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Sample records for neurological signs electronic

  1. [Neurological soft signs in pervasive developmental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halayem, S; Bouden, A; Halayem, M B; Tabbane, K; Amado, I; Krebs, M O

    2010-09-01

    Many studies have focused on specific motor signs in autism and Asperger's syndrome, but few has been published on the complete range of neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD). Scarce are the studies evaluating NSS in children suffering from PDD not otherwise specified (PDDNOS). This study compared performance of 11 autistic children (AD) and 10 children with PDDNOS, with controls matched on age, sex and cognitive performance on Krebs et al.'s NSS scale. Because of the duration of the assessments and specific difficulties encountered in managing some items, an adaptation of the scale had to be made during a pilot study with the agreement of the author. To be eligible, patients had to meet the following inclusion criteria: an age range of 6-16 years, a diagnosis of autistic disorder or PDDNOS based on the DSM IV criteria (American Psychiatric Association 1994). The autism diagnostic interview-revised (ADI-R) was used in order to confirm the diagnosis and to evaluate the association of the symptoms to the severity of the NSS. The childhood autism rating scale (CARS) was completed for the patients in order to evaluate symptoms at the time of the NSS examination. Cognitive ability was assessed with Raven's progressive matrices. Were excluded patients with: history of cerebral palsy, congenital anomaly of the central nervous system, epilepsy, known genetic syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, antecedent of severe head trauma, Asperger's syndrome, obvious physical deformities or sensory deficits that would interfere with neurological assessment, deep mental retardation and recent or chronic substance use or abuse. Healthy controls shared the same exclusion criteria, with no personal history of neurological, psychiatric disorder or substance abuse, no family history of psychiatric disorder and normal or retardation in schooling. All study procedures were approved by the local Ethics Committee (Comité d

  2. Congenital portosystemic shunts in five mature dogs with neurological signs.

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    Windsor, Rebecca Christine; Olby, Natasha J

    2007-01-01

    Congenital portosystemic shunts are a common cause of hepatic encephalopathy and are typically first identified when dogs are dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts; the dogs were presented for severe encephalopathic signs during middle or old age. Three dogs had portoazygos shunts, and four dogs had multifocal and lateralizing neurological abnormalities, including severe gait abnormalities and vestibular signs. All five dogs responded to medical or surgical treatment, demonstrating that older animals can respond to treatment even after exhibiting severe neurological signs.

  3. Early neurological signs in preterm infants with unilateral intraparenchymal echodensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cioni, G; Bos, AF; Einspieler, C; Ferrari, F; Martijn, A; Paolicelli, PB; Rapisardi, G; Roversi, MF; Prechtl, HFR

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to document the early developmental course of neurological signs in a group of preterm infants at risk for hemiplegia due to unilateral intraparenchymal echodensity (UIPE). Sixteen preterm infants with UIPE and sixteen controls were given serial neurological examinations,

  4. Neurological soft signs in adolescents with borderline personality traits.

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    Zhang, Jinqiang; Cai, Lin; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Yi, Jinyao; Yao, Shuqiao; Hu, Muli; Bai, Mei; Li, Lingyan; Wang, Yuping

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and severity of neurological soft signs (NSS), and their relationships with borderline personality (BP) traits in adolescents. Eighty-nine adolescents with BP traits (BP-trait group), and 89 adolescents without traits of any personality disorder (control group), were recruited in China. BP traits were diagnosed by the BPD subscale of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire for the DSM-IV (PDQ-4+). The soft sign subscales of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory were administered to all participants. The group differences in prevalence of soft signs and in NSS scores were analyzed, as well as the associations between the NSS scale and borderline personality traits. Five soft signs were significantly more frequent in adolescents with BP traits. A total of 59.6% of adolescents with BP traits exhibited at least 1 NSS, whereas only 34.8% of adolescents without BP traits did (p system.

  5. Neurological soft signs discriminating mood disorders from first episode schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, MPM; Liddle, PF; Burgerhof, JGM; Knegtering, R; Bosch, RJ

    Objective: To investigate the specificity of neurological soft signs (NSS) for first episode schizophrenia compared with mood disorders. Method: We assessed NSS in a sample of 60 healthy controls, 191 first episode psychosis patients and 81 mood disorder patients. We used a principle component

  6. Neurological soft signs as an endophenotype in an African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The use of endophenotypes, such as neurological soft signs (NSS), is advocated as one possible method to elucidate the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. Exploring the associations between NSS and specific illness symptoms has revealed some trends, although results have been conflicting. To date, such ...

  7. The specificity of neurological signs in schizophrenia : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, S; Knegtering, R; van den Bosch, RJ

    2000-01-01

    This review examines the extent to which neurological signs are more prevalent in schizophrenia patients, compared to mood-disorder patients and healthy subjects, and whether there is a pattern in any of the differences that may be found. We included 17 studies and calculated the weighted mean

  8. Clostridial disease associated with neurologic signs: tetanus, botulism, and enterotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rings, D Michael

    2004-07-01

    Clostridial infections are found worldwide in almost all species of animals and may involve a variety of body systems and present with a diversity of clinical signs. Most damage done through clostridial infections is due to the action of toxins released from the bacteria.Thus, disease caused by Clostridium spp should more correctly be called intoxication. Two prominent clostridial infections are associated with neurologic signs: Clostridium botulinum and C tetani. In both infections, the mechanism that is responsible for causing the problem is similar, despite the remarkable difference in clinical presentation. In addition, neurologic signs are described with C perfringens types C and D but are not the dominant feature of these diseases.

  9. Neurological soft signs in antisocial men and relation with psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Omer Faruk; Demirel, Aysegul; Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Emül, Murat; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-30

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) were studied in some axis-I disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, alcohol and substance abuse disorder. Aim of this study is detection of neurological soft signs in antisocial personality disorder and relation of these signs with psychopathy. The study was included 41 antisocial men and 41 healthy control subjects. Sociodemographic form, neurological evaluation scale and Hare psychopathy checklist was applied to the antisocial subjects, whereas sociodemographic form and neurological evaluation scale were applied to the controls. Antisocial men exhibited significiantly more NSS in total score and subgroups scales (ppsychopathy scores and NSS sequencing complex motor tasks (r=0.309; p=0.049) and NSS other tests subgroup scores (r=0.328; p=0.037). Similar relation was also observed in comparison between psychopathy subgroups. NSS accepted as being endophenotypes in schizophrenia, were also detected in antisocial group significantly more than controls in our study. Significant relationship between psychopathy and NSS may also hint the role of genetic mechanisms in personality development, though new extended studies with larger sample size are needed for clarification of this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An examination of relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Ram Kumar; Swami, Mukesh Kumar; Singh, Paramjeet

    2012-03-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) and cognitive function had been examined in schizophrenia, but their relationship has remained elusive for several years. We examined the relationship between NSS and cognitive functions in the present study. A cross sectional study was carried out. Subjects were drawn from first degree relatives of schizophrenia patients, admitted as inpatient or attending as an outpatient. Controls were recruited by word of mouth from hospital staff and visitors of hospitalized patients. Those subjects who satisfied the screening process were subjected to Cambridge Neurological Inventory for soft sign assessment and digit span test, paired associate learning test (PALT) and visuo-spatial working memory matrix (VSWMM) for cognitive function assessment. Correlation analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM) was used for analysis. Significant negative correlation of primitive reflexes with PALT; of motor coordination with VSWMM, working memory (WM) and cognitive index; of total NSS with WM and cognitive index among first degree relatives. SEM showed that motor soft signs have important negative influence over WM. The current findings indicate that NSS have significant negative effect on cognitive functioning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cauda Equina Compression in the Absence of Neurologic Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzell, Bethany; Sheets, Charles; Bagley, Carlos A

    2016-04-01

    The patient was a 45-year-old man with a 4-year history of chronic low back pain, intensifying insidiously over the previous 8 months. On physical examination, generalized, severe low back pain was increased with all motions, with no abnormal neurologic signs. The initial physical therapy diagnosis was nonspecific low back pain; however, when the patient reported worsening symptoms at 2-week follow-up, he was advised to complete his previously scheduled magnetic resonance imaging and physician follow-up before further physical therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass at L5 consistent with benign nerve sheath tumor.

  12. Neurological soft signs in Chinese adolescents with antisocial personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Cai, Lin; Li, Lingyan; Yang, Yanjie; Yao, Shuqiao; Zhu, Xiongzhao

    2016-09-30

    The current study was designed to explore the specific relationship between neurologic soft signs (NSSs) and characteristics of antisocial personality traits in adolescents, and to investigate particular NSSs linked to certain brain regions in adolescents with antisocial personality traits. The research was conducted on 96 adolescents diagnosed with ASP traits (ASP trait group) using the ASPD subscale of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire for the DSM-IV (PDQ-4+) and 96 adolescents without traits of any personality disorder (control group). NSSs were assessed using the soft sign subscales of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory. Adolescents with ASP traits showed more motor coordination, sensory integration, disinhibition, and total NSSs than the control group. Seven NSSs, including stereognosia in right hand, finger agnosia and graphesthesia in both hands, left-right orientation, and go/no go stimulus, were significantly more frequent in teenagers with ASP traits. Sensory integration was positively associated with ASP traits. Adolescents with antisocial personality traits might have abnormalities in the central nervous system, and sensory integration might be the particular indicator of antisocial personality disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Neurological soft signs in schizophrenic patients and their nonaffected siblings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechri, A; Slama, H; Bourdel, M-C; Chebel, S; Mandhouj, O; Krebs, M-O; Gaha, L

    2008-10-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are subtle neurological signs indicating non specific cerebral dysfunction. Several studies have found an excess of NSS in schizophrenic patients compared to healthy subjects. Although NSS have been consistently reported in schizophrenic patients, their clinical relevance and their relation to functional impairment and severity of this disease are not well-clarified. In addition, the presence of NSS in schizophrenic patient's relatives suggests that they could be associated with the genetic liability. To determine the prevalence and scores of NSS in schizophrenic patients and their nonaffected siblings and to examine the clinical correlates of NSS in the schizophrenic patients. Sixty-six schizophrenic patients (50 males and 16 females, mean age=31.16+/-7.17 years), were compared to 31 of their nonaffected siblings (22 males and nine females, mean age=32.19+/-5.88 years) and to 60 controls subjects (40 males and 20 females, mean age=30.70+/-6.54 years) without family psychiatric history. NSS were assessed with Krebs et al.'s neurological soft signs scale. It is a comprehensive and standardized scale consisting of 23 items comporting five factors: motor coordination, motor integration, sensory integration, quality of lateralization and involuntary movements or posture. The Simpson and Angus scale for extrapyramidal symptoms was also rated. Clinical assessment of the schizophrenic patients was conducted using the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS), clinical global impressions (CGI) and global functioning evaluation (GAF). Psychiatric disorders were ruled out among siblings of schizophrenic patients and control subjects by psychiatric review evaluation, according to the DSM-IV check list. When the total NSS score of 11.5 was considered the cut-off point, the prevalence of NSS was 96.9% in the schizophrenic patients versus 35.5% in the nonaffected siblings (ptotal score and subscores than the siblings and control groups. The NSS

  14. Neurological Soft Signs and Corpus Callosum morphology in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, G; Quartini, A; Paolemili, M; Clemente, R; Iannitelli, A; Di Biasi, C; Gualdi, G

    2011-07-25

    Neurological Soft Signs (NSS) have been found to be more prevalent in schizophrenic patients. A breakdown in intracortical functional connectivity, including interhemispheric communication, has been suggested in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Indeed, problems with interhemispheric information transfer via the Corpus Callosum (CC) have been documented in schizophrenics. Our study goal was to relate NSS to CC morphology. CC Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measurements were collected from 29 right-handed male schizophrenia inpatients. NSS were evaluated employing the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES). We examined the scores obtained from the NES total and the three NES subscales: Integrative Sensory Function, Motor Coordination, and Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts. We compared CC morphology of patients with "high" NSS with that of patients with "low" NSS. Correlation analyses were performed to further clarify the relationship between CC size, NSS, and total lifetime antipsychotic consumption. Patients with "high" scores at the Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts subscale showed a smaller CC rostral body, whereas patients with "high" scores at the Integrative Sensory Function subscale showed a smaller CC splenium. For both the NES total and the Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts subscale, "high" scores were accompanied by an increase of the CC genu. Correlation analyses revealed a significant inverse correlation between the CC rostral body size and the Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts subscale score. In addition, a significant positive correlation was shown between the CC genu size and both the NES total and the Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts subscale scores. The presence of NSS and the accompanying CC structural abnormalities were independent on antipsychotic treatment. Our data provide evidence for an association between NSS and CC morphology and further support the hypothesis of a disturbed interhemispheric functional connectivity in schizophrenia. Copyright

  15. Neurologic signs and symptoms frequently manifest in acute HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmuth, Joanna; Fletcher, James L K; Valcour, Victor; Kroon, Eugène; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Intasan, Jintana; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Narvid, Jared; Pothisri, Mantana; Allen, Isabel; Krebs, Shelly J; Slike, Bonnie; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Spudich, Serena

    2016-07-12

    To determine the incidence, timing, and severity of neurologic findings in acute HIV infection (pre-antibody seroconversion), as well as persistence with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Participants identified with acute HIV were enrolled, underwent structured neurologic evaluations, immediately initiated cART, and were followed with neurologic evaluations at 4 and 12 weeks. Concurrent brain MRIs and both viral and inflammatory markers in plasma and CSF were obtained. Median estimated HIV infection duration was 19 days (range 3-56) at study entry for the 139 participants evaluated. Seventy-three participants (53%) experienced one or more neurologic findings in the 12 weeks after diagnosis, with one developing a fulminant neurologic manifestation (Guillain-Barré syndrome). A total of 245 neurologic findings were noted, reflecting cognitive symptoms (33%), motor findings (34%), and neuropathy (11%). Nearly half of the neurologic findings (n = 121, 49%) occurred at diagnosis, prior to cART initiation, and most of these (n = 110, 90%) remitted concurrent with 1 month on treatment. Only 9% of neurologic findings (n = 22) persisted at 24 weeks on cART. Nearly all neurologic findings (n = 236, 96%) were categorized as mild in severity. No structural neuroimaging abnormalities were observed. Participants with neurologic findings had a higher mean plasma log10 HIV RNA at diagnosis compared to those without neurologic findings (5.9 vs 5.4; p = 0.006). Acute HIV infection is commonly associated with mild neurologic findings that largely remit while on treatment, and may be mediated by direct viral factors. Severe neurologic manifestations are infrequent in treated acute HIV. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Neurological signs in relation to type of cerebrovascular disease in vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staekenborg, S.S.; van der Flier, W.M.; van Straaten, E.C.W.; Lane, R.; Barkhof, F.; Scheltens, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of a number of neurological signs in a large population of patients with vascular dementia (VaD) and to compare the relative frequency of specific neurological signs dependent on type of cerebrovascular disease. METHODS -

  17. Focal neurological signs in hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients: an underestimated entity?

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    Cadranel, J F; Lebiez, E; Di Martino, V; Bernard, B; El Koury, S; Tourbah, A; Pidoux, B; Valla, D; Opolon, P

    2001-02-01

    Focal neurological signs have been poorly documented in the course of hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients because they are not mentioned in any textbooks of liver diseases. Having the opportunity to observe such cases, we underwent a prospective study to determine incidence, characteristics, associated factors, prognostic significance, and outcome of this rare form of hepatic encephalopathy. Over a 12-month period, all cirrhotic patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit of our department for hepatic encephalopathy were prospectively studied. Patients with clinical and electroencephalogram evidences of hepatic encephalopathy were examined by a senior physician and, in cases of focal neurological signs, underwent examination by a neurologist, CT scan, lumbar punction, and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and echo Doppler examination of neck and head vessels. Clinical and biological parameters were compared in patients during episodes with and without focal neurological signs, and outcome was noted. Thirty-four cirrhotic patients were hospitalized for 48 episodes of hepatic encephalopathy; two of these patients with cerebral hematoma were excluded. Twenty-four patients exhibited 38 hepatic encephalopathy episodes without focal neurological signs (82.6%), and eight patients exhibited eight hepatic encephalopathy episodes with focal neurological signs (17.4%) that were hemiplegia and hemiparesia in six patients (75%). In all patients, cerebral CT scan and cerebrospinal fluid examination disclosed no abnormalities, as neither did cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (n = 5) and echo Doppler examination of neck and head vessels (n = 5). Except for female sex, which was more often encountered in patients with focal neurological signs (p < 0.05), there were no differences between episodes with and without focal neurological signs for any of the parameters studied. In surviving patients who recovered from hepatic encephalopathy (7/8), focal neurological

  18. Neurological signs and late-life depressive symptoms in a community population: the ESPRIT study.

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    Soremekun, Mishael; Stewart, Robert; Portet, Florence; Artero, Sylvaine; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Ritchie, Karen

    2010-07-01

    Depression in the elderly is common and often resistant to treatment. It has been suggested that late-life depression may be related to underlying neurobiological changes. However, these observations are derived from diverse clinical samples and as yet have not been confirmed in a more representative population study. Our aim was to investigate associations between neurological signs as markers of underlying brain dysfunction and caseness for depression in an elderly community sample, controlling for physical health and comorbid/past neurological disorders. A cross-sectional analysis of 2102 older people without dementia from the ESPRIT project. Depressive symptomatology was ascertained using the CES-D and abnormal neurological signs/comorbidity from a full neurological examination according to ICD-10 criteria. Pyramidal, extrapyramidal, cranial nerve and sensory deficit signs were significantly associated with case-level depressive symptoms. However, all odds ratios were close to null values in participants who did not have previous neurological disorder. We confirmed previous findings of an association between neurological signs and case-level depressive symptoms in late life. However, this association may simply reflect the impact of more severe comorbid neurological disorder. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Pathogenesis of neurological signs associated with bovine enteric coccidiosis: a prospective study and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, C M; Bellamy, J E; Wobeser, G A

    1987-01-01

    Various hypotheses have been proposed for the pathogenesis of the neurological signs associated with bovine enteric coccidiosis. We undertook a prospective study of cases of bovine enteric coccidiosis with and without nervous signs to test the validity of these hypotheses and explore other possible pathophysiological mechanisms. Clinical, pathological and toxicological data from 12 calves with, and 15 calves without, neurological signs were compared. Calves with neurological signs had a lower liver Cu concentration (p less than 0.01) and a higher plasma glucose concentration (p less than 0.05) than did calves without neurological signs. Hyperglycemia and Cu deficiency may increase the susceptibility to central nervous system damage, but are not likely to account for the onset of neurological signs in calves with enteric coccidiosis. The results of the study suggest that the following are not involved in the pathogenesis of "nervous coccidiosis": disturbance of serum Na, K, Ca, P, or Mg concentration, vitamin A deficiency, thiamine deficiency, anemia, lead intoxication, uremia, Haemophilus somnus meningoencephalitis, severity of coccidial infection, gross alterations in intestinal bacterial flora and hepatopathy. PMID:3607655

  20. Neurological Soft Signs in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Standardised Assessment and Comparison with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bolton

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available While several studies have detected raised levels of neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD, the specificity of these abnormalities remains uncertain. This study used a new standardised measure, the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI, to assess soft signs in 51 subjects with OCD. Comparison was made with data on patients with schizophrenia and a non-clinical control group from a previously reported study. Individuals with OCD showed raised levels of soft signs compared with non-clinical controls in many categories of the CNI: Motor Coordination, Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes, Extrapyramidal Signs, and Failure of Suppression. Compared with patients with schizophrenia, the OCD group had lower levels of neurological signs in some CNI categories: Hard Signs, Motor Co-ordination, Tardive Dyskinesia, Catatonic Signs, and Extrapyramidal Signs. However, levels of soft signs in the OCD group did not significantly differ from those in the schizophrenia group in other CNI categories: Sensory Integration, Primitive Reflexes and Failure of Suppression. The significance of these patterns of findings is discussed.

  1. Neurological Soft Signs In Psychoses A Comparison Between Schizophrenia & Other Psychotic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahsavand. E. Noroozian. M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most important and disabling mental disorders in the world. Males and females are equally affected. Diagnosis is a very difficult problem in this disorder. Because the diagnostic systems such as ICD-10 and DSM-IV are mainly subjective, they are not valid and reliable. Essentially, in the future, we will need to more objective criteria in psychiatry especially in diagnosis of schizophrenia. Neurological soft signs are an example of these objective criteria. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of neurological soft signs in schizophrenic patients and compared it with the prevalence of these signs in other psychotic patients (except mood disorders with psychotic features and normal subjects."nMethods: We compared the neurological soft signs (sensory motor integration, motor. Coordination, consequent complex motor acts, primary reflexes, and eye movements in 30 schizophrenic patients, 30 other psychotic patients (other than mood disorders with psychotic features and 30 normal subjects. Diagnosis of schizophrenia and also other psychoses were based on DSM-IN criteria. Normal subjects have been selected form the staff of Roozbeh hospital randomly."nResults: The difference between the means of motor coordination subscale of neurological soft signs in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders (other than mood disorders with psychotic features were significant (P value < 0.04. There were no significant differences between the means of other subscales of neurological soft signs in two groups of patients."nConclusion: There are some disturbances of motor coordination subscale of neurological soft signs in patients with schizophrenia. It seems that, these disturbances are evidence of involvements of basal ganglia, motor cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. So it may be suggested that motor coordination as a marker can be used in differentiation between the schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.

  2. [Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia: correlations with age, sex, educational status and psychopathology].

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    Panagiotidis, P; Kaprinis, G; Iacovides, A; Fountoulakis, K

    2013-01-01

    Though the pathobiology of schizophrenia can be examined in multiple levels, the organic notion of brain disease suggests that neurological features will be present. One straightforward, inexpensive method of investigating brain dysfunction in schizophrenia is thought the bedside assessment of neurological abnormalities with a standard neurological examination. Neurological abnormalities are traditionally classified as "hard signs" (impairments in basic motor, sensory, and reflex behaviors, which do not appear to be affected in schizophrenia) and "soft signs", which refer to more complex phenomena such as abnormalities in motor control, integrative sensory function, sensorimotor integration, and cerebral laterality. Additionally, neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor motor and sensory abnormalities that are considered to be normal in the course of early development but abnormal when elicited in later life or persist beyond childhood. Soft signs also, have no definitive localizing significance but are indicative of subtle brain dysfunction. Most authors believe that they are a reflection not only of deficient integration between the sensory and motor systems, but also of dysfunctional neuronal circuits linking subcortical brain structures such as the basal ganglia, the brain stem, and the limbic system. Throughout the last four decades, studies have consistently shown that NSS are more frequently present in patients with schizophrenia than in normal subjects and non-psychotic psychiatric patients. However, the functional relevance of NSS remains unclear and their specificity has often been challenged, even though there is indication for a relative specificity with regard to diagnosis, or symptomatology. Many studies have considered soft signs as categorical variables thus hampering the evaluation of fluctuation with symptomatology and/or treatment, whereas other studies included insufficient number of assessed signs, or lacked a comprehensive assessment of

  3. Computed Tomographic Blend Sign Is Associated With Computed Tomographic Angiography Spot Sign and Predicts Secondary Neurological Deterioration After Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

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    Sporns, Peter B; Schwake, Michael; Schmidt, Rene; Kemmling, André; Minnerup, Jens; Schwindt, Wolfram; Cnyrim, Christian; Zoubi, Tarek; Heindel, Walter; Niederstadt, Thomas; Hanning, Uta

    2017-01-01

    Significant early hematoma growth in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage is an independent predictor of poor functional outcome. Recently, the novel blend sign (BS) has been introduced as a new imaging sign for predicting hematoma growth in noncontrast computed tomography. Another parameter predicting increasing hematoma size is the well-established spot sign (SS) visible in computed tomographic angiography. We, therefore, aimed to clarify the association between established SS and novel BS and their values predicting a secondary neurological deterioration. Retrospective study inclusion criteria were (1) spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage confirmed on noncontrast computed tomography and (2) noncontrast computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography performed on admission within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. We defined a binary outcome (secondary neurological deterioration versus no secondary deterioration). As secondary neurological deterioration, we defined (1) early hemicraniectomy under standardized criteria or (2) secondary decrease of Glasgow Coma Scale of >3 points, both within the first 48 hours after symptom onset. Of 182 patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, 37 (20.3%) presented with BS and 39 (21.4%) with SS. Of the 81 patients with secondary deterioration, 31 (38.3%) had BS and SS on admission. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified hematoma volume (odds ratio, 1.07 per mL; P≤0.001), intraventricular hemorrhage (odds ratio, 3.08; P=0.008), and the presence of BS (odds ratio, 11.47; P≤0.001) as independent predictors of neurological deterioration. The BS, which is obtainable in noncontrast computed tomography, shows a high correlation with the computed tomographic angiography SS and is a reliable predictor of secondary neurological deterioration after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Should the Babinski sign be part of the routine neurologic examination?

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    Miller, Timothy M; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2005-10-25

    The Babinski sign is a well-known sign of upper motor neuron dysfunction that is widely considered an essential element of a complete neurologic examination. Little is known about reliability and validity of this sign. A less well-known sign of upper motor neuron dysfunction, decreased speed of foot tapping, also has not been carefully evaluated. Scientific evaluation of findings of the physical examination is crucial in directing busy clinicians. Ten physicians (five neurologists and five non-specialists) examined each foot of 10 subjects, 8 of whom had known unilateral upper motor neuron weakness, 1 had bilateral leg weakness secondary to ALS, and 1 had no known neurologic deficits. Our main outcome measures were inter-rater reliability (kappa values) and accuracy (agreement with known upper motor neuron weakness). The reliability of the Babinski sign was fair (kappa 0.30) and was substantial for foot tapping (kappa 0.73). Agreement with known weakness was 56% for Babinski sign and 85% for foot tapping. Reliability and accuracy for both tests were similar for neurologists and non-specialists. The interobserver reliability and validity of the Babinski sign for identifying upper motor neuron weakness are limited. Slowness of foot tapping may be a more useful sign.

  5. Longitudinal Study of Neurological Soft Signs in First-Episode Early-Onset Psychosis

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    Mayoral, M.; Bombin, I.; Castro-Fornieles, J.; Gonzalez-Pinto, A.; Otero, S.; Parellada, M.; Moreno, D.; Baeza, I.; Graell, M.; Rapado, M.; Arango, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In recent decades, the assessment of neurological soft signs (NSS) in patients with psychosis has become a subject of special interest. The study of the progression of NSS during adolescence will provide valuable information about the role of NSS as endophenotypes or biomarkers and about brain development at a stage in which brain…

  6. Prognostic significance of neurological signs in high-risk infants - a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, E.G.; Hadders-Algra, M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature on the significance of specific neurological signs in infancy, in particular in infants at risk for developmental problems such as cerebral palsy (CP). A literature search was performed using the databases PubMed, Embase, Web of

  7. Prognostic significance of neurological signs in high-risk infants : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, Elisa G.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature on the significance of specific neurological signs in infancy, in particular in infants at risk for developmental problems such as cerebral palsy (CP). A literature search was performed using the databases PubMed, Embase, Web of

  8. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7–11 years (27 males, six females and twenty five adults participants aged 21–29 years old (19 males, six females participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD.

