Kirsti; Nordam, Ann; Sørlie, Venke

    2005-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the kinds of ethical dilemmas surgeons face during practice. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a University hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of physicians and nurses about ethically difficult situations in surgical units. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No gender differences were found in the kinds of ethical dilemmas identified among male and female surgeons. The main finding was that surgeons experienced ethical dilemmas in deciding the right treatment in different situations. The dilemmas included starting or withholding treatment, continuing or withdrawing treatment, overtreatment, respecting the patients and meeting patients' expectations. The main focus in the narratives was on ethical dilemmas concerning the patients' well-being, treatment and care. The surgeons narrated about whether they should act according to their own convictions or according to the opinions of principal colleagues or colleagues from other departments. Handling incompetent colleagues was also seen as an ethical dilemma. Prioritization of limited resources and following social laws and regulations represented ethical dilemmas when they contradicted what the surgeons considered was in the patients' best interests. Conclusion The surgeons seemed confident in their professional role although the many ethical dilemmas they experienced in trying to meet the expectations of patients, colleagues and society also made them professionally and personally vulnerable. PMID:15996268

  2. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. D. Brucki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA. Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  3. Bariatric operative reporting: Quality assessment and perceptions among bariatric surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogryn, Shannon; Hardy, Krista; Vergis, Ashley

    2017-03-01

    The quality of narrative operative notes is poor. No investigation has previously addressed operative reporting specifically in bariatric surgery. To evaluate surgeons' perceptions of the quality of operative reporting in bariatric surgery and compare this to an audit of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) narrative reports using validated quality indicators. University hospital, Canada. A Web-based survey was distributed to bariatric surgeons across Canada. Perceptions regarding the quality of reporting were gathered using a Likert scale (modified Structured Assessment Format for Evaluating Operative Reports) and free text fields. Forty RYGB narrative reports were analyzed against established quality indicators and compared to respondent's perceptions based on themes. Twenty-four of 34 bariatric surgeons (71%) completed the survey. The most commonly performed procedures were RYGB and sleeve gastrectomy (96% and 100%, respectively). Currently, 70.8% perform a traditional narrative report. The average Structured Assessment Format for Evaluating Operative Reports score for narrative dictations by bariatric surgeons was neutral (27.9/40). The lowest scoring items were the "description of indications" (2.9/5) and "succinctness" (3.3/5). Opinions reflected a need for an immediately generated, standardized, template-based report to improve the quality and accessibility of operative documentation. The quality audit reinforced respondents' perceptions. Reports included only 62.0%±6.6% of quality indicators, with the lowest scoring areas being "patient details," "preoperative events," and "postoperative details" (41.1%, 32.4%, and 31.7%, respectively). This survey revealed a perception of mediocre quality of narrative dictations. This was reinforced by an audit of RYGB operative reports. Future investigations should focus on improving this form of operative communication. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgeons Warn of Trampolines' Down Side

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_167494.html Surgeons Warn of Trampolines' Down Side Very young children should stay off, ... 2017 SATURDAY, July 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A trampoline may have your kids jumping for joy, but ...

  5. Surgeon-patient communication during awake procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire S; Guyton, Kristina; Pariser, Joseph J; Siegler, Mark; Schindler, Nancy; Langerman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons are increasingly performing procedures on awake patients. Communication during such procedures is complex and underexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the faculty of 2 hospitals to participate in an interview regarding their approaches to communication during awake procedures. Three researchers used the constant comparative method to transcribe, code, and review interviews until saturation was reached. Twenty-three surgeons described the advantages and disadvantages of awake procedures, their communication with the awake patient, their interactions with staff and with trainees, the environment of awake procedures, and how communication in this context is taught and learned. Surgeons recognized communication during awake procedures as important and reported varied strategies for ensuring patient comfort in this context. However, they also acknowledged challenges with multiparty communication during awake procedures, especially in balancing commitments to teaching with their duty to comfort the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mentoring Surgeons for the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singletary, S Eva

    2005-01-01

    Effective mentoring is especially critical in the training of surgeons. The practice of surgery in the 21st century is changing rapidly at every level, requiring a more complex approach to mentoring young...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4460 - Surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operating room personnel to protect a surgical wound from contamination. The lubricating or dusting powder... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4460 Surgeon's glove. (a...

  8. College portraits, surgeons and the Archibald Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, John Peterson

    2005-06-01

    The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons is fortunate to have a wonderful collection of portraits, which date from William Cheselden's portrait in the mid 18th century to the latest of immediate past president, Kingsley Faulkner. Many of the portraits are of former College presidents. The presidents have often been painted by the leading artist of the day, many of whom won the Archibald Prize. There are many connections between surgeons and the Archibald Prize, the most prestigious award in Australian art.

  9. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  10. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, I. N.; Bouche, P.; Illa, I.; Léger, J.-M.; van den Bergh, P.; Cornblath, D. R.; Evers, E. M. A.; Hadden, R. D. M.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Koski, C. L.; Nobile-Orazio, E.; Pollard, J.; Sommer, C.; van Doorn, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    Several diagnostic criteria for multifocal motor neuropathy have been proposed in recent years and a beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and various other immunomodulatory drugs has been suggested in several trials and uncontrolled studies. The objectives were to prepare consensus

  11. Youth and Experience: The Effect of Surgeon Experience on Outcomes in Cerebral Palsy Scoliosis Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick J; Samdani, Amer F; Brusalis, Christopher M; Blumberg, Todd; Asghar, Jahangir; Bastrom, Tracey P; Pasha, Saba; Refakis, Christian A; Pahys, Joshua M; Flynn, John M; Sponseller, Paul D

    2018-01-01

    Series on the learning curve in spinal deformity surgery have been published, but none has addressed neuromuscular spinal deformity, comprised of arguably the most complex cases. We present the first multi-center analysis of the impact of surgeon experience on neuromuscular spinal deformity surgery. A multi-center prospective study of spinal deformity surgery for cerebral palsy (CP) with at least 2 years of follow-up provided the dataset for assessment. Surgeons were categorized into one of two groups based on their self-reported first year of practice: an experienced surgeons (ES) group included those with at least 10 years of experience at the time of surgery and a young surgeons (YS) group included those with fewer than 10 years of experience at time of surgery. Groups were compared in multiple pre-operative, operative, and post-operative outcomes. The YS group had 8 surgeons who performed 59 surgeries; the ES group had 13 surgeons who performed 103 cases, with one surgeon's cases distributed in both groups. The YS group had a greater proportion of patients with severe mental retardation (89.7% vs. 68.6%, p = .01). Duration of surgery was greater in the YS group (456 vs. 344 minutes, p scoliosis surgery on CP patients, surgeons with fewer than ten years of practice experience demonstrate significantly greater average operative time and decreased mean number of levels fused, yet produce similar clinical outcomes to more experienced surgeons. Level III, therapeutic. Copyright © 2017 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transplant surgeon formation: vocation, incentives, between old and new surgeon generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaria, G; Cardillo, A

    2006-05-01

    The training of the transplant surgeon is one of the most difficult paths in medicine. The transplant surgeon must be trained as a general and a vascular surgeon; he has to be skilled and upgraded in transplant surgical technique; he has to decide the suitability of the donor and of the organs as well as the immunosuppressive therapy for each recipient; he must know the intensive care unit, hepatology, and nephrology. The transplant surgeon has to deal with surgical, infectious, and metabolic complications after organ transplantation. Thus, clinical formation of the transplant surgeon is multifactorial and always upgraded. However, transplants never happen in the morning; retrivals are more likely to be in the night (especially the holidays ones). "Weekend" is a word not frequently used by transplant surgeons. Moreover, when the transplant procedure happens, the normal activity of the ward and of the outpatient clinic were have to be done. The transplant surgeon must have a sort of "vocation" for such a job. Organ harvesting setting is a good proof of adaptability, always during nighttime, often in small hospitals with operating room nurses unfamiliar with the procedure, sometimes waiting for some colleagues or delaying the surgery. This vocation is enhanced by enthusiasm, but incentives are necessary to feed this love. Incentives should be professional and economic; transplant surgeons should be allowed to make clinical decisions, to choose the surgical technique of transplantation, to control the decision process. Lastly, due to the "total on call," the surgeon should profit from a right salary avoiding extramural activities.

  13. A consensus review on the development of palliative care for patients with chronic and progressive neurological disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, D. J.; Borasio, G. D.; Caraceni, A.; de Visser, M.; Grisold, W.; Lorenzl, S.; Veronese, S.; Voltz, R.

    2016-01-01

    The European Association of Palliative Care Taskforce, in collaboration with the Scientific Panel on Palliative Care in Neurology of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (now the European Academy of Neurology), aimed to undertake a review of the literature to establish an evidence-based

  14. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  15. Survey response of oral and maxillofacial surgeons on invasive procedures in patients using antithrombotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diermen, D.E.; van der Waal, I.; Hoogvliets, M.W.; Ong, F.N.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the management strategies of Dutch oral and maxillofacial surgeons when performing invasive dental or oral surgery in patients using oral antithrombotic medication (OAM). In November 2009 a survey was mailed to all 213 members of the Dutch Society for Oral and Maxillofacial

  16. Designing a leadership development program for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Gregory A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous leadership development programs (LDPs) exist in health care, no programs have been specifically designed to meet the needs of surgeons. This study aimed to elicit practicing surgeons' motivations and desired goals for leadership training to design an evidence-based LDP in surgery. At a large academic health center, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 surgical faculty members who voluntarily applied and were selected for participation in a newly created LDP. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed using analyst triangulation and thematic coding to extract major themes regarding surgeons' motivations and perceived needs for leadership knowledge and skills. Themes from interview responses were then used to design the program curriculum specifically to meet the leadership needs of surgical faculty. Three major themes emerged regarding surgeons' motivations for seeking leadership training: (1) Recognizing key gaps in their formal preparation for leadership roles; (2) Exhibiting an appetite for personal self-improvement; and (3) Seeking leadership guidance for career advancement. Participants' interviews revealed four specific domains of knowledge and skills that they indicated as desired takeaways from a LDP: (1) leadership and communication; (2) team building; (3) business acumen/finance; and (4) greater understanding of the health care context. Interviews with surgical faculty members identified gaps in prior leadership training and demonstrated concrete motivations and specific goals for participating in a formal leadership program. A LDP that is specifically tailored to address the needs of surgical faculty may benefit surgeons at a personal and institutional level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgeon Awareness of Operating Room Supply Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher R; Eavey, Roland D; Francis, David O

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which surgeons understand costs associated with expensive operative procedures remains unclear. The goal of the study was to better understand surgeon cost awareness of operating room supplies and implants. This was a cross-sectional study of faculty (n = 24) and trainees (fellow and residents, n = 27) in the Department of Otolaryngology. Participants completed surveys to assess opinions on importance of cost and ease in accessing cost data and were asked to estimate the costs of operating room (OR) supplies and implants. Estimates within 20% of actual cost were considered correct. Analyses were stratified into faculty and trainee surgeons. Cost estimates varied widely, with a low percentage of correct estimations (25% for faculty, 12% for trainees). Surgeons tended to underestimate the cost of high-cost items (55%) and overestimate the cost of low-cost items (77%). Attending surgeons were more accurate at correctly estimating costs within their own subspecialty (33% vs 16%, P cost knowledge and years in practice did not correlate with cost accuracy (P costs of items/implants used in their OR. An opportunity exists to improve the mechanisms by which cost data are fed back to physicians to help promote value-based decision making. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Pediatric neurology training in Canada: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif

    2012-05-01

    Child neurology training in Canada has changed considerably over time, with increasing requirements for standardized teaching of the fundamentals of child neurology and the CanMEDS competencies. We sought to determine the current status of child neurology training in Canada as well future directions for training. A web-based survey was sent to program directors (PD's) of active pediatric neurology training programs. General questions about the programs were asked, as well as about success at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) exam, breakdown of rotations, views on CanMEDS roles and questions on the future of pediatric neurology. 9/9 PD's completed the survey. 96.5% of all trainees successfully passed their RCPSC exam from 2001-2006. Breakdowns of the number and type of rotations for each year of training were provided. All CanMEDS roles were deemed to be important by PD's and programs have developed unique strategies to teach and assess these roles.92.6% of trainees chose to go into academic practice, with the most popular subspecialty being epilepsy. All PD's favour joint training sessions particularly for neurogenetics and neuromuscular disease. Overall, PD's suggest recruitment for future child neurologists at the medical student level but are divided as to whether we are currently training too few or too many child neurologists. This survey provides a view of the current state of pediatric neurology training in Canada and suggestions for further development of post-graduate training. In particular, attention should be given to joint educational programs as well as urgently assessing the manpower needs of child neurologists.

  19. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  20. Why neurology? Factors which influence career choice in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Hoyle, Chad; Yin, Han; McCoyd, Matthew; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the factors which influence the decision to pursue a career in neurology. An anonymous survey was developed using a Likert scale to rate responses. The survey was sent to adult and child neurology faculty, residents and fellows, as well as medical students applying for neurology. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the factors of influence. Respondents were subsequently categorized into pre-neurology trainees, neurology trainees, child neurologists and adult neurologists, and differences between the groups were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test. One hundred and thirty-three anonymous responses were received. The respondents were neurologists across all levels of training and practice. Across all respondents, the most common factor of high importance was intellectual content of specialty, challenging diagnostic problems, type of patient encountered and interest in helping people. Responses were similar across the groups; however, the earliest trainees cited interest in helping people as most important, while those in neurology training and beyond cite intellectual content of the specialty as most important. As trainees transition from their earliest levels of clinical experience into working as residents and faculty, there is a shift in the cited important factors. Lifestyle and financial factors seem to be the least motivating across all groups. Encouragement from peers, mentors, faculty and practicing physicians is considered high influences in a smaller number of neurologists. This may present an opportunity for practicing neurologists to make connections with medical students early in their education in an effort to encourage and mentor candidates.

  1. Proportionate cancer mortality in methyl methacrylate-exposed orthopedic surgeons compared to general surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James Henry

    2011-06-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMA), a volatile liquid used to make dentures, hearing aids, joint prostheses, and medical adhesives, has been associated with colorectal carcinomas in acrylic sheet manufacturing workers. A case-control proportionate cancer mortality investigation was conducted to determine cancer death differences in orthopedic surgeons performing total joint replacements (TJRs) (MMA-exposed cases) and general surgeons not performing TJRs (unexposed controls). The American Colleges of Orthopedic Surgeons and General Surgeons provided complete demographic information on 468 male orthopedic surgeons and 1,890 male general surgeons who died during 1991-2001. Decedent data was submitted to the National Death Index for matching with underlying causes of death on state death certificates. Proportionate differences in ages at death, deaths from cancer, and deaths from site-specific cancers were analyzed for statistically significant differences by unpaired, two-tailed t tests for continuous variables and by both proportionate cancer mortality ratios and Yates-corrected chi squares for categorical variables. Orthopedic surgeons died of cancer more often (χ (2) = 7.699, P = 0.006) and at younger (t = 5.53, P MMA and are proportionately more likely to die from cancer, especially esophageal and myeloproliferative cancers, than general surgeons. MMA-exposed healthcare workers may be at increased risks of untimely deaths from site-specific malignancies.

  2. The Surgeons' Leadership Inventory (SLI): a taxonomy and rating system for surgeons' intraoperative leadership skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson Parker, Sarah; Flin, Rhona; McKinley, Aileen; Yule, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Surgeons must demonstrate leadership to optimize performance and maximize patient safety in the operating room, but no behavior rating tool is available to measure leadership. Ten focus groups with members of the operating room team discussed surgeons' intraoperative leadership. Surgeons' leadership behaviors were extracted and used to finalize the Surgeons' Leadership Inventory (SLI), which was checked by surgeons (n = 6) for accuracy and face validity. The SLI was used to code video recordings (n = 5) of operations to test reliability. Eight elements of surgeons' leadership were included in the SLI: (1) maintaining standards, (2) managing resources, (3) making decisions, (4) directing, (5) training, (6) supporting others, (7) communicating, and (8) coping with pressure. Interrater reliability to code videos of surgeons' behaviors while operating using this tool was acceptable (κ = .70). The SLI is empirically grounded in focus group data and both the leadership and surgical literature. The interrater reliability of the system was acceptable. The inventory could be used for rating surgeons' leadership in the operating room for research or as a basis for postoperative feedback on performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chapter 39: an historical overview of British neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, F Clifford

    2010-01-01

    In the UK, neurology stemmed from general (internal) medicine rather than psychiatry. In 1886 the Neurological Society of London was founded, with Hughlings Jackson as its first President. After World War I, Kinnier Wilson was made Physician in Charge of the first independent department of neurology, which was at Westminster Hospital in London. Although before the 17th century there were British doctors who took an interest in diseases of the nervous system, e.g. Gilbertus Anglicus (c. 1230), who distinguished epilepsy from apoplexy, and Bartholomeus Anglicus, whose encyclopedia (c. 1260) provided the first picture of a dissection printed in English, John of Gaddesden (1280-1361) was the first in Britain to produce a manuscript on neurological disorders. Thomas Willis (1621-1675) was the founder of Neurology, being the first to use the term, and was also the leader of the first multidisciplinary team in neurological science, helping to shift attention from the chambers of the brain to the brain substance itself. He wrote seven books, all but the last in Latin, and his second one, Cerebri anatome (1664) was the first on the nervous system to include the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves, introducing such new terms as lentiform body, corpus striatum, optic thalamus, inferior olives and peduncles. Most of his neurology was in his fifth book, De anima brutorum (1672). Before Willis the brain was a mystery, but his work laid the foundations for neurological advances. After the 17th century of William Harvey and Thomas Sydenham and the 18th century of William Heberden and Robert Whytt there followed the 19th century of James Parkinson (1755-1824), John Cooke (1756-1838), Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), Marshall Hall (1790-1856) and Bentley Todd (1809-1860). Besides its "Father," Hughlings Jackson, the giants who established the unique superiority of British neurology were Sir William Gowers, Sir David Ferrier, Kinnier Wilson, Sir Gordon Holmes and Sir Charles

  4. Orthopaedic Surgeon Burnout: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; DePasse, J Mason; Kamal, Robin N

    2016-04-01

    Burnout is a syndrome marked by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low job satisfaction. Rates of burnout in orthopaedic surgeons are higher than those in the general population and many other medical subspecialties. Half of all orthopaedic surgeons show symptoms of burnout, with the highest rates reported in residents and orthopaedic department chairpersons. This syndrome is associated with poor outcomes for surgeons, institutions, and patients. Validated instruments exist to objectively diagnose burnout, although family members and colleagues should be aware of early warning signs and risk factors, such as irritability, withdrawal, and failing relationships at work and home. Emerging evidence indicates that mindfulness-based interventions or educational programs combined with meditation may be effective treatment options. Orthopaedic residency programs, departments, and practices should focus on identifying the signs of burnout and implementing prevention and treatment programs that have been shown to mitigate symptoms.

  5. Future of thyroid surgery and training surgeons to meet the expectations of 2000 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harness, J K; van Heerden, J A; Lennquist, S; Rothmund, M; Barraclough, B H; Goode, A W; Rosen, I B; Fujimoto, Y; Proye, C

    2000-08-01

    What is the future of thyroid surgery in the new millennium? How can surgeons keep abreast of advances in thyroid endocrinology, genetics, surgical therapy, and other aspects of thyroid disease management? How should surgeons be trained to become highly competent in thyroid disease and to perform safe, effective thyroid operative procedures? Nine internationally recognized endocrine surgeons were asked to express their views on these and related subjects. They noted that advances in molecular biology, pathology, and genetics of thyroid disease should allow more tailored surgical approaches during the twenty-first century. Current training of general surgical residents in thyroid and other types of endocrine surgery is highly variable, which may contribute to increased complication rates and number of second operations. The leadership for addressing these deficiencies and promoting a more organized approach to thyroid disease management should come from national endocrine surgery associations and their leaders. It is incumbent upon endocrine surgeons to maintain their central role in the management of many aspects of thyroid disease. Organizing teams of specialists into thyroid centers (centers of excellence) can (1) increase efficiency; (2) increase quality of care; (3) decrease costs; (4) encourage a more individualized approach to surgery; (5) lower complication rates; and (6) foster innovation in technology and disease management. Two years of additional fellowship training in thyroid and endocrine surgery is now being advocated by increasing numbers of national endocrine surgical associations as the best way to prepare surgeons for society's needs for highly skilled, competent thyroid surgeons of the future.

  6. Maximizing efficiency on trauma surgeon rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaniuk, Aliaksandr; Dickson, Barbara J; Mahoney, Sean; O'Mara, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Rounding by trauma surgeons is a complex multidisciplinary team-based process in the inpatient setting. Implementation of lean methodology aims to increase understanding of the value stream and eliminate nonvalue-added (NVA) components. We hypothesized that analysis of trauma rounds with education and intervention would improve surgeon efficacy. Level 1 trauma center with 4300 admissions per year. Average non-intensive care unit census was 55. Five full-time attending trauma surgeons were evaluated. Value-added (VA) and NVA components of rounding were identified. The components of each patient interaction during daily rounds were documented. Summary data were presented to the surgeons. An action plan of improvement was provided at group and individual interventions. Change plans were presented to the multidisciplinary team. Data were recollected 6 mo after intervention. The percent of interactions with NVA components decreased (16.0% to 10.7%, P = 0.0001). There was no change between the two periods in time of evaluation of individual patients (4.0 and 3.5 min, P = 0.43). Overall time to complete rounds did not change. There was a reduction in the number of interactions containing NVA components (odds ratio = 2.5). The trauma surgeons were able to reduce the NVA components of rounds. We did not see a decrease in rounding time or individual patient time. This implies that surgeons were able to reinvest freed time into patient care, or that the NVA components were somehow not increasing process time. Direct intervention for isolated improvements can be effective in the rounding process, and efforts should be focused upon improving the value of time spent rather than reducing time invested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.J.; Teunis, T.; Guitton, T.G.; Ring, D.; Biert, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are surgeons more likely to