  9. Successful outcome in a dog with neurological and respiratory signs following smoke inhalation.

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    Guillaumin, Julien; Hopper, Kate

    2013-01-01

    To report the case management of a patient with smoke inhalation complicated by neurological impairment, carboxyhemoglobinemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), upper airway obstruction, aspiration pneumonia, and bacteremia. A 1.5-year-old male intact Beagle presented shortly after being involved in a household fire. Upon arrival the dog was diagnosed with ARDS and demonstrated acute neurological signs (eg, obtundation and seizures). Treatment included mechanical ventilation, temporary tracheostomy, and intensive supportive care. During hospitalization, the dog suffered multiple complications including prolonged neurological abnormalities, aspiration pneumonia, and bacteremia. The dog recovered over a 16-day period. This is the first description of extensive management of a patient suffering both neurological and respiratory complication due to smoke inhalation, and details the steps that were taken to achieve a successful outcome. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  10. Electronic Medical Record Tobacco Use Vital Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris John W

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Determination of the prevalence of tobacco use and impact of tobacco prevention/treatment efforts in an electronic medical record enabled practice utilizing a defined tobacco vital sign variable. Design and Measurements Retrospective cohort study utilizing patient data recorded in an electronic medical record database between July 15, 2001, and May 31, 2003. Patient-reported tobacco use status was obtained for each of 6,771 patients during the pre-provider period of their 24,824 visits during the study period with the recorder blinded to past tobacco use status entries. Results An overall current tobacco use prevalence of 27.1% was found during the study period. Tobacco use status was recorded in 96% of visits. Comparison of initial to final visit tobacco use status demonstrates a consistency rate of 75.0% declaring no change in tobacco status in the 4,522 patients with two or more visits. An 8.6% net tobacco use decline was seen for the practice (p value Conclusion Self reported tobacco use status as a vital sign embedded within the workflow of an electronic medical record enabled practice was a quantitative tool for determination of tobacco use prevalence and a measuring stick of risk prevention/intervention impact.

  11. Neurological soft signs in non-psychotic patients with cannabis dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervaux, Alain; Bourdel, Marie-Chantal; Laqueille, Xavier; Krebs, Marie-Odile

    2013-03-01

    Psychomotor performance has consistently been found to be altered in chronic cannabis users. Neurological soft signs (NSS) reflect neurological dysfunction involving integrative networks, especially those involving the cerebellum, where cannabinoid receptors are particularly concentrated. Our objective was to study, for the first time, NSS in a group of patients with cannabis dependence compared with a of healthy control subjects, matched for age, gender and level of education. All outpatients seeking treatment for chronic cannabis use in the substance abuse department of Sainte-Anne Hospital in Paris between June 2007 and May 2009 and meeting the cannabis dependence DSM-IV criteria were included in the study (n = 45). Patients with psychotic disorders, bipolar 1 disorder and current alcohol, opioid or cocaine dependence were excluded. All patients and controls were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies, which screens for lifetime DSM-IV diagnoses, and the Standardized Neurological Examination of Neurological Soft Signs. NSS scores were significantly higher in patients with cannabis dependence compared with healthy subjects (8.90 ± 4.85 versus 6.71 ± 2.73, respectively, Mann-Whitney: U = 775.0, P = 0.05). Patients had particularly high scores on motor coordination and sensory integration NSS factors. Cannabis dependence is associated with more NSS and especially motor coordination and sensory integration signs. These results suggest that cannabinoids interact with the brain networks underlying NSS, known to be altered in schizophrenia. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Babinski's signe de l'eventail: a turning point in the history of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Cristina; Brau, Ricardo H

    2008-03-01

    The Babinski sign is a finding known since the start of the teachings of physical diagnosis by almost all medical students. This reflex is an incredibly helpful phenomenon that enables physicians to distinguish between central and the peripheral nervous system diseases right at the bedside. Yet, most students as well as physicians remain oblivious to the remarkable history behind the Babinski sign and what it means to evolutional history of the modern neurological exam. We intend to study the birth of the "signe de l'eventail" (the fanning sign) and how it transformed medical diagnosis as we practice it today. An extensive search was conducted through the Internet to identify historical documents referring to Babinski and other physicians who also observed the phenomenon as early as the 17th and 18th century. We also conducted a search through medical journals that examined the Babinski sign and its history. The Babinski reflex had been observed much earlier than 1896, when Babinski referred to his finding for the first time. The reflex had been reported in the literature as far back as 1784 and afterwards reobserved several times before Babinski. However, it was Babinski who first offered an interpretation of the reflex and suggested that it was related to an organic disruption in the central nervous system. By identifying the sign, Babinski separated himself from Charcot in the sense of creating a new tradition in neurology where the findings in a neurological exam were of far more importance than just a plain history as his mentor had relied upon. Babinski was not only responsible for suggesting the significance of such sign, but also transformed the role that physical diagnosis plays in modern medicine, where physical examination is key in revealing underlying pathology.

  13. Neurological soft signs feature a double dissociation within the language system in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavano, Alessandro; Gagliardi, Chiara; Martelli, Sara; Borgatti, Renato

    2010-09-01

    The neurocognitive profile of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is characterized by visuospatial deficits, apparently fluent language, motor soft signs, and hypersociability. We investigated the association between neuromotor soft signs and visuospatial, executive-attentive, mnestic and linguistic functions in a group of 26 children and young adults with WBS. We hypothesized that neurological soft signs could be an index of subtle neurofunctional deficits and thus provide a behavioural window into the processes underlying neurocognition in Williams-Beuren syndrome. Dysmetria and dystonic movements were selected as grouping neurological variables, indexing cerebellar and basal ganglia dysfunction, respectively. No detrimental effects on visuospatial/visuoconstructive skills were evident following the presence of either neurological variable. As for language skills, participants with dysmetria showed markedly reduced expressive syntactic and lexico-semantic skills as compared to non-affected individuals, while no difference in chronological age was evident. Participants with dystonic movements showed reduced receptive syntax and increased lexical comprehension skills as compared to non-affected individuals, the age factor being significant. In both instances, the effect size was greater for syntactic measures. We take these novel findings as suggestive of a double dissociation between expressive and receptive skills at sentence level within the WBS linguistic phenotype. The investigation of neuromotor soft signs and neuropsychological functions may provide a key to new non-cortico-centric genotype/phenotype relationships. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative Study of Neurological Soft Signs in Patients with Schizophrenia or Obsessive-compulsive Disorder, and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R; Soni, A; Tyagi, A; Mehta, S; Gupta, S

    2015-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder compared with patients with schizophrenia and a control group in the Indian setting. The secondary objective was to find any correlation between age at onset and neurological soft signs scores, as well as that between severity of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms (total Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale score) and neurological soft signs scores. This was a cross-sectional hospital-based study of 135 individuals (45 patients with schizophrenia, 45 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder who were attending the psychiatric outpatient department of Sawai Man Singh Medical College, Jaipur, India, and 45 matched healthy controls) from 20 June 2013 to 22 December 2014. After applying strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, the participants completed the study instruments (Cambridge Neurological Inventory [Part 2] and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale). Their socio-demographic data were also recorded. The neurological soft signs total score and domain scores (motor coordination, sensory integration, and disinhibition) were significantly higher in patients with schizophrenia (p disorder group or the control group. The obsessive-compulsive disorder group did not significantly differ from the control group in terms of neurological soft signs scores. No correlation was found between neurological soft signs scores and age at onset as well as that between neurological soft signs scores and total Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale score. Neurological soft signs assessed by the Cambridge Neurological Inventory and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, which discriminate patients with schizophrenia from controls, appear to be relatively specific to schizophrenia. Further studies are required to explore neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  15. Neurological soft signs in juvenile patients with Asperger syndrome, early-onset psychosis, and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, María; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Rapado, Marta; Leiva, Marta; Moreno, Carmen; Giráldez, Marisa; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2010-11-01

    The study of neurological soft signs (NSS) in patients with Asperger syndrome may help us to elucidate the neurological basis of this disorder and to clarify its relationship with other neurodevelopmental disorders. The goal of this study was to compare the prevalence of NSS in a sample of patients with Asperger syndrome, early-onset psychosis and healthy controls. NSS were assessed by means of the Neurological Evaluation Scale in a sample of 29 patients with Asperger syndrome (mean age = 12.86 ± 2.58 years), 30 patients with first-episode early-onset psychoses (mean age 14.17 ± 1.02 years) and 30 healthy controls (mean age 12.33 ± 2.69 years). Significant group differences were found between Asperger syndrome patients and healthy controls both in all the Neurological Evaluation Scale subscales and in the Neurological Evaluation Scale total score. There were no significant differences between both groups of patients in any of the Neurological Evaluation Scale scores. NSS are more prevalent in Asperger syndrome than in healthy controls. The NSS profile was not disorder-specific in our samples of patients with Asperger syndrome and early-onset psychoses. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Neurological signs in 23 dogs with suspected rostral cerebellar ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Barbara; Garosi, Laurent; Skerritt, Geoff; Rusbridge, Clare; Sparrow, Tim; Berendt, Mette; Gredal, Hanne

    2016-06-07

    In dogs with ischaemic stroke, a very common site of infarction is the cerebellum. The aim of this study was to characterise neurological signs in relation to infarct topography in dogs with suspected cerebellar ischaemic stroke and to report short-term outcome confined to the hospitalisation period. A retrospective multicentre study of dogs with suspected cerebellar ischaemic stroke examined from 2010-2015 at five veterinary referral hospitals was performed. Findings from clinical, neurological, and paraclinical investigations including magnetic resonance imaging were assessed. Twenty-three dogs, 13 females and 10 males with a median age of 8 years and 8 months, were included in the study. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (n = 9) was a commonly represented breed. All ischaemic strokes were located to the vascular territory of the rostral cerebellar artery including four extensive and 19 limited occlusions. The most prominent neurological deficits were gait abnormalities (ataxia with hypermetria n = 11, ataxia without hypermetria n = 4, non-ambulatory n = 6), head tilt (n = 13), nystagmus (n = 8), decreased menace response (n = 7), postural reaction deficits (n = 7), and proprioceptive deficits (n = 5). Neurological signs appeared irrespective of the infarct being classified as extensive or limited. All dogs survived and were discharged within 1-10 days of hospitalisation. Dogs affected by rostral cerebellar ischaemic stroke typically present with a collection of neurological deficits characterised by ataxia, head tilt, and nystagmus irrespective of the specific cerebellar infarct topography. In dogs with peracute to acute onset of these neurological deficits, cerebellar ischaemic stroke should be considered an important differential diagnosis, and neuroimaging investigations are indicated. Although dogs are often severely compromised at presentation, short-term prognosis is excellent and rapid clinical improvement may be observed within the

  17. Neurological soft signs in persons with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and the relationships to neuropsychological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hui-jie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurological abnormalities have been reported in people with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI. The current study aimed to examine the prevalence of neurological soft signs (NSS in this clinical group and to examine the relationship of NSS to other neuropsychological performances. Methods Twenty-nine people with aMCI and 28 cognitively healthy elderly people were recruited for the present study. The NSS subscales (motor coordination, sensory integration, and disinhibition of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory and a set of neuropsychological tests were administered to all the participants. Results People with aMCI exhibited significantly more motor coordination signs, disinhibition signs, and total NSS than normal controls. Correlation analysis showed that the motor coordination subscale score and total score of NSS were significantly inversely correlated with the combined Z-score of neuropsychological tests in aMCI group. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggested that people with aMCI demonstrated a higher prevalence of NSS compared to healthy elderly people. Moreover, NSS was found to be inversely correlated with the neuropsychological performances in persons with aMCI. When taken together, these findings suggested that NSS may play a potential important role and serve as a tool to assist in the early detection of aMCI.

  18. Acute neurological signs as the predominant clinical manifestation in four dogs with Angiostrongylus vasorum infections in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pors Susanne E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Four dogs with acute neurological signs caused by haemorrhages in the central nervous system were diagnosed with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection as the underlying aetiology. Two dogs presented with brain lesions, one dog with spinal cord lesions and one with lesions in both the brain and spinal cord. Only one dog presented with concurrent signs of classical pulmonary angiostrongylosis (respiratory distress, cough, and only two dogs displayed overt clinical signs of haemorrhages. Results of coagulation assays were inconsistent. Neurological signs reflected the site of pathology and included seizures, various cranial nerve deficits, vestibular signs, proprioceptive deficits, ataxia and paraplegia. One dog died and three were euthanised due to lack of improvement despite medical treatment. This emphasises canine angiostrongylosis as a potential cause of fatal lesions of the central nervous system and the importance of including A. vasorum as a differential diagnosis in young dogs with acute neurological signs in Denmark.

  19. Acute neurological signs as the predominant clinical manifestation in four dogs with Angiostrongylus vasorum infections in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredal, Hanne; Willesen, Jakob L; Jensen, Henrik E; Nielsen, Ole L; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Koch, Jørgen; Kirk, Rikke K; Pors, Susanne E; Skerritt, Geoff C; Berendt, Mette

    2011-06-28

    Four dogs with acute neurological signs caused by haemorrhages in the central nervous system were diagnosed with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection as the underlying aetiology. Two dogs presented with brain lesions, one dog with spinal cord lesions and one with lesions in both the brain and spinal cord. Only one dog presented with concurrent signs of classical pulmonary angiostrongylosis (respiratory distress, cough), and only two dogs displayed overt clinical signs of haemorrhages. Results of coagulation assays were inconsistent. Neurological signs reflected the site of pathology and included seizures, various cranial nerve deficits, vestibular signs, proprioceptive deficits, ataxia and paraplegia. One dog died and three were euthanised due to lack of improvement despite medical treatment. This emphasises canine angiostrongylosis as a potential cause of fatal lesions of the central nervous system and the importance of including A. vasorum as a differential diagnosis in young dogs with acute neurological signs in Denmark.

  20. Sinais neurológicos sutis: uma revisão Neurological soft signs: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Sousa Pietra Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é discutir o significado dos sinais neurológicos sutis e a relevância para a pesquisa em psiquiatria, com ênfase na esquizofrenia e no transtorno bipolar (TB. Realizou-se uma revisão da literatura nas bases de dados Medline e Bireme. Sinais neurológicos sutis são alterações no exame neurológico que compreendem funções diversas como integração sensorial, coordenação motora, sequenciamento motor e presença de reflexos primitivos. Esses sinais indicam disfunção cerebral não focal, podendo se apresentar como fatores de risco para transtornos psiquiátricos. Podem indicar endofenótipos relacionados a disfunções em circuitos neurais específicos, fornecendo informações relevantes para fisiopatologia desses transtornos. Apesar disso, há poucos trabalhos sobre o tema na literatura nacional. A observação de sinais neurológicos sutis aponta para o potencial de o exame neurológico preencher uma lacuna entre a pesquisa neurobiológica e a prática clínica.This work aims to discuss the meaning of neurological soft signs and their relevance for research in psychiatry, with emphasis in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A narrative review of the literature was performed based on the databases Medline and Bireme. Neurological soft signs are abnormalities on the neurological exam affecting several functions, such as sensory integration, motor coordination, motor sequencing and presence of primitive reflexes. These signs indicate non-focal brain dysfunction and can be regarded as risk factors for psychiatric disorders. They can also suggest endophenotypes related with specific neural circuits, providing relevant information on the pathofisiology of these disorders. There are only a few studies on this subject in the Brazilian literature. The observation of neurological soft signs points to the potential of the neurological exam to link the neurobiological knowledge and the clinical practice.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid PCR and antibody concentrations against Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in dogs with neurological signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderlund, K H; Bergström, K; Egenvall, A; Hedhammar, A

    2009-01-01

    The tick-borne bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (sl) and Anaplasma phagocytophilum have been suspected to cause neurological signs in dogs. Diagnosis often has been made based on positive antibody titers in serum of dogs with neurological signs, but a high seroprevalence in dogs in at-risk populations makes diagnosis difficult. To determine if the neurological signs in dogs examined were caused by any of these bacteria. Fifty-four dogs presented to a board-certified neurologist. Prospective study. We divided dogs into 2 groups: those with inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and those with neurological signs from other diseases. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from all dogs were analyzed. Dogs with inflammatory CNS diseases showed no serum antibodies against any of the agents. Among dogs with neurological signs from other diseases, 10.3% had serum antibodies for B. burgdorferi sl and 20.5% for A. phagocytophilum. All blood samples analyzed for bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and all CSF analyzed for antibodies and bacterial DNA for the 2 agents were negative. Based on this study, these bacteria are unlikely causes of neurologic disease in dogs and the presence of serum antibodies alone does not document or establish a definitive diagnosis of CNS disease caused by these organisms. Dogs that have neurologic disease and corresponding serum antibodies against these agents should have additional tests performed to assess for other potential etiologies of the signs.

  2. Occurrence of antibodies against Neospora caninum and/or Toxoplasma gondii in dogs with neurological signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plugge, Nicolle Fridlund; Ferreira, Fabiano Montiani; Richartz, Rosária Regina Tesoni de Barros; de Siqueira, Adriana; Dittrich, Rosangela Locatelli

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate occurrences of antibodies against Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in dogs with neurological signs. Blood samples from 147 dogs were collected: 127 from owned dogs (attended at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the Federal University of Paraná (HV-UFPR) and at private veterinary clinics in the city of Curitiba), and 20 from stray dogs found in Curitiba's metropolitan region. The dogs presented one or more of the following neurological signs: seizures, paresis or paralysis, ataxia, behavioral abnormalities, sensory and somatic disorders and chorioretinitis. The samples were analyzed by means of the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), at a cutoff dilution of 1:50. Out of the 147 samples obtained, 17 (11.56%) were seropositive for N. caninum, 31 (21.08%) for T. gondii and four (2.72%) for both protozoa. Serum titration on the positive animals showed that 54.83% (17/31) and 41.18% (7/17) had titers ≥ 1:200 against T. gondii and N. caninum, respectively. A significant difference in seropositivity for T. gondii (P = 0.021; OR = 2.87; CI = 1.1 > 2.8 > 7.4) was observed between owned dogs (18.11%) and stray dogs (40%). Inclusion of serological tests for neosporosis and toxoplasmosis is recommended in diagnosing neurological diseases in dogs.

  3. Neurological symptoms and signs in HTLV-1 patients with overactive bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Tanajura Costa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare neurological symptoms and signs in HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers and HTLV-1 patients with overactive bladder (OB syndrome. METHODS: We studied 102 HTLV-1 positive individuals without HAM/TSP (HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of OB syndrome. Clinical interview, neurological exam and proviral load was performed in all patients. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with OB were more commonly female (84.3 vs. 60.8% of asymptomatics, p=0.01. The prevalence of neurological complaints was higher in OB group, especially hand or foot numbness and arm or leg weakness. There was no difference between the groups in neurological strength and reflexes. Weakness complaint remained strongly associated with OB in multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for sex and age [adjusted odds ratio and 95%CI 3.59 (1.45-8.88 in arms and 6.68 (2.63-16.93 in legs]. Proviral load was also different between the two groups with higher level on OB individuals.

  4. Neurological signs in 23 dogs with suspected rostral cerebellar ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Barbara Blicher; Garosi, Laurent; Skerritt, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    Background: In dogs with ischaemic stroke, a very common site of infarction is the cerebellum. The aim of this study was to characterise neurological signs in relation to infarct topography in dogs with suspected cerebellar ischaemic stroke and to report short-term outcome confined...... to the hospitalisation period. A retrospective multicentre study of dogs with suspected cerebellar ischaemic stroke examined from 2010–2015 at five veterinary referral hospitals was performed. Findings from clinical, neurological, and paraclinical investigations including magnetic resonance imaging were assessed....... Results: Twenty-three dogs, 13 females and 10 males with a median age of 8 years and 8 months, were included in the study. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (n = 9) was a commonly represented breed. All ischaemic strokes were located to the vascular territory of the rostral cerebellar artery including...

  5. An electronic dictionary of Danish Sign Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Compiling sign language dictionaries has in the last 15 years changed from most often being simply collecting and presenting signs for a given gloss in the surrounding vocal language to being a complicated lexicographic task including all parts of linguistic analysis, i.e. phonology, phonetics......, morphology, syntax and semantics. In this presentation we will give a short overview of the Danish Sign Language dictionary project. We will further focus on lemma selection and some of the problems connected with lemmatisation....

  6. 27 CFR 73.32 - May I electronically sign forms I submit electronically to TTB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Filing of Documents with TTB § 73.32 May I electronically sign forms I submit electronically to TTB? You may electronically sign the electronic form you...

  7. Neurological signs and involuntary movements in schizophrenia: intrinsic to and informative on systems pathobiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whitty, Peter F

    2012-02-01

    While it has long been considered whether the pathobiology of schizophrenia extends beyond its defining symptoms to involve diverse domains of abnormality, in the manner of a systemic disease, studies of neuromotor dysfunction have been confounded by treatment with antipsychotic drugs. This challenge has been illuminated by a new generation of studies on first-episode schizophrenia before initiation of antipsychotic treatment and by opportunities in developing countries to study chronically ill patients who have remained antipsychotic naive due to limitations in provision of psychiatric care. Building from studies in antipsychotic-naive patients, this article reviews 2 domains of neuromotor dysfunction in schizophrenia: neurological signs and involuntary movements. The presence and characteristics of neurological signs in untreated vis-a-vis treated psychosis indicate a vulnerability marker for schizophrenia and implicate disruption to neuronal circuits linking the basal ganglia, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. The presence and characteristics of involuntary movements in untreated vis-a-vis treated psychosis indicate an intrinsic feature of the disease process and implicate dysfunction in cortical-basal ganglia-cortical circuitry. These neuromotor disorders of schizophrenia join other markers of subtle but pervasive cerebral and extracerebral, systemic dysfunction, and complement current concepts of schizophrenia as a disorder of developmentally determined cortical-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical\\/cerebellar network disconnectivity.

  8. Soft Neurological Signs in Childhood by Measurement of Arm Movements Using Acceleration and Angular Velocity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft neurological signs (SNS are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm movement in childhood. In this study, we focused on pronation and supination, which are arm movements included in the SNS examination. Two hundred and twenty-three typically developing children aged 4–12 years (107 boys, 116 girls and 18 adults aged 21–26 years (16 males, two females participated in the experiment. To quantify SNS during pronation and supination, we calculated several evaluation index scores: bimanual symmetry, compliance, postural stability, motor speed and mirror movement. These index scores were evaluated using data obtained from sensors attached to the participants’ hands and elbows. Each score increased as age increased. Results obtained using our system showed developmental changes that were consistent with criteria for SNS. We were able to successfully quantify SNS during pronation and supination. These results indicate that it may be possible to use our system as quantitative criteria for evaluating development of neurological function.

  9. A systematic review and meta-analysis of neurological soft signs in relatives of people with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Kishen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurological soft signs are subtle but observable impairments in motor and sensory functions that are not localized to a specific area of the brain. Neurological soft signs are common in schizophrenia. It has been established that soft signs meet two of five criteria for an endophenotype, namely: association with the illness, and state independence. This review investigated whether soft signs met a further criterion for an endophenotype, namely familial association. It was hypothesized that if familial association were present then neurological soft signs would be: (a more common in first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia than in controls; and (b more common in people with schizophrenia than in their first-degree relatives. Method A systematic search identified potentially eligible studies in the EMBASE (1980-2011, OVID - MEDLINE (1950-2011 and PsycINFO (1806-2011 databases. Studies were included if they carried out a three-way comparison of levels of soft signs between people with schizophrenia, their first-degree relatives, and normal controls. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers and cross-checked by double entry. Results After screening 8678 abstracts, seven studies with 1553 participants were identified. Neurological soft signs were significantly more common in first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia than in controls (pooled standardised mean difference (SMD 1.24, 95% confidence interval (c.i 0.59-1.89. Neurological soft signs were also significantly more common in people with schizophrenia than in their first-degree relatives (SMD 0.92, 95% c.i 0.64-1.20. Sensitivity analyses examining the effects of age and group blinding did not significantly alter the main findings. Conclusions Both hypotheses were confirmed, suggesting that the distribution of neurological soft signs in people with schizophrenia and their first-degree relatives is consistent with the endophenotype criterion of

  10. Evaluation of electronic speed limit signs on US 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This study documents the speed : reduction impacts of two dynamic, : electronic school zone speed limit signs : at United Community Schools between : Ames and Boone, Iowa. The school : facility is situated along US Highway 30, : a rural four-lane div...

  11. Do warning signs on electronic gaming machines influence irrational cognitions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Sally; Blaszczynski, Alex; Nower, Lia

    2009-08-01

    Electronic gaming machines are popular among problem gamblers; in response, governments have introduced "responsible gaming" legislation incorporating the mandatory display of warning signs on or near electronic gaming machines. These signs are designed to correct irrational and erroneous beliefs through the provision of accurate information on probabilities of winning and the concept of randomness. There is minimal empirical data evaluating the effectiveness of such signs. In this study, 93 undergraduate students were randomly allocated to standard and informative messages displayed on an electronic gaming machine during play in a laboratory setting. Results revealed that a majority of participants incorrectly estimated gambling odds and reported irrational gambling-related cognitions prior to play. In addition, there were no significant between-group differences, and few participants recalled the content of messages or modified their gambling-related cognitions. Signs placed on electronic gaming machines may not modify irrational beliefs or alter gambling behaviour.

  12. [Adaptation and validation of the neurological soft sign's scale of Krebs et al. to children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halayem, S; Hammami, M; Fakhfakh, R; Gaddour, N; Tabbane, K; Amado, I; Krebs, M-O; Bouden, A

    2017-04-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) include anomalies in motor integration, coordination, sensory integration and lateralization and could be endophenotypic markers in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Their characterization provides a more precise phenotype of ASD and more homogeneous subtypes to facilitate clinical and genetic research. Few scales for NSS have been adapted and validated in children including children with ASD. Our objective was to perform an adaptation to the child of a scale assessing neurological soft signs and a validation study in both general and clinical populations. We have selected the NSS scale of Krebs et al. (2000) already validated in adults. It encompasses 5 dimensions: motor coordination, motor integration, sensory integration, involuntary movement, laterality. After a preliminary study that examined 42 children, several changes have been made to the original version to adapt it to the child and to increase its feasibility, particularly in children with ASD. Then we conducted a validation study by assessing the psychometric properties of this scale in a population of 86 children including 26 children with ASD (DSM 5 Criteria) and 60 typically developing children. Children's ages ranged between 6 and 12 years, and patients and controls were matched for gender, age and intelligence. Patients were assessed using the Autism diagnostic Interview-revised and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale to confirm diagnosis. Typically developing children were assessed using the semi-structured Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents to eliminate any psychiatric disorder. All children with neurological pathologies (history of cerebral palsy, congenital anomaly of the central nervous system, epilepsy, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, antecedent of severe head trauma) and obvious physical deformities or sensory deficits that could interfere with neurological assessment were excluded from the study. Both patients

  13. Clinical Utility and Lifespan Profiling of Neurological Soft Signs in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Raymond C. K.; Xie, Weizhen; Geng, Fu-lei; Wang, Ya; Lui, Simon S. Y.; Wang, Chuan-yue; Yu, Xin; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Rosenthal, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSSs) bear the promise for early detection of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, the sensitivity and specificity of NSSs in the psychosis continuum remains a topic of controversy. It is also unknown how NSSs reveal neurodevelopmental abnormality in schizophrenia. We investigated the effect sizes of NSSs in differentiating individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders from individuals with other psychiatric conditions and from covariate-matched healthy subjects. We also investigated the partitioned age-related variations of NSSs in both schizophrenia and healthy individuals. NSSs were assessed by the abridged version of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 3105 participants, consisting of healthy individuals (n =1577), unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (n = 155), individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (n = 256), schizophrenia patients (n = 738), and other psychiatric patients (n = 379). Exact matching and propensity score matching procedures were performed to control for covariates. Multiple regression was used to partition age-related variations. Individuals along the schizophrenia continuum showed elevated levels of NSSs, with moderate effect sizes, in contrast to other psychiatric patients who had minimal NSSs, as well as matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the age-and-NSS relationship in schizophrenia patients was represented by a flat but overall elevated pattern, in contrast to a U-shaped pattern in healthy individuals. In sum, NSSs capture a moderate portion of psychosis proneness with reasonable specificity. Lifespan profiling reveals an abnormal developmental trajectory of NSSs in schizophrenia patients, which supports the endophenotype hypothesis of NSSs by associating it with the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. PMID:26712863

  14. Neurological soft signs: Effects of trait schizotypy, psychological distress and auditory hallucination predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia de Leede-Smith

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizotypy is regarded as a trait vulnerability for psychotic disorders, yet alone is insufficient for development of a diagnosable disorder. Additional symptoms and psychological distress are necessary for help seeking and transition from an at risk mental state to a clinical diagnosis. The present study investigated the interaction between trait schizotypy, state auditory verbal hallucination (AVH predisposition, distress and handedness for the expression of neurological soft signs (NSS, a neurodevelopmental vulnerability factor for psychosis. Cluster analysis formed schizotypy groups statistically across the dimensions captured by the SPQ. It was hypothesized that schizotypy and AVH predisposition would interact, resulting in significantly greater NSS. Psychological distress and handedness were hypothesized to be significant covariates, accounting for some variance in the expression of NSS between the groups. A sample of University students (n = 327 completed the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire, Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale, General Health Questionnaire and the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES. Cluster Analysis revealed four schizotypy groups. Distress was not a significant covariate in any analysis. As expected, those with high overall schizotypy and high AVH predisposition expressed significantly greater Motor-Coordination NSS compared to those with high schizotypy and low AVH predisposition. Within the Mixed Interpersonal and Cognitive-Perceptual Schizotypy cluster, those with low AVH predisposition expressed significantly more Motor-Coordination NSS than those with high AVH predisposition. These findings suggest motor coordination NSS are detectable in schizotypy, and AVH predisposition appears to interact with these traits. This study highlights the importance of considering both trait and subclinical state risk factors when investigating risk for psychosis.

  15. Neuroanatomical Markers of Neurological Soft Signs in Recent-Onset Schizophrenia and Asperger-Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirjak, Dusan; Wolf, Robert C; Paternoga, Isa; Kubera, Katharina M; Thomann, Anne K; Stieltjes, Bram; Maier-Hein, Klaus H; Thomann, Philipp A

    2016-05-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are frequently found in psychiatric disorders of significant neurodevelopmental origin. Previous MRI studies in schizophrenia have shown that NSS are associated with abnormal cortical, thalamic and cerebellar structure and function. So far, however, no neuroimaging studies investigated brain correlates of NSS in individuals with Asperger-Syndrome (AS) and the question whether the two disorders exhibit common or disease-specific cortical correlates of NSS remains unresolved. High-resolution MRI data at 3 T were obtained from 48 demographically matched individuals (16 schizophrenia patients, 16 subjects with AS and 16 healthy individuals). The surface-based analysis via Freesurfer enabled calculation of cortical thickness, area and folding (local gyrification index, LGI). NSS were examined on the Heidelberg Scale and related to cortical measures. In schizophrenia, higher NSS were associated with reduced cortical thickness and LGI in fronto-temporo-parietal brain areas. In AS, higher NSS were associated with increased frontotemporal cortical thickness. This study lends further support to the hypothesis that disorder-specific mechanisms contribute to NSS expression in schizophrenia and AS. Pointing towards dissociable neural patterns may help deconstruct the complex processes underlying NSS in these neurodevelopmental disorders.

  16. Leg pain location and neurological signs relate to outcomes in primary care patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Hestbæk, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    Background Low back pain (LBP) patients with related leg pain and signs of nerve root involvement are considered to have a worse prognosis than patients with LBP alone. However, it is unclear whether leg pain location above or below the knee and the presence of neurological signs are important...... in primary care patients. The objectives of this study were to explore whether the four Quebec Task Force categories (QTFC) based on the location of pain and on neurological signs have different characteristics at the time of care seeking, whether these QTFC are associated with outcome, and if so whether......, across LBP with leg pain above the knee and below the knee to LBP with nerve root involvement. However, the variation within the categories was considerable. Conclusion The QTFC identify different LBP subgroups at baseline and there is a consistent ranking of the four categories with respect to outcomes...

  17. Leg pain location and neurological signs relate to outcomes in primary care patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Hestbæk, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) patients with related leg pain and signs of nerve root involvement are considered to have a worse prognosis than patients with LBP alone. However, it is unclear whether leg pain location above or below the knee and the presence of neurological signs are important...... in primary care patients. The objectives of this study were to explore whether the four Quebec Task Force categories (QTFC) based on the location of pain and on neurological signs have different characteristics at the time of care seeking, whether these QTFC are associated with outcome, and if so whether......, across LBP with leg pain above the knee and below the knee to LBP with nerve root involvement. However, the variation within the categories was considerable. CONCLUSION: The QTFC identify different LBP subgroups at baseline and there is a consistent ranking of the four categories with respect to outcomes...

  18. Electronic traffic signs: The interplay between hybrid and full matrix e-signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas-Alba, A.; Hernando Mazon, A.; Blanch Mico, A.M.; Gutierrez Perez, D.; Echeverria Villaspi, J.I.; Landa Tejero-Garces, N.

    2016-07-01

    Road signs constitute a complex and growing communication system where different elements (pictograms, shapes, texts, etc.) are combined following different strategies. In this paper we have confronted drivers with a number of messages (congestion or road works, before, between, after location/s) developed as an adaptation of Advance Location Signs (class G, 1c in the 1968 Convention) to electronic displays. We manipulate two main factors a) the reading strategy (top-down vs. bottom-up) and the type of matrix display (hybrid, dissociating pictogram and text, vs. full matrix), in a repeated measures experimental design. The time taken to answer and the response given (correct, incorrect) was measured for each of the 24 message-blocks. Results show that the organization of the elements displayed is a key determinant for driver comprehension. Further thoughts on the need to understand the interplay between the formats adopted by static vs electronic message signs are provided. (Author)

  19. Is Further Examination Necessary in Patients with Behcets Disease Without Any Neurological Signs or Symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit YAsAR

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Visually evoked potential examination may be used as a conductive method to detect the subclinical neurological pathologies in Behcets disease. The possible silent neurological involvement should be evaluated with further neuro-screening methods. [Dis Mol Med 2015; 3(3.000: 29-34

  20. Evaluation of a wireless, portable, wearable multi-parameter vital signs monitor in hospitalized neurological and neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Robert S; Foard, Kristina L; Harwood, Timothy N

    2017-12-06

    Unrecognized changes in patients' vital signs can result in preventable deaths in hospitalized patients. Few publications or studies instituting routine patient monitoring have described implementation and the setting of alarm parameters for vital signs. We wanted to determine if continuous multi-parameter patient monitoring can be accomplished with an alarm rate that is acceptable to hospital floor nurses and to compare the rate of patient deterioration events to those observed with routine vital sign monitoring. We conducted a prospective, observational, 5-month pilot study in a 26-bed adult, neurological/neurosurgical unit (non-ICU) in an academic medical center. A patient surveillance system employing a wireless body-worn vital signs monitor with automated nursing notification of alarms via smartphones was used to gather data. Data collected included: alarm rates, rapid response team (RRT) calls, intensive care unit (ICU) transfers, and unplanned deaths before and during the pilot study. Average alarm rate for all alarms (SpO2, HR, RR, NIBP) was 2.3 alarms/patient/day. The RRT call rate was significantly reduced (p monitoring can be customized to reduce a high alarm rates, and may reduce rapid response team calls.

  1. An exploratory study of the relationship between neurological soft signs and theory of mind deficits in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Stefano; Chiandetti, Alessio; Siracusano, Alberto; Troisi, Alfonso

    2014-08-15

    Indirect evidence suggests partially common pathogenetic mechanisms for Neurological Soft Signs (NSS), neurocognition, and social cognition in schizophrenia. However, the possible association between NSS and mentalizing impairments has not yet been examined. In the present study, we assessed the ability to attribute mental states to others in patients with schizophrenia and predicted that the presence of theory of mind deficits would be significantly related to NSS. Participants were 90 clinically stable patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia. NSS were assessed using the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES). Theory of mind deficits were assessed using short verbal stories designed to measure false belief understanding. The findings of the study confirmed our hypothesis. Impaired sequencing of complex motor acts was the only neurological abnormality correlated with theory of mind deficits. By contrast, sensory integration, motor coordination and the NES Others subscale had no association with patients׳ ability to pass first- or second-order false belief tasks. If confirmed by future studies, the current findings provide the first preliminary evidence for the claim that specific NSS and theory of mind deficits may reflect overlapping neural substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Indicators of the spontaneous B-lymphocytes proliferation in diagnostics of neurological signs of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzaliev, A M; Mamasaidov, A T; Toktomushev, Ch T; Iusupov, F A; Groshev, S A

    2009-01-01

    An aim of the paper was to study indicators of the spontaneous B-lymphocytes proliferation activity (SBLPA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and lesions of the nervous system. Fifty-eight patients with neurological symptoms of RA were studied. A comparison group included 42 patients with RA without lesions of the nervous system. A control group consisted of 30 healthy people. The investigation of SBLP was conducted using a method of R. Rigler in the modification of E.V. Benenson et al. Significant between-group differences allow to conclude that indicators of SBLP can be used for diagnostics of nervous system lesions in RA.

  3. Clinical, neurological and clinicopathological signs, treatment and outcome of metaldehyde intoxication in 18 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yas-Natan, E; Segev, G; Aroch, I

    2007-08-01

    To describe the clinical signs, clinicopathological abnormalities and outcome of metaldehyde intoxication in dogs. Medical records of dogs presenting between 1989 and 2005 with a diagnosis of metaldehyde toxicity were reviewed retrospectively. Data obtained from the medical record included signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory tests results, hospitalisation period length, treatments and outcome. Eighteen dogs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The most prevalent clinical signs were seizures, hyperthermia, tachycardia and muscle tremors. Serum biochemistry abnormalities included increased serum muscle enzymes activities, acidaemia (six dogs) and decreased blood bicarbonate (eight dogs). Treatment was symptomatic and supportive. Hyperbilirubinaemia was observed in two dogs. Diazepam was the most commonly used anticonvulsant followed by phenobarbitone and pentobarbital. General inhalant anaesthesia was required in nine of 18 dogs with seizures unresponsive to anticonvulsants. The survival was 83 per cent (15 of 18 dogs). This clinical study recorded, for the first time in the veterinary literature, several clinicopathological abnormalities from severely intoxicated dogs. Metabolic acidosis was common, while acute or delayed hepatotoxicity was an uncommon complication.

  4. Headache and focal neurologic signs following exposure to spicy aroma as an initial presentation of moyamoya disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal A. Siddiqui, A.B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a condition of the cerebrovascular system that involves stenosis of the intracranial internal carotid arteries as well as their proximal branches, often leading to stroke in affected patients. Here we describe the case of a patient with headache and focal neurologic signs following exposure to a spicy aroma, who initially had a negative vascular work-up and a preliminary diagnosis of a complex migraine syndrome. She subsequently developed infarction of the left frontal lobe, and imaging studies revealed the diagnosis of moyamoya disease. She was treated with an encephalodurosynangiosis procedure, with notable improvement. This case highlights the importance of considering moyamoya disease in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with headaches with aura.

  5. Neurological soft signs, dissociation and alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapancı, Zafer; Yıldırım, Abdullah; Boysan, Murat

    2017-11-21

    A body of evidence has supported that patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have increased rates of various neurological soft signs (NSS) compared to controls. Various lines of research has documented robust relationships between OCD and dissociative symptomatology. The study aimed to examine the associations between obsessive-compulsive symptoms, dissociative experiences alexithymia, and NSS. The study included thirty OCD patients and thirty healthy controls, matched for age, marital status, education, and income. The Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES), Padua Inventory-Revised (PI-R), Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) were administered. In comparison to healthy controls, patients with OCD had difficulty sequencing for complex motor acts and greater absorption/ imaginative involvement. Using latent class analysis, the study sample was classified into two homogenous subsets as mild NSS (n = 45) and severe NSS (n = 15). Majority of the participants who were grouped into severe NSS latent class were OCD patient (n = 14, 93.3%). Furthermore, those with severe NSS reported greater levels of alexithymia and more severe obsessive-compulsive symptoms, particularly precision. We concluded that relationships between OCD severity and NSS appear to be of crucial importance. Our data along with accumulated evidence suggest that OCD associated with pronounced NSS may represent a specific subtype of the disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural Correlates of Neurological Signs in Huntington’s Disease: A Quantitative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Loh

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a genetically transmitted disorder associated with atrophy of the basal ganglia. Studies of the neuroanatomical correlates of HD have focused primarily on the anterior areas of the basal ganglia and on establishing an association between structural changes resulting from the presence and course of the illness. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of measurements of the third ventrical and lentiform regions. Computed tomographic (CT brain scan measures of the basal ganglia of patients in the “early” and “late” stages of the disease were correlated with scores on a quantified neurological examination (QNE and compared with scans of age-matched control groups. Basal ganglia atrophy was assessed by two conventional “anterior” measures: the maximal distance between the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles (FH and the minimum distance between the caudate nuclei (CC, and two measures of more “posterior” regions: the width of the third ventricle (3V, and a measure of the lentiform regions (LENTI. In the group of patients with HD, CT scan measures were strongly correlated with disease duration. Further, in the “late” group, all CT measures were significantly correlated with QNE scores, with the two “posterior” measures being equally, if not more strongly correlated with QNE scores than the conventional “anterior” measures. Separate correlations of the CT indices of atrophy and QNE scores in the “early” and “late” HD groups revealed relationships between basal ganglia atrophy and motor abnormality consistent with earlier reports.

  7. Prototheca zopfii genotype 2 disseminated infection in a dog with neurological signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Sonne

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Prototheca zopfii is an alga that can cause disease in animals and humans. Here, we reported a case of systemic protothecosis in a 2-year-old female Boxer. The animal exhibited tetraparesis and vertical nystagmus. It died two weeks after the onset of clinical signs and was necropsied. At gross examination, whitish areas were identified in the heart. Oval or round structures were observed by microscopic examination, some of which formed morula-like structures compatible with algae in the heart, skeletal muscle, and brain. Growth of Prototheca sp. was observed in the heart after culture at 37°C on Sabouraud agar medium with chloramphenicol. Immunohistochemical analysis of the heart and brain using an anti-Prototheca zopfii polyclonal antibody yielded positive results. Genotyping of the cultured agent from brain and heart samples was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism of a specific 18S rDNA fragment. P. zopfii genotype 2 was reported to be the cause of disseminated protothecosis in this dog with manifestation in the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle.

  8. Sudden onset of cauda equina syndrome resulting from posterior migration of lumbar herniated disc without significant previous neurological signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jeong-Hyuk; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Chul-Ku; Ha, Ho-Gyun

    2012-09-01

    While extruded disc fragments are known to migrate anteriorly, posteriorly, or laterally to the theca sac, posterior migration of the fragments is relatively rare and sudden onset of cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by the migration is extremely rare. The authors experienced a case of CES that was manifested abruptly with sudden paraplegia caused by posterior migration of the lumbar intervertebral disc. A 74-year old man, who had no prior significant neurologic signs or trauma history, visited our emergency center with paraplegia of both lower extremities occurring suddenly when awakened. On magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings, we could detect ruptured disc herniation with severe lumbar stenosis at the L2-3 level. We performed an emergent decompression, and the right posterior migrated disc fragments at L2-3 were intraoperatively observed. The patient was fully recovered himself on the follow up after 3 months of the operation. In conclusion, early operation can result in better outcome in acute paraplegia caused by the posterior migrated disc fragments.

  9. Could cadmium be responsible for some of the neurological signs and symptoms of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Fiore, Maria G; Magherini, Stefano; Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2012-09-01

    According to the World Health Organization, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a neurological disease characterized by widespread inflammation and multi-systemic neuropathology. Aetiology and pathogenesis are unknown, and several agents have been proposed as causative agents or as factors perpetuating the syndrome. Exposure to heavy metals, with particular reference to mercury and gold in dental amalgams, has been considered among the triggers of ME/CFS. Here we hypothesize that cadmium, a widespread occupational and environmental heavy metal pollutant, might be associated with some of the neurological findings described in ME/CFS. In fact, ME/CFS patients show a decrease of the volume of the gray matter in turn associated with objective reduction of physical activity. Cadmium induces neuronal death in cortical neurons through a combined mechanism of apoptosis and necrosis and it could then be hypothesized that cadmium-induced neuronal cell death is responsible for some of the effects of cadmium on the central nervous system, i.e. a decrease in attention level and memory in exposed humans as well as to a diminished ability for training and learning in rats, that are symptoms typical of ME/CFS. This hypothesis can be tested by measuring cadmium exposure in a cohort of ME/CFS patients compared with matched healthy controls, and by measuring gray matter volume in un-exposed healthy controls, exposed non-ME/CFS subjects, un-exposed ME/CFS patients and exposed ME/CFS patients. In addition, we hypothesize that cadmium exposure could be associated with reduced cerebral blood flow in ME/CFS patients because of the disruptive effects of cadmium on angiogenesis. In fact, cadmium inhibits angiogenesis and low global cerebral flow is associated with abnormal brain neuroimaging results and brain dysfunction in the form of reduced cognitive testing scores in ME/CFS patients. This hypothesis can be tested by measuring cerebral cortex blood flow in un

  10. Prevalence factors associated with equine herpesvirus type 1 infection in equids with upper respiratory tract infection and/or acute onset of neurological signs from 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, N; Mapes, S; Akana, N; Barnett, C; MacKenzie, C; Gaughan, E; Craig, B; Chappell, D; Vaala, W

    2016-01-16

    The objective of the present case-control study was to determine prevalence factors associated with the detection of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in horses presented to veterinarians with clinical signs related to an upper respiratory tract infection and/or acute onset of neurological disease from March 2008 to December 2014. Nasal secretions and whole blood from 4228 equids with acute onset of fever, respiratory signs and/or neurological deficits were tested by qPCR for EHV-1. Categorical analyses were performed to determine the association between observations and EHV-1. A total of 117/4228 (2.7 per cent) equids tested qPCR-positive for EHV-1, with most of the isolates belonging to the non-neuropathogenic genotype (N752). EHV-1 PCR-positive equids were over-represented in racing horses. Depression, anorexia, nasal discharge and coughing were significantly less frequently reported in the EHV-1 qPCR-positive equids compared with the EHV-1 qPCR-negative cases. Neurological deficits were more frequently reported in the EHV-1 qPCR-positive cases. This study provides contemporary information on the frequency of EHV-1 detection by qPCR in blood and nasal secretions from horses with fever, respiratory signs and neurological deficits. British Veterinary Association.

  11. Neurological soft signs in aging, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer´s disease – the impact of cognitive decline and cognitive reserve

    OpenAIRE

    Nadja eUrbanowitsch; Christina eDegen; Pablo eToro; Johannes eSchröder

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Neurological soft signs (NSS), i.e. minor motor and sensory changes, are a common feature in severe psychiatric disorders. We sought to establish the frequency of NSS in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) on basis of a large population based sample and to identify their neuropsychological correlates including cognitive reserve.Methods: NSS were examined using an abbreviated version of the Heidelberg NSS Scale in 221 old participants born bet...

  12. A retrospective evaluation of species-specific sensitivity for neurological signs in toxicological studies: Is the dog more sensitive than the non-human primate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Kathrin; Lorenz, Helga; Laplanche, Loic; Hudzik, Thomas J; Potschka, Heidrun; Hempel, Katja

    2016-01-22

    Selection of the appropriate non-rodent species in preclinical programs is crucial for good translatability and human safety. There is no data available in the literature which provides exact comparison of dog and non-human primate (NHP) sensitivity regarding neurological signs in toxicological studies. We performed a retrospective analysis of 174 toxicity studies with 15 neuroscience substances. Neurological signs in dogs and NHPs were evaluated in correlation to exposure data. Overall incidence of substance induced convulsions was similar in both species and no gender differences were observed. The reported liability of beagles to spontaneous convulsions was not confirmed in our studies. The symptom tremor showed the best inter-species translatability. The current toxicological study design does not include exposure assessment at the time-point of neurological signs, therefore, we propose to include additional toxicokinetic samples. Our analysis revealed factors including housing, handling, and behavior, which prevents direct species comparison. In addition only one non-rodent species is routinely tested in development programs, therefore data for both species is rare. We however, had sufficient data which enabled comparison for one compound. In the spirit of 3Rs further examples should be evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effects of Electronic Communication on American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erin; Kozak, L. Viola; Santiago, Roberto; Stephen, Anika

    2012-01-01

    Technological and language innovation often flow in concert with one another. Casual observation by researchers has shown that electronic communication memes, in the form of abbreviations, have found their way into spoken English. This study focuses on the current use of electronic modes of communication, such as cell smartphones, and e-mail, and…

  14. Long-range interactions and the sign of natural amplitudes in two-electron systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbertz, K.J.H.; Van Leeuwen, R.

    In singlet two-electron systems, the natural occupation numbers of the one-particle reduced density matrix are given as squares of the natural amplitudes which are defined as the expansion coefficients of the two-electron wave function in a natural orbital basis. In this work, we relate the sign of

  15. Exploring Vital Sign Data Quality in Electronic Health Records with Focus on Emergency Care Warning Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyttberg, Niclas; Chen, Rong; Blomqvist, Hans; Koch, Sabine

    2017-08-30

    Computerized clinical decision support and automation of warnings have been advocated to assist clinicians in detecting patients at risk of physiological instability. To provide reliable support such systems are dependent on high-quality vital sign data. Data quality depends on how, when and why the data is captured and/or documented. This study aims to describe the effects on data quality of vital signs by three different types of documentation practices in five Swedish emergency hospitals, and to assess data fitness for calculating warning and triage scores. The study also provides reference data on triage vital signs in Swedish emergency care. We extracted a dataset including vital signs, demographic and administrative data from emergency care visits (n=335027) at five Swedish emergency hospitals during 2013 using either completely paper-based, completely electronic or mixed documentation practices. Descriptive statistics were used to assess fitness for use in emergency care decision support systems aiming to calculate warning and triage scores, and data quality was described in three categories: currency, completeness and correctness. To estimate correctness, two further categories - plausibility and concordance - were used. The study showed an acceptable correctness of the registered vital signs irrespectively of the type of documentation practice. Completeness was high in sites where registrations were routinely entered into the Electronic Health Record (EHR). The currency was only acceptable in sites with a completely electronic documentation practice. Although vital signs that were recorded in completely electronic documentation practices showed plausible results regarding correctness, completeness and currency, the study concludes that vital signs documented in Swedish emergency care EHRs cannot generally be considered fit for use for calculation of triage and warning scores. Low completeness and currency were found if the documentation was not completely

  16. ‘Smoke in the air’: a rare cerebrovascular cause of neurological signs and symptoms in a young adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Ismail

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a rare neurological condition that affects children and adults of all ages. It is characterized by chronic, progressive stenosis of the circle of Willis that ultimately leads to the development of extensive collateral vessels. Presenting symptoms are usually due to cerebral ischemia or hemorrhage. The Japanese term moyamoya (meaning puffy or obscure was coined to describe the characteristic ‘smoke in the air’ appearance of these vessels on cerebral angiography. Moyamoya has the highest recorded incidence in Japan (0.28 per 100,000. In the west it is an extremely rare condition with an overall incidence of (0.086 per 100,000 in the Western United States. Etiology for the most part is unknown; however, genetic susceptibility related to RNF213 gene on chromosome 17q25.3 has been suggested. Moyamoya is being diagnosed more frequently in all races with varying clinical manifestations. Moyamoya disease is a rare progressive neurologic condition characterized by occlusion of the cerebral circulation with extensive collaterals recruitment in children and adults. Distinguished radiological findings confirm the diagnosis. Early recognition and swift institution of therapy is vital in order to minimize neurological deficits. We present the case of a 19-year-old African American female who presented with left-sided parastheia, weakness, and headache for 2 days duration.

  17. Treatment resistant schizophrenia and neurological soft signs may converge on the same pathology: Evidence from explanatory analysis on clinical, psychopathological, and cognitive variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Prinzivalli, Emiliano; Callovini, Gemma; D'Ambrosio, Luigi; Altavilla, Benedetta; Avagliano, Camilla; Iasevoli, Felice

    2018-02-02

    Here, we investigated neurological soft signs (NSSs) in treatment resistant schizophrenia (TRS) vs treatment responder schizophrenia (SZ) patients. TRS is a severe condition, affecting approximately one-third of schizophrenia patients and representing a relevant clinical challenge. NSSs are neurological abnormalities reportedly described in schizophrenia patients and linked to dysregulated network connections. We explored the possibility that NSSs may be: i) more severe in TRS patients; ii) differentially associated to clinical/cognitive variables in TRS vs SZ; iii) predictive of having TRS. In addition, we evaluated whether diagnosis may mediate NSSs associations with the above-mentioned variables. Consecutive patients with schizophrenia diagnosis underwent stringent assessment for TRS diagnosis. Demographics and clinical variables were recorded. Psychopathology (by Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, PANSS), cognitive performances, and NSSs (by Neurological Evaluation Scale, NES) were tested. TRS had higher scores than SZ patients in total NES score and in almost all NES subscales, even after correction for duration of illness and antipsychotic dose (ANCOVA, pvariables (above all: duration of disease and negative symptoms) in TRS but not in SZ patients. Two-way ANOVA showed NSS-x-diagnosis interaction in determining outcomes on multiple cognitive performances, but not in other clinical variables. However, simple main effect analysis detected a significant relationship between high severity NSSs and TRS diagnosis on multiple clinical and cognitive outcomes. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that diagnosis was among a discrete number of predictors yielding significant increases in variance explained on NES total, Sensory Integration and Other Signs subscales' scores. NSSs, together with antipsychotic dose and disease severity, were found to be significantly predictive of TRS diagnosis in a binary logistic regression model. These results suggest a stringent

  18. Correlations between neurological signs and brain MR images of patients in consecutive stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulczycki, J.; Kryst-Widzgowska, T.; Sobczyk, W.; Bochynska, A.; Pilkowska, E.; Milewska, D. [Pracownia Rezonansu Magnetycznego, Inst. Psychiatrii i Neurologii, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Correlations between neurological symptoms and brain MRI changes during the course of SSPE in 10 patients were studied. Visual agnosia and mental regression - very frequent symptoms at the early stages of the disease were caused by nearly symmetrical, focal involvement of the occipital and frontal white matter in all cases. Pyramidal and extrapyramidal disturbances reflected rather diffuse lesions of both cerebral hemispheres in late second stage of the illness. In cases with clinical improvement the brain changes disclosed an entire stability, but not diminishing intensity. (author) 9 refs, 8 figs, 3 tabs

  19. Experimental infection by Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 2 induces brain lesions and neurological signs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, H. K.; Ohtani, M.; Nowak, B.