  8. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Stein J.; Teunis, Teun; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Spoor, Andy B.; Chauhan, Aakash; Shafritz, Adam B.; Wasterlain, Amy; Terrono, Andrew L.; Neviaser, Andrew S.; Schmidt, Andrew; Nelson, Andy; Miller, Anna N.; Kristan, Anze; Apard, Thomas; Berner, Arne; Ilyas, Asif; Jubel, Axel; Jost, Bernhard; Babis, George; Watkins, Barry; Kreis, Barbara; Nolan, Betsy M.; Crist, Brett D.; Cross, Brian J.; Wills, Brian P. D.; Barreto, Camilo Jose Romero; Ekholm, Carl; Swigart, Carrie; Spath, Catherine; Zalavras, Charalampos; Cassidy, Charles; Garnavos, Christos; Moreno-Serrano, Constanza L.; Rodner, Craig; Klostermann, Cyrus; Osei, Daniel A.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Haverkamp, Daniel; Polatsch, Daniel; Drosdowech, Darren; Edelstein, David M.; Eygendaal, Denise; McKee, Desirae M.; van Deurzen, Derek; Verbeek, Diederik O. F.; Patel, Minoo; Brilej, Drago; Walbeehm, Erik T.; Pemovska, Emilija Stojkovska; Hofmeister, Eric; Twiss, Eric L. L.; Hammerberg, Eric Mark; Schumer, Evan D.; Kaplan, F. Thomas D.; Suarez, Fabio; Fernandes, Carlos H.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Walter, Frank L.; Seibert, Franz Josef; Frihagen, Frede; Kraan, Gerald; Gadbled, Guillaume; Huemer, Georg M.; Kohut, Georges; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Garrigues, Grant; Bayne, Grant J.; DeSilva, Gregory; Bamberger, H. Brent; Grunwald, H. W.; Goost, Hans; Broekhuyse, Henry; Durchholz, Holger; Routman, Howard D.; Kodde, F.; McGraw, Iain; Harris, Ian; Lin, Ines C.; Choueka, Jack; Kazanjian, Jack Elias; Gillespie, James A.; Biert, Jan; Greenberg, Jeffrey A.; Abrams, Jeffrey; Wint, Jeffrey; Giuffre, Jennifer L.; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Overbeck, Joachim P.; Doornberg, Job N.; Scheer, Johan H.; Itamura, John; Erickson, John M.; McAuliffe, John; Capo, John T.; Taras, John; Braman, Jonathan; Rubio, Jorge; Filho, Jose Eduardo Grandi Ribeiro; Abboud, Joseph; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Abzug, Joshua M.; Roiz, Juan Miguel Rodriguez; Adams, Julie; Bishop, Julius; Kabir, Karoush; Zyto, Karol; Lee, Kendrick; Eng, Kevin; Rumball, Kevin M.; Erol, Konul; Dickson, Kyle; Jeray, Kyle; Bainbridge, Chris; Poelhekke, Lodewijk; van Minnen, Paul; Mica, Ladislav; Borris, Lars C.; Adolfsson, Lars E.; Weiss, Lawrence; Schulte, Leah M.; Lane, Lewis B.; Paz, Lior; Taitsman, Lisa; Guenter, Lob; Catalano, Louis; Campinhos, Luiz Aaugusto B.; Austin, Luke S.; Lygdas, Panagiotis; Waseem, Mohammad; Palmer, M. Jason; Krijnen, Matthijs R.; Abdel-Ghany, Mahmoud I.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Rizzo, Marco; Oidtmann, Marijke; Pirpiris, Marinis; Loebenberg, Mark I.; Boyer, Martin; Richardson, Martin; Mormino, Matt; Menon, Matthew; Calcagni, Maurizio; Beaumont-Courteau, Maxime; Soong, Maximillian; Wood, Megan M.; Meylaerts, Sven A.; Darowish, Michael; Nancollas, Michael; Prayson, Michael; Quinn, Michael; Grafe, Michael W.; Kessler, Michael W.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Ruiz-Suarez, Michell; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A.; Mckee, Mike; Merchant, Milind; Tyllianakis, Minos; Shafi, Mohamed; Felipe, Naquira Escobar Luis; Parnes, Nata; Chen, Neal C.; Wilson, Neil; Elias, Nelson; Akabudike, Ngozi M.; Horangic, Nicholas J.; Shortt, Nicholas L.; Schep, Niels; Rossiter, Nigel; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K.; van Eerten, Percy V.; Paladini, Paolo; Melvanki, Parag; Althausen, Peter; Giannoudis, Peter; Hahn, Peter; Evans, Peter J.; Jebson, Peter; Kloen, Peter; Krause, Peter; Brink, Peter R. G.; Schandelmaier, Peter; Peters, Anil; Dantuluri, Phani; Blazar, Philip; Muhl, Philipp; Andreas, Platz; Choudhari, Pradeep; Inna, Prashanth; Gaston, R. Glenn; Haverlag, Robert; Ramli, Radzeli Mohd; Costanzo, Ralph M.; de Bedout, Ramon; Ranade, Ashish; Hauck, Randy; Smith, Raymond Malcolm; Babst, Reto H.; Jenkinson, Richard; Hutchison, Richard L.; GIlbert, Richard S.; Page, Richard S.; Wallensten, Richard; Papandrea, Rick; Zura, Robert D.; Slater, Robert R.; Gray, Robert R. L.; Wagenmakers, Robert; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Hackney, Roger G.; van Riet, Roger; Calfee, Ryan P.; Mehta, Samir; Bouaicha, Samy; Spruijt, Sander; Kakar, Sanjeev; Kaplan, Saul; Duncan, Scott F.; Kaar, Scott G.; Mitchell, Scott; Rowinski, Sergio; van Helden, Svenhjalmar; Jacoby, Sidney M.; Kennedy, Stephen A.; Westly, Stephen K.; Beldner, Steven; Morgan, Steven J.; Sulkers, George; Schepers, Tim; Baxamusa, Taizoon; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Wyrick, Theresa; Begue, Thierry; DeCoster, Thomas; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Varecka, Thomas F.; Higgins, Thomas; Fischer, Thomas J.; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Wright, Thomas; Chesser, Tim; Omara, Timothy; Siff, Todd; Havlifc, Tomo; Neuhaus, Valentin; Sabesan, Vani J.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.; Verhofstad, Michael; Giordano, Vincenzo; Iyer, Vishwanath M.; Vochteloo, Anne; Batson, W. Arnnold; Hammert, Warren C.; Belangero, William Dias; Satora, Wojciech; Weil, Yoram; Balogh, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. (1) Are surgeons more likely to recommend surgery when choosing for

  9. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diagnostic imaging techniques and chemical and metabolic analyses to detect, manage, and treat neurological disease. Some ... performed in a doctor’s office or at a clinic. Fluoroscopy is a type of x-ray that ...

  10. Neurologic Complications of Smallpox Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox and smallpox vaccination is reviewed from the Departments of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

  11. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  12. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ballistics: a primer for the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgas, David A; Stannard, James P; Alonso, Jorge E

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on ballistics and to sort through the plethora of myth and popular opinion. The trauma surgeon is increasingly faced with gunshot wounds. Knowledge of ballistics is important to help in assessing the patterns of wounds that are seen. There are many factors that affect the flight of a bullet to its target. Many of these factors also affect the behaviour of the bullet after it strikes the target. It is primarily these factors that interest the surgeon.

  14. Ancillary services available to the orthopedic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Jack M

    2008-01-01

    The delivery of high quality medical services is approaching a crisis situation in the United States. As physician reimbursements decline and overhead increases, orthopedic surgeons must seek additional sources of revenue to remain financially viable and control the quality of medical care that they deliver. The orthopedic surgeon group is well positioned to control its own service lines and deliver excellent patient care as a result. This article reviews the possibilities of multiple types of ancillary service lines available for the orthopedic group practice.

  15. Surgeon, not disease severity, often determines the operation for acute complicated diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafferji, Mohammad S; Hyman, Neil

    2014-06-01

    The "best" operation in the setting of acute complicated diverticulitis has been debated for decades. Multiple studies, including a recent prospective randomized trial, have reported improved outcomes with primary anastomosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether surgeon or patient-specific factors drives the choice of operative procedure. Consecutive adult patients with sigmoid diverticulitis, requiring emergent operative treatment for acute complicated diverticulitis, from 1997 to 2012 at an academic medical center, were identified from a prospectively maintained complications database. Patient characteristics, surgeon, choice of operation, and outcomes including postoperative complications and stoma reversal were noted. The use of primary anastomosis and associated outcomes between colorectal and noncolorectal surgeons were compared. There were 151 patients who underwent urgent resection during the study period, and 136 met inclusion criteria. Eighty-two resections (65.1%) were performed by noncolorectal surgeons and 44 by colorectal surgeons (34.9%). Noncolorectal surgeons performed more Hartmann procedures (68.3% vs 40.9%, p = 0.01) despite similar demographics, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, and Hinchey stage. Length of stay, time to stoma reversal, ICU days, and postoperative complications were lower in the colorectal group (43.2% vs 16.7, p = 0.02). Although patient-specific factors are important, surgeon is a potent predictor of operation performed in the setting of severe acute diverticulitis. A more aggressive approach to primary anastomosis may lower the complication rate after surgical treatment for severe acute diverticulitis. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Residents' Perceptions of Plastic Surgeons as Craniofacial Surgery Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Muraro, Carlos Alberto Salomão; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    To assess residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists in Brazil. Brazilian residents were asked to choose 1 or 2 specialists that they perceived to be an expert for 14 craniofacial surgery-related scenarios. Both an overall analysis (all 14 scenarios) and subanalysis (each scenario separately) were performed. Response patterns were distributed as "plastic surgeons alone," "plastic surgeons combined with other specialists," or "without plastic surgeons." Overall, plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P surgery-related scenarios and also demonstrated that "plastic surgeons alone" and "without plastic surgeons" were selected more (all P surgery residents and male residents chose more (all P plastic surgeons as experts than their peers. Residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists are limited in Brazil.

  17. Discrimination against female surgeons is still alive: Where are the full professorships and chairs of departments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2017-01-01

    Although half of all medical students are now and women are increasingly filling surgical residency positions, few ascend the academic ladder to become chairman of their departments, much less full academic professors. We queried PubMed to search for the number of women surgeons in different subspecialties, and asked how many were chairman or full academic professors? Data coming out of largely general or cardiothoracic surgery departments cited no substantial gains for women surgeons over the years; there were few chairmanships or full professorships. In one study of 54 female cardiothoracic surgeons, 60% of academic appointments were at the instructor or assistant professor level; only 18% were full professors. In another study looking at 12-year data from major academic medical institutions in the US, women constituted only 9.2% of chairs, only 14.7% of full professors, and just 9.3% of deans. In a third study, out of 270 female general surgeons, there were only three who were chairman, and just 12.4% were tenured professors. In Great Britain/Ireland, of 315 neurosurgeons (25 females), all 16 full professors were males. Two medical/surgical series speculated it would take until 2096 or 2136 for females to attain 50% of full professorships. The American Association of Neurological Surgery (U.S. 2017; personal communication) showed that of 287 Board-certified female neurosurgeons, there is just one female surgeons chairman. Few female physicians/surgeons were chairs of departments or full professors at their academic institutions. Do women in medicine/surgery really need to wait until 2136 to achieve equality?

  18. In surgeons performing cardiothoracic surgery is sleep deprivation significant in its impact on morbidity or mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfour, Leila; Asfour, Victoria; McCormack, David; Attia, Rizwan

    2014-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: is there a difference in cardiothoracic surgery outcomes in terms of morbidity or mortality of patients operated on by a sleep-deprived surgeon compared with those operated by a non-sleep-deprived surgeon? Reported search criteria yielded 77 papers, of which 15 were deemed to represent the best evidence on the topic. Three studies directly related to cardiothoracic surgery and 12 studies related to non-cardiothoracic surgery. Recommendations are based on 18 121 cardiothoracic patients and 214 666 non-cardiothoracic surgical patients. Different definitions of sleep deprivation were used in the studies, either reviewing surgeon's sleeping hours or out-of-hours operating. Surgical outcomes reviewed included: mortality rate, neurological, renal, pulmonary, infectious complications, length of stay, length of intensive care stay, cardiopulmonary bypass times and aortic-cross-clamp times. There were no significant differences in mortality or intraoperative complications in the groups of patients operated on by sleep-deprived versus non-sleep-deprived surgeons in cardiothoracic studies. One study showed a significant increase in the rate of septicaemia in patients operated on by severely sleep-deprived surgeons (3.6%) compared with the moderately sleep-deprived (0.9%) and non-sleep-deprived groups (0.8%) (P = 0.03). In the non-cardiothoracic studies, 7 of the 12 studies demonstrated statistically significant higher reoperation rate in trauma cases (P sleep deprivation in cardiothoracic surgeons on morbidity or mortality. However, overall the non-cardiothoracic studies have demonstrated that operative time and sleep deprivation can have a significant impact on overall morbidity and mortality. It is likely that other confounding factors concomitantly affect outcomes in out-of-hours surgery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  19. Silas Weir Mitchell: Neurologists and Neurology during the American Civil War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, François; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With few exceptions, neurology was nonexistent in the United States until the Civil War years. From 1861 to 1865, the United States saw a bitter armed conflict between the North (the Union) and the South (the Confederate States or Confederacy), and during those years, neurology was born in the United States. In 1861, Silas Weir Mitchell, together with George Morehouse and William Keen, opened and operated the first neurological hospital in Philadelphia, with the backing of the Surgeon General William Hammond. They treated and studied many peripheral nerve diseases, which led to their making the medical world aware of several conditions, including causalgia (now known as complex regional pain syndrome) and the phantom limb phenomenon. Progress in neurology, both at that time and in subsequent years, owed a great deal to cross-fertilization from Europe. Charles Edouard Brown-Séquard exemplified this. He held multiple medical positions on both sides of the Atlantic, including a position at Harvard in 1864. His teachings, to some extent, contributed to the development of neurology in the United States. In the Confederate states, medical care was less well organized, and neurology only developed later. After the war, in 1874, Mitchell, Hammond, and a few others founded the American Neurological Association. While war influenced the development of medicine, and neurology in particular, medicine also helped to shape the outcome of the war. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, Andrija; Koller, Monika; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2013-02-06

    'Neuromarketing' is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods 'neuromarketing' and scientific ones 'consumer neuroscience'. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology:First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington's disease.Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom.Third, trust research in the medical context lacks

  1. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom

  2. Physicians and surgeons in ancient India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, C K

    1981-10-01

    This paper briefly recapitulates the evolution of ancient medical classics its origin, the Physicians and Surgeons and their contributions in its mythological and historical background. The significance of this science in the ancient days is also evidenced by the existence, of the two seats of learning-Takshasila and Kasi-in all its prolific profundity.

  3. Surgeons' intraoperative decision making and risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauley, Keryn; Flin, Rhona; Yule, Steven; Youngson, George

    2011-10-01

    Surgical research on decision making and risk management usually focuses on perioperative care, despite the magnitude and frequency of intraoperative risks. The aim of this study was to examine surgeons' intraoperative decisions and risk management strategies to explore differences in cognitive processes. Critical decision method interviews were conducted with 24 consultant surgeons who recalled cases and selected important decisions during the operations. These decision were then discussed in detail in relation to decision-making style and risk management. The key decision in each case was made using either a rapid, intuitive mode (46%) or a more deliberate comparison of alternative courses of action (50%). Decision strategy was not related to surgical approach (endoscopic vs open), context (elective vs emergency), perceived time pressure, or situational threats. Risk management involved perceiving threats and assessing impact but also indicated the role of personal risk tolerance. Surgeons described making key intraoperative decisions using either an intuitive or an analytic mode of thinking. Surgeons' risk assessment, risk tolerance, and decision strategies appear to be influenced by their personalities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 2009 review and revisions of the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waring, William P; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Burns, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) were recently reviewed by the ASIA's Education and Standards Committees, in collaboration with the International Spinal Cord Society's Education Committee. Available educational materials for the ISNCSCI...

  6. [German neurology and neurologists during the Third Reich: the aftermath].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M; Fangerau, H; Karenberg, A

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the consequences for neurology as a discipline which resulted from neurologists' participation in the crimes committed under National Socialism (NS). Chronologically, the current literature distinguishes mainly four overlapping stages: (1) a first phase was characterized by legal persecution and "denazification", which was also the time of the Nuremberg doctors' trial in which no neurologists were on trial. A detailed documentation of the trial for the German medical profession was published by Alexander Mitscherlich. (2) In the subsequent practice of wide amnestying and reintegration of former Nazi followers during the 1950s, neurologists were no exception as its elite continued in their positions. The year 1953 was the year of the Lisbon scandal, when chiefly Dutch representatives protested against the participation of Julius Hallervorden in the International Congress of Neurology. The newly founded societies, the German Society for Neurology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurologie, DGN) and the German Society for Psychiatry and Neurology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychiatrie und Neurologie, DGPN), unanimously supported their member. (3) The next period was characterized by a nascent criticism of the prevailing attitude of covering up the crimes committed by physicians during the Nazi period. The discovery of incriminating brain sections at various Max Planck Institutes brought neurology to the focus of the debate. (4) Since the 1980s and 1990s historians (of medicine) have been systematically examining medicine's Nazi past in a professional way, which resulted in a noticeable increase of knowledge. Additionally, a new generation of scholars provoked a change of mind insofar as they recognized medicine's responsibility for the crimes committed between 1933 and 1945. We expect that future historical research will further elucidate the history of neurology during the NS regime and have consequences for our current understanding of research

  7. John M. T. Finney: distinguished surgeon and Oslerphile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Marvin J

    2016-01-01

    John Finney (1863-1942) was born near Natchez, Mississippi. After receiving his medical degree from Harvard, he interned at Massachusetts General Hospital and then went to Baltimore to become one of the first interns at the new Johns Hopkins Hospital. He met William Osler the day the hospital opened and became a lifelong admirer of "the Chief." Finney specialized in gastrointestinal surgery and was recognized for his expertise in the field. Osler recommended Finney to a physician colleague, writing, "You could not be in better hands…. Finney has been most successful and his judgment is so good." Finney served for 33 years under William Halsted at Hopkins. After Halsted's death, Finney was offered the chair of surgery at Johns Hopkins but declined. He was a founder and first president of the American College of Surgeons. He also served as president of the American Surgical Association and the Society of Clinical Surgery. Finney became chief surgical consultant for the Allied Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He was decorated by the United States, France, and Belgium. Finney was a master surgeon and a role model for generations of students and physicians.

  8. Perfil profesional del cirujano general: Professional profile General surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Hernández Varea

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El perfil del egresado es un elemento clave para confección del currículo, y constituye el modelo de las características, conocimientos y habilidades que se aspira formar en el futuro cirujano. Dicho perfil debe responder a las necesidades sociales, permitir la planificación del proceso docente-educativo y concretar la relación universidad-sociedad. En el presente artículo se analizan, a partir de la situación actual, los antecedentes históricos del modelo de formación del especialista en cirugía general, la definición de cirugía general, los principales cambios internacionales en el modelo de formación de cirujanos y las funciones generales que se deben considerar en el perfil profesional del cirujano y su cumplimiento en el programa de cirugía.Graduate profile is a key element to make the curriculum, and it is a representation of the possible features, knowledges, and abilities in the future surgeon. Such profile must to account for social needs, to allow the planning of teaching-educational process, and to stay exactly the university-society relation. In present paper, from a current situation, are analyzed the historical backgrounds of training model of general surgery specialist, general surgery definition, the main international changes in the training model of surgeon, and its fulfillment in surgery program.

  9. Surgeon-superintendents on convict ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J

    1996-04-01

    Surgeon-superintendents on the convict ships transporting convicted men, women and youths to Australia played a key role in the evolution of medical standards in Australia. The British Transportation Acts of 1717 and 1825 added the punishment of exile and banishment to the prevailing penology of the era, that of retribution and deterrence. The surgeon-superintendents formed a bulwark during the sea voyages (between 88 and 258 days), protecting the convicts against the potential abuses of the time. Between 1787 and 1868, some 160 000 convicts were transported to the open air gaols at Sydney, Norfolk Island, Van Diemen's Land (Hobart, Macquarie Harbour, Maria Island and Port Arthur), Moreton Bay, Melville Island and Fremantle. Seventeen convict ships left England for Australia in 1823 alone. The surgeon-superintendent's role on the high seas evolved over this time from one of amateur casualness with a primary responsibility to the system rather than to individual convicts, to that of a highly efficient, courageous professionalism. It became a new specialty discipline in its own right. Mortality on the convict transportation voyages fell from one in three convicts embarked in 1790 to zero mortality in the convicts transported on the Sultana in 1859. The key role of the surgeon-superintendent, in the context of preventive medicine, is developed in the present paper. Historical nodes in the evolution of the new discipline of prison doctor were the 1814 Report of Redfern (himself a former convict), and the evolution from the 1820s of doctors who became the pioneers of the specialty discipline of the Prison Medical Service in Australia. The experiences and influences of surgeon-superintendents on convict transportation vessels formed the catalyst for the Passenger Act (UK) of 1855 which, for the remaining decades of the 19th century, regulated the lives of millions of immigrants to Australia and New Zealand.

  10. Esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett esophagus in a neurologically impaired teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Chun, Peter; Shin, Dong Hoon; Park, Jae Hong

    2016-11-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) accompanied by Barrett esophagus (BE) is rare in patients younger than 20 years old. EAC in the upper esophagus is also rare. We report a rare case of EAC with BE that developed in the upper esophagus after chronic, untreated gastroesophageal reflux disease in a neurologically impaired teenager. A 19-year-old neurologically impaired man underwent endoscopy for evaluation of dysphagia and vomiting, and was diagnosed with EAC with BE. He underwent transthoracic esophagectomy, extensive lymph node dissection, and cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but the prognosis was poor. Pathology indicated poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with BE. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Neurology residency training in Europe--the current situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struhal, W; Sellner, J; Lisnic, V; Vécsei, L; Müller, E; Grisold, W

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about neurological training curricula in Europe. A joint approach by the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS), the Union of European Medical Specialists/European Board of Neurology and the European Association of Young Neurologist and Trainees was established to explore the spectrum of neurology training in Europe. In 2006, a questionnaire-based survey on neurology curricula as well as demographic data was designed by WS and WG and distributed by the EFNS to the national delegates of the EFNS, which comprises all European countries and Israel. By 2009, delegates from 31 of 41 countries (representing 76% of 505 million) had returned the questionnaire. A total of 24,165 specialists (46% women) were registered in the 31 countries. This corresponds to an average of 6.6 neurologists per 100,000 inhabitants (range 0.9-17.4/100,000 inhabitants). Duration of training in Europe was on average 4.9,years, ranging from 3 to 6,years. The number of residents interested in neurological training exceeded the amount of available training positions. Performance of neurological trainees was regularly assessed in 26 countries (84%), usually by recurrent clinical evaluation. Board examinations were held in 23 countries (74%). Interim examinations were performed in three countries, exit examinations in 14 and both interim and exit examination in 6. Considerable differences were also found in manpower (0.9-17.4 neurologists/100,000 inhabitants) and working conditions (e.g. average weekly working hours ranging from 30-80 h/month). We found a significant positive correlation between manpower and theoretical training hours. Considerable differences exist in training curricula of European countries. These data might provide the basis for European training and quality assurance initiatives. © 2010 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2010 EFNS.

  12. Comprehension of amalgamation for future digital society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Uk

    2010-08-15

    This book deals with understanding of amalgamation for future digital society, which describes outline of amalgamation, ubiquitous environment, cognitive science I such as psychology and neurology, cognitive science II like philosophy, linguistics and anthropology, an automatic machine, evolution theory and amalgamation, brain science and consciousness, mind and software and creativity and art. Each chapter has introduction, composition, related science, function and models.

  13. Arthur van Gehuchten takes neurology to the movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Geneviève

    2002-11-26

    To present the cinematographic production of Arthur Van Gehuchten (1861-1914) and to put this collection into its medical and sociocultural context. The arrival of Edison's Kinetoscope (1891) and Lumière's Cinématographe (1895) provoked the immediate interest of neurologists who foresaw the potential of motion pictures for illustration, research, and teaching. Arthur Van Gehuchten, professor of anatomy and neurology at the Catholic University of Louvain, was trained as a microscopist and a cytologist. From neuroanatomy, he progressively broadened his interest to neurology. Van Gehuchten was an avant-garde teacher, eager to adopt new visual aids. In 1895, he attended the first cinematographic screenings. Medical cinematography was soon brought into disrepute in European academic circles, when films made by the French surgeon Doyen were copied and shown on fairgrounds. Nevertheless, in 1905, Van Gehuchten began to film neurologic patients. He used this technique extensively to demonstrate clinical signs, to illustrate neurologic diseases, and to document functional evolution following surgery. For decades, these films were screened for medical students by Van Gehuchten's successors to the chair of neurology. The original nitrate films (more than 2 hours) have been recently rediscovered. They have been restored by the Royal Belgian Film Archive, where they are the oldest Belgian films. At the beginning of the 20th century, Van Gehuchten built up a collection of moving pictures for teaching purposes. This was one of the first such undertakings. This unique set of films has miraculously survived, and serves as an important archive of nervous diseases and their manifestations prior to the advent of modern therapies.

  14. Neurologic presentation of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushara, Khalafalla O

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) long has been associated with neurologic and psychiatric disorders including cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, and depression. Earlier reports mainly have documented the involvement of the nervous system as a complication of prediagnosed CD. However, more recent studies have emphasized that a wider spectrum of neurologic syndromes may be the presenting extraintestinal manifestation of gluten sensitivity with or without intestinal pathology. These include migraine, encephalopathy, chorea, brain stem dysfunction, myelopathy, mononeuritis multiplex, Guillain-Barre-like syndrome, and neuropathy with positive antiganglioside antibodies. The association between most neurologic syndromes described and gluten sensitivity remains to be confirmed by larger epidemiologic studies. It further has been suggested that gluten sensitivity (as evidenced by high antigliadin antibodies) is a common cause of neurologic syndromes (notably cerebellar ataxia) of otherwise unknown cause. Additional studies showed high prevalence of gluten sensitivity in genetic neurodegenerative disorders such as hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia and Huntington's disease. It remains unclear whether gluten sensitivity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders or whether it represents an epiphenomenon. Studies of gluten-free diet in patients with gluten sensitivity and neurologic syndromes have shown variable results. Diet trials also have been inconclusive in autism and schizophrenia, 2 diseases in which sensitivity to dietary gluten has been implicated. Further studies clearly are needed to assess the efficacy of gluten-free diet and to address the underlying mechanisms of nervous system pathology in gluten sensitivity.