    2018-01-01

    was then monitored for 22 days post-infection (dpi). Organs were sampled at 3 dpi and also from moribund fish showing signs of severe systemic infection such as bleeding, exophthalmia or erratic swimming behaviour. Y. ruckeri was observed in the meninges and diencephalon of the brain, and lamina propria of olfactory...... organ at 3 dpi. At 12 dpi, Y. ruckeri had spread throughout the brain including cranial connective tissues and ventricles and the infection was associated with haemorrhages and an infiltration with leucocytes. Y. ruckeri infection and associated with leucocyte infiltration were observed at 13 dpi...

  20. Experimental infection by Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 2 induces brain lesions and neurological signs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm, H K; Ohtani, M; Nowak, B; Boutrup, T S; Jones, B; Raida, M K; Bojesen, A M

    2017-11-17

    Pathological manifestations in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following experimental waterborne infection with Yersinia ruckeri serotype O1 biotype 2 (strain 07111224) were investigated. Rainbow trout were exposed to 8 × 107  CFU/ml of Y. ruckeri by bath for 6 hr, and mortality was then monitored for 22 days post-infection (dpi). Organs were sampled at 3 dpi and also from moribund fish showing signs of severe systemic infection such as bleeding, exophthalmia or erratic swimming behaviour. Y. ruckeri was observed in the meninges and diencephalon of the brain, and lamina propria of olfactory organ at 3 dpi. At 12 dpi, Y. ruckeri had spread throughout the brain including cranial connective tissues and ventricles and the infection was associated with haemorrhages and an infiltration with leucocytes. Y. ruckeri infection and associated with leucocyte infiltration were observed at 13 dpi. In conclusion, Y. ruckeri strain 07111224 causes encephalitis in the acute phase of infection, which could explain why Y. ruckeri-affected fish show exophthalmia and erratic swimming known as signs of ERM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Histo- and immunopathological features of terminal AIDS. An autopsy case of a Japanese man with neurological signs as initial symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyayama, H; Takeya, M; Takahashi, K; Koito, A; Hattori, T; Takatsuki, K

    1988-10-01

    An autopsy case of a 37-year-old Japanese man, confirmed as an AIDS patient infected by an undetermined route of transmission, is presented. The initial symptoms of full-blown AIDS in this case were neurological, and the patient died of severe pneumonia 9 months after onset. The main histo- and immunopathological features were a marked depletion of helper-inducer T cells and dendritic reticulum cells in the lymphoid tissues, opportunistic infections, and some neuropathologic changes. Very few cells, possibly macrophages, immunoreactive with a monoclonal antibody (VAK-5) against HIV-gag protein P24 were found in the mediastinal lymph nodes. Numerous pathogens had induced opportunistic infections in many organs: severe and generalized cytomegalovirus infection, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, bronchopneumonia (possibly due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa), candidiasis in the tongue and oral cavity, and atypical mycobacteriosis in the pulmonic hilar lymph nodes. Vascular proliferation was found in the perinodal regions of some lymph nodes, but this was not neoplastic vascular proliferation compatible with that of localized Kaposi's sarcoma.

  2. Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials in Great Danes with and without clinical signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy: association with neurological findings and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Vaquero, P; da Costa, R C

    2014-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (TMMEPs) assess the functional integrity of the descending motor pathways, which are typically compromised in canine cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). The objective of this prospective study was to establish the reference ranges of TMMEP latency and amplitude in clinically normal (control) Great Danes (GDs), compare TMMEPs obtained in GDs with and without CSM, and determine whether there is any association between TMMEP data and severity of neurological signs or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Twenty-nine client-owned GDs were enrolled (15 controls, 14 CSM-affected). All dogs underwent TMMEPs under sedation, and latencies and amplitudes were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and cranial tibial (CT) muscles. MRI of the cervical vertebral column was performed to evaluate the presence and severity of spinal cord (SC) compression, and the presence of SC signal changes. ECR and CT latencies were significantly longer in CSM-affected than control GDs. No significant differences between groups were found for amplitudes or neuronal path lengths. For the CT TMMEPs, CSM-affected GDs with moderate and severe clinical signs had significantly longer latencies than those with mild clinical signs. Significantly longer CT latencies were found in dogs with moderate and severe SC compression compared with dogs with mild compression. CT TMMEPs could not be recorded in 7/9 CSM-affected GDs with SC signal changes. These results provide a reference range for TMMEPs of clinically normal GDs. The use of TMMEPs is a valid ancillary test to assess the integrity of motor pathways in GDs with CSM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The development of optimal on-premise Electronic Message Center (EMC) lighting levels and sign lighting measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Research conducted recently for the United States Sign Council Foundation found no consensus in the research : literature or the practices of the commercial electronic message center (EMC) industry on lighting measurement : or appropriate lighting le...

  4. Neurological soft signs in aging, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer´s disease – the impact of cognitive decline and cognitive reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja eUrbanowitsch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Neurological soft signs (NSS, i.e. minor motor and sensory changes, are a common feature in severe psychiatric disorders. We sought to establish the frequency of NSS in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD on basis of a large population based sample and to identify their neuropsychological correlates including cognitive reserve.Methods: NSS were examined using an abbreviated version of the Heidelberg NSS Scale in 221 old participants born between 1930 and 1932 (63 with MCI, 15 with AD, 143 healthy old controls and 256 healthy young participants (born between 1950 and 1952 of the population-based Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ILSE. Subjects received thorough neuropsychological testing; years of school education were used as a proxy for cognitive reserve.Results: NSS scores were significantly (p<0.001 higher in the AD patients (5.6±3.11 than in the healthy old controls (2.8±1.90 and in the MCI patients (3.0±1.96. This result was confirmed after years of school education which were inversely correlated (r = - 0.25; p<0.001 with NSS were entered as a covariate. In the patients but not in the controls, NSS were significantly correlated with deficits in executive functioning and visuospatial functioning. Comparison of NSS scores between old (2.84 ± 1.9 and young (2.46 ± 1.97 controls yielded only minor, non-significant differences after education (13.86 ± 3.0 vs. 14.61 ± 2.48 years, respectively was controlled for.Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that NSS are frequently found in mild AD but not in MCI. NSS refer to frontal-executive deficits and visuospatial dysfunction rather than age per se and can be partly compensated for by cognitive reserve.

  5. Electronic medical archives: a different approach to applying re-signing mechanisms to digital signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzer-Long; Lin, Frank Y S

    2011-08-01

    Electronic medical records can be defined as a digital format of the traditionally paper-based anamneses, which contains the history of a patient such as his somewhat illness, current health problems, and his chronic treatments. An electronic anamnesis is meant to make the patient's health information more conveniently accessible and transferable between different medical institutions and also easier to be kept quite a long time. Because of such transferability and accessibility of electronic anamneses, we can use less resource than before on storing the patients' medical information. This also means that medical care providers could save more funds on record-keeping and access a patient's medical background directly since shown on the computer screen more quickly and easily. Overall, the service quality has seemingly improved greatly. However, the usage of electronic anamneses involves in some concerned issues such as its related law declaration, and the security of the patient's confidential information. Because of these concerns, a secure medical networking scheme is taking into consideration. Nowadays, the administrators at the medical institutions are facing more challenges on monitoring computers and network systems, because of dramatic advances in this field. For instance, a trusted third party is authorized to access some medical records for a certain period of time. In regard to the security purpose, all the electronic medical records are embedded with both of the public-key infrastructure (PKI) cryptography and the digital signature technique so as to ensure the records well-protected. Since the signatures will be invalid due to the revocation or time expiration, the security of records under this premise would turn into vulnerable. Hence, we propose a re-signing scheme, whose purpose is to make a going-expired digital signature been resigned in time, in keeping with the premise of not conflicting with the laws, morals, and privacy while maintaining the

  6. Vital signs in intensive care: automatic acquisition and consolidation into electronic patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Telmo; Ribeiro, Cristina; Granja, Cristina

    2009-02-01

    The integration of computer systems into clinical practice is a consequence of the growing sophistication of medical machinery. The fact that patient management in large institutions is handled by complex information systems brings about the need for integration between applications on both sides. The paper describes a prototype for automatic data collection from intensive care devices developed at Pedro Hispano Hospital in Portugal. The system acts as an application gateway between the network of patient monitoring devices and the general-purpose hospital network. The conformance to medical standards is one of the main concerns. The international standard Health Level 7 (HL7) has been adopted to import vital signs, as well as to prepare data for visualization in departmental applications and to organize archives. The design has followed the administrative and clinical processes in the hospital closely, leading to a successful interaction with the health professionals. Automatic acquisition eliminates transcription errors, improves the quality of records and allows the assembly of large electronic archives of vital sign data. The concern with data archiving in standard formats opens many possibilities for further analysis of the collected data sets. The possibility of communicating via the HL7 standard makes the whole system easily interoperable with applications in related domains.

  7. Impact of electronic medical record integration of a handoff tool on sign-out in a newborn intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, J P; Sharek, P J; Longhurst, C A

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of integrating a handoff tool into the electronic medical record (EMR) on sign-out accuracy, satisfaction and workflow in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Prospective surveys of neonatal care providers in an academic children's hospital 1 month before and 6 months following EMR integration of a standalone Microsoft Access neonatal handoff tool. Providers perceived sign-out information to be somewhat or very accurate at a rate of 78% with the standalone handoff tool and 91% with the EMR-integrated tool (P < 0.01). Before integration of neonatal sign-out into the EMR, 35% of providers were satisfied with the process of updating sign-out information and 71% were satisfied with the printed sign-out document; following EMR integration, 92% of providers were satisfied with the process of updating sign-out information (P < 0.01) and 98% were satisfied with the printed sign-out document (P<0.01). Neonatal care providers reported spending a median of 11 to 15 min/day updating the standalone sign-out and 16 to 20 min/day updating the EMR-integrated sign-out (P = 0.026). The median percentage of total sign-out preparation time dedicated to transcribing information from the EMR was 25 to 49% before and <25% after EMR integration of the handoff tool (P < 0.01). Integration of a NICU-specific handoff tool into an EMR resulted in improvements in perceived sign-out accuracy, provider satisfaction and at least one aspect of workflow.

  8. [Correlation of clinico-neurological peculiarities and morphological signs of small hernias (protrusion) of the lumbar intervertebral discs in formation of discogenic pain syndromes in patients of different age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khizhniak, M V; Makeeva, T I; Priĭmak, I V

    2014-01-01

    Morphological signs of small hernias (protrusion) of intervertebral discs (IVD), the results of a neurovisualizing methods of investigation and clinico-neurological features of osteochondrosis as well, were summarized. In young and middle age patients morphological chatacteristics of small hernias (protrusion) of IVD, data of neurovisualizing methods of investigation have had correlated with clinico-neurological features of the disease and were the key determinants while performance of the puncture laser microdiscectomy. In a middle age and elderly patients a weak correlation was noted between the IVD protrusion dimensions and intensity of a lumbar and radicular pain syndromes, functional activity (Osvestry index), what have had permitted to apply a pathogenetically substantiated method of a durable epidural pharmacotherapy. The investigation results witness the necessity of differentiated application of the puncture methods of treatment for the pain discogenic syndromes in patients of different age.

  9. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding.

  10. 27 CFR 73.33 - Am I legally bound by a form I sign electronically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Filing of Documents with TTB § 73.33 Am I legally bound... paper document submitted to satisfy the same reporting requirement. Persons using electronic signatures...

  11. Documentary Realism, Sampling Theory and Peircean Semiotics: electronic audiovisual signs (analog or digital as indexes of reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Godoy

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses Documentary Realism, focusing on thephysical phenomena of transduction that take place in analog and digital audiovisual systems, herein analyzed in the light of the Sampling Theory, within the framework of Shannon and Weaver’s Information Theory. Transduction is a process by which one type of energy is transformed into another, or by which information is transcodified. Within the scope of Documentary Realism, it cannotbe claimed that electronic audiovisual signs, because of their technical digital features lead to a rupture with reality. Rather, the digital documentary, based on electronic digital cinematography, is still an index of reality.

  12. The role of nanotechnology and nano and micro-electronics in monitoring and control of cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has been broadly defined as the one for not only the creation of functional materials and devices as well as systems through control of matter at the scale of 1-100 nm, but also the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the same scale. Growing needs in the point-of-care (POC) that is an increasing market for improving patient's quality of life, are driving the development of nanotechnologies for diagnosis and treatment of various life threatening diseases. This paper addresses the recent development of nanodiagnostic sensors and nanotherapeutic devices with functionalized carbon nanotube and/or nanowire on a flexible organic thin film electronics to monitor and control of the three leading diseases namely 1) neurodegenerative diseases, 2) cardiovascular diseases, and 3) diabetes and metabolic diseases. The sensors developed include implantable and biocompatible devices, light weight wearable devices in wrist-watches, hats, shoes and clothes. The nanotherapeutics devices include nanobased drug delivery system. Many of these sensors are integrated with the wireless systems for the remote physiological monitoring. The author's research team has also developed a wireless neural probe using nanowires and nanotubes for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease. Light weight and compact EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system in a hat developed is capable of monitoring real time epileptic patients and patients with neurological and movement disorders using the Internet and cellular network. Physicians could be able to monitor these signals in realtime using portable computers or cell phones and will give early warning signal if these signals cross a pre-determined threshold level. In addition the potential impact of nanotechnology for applications in medicine is that, the devices can be designed to interact with cells and tissues at the molecular level, which allows high degree of functionality. Devices engineered at nanometer scale imply a

  13. Problem neurology residents: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabby, David S; Majeed, Muhammed H; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2011-06-14

    Problem residents are found across most medical specialties at a prevalence of about 10%. This study was designed to explore the prevalence and causes of problem neurology residents and to compare neurology programs' responses and outcomes. Directors of 126 US neurology residency programs were sent an electronic survey. We collected data on demographics, first and all "identifiers" of problem residents, and year of training in which the problem was found. We asked about observable signs, etiology, and who performed remediation. We asked what resources were used and what outcomes occurred. Ninety-five program directors completed surveys (75% response rate). Almost all neurology programs have problem residents (81%). Age, sex, marital status, being a US native, or attending a US medical school had no effect on problem status. Being a parent carried a lower likelihood of problems (32%). Most commonly the problem is acted on during the first year of training. Faculty members without defined educational roles were the most frequent first identifiers. Program directors were the most common remediators. The most common remediation techniques were increasing supervision and assigning a faculty mentor. Graduate medical education office and psychiatric or psychological counseling services were most often used. Eleven percent of problem residents required a program for impaired physicians and 14% required a leave of absence. Sixteen percent were dismissed from their programs. The prevalence of problem residents in neurology is similar to other disciplines, and various resources are available to remediate them.

  14. SIGNS The sandwich sign

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    214. 5. Kunimasa K, Jo T, Takaiwa T, Ishida T. Thoracic sandwich sign. Intern Med 2011;50:2865. 6. Caceres J, Mata JM, Castaner E, Villanueva A. CT recognition of traumatic herniation of stomach: the sandwich sign. J Thorac Imaging 1995 ...

  15. Nature of the effective interaction in electron-doped cuprate superconductors: A sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Xiang; Wang, Fa; Yao, Hong; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the mechanism of Cooper pairing amounts to determining the effective interaction that operates at low energies. Efforts to achieve such a goal for superconducting materials, especially strongly correlated ones, from both bottom-up and top-down approaches, have been plagued by having to use uncontrolled approximations. Here, we perform large-scale, numerically exact, sign-problem-free zero-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations on an effective theory based on "hot spots" plus fluctuating collective modes. Because hot spots are clearly identified by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for electron-doped cuprates, we focus our attention on such materials. Our goal is to determine the minimum effective action that can describe the observed superconductivity and charge-density wave. The results suggest that antiferromagnetic fluctuation alone is not sufficient—the effective action needs to be amended with nematic fluctuations. We believe that our results address the pairing mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity in electron-doped cuprates, and they shed light on the pairing mechanism of hole-doped cuprates.

  16. [Simple and useful evaluation of motor difficulty in childhood (9-12 years old children ) by interview score on motor skills and soft neurological signs--aim for the diagnosis of developmental coordination disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Shuhei

    2009-09-01

    Many children with developmental disorders are known to have motor impairment such as clumsiness and poor physical ability;however, the objective evaluation of such difficulties is not easy in routine clinical practice. In this study, we aimed to establish a simple method for evaluating motor difficulty of childhood. This method employs a scored interview and examination for detecting soft neurological signs (SNSs). After a preliminary survey with 22 normal children, we set the items and the cutoffs for the interview and SNSs. The interview consisted of questions pertaining to 12 items related to a child's motor skills in his/her past and current life, such as skipping, jumping a rope, ball sports, origami, and using chopsticks. The SNS evaluation included 5 tests, namely, standing on one leg with eyes closed, diadochokinesia, associated movements during diadochokinesia, finger opposition test, and laterally fixed gaze. We applied this method to 43 children, including 25 cases of developmental disorders. Children showing significantly high scores in both the interview and SNS were assigned to the "with motor difficulty" group, while those with low scores in both the tests were assigned to the "without motor difficulty" group. The remaining children were assigned to the "with suspicious motor difficulty" group. More than 90% of the children in the "with motor difficulty" group had high impairment scores in Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC), a standardized motor test, whereas 82% of the children in the "without motor difficulty" group revealed no motor impairment. Thus, we conclude that our simple method and criteria would be useful for the evaluation of motor difficulty of childhood. Further, we have discussed the diagnostic process for developmental coordination disorder using our evaluation method.

  17. Supernumerary human hair cells-signs of regeneration or impaired development? A field emission scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask-Andersen, Helge; Li, Hao; Löwenheim, Hubert; Müller, Marcus; Pfaller, Kristian; Schrott-Fischer, Annelies; Glueckert, Rudolf

    2017-03-01

    Current attempts to regenerate cochlear sensorineural structures motivate further inspection of the human organ of hearing. Here, we analyzed the supernumerary inner hair cell (sIHC), a possible sign of regeneration and cell replacement. Human cochleae were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM; maximum resolution 2 nm) obtained from individuals aged 44, 48, and 58 years with normal sensorineural pure-tone average (PTA) thresholds (PTA <20 dB). The wasted tissue was harvested during trans-cochlear approaches and immediately fixed for ultrastructural analysis. All specimens exhibited sIHCs at all turns except at the extreme lower basal turn. In one specimen, it was possible to image and count the inner hair cells (IHCs) along the cochlea representing the 0.2 kHz-8 kHz region according to the Greenwood place/frequency scale. In a region with 2,321 IHCs, there were 120 scattered one-cell losses or 'gaps' (5%). Forty-two sIHCs were present facing the modiolus. Thirty-eight percent of the sIHCs were located near a 'gap' in the IHC row (±6 IHCs). The prevalence of ectopic inner hair cells was higher than expected. The morphology and placement could reflect a certain ongoing regeneration. Further molecular studies are needed to verify if the regenerative capacity of the human auditory periphery might have been underestimated.

  18. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  19. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  20. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  1. Advance care planning for patients with advanced neurology diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chi; Lau, Vikki Wai-Kee; Un, Ka-Chun; Wong, Man-Sheung; Chan, Kwok-Ying

    2017-10-13

    Advanced neurology diseases including motor neuron disease (MND) are usually progressive life-limiting illness and could be devastating for patients, families and caregivers. Although medical technologies, such as enteral feeding and non-invasive ventilation, may prolong life expectancy of the patients, their utilization prompts important ethical questions in regard to their quality of life (QoL). Little attention had been paid on how ACP practice would practically help with patients suffering from different neurology diseases. We are unaware of any published studies on ACP practice among patients with different neurology diseases. In our study, we assessed end-of-life (EOL) care preferences, documentation, and communication in patients with various types of advanced neurology diseases. This was a retrospective chart review of all patients referred to the neuro-palliative care team (NPCT) in a local acute hospital in Hong Kong. The study was approved by the institutional review board of the University of Hong Kong. NPCT consultation was hand abstracted from the electronic health record if there was a subspecialty palliative care (PC) consultation note during the study period. Hand abstraction of data also included any content related to advance care planning (ACP) [advance directive (AD), resuscitation order, ventilator support, artificial feeding, patient wishes, legacy]. For patient who signed AD, items including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (100%), mechanical ventilation (100%), artificial nutrition and hydration (80%) were mentioned more frequently than other EOL interventions. For patients who had ACP but without AD, the most common diagnosis is bad stroke (60%). Place of death, artificial nutrition and hydration were most mentioned EOL interventions. EOL decision making in patients with advanced neurology disease is often delayed. This study showed that MND patients are readier to discuss their EOL issues and signed their AD. The NPCT can play a valuable

  2. Not only the sugar, early infarct sign, hyperDense middle cerebral artery, age, neurologic deficit score but also atrial fibrillation is predictive for symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sombat Muengtaweepongsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH is the most unwanted adverse event in patients with acute ischemic stroke who received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (i.v. rt-PA. Many tool scores are available to predict the probability of sICH. Among those scores, the Sugar, Early infarct sign, hyperDense middle cerebral artery, Age, Neurologic deficit (SEDAN gives the highest area under the curve-receiver operating characteristic value. Objective: We aimed to examine any factors other than the SEDAN score to predict the probability of sICH. Methods: Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with i.v. rt-PA within 4.5 h time window from January 2010 to July 2012 were evaluated. Compiling demographic data, risk factors, and comorbidity (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, atrial fibrillation (AF, ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, previous stroke, gout, smoking cigarette, drinking alcoholic beverage, family history of stroke, and family history of ischemic heart disease, computed tomography scan of patients prior to treatment with rt-PA, and assessing the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score for the purpose of calculating SEDAN score were analyzed. Results: Of 314 patients treated with i.v. rt-PA, there were 46 ICH cases (14.6% with 14 sICH (4.4% and 32 asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage cases (10.2%. The rate of sICH occurrence was increased in accordance with the increase in the SEDAN score and AF. Age over 75 years, early infarction, hyperdense cerebral artery, baseline blood sugar more than 12 mmol/l, NIHSS as 10 or more, and AF were the risk factors to develop sICH after treated with rt-PA at 1.535, 2.501, 1.093, 1.276, 1.253, and 2.492 times, respectively. Conclusions: Rather than the SEDAN score, AF should be a predictor of sICH in patients with acute ischemic stroke after i.v. rt-PA treatment in Thai population.

  3. Prevalence of heart failure signs and symptoms in a large primary care population identified through the use of text and data mining of the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakrishnan, Rajakrishnan; Steinhubl, Steven R; Ng, Kenney; Sun, Jimeng; Byrd, Roy J; Daar, Zahra; Williams, Brent A; deFilippi, Christopher; Ebadollahi, Shahram; Stewart, Walter F

    2014-07-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) contains a tremendous amount of data that if appropriately detected can lead to earlier identification of disease states such as heart failure (HF). Using a novel text and data analytic tool we explored the longitudinal EHR of over 50,000 primary care patients to identify the documentation of the signs and symptoms of HF in the years preceding its diagnosis. Retrospective analysis consisted of 4,644 incident HF cases and 45,981 group-matched control subjects. Documentation of Framingham HF signs and symptoms within encounter notes were carried out with the use of a previously validated natural language processing procedure. A total of 892,805 affirmed criteria were documented over an average observation period of 3.4 years. Among eventual HF cases, 85% had ≥1 criterion within 1 year before their HF diagnosis, as did 55% of control subjects. Substantial variability in the prevalence of individual signs and symptoms were found in both case and control subjects. HF signs and symptoms are frequently documented in a primary care population as identified through automated text and data mining of EHRs. Their frequent identification demonstrates the rich data available within EHRs that will allow for future work on automated criterion identification to help develop predictive models for HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurological aspects of vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Mood and behavioral abnormalities are the most common early findings related to vibroacoustic disease (VAD). Other signs and symptoms have been observed in VAD patients. Brain MRI discloses small multifocal lesions in about 50% of subjects with more than 10 yr of occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or = 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or = 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. However, to date, there have been no studies globally integrating all the neurological, imaging and neurophysiological data of VAD patients. This is the main goal of this study. The 60 male Caucasians diagnosed with VAD were neurologically evaluated in extreme detail in order to systematically identify the most common and significant neurological disturbances in VAD. This population demonstrates cognitive changes (identified through psychological and neurophysiological studies (ERP P300)), vertigo and auditory changes, visual impairment, epilepsy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Neurological examination reveals pathological signs and reflexes, most commonly the palmo-mental reflex. A vascular pattern underlying the multifocal hyperintensities in T2 MR imaging, with predominant involvement of the small arteries of the white matter, is probably the visible organic substratum of the neurological picture. However, other pathophyisological mechanisms are involved in epileptic symptomatology.

  5. Monitoring of lead load and its effect on neonatal behavioral neurological assessment scores in Guiyu, an electronic waste recycling town in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Xu, Xijin; Wu, Kusheng; Chen, Gangjian; Liu, Junxiao; Chen, Songjian; Gu, Chengwu; Zhang, Bao; Zheng, Liangkai; Zheng, Minghao; Huo, Xia

    2008-10-01

    Guiyu is the major electronic waste (e-waste) recycling town in China. The primary purpose of this study was to measure the lead levels in neonates and examine the correlation between lead levels and neurobehavioral development. One hundred full-term neonates from Guiyu and fifty-two neonates from neighboring towns (control group) in the late summer of 2006 were selected for study. The lead levels in the umbilical cord blood (CBPb) and lead levels in meconium (MPb) of neonates were determined with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The neonatal behavioral neurological assessment (NBNA) was conducted on all neonates. A questionnaire related to the exposure to lead of pregnant women was used as a survey of the neonates' mothers. Compared with the control group, neonates in Guiyu had significantly higher levels of lead (P e-waste recycling. Neonates with high levels of lead load have lower NBNA scores (P e-waste recycling activities related to lead contamination. This study suggests that environmental lead contamination due to e-waste recycling have an impact on neurobehavioral development of neonates in Guiyu.

  6. Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your vital signs show how well your body is functioning. They are usually measured at doctor's offices, often as part of ... slow or fast breathing can also be a sign of a serious breathing problem. Temperature, which measures ...

  7. Signes Iconiques, Signes Linguistiques (Iconic Signs, Linguistic Signs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Henri

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses the audiovisual image as sign; the classification of signs according to two different semiologies, and two different semantic theories; and the relation to different pedagogical approaches. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  8. 31 CFR 370.35 - Does the Bureau of the Public Debt accept all electronically signed transaction requests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does the Bureau of the Public Debt... PUBLIC DEBT ELECTRONIC TRANSACTIONS AND FUNDS TRANSFERS RELATING TO UNITED STATES SECURITIES Electronic Submission of Transaction Requests Through the Bureau of the Public Debt § 370.35 Does the Bureau of the...

  9. Childhood acute bacterial meningitis: risk factors for acute neurological complications and neurological sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniuk, Sérgio A; Hamdar, Fátima; Ducci, Renata D; Kira, Ariane T F; Cat, Mônica N L; Cruz, Cristina R da

    2011-01-01

    To assess acute neurological complications and neurological sequelae of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in order to determine possible warning signs. This retrospective study evaluated children with acute bacterial meningitis (between 1 month and 14 years of age) admitted between 2003 and 2006. Of the 44 patients studied, 17 (38.6%) had acute neurological complications. Seizure was the most frequent (31.8%) complication. Patients with acute neurological complications showed a higher frequency of lower neutrophil count (p = 0.03), seizure at admission (p 200 mg/dL (p < 0.01), and cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration/glycemia ratio (p < 0.01) were identified as risk variables for sequelae. Neutrophil count < 60%, seizure at admission, and S. pneumoniae as the etiologic agent were identified as warning signs for acute neurological complications, while protein levels, cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration/glycemia ratio, and seizure at admission were seen as risk factors for neurological sequelae.

  10. 21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research L. Leijonborg welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar and CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and signing the electronic guest book with T. Pettersson.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photo Service

    2008-01-01

    21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research L. Leijonborg welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar and CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and signing the electronic guest book with T. Pettersson.

  11. Neurology and literature 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2014-05-01

    Good literary fiction has the potential to move us, extend our sense of life, transform our prospective views and help us in the face of adversity. A neurological disorder is likely to be the most challenging experience a human being may have to confront in a lifetime. As such, literary recreations of illnesses have a doubly powerful effect. Study the synergies between neurology and fictional literature with particular reference to narrative based medicine (NBM). Doctors establish boundaries between the normal and the abnormal. Taking a clinical history is an act of interpretation in which the doctor integrates the science of objective signs and measurable quantities with the art of subjective clinical judgment. The more discrepancy there is between the patient's experience with the illness and the doctor's interpretation of that disease, the less likely the doctor-patient interaction is to succeed. NBM contributes to a better discernment of the meanings, thus considering disease as a biographical event rather than just a natural fact. Drawing from their own experience with disease, writers of fiction provide universal insights through their narratives, whilst neuroscientists, like Cajal, have occasionally devoted their scientific knowledge to literary narratives. Furthermore, neurologists from Alzheimer to Oliver Sacks remind us of the essential value of NBM in the clinic. Integrating NBM (the narrative of patients) and the classic holistic approach to patients with our current paradigm of evidence based medicine represents a challenge as relevant to neurologists as keeping up with technological and scientific advances. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. [Danger signs in the malaria patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Alberto

    2009-06-01

    Danger signs are clinical indicators of severity and are useful to predict complications or death. In the malaria patient, clinical or parasitological signs can be easily be recognized during the acute phase of the illness that indicate serious complications. Danger signs include neurological change, abnormal breathing pattern, persistent vomiting and diarrhea, jaundice, bleeding, dark urine, delayed capillary refill, intense pallor, hyperpyrexia, hyperparasitemia and schizontemia. Timely recognition of these signs can lead to a decrease in cases with complications and deaths.

  13. Advocacy in neurology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauranik, Apoorva

    2008-01-01

    ...), launched the Neurological Alliance of Ireland, a nationwide coalition of patient advocacy groups and physicians and authored Standards of Care, the "blueprint" for the development of neurological...

  14. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002 on the admitted cases with neurological complications after chickenpox (with rash or scar. Patients were investigated with CT/MRI, CSF study, EEG and nerve conduction studies and hematological workup. They were followed-up for 1 year and outcome assessed using modified Rankin scale. Results: The latency for the neurological complications was 4-32 days (mean: 16.32 days. There were 18 cases: 10 adults (64% and 8 children (36%. Cerebellar ataxia (normal CT/MRI was observed in 7 cases (32% (mean age: 6.85 years. One patient (6 years had acute right hemiparesis in the fifth week due to left capsular infarct. All these cases spontaneously recovered by 4 weeks. The age range of the adult patients was 13-47 years (mean: 27 years. The manifestations included cerebellar and pyramidal signs (n-4 with features of demyelination in MRI who recovered spontaneously or with methylprednisolone by 8 weeks. Patient with encephalitis recovered in 2 weeks with acyclovir. Guillain Barre syndrome of the demyelinating type (n-2 was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and they had a slow recovery by a modified Rankin scale (mRs score of 3 and 2 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. One case died after hemorrhage into the occipital infarct. There were two cases of asymmetrical neuropathy, one each of the seventh cranial and brachial neuritis. Conclusion: Spontaneous recovery occurs in post-chickenpox cerebellar ataxia. Rarely, serious complications can occur in adults. The demyelinating disorders, either of the central or peripheral

  15. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  16. Collecting psychosocial "vital signs" in electronic health records: Why now? What are they? What's new for psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Karen A; Adler, Nancy E; Forrest, Christopher B; Stead, William W

    2016-09-01

    Social, psychological, and behavioral factors are recognized as key contributors to health, but they are rarely measured in a systematic way in health care settings. Electronic health records (EHRs) can be used in these settings to routinely collect a standardized set of social, psychological, and behavioral determinants of health. The expanded use of EHRs provides opportunities to improve individual and population health, and offers new ways for the psychological community to engage in health promotion and disease prevention efforts. This article addresses 3 issues. First, it discusses what led to current efforts to include measures of psychosocial and behavioral determinants of health in EHRs. Second, it presents recommendations of an Institute of Medicine committee regarding inclusion in EHRS of a panel of measures that meet a priori criteria. Third, it identifies new opportunities and challenges these recommendations present for psychologists in practice and research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Neurological abnormalities and neurocognitive functions in healthy elder people: A structural equation modeling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Raymond CK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Neurological abnormalities have been reported in normal aging population. However, most of them were limited to extrapyramidal signs and soft signs such as motor coordination and sensory integration have received much less attention. Very little is known about the relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive function in healthy elder people. The current study aimed to examine the underlying relationships between neurological soft signs and neurocognition in a group of healthy elderly. Methods One hundred and eighty healthy elderly participated in the current study. Neurological soft signs were evaluated with the subscales of Cambridge Neurological Inventory. A set of neurocognitive tests was also administered to all the participants. Structural equation modeling was adopted to examine the underlying relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognition. Results No significant differences were found between the male and female elder people in neurocognitive function performances and neurological soft signs. The model fitted well in the elderly and indicated the moderate associations between neurological soft signs and neurocognition, specifically verbal memory, visual memory and working memory. Conclusions The neurological soft signs are more or less statistically equivalent to capture the similar information done by conventional neurocognitive function tests in the elderly. The implication of these findings may serve as a potential neurological marker for the early detection of pathological aging diseases or related mental status such as mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Neurological abnormalities and neurocognitive functions in healthy elder people: a structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Raymond C K; Xu, Ting; Li, Hui-jie; Zhao, Qing; Liu, Han-hui; Wang, Yi; Yan, Chao; Cao, Xiao-yan; Wang, Yu-na; Shi, Yan-fang; Dazzan, Paola

    2011-08-10

    Neurological abnormalities have been reported in normal aging population. However, most of them were limited to extrapyramidal signs and soft signs such as motor coordination and sensory integration have received much less attention. Very little is known about the relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive function in healthy elder people. The current study aimed to examine the underlying relationships between neurological soft signs and neurocognition in a group of healthy elderly. One hundred and eighty healthy elderly participated in the current study. Neurological soft signs were evaluated with the subscales of Cambridge Neurological Inventory. A set of neurocognitive tests was also administered to all the participants. Structural equation modeling was adopted to examine the underlying relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognition. No significant differences were found between the male and female elder people in neurocognitive function performances and neurological soft signs. The model fitted well in the elderly and indicated the moderate associations between neurological soft signs and neurocognition, specifically verbal memory, visual memory and working memory. The neurological soft signs are more or less statistically equivalent to capture the similar information done by conventional neurocognitive function tests in the elderly. The implication of these findings may serve as a potential neurological marker for the early detection of pathological aging diseases or related mental status such as mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  20. Vital Signs: Exposure to Electronic Cigarette Advertising Among Middle School and High School Students - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tushar; Marynak, Kristy; Arrazola, René A; Cox, Shanna; Rolle, Italia V; King, Brian A

    2016-01-08

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has increased considerably among U.S. youths since 2011. Tobacco use among youths in any form, including e-cigarettes, is unsafe. Tobacco product advertising can persuade youths to start using tobacco. CDC analyzed data from the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey to estimate the prevalence of e-cigarette advertisement exposure among U.S. middle school and high school students. The 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey, a school-based survey of middle school and high school students in grades 6-12, included 22,007 participants. Exposure to e-cigarette advertisements (categorized as "sometimes," "most of the time," or "always") was assessed for four sources: retail stores, Internet, TV and movies, and newspapers and magazines. Weighted exposure estimates were assessed overall and by school type, sex, race/ethnicity, and grade. In 2014, 68.9% of middle and high school students (18.3 million) were exposed to e-cigarette advertisements from at least one source. Among middle school students, exposure was highest for retail stores (52.8%), followed by Internet (35.8%), TV and movies (34.1%), and newspapers and magazines (25.0%). Among high school students, exposure was highest for retail stores (56.3%), followed by Internet (42.9%), TV and movies (38.4%), and newspapers and magazines (34.6%). Among middle school students, 23.4% reported exposure to e-cigarette advertising from one source, 17.4% from two sources, 13.7% from three sources, and 11.9% from four sources. Among high school students, 21.1% reported exposure to e-cigarette advertising from one source, 17.0% from two sources, 14.5% from three sources, and 18.2% from four sources. Approximately seven in 10 U.S. middle and high school students were exposed to e-cigarette advertisements in 2014. Exposure to e-cigarette advertisements might contribute to increased use of e-cigarettes among youths. Multiple approaches are warranted to reduce youth e-cigarette use and exposure to e

  1. Does walking change the Romberg sign?

    OpenAIRE

    Findlay, Gordon F. G.; Balain, Birender; Trivedi, Jayesh M.; Jaffray, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The Romberg sign helps demonstrate loss of postural control as a result of severely compromised proprioception. There is still no standard approach to applying the Romberg test in clinical neurology and the criteria for and interpretation of an abnormal result continue to be debated. The value of this sign and its adaptation when walking was evaluated. Detailed clinical examination of 50 consecutive patients of cervical myelopathy was performed prospectively. For the walking Romberg sign, pat...

  2. African Journal of Neurological Sciences - 2009 Vol. 28 No 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interdisciplinary Centre for Palliative Medicine and Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-. University .... dementia, however, these neurological signs are not to prevail; 3) even after careful evaluation no reason for .... resource poor settings seems to be crucial for the future health care of African countries. Also ...

  3. Enhancement of absorption and resistance of motion utilizing a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor to effectively monitor physiological signs during sport exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    This study presents an effective engineering approach for human vital signs monitoring as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work is to study how to capture critical physiological parameters efficiently through a well-constructed electronic system and a robust multi-channel opto-electronic patch sensor (OEPS), together with a wireless communication. A unique design comprising multi-wavelength illumination sources and a rapid response photo sensor with a 3-axis accelerometer enables to recover pulsatile features, compensate motion and increase signal-to-noise ratio. An approved protocol with designated tests was implemented at Loughborough University a UK leader in sport and exercise assessment. The results of sport physiological effects were extracted from the datasets of physical movements, i.e. sitting, standing, waking, running and cycling. t-test, Bland-Altman and correlation analysis were applied to evaluate the performance of the OEPS system against Acti-Graph and Mio-Alpha.There was no difference in heart rate measured using OEPS and both Acti-Graph and Mio-Alpha (both p<0.05). Strong correlations were observed between HR measured from the OEPS and both the Acti-graph and Mio-Alpha (r = 0.96, p<0.001). Bland-Altman analysis for the Acti-Graph and OEPS found the bias 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) -17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm for lower and upper limits of agreement respectively, for the Mio-Alpha and OEPS the bias is 1.63 bpm, standard deviation SD8.62 bpm, lower and upper limits of agreement, - 15.27 bpm and +18.58 bpm respectively. The OEPS demonstrates a real time, robust and remote monitoring of cardiovascular function.

  4. [Neurorehabilitation, neurology, rehabilitation medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbán, Edina; Szél, István; Fáy, Veronika; Dénes, Zoltán; Lippai, Zoltán; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-05-30

    We have read several publications of great authority on the neurological profession in the last two years in which were expressed assessments of the current situation combined with opinions about neurology and the necessity to reorganize neurological patient care. These articles took up the question of neurorehabilitation too. The authors, who on a daily basis, deal with the rehabilitation of people with disabilities as a consequence of neurological conditions, summarize some important definitions of rehabilitation medicine and the present system of neurological rehabilitation, as it is defined by the rehabilitation profession.

  5. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  6. American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Info » Voice, Speech, and Language American Sign Language On this page: What is American Sign Language? ... signs "I love you." What is American Sign Language? American Sign Language (ASL) is a complete, complex ...

  7. Genetics of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mottagui-Tabar, Salim; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2004-05-01

    Neurological diseases are defined as an inappropriate function of the peripheral or central nervous system due to impaired electrical impulses throughout the brain and/or nervous system that may present with heterogeneous symptoms according to the parts of the system involved in these pathologic processes. Growing evidence on genetic components of neurological disease have been collected during recent years. Genetic studies have opened the way for understanding the underlying pathology of many neurological disorders. The outcome of current intense research into the genetics of neurological disorders will hopefully be the introduction of new diagnostic tools and the discovery of potential targets for new and more effective medications and preventive measures.

  8. Focal neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or head Electromyogram (EMG), nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap Alternative Names Neurological deficits - focal Images Brain References Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  9. The use of 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging for therapeutic decisions in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices and significant neurological, neurosurgical and neuro-oncology diagnostic indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, Łukasz; Sterliński, Maciej; Marczak, Magdalena; Miśko, Jolanta; Podgórski, Jan Krzysztof; Szwed, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Between September 2009 and May 2014 the classification of 36 patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in terms of the feasibility of MRI scanning due to strong clinical indications was carried out. Finally MRI examinations were performed in 20 patients, of whom 27 studies were conducted and a total number of 35 anatomical regions were scanned. Neurological, neurosurgical and neuro-oncology indications for MRI were reported in 19 patients (95%) in whom 26 MRI studies (96.3%) were performed, and 34 anatomical regions (97.1%) were scanned. One patient had indications for MRI in the field of cardiology. Medical information obtained from 27 MRI studies allowed decisions to be made regarding the treatment in all patients. After 8 studies (29.6%), patients were classified into 9 different neurosurgical procedures. In the case of the remaining 19 studies (70.4%), there were no indications for surgical treatment and the decisions to implement conservative treatment were made. There were no complications related to the implanted CIEDs observed: neither immediate nor in the follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional neurological disorders: imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, V

    2014-10-01

    Functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorder, are unexplained neurological symptoms. These symptoms are common and can be associated with significant consequences. This review covers the neuroimaging literature focusing on functional motor symptoms including motor functioning and upstream influences including self-monitoring and internal representations, voluntariness and arousal and trauma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS × What research is being done? The National Institute of Neurological ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS See More About Research The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke ( ...

  12. Neurological soft signs as an endophenotype in an African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Schizophrenia is a severe chronic psychiatric disorder that shows considerable clinical heterogeneity which arguably reflects the heterogeneous nature of susceptibility factors for the illness.1 Currently there is uncertainty as to whether this is a single disorder with different clinical manifestations or in.

  13. [Joseph Babinski's contribution to neurological symptomatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Tetsuo

    2014-11-01

    Joseph Babinski (1857-1932) was an excellent clinician. André Breton, a French poet, described Babinski's way of clinical examination in his Manifeste du surréalisme (1924), which vividly revealed Babinski's meticulous character. Babinski is well known by his eponymous Babinski reflex. Although some predecessors had described this phenomenon briefly, its meaning was interpreted by Babinski. His contribution to neurological symptomatology was not restricted to his plantar skin reflex, but also to other wide area. In this article, symptoms described by Babinski, i.e. plantar skin reflex, cerebellar symptoms including cerebellar asynergy, adiadochokinesis, dysmetria, cerebellar catalepsy, and rising sign, platysma sign, anosognosia are explained and are critically discussed.

  14. Relationships between neurological findings and classroom behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, O C; Saratsiotis, J B; Mosser, R S

    1975-09-01

    Five hundred seventy-five children from low-income urban neighborhoods who were between 10 and 12 years of age were examined by pediatricians for certain neurological signs. Classroom teachers ranked each child according to types of behavior. Data on neurological signs found in more than 15 children and on types of classroom behavior clinically expected to be related to central nervous system defects were studied statistically. Significant positive associations were found between nystagmus and hyperactivity, mixed dominance and hyperactivity, and mixed dominance and variable day-to-day performance. Errors in moving parts of the body on verbal command were associated with distractibility and underachievement. Head circumference greater than the 90th percentile for age was associated with unvarying behavior and clumsiness; tactile agnosia with unvarying behavior; asymmetry of the eyes with hyperactivity; and asymmetrical position of the child's head with underachievement. A negative association was found between nystagmus and musical ability.

  15. Smart Signs Show You the Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijding, M.E.M.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Benz, H.P.; Matysiak Szóstek, A.

    Smart Signs are a new type of electronic door and way signs based on small computers which can be seamlessly incorporated in the environment. Smart Signs provide personalized context-aware guidance and messaging designed to support wayfinding activities in large indoor spaces and their surroundings.

  16. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Chairman, Neurology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Special Thanks to: The Shanley Family The Saxon ... Maryland Medical Center University of Maryland School of Medicine Know Stroke: Know the Signs. Act in Time. ...

  20. Know Stroke: Know the Signs, Act in Time Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stroke and call 911. [ Young woman at the park watching as her mom pushes her daughter on ... and acted on the signs of a stroke." National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - A component ...

  1. Baldwin Borough Signs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — An inventory by location of the signs on Borough of Baldwin roads and properties, such as street signs, traffic signs, and warning signs.

  2. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  3. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  4. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  5. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  6. Neurological diseases and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequentl...

  7. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intervertebral Disc Characteristic on Progressive Neurological Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Yudoyono

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the intervertebral disc characteristic on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in lumbar herniated disc (LHD patients with progressive neurological deficit. Methods: Patients were collected retrospectively from Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Database from 2011–2013 with LHD, had neurological deficit such as radiculopathy and cauda equine syndrome for less than four weeks with a positive sign confirmed by neurological examination and confirmatory with MRI examination. Results: A total of 14 patients with lumbar herniated disc disease (10 males, 4 females suffered from progressive neurological deficit with an average age of (52.07±10.9 years old. Early disc height was 9.38±0.5 mm and progressive neurological deficit state disc height was 4.03±0.53 mm, which were significantly different statisticaly (p<0.01. Symptoms of radiculopathy were seen in 11 patients and cauda equine syndrome in three patients. Modic changes grade 1 was found in five patients, grade 2 in eight patients,grade 3 in one patient, Pfirmman grade 2 in eleven patients and grade 3 in three patients. Thecal sac compression 1/3 compression was seen in four patients and 2/3 compression in ten patients. Conclusions: Neurosurgeon should raise concerns on the characteristic changes of intervertebral disc in magnetic resonance imaging examination to avoid further neural injury in lumbar herniated disc patients.

  9. Signing off

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Physics Related Aptitude Test As the teacher shortage bites anyone with a degree in science expects to walk into a school and be received, with open arms, as a physics teacher. Are they really suitable? To help you decide Signing Off provides the following invaluable psychometric test. Extensively researched and, for single users only, it comes completely free to Physics Education subscribers! (Copies of this Physics Related Aptitude Test are available to credit-card customers from prat@realripoff.com priced #35 per client, 125 dollars to US customers.) This invaluable psychometric test has been extensively researched. Your first lesson of the new school year introduces the study of electricity. Do you: A Use the notes prepared by your predecessor. B Find a video on electricity and play it to the class. C Arrange a series of exciting practical demonstrations to stimulate the young inquiring mind. D Let the children design and make their own circuits to light flashlight bulbs. Your 14-year-olds have completed a written test on heat and energy. Do you: A Mark correct only the work of students who have written their names neatly at the top LEFT HAND corner, as required. B Only set multiple choice tests, so that the computer can mark them for you. C Mark carefully by hand, explaining in detail to each student exactly how and why they have made errors and adding encouraging comments with lots of praise. D Give out correct sets of answers and allow students to mark their own work. There is a staff social. Do you: A Ask for a definition of the term 'social'. B Ask for a web-based version. C Determine to go, so that you can discuss setting up cross-curricular links with colleagues. D Join the organizing committee. Who do you admire most? A Sir Isaac Newton. B Bill Gates. C Leonardo da Vinci. D Leonardo di Caprio. You are required to teach biology class. Your response is: A Denial. B To ask for an appropriate computer simulation. C To attend a specialized course for biology

  10. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  11. Suicide in Neurologic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, David B.; Anderson, C. Alan

    2002-11-01

    The risk of attempted or completed suicide is increased in patients with migraine with aura, epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and Huntington's disease. Contrary to the general perception that the risk of suicide among patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing conditions is low, several reports suggest that the risk of suicide in these patients increases relative to the general population. Some patients at risk for neurologic disorders are also at increased risk for suicide; in particular, the risk of suicide is increased among persons at risk for Huntington's disease, independent of the presence or absence of the Huntington's gene mutation. The risk of attempted or completed suicide in neurologic illness is strongly associated with depression, feelings of hopelessness or helplessness, and social isolation. Additional suicide risk factors in persons with neurologic illness include cognitive impairment, relatively younger age (under 60 years), moderate physical disability, recent onset or change in illness, a lack of future plans or perceived meaning in life, recent losses (personal, occupational, or financial), and prior history of psychiatric illness or suicidal behavior. Substance dependence, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, and some personality disorders (eg, borderline personality disorder) may also contribute to increased risk of suicide among persons with neurologic illnesses. Identification and aggressive treatment of psychiatric problems, especially depression, as well as reduction of modifiable suicide risk factors among patients with neurologic illness is needed to reduce the risk of attempted and completed suicide in this population.

  12. Neurologic manifestations of achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jacqueline T; Bodensteiner, John B; Butler, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the best described and most common form of the congenital short-limbed dwarfing conditions. Achondroplasia is apparent at birth and has a birth prevalence of 1 in 20000-30000 live-born infants. Achondroplasia is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition, although 80% of cases occur sporadically as new events in their families. Achondroplasia is caused, in virtually all of the cases, by a G380R mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Patients with achondroplasia should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians including geneticists, neurologists, and orthopedists, since there are numerous bony and neurological complications. The most severe complication results from craniocervical stenosis and medullary and upper spinal cord compression, which can have devastating and even lethal sequelae during early childhood. In subsequent decades, including adolescence, spinal cord and nerve compression are more prominent. The neurological complications of achondroplasia have been recognized in adults for more than a century and are attributed to bony defects, connective tissue structures, or both. Similar neurological complications are now appreciated in infants, young children, and teenagers with achondroplasia. Defective connective tissue elements in achondroplasia frequently lead to ligamentous laxity, which can aggravate the complications associated with bony stenosis. Bony abnormalities are known to cause neurological morbidity and lead to a shortened lifespan. Neurological complications associated with achondroplasia are reviewed, including recommendations for the evaluation and management of these clinical problems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  14. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  15. Neurologic Diseases and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Chokroverty, Sudansu

    2017-03-01

    Sleep disorders and neurologic illness are common and burdensome in their own right; when combined, they can have tremendous negative impact at an individual level as well as societally. The socioeconomic burden of sleep disorders and neurologic illness can be identified, but the real cost of these conditions lies far beyond the financial realm. There is an urgent need for comprehensive care and support systems to help with the burden of disease. Further research in improving patient outcomes in those who suffer with these conditions will help patients and their families, and society in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The neurology literature 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoujah, Danya; Chang, Wan-Tsu W; Abraham, Michael K

    2017-09-06

    Emergency neurology is a complex and rapidly changing field. Its evolution can be attributed in part to increased imaging options, debates about optimal treatment, and simply the growth of emergency medicine as a specialty. Every year, a number of articles published in emergency medicine or other specialty journals should become familiar to the emergency physician. This review summarizes neurology articles published in 2016, which the authors consider crucial to the practice of emergency medicine. The articles are categorized according to disease process, with the understanding that there can be significant overlap among articles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Warning Signs After Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy > Postpartum care > Warning signs after birth Warning signs after birth E-mail to a friend Please ... infection Postpartum bleeding Postpartum depression (PPD) What warning signs should you look for? Call your provider if ...

  19. Lhermitte's sign and vitamin B12 deficiency: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Lhermitte's sign, a classical neurological sign, is a rare manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. The aim here was to report on a case of an elderly patient with vitamin B12 deficiency whose first clinical manifestation was the presence of Lhermitte's sign. CASE REPORT: We describe an elderly patient with vitamin B12 deficiency who presented cognitive dysfunction, peripheral polyneuropathy and sensory ataxia, and whose first clinical manifestation was the presence of Lhermitte's sign. This sign is one of the rarest manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  20. Autoimmune Neurology of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, W Oliver; Pittock, Sean J

    2017-06-01

    This article reviews the rapidly evolving spectrum of autoimmune neurologic disorders with a focus on those that involve the central nervous system, providing an understanding of how to approach the diagnostic workup of patients presenting with central nervous system symptoms or signs that could be immune mediated, either paraneoplastic or idiopathic, to guide therapeutic decision making. The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the discovery of novel neural antibodies and their targets. Many commercial laboratories can now test for these antibodies, which serve as diagnostic markers of diverse neurologic disorders that occur on an autoimmune basis. Some are highly specific for certain cancer types, and the neural antibody profiles may help direct the physician's cancer search. The diagnosis of an autoimmune neurologic disorder is aided by the detection of an objective neurologic deficit (usually subacute in onset with a fluctuating course), the presence of a neural autoantibody, and improvement in the neurologic status after a course of immunotherapy. Neural autoantibodies should raise concern for a paraneoplastic etiology and may inform a targeted oncologic evaluation (eg, N-methyl-D-aspartate [NMDA] receptor antibodies are associated with teratoma, antineuronal nuclear antibody type 1 [ANNA-1, or anti-Hu] are associated with small cell lung cancer). MRI, EEG, functional imaging, videotaped evaluations, and neuropsychological evaluations provide objective evidence of neurologic dysfunction by which the success of immunotherapy may be measured. Most treatment information emanates from retrospective case series and expert opinion. Nonetheless, early intervention may allow reversal of deficits in many patients and prevention of future disability.