  15. Neurological aspects of vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Mood and behavioral abnormalities are the most common early findings related to vibroacoustic disease (VAD). Other signs and symptoms have been observed in VAD patients. Brain MRI discloses small multifocal lesions in about 50% of subjects with more than 10 yr of occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or = 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or = 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. However, to date, there have been no studies globally integrating all the neurological, imaging and neurophysiological data of VAD patients. This is the main goal of this study. The 60 male Caucasians diagnosed with VAD were neurologically evaluated in extreme detail in order to systematically identify the most common and significant neurological disturbances in VAD. This population demonstrates cognitive changes (identified through psychological and neurophysiological studies (ERP P300)), vertigo and auditory changes, visual impairment, epilepsy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Neurological examination reveals pathological signs and reflexes, most commonly the palmo-mental reflex. A vascular pattern underlying the multifocal hyperintensities in T2 MR imaging, with predominant involvement of the small arteries of the white matter, is probably the visible organic substratum of the neurological picture. However, other pathophyisological mechanisms are involved in epileptic symptomatology.

  16. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... rehabilitation programme, between 2002 and 2004. Re-operation rate was assessed 6 months postoperatively. Surgeons were grouped as unsupervised junior registrars versus experienced surgeons operating or supervising. Fractures were stratified as technically undemanding or demanding. RESULTS: Unsupervised junior...... Society of Anaesthesiologists score, New Mobility Score, time to surgery and type of implant, surgery by unsupervised junior registrars was still a significant independent risk factor for re-operation in technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. CONCLUSION: Unsupervised junior registrars should...

  17. Neurologic considerations in propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, John; Chapman, Kimberly A; Summar, Marshall L; Ah Mew, Nicholas; Sutton, V Reid; MacLeod, Erin; Stagni, Kathy; Ueda, Keiko; Franks, Jill; Island, Eddie; Matern, Dietrich; Peña, Loren; Smith, Brittany; Urv, Tiina; Venditti, Charles; Chakarapani, Anupam; Gropman, Andrea L

    2012-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an organic acidemia which has a broad range of neurological complications, including developmental delay, intellectual disability, structural abnormalities, metabolic stroke-like episodes, seizures, optic neuropathy, and cranial nerve abnormalities. As the PA consensus conference hosted by Children's National Medical Center progressed from January 28 to 30, 2011, it became evident that neurological complications were common and a major component of morbidity, but the role of imaging and the basis for brain pathophysiology were unclear. This paper reviews the hypothesized pathophysiology, presentation and uses the best available evidence to suggest programs for treatment, imaging, and monitoring the neurological complications of PA. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acupuncture application for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyangsook; Park, Hi-Joon; Park, Jongbae; Kim, Mi-Ja; Hong, Meesuk; Yang, Jongsoo; Choi, Sunmi; Lee, Hyejung

    2007-01-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used for a range of neurological disorders. Despite its popularity, the evidence to support the use of acupuncture is contradictory. This review was designed to summarize and to evaluate the available evidence of acupuncture for neurological disorders. Most of the reviewed studies suffer from lack of methodological rigor. Owing to paucity and poor quality of the primary studies, no firm conclusion could be drawn on the use of acupuncture for epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ataxic disorders, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. For stroke rehabilitation, the evidence from recent high-quality trials and previous systematic reviews is not convincing. More rigorous trials are warranted to establish acupuncture's role in neurological disorders.

  19. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. [Child neurology and multimedia technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Methods of computer technology (intelligent technology, IT), such as multimedia and virtual reality, are utilized more and more in all medical fields including child neurology. Advances in the digitalization of individual medical data and multi-media technology have enabled patients to be able to obtain their own medical data by small media and to receive medical treatment at any hospitals even if they are located in distance place. Changes from a doctor oriented to patients oriented medicine is anticipated. It is necessary to store medical data from birth to adulthood and to accumulate epidemiological data of rare diseases such as metabolic diseases or degenerative diseases especially in child neurology, which highly require tele medicine and telecare at home. Moreover, IT may improve in the QOL of patients with neurological diseases and of their families. Cooperation of medicine and engineering is therefore necessary. Results of our experiments on telemedicine, telecare and virtual reality are described.

  1. Neurosurgeons in Japan Are Exclusively Brain Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoto, Shunji

    2017-03-01

    In Japan, neurosurgeons have traditionally mainly treated brain diseases, with most cases involving the spine and spinal diseases historically being treated by orthopedists. Nowadays, spinal surgery is 1 of the many subspecialties in the neurosurgical field in Japan. Most patients with neurological deficits or suspected neurological diseases see board-certified neurosurgeons directly in Japan, not through referrals from family physicians or specialists in other fields. Problems originating in the spine and spinal cord have been overlooked or misdiagnosed in these situations. Neurosurgeons in Japan must rethink the educational program to include advanced trauma life support and spinal surgery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Comparative Sensitivity of Intraoperative Motor Evoked Potential Monitoring in Predicting Postoperative Neurologic Deficits: Nondegenerative versus Degenerative Myelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Aaron J.; Safaee, Michael; Chou, Dean; Weinstein, Philip R.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Clark, John P.; Mummaneni, Praveen V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design ?Retrospective review. Objective ?Intraoperative motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring in spine surgery may assist surgeons in taking corrective measures to prevent neurologic deficits. The efficacy of monitoring MEPs intraoperatively in patients with myelopathy from nondegenerative causes has not been quantified. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative MEP monitoring in patients with myelopathy caused by nondegenerative processes to patients with degenera...

  3. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  4. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  5. Sleep disorders in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Guryevich Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are closely associated with both nervous system diseases and mental disorders; however, such patients prefer to seek just neurological advice. Insomnia is the most common complaint in routine clinical practice. It is characterized by different impairments in sleep and daytime awakening. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is less common, but more clinically important because of its negative impact on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The common neurological disorders are restless legs syndrome and REM sleep behavior disorder, as well as narcolepsy, the major manifestations of which are impaired nocturnal sleep and daytime awakening.

  6. The ethics consultation and the pediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statter, Mindy B

    2013-08-01

    The cultural, ethnic, religious, socioeconomic, and educational diversity of the patient population and the expanded surgical options provided by innovation and technology can pose significant ethical challenges. The questions confronting pediatric surgeons and their patients' families have greater complexity, and both the pediatric surgeon and the family perceive increasing vulnerability and uncertainty. The analysis and management of ethical issues in pediatric surgery cannot simply be extrapolated from the approach applied to adult cases. By reviewing the history of the events that contributed to the creation and utilization of hospital ethics committees and examining the role of the ethics consultant in the context of pediatric surgical care, practitioners and trainees will be better able to address these multifaceted situations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Occupational health related concerns among surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Anjuman Gul; Naeem, Zahid; Zaman, Atif; Zahid, Faryal

    2016-01-01

    The surgeon’s daily workload renders him/her susceptible to a variety of the common work-related illness. They are exposed to a number of occupational hazards in their professional work. These hazards include sharp injuries, blood borne pathogens, latex allergy, laser plumes, hazardous chemicals, anesthetic gases, equipment hazards, static postures, and job related stressors. However, many pay little attention to their health, and neither do they seek the appropriate help when necessary. It is observed that occupational hazards pose a huge risk to the personal well-being of surgeons. As such, the importance of early awareness and education alongside prompt intervention is duly emphasized. Therefore, increased attention to the health, economic, personal, and social implications of these injuries is essential for appropriate management and future prevention. These risks are as great as any other occupational hazards affecting surgeons today. The time has come to recognize and address them. PMID:27103909

  8. Smart apps for the smart plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniketh Venkataram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the ability to benefit plastic surgeons in all aspects of patient care and education. With the sheer number of applications available and more being created everyday, it is easy to miss out on apps which could be of great relevance. Moreover, the range of android applications available has not been extensively discussed in the literature. To this end, we have compiled an exhaustive list of android smartphone applications, which we feel can help our day to day functioning. The apps have been extensively reviewed and neatly described along with all their potential uses. In addition, we have made an effort to highlight ′non-medical′ or efficiency apps which can improve departmental functioning. These apps have not been described in prior articles, and their functionality might not be known to all. We believe that the technology savvy plastic surgeon can make maximum use of these apps to his benefit.

  9. Occupational injuries among pediatric orthopedic surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsiddiky, Abdulmonem M.; Alatassi, Raheef; Altamimi, Saad M.; Alqarni, Mahdi M.; Alfayez, Saud M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this cross-sectional study, we surveyed all pediatric orthopedic surgeons in Saudi Arabia using an anonymous electronic questionnaire composed of 23 items to identify the rate of occupational injuries and obtain other relevant information. Thirty-nine participants completed the questionnaire (response rate: 83%). Participants who sustained occupational injuries throughout their careers represented 82.5%. The most injured areas were the hands, eyes, and back by 54.5%, 24.2%, and 15.2%, respectively. Approximately 11.1% were injured while operating on infected patients. Approximately 30.3% reported their injuries to their institution. We concluded that the rate of occupational injuries among pediatric orthopedic surgeons is very high and underreported. PMID:28640103

  10. Conflict resolution: practical principles for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liz; Berger, David H; Awad, Samir S; Brandt, Mary L; Martinez, George; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2008-11-01

    Historically, surgeons have had little formal training in conflict resolution; however, there has been an increasing body of evidence that poor conflict resolution skills may have an adverse impact on patient outcomes and career advancement. Furthermore, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has recognized the importance of conflict resolution skills in resident training by mandating the training of communication skills and professionalism. These skills have often been taught in other professions, and surgeons may need to acquaint themselves with the literature from those fields. Conflict resolution techniques such as the 7-step model or principle-based conflict resolution can be applied to conflict in the operating room, wards, and among colleagues. We propose a model for conflict resolution by using the basic tools of the history and physical exam, a process well known to all physicians.

  11. A Primer on Social Media for Plastic Surgeons: What Do I Need to Know About Social Media and How Can It Help My Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Daniel J; Grant Stevens, W; Nazarian, Sheila

    2017-05-01

    Social media has changed the way plastic surgeons interact with their colleagues, patients, and friends. Social media is a rapidly changing phenomenon that it is critical to plastic surgeons and their practice. Plastic surgery can be marketed directly to consumers and therefore social media can provide a valuable platform to interact with potential patients and to define a surgeon's expertise and practice online. Social media impacts search engine optimization algorithms, increasing web traffic to a surgeon's site, and it can affect patients' perceptions of the practice and surgeon. Social media is a powerful tool, but it should be harnessed wisely to avoid potential pitfalls. This article provides an overview of social media, an outline of resources for surgeons to use, and some tips and tricks for new users. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The neurological work of Artur Galcerán i Granés (1850-1919).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboix, A; Fabregas, M G

    2011-05-01

    To analyze the neurological work of Artur Galcerán i Granés (Girona 1850-Barcelona 1919) founder of the Society of Psychiatry and Neurology of Barcelona in 1911. We performed a literature search using MEDLINE from the keywords"Galceran Granés" and "Society of Psychiatry and Neurology of Barcelona", using the doctoral thesis of M. G. Fabregas Camps: "History of Neurology in Catalonia. From 1882 to 1949 ", and original historical bibliographical sources of the Library of the Academy of Sciences Mèdiques de Catalunya i Balears. Artur Galcerán i Granés was a disciple of the school of psychiatry of Dr. Joan Giné i Partagàs. His highlighting neurological work was: 1) "Some static and dynamic inferences about the brain, which may serve to clarify the concept of localization", 2) "Treatment of epilepsy" and 3) "Neuropathology and General Psychiatry". He was editor of "Archivos de Terapeútica de las enfermedades nerviosas y mentales" and "Anales de la Sociedad de Psiquiatría y Neurología". He was director of the mental asylum in Sant Boi of Llobregat and Pere Mata of Reus. In 1911 he founded the first Catalan and Spanish neurological society in Barcelona. The neurological work of Artur Galcerán i Granes is remarkable and significant. He was the founder of the first Catalan and Spanish neurological society: The Society of Psychiatry and Neurology of Barcelona in 1911, the forerunner of the Catalan Society of Neurology. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Think small: nanotechnology for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Amir R; Brenner, Sara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the topic of nanotechnology to plastic surgeons and to discuss its relevance to medicine in general and plastic surgery in particular. Nanotechnology will be defined, and some important historical milestones discussed. Common applications of nanotechnology in various medical and surgical subspecialties will be reviewed. Future applications of nanotechnology to plastic surgery will be examined. Finally, the critical field of nanotoxicology and the safe use of nanotechnology in medicine and plastic surgery will be addressed.

  14. Expanding the neurological examination using functional neurologic assessment: part II neurologic basis of applied kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W H; Yanuck, S F

    1999-03-01

    Functional Neurologic Assessment and treatment methods common to the practice of applied kinesiology are presented. These methods are proposed to enhance neurological examination and treatment procedures toward more effective assessment and care of functional impairment. A neurologic model for these procedures is proposed. Manual assessment of muscular function is used to identify changes associated with facilitation and inhibition, in response to the introduction of sensory receptor-based stimuli. Muscle testing responses to sensory stimulation of known value are compared with usually predictable patterns based on known neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, guiding the clinician to an understanding of the functional status of the patient's nervous system. These assessment procedures are used in addition to other standard diagnostic measures to augment rather than replace the existing diagnostic armamentarium. The proper understanding of the neurophysiologic basis of muscle testing procedures will assist in the design of further investigations into applied kinesiology. Accordingly, the neurophysiologic basis and proposed mechanisms of these methods are reviewed.

  15. Retrospective analysis underestimates neurological deficits in complex spinal deformity surgery: a Scoli-RISK-1 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael P; Lenke, Lawrence G; Godzik, Jakub; Pellise, Ferran; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Smith, Justin S; Lewis, Stephen J; Ames, Christopher P; Carreon, Leah Y; Fehlings, Michael G; Schwab, Frank; Shimer, Adam L

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors conducted a study to compare neurological deficit rates associated with complex adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery when recorded in retrospective and prospective studies. Retrospective studies may underreport neurological deficits due to selection, detection, and recall biases. Prospective studies are expensive and more difficult to perform, but they likely provide more accurate estimates of new neurological deficit rates. METHODS New neurological deficits were recorded in a prospective study of complex ASD surgeries (pSR1) with a defined outcomes measure (decrement in American Spinal Injury Association lower-extremity motor score) for neurological deficits. Using identical inclusion criteria and a subset of participating surgeons, a retrospective study was created (rSR1) and neurological deficit rates were collected. Continuous variables were compared with the Student t-test, with correction for multiple comparisons. Neurological deficit rates were compared using the Mantel-Haenszel method for standardized risks. Statistical significance for the primary outcome measure was p spinal deformities, and exclusion criteria were identical. Sagittal Cobb measurements were higher in pSR1, although sagittal alignment was similar. Preoperative neurological deficit rates were similar in the groups. Three-column osteotomies were more common in pSR1, particularly vertebral column resection. New neurological deficits were more common in pSR1 (pSR1 17.3% [95% CI 12.6-22.2] and rSR1 9.0% [95% CI 5.0-13.0]; p = 0.01). The majority of deficits in both studies were at the nerve root level, and the distribution of level of injury was similar. CONCLUSIONS New neurological deficit rates were nearly twice as high in the prospective study than the retrospective study with identical inclusion criteria. These findings validate concerns regarding retrospective cohort studies and confirm the need for and value of carefully designed prospective, observational cohort

  16. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  17. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  18. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify

  19. [Neurology in medieval regimina sanitatis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frutos González, V; Guerrero Peral, A L

    2011-09-01

    In medical medieval literature some works about dietetics stand out. Dietetics, as a separate branch of medicine, includes not only food or drinks, but other environmental factors influencing on health. They are known as regimina sanitatis or salutis, and specially developed in the Christian west. They generally consisted of a balance between the Galenic "six non-natural things"; factors regulating health and its protection: environment, exercise, food, sleep, bowel movements and emotions. After reviewing the sources and defining the different stages of this genre, we have considered three of the most out-standing medieval regimina, the anonymous Regimen sanitatis salernitanum, Arnaldo de Vilanova's Regimen sanitatis ad regem aragonum and Bernardo de Gordon's Tractatus of conservatione vite humane. In them we review references to neurological disease. Though not independently considered, there is a significant presence of neurological diseases in the regimina. Dietetics measures are proposed to preserve memory, nerves, or hearing, as well as for the treatment of migraine, epilepsy, stroke or dizziness. Regimina are quiet representative among medical medieval literature, and they show medieval physicians vision of neurological diseases. Dietetics was considered useful to preserve health, and therapeutics was based on natural remedies. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  1. Robotic Assistance Confers Ambidexterity to Laparoscopic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choussein, Souzana; Srouji, Serene S; Farland, Leslie V; Wietsma, Ashley; Missmer, Stacey A; Hollis, Michael; Yu, Richard N; Pozner, Charles N; Gargiulo, Antonio R

    2018-01-01

    To examine whether a robotic surgical platform can complement the fine motor skills of the nondominant hand, compensating for the innate difference in dexterity between surgeon's hands, thereby conferring virtual ambidexterity. Crossover intervention study (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). Centers for medical simulation in 2 tertiary care hospitals of Harvard Medical School. Three groups of subjects were included: (1) surgical novices (medical graduates with no robotic/laparoscopic experience); (2) surgeons in training (postgraduate year 3-4 residents and fellows with intermediate robotic and laparoscopic experience); and (3) advanced surgeons (attending surgeons with extensive robotic and laparoscopic experience). Each study group completed 3 dry laboratory exercises based on exercises included in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) curriculum. Each exercise was completed 4 times: using the dominant and nondominant hands, on a standard laparoscopic FLS box trainer, and in a robotic dry laboratory setup. Participants were randomized to the handedness and setting order in which they tackled the tasks. Performance was primarily measured as time to completion, with adjustments based on errors. Means of performance for the dominant versus nondominant hand for each task were calculated and compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance. A total of 36 subjects were enrolled (12 per group). In the laparoscopic setting, the mean overall time to completion of all 3 tasks with the dominant hand differed significantly from that with the nondominant hand (439.4 seconds vs 568.4 seconds; p = .0008). The between-hand performance difference was nullified with the robotic system (374.4 seconds vs 399.7 seconds; p = .48). The evaluation of performance for each individual task also revealed a statistically significant disparate performance between hands for all 3 tasks when the laparoscopic approach was used (p = .003, .02, and .01

  2. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R; Ammirati, Mario; Brennum, Jannick; Mendez, Ivar; Ammar, Ahmed S; Balak, Naci; Bolles, Gene; Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Mathiesen, Tiit; Broekman, Marike L

    2017-01-17

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell interventions for neurologic disease, based primarily on the new Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation released by the International Society for Stem Cell Research in May 2016. Important considerations in the ethical translation of stem cells to clinical practice include regulatory oversight, conflicts of interest, data sharing, the nature of investigation (e.g., within vs outside of a clinical trial), informed consent, risk-benefit ratios, the therapeutic misconception, and patient vulnerability. To help guide the translation of stem cells from the laboratory into the neurosurgical clinic in an ethically sound manner, we present an ethical discussion of these major issues at stake in the field of stem cell clinical research for neurologic disease. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons' non-technical skills. METHODS: Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non......-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were...

  4. General surgeons in the small towns of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, D D

    1986-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine practice characteristics of general surgeons in the small towns of Georgia. Questionnaires were mailed to 215 general surgeons practicing in towns of fewer than 25,000 persons. Of these, 99 were returned completed by practicing surgeons. Eighty-three per cent of all board-certified general surgeons responded. They indicated that their practices extended beyond the traditional boundaries of general surgery to include common problems in gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and thoracic surgery.

  5. Patient Attitudes Toward Orthopedic Surgeon Ownership of Related Ancillary Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Paul H; Cross, Michael B; Johnson, Staci R; Rasinski, Kenneth A; Nunley, Ryan M; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-08-01

    Physician ownership of businesses related to orthopedic surgery, such as surgery centers, has been criticized as potentially leading to misuse of health care resources. The purpose of this study was to determine patients' attitudes toward surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses. We surveyed 280 consecutive patients at 2 centers regarding their attitudes toward surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses using an anonymous questionnaire. Three surgeon ownership scenarios were presented: (1) owning a surgery center, (2) physical therapy (PT), and (3) imaging facilities (eg, Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanner). Two hundred fourteen patients (76%) completed the questionnaire. The majority agreed that it is ethical for a surgeon to own a surgery center (73%), PT practice (77%), or imaging facility (77%). Most (>67%) indicated that their surgeon owning such a business would have no effect on the trust they have in their surgeon. Although >70% agreed that a surgeon in all 3 scenarios would make the same treatment decisions, many agreed that such surgeons might perform more surgery (47%), refer more patients to PT (61%), or order more imaging (58%). Patients favored surgeon autonomy, however, believing that surgeons should be allowed to own such businesses (78%). Eighty-five percent agreed that patients should be informed if their surgeon owns an orthopedic-related business. Although patients express concern over and desire disclosure of surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses, the majority believes that it is an ethical practice and feel comfortable receiving care at such a facility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream. (a) Identification. Surgeon's gloving cream is an ointment intended to be used to lubricate the user...