  1. Neurological manifestations of ear disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garosi, Laurent S; Lowrie, Mark L; Swinbourne, Natalie F

    2012-11-01

    There are four major neuroanatomical structures associated with the ear that, when damaged, result in different neurologic clinical signs. These structures are the facial nerve, the ocular sympathetic tract, the vestibular receptors, and the cochlea. The clinical signs associated with disorders of each structure are discussed, followed by a summary of the diseases that should be considered in each case. The article begins with a description of the neuroanatomy of each of these structures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurological aspects of eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dejana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficult types of preeclampsia and eclampsia are presented with the neurological symptoms. The break of cerebral autoregulation mechanism plays the most important role in pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm. Nevertheless eclampsia isn’t just an ordinary hypertensive encephalopathy because other pathogenic mechanisms are involved in its appearance. The main neuropathologic changes are multifocal vasogenic edema, perivascular multiple microinfarctions and petechial hemorrhages. Neurological clinical manifestations are convulsions, headache, visual disturbances and rarely other discrete focal neurological symptoms. Eclampsia is a high-risk factor for onset of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. This is a reason why neurological diagnostic tests are sometimes needed. The method of choice for evaluation of complicated eclampsia is computerized brain topography that shows multiple areas of hypodensity in occipitoparietal regions. These changes are focal vasogenic cerebral edema. For differential diagnosis of eclampsia and stroke other diagnostic methods can be used - fundoscopic exam, magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebral angiography and cerebrospinal fluid exam. The therapy of eclampsia considers using of magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive, anticonvulsive and antiedematous drugs.

  3. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a

  4. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  5. Improving Recognition of Pediatric Severe Sepsis in the Emergency Department: Contributions of a Vital Sign-Based Electronic Alert and Bedside Clinician Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamuth, Fran; Alpern, Elizabeth R; Abbadessa, Mary Kate; Hayes, Katie; Schast, Aileen; Lavelle, Jane; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Weiss, Scott L; Zorc, Joseph J

    2017-12-01

    Recognition of pediatric sepsis is a key clinical challenge. We evaluate the performance of a sepsis recognition process including an electronic sepsis alert and bedside assessment in a pediatric emergency department (ED). This was a cohort study with quality improvement intervention in a pediatric ED. Exposure was a positive electronic sepsis alert, defined as elevated pulse rate or hypotension, concern for infection, and at least one of the following: abnormal capillary refill, abnormal mental status, or high-risk condition. A positive electronic sepsis alert prompted team assessment or huddle to determine need for sepsis protocol. Clinicians could initiate team assessment or huddle according to clinical concern without positive electronic sepsis alert. Severe sepsis outcome defined as activation of the sepsis protocol in the ED or development of severe sepsis requiring ICU admission within 24 hours. There were 182,509 ED visits during the study period, with 86,037 before electronic sepsis alert implementation and 96,472 afterward, and 1,112 (1.2%) positive electronic sepsis alerts. Overall, 326 patients (0.3%) were treated for severe sepsis within 24 hours. Test characteristics of the electronic sepsis alert alone to detect severe sepsis were sensitivity 86.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 82.0% to 89.5%), specificity 99.1% (95% CI 99.0% to 99.2%), positive predictive value 25.4% (95% CI 22.8% to 28.0%), and negative predictive value 100% (95% CI 99.9% to 100%). Inclusion of the clinician screen identified 43 additional electronic sepsis alert-negative children, with severe sepsis sensitivity 99.4% (95% CI 97.8% to 99.8%) and specificity 99.1% (95% CI 99.1% to 99.2%). Electronic sepsis alert implementation increased ED sepsis detection from 83% to 96%. Electronic sepsis alert for severe sepsis demonstrated good sensitivity and high specificity. Addition of clinician identification of electronic sepsis alert-negative patients further improved sensitivity

  6. Does walking change the Romberg sign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Gordon F G; Balain, Birender; Trivedi, Jayesh M; Jaffray, David C

    2009-10-01

    The Romberg sign helps demonstrate loss of postural control as a result of severely compromised proprioception. There is still no standard approach to applying the Romberg test in clinical neurology and the criteria for and interpretation of an abnormal result continue to be debated. The value of this sign and its adaptation when walking was evaluated. Detailed clinical examination of 50 consecutive patients of cervical myelopathy was performed prospectively. For the walking Romberg sign, patients were asked to walk 5 m with their eyes open. This was repeated with their eyes closed. Swaying, feeling of instability or inability to complete the walk with eyes closed was interpreted as a positive walking Romberg sign. This test was compared to common clinical signs to evaluate its relevance. Whilst the Hoffman's reflex (79%) was the most prevalent sign seen, the walking Romberg sign was actually present in 74.5% of the cases. The traditional Romberg test was positive in 17 cases and 16 of these had the walking Romberg positive as well. Another 21 patients had a positive walking Romberg test. Though not statistically significant, the mean 30 m walking times were slower in patients with traditional Romberg test than in those with positive walking Romberg test and fastest in those with neither of these tests positive. The combination of either Hoffman's reflex and/or walking Romberg was positive in 96% of patients. The walking Romberg sign is more useful than the traditional Romberg test as it shows evidence of a proprioceptive gait deficit in significantly more patients with cervical myelopathy than is found on conventional neurological examination. The combination of Hoffman's reflex and walking Romberg sign has a potential as useful screening tests to detect clinically significant cervical myelopathy.

  7. [Cinema and neurology: early educational applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Carrillo, Jesús M

    2015-03-01

    Since its earliest days, cinema has been used in the teaching of neurology both to illustrate the professor's explanations and to make learning easier for students. To analyse some of the first applications of cinema to the teaching and learning of neurology. Shortly after the birth of the film projector it became apparent that it could be a valuable aid in teaching medicine, and especially neurology. Initially, actual recordings made by doctors themselves were used, and later documentaries, short films and feature films were employed as means of showing diagnostic and therapeutic methods, as well as different pathological signs, such as movement disorders. The intention was not to replace other methodologies but instead to complement them and to make the process of acquiring knowledge easier. Applying cinema in teaching is a useful way to portray the contents of different subjects, especially in the field of neurology, and to favour the acquisition of both specific and cross-disciplinary competences, with very positive results being obtained among students.

  8. [Neurological manifestations in atypical Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Guzmán, Edgar; Gámez-González, Luisa Berenise; Rivas-Larrauri, Francisco; Sorcia-Ramírez, Giovanni; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. Atypical Kawasaki disease is defined as that where there are signs and symptoms not corresponding to the classical criteria for this nosological entity. Children with atypical Kawasaki disease may present with acute abdominal symptoms, meningeal irritation, pneumonia or renal failure. We describe 4 children with ages ranging from 2 to 12 years who had atypical Kawasaki disease, with neurological and gastrointestinal symptoms as part of the systemic presentation of the disease. Treatment consisted of immunoglobulin and corticosteroids with good evolution. KD is a systemic vasculitis that can involve many territories. Atypical manifestations can mislead the clinician and delay diagnosis. Pediatricians and sub-specialists should be aware of these neurological manifestations in order to provide adequate and opportune treatment.

  9. Hashimoto encephalopathy: Neurological and psychiatric perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE is an autoimmune disease with neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations and elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Patients are mostly women. Age varies from 8 to 86 years. Prevalence of HE is estimated to be 2.1/100,000. Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms and signs constitute the clinical picture. The disease responds well to corticosteroid therapy, but sometimes other immunomodulatory therapies must be applied. Autoimmune mechanisms with antibodies against antigens in the brain cortex are suspected. The course of the disease can be acute, subacute, chronic, or relapsing/remitting. Some patients improve spontaneously, but a few died in spite of adequate therapy.

  10. Gluten sensitivity and neurological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Berio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report on six cases of gluten-sensitivity, also defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity, characterized by abdominal features (diarrhea, bloating, pain, genetic positivity for predisposition to celiac disease (DQB1* 02 in all cases; DQA1*05 in three; DQA1*02 in two, DQB1*03 in two, negative anti-t-Transglutaminase antibodies, normal mucosa on biopsy in four cases, type 1 of Marsh in one case. The subjects presented frequent central nervous system (CNS symptoms: headache in three patients, somnolence in one, electroencephalogram aspecific alterations in three (in two of them with previous seizures, leptomeningeal cyst in one, intracranial calcification in one, cerebral gliosis in two. After a gluten-free diet, all intestinal and clinical CNS features remitted, but re-appeared after gluten reintroduction. On the basis of the neurological signs, the authors stress the relevance of immune innate system in the pathogenesis of these cases with possible subsequent evolution on immune adaptive system involvement.

  11. The neurology of proverbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, D

    1990-01-01

    Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are "concrete", recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests) point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH). Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  12. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  13. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  14. [Vitamin D and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Éric; Camu, William

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk of multiple sclerosis and also with a higher relapse rate as well as a higher number of MRI lesions. Elders with vitamin D deficiency have worse cognitive performance. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease. Ischemic stroke are more frequent and more severe in patients with low vitamin D levels. Carotid atherosclerosis is more frequent and more severe in patients with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk and worse prognosis of Parkinson's disease. In the different neurological disorders discussed herein, gene polymorphisms that could alter vitamin D metabolism are also associated with a higher incidence or a worse disease prognosis. Despite the links between vitamin D deficiency and the risks of developing neurological disorders, there is, to date, no proof that supplementation could alter the course of these diseases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  16. The Forbidden Signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    is an important addition that offers insight into the hardware requirements for bio-semiosis. As any type of semiosis must be dependent upon Semiotic scaffolds, I recently argued that the process of semiosis has to be divided into two separate processes of sign establishment and sign interpretation......, and that misalignment between the two processes result in faulty sign interpretation and over-signification. Such faulty signs were forbidden in the sign classification system of Peirce, so I defined them as forbidden signs. Here I present an analysis of the forbidden sign categories with examples from Occult semiotics...... as the combination of two processes; one leading to diversity generation within semiotic scaffolds followed by a second process of decimation of faulty signs during selection in specific learning environments. The analysis suggests that forbidden signs are always used as early stages in the iterative sign...

  17. Sign Language Interpreters' Training

    OpenAIRE

    Andriakopoulou, Eirini; Bouras, Christos; Giannaka, Eri

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, the evolution of technology and the increasing use of computers gave the opportunity for developing new methods of education of deaf individuals and sign language interpreters. The e-learning environments that have been developed for the education of sign language provide web-based courses, designed to effectively teach to anyone the Sign Language. Recognizing the difficulties and barriers of sign language training as well as the importance of sign language interpreters for the comm...

  18. Neurologic complications of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Weimer, Louis H

    2014-06-01

    This review serves as an overview of neurologic conditions associated with alcohol abuse or withdrawal, including epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic approach, and treatment. Frequent alcohol abuse and frank alcoholism are very common among adults in the United States. Although rates decline with each decade, as many as 10% of the elderly drink excessively. Given the ubiquitous nature of alcoholism in society, its complications have been clinically recognized for generations, with recent advances focusing on improved understanding of ethanol's biochemical targets and the pathophysiology of its complications. The chronic effects of alcohol abuse are myriad and include neurologic complications through both direct and indirect effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. These disorders include several encephalopathic states related to alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, and related nutritional deficiencies; acute and chronic toxic and nutritional peripheral neuropathies; and myopathy. Although prevention of alcoholism and its neurologic complications is the optimal strategy, this article reviews the specific treatment algorithms for alcohol withdrawal and its related nutritional deficiency states.

  19. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  20. Clinical and neurological characteristics of aortic thromboembolism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, R; Penderis, J; Chang, Y P; Zoia, A; Mosley, J; Anderson, T J

    2008-04-01

    To characterise the clinical presentation and neurological abnormalities in dogs affected by aortic thromboembolism. The medical records of 13 dogs diagnosed with aortic thromboembolism as the cause of the clinical signs, and where a complete neurological examination was performed, were reviewed retrospectively. The onset was acute in only four dogs, chronic in five dogs (with all of these presenting as exercise intolerance) or chronic with acute deterioration in four dogs. Dogs with an acute onset of clinical signs were more severely affected exhibiting neurological deficits, while dogs with a chronic onset of disease predominantly presented with the exercise intolerance and minimal deficits. The locomotor deficits included exercise intolerance with pelvic limb weakness (five of 13), pelvic limb ataxia (one of 13), monoparesis (two of 13), paraparesis (two of 13), non-ambulatory paraparesis (two of 13) and paraplegia (one of 13). There was an apparent male predisposition and the cavalier King charles spaniel was overrepresented. The rate of onset of clinical signs appears to segregate dogs affected by aortic thromboembolism into two groups, with different clinical characteristics and outcomes. Dogs with an acute onset of the clinical signs tend to be more severely affected, while dogs with a chronic onset predominantly present with exercise intolerance. It is therefore important to consider aortic thromboembolism as a differential diagnosis in dogs with an acute onset of pelvic limb neurological deficits and in dogs with longer standing exercise intolerance.

  1. Retrospective study of the clinical effects of acupuncture on cervical neurological diseases in dogs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Ching Ming; Chang, Fang Chia; Lin, Chung Tien

    2016-01-01

    .... The interval between the neurological disease onset and treatment (duration of signs), time to improvement after treatment, and recovery time were compared in dogs by body weight, age, and dry needle acupuncture (AP...

  2. [Postpolio syndrome. Neurologic and psychiatric aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M-A; Schönknecht, P; Pilz, J; Storch-Hagenlocher, B

    2004-04-01

    Postpolio syndrome is defined as a clinical syndrome of new pareses in individuals who had been affected by acute paralytic poliomyelitis years before. The objective of this study was to describe neurologic and psychiatric signs of the disease. We evaluated the clinical signs and treatment of 16 patients with postpolio syndrome. Possible symptoms of depression were evaluated by the Hamilton and Geriatric Depression Scales. Postpolio syndrome manifested at a median age of 57.5 years (range 25-73) in a median of 41 years (range 16-70 years) after acute poliomyelitis. Muscles already affected during acute poliomyelitis were affected in all patients with postpolio syndrome. Six of 16 patients (37.5%) developed paresis in muscles formerly not affected by acute poliomyelitis. In eight of 15 patients (53%), depressive episodes were recognized according to the ICD-10 criteria. Symptoms of depression should be recognized in patients with postpolio syndrome and incorporated in therapy based on physiotherapy.

  3. Study on subsequent neurologic complications in children with acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Naoaki; Shimazaki, Haruyo; Hoshi, Yasutaka; Akatsuka, Jun-ichi (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-06-01

    Twenty-seven children with acute leukemia were studied in order to detect the subsequent neurologic complications due to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Twenty-four patients with ALL received central nervous system prophylaxis including cranial irradiation. The methods of evaluation consisted of electroencephalogram (EEG), computed tomography of the head (CT scan), soft neurological sign, intelligence quotient (IQ) and Bender Gestalt test. The patients with relapse showed severe abnormalities in various kinds of examinations. Younger children at diagnosis were associated with a higher abnormality rate of soft neurological signs and Bender Gestalt test. Factors which were found to be closely associated with a lower IQ score included younger children at diagnosis and longer duration of remission time. These results indicate the need for caution for the dosage of cranial irradiation for younger patients in CNS prophylaxis, and improvement of a lower IQ score in long-term survivors requires further investigation as to the appropriate intellectual environment for their development after remission. (author).

  4. Neurological manifestations of snake bite in Sri Lanka.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seneviratne U

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Snake bite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in certain parts of Sri Lanka. This study was designed to determine the offending snakes, neurological manifestations, disease course, and outcome in neurotoxic envenomation. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Fifty six consecutive patients admitted with neurological manifestations following snake bite were studied prospectively. Data were obtained regarding the offending snakes, neurological symptoms, time taken for onset of symptoms, neurological signs, and time taken for recovery. RESULTS: The offending snake was Russell′s viper in 27(48.2%, common and Sri Lankan krait in 19(33.9%, cobra in 3(5.4%, and unidentified in 7(12.5%. Ptosis was the commonest neurological manifestation seen in 48(85.7% followed by ophthalmoplegia (75%, limb weakness (26.8%, respiratory failure (17.9%, palatal weakness (10.7%, neck muscle weakness (7.1%, and delayed sensory neuropathy (1.8%. Neurological symptoms were experienced usually within 6 hours after the bite. Following administration of antivenom, the signs of recovery became evident within a few hours to several days. The duration for complete recovery ranged from four hours to two weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Complete recovery of neuromuscular weakness was observed in all patients except for one who died with intracerebral haemorrhage shortly after admission.

  5. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  6. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences (AJNS) is owned and controlled by the Pan African Association of Neurological Sciences (PAANS). The AJNS's aim is to publish scientific papers of any aspects of Neurological Sciences. AJNS is published quarterly. Articles submitted exclusively to the AJNS are accepted if neither ...

  7. 76 FR 2129 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke... who plan to attend and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation or other...

  8. Catheter-related epidural abscesses -- don't wait for neurological deficits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royakkers, A.A.; Willigers, H.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Wilmink, J.T.; Durieux, M.; Kleef, M. van

    2002-01-01

    Epidural abscess is a rare but serious complication of epidural anesthesia for peri- and postoperative analgesia. It is feared because of possible persistent neurological deficits. Epidural abscess presents mostly with a classic triad of symptoms: back pain, fever and variable neurological signs and

  9. Neurological abnormalities in the `cri-du-chat' syndrome 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colover, Jack; Lucas, Mary; Comley, J. A.; Roe, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    An unusual case of the cri-du-chat syndrome is described in a 6½ year old boy, who, as well as attacks of stridor and choking, showed disorders of spatial perception and cerebellar signs in the form of nystagmus, clumsiness of the hands, and ataxia. Pyramidal signs were also present. He was only mildly retarded mentally. Psychological testing showed that he had a severe deficit for number processing, and also constructional apraxia. Surprisingly, his vocabulary was quite good, as was his reading capacity. Chromosome analysis showed a very small deletion of the short arm of the group B chromosome. In infancy this diagnosis may be suspected because of the high-pitched cry and attacks of stridor and choking. In late childhood, when the signs may be only of a neurological disorder, its recognition may be difficult without confirmation from chromosome studies. The neurological features of this disease are reviewed. Images PMID:5084140

  10. Original footage of the Chilean miners with manganism published in Neurology in 1967.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Marcelo; Bustamante, M Leonor; Mena, Francisco; Lees, Andrew

    2015-12-15

    Manganism has captured the imagination of neurologists for more than a century because of its similarities to Parkinson disease and its indirect but seminal role in the "l-dopa miracle." We present unpublished footage of the original case series reported in Neurology® in 1967 by Mena and Cotzias depicting the typical neurologic signs of manganism in 4 Chilean miners and their response to high doses of l-dopa. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. The Babinski sign--a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S P

    2003-01-01

    In 1896, Josph Babinski, a French neurologist, first described the best known neurologic eponym--"the Babinski sign". This sign is characterised by dorsiflexion of the big toe, by recruitment of the extensor hallucis longus muscle, on stimulating the sole of the foot. He himself emphasised from the outset the intimate relationship between this sign and the shortening movement in other leg muscles, which forms the flexion synergy of the lower limb. The Babinski sign is not a new reflex, rather it is released as a result of breakdown of the harmonious integration of the flexion and extension component of the normal defence reflex mechanism, due to pyramidal tract dysfunction. A pathological Babinski sign should be clearly distinguished from upgoing toes that may not always be a part of the flexion synergy. This article reviews the Babinski sign in detail, focusing on the historical perspectives, role of pyramidal tract dysfunction, art of elicitation and interpretation. The significance of assessing this phenomenon in the entire leg and the clinical clues that will help to dispel the myths regarding the Babinski sign has been emphasized.

  12. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  13. Neurologic emergencies in HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-De-Villoria, J A; Fernández-García, P; Borrego-Ruiz, P J

    HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients comprise a heterogeneous group including transplant patients, patients undergoing treatment with immunosuppressors, uremic patients, alcoholics, undernourished patients, diabetics, patients on dialysis, elderly patients, and those diagnosed with severe or neoplastic processes. Epileptic seizures, focal neurologic signs, and meningoencephalitis are neurologic syndromes that require urgent action. In most of these situations, neuroimaging tests are necessary, but the findings can be different from those observed in immunocompetent patients in function of the inflammatory response. Infectious disease is the first diagnostic suspicion, and the identification of an opportunistic pathogen should be oriented in function of the type and degree of immunosuppression. Other neurologic emergencies include ischemic stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, neoplastic processes, and pharmacological neurotoxicity. This article reviews the role of neuroimaging in HIV-negative immunodepressed patients with a neurologic complication that requires urgent management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurological aspects of grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Adriana C; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flavia; Nardi, Antonio E; Machado, Sergio; Pessoa, Tamires M

    2014-01-01

    Despite grief being a universal experience and the increased scientific attention paid to grief and bereavement in recent years, studies that seek to better understand the role of the neurological aspects of grief are still scarce. We found 5 studies that discussed the relationship between the neurological aspects of grief due to the death of a loved one. All studies showed an activation of common areas, i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), insula and amygdala. These findings could indicate that there is a group of areas working together and responding to generate the symptomatology of grief. Because grief is a universal experience, it is essential that the necessary and effective support can be provided to those who experience the loss of someone considered important in their lives, and this requires understanding grief's manifestation, its differential diagnosis in reference to other clinical conditions, mainly psychiatric ones, and adequate forms of intervention and treatment when necessary. Proper understanding and support can help prevent the emergence of more serious health problems.

  15. The neurology of acutely failing respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2017-04-01

    Forces involved in breathing-which effectively pull in air-are the diaphragmatic, intercostal, spine, and neck muscles. Equally important is the bulbar musculature maintaining the architecture of a patent airway conduit and abdominal wall and internal intercostal muscles providing cough. Acute injury along a neural trajectory from brainstem to muscle will impair the coordinated interaction between these muscle groups. Acutely failing respiratory mechanics can be caused by central and peripheral lesions. In central lesions, the key lesion is in the nucleus ambiguus innervating the dilator muscles of the soft palate, pharynx, and larynx, but abnormal respiratory mechanics rarely coincide with abnormalities of the respiratory pattern generator. In peripheral lesions, diaphragmatic weakness is a main element, but in many neuromuscular disorders mechanical upper airway obstruction from oropharyngeal weakness contributes equally to an increased respiratory load. The neurology of breathing involves changes in respiratory drive, rhythm, mechanics, and dynamics. This review focuses on the fundamentals of abnormal respiratory mechanics in acute neurologic conditions, bedside judgment, interpretation of additional laboratory tests, and initial stabilization, with practical solutions provided. Many of these respiratory signs are relevant to neurologists, who in acute situations may see these patients first. Ann Neurol 2017;81:485-494. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  16. Breast Cancer Presents with a Paraneoplastic Neurologic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Coelho Barata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes (PNS pose quite an uncommon neurological complication, affecting less than 1% of patients with breast cancer. Nearly one third of these patients lack detectable onconeural antibodies (ONAs, and improvement in neurologic deficits with concomitant cancer treatments is achieved in less than 30% of cases. Case Presentation: A 42-year-old, premenopausal woman presented with facial paralysis on the central left side accompanied by a left tongue deviation, an upward vertical nystagmus, moderate spastic paraparesis, dystonic posturing of the left foot, lower limb hyperreflexia and bilateral extensor plantar reflex. After ruling out all other potential neurologic causes, PNS was suspected but no ONAs were found. A PET-CT scan detected increased metabolism in the right breast, as well as an ipsilateral thoracic interpectoral adenopathy. Core biopsy confirmed the presence of an infiltrating duct carcinoma. After breast surgery, the neurologic symptoms disappeared. One week later, the patient was readmitted to the hospital with a bilateral fatigable eyelid ptosis, and two weeks later, there was a noticeable improvement in eyelid ptosis, accompanied by a rapid and progressive development of lower spastic paraparesis. She started adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy with marked clinical and neurological improvement, and by the end of radiotherapy, there were no signs of neurologic impairment. Conclusion: This case study highlights the importance of a high level of vigilance for the detection of PNS, even when ONAs are not detected, as the rapid identification and treatment of the underlying tumor offers the best chance for a full recovery.

  17. On the System of Person-Denoting Signs in Estonian Sign Language: Estonian Name Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paales, Liina

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Estonian personal name signs. According to study there are four personal name sign categories in Estonian Sign Language: (1) arbitrary name signs; (2) descriptive name signs; (3) initialized-descriptive name signs; (4) loan/borrowed name signs. Mostly there are represented descriptive and borrowed personal name signs among…

  18. The split hand sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Benny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral sclerosis (ALS is a disease characterized by pure motor asymmetric wasting of various muscles with associated upper motor neuron signs. The split hand sign, which is because of dissociated muscle weakness in the hands (thenar muscles disproportionately wasted as compared to the hypothenar muscles is a useful clinical sign for bed side diagnosis of ALS.

  19. Signed languages and globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddinga, A.; Crasborn, O.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf people who form part of a Deaf community communicate using a shared sign language. When meeting people from another language community, they can fall back on a flexible and highly context-dependent form of communication called international sign, in which shared elements from their own sign

  20. British Sign Name Customs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  1. Primary care perceptions of neurology and neurology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Angela M; Wade, Carrie; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-06-01

    Neurophobia (fear of neural sciences) and evaluation of independent sector contracts in neurology have seldom been examined among general practitioners (GPs). A questionnaire determined GPs' perceptions of neurology compared with other medical specialties. GP experiences of neurology services with independent sector companies and the local National Health Service (NHS) were compared. Areas of potential improvement in NHS neurology services were recorded from thematic analyses. Among 76 GPs neurology was perceived to be as interesting as other medical specialties. GPs reported less knowledge, more difficulty and less confidence in neurology compared with other medical specialties. There was a preference for a local NHS neurology service (pneurology services provided better patient satisfaction. GPs prefer local NHS neurology services to independent sector contracts. GPs' evaluations should inform commissioning of neurology services. Combating neurophobia should be an integral part of responsive commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Deja vu in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The significance of deja vu is widely recognised in the context of temporal lobe epilepsy, and enquiry about deja vu is frequently made in the clinical assessment of patients with possible epilepsy. Deja vu has also been associated with several psychiatric disorders. The historical context of current understanding of deja vu is discussed. The literature reveals deja vu to be a common phenomenon consistent with normality. Several authors have suggested the existence of a "pathological" form of deja vu that differs, qualitatively or quantitatively, from "non-pathological" deja vu. The features of deja vu suggesting neurological or psychiatric pathology are discussed. Several neuroanatomical and psychological models of the deja vu experience are highlighted, implicating the perceptual, mnemonic and affective regions of the lateral temporal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala in the genesis of deja vu. A possible genetic basis for a neurochemical model of deja vu is discussed. Clinical approaches to the patient presenting with possible deja vu are proposed.