  7. How surgeons make decisions when the evidence is inconclusive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Michiel G. J. S.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Osterman, A. Lee; Spoor, A. B.; van der Zwan, A. L.; Shrivastava, Abhay; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Aida, E. Garcia G.; Aita, M. A.; Castillo, Alberto Pérez; Marcus, Alexander; Ladd, Amy; Terrono, Andrew L.; Gutow, Andrew P.; Schmidt, Andrew; Wang, Angela A.; Eschler, Anica; Miller, Anna N.; Wikerøy, Annette K. B.; Barquet, Antonio; Armstrong, April D.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Bedi, Asheesh; Shyam, Ashok K.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Jubel, Axel; Babst, Reto H.; Nolan, Betsy M.; Arciero, Bob; Bremer, Vanden; Bamberger, Brent; Peterson, Bret C.; Crist, Brett D.; Cross, Brian J.; Badman, Brian L.; Henley, C. Noel; Ekholm, Carl; Swigart, Carrie; Manke, Chad; Zalavras, Charalampos; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Cassidy, Charles; Cornell, Charles; Getz, Charles L.; Metzger, Charles; Wilson, Chris; Heiss, Christian; Perrotto, Christian J.; Wall, Christopher J.; Walsh, Christopher J.; Garnavos, Christos; Jiang, Chunyan; Lomita, Craig; Torosian, Craig M.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Whelan, Daniel B.; Wascher, Daniel C.; Hernandez, Daniel; Polatsch, Daniel; Beingessner, Daphne; Drosdowech, Darren; Tate, David E.; Hak, David; Rowland, David J.; Kalainov, David M.; Nelson, David; Weiss, David; McKee, Desirae M.; van Deurzen, D. F. G.; Endrizzi, Donald; Erol, Konul; Overbeck, Joachim P.; Baer, Wolfgang; Schwab, Eckart; Maza, Edgardo Ramos; Harvey, Edward; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Preloggler, Elisabeth; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Shin, Eon K.; Hofmeister, Eric P.; Kaplan, Thomas D.; Beeres, F. J. P.; Suarez, Fabio; Fernandes, C. H.; Cayón, Fidel Ernesto Cayón; Dolatowski, Filip Celestyn; Martin, Fischmeister; Sierra, Francisco Javier Aguilar; Lopez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Walter, Frank; Seibert, Franz Josef; Baumgaertel, Fred; Frihagen, Frede; Fuchs, P. C.; Huemer, Georg M.; Kontakis, George; Athwal, George S.; Dyer, George S. M.; Thomas, George; Kohut, Georges; Williams, Gerald; Hernandez, German Ricardo; Caro, Gladys Cecilia Zambrano; Garrigues, Grant; Merrell, Greg; DeSilva, Gregory; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Regazzi, Gustavo; de Azevedo, Gustavo Borges Laurindo; Ruggiero, Gustavo Mantovani; Helling, H. J.; MccUtchan, Hal; Goost, Hans; Kreder, Hans J.; Hasenboehler, Paula M.; Routman, Howard D.; van der Heide, Huub; Kleinlugtenbelt, I.; McGraw, Iain; Harris, Ian; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Mohammad; Lin, Ines C.; Iossifidis, A.; Andrew, J.; Trenholm, I.; Goslings, J. Carel; Wiater, J. Michael; Choueka, Jack; Ahn, Jaimo; Kellam, James; Biert, Jan; Pomerance, Jay; Johnson, Jeff W.; Greenberg, Jeffrey A.; Yao, Jeffrey; Watson, Jeffry T.; Giuffre, Jennifer L.; Hall, Jeremy; Park, Jin-Young; Fischer, Jochen; Murachovsky, Joel; Howlett, John; McAuliffe, John; Evans, John P.; Taras, John; Braman, Jonathan; Hobby, Jonathan L.; Rosenfeld, Jonathan; Boretto, Jorge; Orbay, Jorge; Rubio, Jorge; Ortiz, Jose A.; Abboud, Joseph; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Vroemen, Joseph P. A. M.; Adams, Julie; Clarke, J. V.; Kabir, K.; Chivers, Karel; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Segalman, Keith; Lee, Kendrick; Eng, Kevin; Chhor, Kimberlly S.; Ponsen, K. J.; Jeray, Kyle; Marsh, L.; Poelhekke, L. M. S. J.; Mica, Ladislav; Borris, Lars C.; Halperin, Lawrence; Weiss, Lawrence; Benson, Leon; Elmans, Leon; de Mendonca, Leonardo Alves; Rocha, Leonardo; Katolik, Leonid; Lattanza, Lisa; Taitsman, Lisa; Guenter, Lob; Catalano, Louis; Buendia, Luis Antonio; Austin, Luke S.; Palmer, M. Jason; de Vries, M. R.; Bronkhorst, Maarten W. G. A.; Abdel-Ghany, Mahmoud I.; van de Sande, M. A. J.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Rizzo, Marco; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Pirpiris, Marinis; Baratz, Mark; Lazarus, Mark D.; Boyer, Martin; Richardson, Martin; Kastelec, Matej; Mormino, Matt; Budge, Matthew D.; Turina, Matthias; Wood, Megan M.; Baskies, Michael; Baumgaertner, Michael; Behrman, Michael; Hausman, Michael; Jones, Michael; LeCroy, Michael; Moskal, Michael; Nancollas, Michael; Prayson, Michael; Grafe, Michael W.; Kessler, Michael W.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Mckee, Mike; Merchant, Milind; Tyllianakis, Minos; Felipe, Naquira Escobar Luis; Chen, Neal C.; Saran, Neil; Wilson, Neil; Shortt, Nicholas L.; Schep, Niels; Rossiter, Nigel; Lasanianos, N. G.; Kanakaris, Nikolaos; Weiss, Noah D.; Harvey, Norah M.; van Eerten, P. V.; Melvanki, Parag; McCulloch, Patrick T.; Martineau, Paul A.; Appleton, Paul; Guidera, Paul; Levin, Paul; Giannoudis, Peter; Evans, Peter J.; Jebson, Peter; Kloen, Peter; Krause, Peter; Brink, Peter R. G.; Peters, J. H.; Blazar, Philip; Streubel, Philipp N.; Inna, Prashanth; Prashanth, S.; Solanki, Punita V.; Wang, Qiugen; Quell, M.; Benafield, R. Bryan; Haverlag, R.; Peters, R. W.; Varma, Rajat; Nyszkiewicz, Ralf; Costanzo, Ralph M.; de Bedout, Ramon; Ranade, Ashish S.; Smith, Raymond Malcolm; Abrams, Reid; Fricker, Renato M.; Omid, Reza; Barth, Richard; Buckley, Richard; Jenkinson, Richard; GIlbert, Richard S.; Page, Richard S.; Wallensten, Richard; Zura, Robert D.; Feibel, Robert J.; Gray, Robert R. L.; Tashijan, Robert; Wagenmakers, Robert; Pesantez, Rodrigo; van Riet, Roger; Norlin, Rolf; Pfeifer, Roman; Liem, Ronald; Kulick, Roy G.; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Shatford, Russell; Klinefelter, Ryan; Calfee, Ryan P.; Moghtaderi, Sam; Sodha, Samir; Sprujt, Sander; Kakar, Sanjeev; Kaplan, Saul; Duncan, Scott; Kluge, Sebastian; Rodriguez-Elizalde, Sebastian; Checchia, Sergio L.; Rowinski, Sergio; Dodds, Seth; Hurwit, Shep; Sprengel, K.; van der Stappen, W. A. H.; Kronlage, Steve; Belded, Steven; Morgan, Steven J.; Rhemrev, Steven J.; Hilliard, Stuart; Gosens, Taco; Sasaki, Takashi; Taleb, C.; Pritsch, Tamir; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Wyrick, Theresa; DeCoster, Thomas; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Stackhouse, Thomas G.; Hughes, Thomas; Wright, Thomas; Ly, Thuan V.; Havenhill, Timothy G.; Omara, Timothy; Siff, Todd; McLaurin, Toni M.; Wanich, Tony; Rueger, Johannes M.; Vallim, Frederico C. M.; Sabesan, Vani J.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.; Knoll, Victoria D.; Telang, Vidyadhar; Iyer, Vishwanath M.; Jokhi, Vispi; Batson, W. Arnnold; Willems, W. Jaap; Smith, Wade R.; Belangero, William Dias; Wolkenfelt, J.; Weil, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    To address the factors that surgeons use to decide between 2 options for treatment when the evidence is inconclusive. We tested the null hypothesis that the factors surgeons use do not vary by training, demographics, and practice. A total of 337 surgeons rated the importance of 7 factors when

  8. Risk of Neurological Injuries in Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Julian J H; Curtis, Mary; Carter, Emma; Cowan, Joseph; Lehovsky, Jan

    2016-06-01

    A retrospective study. Rate of neurological injuries is widely reported for spinal deformity surgery. However, few have included the influence of the subtypes and severity of the deformity, or anterior versus posterior corrections. The purpose of this study is to quantify these risks. The risk of neurological injuries was examined in a single institution. Quantification of risk was made between operations, and for different subtypes of spinal deformity. Prospectively entered neuromonitoring database between 2006 and 2012 was interrogated, including all deformity cases under 21 years of age. Tumor, fracture, infection, and revision cases were excluded. All major changes in monitoring ("red alerts") were identified and detailed examinations of the neuromonitoring records, clinical notes, and radiographs were made. Diagnosis, deformity severity, and operative details were recorded. Of 2291 deformity operations, there were 2068 scoliosis (1636 idiopathic, 204 neuromuscular, 216 syndromic, 12 others), 89 kyphosis, 54 growing rod procedures, and 80 operations for hemivertebra. Six hundred ninety-six anterior and 1363 posterior operations were performed for scoliosis (nine not recorded), and 38 anterior and 51 posterior kyphosis corrections. Sixty-seven "red alerts" were identified (62 posterior, five anterior). Average Cobb angle was 88°. There were 14 transient and six permanent neurological injuries. One permanent injury was sustained during kyphosis correction and five during scoliosis correction. Common surgeon reactions after "red alerts" were surgical pause with anesthetic interventions (n = 39) and the Stagnara wake-up test (n = 22). Metalwork was partially removed in 20, revised in 12, and completely removed in nine. Thirteen procedures were abandoned. The overall risk of permanent neurological injury was 0.2%. The highest risk groups were posterior corrections for kyphosis, and scoliosis associated with a syndrome. Four percent of all posterior

  9. Neurologic manifestations of hypothyroidism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertalan, Abigail; Kent, Marc; Glass, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine disease in dogs. A variety of clinicopathologic abnormalities may be present; however, neurologic deficits are rare. In some instances, neurologic deficits may be the sole manifestation of hypothyroidism. Consequent ly, the diagnosis and management of the neurologic disorders associated with hypothyroidism can be challenging. This article describes several neurologic manifestations of primary hypothyroidism in dogs; discusses the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism-induced neurologic disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous systems; and reviews the evidence for the neurologic effects of hypothyroidism.

  10. Assessment of surgeon fatigue by surgical simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuwairqi K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Tuwairqi,1 Jessica H Selter,2 Shameema Sikder3 1College of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 3Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: The impact of fatigue on surgical performance and its implications for patient care is a growing concern. While investigators have employed a number of different tools to measure the effect of fatigue on surgical performance, the use of the surgical simulator has been increasingly implemented for this purpose. The goal of this paper is to review the published literature to achieve a better understanding of evaluation of fatigue on performance as studied with surgical simulators. Methods: A PubMed and Cochrane search was conducted using the search terms “simulator”, “surgery”, and “fatigue”. In total, 50 papers were evaluated, and 20 studies were selected after application of exclusion criteria. Articles were excluded if they did not use the simulator to assess the impact of fatigue on surgeon performance. Systematic reviews and case reports were also excluded. Results: Surgeon fatigue led to a consistent decline in cognitive function in six studies. Technical skills were evaluated in 18 studies, and a detrimental impact was reported in nine studies, while the remaining nine studies showed either no change or positive results with regard to surgical skills after experience of fatigue. Two pharmacological intervention studies reversed the detrimental impact of fatigue on cognitive function, but no change or a worsening effect was recognized for technical skills. Conclusion: Simulators are increasingly being used to evaluate the impact of fatigue on the surgeon's performance. With regard to the impact of fatigue in this regard, studies have demonstrated a consistent decline in cognitive function and mixed outcomes for technical skills. Larger studies that relate the simulator's results to real surgical

  11. Surgeons' motivation for choice of workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähler, Lena; Kristiansen, Maria; Rudkjøbing, Andreas; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2012-09-01

    To ensure qualified health care professionals at public hospitals in the future, it is important to understand which factors attract health care professionals to certain positions. The aim of this study was to explore motives for choosing employment at either public or private hospitals in a group of Danish surgeons, as well as to examine if organizational characteristics had an effect on motivation. Eight qualitative interviews were conducted with surgeons from both public and private hospitals sampled using the snowball method. The interviews were based on a semi-structured interview guide and analyzed by means of phenomenological theory. Motivational factors such as personal influence on the job, the opportunity to provide the best possible patient care, challenging work tasks colleagues, and ideological reasons were emphasized by the surgeons as important reasons for their choice of employment. Motivational factors appeared to be strongly connected to the structure of the organization; especially the size of the organization was perceived to be essential. It is worth noting that salary, in contrast to the general belief, was considered a secondary benefit rather than a primary motivational factor for employment. The study revealed that motivational factors are multidimensional and rooted in organizational structure; i.e. organizational size rather than whether the organization is public or private is crucial. There is a need for further research on the topic, but it seems clear that future health care planning may benefit from taking into account the implications that large organizational structures have for the staff working within these organizations. not relevant. not relevant.

  12. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... Society of Anaesthesiologists score, New Mobility Score, time to surgery and type of implant, surgery by unsupervised junior registrars was still a significant independent risk factor for re-operation in technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. CONCLUSION: Unsupervised junior registrars should...

  13. American Orthopaedic Surgeons in World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David P; DeLee, Jesse C

    2017-04-05

    On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and entered what was then called the Great War. Among the first officers sent to Europe were 21 orthopaedic surgeons in the so-called First Goldthwait Unit. Prior to the war, orthopaedics had been a nonoperative "strap-and-buckle" specialty that dealt primarily with infections, congenital abnormalities, and posttraumatic deformity. The Great War changed all of that forever, creating a new surgical specialty with emphasis on acute treatment, prevention of deformity, restoration of function, and rehabilitation.

  14. Why surgeons need to know about anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Fuchs-Buder, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During laparoscopic surgery, it is important to secure adequate surgical workspace. This can be obtained by improved neuromuscular blockade during the procedure. However, there are a lack of knowledge about neuromuscular blockade in anaesthesia in general among surgeons and a lack...... of knowledge about surgical technical issues among anaesthesiologists. METHODS: The issues are discussed based on the available literature. RESULTS: Knowledge between the two specialities is highly relevant and is typically lacking. There are data to support the fact that the abdomen may be tense although...

  15. [Application of psychophysics to neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2008-04-01

    Although psychophysics has already been used in many neurological evaluations including the visual and hearing tests, the use of psychophysics has been limited to the evaluation of sensory disorders. In this review paper, however, the author introduced recent attempts to apply psychophysics to the evaluation of higher cognitive functions such as perception of scenes and facial expressions. Psychophysics was also used to measure visual hypersensitivity in a patient with migraine. The benefits of the use of psychophysics in neurological and neuropsychological settings would be as follows. (1) We can evaluate higher cognitive functions quantitatively. (2) We can measure performance both above and below the normal range by the same method. (3) We can use the same stimulus and task as other research areas such as neuroscience and neuroimaging, and compare results between research areas.

  16. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  18. Proust, neurology and Stendhal's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  20. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and cinema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Jiménez-Antona, Carmen

    2010-12-16

    Cinema has been defined in many different ways, but most of them agree that it should be considered both a technique and an art. Although films often depict fantasy stories, in many cases they also reflect day-to-day realities. In its earliest days cinema was already attracted to the world of health and sickness, and frequently addressed topics like medical practice, how patients lived with their illnesses, bioethical issues, the relationship between physician and patient or research. To review the presence of neurological pathologies in the cinema with a view to identifying the main neurological disorders that have been portrayed in films. Likewise it also intends to describe the medical praxis that is employed, the relationship between physician and patient, how the experiences of the patient and the family are represented, the adaptation to social and occupational situations, and the intervention of other health care professionals related with neurological patients. Some of the most significant films that have addressed these topics were reviewed and it was seen that in some of them the illness is dealt with in a very true-to-life manner, whereas others tend to include a greater number of inaccuracies and a larger degree of fiction. Cinema has helped to shape certain ways of thinking about the health care professionals who work with neurological patients, the importance of support from the family and the social role, among other things. This confirms that resorting to cinematographic productions is a fruitful tool for stimulating a critical interest in the past and present of medical practice.

  1. Is the AO guideline for postoperative treatment of tibial plateau fractures still decisive? A survey among orthopaedic surgeons and trauma surgeons in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vusse, M; Kalmet, P H S; Bastiaenen, C H G; van Horn, Y Y; Brink, P R G; Seelen, H A M

    2017-08-01

    The standard aftercare treatment (according to the AO guideline) for surgically treated trauma patients with fractures of the tibial plateau is non-weight bearing or partial weight bearing for 10-12 weeks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the current state of practice among orthopaedic surgeons and trauma surgeons in choosing the criteria and the time period of restricted weight bearing after surgically treated tibial plateau fractures. A web-based survey was distributed among members of the Dutch Trauma Society and Dutch Orthopaedic Society to identify the most commonly applied protocols in terms of the post-operative initiation and level of weight bearing in patients with tibial plateau fractures. One hundred and eleven surgeons responded to the survey. 72.1% of the respondents recommended starting weight bearing earlier than the 12 weeks recommended by the AO guideline; 11.7% recommended starting weight bearing immediately, 4.5% after 2 weeks and 55.9% after 6 weeks. Moreover, 88.7% of the respondents reported deviating from their own local protocol. There is little consensus about the definition of 100% weight bearing and how to build up weight bearing over time. This study demonstrates that consensus about the weight bearing aftercare for tibial plateau fractures are limited. A large majority of surgeons do not follow the AO guideline or their own local protocol. More transparent criteria and predictors are needed to design optimal weight-bearing regimes for the aftercare of tibial plateau fractures.

  2. How Can We Improve Education of Breast Surgeons Across Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacinska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    The proposed global curriculum developed by the American Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) and the European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and the textbook: provides a state-of- the- art of breast cancer surgery, complements the syllabus and curriculum of the Union Europeenne des Medecins Specialistes (UEMS) examination in breast surgery/ European Board of Surgery Qualification in Breast Surgery (EBSQinBS) administered by ESSO (1) Knowledge and understanding of the principles of breast cancer incidence, aetiology, risk factors, genetics, premalignant and high-risk lesions, pathology, prognostic and predictive factors, risk prediction models, screening, diagnosis and imaging, breast cancer, oncoplastic, reconstructive breast surgery, axillary surgery and future perspective for this, radiation therapy, neoadjuvant and adjuvant systemic treatment- endocrine-, immuno- and chemotherapy, side effects and toxicities of treatment, locoregional recurrence, follow-up, locally advanced breast cancer, metastatic breast cancer, breast cancer in young and elderly patients, survivor issues, lymphedema, palliative care, chroni pain, body image and sexuality, fertility issues, cognitive functions, etc.) (1) ESSO fellowships: for instance BSSO (Brazilian Society of Surgical Oncology)-ESSO fellowship, ESSO members are being offered the opportunity by the BSSO to apply for a visiting observership in Brazil; ESSO fellowship in Breast Surgery- the fellowship provides further specialised training in the multi-modality clinical care specific to the breast cancer patient and a deeper training in breast cancer research; training fellowships- to allow young surgeons to visit a specialist breast unit in Europe, to help them to expand their experience and learn new techniques; congress fellowships- for each ESSO congress the ESSO Scientific Committee awards a number of fellowship grantsto participants from low-income countries to attend the congress; EYSAC (ESSO Young Surgeons and Alumni

  3. Discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ian A; Harris, Anita M; Naylor, Justine M; Adie, Sam; Mittal, Rajat; Dao, Alan T

    2013-05-01

    We surveyed 331 patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty pre-operatively, and patients and surgeons were both surveyed 6 and 12 months post-operatively. We identified variables (demographic factors, operative factors and patient expectations) as possible predictors for discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction. At 12 months, 94.5% of surgeons and 90.3% of patients recorded satisfaction with the outcome. The discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction was mainly due to patient dissatisfaction-surgeon satisfaction. In an adjusted analysis, the strongest predictors of discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction were unmet patient expectations and the presence of complications. Advice to potential joint arthroplasty candidates regarding the decision to proceed with surgery should be informed by patient reported outcomes, rather than the surgeon's opinion of the likelihood of success. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adult Spinal Deformity Surgeons Are Unable to Accurately Predict Postoperative Spinal Alignment Using Clinical Judgment Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailon, Tamir; Scheer, Justin K; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank J; Klineberg, Eric; Sciubba, Daniel M; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Zebala, Lukas; Hostin, Richard; Obeid, Ibrahim; Koski, Tyler; Kelly, Michael P; Bess, Shay; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Smith, Justin S; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-07-01

    Adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery seeks to reduce disability and improve quality of life through restoration of spinal alignment. In particular, correction of sagittal malalignment is correlated with patient outcome. Inadequate correction of sagittal deformity is not infrequent. The present study assessed surgeons' ability to accurately predict postoperative alignment. Seventeen cases were presented with preoperative radiographic measurements, and a summary of the operation as performed by the treating physician. Surgeon training, practice characteristics, and use of surgical planning software was assessed. Participants predicted if the surgical plan would lead to adequate deformity correction and attempted to predict postoperative radiographic parameters including sagittal vertical axis (SVA), pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence to lumbar lordosis mismatch (PI-LL), thoracic kyphosis (TK). Seventeen surgeons participated: 71% within 0 to 10 years of practice; 88% devote >25% of their practice to deformity surgery. Surgeons accurately judged adequacy of the surgical plan to achieve correction to specific thresholds of SVA 69% ± 8%, PT 68% ± 9%, and PI-LL 68% ± 11% of the time. However, surgeons correctly predicted the actual postoperative radiographic parameters only 42% ± 6% of the time. They were more successful at predicting PT (61% ± 10%) than SVA (45% ± 8%), PI-LL (26% ± 11%), or TK change (35% ± 21%; p deformity but not number of years in practice or number of three-column osteotomies performed per year. Surgeons failed to correctly predict the adequacy of the proposed surgical plan in approximately one third of presented cases. They were better at determining whether a surgical plan would achieve adequate correction than predicting specific postoperative alignment parameters. Pelvic tilt and SVA were predicted with the greatest accuracy. Copyright © 2016 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of patient health literacy: a national survey of plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Christina R; Chuang, Danielle J; Lee, Bernard T

    2014-12-01

    Health literacy affects patient participation, compliance, and outcomes. Nearly half of American adults have inadequate functional health literacy. Identification and accommodation of patients with low literacy is an important goal of the American Medical Association, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the Healthy People 2020 initiative. This study aims to assess plastic surgeons' perception of patient literacy. A survey was distributed to American Society of Plastic Surgeons members about time devoted to patient counseling, use of techniques for evaluating and enhancing patient understanding, perception of level of education, and estimated literacy. Participation was voluntary and data were collected anonymously using an online survey tool. There were 235 participants in the survey (9.9 percent response rate). Patient literacy was most frequently assessed using their general impression (62.2 percent) and by asking patients about their employment (37.3 percent); 26.2 percent did not assess literacy. The majority of surgeons (62 percent) reported spending at least 20 minutes counseling new patients, and 37 percent reported spending more than 30 minutes. Lay terminology (94 percent) and pictures/diagrams (84.6 percent) were common patient education aids, whereas only 8.1 percent use teach-back methods. Plastic surgeons overestimated the level of education and reading level of their patients compared with national data. Formal assessment of health literacy is rarely performed, as most plastic surgeons use a general impression. Although plastic surgeons devote significant time to patient counseling, evidence-based communication methods, such as the teach-back method, are underused. Simple, directed questions can identify patients with low literacy skills, to accommodate their communication needs.

  6. Live surgical education: a perspective from the surgeons who perform it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahid A A; Chang, Richard T M; Ahmed, Kamran; Knoll, Thomas; van Velthoven, Roland; Challacombe, Ben; Dasgupta, Prokar; Rane, Abhay

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the experience and views regarding live surgical broadcasts (LSB) among European urologists attending the European Association of Urology Robotic Urology Society (ERUS) congress in September 2012. An anonymous survey was distributed via email inviting the participants of the ERUS congress with experience of LSB to share their opinions about LSB. The outcomes measured included; personal experience of LSB, levels of anxiety faced and the perceived surgical quality. The impact of factors, such as communication/team-working, travel fatigue and lack of specific equipment were also evaluated. In all, 106 surgeons responded with 98 (92.5%) reporting personal experience of LSB; 6.5% respondents noted 'significant anxiety' increasing to 19.4% when performing surgery away from home (P language difficulties (6.2%) and jet lag (7.3%) were other significant factors reported. In all, 75% of surgeons perceived the audience wanted a slick demonstration; however, 52.2% and 42.4% respectively also reported the audience wished the surgeon to struggle or manage a complication during a LSB. A small proportion of surgeons had significantly heightened anxiety levels and lower perceived performance during LSB, which in a 'foreign' environment seemed to affect a greater proportion of surgeons. Various factors appear to impact surgical performance raising concerns about the appropriateness of unregulated LSB as a teaching method. To mitigate these concerns, surgeons' performing live surgery feel that the operation needs to be well planned using appropriate equipment; with many considering bringing their own team or operating from home on a video link. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  7. Long-term activity restrictions after shoulder arthroplasty: an international survey of experienced shoulder surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Robert A; Mallon, William J; Willems, W Jaap; Moorman, Claude T

    2011-03-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is being performed with increasing frequency, and patients' athletic participation after shoulder arthroplasty is on the rise. However, little data exist regarding appropriate long-term activity restrictions. We hypothesize that European and North American surgeons both recommend increasing long-term activity restrictions, moving from hemiarthroplasty to total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and that both groups impose similar restrictions on their patients. An online survey was sent to members of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and the European Society for Surgery of the Shoulder and Elbow (SECEC). Participants received a list of 37 activities and classified their postoperative recommendations for each activity as allowed, allowed with experience, not allowed, or undecided. The participation rate was 18%, including 47 North American surgeons and 52 European surgeons. All patients were allowed to participate in nonimpact activities, including jogging/running, walking, stationary bicycling, and ballroom dancing. Sports requiring light upper extremity involvement, including low-impact aerobics, golf, swimming, and table tennis, were allowed after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, and were allowed with experience after RTSA. Sports with fall potential, including downhill skiing, tennis, basketball, and soccer, were allowed with experience after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, and undecided or not allowed after RTSA. Higher-impact sports, such as weightlifting, waterskiing, and volleyball, were undecided after hemiarthroplasty and TSA and were not allowed after RTSA. European surgeons were more conservative than American surgeons in their recommendations after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, but good agreement between the 2 groups was noted regarding restrictions after RTSA. Restrictions should be based on the type of arthroplasty performed and patients' preoperative experience. Copyright © 2011 Journal of

  8. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  9. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  10. Facial paralysis for the plastic surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosins, Aaron M; Hurvitz, Keith A; Evans, Gregory RD; Wirth, Garrett A

    2007-01-01

    Facial paralysis presents a significant and challenging reconstructive problem for plastic surgeons. An aesthetically pleasing and acceptable outcome requires not only good surgical skills and techniques, but also knowledge of facial nerve anatomy and an understanding of the causes of facial paralysis. The loss of the ability to move the face has both social and functional consequences for the patient. At the Facial Palsy Clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, 22,954 patients were surveyed, and over 50% were found to have a considerable degree of psychological distress and social withdrawal as a consequence of their facial paralysis. Functionally, patients present with unilateral or bilateral loss of voluntary and nonvoluntary facial muscle movements. Signs and symptoms can include an asymmetric smile, synkinesis, epiphora or dry eye, abnormal blink, problems with speech articulation, drooling, hyperacusis, change in taste and facial pain. With respect to facial paralysis, surgeons tend to focus on the surgical, or ‘hands-on’, aspect. However, it is believed that an understanding of the disease process is equally (if not more) important to a successful surgical outcome. The purpose of the present review is to describe the anatomy and diagnostic patterns of the facial nerve, and the epidemiology and common causes of facial paralysis, including clinical features and diagnosis. Treatment options for paralysis are vast, and may include nerve decompression, facial reanimation surgery and botulinum toxin injection, but these are beyond the scope of the present paper. PMID:19554190

  11. Ultrasonography: a useful tool for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Ruiz, Jesús; de Cabo, F

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonography is a diagnostic technique used in many clinical specialties that should also be used by plastic surgeons. The authors have used ultrasonography since 2011 as part of the routine follow-up evaluation for all their patients who have undergone breast augmentation (the main indication), body implants, gynecomastia, fat transfer, or abdominoplasty. The main goal of this study was to correlate normal and pathologic conditions clinically with their respective imaging findings. The secondary aim was to establish the utility of this tool in a plastic surgery setting. With increasing experience, the use of ultrasound evaluation was expanded to include evaluation of seromas and hematomas, determination of the diastasis recti width, and confirmation of the presence of hernias, especially in patients with high adiposity, who are difficult to scan. This report describes several clinical cases of complications associated with breast augmentation and discusses the most significant common problems encountered during the first 2 years of ultrasonography scanner use in a plastic surgeon's office. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  12. The world's best-known surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, A J

    1983-10-01

    Henry Norman Bethune was born in Ontario in 1890 and was to become the best-known physician in the world. Bethune, a thoracic surgeon, spent his professional life in Detroit and Montreal, with these periods separated by a year spent as a patient in a tuberculosis sanatorium. This was where his interest in pulmonary disease was stimulated. Pioneer thoracic surgeon, councillor to the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, artist, poet, polemist, conservative-turned-communist, iconoclast, and soldier, Bethune was a highly complex individual. Diverting his energies from surgery to social issues during the depression, Bethune participated in the Spanish Civil War, at which time he designed the world's first mobile blood transfusion unit. Eight months later, Bethune joined Mao Tse-tung's Eight Route Army in China. In 1939 he died of septicemia acquired from a sliver of infected bone while he was operating on a wounded Chinese patient. Bethune's fame today derives principally from the popularization of his accomplishments by Mao, whom he met once and who subsequently decreed that all in China should learn about him. Bethune's posthumous influence played an important role in the reopening of relations between China and the West.

  13. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. METHODS: A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. RESULTS: Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  14. A survey of oral surgeons' tobacco-use-related knowledge and intervention behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Raquel; Delgado-Molina, Esther; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate whether oral surgeons are aware of tobacco' s role in oral health. Moreover, we wanted to know professionals' attitudes towards smoker patients and physicians' involvement in detecting and eradicating this habit in patients. We conducted a survey to determine the awareness of the members of the Spanish Society of Oral Surgery about tobacco' s damage on oral health and the role of dentists in the prevention and elimination of the smoking habit. 450 surveys were distributed during the Seventh National Congress of the Spanish Society of Oral Surgery, of which 224 (49.8%) were answered. Seventy-six point eight percent of oral surgeons said that they have a good knowledge of the effects of snuff on oral health. However, only 42.9% admitted they had received specific training regarding how to deal with patients who want to give up smoking. Sixty-three point four percent had explained to smoker patients the risk of this habit for the oral and general health. However, 17% admitted they do not advise their patients to give up smoking for fear of upsetting them, while 15.2% expressed lack of time, and 3.6% think it is not their competence. As to the relationship between oral cancer and smoking, 83% of oral surgeons recognize a direct relationship. In addition, 85.7% of professionals believe that dentists have a primary role in oral cancer prevention. These results indicate that most oral surgeons are concerned about the smoking habit of their patients. However, it is necessary to increase the specific training of dentists by providing tobacco treatment programs as part of their professional responsibility. Oral surgeons recognize the direct relationship between the smoking habit and oral cancer and regard as very important the role of dentists in the prevention of this disease.

  15. Opportunities in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Worldwide Surgeons' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Michael; Newman, Jared M; Khlopas, Anton; Chughtai, Morad; Martinez, Nick; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Mont, Michael A

    2017-07-25

    This study surveyed a group of US and international orthopaedic surgeons to prioritize areas of improvement in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Specifically, we assessed surgeon responses regarding the top five areas of TKA needing improvement; which were stratified by: a) US surgeons, b) international surgeons, c) US surgeons' implant-brand-loyalty, and d) surgeons' years of experience and case volume. Four hundred and eighteen surgeons who were board-certified, in practice for at least two years, spent 60% of their time in clinical practice, and performed a minimum of 25 lower extremity joint arthroplasties per year were surveyed. They chose the top five areas (among 17) needing improvement for TKA. Results were stratified by surgeons' location (US and international), implant-brand-loyalty, years of experience, and case volume. Functional outcomes was the top identified area for improvement (US 63% and international 71%), followed by brand loyalty (Company I 68%, other brand 59%, and multi-brand/no loyalty 66%), years of experience (early-career 64%, mid-career 63%, and late-career 75%) and case volume (low-volume 69%, mid-volume 60%, and high-volume 71%). Following this was costs for US surgeons (47%) and implant survivorship for international surgeons (57%). While costs were the next highest area for specific Company-loyal surgeons (57%), implant survivorship was the next highest area for the other two cohorts. Implant survivorship was the second most important area of improvement regardless of years of experience and for low- and mid-volume surgeons. Surgeons identified functional outcomes as the most important area needing improvement. Cost of implants was more important for American as compared to international surgeons.

  16. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  17. Alexander Thom (1775-1845): From Army Surgeon to Settlement Founder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Ross D

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the life of a 19th century medical practitioner and the impact he had on both people and society. Alexander Thom had a distinguished career as a surgeon in the British Army Medical Service before retiring to become one of the founding settlers and leaders of Perth, Ontario. There his half-pay retirement, land grants from being in the military and his medical practice enabled him to become a successful businessman-mill owner, justice of the peace, local politician and eventually district court judge. Like many doctors of his or any era, his contributions to society extended beyond his medical practice.

  18. Neurological manifestaions among Sudanese patients with multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study demonstrated that the most common non- neurological symptoms was locomotor symptoms (24%) ,while the most common neurological symptoms were backache and neck pain .The most common neurological findings were cord compression (8%) followed by peripheral neuropathy (2%) and CVA (2%). 22% of ...

  19. When surgeons decide to become surgeons: new opportunities for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Mark S; Billig, Jessica; Berman, Russell S; Kalet, Adina L; Zabar, Sondra R; Fox, Jaclyn R; Pachter, H Leon

    2014-02-01

    When surgeons decide to become surgeons has important implications. If the decision is made prior to or early in medical school, surgical education can be more focused on surgical diseases and resident skills. To determine when surgeons - compared with their nonsurgical colleagues - decide on their medical path, residents in surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and emergency medicine were surveyed. Timing of residency choice, demographic data, personal goals, and reason for residency choice were queried. A total of 234 residents responded (53 surgical residents). Sixty-two percent of surgeons reported that they were "fairly certain" of surgery before medical school, 13% decided during their preclinical years, and 25% decided during their clerkship years. This compares with an aggregate 40%, 7%, and 54%, respectively, for the other 5 residency specialties. These differences were statistically significant (P = .001). When the 234 residents were asked about their primary motivation for choosing their field, 51% pointed to expected job satisfaction and 44% to intellectual curiosity, and only 3% mentioned lifestyle, prestige, or income. General surgery residents decide on surgery earlier than residents in other programs. This may be advantageous, resulting in fast-tracking of these medical students in acquiring surgical knowledge, undertaking surgical research, and early identification for surgical residency programs. Surgical training in the era of the 80-hour work week could be enhanced if medical students bring much deeper knowledge of surgery to their first day of residency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Gentleman Artist-Surgeon in Late Victorian Group Portraiture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, Keren Rosa

    2016-01-01

    In this article I consider the ways in which group portraits of surgeons, a genre associated with inscriptions of corporate membership and institutional authority, reflected the complex and at times contradictory status of surgeons during the late Victorian period. Group portraits from this period offer a diverse range of representations of surgeons – from middle-class professional to hygiene reformer, scientist to cultured gentleman – all of which worked against the popular conception of the surgeon as manual labourer and bloody carpenter. In particular, the emergence during the period of the gentleman artist-surgeon, exemplified by the celebrity surgeon and amateur artist Henry Thompson (1820–1904), signalled a new incarnation of the surgeon and offered an alternative to both the stereotypes of the surgeon as manual labourer and the surgeon or middle-class professional. But there were complexities and contradictions that beset the identity of the gentleman artist-surgeon, and these will be considered with reference to Thompson’s own novel, Charley Kingston’s Aunt (1885). PMID:27904434

  1. Mercy killing in neurology: The beginnings of neurology on screen (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Karenberg, Axel

    2016-09-20

    The history of Neurocinema includes neuroethics, and this theme was first used in 2 films released in the 1940s in both Germany and the United States. Ich Klage An (I Accuse) is about "terminal" multiple sclerosis in a young woman and the decision to determine one's own fate. The protagonist anticipates becoming "deaf, blind, and idiotic" and asks her husband to administer a toxic drug dose, which he does. The film disturbingly suggests that the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is tantamount to a death sentence. Ich Klage An (1941) played during the medical murders era ("Aktion T-4" program) but has few references to National Socialism, except for judges with Nazi emblems on their robes making a brief Nazi salute and a jury chamber with a bust of Hitler. Party leadership agreed that the film made a deep impression, but the intended effect on the viewing public is largely unknown. An Act of Murder (1948) involves another young woman with an inoperable brain tumor. When her condition worsens during a trip, her husband deliberately crashes the car, killing her but surviving himself. A subsequent trial finds that she died of an overdose rather than the crash. The trial judge dismisses the murder charge, but the film argues the morals of mercy killing. These films came out during the Nazi euthanasia program and founding of the Euthanasia Society of America in 1938. The choice of neurologic disease by these filmmakers and scriptwriters to defend euthanasia is remarkable. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Lyman A. Brewer III (1907-1988): surgeon-scientist, inspirational teacher, and humanist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R

    1998-12-01

    Dr. Lyman Augustus Brewer III, a distinguished, colorful thoracic surgeon and among the first to practice that specialty in the West, died on June 25, 1988, in Los Angeles, California, after a courageous battle with lymphoma. Dr. Brewer was a great humanist, innovative clinical surgeon, charismatic teacher, and surgical leader. In World War II, Lieutenant Colonel Brewer served in the Second Auxiliary Surgical Group in the Mediterranean and European theaters and helped define criteria that became the standard for the management of thoracic war injuries. Out of this experience he authored the classic paper, "The Wet Lung in War Casualties." Dr. Brewer's scientific contributions embraced the broad spectrum of thoracic surgical topics, including treatment of tuberculosis, classification of lung cancer, bronchial stump buttressing using the pericardial fat pad (Brewer fat pad), and management of esophageal perforation. Dr Brewer wrote seven books and more than 100 papers, and served as First Vice President of The American College of Surgeons and as President of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and The Pacific Coast Surgical Association.

  3. Surgical Treatment of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: Trends and the Influence of Patient and Surgeon Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkinson, Joshua M; Zhong, Lin; Aliu, Oluseyi; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-09-01

    To examine trends in and determinants of the use of different procedures for treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Florida State Ambulatory Surgery Database for 2005 to 2012. We selected all patients who underwent in situ decompression, transposition, or other surgical treatments for cubital tunnel syndrome. We tested trends in the use of these techniques and performed a multivariable analysis to examine associations among patient characteristics, surgeon case volume, and the use of different techniques. Of the 26,164 patients who underwent surgery for cubital tunnel syndrome, 80% underwent in situ decompression, 16% underwent transposition, and 4% underwent other surgical treatment. Over the study period, there was a statistically significant increase in the use of in situ release and a decrease in the use of transposition. Women and patients treated by surgeons with a higher cubital tunnel surgery case volume underwent in situ release with a statistically higher incidence than other techniques. In Florida, surgeon practice reflected the widespread adoption of in situ release as the primary treatment for cubital tunnel syndrome, and its relative incidence increased during the study period. Patient demographics and surgeon-level factors influenced procedure selection. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The harassment and stalking of plastic surgeons by their patients in Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allnutt, Stephen; Samuels, Anthony; Taylor, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    Abstract Medical professionals come into direct contact with the public. The relationships are often personal. The aim of the survey is to examine the prevalence of harassment of plastic surgeons by their patients. Survey questionnaires were mailed to all plastic surgeons listed in the 1999 Australasian Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery List of Members. A very wide definition of harassment was then provided and information in regard to the nature of the harassment was obtained. This was a descriptive survey of plastic surgeons' experiences of harassment by patients in Australia and New Zealand. More than half of the plastic surgeons in Australia and New Zealand who responded to the questionnaire reported having been a victim of harassment at some point of their careers. One quarter had been harassed in the previous year. Over 20% of cases met the legal criteria for stalking. These estimates are in excess of those reported in the other studies of the general community. Harassment persisted in the majority of cases for at least a month and in a third of cases for up to 5 years. The recognition of psychiatric disorder, particularly personality dysfunction, prior to embarking on surgery may limit the likelihood of harassment by difficult patients. Formal teaching may be helpful to surgical registrars and consultants. Expert intervention could assist in reducing clinician anxiety.

  5. Condyloma acuminata in infants and children. A survey of colon and rectal surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budayr, M; Ankney, R N; Moore, R A

    1996-10-01

    Condyloma acuminata are anogenital warts caused by a human papillomavirus. Human papillomavirus is a tissue-specific, site-specific, double-stranded DNA virus, which is capable of inducing high-grade genital intraepithelial neoplasia and malignancy. The incidence of anogenital warts in the pediatric age group is rising, and sexual abuse has been implicated as a potential cause. Accumulated data from separate questionnaires sent to practicing colorectal surgeons who are members of The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and fellows in colon and rectal training programs have been analyzed. Thirty percent of those polled responded to our survey. Of the respondents, 93 percent see less than two pediatric cases per year. Seventy-two percent stated that tissue specimens would be sent routinely for histopathologic identification. Although 73 percent of surgeons consider anogenital warts a potentially sexually transmitted disease, only 26 percent reported screening for other sexually transmitted diseases. A diagnostic and therapeutic protocol is followed by 19 percent of respondents. Patient follow-up varied from six months (43 percent) to lifelong examinations (3 percent). Sixty-four percent of respondents agreed that a diagnostic and therapeutic protocol based on current knowledge would be beneficial. We conclude that colon and rectal surgeons have a low exposure to anogenital warts in infants and children. Furthermore, we believe that a diagnostic and therapeutic protocol based on the current literature would be helpful.

  6. Citizenship in civil society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by

  7. Norman Bethune, Canadian surgeon: his Chinese connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, G V

    1983-07-01

    Norman Bethune, a Canadian thoracic surgeon who dabbled in painting, poetry, criticism, teaching and invention, was a member of the Communist Party of Canada. He became involved in two civil wars on opposite sides of the world and amassed both criticism and respect from colleagues and national leaders. The author describes Bethune's time in China, during which he developed front line field hospitals for Mao Tse-tung and his guerrillas in their struggle against the Japanese during 1938 and 1939. His efforts in China on behalf of the wounded brought him into contact with the primitive military medicine of the country and the poverty of its people; it earned for him a local reputation as saviour and benefactor and gave him an honoured place in Chinese military history.

  8. [Technology or technolatry: where are surgeons going?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Innovative pressure forms part of the current technical-scientific utopia and equally affects surgeons, patients, communication media, and the health industry. It has brought a new type of technical adventurism with its accompanying iatrogenesis, which involves unnecessary risks. Personal ambitions, industrial persuasion and the promotion of hospital brands, both public and private, have weakened values and professional ethics in an environment in which technology is losing cost/benefit, and the conflict of interests have aroused many suspicions. A critical review of the technolatry culture is presented as well as a sober assessment of the costs of our interventions, not only in the economic sphere, but also as regards the safety of our patients, the environmental sustainability, and the most efficient use of health care devices. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurologic long term outcome after drowning in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suominen Pertti K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drowning is a major source of mortality and morbidity in children worldwide. Neurocognitive outcome of children after drowning incidents cannot be accurately predicted in the early course of treatment. Therefore, aggressive out-of-hospital and in-hospital treatment is emphasized. There are "miracle" cases after long submersion times that have been reported in the medical literature, which mostly concern small children. However, many of the survivors will remain severely neurologically compromised after remarkably shorter submersion times and will consequently be a great burden to their family and society for the rest of their lives. The duration of submersion, the need of advanced life support at the site of the accident, the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, whether spontaneous breathing and circulation are present on arrival at the emergency room are important factors related to survival with mild neurological deficits or intact function in drowned children. Data on long-term outcome are scarce. The used outcome measurement methods and the duration of follow-up have not been optimal in most of the existing studies. Proper neurological and neurophysiological examinations for drowned children are superior to outcome scales based chart reviews. There is evidence that gross neurological examination at the time of discharge from the hospital in young children does not reveal all the possible sequelae related to hypoxic brain injury and thus long-term follow-up of drowned resuscitated children is strongly recommended.

  10. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  11. Atypical Neurological Manifestations Of Hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    pal P K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A part from the well-established syndrome of motor paralysis, hypokalemia may present with atypical neurological manifestations, which are not well documented in literature. Methods: We treated 30 patients of hypokalemia whose neurological manifestations improved after corrections of hypokalemia. A retrospective chart review of the clinical profile was done with emphasis on the evolution of symptoms and occurrence of unusual manifestations. Results: Twenty-eight patients had subacute quadriparesis with duration of symptoms varying from 10hrs to 7 days and two had slowly progressive quadriparesis. Fifty percent of patients had more than one attack of paralysis. Early asymmetric weakness (11, stiffness and abnormal posture of hands (7, predominant bibrachial weakness (4, distal paresthesias (4, hemiparesthesia (1, hyperreflexia(4, early severe weakness of neck muscles (3, chorea (1, trismus (1,and, retention of urine (1 were the unusual features observed. The means level of serum potassium on admission was 2.1+0.6mEq/L.and the serum creatine kinase was elevated in 14 out of 17 patients. All patients except two had complete recovery.

  12. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  13. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. [Oliver Sacks and literary neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola, Elena; Banos, Josep E

    2014-03-16

    Popular medical literature attempts to discuss medical topics using a language that is, as far as possible, free of all medical jargon so as to make it more easily understandable by the general public. The very complexity of neurology makes it more difficult for the stories dealing with this specialty to be understood easily by an audience without any kind of medical training. This paper reviews the works written by Oliver Sacks involving the field of neurology aimed at the general public, and the main characteristics and the clinical situation discussed by the author are presented. Some biographical notes about Oliver Sacks are also included and the 11 books published by this author over the last 40 years are also analysed. In each case they are put into a historical context and the most outstanding aspects justifying what makes them an interesting read are commented on. In most cases, the genesis of the work is explained together with its most significant features. The works of Sacks contain a wide range of very interesting clinical situations that are usually explained by means of a language that is readily comprehensible to the general public. It also provides neurologists with a holistic view of different clinical situations, together with a discussion of their biographical, historical and developmental components.

  15. How Good are Orthopaedic Surgeons at Interpreting ECGs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shariff Raheel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is to find out how good orthopaedic surgeons are at interpreting electrocardiograms and to compare the results between surgical specialties with physicians. It showed that surgeons were considerably weaker than physicians in this aspect. The difference between the surgical specialities was not significant, but the orthopaedic surgeons were marginally better than other surgical specialists. Improper interpretation of electrocardiogram may compromise patient care. A formal training may be required in surgical portfolio.

  16. Among Musculoskeletal Surgeons, Job Dissatisfaction Is Associated With Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wulfften Palthe, Olivier D R; Neuhaus, Valentin; Janssen, Stein J; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2016-08-01

    Burnout is common in professions such as medicine in which employees have frequent and often stressful interpersonal interactions where empathy and emotional control are important. Burnout can lead to decreased effectiveness at work, negative health outcomes, and less job satisfaction. A relationship between burnout and job satisfaction is established for several types of physicians but is less studied among surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions. We asked: (1) For surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, what risk factors are associated with worse job dissatisfaction? (2) What risk factors are associated with burnout symptoms? Two hundred ten (52% of all active members of the Science of Variation Group [SOVG]) surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions (94% orthopaedic surgeons and 6% trauma surgeons; in Europe, general trauma surgeons do most of the fracture surgery) completed the Global Job Satisfaction instrument, Shirom-Malamed Burnout Measure, and provided practice and surgeon characteristics. Most surgeons were male (193 surgeons, 92%) and most were academically employed (186 surgeons, 89%). Factors independently associated with job satisfaction and burnout were identified with multivariable analysis. Greater symptoms of burnout (β, -7.13; standard error [SE], 0.75; 95% CI, -8.60 to -5.66; p < 0.001; adjusted R(2), 0.33) was the only factor independently associated with lower job satisfaction. Having children (β, -0.45; SE, 0.0.21; 95% CI, -0.85 to -0.043; p = 0.030; adjusted R(2), 0.046) was the only factor independently associated with fewer symptoms of burnout. Among an active research group of largely academic surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, most are satisfied with their job. Efforts to limit burnout and job satisfaction by optimizing engagement in and deriving meaning from the work are effective in other settings and merit attention among surgeons. Level II, prognostic study.

  17. Neurological recovery at age 92 after acute trauma and operative spinal decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Eltahawy, MD, PhD, FRCS, FACS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available People aged > 80 years are among the fastest growing segments of most Western societies. With improved lifestyles and medical care, complex surgical interventions will be increasingly offered to elderly patients. Questions will arise about the value of performing major surgery in patients near their postulated end of life. Here, we describe a near-full neurological recovery from a profound neurological deficit that occurred as a result of a spinal fracture after a fall. To our knowledge, this is the first report of neurological recovery at such an advanced age.

  18. Mentorship as Experienced by Women Surgeons in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorozuya, Kyoko; Kawase, Kazumi; Akashi-Tanaka, Sadako; Kanbayashi, Chizuko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Women have accounted for over 30% of new medical students since 1995 in Japan. Establishing support systems for women surgeons to continue their work is a major issue in Japan. Mentorship can be one of the most effective means to help women surgeons to continue their work. The purpose of this study was to clarify the current status of mentorship among Japanese women surgeons and to discuss the role of mentors for women surgeons. Invitation letters were sent to all female members of the Japan Association of Women Surgeons in April 2011. An 84-item questionnaire survey was sent to those who agreed to participate in this study via the internet. Fifty-five surgeons participated in this study, a response rate of 48.7%. Sixty-seven percent of respondents found it difficult to continue in their job; 85% thought mentorship was necessary for women surgeons to progress in their careers; and 84% reported that they already had a mentor. Respondents thought that a mentor helped them to advance their clinical career, to stay in their job, and to provide moral support. However, mentors appeared to be less useful in helping them to advance their research career, to network, to increase their status, and to achieve a work-life balance. This study revealed areas where mentors appeared to be less helpful to women surgeons. The survey gave an indication of how to help improve and develop the career and personal life of women surgeons in Japan.

  19. Analysis of the antibiotic prophylaxis prescribed by Spanish Oral Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Herráez-Vilas, José-María; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduardo; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2009-10-01

    To identify prophylactic antibiotic prescription practices among Spanish dentists with preferential dedication to Oral Surgery in different types of tooth extraction surgeries. Members of the Spanish Oral Surgery Society were surveyed on antibiotic prophylaxis use in 4 different tooth extraction modalities scaled according to their surgical invasiveness. Sixty-nine of the 105 distributed questionnaires were returned completed. Thirteen percent of the surveyed surgeons would prescribe antibiotics to prevent postoperative wound infection when confronted with conventional tooth extraction lasting less than 5 minutes. In the case of surgery lasting more than 5 minutes, the percentage of participants that would prescribe antibiotics increased to 39%. When a mucoperiosteal flap was elevated or an ostectomy was performed, 87% and 100%, respectively, would prescribe antibiotic prophylaxis. Amoxicillin and its combination with clavulanic acid were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics. All participants would prescribe the antibiotic orally, starting after surgery and with a duration that ranged from 2-8 days. The results obtained suggest that antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing local odontogenic infection is not being correctly implemented in Spain. This can generate new bacterial resistances, facilitate adverse drug reactions and favor opportunistic infections. Better designed studies are needed in order to clarify the role of antibiotics in the prevention of postsurgical wound infection.