  3. Consciousness: A Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking.

  4. The "double panda" sign in Leigh disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonam, Kothari; Bindu, P S; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Khan, Nahid Akhtar; Govindaraju, C; Arvinda, Hanumanthapura R; Nagappa, Madhu; Sinha, Sanjib; Thangaraj, K; Taly, Arun B

    2014-07-01

    Although the "face of the giant panda" sign on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is traditionally considered to be characteristic of Wilson disease, it has also been reported in other metabolic disorders. This study describes the characteristic "giant panda" sign on MRI in a child with Leigh disease. The diagnosis was based on the history of neurological regression; examination findings of oculomotor abnormalities, hypotonia, and dystonia; raised serum lactate levels; and characteristic brain stem and basal ganglia signal changes on MRI. The midbrain and pontine tegmental signal changes were consistent with the "face of the giant panda and her cub" sign. In addition to Wilson disease, metabolic disorders such as Leigh disease should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of this rare imaging finding. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Neurology and diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Neurological symptoms in children with intussusception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Puertas-Martín, V; Carreras-Sáez, I; Maraña-Pérez, A I; Escobar-Delgado, T; García-Peñas, J J

    2014-05-01

    Intussusception is a potentially severe obstructive disease that occurs when a more proximal portion of bowel invaginates into a more distal part of the bowel. Patients with intussusception often present with a wide range of non-specific systemic symptoms, with less than one quarter presenting with the classic triad of vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloody stools. An acute change in level of consciousness could be the only clinical symptom of this disorder. To ascertain the frequency and nature of the neurological symptoms in children with intussusception, and to describe the characteristics of the patients presenting in this atypical way. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 351 children presenting with intussusception from 2000 to 2012. General epidemiological data, abdominal and neurological signs and symptoms, duration of symptoms and effectiveness of treatment, were analysed in all patients. Of the 351 patients studied, 15 (4.27%) had one or more neurological symptoms recorded at presentation, with lethargy being the most frequent (66.66%), followed by hypotonia, generalized weakness, paroxysmal events, and fluctuating consciousness. Sixty per cent of these fifteen patients showed isolated neurological symptomatology, and eleven of them (73.3%) needed a laparotomy to reduce the intussusception. Intussusception should be considered in the differential diagnosis in infants and young children presenting as a pediatric emergency with lethargy, hypotonia, generalized weakness, paroxysmal events and/or sudden changes in consciousness, even in the absence of the classical symptoms of intussusception. An early recognition of intussusception may improve the global prognosis and avoid ischaemic intestinal sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Minor neurological dysfunction from birth to 12 years. II : Puberty is related to decreased dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunsing, R J; Hadders-Algra, M; Huisjes, H J; Touwen, B C

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether puberty is related to decreased minor neurological dysfunction (MND), 174 children from the Groningen Perinatal Project who had had MND at nine years were re-examined at 12 years. No signs of MND could be demonstrated in 39 of the children, 33 of whom showed at least three signs

  8. MINOR NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION FROM BIRTH TO 12 YEARS .2. PUBERTY IS RELATED TO DECREASED DYSFUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUNSING, RJ; HADDERSALGRA, M; HUISJES, HJ; TOUWEN, BCL

    To determine whether puberty is related to decreased minor neurological dysfunction (MND), 174 children from the Groningen Perinatal Project who had had MND at nine years were re-examined at 12 years. No signs of MND could be demonstrated in 39 of the children, 33 of whom showed at least three signs

  9. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  10. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-07-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Adults with pneumococcal meningitis have the highest risk of developing focal neurological deficits, which are most commonly caused by cerebral infarction, but can also be due to cerebritis, subdural empyema, cerebral abscess or intracerebral bleeding. Focal deficits may improve during clinical course and even after discharge, but a proportion of patients will have persisting focal neurological deficits that often interfere in patient's daily life. Hearing loss occurs in a high proportion of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and has been associated with co-existing otitis. Children and adults recovering from bacterial meningitis without apparent neurological deficits are at risk for long-term cognitive deficits. Early identification of neurological sequelae is important for children to prevent additional developmental delay, and for adults to achieve successful return in society after the disease. Neurological sequelae occur in a substantial amount of patients following bacterial meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  12. Splicing Regulation in Neurologic Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Licatalosi, Donny D; Darnell, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    .... It is becoming evident that alternative splicing plays a particularly important role in neurologic disease, which is perhaps not surprising given the important role splicing plays in generating...

  13. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. D. Brucki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA. Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  14. Smart Signs: Showing the way in Smart Surroundings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijding, M.E.M.; Benz, H.P.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    This paper presents a context-aware guidance and messaging system for large buildings and surrounding venues. Smart Signs are a new type of electronic door- and way-sign based on wireless sensor networks. Smart Signs present in-situ personalized guidance and messages, are ubiquitous, and easy to

  15. Sign language and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvillian, J D; Nelson, K E; Rhyne, J M

    1981-03-01

    Research findings and issues in teaching sign language to nonspeaking autistic children are reviewed. Data on over 100 children indicate that nearly all autistic children learn receptive and expressive signs, and many learn to combine signs. These children also exhibit marked improvement in adaptive behaviors. Speech skills are acquired by fewer children and may be developed through simultaneous speech and sign training. Possible explanations for these results are given, together with suggestions for future research and data collection. Recommended innovations include exposure to fluent signers and training in discourse and code-switching. Different sign language teaching methods need to be investigated more fully, including emphasis on training sign language within the children's total environment and with greater staff and parental participation.

  16. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  17. Formal Devices for Creating New Signs in American Sign Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellugi, Ursula; Newkirk, Don

    1981-01-01

    Examines recently coined American Sign Language signs to show how the ASL lexicon is expanded. Included are elicited signs for relatively new objects or ideas, signs referring to metalinguistics concepts in ASL, signs used as jargon or specialized vocabulary, and signs "invented" by young deaf children. (Author/PJM)

  18. Acute neurological involvement in diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Sylvie; Kwon, Thérésa; Elmaleh, Monique; Charbit, Marina; Launay, Emma Allain; Harambat, Jérôme; Brun, Muriel; Ranchin, Bruno; Bandin, Flavio; Cloarec, Sylvie; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhene; Piètrement, Christine; Champion, Gérard; Ulinski, Tim; Deschênes, Georges

    2010-07-01

    Neurologic involvement is the most threatening complication of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS). We report a retrospective multicenter series of 52 patients with severe initial neurologic involvement that occurred in the course of D+HUS. Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection was documented in 24. All except two patients had acute renal failure that required peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or both techniques. A first group of eight patients remained with normal consciousness; five of them had protracted seizures. A second group of 23 patients had stuporous coma; five of these had protracted severe seizures, and 18 had a neurologic defect including pyramidal syndrome, hemiplegia or hemiparesia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. A third group of 21 patients had severe coma. Plasma exchanges were undertaken in 25 patients, 11 of whom were treated within 24 hours after the first neurologic sign; four died, two survived with severe sequelae, and five were alive without neurologic defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 29 patients showed that (1) every structure of the central nervous system was susceptible to involvement; (2) no correlation seemed to exist between special profile of localization on early MRI and the final prognosis; and (3) MRI did not exhibit any focal lesions in three patients. The overall prognosis of the series was marked by the death of nine patients and severe sequelae in 13. Neurologic involvement is associated with a severe renal disease but does not lead systematically to death or severe disability.

  19. Neurological damage arising from intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rei, M; Ayres-de-Campos, D; Bernardes, J

    2016-01-01

    Complications occurring at any level of foetal oxygen supply will result in hypoxaemia, and this may ultimately lead to hypoxia/acidosis and neurological damage. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the short-term neurological dysfunction caused by intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis, and this diagnosis requires the presence of a number of findings, including the confirmation of newborn metabolic acidosis, low Apgar scores, early imaging evidence of cerebral oedema and the appearance of clinical signs of neurological dysfunction in the first 48 h of life. Cerebral palsy (CP) consists of a heterogeneous group of nonprogressive movement and posture disorders, frequently accompanied by cognitive and sensory impairments, epilepsy, nutritional deficiencies and secondary musculoskeletal lesions. Although CP is the most common long-term neurological complication associated with intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis, >80% of cases are caused by other phenomena. Data on minor long-term neurological deficits are scarce, but they suggest that less serious intellectual and motor impairments may result from intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis. This chapter focuses on the existing evidence of neurological damage associated with poor foetal oxygenation during labour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interventional neurology: a reborn subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Randall C; Alshekhlee, Amer; Yavagal, Dileep R; Vora, Nirav; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2012-10-01

    Neurologists have a long history of involvement in cerebral angiography; however, the roots of neurologist involvement in therapeutic endovascular procedures have not been previously documented. As outlined in this article, it has taken the efforts of several early pioneers to lay the ground work for interventional neurology, a specialty that has become one of the fastest growing neurological subspecialties. The ground work, along with a great clinical need, has allowed the modern interventional neurologist to tackle some of the most intractable diseases, especially those affecting the cerebral vasculature. The institutionalization of interventional neurology as a subspecialty was first advocated in 1995 in an article entitled, "Interventional Neurology, a subspecialty whose time has come." The institutions created in the wake of this article have provided the framework that has allowed interventional neurology to transition from "a subspecialty whose time has come" to a subspecialty that is here to stay and thrive. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  1. The Sign Learning Theory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KING OF DAWN

    The Sign Learning Theory. Although a blend of both Gestalt psychology and behaviourism, the sign learning theory is actually a drift from the behaviourist perspective with an attempt to explain certain phenomena commonly seen in behaviour which could not be satisfactorily accounted for by stimulus-response paradigms.

  2. Standardization of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the years attempts have been made to standardize sign languages. This form of language planning has been tackled by a variety of agents, most notably teachers of Deaf students, social workers, government agencies, and occasionally groups of Deaf people themselves. Their efforts have most often involved the development of sign language books…

  3. Neurological diseases of the Cavalier King Charles spaniel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusbridge, C

    2005-06-01

    Several neurological syndromes have been described in Cavalier King Charles spaniels and many of the conditions have similar clinical signs. The current knowledge of these syndromes is reviewed in this article, with the aim of enabling the general practitioner to formulate a differential diagnosis and plan for diagnostic tests and treatment. Specifically, the article discusses and contrasts the most common conditions seen, Including occipital hypoplasia/syringomyelia, episodic collapse, epilepsy and vestibular disorders.

  4. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  5. [Neurologic manifestations of Behçet disease. Review of the caseload of the Neurology and Dermatology services at the Santa Maria Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canhão, P; Ferro, J M; Freitas, J P

    1992-07-01

    Neurological involvement in a series of patients with Behçet's disease, evaluated at the Departments of Neurology and Dermatology, St. Maria Hospital is reported. Meningoencephalytic or encephalytic were the most common clinical forms, while headache, cerebellar and pyramidal signs were the most prevalent symptoms/signs. On follow-up (range 2-13 years) the majority of the patients had either a progressive or a remitting-progressive course. Magnetic ressonance imaging was the most valuable method of detecting central nervous system lesions.

  6. A Poisson-like model of sub-clinical signs from the examination of healthy aging subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Stephen J; Myklebust, Barbara; Myklebust, Joel; Reynolds, Norman; Duthie, Edmund

    2008-08-01

    Our studies of the standard neurological examination on 66 middle-aged (50-64 yrs) and elderly subjects (65-84 yrs) demonstrate that healthy elders have neurological deficits (or "signs") that are not associated with specific known neurological disease. The purpose of the current study is to describe this loss of neurological function in healthy aging subjects as seen through accumulated subclinical neurological signs present. Logistic regression is applied to the data on each of six signs. Parameters determined are used to describe the distribution of first occurrence times for each sign. The results are then used to construct a Poisson-like model that describes the accumulation in the number of signs present over time on average. This model is also used to simulate a longitudinal population to explore the variability in the number of signs present over time in an aging population. As the rate of arrival of the signs is heterogeneous, as determined through logistic regression, and the number of signs detected is finite, the resulting distributions of the number of signs over time have a different nature than Poisson. Our results suggest that we can expect to see on average one neurological deficit in healthy people by the age of 62, and that the expected number of deficits increases linearly at the rate of 1 additional sign every 12 years over a wide age range (age 70-90). The distribution of the number of deficits over time is also described. The linearity in the average rate at which signs appear in this population is somewhat of a surprise, in that an increasing (accelerating) rate might be anticipated. In addition to characterizing the neurological exam results in this group, we demonstrate a methodology that allows the comparison of groups and defines a rate of neurological aging.

  7. Why neurology? Factors which influence career choice in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Hoyle, Chad; Yin, Han; McCoyd, Matthew; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the factors which influence the decision to pursue a career in neurology. An anonymous survey was developed using a Likert scale to rate responses. The survey was sent to adult and child neurology faculty, residents and fellows, as well as medical students applying for neurology. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the factors of influence. Respondents were subsequently categorized into pre-neurology trainees, neurology trainees, child neurologists and adult neurologists, and differences between the groups were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test. One hundred and thirty-three anonymous responses were received. The respondents were neurologists across all levels of training and practice. Across all respondents, the most common factor of high importance was intellectual content of specialty, challenging diagnostic problems, type of patient encountered and interest in helping people. Responses were similar across the groups; however, the earliest trainees cited interest in helping people as most important, while those in neurology training and beyond cite intellectual content of the specialty as most important. As trainees transition from their earliest levels of clinical experience into working as residents and faculty, there is a shift in the cited important factors. Lifestyle and financial factors seem to be the least motivating across all groups. Encouragement from peers, mentors, faculty and practicing physicians is considered high influences in a smaller number of neurologists. This may present an opportunity for practicing neurologists to make connections with medical students early in their education in an effort to encourage and mentor candidates.

  8. 21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Spanish State Secretary for Research C. Martinez welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and CERN Financial Officer S. Lettow and signing the electronic guest book with theoretical physicist A. de Rújula.

    CERN Multimedia

    LHC 2008

    2008-01-01

    21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Spanish State Secretary for Research C. Martinez welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and CERN Financial Officer S. Lettow and signing the electronic guest book with theoretical physicist A. de Rújula.

  9. 21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Czech Deputy Minister of Education, Youth and Sports, responsible for Science and Universities V. Ruzicka welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and CERN Financial Officer S. Lettow and signing the electronic guest book with CERN user R. Leitner.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photo Service

    2008-01-01

    21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Czech Deputy Minister of Education, Youth and Sports, responsible for Science and Universities V. Ruzicka welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and CERN Financial Officer S. Lettow and signing the electronic guest book with CERN user R. Leitner.

  10. 21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration -Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador pf the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the UN B. J. Van Eenennaam welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and CERN Financial Officer S. Lettow and signing the electronic guest book with ATLAS engineer H. ten Kate.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photo Service

    2008-01-01

    21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration -Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador pf the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the UN B. J. Van Eenennaam welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and CERN Financial Officer S. Lettow and signing the electronic guest book with ATLAS engineer H. ten Kate.

  11. The ATIS sign language corpus

    OpenAIRE

    Bungeroth, Jan; Stein, Daniel; Dreuw, Philippe; Ney, Hermann; Morrissey, Sara; Way, Andy; van Zijl, Lynette

    2008-01-01

    Systems that automatically process sign language rely on appropriate data. We therefore present the ATIS sign language corpus that is based on the domain of air travel information. It is available for five languages, English, German, Irish sign language, German sign language and South African sign language. The corpus can be used for different tasks like automatic statistical translation and automatic sign language recognition and it allows the specific modelling of spatial references in sign...

  12. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diagnostic imaging techniques and chemical and metabolic analyses to detect, manage, and treat neurological disease. Some ... performed in a doctor’s office or at a clinic. Fluoroscopy is a type of x-ray that ...

  13. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurologic Complications of Smallpox Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox and smallpox vaccination is reviewed from the Departments of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

  15. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  16. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  18. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  19. Signs of Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Building Resilience Sleep Growing Healthy Healthy Children > Healthy Living > Emotional Wellness > Signs of ...

  20. The Babinski sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jasper M; Reilly, Mary M

    2011-10-01

    Joseph Babinski (1857-1932), a French neurologist of Polish descent, was the first person to describe extension of the big toe following stimulation of the sole of the foot on 22 February 1896 (Babinski, 1896). He referred to the sign as 'phénomène des orteils' (toes phenomenon) but it is now usually referred to eponymously as the 'Babinski sign' or descriptively as the extensor plantar response.

  1. Education Research: Neurology resident education: Trending skills, confidence, and professional preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Justin T; Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M; Engstrom, John

    2016-03-15

    To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Parkinsonian signs are a risk factor for falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahodwala, Nabila; Nwadiogbu, Chinwe; Fitts, Whitney; Partridge, Helen; Karlawish, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Parkinsonian signs are common, non-specific findings in older adults and associated with increased rates of dementia and mortality. It is important to understand which motor outcomes are associated with parkinsonian signs. To determine the role of parkinsonian signs on fall rates among older adults. We conducted a longitudinal study of primary care patients from the University of Pennsylvania Health System. Adults over 55 years were assessed at baseline through surveys and a neurological examination. We recorded falls over the following 2 years. Parkinsonian signs were defined as the presence of 2 of 4 cardinal signs. Incident falls were compared between subjects with and without parkinsonian signs, and modified Poisson regression used to adjust for potential confounders in the relationship between parkinsonian signs and falls. 982 subjects with a mean age of 68 (s.d. 8.8) years participated. 29% of participants fell and 12% exhibited parkinsonian signs at baseline. The unadjusted RR for falls among individuals with parkinsonian signs was 1.36 (95% CI 1.05-1.76, p=0.02). After adjusting for age, cognitive function, urinary incontinence, depression, diabetes, stroke and arthritis, individuals with parkinsonian signs were still 38% more likely to fall than those without parkinsonian signs (RR 1.38, 95% CI 1.04-1.82; p=0.03). Falls among those with parkinsonian signs were more likely to lead to injury (53% vs 37%; p=0.04). Parkinsonian signs are a significant, independent risk factor for falls. Early detection of this clinical state is important in order to implement fall prevention programs among primary care patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adolf Kussmaul and Kussmaul's sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navreet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kussmaul's has provided us with three important signs: Pulses paradoxus, Kussmaul's sign and Kussmaul Breathing. This article discusses Kussmaul's sign, its discovery, first description, pathophyiology and exceptions.

  4. The tablet device in hospital neurology and in neurology graduate medical education: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Pravin; Newey, Christopher R; Bhimraj, Adarsh

    2015-01-01

    There is limited literature on tablet devices for neurohospitalists and in neurological graduate medical education. This study evaluated utilization, benefits, and limitations of customized tablets on inpatient neurology practice and resident education. The hypothesis was the perception of the tablet would be positive, given their portability, convenience to accessing point-of-care reference, and accessibility to the electronic medical record. Second-generation iPads with neurology-specific applications and literature were provided to our in-hospital general, stroke, and consult neurology teams. After 1 year, residents on these teams were surveyed on demographic data, familiarity, and utilization of the iPad and their perceptions of the device. All 27 residents responded to the survey. Most participants (23 of 27) used a tablet while on inpatient service. Twelve regularly utilized the neurology-specific apps and/or accessed scientific articles. Technologically savvy residents felt significantly more comfortable using tablets and were more quickly acquainted with the features. Thirteen respondents wanted a formal orientation on the advanced features of the tablet independent of their familiarity with the device or level of technological comfort. Overall, the perception was that the tablet was beneficial for inpatient clinical care and as an educational reference. Participants became easily familiarized with the device features quickly, regardless of whether they owned one previously or not. Most physicians indicated interest in advanced features of tablets; however, a formal orientation may be beneficial for optimal utilization. A reliable network connection is essential to in-hospital use of tablet devices. Additional research pertaining to patient outcomes, objective educational benefit, and cost-effectiveness is necessary.

  5. Neurologic presentation of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushara, Khalafalla O

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) long has been associated with neurologic and psychiatric disorders including cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, and depression. Earlier reports mainly have documented the involvement of the nervous system as a complication of prediagnosed CD. However, more recent studies have emphasized that a wider spectrum of neurologic syndromes may be the presenting extraintestinal manifestation of gluten sensitivity with or without intestinal pathology. These include migraine, encephalopathy, chorea, brain stem dysfunction, myelopathy, mononeuritis multiplex, Guillain-Barre-like syndrome, and neuropathy with positive antiganglioside antibodies. The association between most neurologic syndromes described and gluten sensitivity remains to be confirmed by larger epidemiologic studies. It further has been suggested that gluten sensitivity (as evidenced by high antigliadin antibodies) is a common cause of neurologic syndromes (notably cerebellar ataxia) of otherwise unknown cause. Additional studies showed high prevalence of gluten sensitivity in genetic neurodegenerative disorders such as hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia and Huntington's disease. It remains unclear whether gluten sensitivity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders or whether it represents an epiphenomenon. Studies of gluten-free diet in patients with gluten sensitivity and neurologic syndromes have shown variable results. Diet trials also have been inconclusive in autism and schizophrenia, 2 diseases in which sensitivity to dietary gluten has been implicated. Further studies clearly are needed to assess the efficacy of gluten-free diet and to address the underlying mechanisms of nervous system pathology in gluten sensitivity.

  6. Methyl Mercury Exposure at Niigata, Japan: Results of Neurological Examinations of 103 Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimio Maruyama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Large-scale poisonings caused by methyl mercury (MeHg have occurred in Japan (Minamata in the 1950s and Niigata in the 1960s and Iraq (in the 1970s. The current WHO neurological risk standard for adult exposure (hair level: 50 μg/g was based partly on evidence from Niigata which did not consider any cases who were diagnosed later and/or exposed to low level of MeHg (hair mercury level less than 50 μg/g. Methods. Early in the Niigata epidemic in June 1965 there were two extensive surveys. From these two surveys, we examined 103 adults with hair mercury measurement who consulted two medical institutions. We compared the prevalence and the distribution of neurological signs related to MeHg poisoning between exposure categories. Result. We found 48 subjects with neurological signs related to MeHg poisoning who had hair mercury concentration less than 50 μg/g. Among the neurological signs, sensory disturbance of the bilateral distal extremities was observed more frequently, followed by disequilibrium, hearing impairment, and ataxia, in groups with hair MeHg concentration both below 50 μg/g and over 50 μg/g. Conclusion. The present study suggests the possibility that exposure to MeHg at levels below the current WHO limits could cause neurologic signs, in particular, sensory disturbance.

  7. Methyl mercury exposure at Niigata, Japan: results of neurological examinations of 103 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Kimio; Yorifuji, Takashi; Tsuda, Toshihide; Sekikawa, Tomoko; Nakadaira, Hiroto; Saito, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale poisonings caused by methyl mercury (MeHg) have occurred in Japan (Minamata in the 1950s and Niigata in the 1960s) and Iraq (in the 1970s). The current WHO neurological risk standard for adult exposure (hair level: 50 μg/g) was based partly on evidence from Niigata which did not consider any cases who were diagnosed later and/or exposed to low level of MeHg (hair mercury level less than 50 μg/g). Early in the Niigata epidemic in June 1965 there were two extensive surveys. From these two surveys, we examined 103 adults with hair mercury measurement who consulted two medical institutions. We compared the prevalence and the distribution of neurological signs related to MeHg poisoning between exposure categories. We found 48 subjects with neurological signs related to MeHg poisoning who had hair mercury concentration less than 50 μg/g. Among the neurological signs, sensory disturbance of the bilateral distal extremities was observed more frequently, followed by disequilibrium, hearing impairment, and ataxia, in groups with hair MeHg concentration both below 50 μg/g and over 50 μg/g. The present study suggests the possibility that exposure to MeHg at levels below the current WHO limits could cause neurologic signs, in particular, sensory disturbance.

  8. Neurological aspects of HTLV-1 infection in Bahia: results from an 8-year cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Tanajura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HTLV-1 is the causal agent of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, a disease observed in up to 5% of individuals infected with HTLV-1. However, infected individuals without the disease can present neurological complaints relating to sensory, motor or urinary manifestations. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of neurological manifestations among patients with HTLV-1. Method HTLV-1 patients in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, were enrolled into a cohort study. Results Among 414 subjects, 76 had definite and 87 had possible or probable HAM/TSP at the baseline, whereas 251 subjects had no neurological signs or symptoms. Definite HAM/TSP developed in 5 patients (1.74%. The asymptomatic subjects were selected for analysis. The incidence rate expressed per 1,000 persons-year was calculated. It was 206 for hand numbness, 129 for nocturia and 126 for urinary urgency. In the neurological examination, leg hyperreflexia presented an average incidence rate of 76; leg paraparesis, 52; and Babinski sign, 36. Kaplan-Meyer curves categorized according to gender and proviral load showed that females and patients with proviral load of more than 100,000 copies per 106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs presented higher risk. Conclusion Development of neurological symptoms or signs occurred in up to 30% of asymptomatic subjects during 8 years of follow-up. Female gender and high proviral load were risk factors for neurological disease.

  9. Computational triadic algebras of signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadrozny, W. [T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present a finite model of Peirce`s ten classes of signs. We briefly describe Peirce`s taxonomy of signs; we prove that any finite collection of signs can be extended to a finite algebra of signs in which all interpretants are themselves being interpreted; and we argue that Peirce`s ten classes of signs can be defined using constraints on algebras of signs. The paper opens the possibility of defining multimodal cognitive agents using Peirce`s classes of signs, and is a first step towards building a computational logic of signs based on Peirce`s taxonomies.

  10. Neurologic considerations in propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, John; Chapman, Kimberly A; Summar, Marshall L; Ah Mew, Nicholas; Sutton, V Reid; MacLeod, Erin; Stagni, Kathy; Ueda, Keiko; Franks, Jill; Island, Eddie; Matern, Dietrich; Peña, Loren; Smith, Brittany; Urv, Tiina; Venditti, Charles; Chakarapani, Anupam; Gropman, Andrea L

    2012-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an organic acidemia which has a broad range of neurological complications, including developmental delay, intellectual disability, structural abnormalities, metabolic stroke-like episodes, seizures, optic neuropathy, and cranial nerve abnormalities. As the PA consensus conference hosted by Children's National Medical Center progressed from January 28 to 30, 2011, it became evident that neurological complications were common and a major component of morbidity, but the role of imaging and the basis for brain pathophysiology were unclear. This paper reviews the hypothesized pathophysiology, presentation and uses the best available evidence to suggest programs for treatment, imaging, and monitoring the neurological complications of PA. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acupuncture application for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyangsook; Park, Hi-Joon; Park, Jongbae; Kim, Mi-Ja; Hong, Meesuk; Yang, Jongsoo; Choi, Sunmi; Lee, Hyejung

    2007-01-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used for a range of neurological disorders. Despite its popularity, the evidence to support the use of acupuncture is contradictory. This review was designed to summarize and to evaluate the available evidence of acupuncture for neurological disorders. Most of the reviewed studies suffer from lack of methodological rigor. Owing to paucity and poor quality of the primary studies, no firm conclusion could be drawn on the use of acupuncture for epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ataxic disorders, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. For stroke rehabilitation, the evidence from recent high-quality trials and previous systematic reviews is not convincing. More rigorous trials are warranted to establish acupuncture's role in neurological disorders.

  12. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. [Child neurology and multimedia technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Methods of computer technology (intelligent technology, IT), such as multimedia and virtual reality, are utilized more and more in all medical fields including child neurology. Advances in the digitalization of individual medical data and multi-media technology have enabled patients to be able to obtain their own medical data by small media and to receive medical treatment at any hospitals even if they are located in distance place. Changes from a doctor oriented to patients oriented medicine is anticipated. It is necessary to store medical data from birth to adulthood and to accumulate epidemiological data of rare diseases such as metabolic diseases or degenerative diseases especially in child neurology, which highly require tele medicine and telecare at home. Moreover, IT may improve in the QOL of patients with neurological diseases and of their families. Cooperation of medicine and engineering is therefore necessary. Results of our experiments on telemedicine, telecare and virtual reality are described.