  20. Conflicts of interest with the hand surgeon's relationship with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelSignore, Jeanne L; Goodman, Murray J

    2012-01-01

    Many advances in hand surgery have been supported and enabled by the integral relationship that exists between the profession of hand surgery and industry. This relationship takes many forms, including medical education, development of new technology and methodology, research, and opportunities for patient education. As with all of these endeavors, the primary focus of both the physician and industry must be the care of the patient. When a collaborative relationship exists between physicians and industry, a conflict of interest is present and must be recognized as such and managed to avoid any detriment to patient care. Although the hand surgeon, the patient, and industry share the common interest of advancement of patient care, there does exist real and potential conflicts of interest, which are unavoidable, but not necessarily undesirable. Multiple guidelines exist to govern relationships between industry and physicians. The cooperative relationship between the physician and industry is not only helpful, but it can be critical to the advancement of and innovations in patient care. When properly managed, collaboration between the physician and industry can effectively achieve the common goal of serving the best interest of the patient. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Speech and neurology-chemical impairment correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayre, Harb S.

    2002-05-01

    Speech correlates of alcohol/drug impairment and its neurological basis is presented with suggestion for further research in impairment from poly drug/medicine/inhalent/chew use/abuse, and prediagnosis of many neuro- and endocrin-related disorders. Nerve cells all over the body detect chemical entry by smoking, injection, drinking, chewing, or skin absorption, and transmit neurosignals to their corresponding cerebral subsystems, which in turn affect speech centers-Broca's and Wernick's area, and motor cortex. For instance, gustatory cells in the mouth, cranial and spinal nerve cells in the skin, and cilia/olfactory neurons in the nose are the intake sensing nerve cells. Alcohol depression, and brain cell damage were detected from telephone speech using IMPAIRLYZER-TM, and the results of these studies were presented at 1996 ASA meeting in Indianapolis, and 2001 German Acoustical Society-DEGA conference in Hamburg, Germany respectively. Speech based chemical Impairment measure results were presented at the 2001 meeting of ASA in Chicago. New data on neurotolerance based chemical impairment for alcohol, drugs, and medicine shall be presented, and shown not to fully support NIDA-SAMSHA drug and alcohol threshold used in drug testing domain.

  2. Current trends in the practice of endoscopy among surgeons in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Joshua; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Holzman, Michael D; Poulose, Benjamin K; Pierce, Richard A

    2017-04-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic roles for endoscopic intervention are expanding. To continue emphasis on endoscopy in surgical training, The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons has developed the Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery (FES) course to standardize and assess endoscopy training. However, little demographic information exists about the current practice of endoscopy by general surgeons and how to best integrate endoscopic skills into surgical training. A survey to collect data regarding the current practice patterns of endoscopy was sent to surgeons with a valid email address in the American Medical Association masterfile. Information regarding the type of training (academic vs. community general surgery residency) and current practice environment (academic medical center vs. community hospital) was collected. The respondents' current practice volume of upper endoscopy and colonoscopy over the prior year was stratified into three groups: rare (10 per month). Pearson's Chi-squared test was used to analyze the data. The survey was sent to 9902 general surgeons. There were 767 who provided answers regarding their current practice of endoscopy. Mean time in practice was 18 ± 10 years, 87 % were male, and 83 % practiced in a metropolitan area. Respondents who trained at academic general surgery programs were less likely than those at community programs to frequently perform colonoscopy (17.3 vs. 27.9 %, p endoscopy (11.8 vs. 17.1 %, p endoscopy (9.8 vs. 14.8 %, p < 0.05) than those who practice at community hospitals. The type of residency training and current practice setting of general surgeons has a significant influence on the volume of endoscopic procedures performed. This study identifies areas where more emphasis on endoscopic skills training is needed, such as FES.

  3. Potential media influence on the high incidence of medical disputes from the perspective of plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiehfeng; Lin, Ching-Feng; Chen, Cha-Chun; Chiu, Shih-Feng; Shih, Fuh-Yuan; Lyu, Shu-Yu; Lee, Ming-Been

    2017-08-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of medical disputes among plastic surgeons in Taiwan and to elucidate their perspectives regarding the influence of medical litigation media coverage on the physician-patient relationship. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among plastic surgeons attending a series of continuing education training lectures organized by the Taiwan Society of Plastic Surgery in 2015. Of the 109 respondents, over a third (36.4%) had previously experienced a medical dispute. The vast majority of both physicians who had medical disputes (77.1%) and those who did not (72.1%) felt that the media tends to be supportive of patients in their reporting, and 37.1% of all plastic surgeons felt that the media always portrays the patient as a victim. Respondents who experienced medical disputes in this study felt that the top five leading causes of the high incidence of medical disputes were patient disappointment with procedure results (81.1%), insufficient patient psychological preparation or emotional instability (61.7%), inadequate risk communication on the part of the physician (64.9%), patient uneasiness with the procedure or perception of carelessness (60.6%), and insufficient physician training or incorrect medical evaluation (57.4%). Over a third of the respondents had previously experienced a medical dispute. This study highlights the perception among plastic surgeons that the media reporting of medical disputes and medical litigation is biased in favor of the patients, with 37.1% of the plastic surgeons surveyed opining that patients are always cast as victims. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Identifying Sources of Funding That Contribute to Scholastic Productivity in Academic Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qing Zhao; Cohen, Justin B; Baek, Yoonji; Chen, Austin D; Doval, Andres F; Singhal, Dhruv; Fukudome, Eugene Y; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2018-01-09

    Scholastic productivity has previously been shown to be positively associated with National Institute of Health (NIH) grants and industry funding. This study examines whether society, industry, or federal funding contributes toward academic productivity as measured by scholastic output of academic plastic surgeons. Institution Web sites were used to acquire academic attributes of full-time academic plastic surgeons. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Open Payment database, NIH reporter, the Plastic Surgery Foundation (PSF), and American Association of Plastic Surgeons (AAPS) Web sites were accessed for funding and endowment details. Bibliometric data of each surgeon were then collected via Scopus to ascertain strengths of association with each source. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify significant contributors to high scholastic output. We identified 935 academic plastic surgeons with 94 (10.1%), 24 (2.6%), 724 (77.4%), and 62 (6.6%) receiving funding from PSF, AAPS, industry, and NIH, respectively. There were positive correlations in receiving NIH, PSF, and/or AAPS funding (P < 0.001), whereas industry funding was found to negatively associate with PSF (r = -0.75, P = 0.022) grants. The NIH R award was consistently found to be the most predictive of academic output across bibliometrics, followed by the AAPS academic scholarship award. Conventional measures of academic seniority remained predictive across all measures used. Our study demonstrates for the first time interactions between industry, federal, and association funding. The NIH R award was the strongest determinant of high scholastic productivity. Recognition through AAPS academic scholarships seemed to associate with subsequent success in NIH funding.

  5. [Post-ischemia neurologic recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud-Chaumeil, Bernard; Pariente, Jérémie; Albucher, Jean-François; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common affliction of patients with neurological symptoms. Rehabilitation of stroke patients is a difficult task. Our knowledge on rehabilitation has recently improved with the emergence of data from new neuroimaging techniques. A prospective, double blind, cross over, placebo, controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia, is conducted to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke. Each patient undergoes two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations, one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. A single dose of fluoxetine is enough to modulate cerebral sensori-motor activation and significantly improves motor skills of the affected side. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine on motor function.

  6. Neurology of foreign language aptitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Biedroń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This state-of-the art paper focuses on the poorly explored issue of foreign language aptitude, attempting to present the latest developments in this field and reconceptualizations of the construct from the perspective of neuroscience. In accordance with this goal, it first discusses general directions in neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude, starting with the earliest attempts to define the neurological substrate for talent, sources of difficulties in the neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude and modern research methods. This is followed by the discussion of the research on the phonology of foreign language aptitude with emphasis on functional and structural studies as well as their consequences for the knowledge of the concept. The subsequent section presents the studies which focus on lexical and morphosyntactic aspects of foreign language aptitude. The paper ends with a discussion of the limitations of contemporary research, the future directions of such research and selec ed methodological issues.

  7. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  8. Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Glass Houses of Attending Surgeons: An Assessment of Unprofessional Behavior on Facebook Among Practicing Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Sudbeck, Craig; Luers, Thomas; Adamson, Peter; Cook, Gates; Schenarts, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent publication demonstrated that unprofessional behavior on Facebook is common among surgical residents. In the formulation of standards and curricula to address this issue, it is important that surgical faculty lead by example. Our current study refocuses on the Facebook profiles of faculty surgeons involved in the education of general surgery residents. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) web site was used to identify general surgery residencies located in the Midwest. Departmental web sites were then searched to identify teaching faculty for the general surgery residency. Facebook was then searched to determine which faculty had profiles available for viewing by the general public. Profiles were then placed in 1 of the 3 following categories: professional, potentially unprofessional, or clearly unprofessional. A chi-square test was used to determine significance. In all, 57 residency programs were identified on the ACS web site, 100% of which provided an institutional web site listing the surgical faculty. A total of 758 general surgery faculty were identified (133 women and 625 men), of which 195 (25.7%) had identifiable Facebook accounts. In all, 165 faculty (84.6%) had no unprofessional content, 20 (10.3%) had potentially unprofessional content, and 10 (5.1%) had clearly unprofessional content. Inter-rater reliability was good (88.9% agreement, κ = 0.784). Clearly unprofessional behavior was found only in male surgeons. For male surgeons, clearly unprofessional behavior was more common among those in practice for less than 5 years (p = 0.031). Alcohol and politics were the most commonly found variables in the potentially unprofessional group. Inappropriate language and sexually suggestive material were the most commonly found variables in the clearly unprofessional group. Unprofessional behavior on Facebook is less common among surgical faculty compared with surgical residents. However, the rates remain unacceptably high, especially among men and

  10. Impact of Different Surgeons on Dental Implant Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    To assess the influence of several factors on the prevalence of dental implant failure, with special consideration of the placement of implants by different dental surgeons. This retrospective study is based on 2,670 patients who received 10,096 implants at one specialist clinic. Only the data of patients and implants treated by surgeons who had inserted a minimum of 200 implants at the clinic were included. Kaplan-Meier curves were stratified with respect to the individual surgeon. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) method was used to account for the fact that repeated observations (several implants) were placed in a single patient. The factors bone quantity, bone quality, implant location, implant surface, and implant system were analyzed with descriptive statistics separately for each individual surgeon. A total of 10 surgeons were eligible. The differences between the survival curves of each individual were statistically significant. The multivariate GEE model showed the following variables to be statistically significant: surgeon, bruxism, intake of antidepressants, location, implant length, and implant system. The surgeon with the highest absolute number of failures was also the one who inserted the most implants in sites of poor bone and used turned implants in most cases, whereas the surgeon with the lowest absolute number of failures used mainly modern implants. Separate survival analyses of turned and modern implants stratified for the individual surgeon showed statistically significant differences in cumulative survival. Different levels of failure incidence could be observed between the surgeons, occasionally reaching significant levels. Although a direct causal relationship could not be ascertained, the results of the present study suggest that the surgeons' technique, skills, and/or judgment may negatively influence implant survival rates.

  11. Survey on current practices for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Hans; Cronberg, Tobias; Dünser, Martin W; Duranteau, Jacques; Horn, Janneke; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    To investigate current practices and timing of neurological prognostication in comatose cardiac arrest patients. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to the 8000 members of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine during September and October 2012. The survey had 27 questions divided into three categories: background data, clinical data, decision-making and consequences. A total of 1025 respondents (13%) answered the survey with complete forms in more than 90%. Twenty per cent of respondents practiced outside of Europe. Overall, 22% answered that they had national recommendations, with the highest percentage in the Netherlands (>80%). Eighty-nine per cent used induced hypothermia (32-34 °C) for comatose cardiac arrest patients, while 11% did not. Twenty per cent had separate prognostication protocols for hypothermia patients. Seventy-nine per cent recognized that neurological examination alone is not enough to predict outcome and a similar number (76%) used additional methods. Intermittent electroencephalography (EEG), brain computed tomography (CT) scan and evoked potentials (EP) were considered most useful. Poor prognosis was defined as cerebral performance category (CPC) 3-5 (58%) or CPC 4-5 (39%) or other (3%). When prognosis was considered poor, 73% would actively withdraw intensive care while 20% would not and 7% were uncertain. National recommendations for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest are uncommon and only one physician out of five uses a separate protocol for hypothermia treated patients. A neurological examination alone was considered insufficient to predict outcome in comatose patients and most respondents advocated a multimodal approach: EEG, brain CT and EP were considered most useful. Uncertainty regarding neurological prognostication and decisions on level of care was substantial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Remote ischemic preconditioning: the surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielmann, Matthias; Wendt, Daniel; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Price, Vivien; Dohle, Daniel-Sebastian; Pasa, Susanne; Kottenberg, Eva

    2013-03-01

    Since cardiac surgery began, surgeons have aimed to find methods of minimizing myocardial injury resulting from ischemia and reperfusion. The concept of somehow conditioning the heart in order to attenuate ischemia and reperfusion-related injury has evolved in cardiovascular research over decades, from ischemic preconditioning and postconditioning to, more recently, remote ischemic preconditioning (and postconditioning). Although many strategies have proven to be beneficial in the experimental arena, a few have been successfully translated into clinical practice. Remote ischemic preconditioning, with the use of brief episodes of ischemia and reperfusion of vascular territories remote from the heart, has been shown convincingly to decrease myocardial injury. To date, the translation of this powerful innate mechanism of myocardial and/or multiorgan protection from the animal lab to the operating theatre, using transient occlusion of blood flow to the upper limb with a blood-pressure cuff before cardiac surgery, has shown promising results, with several proof-of-principle and first randomized controlled clinical trials reporting benefits for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. If the efficacy of remote ischemic preconditioning can be conclusively proven, the clinical applications in cardiac surgery could be almost infinite, providing multiorgan protection in various surgical scenarios.

  13. Occupational Hazards Among Dental Surgeons In Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Nabeel Naeem; Aleem, Sajid Atif

    2016-04-01

    To determine the frequency of different occupational hazards among dental surgeons in Karachi. Cross-sectional survey. Amulticenter study conducted at Ameen Diabetic and Dental Hospital, Dental OPD, Karachi Medical and Dental College, and Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Karachi, from February to March 2014. Dentists, practicing in different areas of Karachi, were given a self-administered questionnaire. It comprised of a form containing information about the socio-demographic profile of dentists and questionnaires regarding occupational hazards experienced in practice. Atotal of 130 dentists, involved in clinical practice, were randomly selected. There were 45 (35%) males and 85 (65%) females. The average age was 39 ±5.76 years. Out of 130 dentists, 93.8% (122/130) had occupational hazard during practice. Cervical back pain was observed in 81.96% dentists followed by knee / elbow joint pain in 53.27%, eye infection in 44.615%, impaired hearing in 40.98%, psychological stress in 41.80% and material allergy was 12.29%. Various spinal and joint pains, eye infections, impaired hearing, stress and material allergy represented occupational hazard to 93.8% of the surveyed dentists.

  14. Recycling unused medical supplies: a surgeon's response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennino, R; Mayer, A M; Dahn, A T; Husser, W

    1994-08-01

    In Third World countries, there is a desperate need for basic medical supplies. Surgeons are responsible for a significant amount of medical waste in operating rooms, and much of that waste comes from partially used prepackaged sterile operative sets. In October 1992, InterVol established a regional pilot program in Rochester, N.Y., to test the feasibility of collecting unused medical supplies from area health-care facilities and shipping them to countries that need them. This project was designed to help hospitals dispose of reusable medical supplies while providing direct support to Third World hospitals and to medical teams that volunteer in Third World countries. In the process, a data base was created, which could be analyzed to find new ways of limiting unused materials that needed to be discarded. This project operated in four phases: (1) setup and education, (2) collection, (3) sorting and inventory, and (4) distribution. The program was proved to be effective and may serve as a model to help other communities establish similar programs.

  15. Dr. Norman Bethune as a surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, I B

    1996-02-01

    Dr. Norman Bethune's recognition as a Canadian of renown resulted from his devoted work in China during the late 1930s. He had received a general surgical training, but his personal illness with tuberculosis led him to specialize in thoracic surgery. A surgical program at McGill University under Dr. Edward Archibald, a pioneer thoracic surgeon, was initially successful, but by the mid-1930s Bethune was rejected by McGill and Dr. Archibald. He became chief of thoracic surgery at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur outside Montreal. H developed thoracic surgical instruments and wrote numerous scientific papers. The outbreak of civil war in Spain in 1937 attracted Bethune to oppose what he viewed as fascist aggression. He went to Spain, where he established the value of mobile blood banking. On his return to Canada in 1937 he became aware of the escalating war between China and Japan. He joined the Chinese communist forces in northern China and spent 18 months doing Herculean mobile war surgery, while improving the state of medical services in primitive, depressing conditions. He died in 1939 at the age of 49 years of septicemia as a result of accidental laceration of his finger during surgery. The Chinese have venerated Norman Bethune and stimulated his memorialization in Canada. His surgical record can be viewed as mixed in quality, but overall his performance remains impressive for its achievement.

  16. Improving the Surgeon's participation in research: is It a problem of training or priority?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, C Y; Whang, E E; Longmire, W P; McFadden, D W

    2000-06-01

    Although numerous important contributions have originated from basic science research performed by surgeons, it seems that such dedicated work is becoming increasingly difficult to accomplish. What are the reasons for this change and what improvements can be made? This study aims to characterize the basic research training and careers of senior academic surgeons to assess and devise strategies for sustaining productive and quality surgical research. A 25-item survey was sent to 850 senior-level members of academic societies, including the Association of Academic Surgeons, Society of University Surgeons, and American Surgical Association. It addressed each surgeon's clinical and research training and career, as well as opinions concerning surgical research. Three hundred seventy-seven (44%) surveys were received. Mean age was 64 years, and 73% were full professors. Seventy-two percent of respondents performed basic science research during training, and for 71% of this group, research was a significant reason for choosing a clinical specialty. Ninety-one percent performed research in the same specialty area during and after training. Of those who performed research during training, a full 99% continued to perform research on completion of training. However, 38% stopped performing basic research by age 39. Seventeen and twenty-three percent stopped basic research between 40 and 49 and between 50 and 59 years of age, respectively. The most common factors causing them to stop were increased clinical load (40%) and increased administrative duties (38%). For respondents who had stopped research prior to age 40, 73% cited increased clinical load as the primary reason. Eighty-five percent felt a dedicated research period should be included in surgery training. Most respondents had participated in basic research during training, and continued similar research after training. However, an overwhelming clinical practice at the junior faculty level seemed to hinder research. We

  17. Pediatric neurology of the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavely, James A

    2006-05-01

    The neurologic examination in the puppy or kitten can be a challenging experience. Understanding the development of behavior reflexes and movement in puppies and kittens enables us to overcome some of these challenges and to recognize the neurologically abnormal patient. Subsequently,we can identify the neuroanatomic localization and generate a differential diagnosis list. This article first reviews the pediatric neurologic examination and then discusses diseases unique to these individuals.

  18. The effect of surgeon specialization on outcomes after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Alexander T; Smith, Ann D; Schaumeier, Maria J; de Vos, Marit S; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Nguyen, Louis L

    2014-09-01

    Although mortality after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has steadily declined, operative mortality for a ruptured AAA (rAAA) remains high. Repair of rAAA at hospitals with a higher elective aneurysm workload has been associated with lower mortality rates irrespective of the mode of treatment. This study sought to determine the association between surgeon specialization and outcomes after rAAA repair. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database from 2005 to 2010 was used to examine the 30-day mortality and morbidity outcomes of patients undergoing rAAA repair by vascular and general surgeons. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed for each death and morbidity, adjusting for all independently predictive preoperative risk factors. Survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. We identified 1893 repairs of rAAAs, of which 1767 (96.1%) were performed by vascular surgeons and 72 (3.9%) were performed by general surgeons. There were no significant differences between patients operated on by general vs vascular surgeons in preoperative risk factors or method of repair. Overall 30-day mortality was 34.3% (649 of 1893). After risk adjustment, mortality was significantly lower in the vascular surgery group compared with the general surgery group (odds ratio [OR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.86; P = .011). The risk of returning to the operating room (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.97; P = .038), renal failure (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.95; P = .034), and a cardiac complication (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.28-0.99; P = .047) were all significantly less in the vascular surgery group. Despite similar preoperative risk factors profiles, patients who were operated on by vascular surgeons had lower mortality, less frequent returns to the operating room, and decreased incidences of postoperative renal failure and cardiac events. These data add weight to the case for further centralization of

  19. Social Media Use among United Kingdom Vascular Surgeons: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Andrew R; McDonald, James J; Brady, Richard R W

    2016-05-01

    Engagement with social media (SM) is increasing within the general population and medical professionals. Overall, SM engagement is divided between closed, private networks and open, public platforms, such as LinkedIn and Twitter. As engagement with SM is known to vary between specialties, this study was undertaken to evaluate the uptake of SM among vascular surgeons and to describe user demographics associated with SM engagement. Vascular surgeons were identified from the 2013 Vascular Society of Great Britain and Ireland Quality Improvement Project and cross-referenced with the General Medical Council registry. Identified individual surgeons were manually searched for on common SM platforms and via Google to identify both SM profiles and personal/partnership practice websites. In total, 472 surgeons (442 men, 93.6%) from 112 National Health Service Trusts were identified. Three hundred forty (63.7%) graduated from UK universities with a mean graduating year of 1987 (range 1969-2000). Cumulatively, they performed 36,300 procedures (mean 72/surgeon; range 3-257). Overall, SM engagement was 47.4%; 217 (46.0%) had LinkedIn accounts and 23 (4.8%) had Twitter profiles. LinkedIn users had a mean of 69 connections (range 0-500+) and had a mean graduating year of 1988 (range 1969-2000). Twitter users had a mean of 258 followers (range 2-2424) and had tweeted a mean of 450 times (range 0-2865); they graduated more recently than their non-Twitter engaged colleagues (mean graduation 1991 vs. 1987, P = 0.006). Overall, SM usage was associated with a more recent graduation (P = 0.038) and with working in the private sector (21.4% vs. 13.7%, P = 0.029). There were demographic differences between those who had LinkedIn and Twitter accounts. Twitter and LinkedIn engagement among vascular surgeons is higher than that of other surgical specialties. There is a significant link between the experience of the surgeon and with SM use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Two-Nation Comparison of Classification and Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fractures: An Internet-Based Multicenter Study Among Spine Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishnamaz, Miguel; Curfs, Inez; Balosu, Stephan; Willems, Paul; van Hemert, Wouter; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Kobbe, Philipp

    2015-11-01

    Web-based multicenter study. The aim of the study was to assess and compare the management strategy for traumatic thoracolumbar fractures between German and Dutch spine surgeons. To date, there is no evidence-based treatment algorithm for thoracolumbar spine fractures, thereby an international controversy concerning optimal treatment exists. In this web-based multicenter study (www.spine.hostei.com), computed tomography scans of traumatic thoracolumbar fractures (T12-L2) were evaluated by German and Dutch spine surgeons. Supplementary case-specific information such as age, sex, height, weight, neurological status, and injury mechanism were provided.By using a questionnaire, fractures were classified according to the AO-Magerl Classification, followed by 6 questions concerning the treatment algorithm. Data were analyzed using SPSS (Version 21, 76, Chicago, IL). The interobserver agreement was determined by using Cohen κ. Statistical significance was defined as P spine surgeons was found. Overall German spine surgeons had a lower threshold concerning the indication for surgical treatment (Ger 87% vs. NL 30%; P < 0.05). There was a consensus about operative stabilization of AO Type B and C injuries and injuries with neurologic deficit, whereas a discrepancy in the therapeutic algorithm for AO Type A fractures was observed. This difference was most pronounced regarding the indication for posterior (Ger 96.6%; NL 41.2%; P < 0.05) and circumferential stabilization (Ger 53.4%; NL 0%; P < 0.05) for burst fractures. There is a consensus to stabilize AO Type B and C fractures, whereas country-specific differences in the treatment of Type A fractures, especially in case of burst fractures, occur. Prospective, controlled multicenter outcome studies may provide more evidence in optimal treatment for thoracolumbar fractures. 2.

  1. [German neurology and neurologists during the Third Reich: Preconditions and general framework before and after 1933].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M; Karenberg, A; Fangerau, H

    2016-08-01

    This article focuses on the institutional development of neurology in Germany up to the rise to power of the National Socialists and the radical sociopolitical changes after 1933. A wide range of scattered secondary literature was assessed and evaluated. Additionally, some original sources are literally quoted and interpreted according to the context. Since the end of the nineteenth century a complicated process of separation from internal medicine and psychiatry led to the formation of a self-conscious discipline of neurology. The first generation of German neurologists succeeded in founding the German Journal for Neurology ("Deutsche Zeitschrift für Nervenheilkunde") in 1890 and their own neurological association, the Society of German Neurologists ("Gesellschaft Deutscher Nervenärzte", GDN) in 1907. On an international scale, however, the institutional implementation of neurology with only a small number of chairs and few neurology departments remained more than modest. The ambitions for autonomy ended 2 years after the change of power in 1933. Regulatory interventions by the government and psychiatric interests led to the fusion of the GDN with the psychiatric specialist society, the new association being called the Society of German Neurologists and Psychiatrists ("Gesellschaft Deutscher Neurologen und Psychiater", GDNP) in 1935. In this group psychiatrists dominated the discourse. The expulsion, imprisonment and murder of physicians declared as non-Aryan or Jewish along with the forced consolidation ("Gleichschaltung") at the universities prompted profound changes in medical and academic life. It remains an ongoing challenge of neurological historical research to measure the impact of this upheaval on the few neurology departments in hospitals and private practices.

  2. Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-03

    Aug 3, 2014 ... The article by De Beer et al.[1] in this issue of SAJS is timeous within the context of changing paradigms in the training of surgeons globally. In South Africa. (SA), the training of surgeons is the responsibility of the university departments of surgery. This function takes place on a training platform that is ...

  3. Review of CD Rom: The Virtual Surgeon: ACL Reconstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE VIRTUAL SURGEON: ACL RECONSTRUCTION Professor George Bentley ChM FRCS, Russell E LVindsor MD, Mr Andrew Williams FRCS(0rth); 4150 + VAT(UK) The Virtual Surgeon - 3D Anatomy of the Knee 469 + VAT(UK). TVF Multimedia Ltd, 375 City Road, London, EClV lNB, UK ...

  4. Burnout Syndrome among Orthopaedic Surgeons in Lagos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The burnout syndrome has been associated with decreased job performance and low career satisfaction. There are many studies on surgeon burnout and globally but none has been carried out in Nigeria to address the issue of burnout among orthopaedic surgeons. This study aimed at assessing the

  5. Radiation dose to surgeons in theatre | van der Merwe | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of ionising radiation and radiation limits, and measure radiation doses received by surgeons in theatre. Design. Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of accumulated dose to specific anatomical regions of a neurosurgeon, gastroenterologist and orthopaedic surgeon performing ...

  6. Surgeons' Leadership Styles and Team Behavior in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Arriaga, Alexander F; Peyre, Sarah E; Corso, Katherine A; Roth, Emilie M; Yule, Steven J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-01-01

    The importance of leadership is recognized in surgery, but the specific impact of leadership style on team behavior is not well understood. In other industries, leadership is a well-characterized construct. One dominant theory proposes that transactional (task-focused) leaders achieve minimum standards and transformational (team-oriented) leaders inspire performance beyond expectations. We videorecorded 5 surgeons performing complex operations. Each surgeon was scored on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, a validated method for scoring transformational and transactional leadership style, by an organizational psychologist and a surgeon researcher. Independent coders assessed surgeons' leadership behaviors according to the Surgical Leadership Inventory and team behaviors (information sharing, cooperative, and voice behaviors). All coders were blinded. Leadership style (Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire) was correlated with surgeon behavior (Surgical Leadership Inventory) and team behavior using Poisson regression, controlling for time and the total number of behaviors, respectively. All surgeons scored similarly on transactional leadership (range 2.38 to 2.69), but varied more widely on transformational leadership (range 1.98 to 3.60). Each 1-point increase in transformational score corresponded to 3 times more information-sharing behaviors (p leadership and its impact on team performance in the operating room. As in other fields, our data suggest that transformational leadership is associated with improved team behavior. Surgeon leadership development, therefore, has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of operative care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A newly designed ergonomic body support for surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albayrak, A.; Van Veelen, M.A.; Prins, J.F.; Snijders, C.J.; De Ridder, H.; Kazemier, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: One of the main ergonomic problems during surgical procedures is the surgeon's awkward body posture, often accompanied by repetitive movements of the upper extremities, increased muscle activity, and prolonged static head and back postures. In addition, surgeons perform surgery so

  8. Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their postgraduate training. MM de Beer, VOL Karusseit, HB Pienaar. Abstract. Background. There is a perception among general surgeons that there are deficiencies in surgical training in South Africa (SA). Dependence on under-resourced state training institutions ...

  9. Hepatitis-B Vaccination Status Among Dental Surgeons in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The development of success-oriented hepatitis-B vaccine uptake approach among dental surgeons is dependent on the availability of comprehensive baseline data. Objective: To determine the hepatitis-B vaccination status among dental surgeons in Benin City. Materials and Methods: This ...

  10. Improving Recruitment of surgical trainees and Training of Surgeons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The surgical work output in Uganda is qualitatively and quantitatively inadequate. The number of surgeons is estimated at 100 for a population of over 26 million Ugandans. This paper reports on how to improve recruitment of surgical trainees and training of surgeons in Uganda, focusing on perceptions of ...

  11. Decreased heart rate variability in surgeons during night shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a measure of stress and mental strain in surgeons. Low HRV has been associated with death and increased risk of cardiac events in the general population. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of a 17-hour night shift on surgeons'...

  12. Fate of abstracts presented at Association of Paediatric Surgeons of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of abstracts presented at the annual scientific meetings of Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria and their final publication rate. Materials and Methods: All abstracts accepted for presentation at the Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria ...

  13. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Tolaymat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep problems are frequently addressed as a primary or secondary concern during the visit to the pediatric neurology clinic. Sleep disorders can mimic other neurologic diseases (e.g., epilepsy and movement disorders, and this adds challenges to the diagnostic process. Sleep disorders can significantly affect the quality of life and functionality of children in general and those with comorbid neurological diseases in particular. Understanding the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, recognizing the implications of sleep disorder in children with neurologic diseases and behavioral difficulties, and early intervention continue to evolve resulting in better neurocognitive outcomes.

  14. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  15. Spine Surgeon Selection Criteria: Factors Influencing Patient Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Blaine T; Ahn, Junyoung; Bohl, Daniel D; Mayo, Benjamin C; Louie, Philip K; Singh, Kern

    2016-07-01

    A prospective questionnaire. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors that patients consider when selecting a spine surgeon. The rise in consumer-driven health insurance plans has increased the role of patients in provider selection. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that may influence a patient's criteria for selecting a spine surgeon. Two hundred thirty-one patients who sought treatment by one spine surgeon completed an anonymous questionnaire consisting of 26 questions. Four questions regarded demographic information; 16 questions asked respondents to rate the importance of specific criteria regarding spine surgeon selection (scale 1-10, with 10 being the most important); and six questions were multiple-choice regarding patient preferences toward aspects of their surgeon (age, training background, etc.). Patients rated board certification (9.26 ± 1.67), in-network provider status (8.10 ± 3.04), and friendliness/bedside manner (8.01 ± 2.35) highest among factors considered when selecting a spine surgeon. Most patients (92%) reported that 30 minutes or less should pass between check-in and seeing their surgeon during a clinic appointment. Regarding whether their spine surgeon underwent training as a neurosurgeon versus an orthopedic surgeon, 25% reported no preference, 52% preferred neurosurgical training, and 23% preferred orthopedic training. Our findings suggest that board certification and in-network health insurance plans may be most important in patients' criteria for choosing a spine surgeon. Advertisements were rated least important by patients. Patients expressed varying preferences regarding ideal surgeon age, training background, proximity, medical student/resident involvement, and clinic appointment availability. The surgeon from whom patients sought treatment completed an orthopedic surgery residency; hence, it is notable that 52% of patients preferred a spine surgeon with a neurosurgical background. In the context

  16. Are surgeon's content with the current surgical headgear systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indramohan, Vivek P; Ashford, Robert; Khan, Salim; Lintern, Maxine

    2012-10-01

    Medical devices such as 'surgical headgears' are used by surgeons during certain micro-surgical applications requiring enhanced vision and magnification. The main aim of the study was to investigate the clinical usability of existing headgear, the prevalence of discomfort experienced by surgeons frequently using such devices and ascertain if the surgeons are content with the existing headgear systems. Online semi-structured questionnaires were sent to 200 surgical consultants hailing from six different sub-specialities currently practicing in various National Health Service (NHS) trusts in the UK. Data collected from the questionnaires were descriptively analysed. Vital issues pertaining to weight (36%), distraction (50%), pain and strain around the areas of head (56%), neck (26%), nose (28%), ears (16%), neck and back muscles (30%) were reported by the surgeons. In conclusion, 70% of surgeons are not content with the current headgear systems. Consequently, they foresee a need for an efficient and improved headgear system.

  17. [Surgeons among the pirates in the 17th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelders, S

    2005-12-24

    The memoirs of ship's surgeons that sailed with the Caribbean buccaneers and pirates of the 17th century are an important source of information on how they lived and worked. The surgeons enjoyed a full-fledged position among the egalitarian buccaneers. Known buccaneer surgeons whose memoirs have been preserved were apparently not entirely qualified according to the traditional guild system. Besides the usual work of ship's surgeons in general, the buccaneer surgeons had to be able to cope with the specific demands of the tropical climate. Botanical knowledge obtained from the Indian tribes played an important role in surviving the jungles of Central America. In addition, they were required to assist with duels, which played an important role among pirates and buccaneers in the settling of conflicts aboard ship, this in contrast to the situation on merchant and navy ships.

  18. [Effect of surgeons on palliative treatment for malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jin

    2017-01-25

    For advanced stage tumor patients who can not receive radical treatment, quite a part of them require surgical intervention. Surgeons play a important role and are still the main force in palliative treatment for tumors. But in present medical education system, training contents for surgeon involving palliative treatment are few. In fact, surgeons have responsibilities for improving the quality of life, ameliorating pain, preserving the dignity and relieving symptoms of patients in the palliative treatment of tumors. Surgeons should pay attentions to the communication with patients, play a part of clinical multidisciplinary team and apply reasonable surgical intervention approach. Education of palliative treatment for surgeons should also include medical humanistic concern, and the recognition of effects of medical humanity, ethics, dignity and religion on the recovery of tumor patients.

  19. Exploring how surgeon teachers motivate residents in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dath, Deepak; Hoogenes, Jen; Matsumoto, Edward D; Szalay, David A

    2013-02-01

    Motivation in teaching, mainly studied in disciplines outside of surgery, may also be an important part of intraoperative teaching. We explored techniques surgeons use to motivate learners in the operating room (OR). Forty-four experienced surgeon teachers from multiple specialties participated in 9 focus groups about teaching in the OR. Focus groups were transcribed and subjected to qualitative thematic analysis by 3 reviewers through an iterative, rigorous process. Analysis revealed 8 motivational techniques. Surgeons used motivation techniques tacitly, describing multiple ways that they facilitate resident motivation while teaching. Two major categories of motivational techniques emerged: (1) the facilitation of intrinsic motivation; and (2) the provision of factors to stimulate extrinsic motivation. Surgeons unknowingly but tacitly and commonly use motivation in intraoperative teaching and use a variety of techniques to foster learners' intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Motivating learners is 1 vital role that surgeon teachers play in nontechnical intraoperative teaching. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Pathological Methods and Prognostic Factors in Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughrue, Michael E; Fung, Kar-Ming; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Peterson, Jo Elle G; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2017-12-20

    Adults diagnosed with vestibular schwannomas. What is the prognostic significance of Antoni A vs B histologic patterns in vestibular schwannomas? No recommendations can be made due to a lack of adequate data. What is the prognostic significance of mitotic figures seen in vestibular schwannoma specimens? No recommendations can be made due to a lack of adequate data. Are there other light microscopic features that predict clinical behavior of vestibular schwannomas? No recommendations can be made due to a lack of adequate data. Does the KI-67 labeling index predict clinical behavior of vestibular schwannomas? No recommendations can be made due to a lack of adequate data. Does the proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index predict clinical behavior of vestibular schwannomas? No recommendations can be made due to a lack of adequate data. Does degree of vascular endothelial growth factor expression predict clinical behavior of vestibular schwannomas? No recommendations can be made due to a lack of adequate data.  The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients-vestibular-schwannoma/chapter_6.

  1. Occupational Stress and Burnout among Surgeons in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajeev; Huggard, Peter; van Toledo, Annik

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the levels of occupational stress and burnout among surgeons in Fiji. A document set comprising a cover letter; a consent form; a sociodemographic and supplementary information questionnaire; the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI); the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12); the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT); and the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) questionnaires were provided to surgeons from three public divisional hospitals in Fiji. Thirty-six of 43 (83.7%) invited surgeons participated in the study. According to their MBI scores, surgeons suffered from low (10, 27.8%), moderate (23, 63.9%), and high (3, 8.3%) levels of burnout. Comparatively, 23 (63.9%) demonstrated moderate burnout according to their ProQOL scores. Substantial psychiatric morbidity was observed in 16 (44.0%) surgeons per their GHQ-12 scores. Consumption of alcohol was noted in 29 (80.6%) surgeons, and 12 (33.4%) had AUDIT scores characterizing their alcohol use in excess of low-risk guidelines or as harmful or hazardous drinking. Surgeons of Fijian nationality showed higher MBI emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores compared with surgeons of other nationalities. Surgeons with an awareness of the availability of counseling services at their hospitals showed low AUDIT and ProQOL burnout scores. Smokers, alcohol drinkers, and kava drinkers showed higher AUDIT scores. This study highlights a level of occupational stress and burnout among surgeons in Fiji and a lack of awareness of their mental and physical well-being. The authors recommend that occupational stress and burnout intervention strategies be put in place in hospitals in Fiji.

  2. Introducing the International Confederation of Plastic Surgery Societies: ICOPLAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhorst, Hinne A; Badran, Hassan; Clarke, Howard M; Cooter, Rodney; Evans, Gregory R D; Kirschbaum, Julio Daniel; Koh, Kyung Suk; Lazier, Carol; Murphy, Robert X; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Piccolo, Nelson Sarto; Perks, Graeme

    2017-09-01

    This article describes the formation of the International Confederation of Plastic Surgery Societies (ICOPLAST) as a novel, transparent, dynamic, and proactive confederation of national plastic surgery societies. ICOPLAST aspires to provide a voice for the entire international community of plastic surgeons. ICOPLAST has been designed to benefit the patient, plastic surgery as a profession, and each individual plastic surgeon. Its principal objective is to enhance international communication, education, and advocacy processes to ultimately improve patient outcomes for plastic surgery patients globally. The new ICOPLAST's focus is to add true value for patients. ICOPLAST's evolution, philosophy, governance, and bylaws are explained and all societies worldwide are encouraged and cordially invited to join. An open and warm invitation is provided. Additional information is found at www.ICOPLAST.org.

  3. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  4. Acute care surgeon South American model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggetti, Renato Sergio

    2008-08-01

    In the World Health Organization book by Murray and Lopez (The Global Burden of Disease), the authors make the point that there are major regional differences across the world for death from injury. In the European market economies, injuries accounted for 6% of all deaths, of which the majority were the result of road traffic accidents. In stark contrast, in Latin America and the Caribbean, injuries account for 12-13% of all deaths, and most of these are the result of violence. An estimated 30% of all male deaths are from external causes, and road traffic accidents are the number two cause of death. Within South American countries, trauma is the second most common cause of death in Columbia, Venezuela, Ecuador, and Brazil. In other South American countries, it is the third or fourth most common cause of death. If one examines the Disability Adjusted Life Years, South America is the third highest in the world. Death from injury primarily affects people in the middle- and low-income group. Traffic accidents and suicide are the main causes of trauma in the high-income population. South America is made up of developing and poor countries that have trauma as a very important cause of death and disability. The author has reviewed information on injury from the World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization, and Brazilian Health Ministry. In addition, a search of injury was performed through MEDLINE. The results of this review show that trauma is a major public health problem in South America. At the present time, there is a lack of statewide system development. In addition, there are difficulties in training surgeons to cope with these problems.

  5. Who should lead a trauma team: Surgeon or non-surgeon? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibandeh, Shahab; Hajibandeh, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Presence of a trauma team leader (TTL) in the trauma team is associated with positive patient outcomes in major trauma. The TTL is traditionally a surgeon who coordinates the resuscitation and ensures adherence to Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines. The necessity of routine surgical leadership in the resuscitative component of trauma care has been questioned by some authors. Therefore, it remains controversial who should lead the trauma team. We aimed to evaluate outcomes associated with surgeon versus non-surgeon TTLs in management of trauma patients. Methods: In accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement standards, we performed a systematic review. Electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched to identify randomized and non-randomized studies investigating outcomes associated with surgeon versus non-surgeon TTL in management of trauma patients. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used to assess the methodological quality and risk of bias of the selected studies. Fixed-effect model was applied to calculate pooled outcome data. Results: Three retrospective cohort studies, enrolling 2,519 adult major trauma patients, were included. Our analysis showed that there was no difference in survival [odds ratio (OR): 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-1.10, P=0.19] and length of stay when trauma team was led by surgeon or non-surgeon TTLs; however, fewer injuries were missed when the trauma team was led by a surgeon (OR: 0.48, 95% CI 0.25-0.92, P=0.03). Conclusions: Despite constant debate, the comparative evidence about outcomes associated with surgeon and non-surgeon trauma team leader is insufficient. The best available evidence suggests that there is no significant difference in outcomes of surgeon or non-surgeon trauma team leaders. High quality randomized controlled trials are required to compare the

  6. Who should lead a trauma team: Surgeon or non-surgeon? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibandeh, Shahab; Hajibandeh, Shahin

    2017-07-01

    Presence of a trauma team leader (TTL) in the trauma team is associated with positive patient outcomes in major trauma. The TTL is traditionally a surgeon who coordinates the resuscitation and ensures adherence to Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines. The necessity of routine surgical leadership in the resuscitative component of trauma care has been questioned by some authors. Therefore, it remains controversial who should lead the trauma team. We aimed to evaluate outcomes associated with surgeon versus non-surgeon TTLs in management of trauma patients. In accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement standards, we performed a systematic review. Electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched to identify randomized and non-randomized studies investigating outcomes associated with surgeon versus non-surgeon TTL in management of trauma patients. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used to assess the methodological quality and risk of bias of the selected studies. Fixed-effect model was applied to calculate pooled outcome data. Three retrospective cohort studies, enrolling 2,519 adult major trauma patients were included. Our analysis showed that there was no difference in survival [odds ratio (OR): 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-1.10, P=0.19] and length of stay when trauma team was led by surgeon or non-surgeon TTLs; however, fewer injuries were missed when the trauma team was led by a surgeon (OR: 0.48, 95% CI 0.25-0.92, P=0.03). Despite constant debate, the comparative evidence about outcomes associated with surgeon and non-surgeon trauma team leader is insufficient. The best available evidence suggests that there is no significant difference in outcomes of surgeon or non-surgeon trauma team leaders. High quality randomized controlled trials are required to compare the effectiveness of surgeon and non-surgeon trauma team

  7. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, R. A. C.; Bouche, P.; Cornblath, D. R.; Evers, E.; Hadden, R. D. M.; Hahn, A.; Illa, I.; Koski, C. L.; Léger, J. M.; Nobile-Orazio, E.; Pollard, J.; Sommer, C.; van den Bergh, P.; van Doorn, P. A.; van Schaik, I. N.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous sets of diagnostic criteria have sought to define chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and randomized trials and systematic reviews of treatment have been published. The objective is to prepare consensus guidelines on the definition, investigation and treatment

  8. PYRITINOL USAGE IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Zavadenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of developmental disorders, correction of learning disabilities and behavioral problems in children should be prompt, complex and include pharmacotherapy with nootropic agents. The results of recent studies shown in this review proved effectiveness of pharmacotherapy with pyritinol in children with perinatal injury of central nervous system and its consequences, psychomotor and speech development delay, dyslexia, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, cognitive disorders and learning disabilities (including manifestations of epilepsy, chronic tic disorders and Tourette syndrome. Due to its ability to optimize metabolic processes in central nervous system, pyritinol is used in treatment of vegetative dysfunction in children and adolescents, especially associated with asthenical manifestations, as well as in complex therapy of exertion headache and migraine. The drug is effective in treatment of cognitive disorders in children and adolescents with epilepsy, pyritinol was administered without changing of the basic anticonvulsive therapy and no deterioration (increase of severity of seizures or intensity of epileptiform activity on electroencephalogramms was observed. Significant nootropic effect of pyritinol, including neurometabolic, neuroprotective, neurodynamic and other mechanisms, in association with safety and rare side effects of this drug determines its wide usage in pediatric neurology.

  9. Toward a Neurology of Loneliness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter century. The brain is the key organ of social connections and processes, however, and the same objective social relationship can be experienced as caring and protective or as exploitive and isolating. We review evidence that the perception of social isolation (i.e., loneliness) impacts brain and behavior and is a risk factor for broad-based morbidity and mortality. However, the causal role of loneliness on neural mechanisms and mortality is difficult to test conclusively in humans. Mechanistic animal studies provide a lens through which to evaluate the neurological effects of a member of a social species living chronically on the social perimeter. Experimental studies show that social isolation produces significant changes in brain structures and processes in adult social animals. These effects are not uniform across the brain or across species but instead are most evident in brain regions that reflect differences in the functional demands of solitary versus social living for a particular species. The human and animal literatures have developed independently, however, and significant gaps also exist. The current review underscores the importance of integrating human and animal research to delineate the mechanisms through which social relationships impact the brain, health, and well-being. PMID:25222636

  10. Gluten sensitivity and neurological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Berio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report on six cases of gluten-sensitivity, also defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity, characterized by abdominal features (diarrhea, bloating, pain, genetic positivity for predisposition to celiac disease (DQB1* 02 in all cases; DQA1*05 in three; DQA1*02 in two, DQB1*03 in two, negative anti-t-Transglutaminase antibodies, normal mucosa on biopsy in four cases, type 1 of Marsh in one case. The subjects presented frequent central nervous system (CNS symptoms: headache in three patients, somnolence in one, electroencephalogram aspecific alterations in three (in two of them with previous seizures, leptomeningeal cyst in one, intracranial calcification in one, cerebral gliosis in two. After a gluten-free diet, all intestinal and clinical CNS features remitted, but re-appeared after gluten reintroduction. On the basis of the neurological signs, the authors stress the relevance of immune innate system in the pathogenesis of these cases with possible subsequent evolution on immune adaptive system involvement.

  11. Endocannabinoid System in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Roberta; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Marasco, Daniela; Malfitano, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Several studies support the evidence that the endocannabinoid system and cannabimimetic drugs might have therapeutic potential in numerous pathologies. These pathologies range from neurological disorders, atherosclerosis, stroke, cancer to obesity/metabolic syndrome and others. In this paper we review the endocannabinoid system signaling and its alteration in neurodegenerative disorders like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease and discuss the main findings about the use of cannabinoids in the therapy of these pathologies. Despite different etiologies, neurodegenerative disorders exhibit similar mechanisms like neuro-inflammation, excitotoxicity, deregulation of intercellular communication, mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of brain tissue homeostasis. Current treatments ameliorate the symptoms but are not curative. Interfering with the endocannabinoid signaling might be a valid therapeutic option in neuro-degeneration. To this aim, pharmacological intervention to modulate the endocannabinoid system and the use of natural and synthetic cannabimimetic drugs have been assessed. CB1 and CB2 receptor signaling contributes to the control of Ca2+ homeostasis, trophic support, mitochondrial activity, and inflammatory conditions. Several studies and patents suggest that the endocannabinoid system has neuro-protective properties and might be a target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  13. Task analysis in neurosciences programme design - neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Defining educational objectives is the key to achieving the goal of professional competence in students. The technique of task analysis was selected to determine components of competence in clinical neurology appropriate to the needs of primary care. A survey of neurological problems in general practice revealed that ...

  14. Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 28 of 28 ... Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  15. Suspecting Neurological Dysfunction From E Mail Messages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non medical person suspected and confirmed neurological dysfunction in an individual, based only on e mail messages sent by the individual. With email communication becoming rampant “peculiar” email messages may raise the suspicion of neurological dysfunction. Organic pathology explaining the abnormal email ...

  16. Neurological and neurosurgical manifestations of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adults in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire and in Kinshasa and among inpatients in Ugandan hospitals. Ninety per cent of deaths ... various parts of the continent. Neurological manifestations. The spectrum of neurological diseases reported in ... Primary effects of HIV. HEADACHE. Case report. A Malawian 46-year-old male senior ...

  17. Scoliosis Research Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate ... a Member Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of ...

  18. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  19. Surgeons' Leadership Styles and Team Behavior in the Operating Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Arriaga, Alexander F; Peyre, Sarah E; Corso, Katherine A; Roth, Emilie M; Yule, Steven J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of leadership is recognized in surgery, but the specific impact of leadership style on team behavior is not well understood. In other industries, leadership is a well-characterized construct. One dominant theory proposes that transactional (task-focused) leaders achieve minimum standards, whereas transformational (team-oriented) leaders inspire performance beyond expectations. Study Design We video-recorded 5 surgeons performing complex operations. Each surgeon was scored on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, a validated method for scoring transformational and transactional leadership style, by an organizational psychologist and a surgeon-researcher. Independent coders assessed surgeons' leadership behaviors according to the Surgical Leadership Inventory and team behaviors (information-sharing, cooperative, and voice behaviors). All coders were blinded. Leadership style (MLQ) was correlated with surgeon behavior (SLI) and team behavior using Poisson regression, controlling for time and the total number of behaviors, respectively. Results All surgeons scored similarly on transactional leadership (2.38-2.69), but varied more widely on transformational leadership (1.98-3.60). Each 1-point increase in transformational score corresponded to 3× more information-sharing behaviors (pleadership and its impact on team performance in the OR. As in other fields, our data suggest that transformational leadership is associated with improved team behavior. Surgeon leadership development therefore has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of operative care. PMID:26481409

  20. Surgeons' leadership in the operating room: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Yule, Steven; Flin, Rhona; McKinley, Aileen

    2012-09-01

    There is widespread recognition in high-risk organizations that leadership is essential for efficient and safe team performance. However, there is limited empiric evidence identifying specific leadership skills and associated behaviors enacted by surgeons during surgery. Observational data on surgeons' intraoperative leadership behaviors were gathered during surgeries (n = 29) in 3 hospitals. Observations were coded using 7 leadership elements identified from the literature on surgeons' leadership. Surgeries were categorized by complexity using British United Provident Association ratings. A total of 258 leadership behaviors were observed during more than 63 hours of observation. Surgeons most frequently showed guiding and supporting (33%), communicating and coordinating (20%), and task management behaviors (15%). In many instances the surgeons' leadership was directed to the room rather than to a specific team member. Surgeons engaged in leadership behaviors significantly more frequently during cases of high complexity compared with cases of lower complexity. This study is the first step in developing an empirically derived taxonomy to identify and classify surgeons' intraoperative leadership behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  2. The rights of persons with disability bill, 2014: Implications for neurological disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Bada Math

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available India ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD in 2007. This is a welcome step toward realizing the rights of the persons with disability. The UNCRPD proclaims that disability results from interaction of impairments with attitudinal and environmental barriers, which hinders full and active participation in society on an equal basis with others. Further, the convention also mandates the signatory governments to make suitable changes in the existing laws of the country, to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers, and to comply with the terms of the UNCRPD in order to protect the rights of the person with disabilities, hence the amendments of the national laws. Hence, the Government of India drafted the Right of Persons with Disabilities Bill (RPWD Bill, 2014. It is evident that neurological disorders are emerging as priority health problems worldwide. They not only contribute to mortality but also contribute to huge morbidity. Further, shortage of neurologists, huge treatment gap, and stigma add to the burden. The situation becomes worse with regard to providing quality care, comprehensive rehabilitation, and social welfare measures to persons with neurological disability. There is no doubt that persons with neurological disability do not get adequate representation, stigmatized and discriminated across the civil societies, which hinders full and active participation in society. Hence, this article is a critique of the RPWD Bill, 2014 from the perspective of persons with neurological and neurosurgical disability. Further, this article also discusses challenges in quantifying and certifying disability in neurological disability.

  3. The rights of persons with disability bill, 2014: Implications for neurological disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Math, Suresh Bada; Gupta, Anupam; Yadav, Ravi; Shukla, Dhaval

    2016-10-01

    India ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) in 2007. This is a welcome step toward realizing the rights of the persons with disability. The UNCRPD proclaims that disability results from interaction of impairments with attitudinal and environmental barriers, which hinders full and active participation in society on an equal basis with others. Further, the convention also mandates the signatory governments to make suitable changes in the existing laws of the country, to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers, and to comply with the terms of the UNCRPD in order to protect the rights of the person with disabilities, hence the amendments of the national laws. Hence, the Government of India drafted the Right of Persons with Disabilities Bill (RPWD Bill), 2014. It is evident that neurological disorders are emerging as priority health problems worldwide. They not only contribute to mortality but also contribute to huge morbidity. Further, shortage of neurologists, huge treatment gap, and stigma add to the burden. The situation becomes worse with regard to providing quality care, comprehensive rehabilitation, and social welfare measures to persons with neurological disability. There is no doubt that persons with neurological disability do not get adequate representation, stigmatized and discriminated across the civil societies, which hinders full and active participation in society. Hence, this article is a critique of the RPWD Bill, 2014 from the perspective of persons with neurological and neurosurgical disability. Further, this article also discusses challenges in quantifying and certifying disability in neurological disability.

  4. Rejected applications: an early American Academy of Neurology struggles to define its membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2014-07-22

    To review membership application materials (especially rejected applications) to the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) during its formative years (1947-1953). Detailed study of materials in the AAN Historical Collection. The author identified 73 rejected applications. Rejected applicants (71 male, 2 female) lived in 25 states. The largest number was for the Associate membership category (49). These were individuals "in related fields who have made and are making contributions to the field of neurology." By contrast, few applicants to Active membership or Fellowship status were rejected. The largest numbers of rejectees were neuropsychiatrists (19), neurosurgeons (16), and psychiatrists (14). The AAN, established in the late 1940s, was a small and politically vulnerable organization. A defining feature of the fledgling society was its inclusiveness; its membership was less restrictive than that of the older American Neurological Association. At the same time, the society needed to preserve its core as a neurologic society rather than one of psychiatry or neurosurgery. Hence, the balance between inclusiveness and exclusive identity was a difficult one to maintain. The Associate membership category, more than any other, was at the heart of this issue of self-definition. Associate members were largely practitioners of psychiatry or neurosurgery. Their membership was a source of consternation and was to be carefully been held in check during these critical formative years. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Women in surgery: little change in gender equality in Japanese medical societies over the past 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2013-10-01

    Japan lags behind other industrialized nations in terms of gender equality. To improve the work environment for surgeons, the opinions of female surgeons must be respected. The Committee on Women Surgeons of the Japan Surgical Society (JSS) conducted two surveys 3 years apart of the numbers of female councilors and directors in the member societies of the Japanese Association of Medical Sciences. In the nonsurgical medical societies, although there was an increase in the number of female councilors, only one female director was named over the past 3 years. On the other hand, there were no female directors in any of the 12 surgical societies in 2011. The JSS was founded in 1899. No female surgeon has ever been elected as director and there are currently no female councilors due to the new election system. The Gender Equality Bureau of the Cabinet Office should therefore provide greater support to improve gender equality in Japan.

  6. What surgical skills rural surgeons need to master.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Amy L; Hughes, Tyler G; Borgstrom, David C; Sachdeva, Ajit K; DaRosa, Debra A; Hoyt, David B

    2013-11-01

    As new technology is developed and scientific evidence demonstrates strategies to improve the quality of care, it is essential that surgeons keep current with their skills. Rural surgeons need efficient and targeted continuing medical education that matches their broader scope of practice. Developing such a program begins with an assessment of the learning needs of the rural surgeon. The aim of this study was to assess the learning needs considered most important to surgeons practicing in rural areas. A needs assessment questionnaire was administered to surgeons practicing in rural areas. An additional gap analysis questionnaire was administered to registrants of a skills course for rural surgeons. Seventy-one needs assessment questionnaires were completed. The self-reported procedures most commonly performed included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 44), hernia repair (n = 42), endoscopy (n = 43), breast surgery (n = 23), appendectomy (n = 20), and colon resection (n = 18). Respondents indicated that they would most like to learn more skills related to laparoscopic colon resection (n = 16), laparoscopic antireflux procedures (n = 6), laparoscopic common bile duct exploration/ERCP (n = 5), colonoscopy/advanced techniques and esophagogastroscopy (n = 4), and breast surgery (n = 4). Ultrasound, hand surgery, and leadership and communication were additional topics rated as useful by the respondents. Skills course participants indicated varying levels of experience and confidence with breast ultrasound, ultrasound for central line insertion, hand injury, and facial soft tissue injury. Our results demonstrated that surgeons practicing in rural areas have a strong interest in acquiring additional skills in a variety of general and subspecialty surgical procedures. The information obtained in this study may be used to guide curriculum development of further postgraduate skills courses targeted to rural surgeons. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published

  7. Factors influencing surgeons' decisions in elective cosmetic surgery consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sharon A; Rosser, Robert; James, M Ian; Kaney, Sue; Salmon, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Current guidelines for surgeons' decisions about whether to offer cosmetic surgery are ineffective. Therefore, surgeons have to make difficult decisions on a case-by-case basis. The authors sought to identify the patient variables that influence surgeons' decisions in practice. A qualitative study first delineated, from observation of consultations and interviews with surgeons and other staff, variables that might influence their decisions. Then, in a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking cosmetic surgery, the authors measured these variables and tested whether they predicted the surgeons' decisions to offer surgery. Participants were 6 consultant plastic surgeons who assess cosmetic surgery referrals and 276 new patients aged 16 years or older referred to these surgeons. The qualitative study suggested that, as well as clinical factors (the probability of a satisfactory surgical outcome and the risks v. benefits of surgery), surgery was more likely to be offered where it was of low cost (i.e., minor skin surgery), physical symptoms or dysfunction were present, and abnormality of appearance was extreme. The role of patients' quality of life was unclear. The quantitative study confirmed that the probability of surgery was increased where requests were for minor skin procedures and by abnormality of patients' appearance. In patients seeking major body procedures, surgery was less likely when patients reported poor quality of life. Surgeons' decisions about whether to offer elective cosmetic surgery follow systematic rules. By incorporating the factors that surgeons use in their decision making, more effective guidelines about elective cosmetic surgery provision than are presently available could be developed.

  8. An Assessment of Online Reviews of Hand Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Kirpatrick

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the number of reviews and scores for active members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH in popular physician rating websites (Healthgrades.com and Vitals.com. Methods: A total of 433 ASSH active members were searched in two popular rating websites for a total of 866 web searches. Demographic data, overall and subcategory scores, number of reviews, and wait times were scored from each member’s webpage. Results: The average number of reviews per surgeon on Healthgrades.com and Vitals.com were 13.8 (range 1-108 and 9.4 (range 0-148, respectively. The average overall score for physicians was 8.1 out of 10 points. For both websites, the vast majority (80-90% of active members of the ASSH had 20 or less reviews. Multivariate data analysis revealed no statistical differences in overall score by region (P=0.24 or gender (P=0.38. Increasing physician age negatively correlated with overall score (P=0.01. Wait time was not associated with a negative score (P=0.38. Conclusion: Active members of the ASSH received generally positive reviews. The average number of reviews for active members of the ASSH was exceedingly small, bringing into question the legitimacy and validity of these scores. This is especially important when taking into consideration the increasing popularity of these websites, and the reliance of patients on them to obtain physician information. The clinical implication of this study is that physicians have a vested interest in the legitimacy of the data provided by these websites and other physician rating outlets.

  9. The "urban myth" of the association between neurological disorders and vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Panatto, D; Lai, P L; Amicizia, D

    2015-06-10

    In modern society, a potentially serious adverse event attributed to a vaccination is likely to be snapped up by the media, particularly newspapers and television, as it appeals to the emotions of the public. The widespread news of the alleged adverse events of vaccination has helped to create the "urban myth" that vaccines cause serious neurological disorders and has boosted antivaccination associations. This speculation is linked to the fact that the true causes of many neurological diseases are largely unknown. The relationship between vaccinations and the onset of serious neuropsychiatric diseases is certainly one of coincidence rather than causality. This claim results from controlled studies that have excluded the association between vaccines and severe neurological diseases, therefore it can be said, with little risk of error, that the association between modern vaccinations and serious neurological disorders is a true "urban myth". © Copyright by Pacini Editore SpA, Pisa, Italy.

  10. Successful outcome in a dog with neurological and respiratory signs following smoke inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumin, Julien; Hopper, Kate

    2013-01-01

    To report the case management of a patient with smoke inhalation complicated by neurological impairment, carboxyhemoglobinemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), upper airway obstruction, aspiration pneumonia, and bacteremia. A 1.5-year-old male intact Beagle presented shortly after being involved in a household fire. Upon arrival the dog was diagnosed with ARDS and demonstrated acute neurological signs (eg, obtundation and seizures). Treatment included mechanical ventilation, temporary tracheostomy, and intensive supportive care. During hospitalization, the dog suffered multiple complications including prolonged neurological abnormalities, aspiration pneumonia, and bacteremia. The dog recovered over a 16-day period. This is the first description of extensive management of a patient suffering both neurological and respiratory complication due to smoke inhalation, and details the steps that were taken to achieve a successful outcome. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  11. Non-technical skills of surgeons and anaesthetists in simulated operating theatre crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumouras, A G; Hamidi, M; Lung, K; Tarola, C L; Tsao, M W; Scott, J W; Smink, D S; Yule, S

    2017-07-01

    Deficiencies in non-technical skills (NTS) have been increasingly implicated in avoidable operating theatre errors. Accordingly, this study sought to characterize the impact of surgeon and anaesthetist non-technical skills on time to crisis resolution in a simulated operating theatre. Non-technical skills were assessed during 26 simulated crises (haemorrhage and airway emergency) performed by surgical teams. Teams consisted of surgeons, anaesthetists and nurses. Behaviour was assessed by four trained raters using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) and Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) rating scales before and during the crisis phase of each scenario. The primary endpoint was time to crisis resolution; secondary endpoints included NTS scores before and during the crisis. A cross-classified linear mixed-effects model was used for the final analysis. Thirteen different surgical teams were assessed. Higher NTS ratings resulted in significantly faster crisis resolution. For anaesthetists, every 1-point increase in ANTS score was associated with a decrease of 53·50 (95 per cent c.i. 31·13 to 75·87) s in time to crisis resolution (P theatre environment. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A plastic surgeon's guide to applying smartphone technology in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Adrienne D; Gupta, Subhas C

    2013-02-01

    The vast array of information technology available to plastic surgeons continues to expand. With the recent introduction of smartphone application ("app") technology to the market, the potential for incorporating both social media and app technology into daily practice exists. The authors describe and evaluate the smartphone applications most pertinent to plastic surgery. Smartphone apps from all available markets were analyzed for various factors, including popularity among general consumers, ease of use, and functionality. Using various advertising guidelines from plastic surgery societies as well as the US Food and Drug Administration, each app's content was further analyzed within the context of ethical obligations. The apps with the highest number of ratings were those offering the option to upload photos and morph each photo according to the user's own preference. The title of apps also appears to play a role in popularity. A majority of apps demonstrated the same features available on websites. The applicability of social media marketing via smartphone apps has the potential to change future patient-surgeon interactions by offering more personalized and user-friendly encounters. The role of smartphone apps is important to the future of plastic surgery as long as plastic surgeons maintain an active role in the development of these apps to ensure their value.

  13. Neurology in the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Carl H; Daroff, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Between December 1965 and December 1971, the United States maintained armed forces in Vietnam never less than 180,000 men and women in support of the war. At one time, this commitment exceeded half a million soldiers, sailors, and airmen from both the United States and its allies. Such forces required an extensive medical presence, including 19 neurologists. All but two of the neurologists had been drafted for a 2-year tour of duty after deferment for residency training. They were assigned to Vietnam for one of those 2 years in two Army Medical Units and one Air Force facility providing neurological care for American and allied forces, as well as many civilians. Their practice included exposure to unfamiliar disorders including cerebral malaria, Japanese B encephalitis, sleep deprivation seizures, and toxic encephalitis caused by injection or inhalation of C-4 explosive. They and neurologists at facilities in the United States published studies on all of these entities both during and after the war. These publications spawned the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Study, which was conceived during the Korean War and continues today as the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Center. It initially focused on post-traumatic epilepsy and later on all effects of brain injury. The Agent Orange controversy arose after the war; during the war, it was not perceived as a threat by medical personnel. Although soldiers in previous wars had developed serious psychological impairments, post-traumatic stress disorder was formally recognized in the servicemen returning from Vietnam. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  15. Neurology advanced practice providers: A position paper of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Heidi B; Fritz, Joseph V; Govindarajan, Raghav; Penfold Murray, Rebecca; Boyle, Kathryn B; Getchius, Thomas S D; Freimer, Miriam

    2015-08-01

    There are many factors driving health care reform, including unsustainable costs, poor outcomes, an aging populace, and physician shortages. These issues are particularly relevant to neurology. New reimbursement models are based on value and facilitated by the use of multidisciplinary teams. Integration of advanced practice providers (APPs) into neurology practice offers many advantages with new models of care. Conversely, there are many and varied challenges financially and logistically with these practice models. The American Academy of Neurology has formed a Work Group to address the needs of both neurologists and neurologic APPs and monitor the effect of APPs on quality and cost of neurologic care.

  16. The Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Nath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly discusses various definitions and concepts of the so-called information society. The term information society has been proposed to refer to the post-industrial society in which information plays a pivotal role. The definitions that have been proposed over the years highlight five underlying characterisations of an information society: technological, economic, sociological, spatial, and cultural. This article discusses those characteristics. While the emergence of an information society may be just a figment of one’s imagination, the concept could be a good organising principle to describe and analyse the changes of the past 50 years and of the future in the 21st century.

  17. Neurological comorbidity in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabaru, Keiko; Matsuo, Muneaki

    2017-08-10

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of central nervous system comorbidities in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). We performed a nationwide survey to investigate neurological comorbidities in 3-15-year-old children with NF1 in Japan by sending questionnaires to pediatricians and pediatric neurologists. A secondary questionnaire was sent to the parents of identified NF1 patients to assess neurological comorbidities including headache, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Rating Scale (RS), and the Social Responsiveness Scale 2. The primary survey identified 760 NF1 patients, and the parents of 565 patients were sent the secondary questionnaire. The parental response rate was 25.7% (145; 63 girls, 81 boys, one unspecified). Among the patients, 42.9% (55/128; 35 girls, 20 boys) were reported to exhibit intellectual problems. On the ADHD-RS, 40.2% (47/117) of NF1 patients aged 6-15 had ADHD (RS score >93rd percentile), with a rate of 47.7% in boys and 30.8% in girls. Furthermore, 20.2% of patients had suspected autism spectrum disorder (29/143; 10 girls, 19 boys), with Social Responsiveness Scale score ≥76. Headache was reported by 49.6% (61/123) of children over 5 years old, and 25.2% (31/123; 10 girls, 21 boys) reported migraine. Other neurological comorbidities included 20 cases of epilepsy (13.8%), 11 cases of optic nerve glioma (7.6%), five cases of brain tumor (3.4%), six cases of cerebrovascular disease (4.1%), and two cases of hydrocephalus (1.4%). Intellectual problems, ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, and migraine are major neurological comorbidities in NF1. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. [Charles Miller Fisher: a giant of neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    C. Miller Fisher MD, one of the great neurologists in the 20th century, died in April 2012. Born in Canada, he studied medicine at the University of Toronto. As a Canadian Navy medical doctor he participated in World War II and was a war prisoner from 1941 to 1944. He did a residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute between 1946 and 1948, and later on was a Fellow in Neurology and Neuropathology at the Boston City Hospital. In 1954 he entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as a neurologist and neuropathologist, where he remained until his retirement, in 2005. His academic career ended as Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. His area of special interest in neurology was cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In 1954 he created the first Vascular Neurology service in the world and trained many leading neurologists on this field. His scientific contributions are present in more than 250 publications, as journal articles and book chapters. Many of his articles, certainly not restricted to CVD, were seminal in neurology. Several concepts and terms that he coined are currently used in daily clinical practice. The chapters on CVD, in seven consecutive editions of Harrison's Internal Medicine textbook, are among his highlights. His death was deeply felt by the neurological community.

  19. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  20. What is the best method of surgical training?: A report of America's leading senior surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, C Y; Whang, E E; Karamanoukian, R; Longmire, W P; McFadden, D W

    1998-08-01

    To characterize the career choices and developments made by leading senior surgeons in this country and to examine hypothetically whether application of a short tracking program would have hindered their career decisions. A survey pertaining to each surgeon's career, decisions, and opinions concerning surgical training. Senior surgeons of regional and national surgical societies. Survey responses. A total of 352 surveys (41.4%) were received. Respondents answered that the most common reasons for choosing a specialty were role models or mentors (56%), research (51%), and available patient population (23%). The 2 most common stages in a career at which the respondents became interested in a specialty, or an area of expertise, were at the junior residency level (when the specialty was chosen) and at the assistant professor level (when a more specific topic within the specialty was chosen). The most common stage at which the group believed they acquired their expertise was also at the assistant professor level. Seventy-one percent of respondents believed broad training was superior to a short tracking system, although none had participated in shortened surgical training. Most leading senior surgeons in this country still believe that broad surgical training is superior and should be maintained. Because career specialties in this surveyed group were generally chosen in early residency, a hypothetical application of the short tracking system would have still allowed for these important decisions to be made. Also, it seems likely that specialty and career development would not have been hindered because "expertization" mostly occurred after training was completed. Regardless of training method, a role model or mentor seems most important in career choices and developments.

  1. To Morcellate or Not to Morcellate: A Cross-Sectional Survey Of Gynecologic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhat, Farr; Apostol, Radu; Greene, Alexis D; Pilkinton, Marjorie L

    2017-01-01

    The inadvertent dissemination of uterine cancer cells with the power morcellator has received much attention in the press and a warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Many hospitals prohibit the use of the morcellator in gynecologic surgery. We conducted a survey in an attempt to assess gynecologic surgeons' beliefs regarding the intracorporeal power morcellation of fibroids in light of the risk of dissemination of malignancy in patients in whom the presence of cancer is unknown before surgery. We conducted an Internet-based survey of 3505 members of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons (SLS) to assess demographics, current use of the intracorporeal power morcellator, and whether the recent negative press has affected gynecologic surgeons' use of the morcellator. Of the 3505 SLS members surveyed, 518 responded (response rate, 14.77%). Three hundred thirteen (61%) of the respondents were not using the intracorporeal power morcellator. Of those, 48% reported the reason was a hospital-wide ban, and an additional 17% reported lack of availability (not in stock). Senior attendings with >20 years of experience used the morcellator more often than junior attendings and fellows (P = .007). Furthermore, the morcellator was used significantly less among those with the belief that morcellation of occult malignancy affects survival (P = .013). Three hundred sixty-one (76%) of the participants currently perform laparotomy in fewer than a quarter of their cases; most those cases are still performed using laparoscopic and robot-assisted techniques. The recent negative press suggesting that intracorporeal power morcellation can disseminate occult malignancy and affect survival has decreased the use of the morcellator. Despite the declining use of power morcellation, most practicing gynecologic surgeons have not converted their procedures to laparotomy.

  2. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 1999 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 19-20, 1999 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 4 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Cancer, Neurology, Radiopharmacy and biology, General nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  3. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2001 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 16-17, 2001 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 6 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Cancer, Physics of nuclear medicine, Neurology, Radiopharmacy and biology, Nuclear cardiology, General nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  4. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Spring Meeting 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2001 spring meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on May 18, 2001 in Daegu, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 3 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Nuclear medicine, Neurology, Cancer. (Yi, J. H.)

  5. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 1998 Autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 13-14, 1998 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 5 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: general nuclear medicine, neurology, radiopharmacy and biology, nuclear cardiology, physics and instrumentation. (Yi, J. H.)

  6. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2002 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 15-16, 2002 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 5 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Cancer, Physics of nuclear medicine, Neurology, Radiopharmacy and biology, General nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  7. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Spring Meeting 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 1998 spring meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on May 15, 1998 in Chungju, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 3 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: general nuclear medicine, neurology, radiopharmacy and biology. (Yi, J. H.)

  8. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This proceedings contains articles of 2003 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 14-15, 2003 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 6 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: General Cancer, Cancer PET, Brain Neurology and General Nuclear Medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  9. Standardized patient outcomes trial (SPOT in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E. Safdieh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurologic examination is a challenging component of the physical examination for medical students. In response, primarily based on expert consensus, medical schools have supplemented their curricula with standardized patient (SP sessions that are focused on the neurologic examination. Hypothesis-driven quantitative data are needed to justify the further use of this resource-intensive educational modality, specifically regarding whether using SPs to teach the neurological examination effects a long-term benefit on the application of neurological examination skills. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data from medical students at Weill Cornell Medical College. The control group (n=129 received the standard curriculum. The intervention group (n=58 received the standard curriculum and an additional SP session focused on the neurologic examination during the second year of medical school. Student performance on the neurologic examination was assessed in the control and intervention groups via an OSCE administered duri