  14. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  15. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  16. Sleep disorders in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Guryevich Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are closely associated with both nervous system diseases and mental disorders; however, such patients prefer to seek just neurological advice. Insomnia is the most common complaint in routine clinical practice. It is characterized by different impairments in sleep and daytime awakening. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is less common, but more clinically important because of its negative impact on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The common neurological disorders are restless legs syndrome and REM sleep behavior disorder, as well as narcolepsy, the major manifestations of which are impaired nocturnal sleep and daytime awakening.

  17. These signs here now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    1995-01-01

    Hallidays (1984) formulations of systemic-functional linguistics together with Hodge and Kress' (1988) social semiotics share the assumption that signs are not arbitrary: People make choices out of a web of possible constructions or expressions, and those choices can be shown to be motivated......, could be advocated as am improvement to the social semiotic analyses, and whether the Peircean idea of dynamic interpretants could be applied to turn-taking or vica versa. I shall be referring to Kress' paper on the non-arbitrary character of signs (Kress 1993) as a point of departure and comparison....

  18. Toward the Ideal Signing Avatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Adamo-Villani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses ongoing research on the effects of a signing avatar's modeling/rendering features on the perception of sign language animation. It reports a recent study that aimed to determine whether a character's visual style has an effect on how signing animated characters are perceived by viewers. The stimuli of the study were two polygonal characters presenting two different visual styles: stylized and realistic. Each character signed four sentences. Forty-seven participants with experience in American Sign Language (ASL viewed the animated signing clips in random order via web survey. They (1 identified the signed sentences (if recognizable, (2 rated their legibility, and (3 rated the appeal of the signing avatar. Findings show that while character's visual style does not have an effect on subjects' perceived legibility of the signs and sign recognition, it has an effect on subjects' interest in the character. The stylized signing avatar was perceived as more appealing than the realistic one.

  19. Sign Vocabulary Recognition in Students of American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Linda; Fristoe, Macalyne

    1992-01-01

    This investigation explored recognition memory for sign language vocabulary in sign language students. Ten beginning and 10 advanced students were asked to judge their familiarity with 50 old and new vocabulary items presented in both written (sign gloss) and signed stimulus modes. (JL)

  20. The Distribution of Signs in New Zealand Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, David; Kennedy, Graeme

    2006-01-01

    Until now, teachers and learners of NZSL have not had access to information on the most frequently used signs in the Deaf community. This article describes the first study of the distribution of signs in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL). We hope that it will help teachers of NZSL make decisions about which signs to teach first and suggest…

  1. Curriculum in Psychiatry and Neurology for Pharmacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopheide, Julie A; Bostwick, Jolene R; Goldstone, Lisa W; Thomas, Kelan; Nemire, Ruth; Gable, Kelly N; Cates, Marshall; Caballero, Joshua; Smith, Tawny; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn

    2017-09-01

    Objective. To describe pharmacy curricula in psychiatry and neurology and to report on neuropsychiatric pharmacy specialists' views on optimal curriculum. Methods. Design and administer one electronic survey to accredited pharmacy programs asking them to report information on curricula in psychiatry and neurology for the 2014-2015 academic year. Design and administer a separate electronic survey to board certified pharmacists with an academic affiliation who are members of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) asking about their teaching activities and their opinion on optimal curricula. Results. Fifty-six percent of pharmacy programs and 65% of CPNP members responded to the surveys. The program survey revealed greater than 80% of topics were taught by full-time faculty. Didactic lecturing, team-based learning, and case studies were the most common teaching methods. Programs dedicated the most didactics (3 to 5+ hours) to epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, and pain. Autism, traumatic brain injury, personality, and eating disorders were either not taught or given ≤ 1 hour of didactics in most programs. Inpatient psychiatry had the most APPE placements with a mean of 19.6, range 0-83. APPE electives in psychiatry outnumbered those in neurology 5 to 1. CPNP member survey results showed 2 out of 3 members agreed that curriculum could be improved with additional APPEs in psychiatry and neurology. Conclusion. Didactic hour distribution in psychiatry and neurology could be improved to better align with board certification in psychiatric pharmacy (BCPP) recommendations and disorder prevalence and complexity. Specialists recommend an experiential component in neurology and psychiatry to combat stigma and improve pharmacist knowledge and skills.

  2. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    OpenAIRE

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in ...

  3. Expanding the neurological examination using functional neurologic assessment: part II neurologic basis of applied kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W H; Yanuck, S F

    1999-03-01

    Functional Neurologic Assessment and treatment methods common to the practice of applied kinesiology are presented. These methods are proposed to enhance neurological examination and treatment procedures toward more effective assessment and care of functional impairment. A neurologic model for these procedures is proposed. Manual assessment of muscular function is used to identify changes associated with facilitation and inhibition, in response to the introduction of sensory receptor-based stimuli. Muscle testing responses to sensory stimulation of known value are compared with usually predictable patterns based on known neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, guiding the clinician to an understanding of the functional status of the patient's nervous system. These assessment procedures are used in addition to other standard diagnostic measures to augment rather than replace the existing diagnostic armamentarium. The proper understanding of the neurophysiologic basis of muscle testing procedures will assist in the design of further investigations into applied kinesiology. Accordingly, the neurophysiologic basis and proposed mechanisms of these methods are reviewed.

  4. Signing in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes British Sign Language (BSL) as a viable option for teaching science. BSL is used by a vast number of people in Britain but is seldom taught in schools or included informally alongside lessons. With its new addition of a large scientific glossary, invented to modernise the way science is taught to deaf children, BSL breaks…

  5. Flemish Sign Language Standardisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herreweghe, Mieke; Vermeerbergen, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the Flemish Deaf community officially rejected standardisation of Flemish Sign Language. It was a bold choice, which at the time was not in line with some of the decisions taken in the neighbouring countries. In this article, we shall discuss the choices the Flemish Deaf community has made in this respect and explore why the Flemish Deaf…

  6. Sign-away Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Catherine E.

    1976-01-01

    Why would mental health clients sign release-of-information forms unless they thought a refusal to do so would jeopardize their access to service? The author believes that the practice of not advising clients of their rights to privacy has ethical implications that can compromise the value of the treatment. (Author)

  7. Buffer Zone Sign Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    The certified pesticide applicator is required to post a comparable sign, designating a buffer zone around the soil fumigant application block in order to control exposure risk. It must include the don't walk symbol, product name, and applicator contact.

  8. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  9. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  10. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify

  11. [Neurology in medieval regimina sanitatis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frutos González, V; Guerrero Peral, A L

    2011-09-01

    In medical medieval literature some works about dietetics stand out. Dietetics, as a separate branch of medicine, includes not only food or drinks, but other environmental factors influencing on health. They are known as regimina sanitatis or salutis, and specially developed in the Christian west. They generally consisted of a balance between the Galenic "six non-natural things"; factors regulating health and its protection: environment, exercise, food, sleep, bowel movements and emotions. After reviewing the sources and defining the different stages of this genre, we have considered three of the most out-standing medieval regimina, the anonymous Regimen sanitatis salernitanum, Arnaldo de Vilanova's Regimen sanitatis ad regem aragonum and Bernardo de Gordon's Tractatus of conservatione vite humane. In them we review references to neurological disease. Though not independently considered, there is a significant presence of neurological diseases in the regimina. Dietetics measures are proposed to preserve memory, nerves, or hearing, as well as for the treatment of migraine, epilepsy, stroke or dizziness. Regimina are quiet representative among medical medieval literature, and they show medieval physicians vision of neurological diseases. Dietetics was considered useful to preserve health, and therapeutics was based on natural remedies. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  13. International electives in neurology training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L.; Coleman, Mary E.; Engstrom, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. Background: There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. Methods: A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012–February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Results: Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health–related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%–9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%–19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. Conclusions: In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority

  14. The Danish Sign Language Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The entries of the The Danish Sign Language Dictionary have four sections:  Entry header: In this section the sign headword is shown as a photo and a gloss. The first occurring location and handshape of the sign are shown as icons.  Video window: By default the base form of the sign headword...... function signs) and mouth movement, cross-references to synonyms etc., information about restricted use, and example sentences. Semantically opaque compounds with the sign are shown below the regular meanings.  Additional information: This section holds cross-references to homonyms and to common frozen...... forms of the sign (only for classifier entries). In addition to this, frequent co-occurrences with the sign are shown in this section. The signs in the The Danish Sign Language Dictionary can be looked up through:  Handshape: Particular handshapes for the active and the passive hand can be specified...

  15. Cardiac Dysrhythmias and Neurological Dysregulation: Manifestations of Profound Hypomagnesemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagger Mawri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the second most common intracellular cation and serves as an important metabolic cofactor to over 300 enzymatic reactions throughout the human body. Among its various roles, magnesium modulates calcium entry and release from sarcoplasmic reticulum and regulates ATP pumps in myocytes and neurons, thereby regulating cardiac and neuronal excitability. Therefore, deficiency of this essential mineral may result in serious cardiovascular and neurologic derangements. In this case, we present the clinical course of a 76-year-old woman who presented with marked cardiac and neurological signs and symptoms which developed as a result of severe hypomagnesemia. The patient promptly responded to magnesium replacement once the diagnosis was established. We herein discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of severe hypomagnesemia and emphasize the implications of magnesium deficiency in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Furthermore, this case highlights the importance of having high vigilance for hypomagnesemia in the appropriate clinical setting.

  16. Neurologic manifestations associated with an outbreak of typhoid fever, Malawi--Mozambique, 2009: an epidemiologic investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sejvar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi causes typhoid fever, which is typically associated with fever and abdominal pain. An outbreak of typhoid fever in Malawi-Mozambique in 2009 was notable for a high proportion of neurologic illness. OBJECTIVE: Describe neurologic features complicating typhoid fever during an outbreak in Malawi-Mozambique METHODS: Persons meeting a clinical case definition were identified through surveillance, with laboratory confirmation of typhoid by antibody testing or blood/stool culture. We gathered demographic and clinical information, examined patients, and evaluated a subset of patients 11 months after onset. A sample of persons with and without neurologic signs was tested for vitamin B6 and B12 levels and urinary thiocyanate. RESULTS: Between March - November 2009, 303 cases of typhoid fever were identified. Forty (13% persons had objective neurologic findings, including 14 confirmed by culture/serology; 27 (68% were hospitalized, and 5 (13% died. Seventeen (43% had a constellation of upper motor neuron findings, including hyperreflexia, spasticity, or sustained ankle clonus. Other neurologic features included ataxia (22, 55%, parkinsonism (8, 20%, and tremors (4, 10%. Brain MRI of 3 (ages 5, 7, and 18 years demonstrated cerebral atrophy but no other abnormalities. Of 13 patients re-evaluated 11 months later, 11 recovered completely, and 2 had persistent hyperreflexia and ataxia. Vitamin B6 levels were markedly low in typhoid fever patients both with and without neurologic signs. CONCLUSIONS: Neurologic signs may complicate typhoid fever, and the diagnosis should be considered in persons with acute febrile neurologic illness in endemic areas.

  17. Making an Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: The Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language (ODNZSL),1 launched in 2011, is an example of a contemporary sign language dictionary that leverages the 21st century advantages of a digital medium and an existing body of descriptive research on the language, including a small electronic corpus of New ...

  18. Making an Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language (ODNZSL),1 launched in 2011, is n example of a contemporary sign language dictionary that leverages the 21st century advantages of a digital medium and an existing body of descriptive research on the language, including a small electronic corpus of New Zealand ...

  19. Visual Signs of Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Rexbye

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer culture has placed the ageing body in a dilemma of representation. Physical appearance has become increasingly important as a symbol of identity, and at the same time society idealizes youth. This study explores visual ageing empirically. By using photographs of older persons (70+ as starting point, it is explored how visual age is assessed and interpreted. It is shown that informants read age in a spread of stages and categories. Main age indicators are biological markers: skin, eyes, and hair colour, but supplemented by vigour, style, and grooming. Furthermore, in-depth interviews indicate that visual age is mainly interpreted into categories and moral regulations rooted in early modernity. Subsequently the question of a postmodern perspective of visual ageing is discussed in this article. The empirical findings in the study question a postmodern fluidity of visual signs – at least when the concern is signs of ageing.

  20. Neurologic manifestations of hypothyroidism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertalan, Abigail; Kent, Marc; Glass, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine disease in dogs. A variety of clinicopathologic abnormalities may be present; however, neurologic deficits are rare. In some instances, neurologic deficits may be the sole manifestation of hypothyroidism. Consequent ly, the diagnosis and management of the neurologic disorders associated with hypothyroidism can be challenging. This article describes several neurologic manifestations of primary hypothyroidism in dogs; discusses the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism-induced neurologic disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous systems; and reviews the evidence for the neurologic effects of hypothyroidism.

  1. Dense MCA Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to the emergency department after being found down at home, last seen normal 7 ½ hours prior to arrival. Patient had a history of hypertension, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation and breast cancer status post chemotherapy/radiation and lumpectomy. Physical exam showed right gaze preference, left facial droop and tongue deviation and flaccid left hemiplegia. Significant findings: A non-contrast computed tomography (CT scan showed a hyperdensity along the right middle cerebral artery (MCA consistent with acute thrombus. The red arrow highlights the hyperdensity in the annotated image. Discussion: The dense MCA sign can serve as an important tool in the diagnosis of acute stroke. It typically appears before other signs of infarct are apparent on CT imaging, and identifies an intracranial large artery occlusion and corresponding infarct, in the correct clinical setting.1 Calcifications in the same area of the brain could be mistaken for an MCA sign, but this sign carries a high specificity (95% and lower sensitivity (52% for arterial obstruction in ischemic stroke.2 Early identification allows for a wider array of treatment options for a patient with an ischemic stroke, including intra-venous or intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. This patient was subsequently taken for mechanical thrombectomy. Mechanical thrombectomy was chosen for this patient because the resources were available, and recent clinical trials have shown that newer types of mechanical thrombectomy have a positive functional outcome in patients with an ischemic stroke from an intracranial large artery occlusion, as compared to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPa alone.3,4,5,6 In facilities lacking the capability for mechanical thrombectomy, treatment considerations include rapid transfer to a facility with capability, or proceeding with intravenous tPa. After intervention, this

  2. Planetary Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  3. Neurological manifestations of calcific aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Egorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being thoroughly studied, senile aortic stenosis (AS remains a disease that is frequently underestimated by Russian clinicians. Meanwhile, its manifestations can not only deteriorate quality of life in patients, but can also be poor prognostic signs. The most common sequels of this disease include heart failure and severe arrhythmias. However, there may be also rare, but no less dangerous complications: enteric bleeding associated with common dysembriogenetic backgrounds, infarctions of various organs, the basis for which is spontaneous calcium embolism, and consciousness loss episodes. The latter are manifestations of cardiocerebral syndrome. Apart from syncope, embolic stroke may develop within this syndrome. There is evidence that after syncope occurs, life expectancy averages 3 years. Global practice is elaborating approaches to the intracardiac calcification prevention based on the rapid development of new pathogenetic ideas on this disease. In particular, it is clear that valvular calcification is extraskeletal leaflet ossification rather than commonplace impregnation with calcium salts, i.e. the case in point is the reverse of osteoporosis. This is the basis for a new concept of drug prevention of both calcification and the latter-induced heart disease. But the view of senile AS remains more than conservative in Russia. The paper describes a clinical case of a rare complication as cerebral calcium embolism and discusses the nature of neurological symptoms of the disease, such as vertigo and syncope.

  4. [Application of psychophysics to neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2008-04-01

    Although psychophysics has already been used in many neurological evaluations including the visual and hearing tests, the use of psychophysics has been limited to the evaluation of sensory disorders. In this review paper, however, the author introduced recent attempts to apply psychophysics to the evaluation of higher cognitive functions such as perception of scenes and facial expressions. Psychophysics was also used to measure visual hypersensitivity in a patient with migraine. The benefits of the use of psychophysics in neurological and neuropsychological settings would be as follows. (1) We can evaluate higher cognitive functions quantitatively. (2) We can measure performance both above and below the normal range by the same method. (3) We can use the same stimulus and task as other research areas such as neuroscience and neuroimaging, and compare results between research areas.

  5. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  7. Proust, neurology and Stendhal's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Neurological Effects of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskun YARAR

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning (COP is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity due to poisoning in all over the world. Although the incidence of COP has not been known exactly in the childhood, almost one-third of CO exposures occurred in children. The data regarding COP in children are inconclusive. Children may be more vulnerable to CO exposure than adults as a result of their high respiration and metabolic rates, high oxygen metabolism, and immature central nervous system. Recent researches proposed new theories about neurological effects of CO toxicity. The clinical presentations associated acute COP may be various and nonspecific. Unrecognized CO exposure may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. CO exposed children often become symptomatic earlier, and recover more rapidly, than similarly CO exposed adults. Mild clinical signs and symptoms associated with COP are headache, dizziness, weakness, lethargy, and myalgia; however, severe signs and symptoms such as blurred vision, syncope, convulsion, coma, cardiopulmonary arrest and death can also accompany with COP. Neurologic manifestations can include altered mental status at different degrees, neck stiffness, tremor, ataxia, and positive Babinski's sign. Delayed neurologic sequels (DNS of COP might be seen in children like adults. DNS symptoms and signs in children include memory problems, mental retardation, mutism, fecal and urinary incontinence, motor deficits, facial palsy, psychosis, chronic headache, seizures, and epilepsy. After CO exposure children must be cared to detect and treat DNS. Although hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is reported to prevent development of DNS, its indications, application duration and procedures are controversial in both of the children and adults. Although their predictive values are limited, exposing to CO more than eight hours and suffering from CO-induced coma, cardiac arrest, lactic acidosis, high COHb levels, and pathologic findings

  9. Pathology of neurologic disorders of raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamir, Amir N

    2011-09-01

    The raccoon (Procyon lotor) is almost ubiquitous in North America. In recent times, it was introduced in many parts of the world where it has now become largely feral. Since the outbreak of raccoon rabies epizootic in eastern United States and Canada, most diagnostic laboratories have had increased numbers of raccoon carcasses or raccoon brain submissions for diagnosis of rabies. However, since a number of other diseases that affect the central nervous system and have similar clinical signs as rabies have been documented in this species, the current review attempts to bring together the published information on neurologic disorders of raccoons.

  10. [Information technology in learning sign language].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Cesar; Pulido, Jose L; Arias, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    To develop a technological tool that improves the initial learning of sign language in hearing impaired children. The development of this research was conducted in three phases: the lifting of requirements, design and development of the proposed device, and validation and evaluation device. Through the use of information technology and with the advice of special education professionals, we were able to develop an electronic device that facilitates the learning of sign language in deaf children. This is formed mainly by a graphic touch screen, a voice synthesizer, and a voice recognition system. Validation was performed with the deaf children in the Filadelfia School of the city of Bogotá. A learning methodology was established that improves learning times through a small, portable, lightweight, and educational technological prototype. Tests showed the effectiveness of this prototype, achieving a 32 % reduction in the initial learning time for sign language in deaf children.

  11. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  12. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and cinema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Jiménez-Antona, Carmen

    2010-12-16

    Cinema has been defined in many different ways, but most of them agree that it should be considered both a technique and an art. Although films often depict fantasy stories, in many cases they also reflect day-to-day realities. In its earliest days cinema was already attracted to the world of health and sickness, and frequently addressed topics like medical practice, how patients lived with their illnesses, bioethical issues, the relationship between physician and patient or research. To review the presence of neurological pathologies in the cinema with a view to identifying the main neurological disorders that have been portrayed in films. Likewise it also intends to describe the medical praxis that is employed, the relationship between physician and patient, how the experiences of the patient and the family are represented, the adaptation to social and occupational situations, and the intervention of other health care professionals related with neurological patients. Some of the most significant films that have addressed these topics were reviewed and it was seen that in some of them the illness is dealt with in a very true-to-life manner, whereas others tend to include a greater number of inaccuracies and a larger degree of fiction. Cinema has helped to shape certain ways of thinking about the health care professionals who work with neurological patients, the importance of support from the family and the social role, among other things. This confirms that resorting to cinematographic productions is a fruitful tool for stimulating a critical interest in the past and present of medical practice.

  13. Prospects for neurology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, W M; Kandel, E R

    2001-02-07

    Neurological and psychiatric illnesses are among the most common and most serious health problems in developed societies. The most promising advances in neurological and psychiatric diseases will require advances in neuroscience for their elucidation, prevention, and treatment. Technical advances have improved methods for identifying brain regions involved during various types of cognitive activity, for tracing connections between parts of the brain, for visualizing individual neurons in living brain preparations, for recording the activities of neurons, and for studying the activity of single-ion channels and the receptors for various neurotransmitters. The most significant advances in the past 20 years have come from the application to the nervous system of molecular genetics and molecular cell biology. Discovery of the monogenic disorder responsible for Huntington disease and understanding its pathogenesis can serve as a paradigm for unraveling the much more complex, polygenic disorders responsible for such psychiatric diseases as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness, and borderline personality disorder. Thus, a new degree of cooperation between neurology and psychiatry is likely to result, especially for the treatment of patients with illnesses such as autism, mental retardation, cognitive disorders associated with Alzheimer and Parkinson disease that overlap between the 2 disciplines.

  14. Upgoing thumb sign: A sensitive indicator of brain involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir; Alsubaie, Rasha; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza

    2017-07-25

    To assess the frequency of this finding in patients with minor stroke and TIAs compared to those with stroke mimics and to evaluate the level of agreement between examiners to detect an upgoing thumb sign. We previously reported an upgoing thumb sign as a subtle clinical finding in patients with transient ischemic attacks or minor stroke. In this study conducted between March 2016 and October 2016 at the Stroke Prevention Clinic at University Hospital, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada, participants were examined independently by stroke faculty and fellows who were blinded to each other's findings. The frequency of the upgoing thumb sign in patients with minor or threatened stroke was compared to that in patients with stroke mimics, and the level of agreement between examiners and clinical findings was assessed with the Cohen κ test. The upgoing thumb sign was observed more frequently in those with minor stroke/TIA than in those with stroke mimics (p = 0.001). A substantial level of agreement between examiners was recorded in the detection of the thumb sign (κ: right 0.71, left 0.78). In addition, an upgoing thumb sign showed a substantial level of agreement with the patient's symptoms (examiner 1: κ = 0.65, p thumb sign is a sensitive and reliable indicator of brain involvement. This examination is noninvasive, easy, reliable, and highly compatible with and confirmatory of the patient's symptoms. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Holt, Gineke A.; Arendsen, Jeroen; de Ridder, Huib; Koenderink-van Doorn, Andrea J.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Hendriks, Emile A.

    2009-02-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of data-driven ASLR methods has shortcomings which may not be solvable without the use of knowledge on human sign language processing. Handling variation in the precise execution of signs is an example of such shortcomings: data-driven methods (which include almost all current methods) have difficulty recognizing signs that deviate too much from the examples that were used to train the method. Insight into human sign processing is needed to solve these problems. Perceptual research on sign language can provide such insights. This paper discusses knowledge derived from a set of sign perception experiments, and the application of such knowledge in ASLR. Among the findings are the facts that not all phases and elements of a sign are equally informative, that defining the 'correct' form for a sign is not trivial, and that statistical ASLR methods do not necessarily arrive at sign representations that resemble those of human beings. Apparently, current ASLR methods are quite different from human observers: their method of learning gives them different sign definitions, they regard each moment and element of a sign as equally important and they employ a single definition of 'correct' for all circumstances. If the object is for an ASLR method to handle natural sign language, then the insights from sign perception research must be integrated into ASLR.

  16. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  17. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  18. Sign language typology: The contribution of rural sign languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, C.; Pfau, R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the field of sign language typology has shown that sign languages exhibit typological variation at all relevant levels of linguistic description. These initial typological comparisons were heavily skewed toward the urban sign languages of developed countries, mostly in the Western

  19. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Holt, G.A.; Arendsen, J.; De Ridder, H.; Van Doorn, A.J.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Hendriks, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of

  20. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in the citation form. Sign lowering has been documented previously, but this is the first study to examine it in phonetic detail. The data presented here are tokens of the sign WONDER, as produced by six native signers, in two phonetic contexts and at three signing rates, which were captured by optoelectronic motion capture. The results indicate that sign lowering occurred for all signers, according to the factors we manipulated. Sign production was affected by several phonetic factors that also influence speech production, namely, production rate, phonetic context, and position within an utterance. In addition, we have discovered interesting variations in sign production, which could underlie distinctions in signing style, analogous to accent or voice quality in speech. PMID:20607146

  1. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  2. Arthur van Gehuchten takes neurology to the movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Geneviève

    2002-11-26

    To present the cinematographic production of Arthur Van Gehuchten (1861-1914) and to put this collection into its medical and sociocultural context. The arrival of Edison's Kinetoscope (1891) and Lumière's Cinématographe (1895) provoked the immediate interest of neurologists who foresaw the potential of motion pictures for illustration, research, and teaching. Arthur Van Gehuchten, professor of anatomy and neurology at the Catholic University of Louvain, was trained as a microscopist and a cytologist. From neuroanatomy, he progressively broadened his interest to neurology. Van Gehuchten was an avant-garde teacher, eager to adopt new visual aids. In 1895, he attended the first cinematographic screenings. Medical cinematography was soon brought into disrepute in European academic circles, when films made by the French surgeon Doyen were copied and shown on fairgrounds. Nevertheless, in 1905, Van Gehuchten began to film neurologic patients. He used this technique extensively to demonstrate clinical signs, to illustrate neurologic diseases, and to document functional evolution following surgery. For decades, these films were screened for medical students by Van Gehuchten's successors to the chair of neurology. The original nitrate films (more than 2 hours) have been recently rediscovered. They have been restored by the Royal Belgian Film Archive, where they are the oldest Belgian films. At the beginning of the 20th century, Van Gehuchten built up a collection of moving pictures for teaching purposes. This was one of the first such undertakings. This unique set of films has miraculously survived, and serves as an important archive of nervous diseases and their manifestations prior to the advent of modern therapies.

  3. Refuting the lipstick sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassbaugh, Jason A; Bean, Betsey R; Greenhouse, Alyssa R; Yu, Henry H; Arrington, Edward D; Friedman, Richard J; Eichinger, Josef K

    2017-08-01

    Arthroscopic examination of the tendon has been described as the "gold standard" for diagnosis of tendinitis of the long head of the biceps (LHB). An arthroscopic finding of an inflamed and hyperemic LHB within the bicipital groove has been described as the "lipstick sign." Studies evaluating direct visualization in diagnosis of LHB tendinitis are lacking. During a 1-year period, 363 arthroscopic shoulder procedures were performed, with 16 and 39 patients prospectively selected as positive cases and negative controls, respectively. All positive controls had groove tenderness, positive Speed maneuver, and diagnostic ultrasound-guided bicipital injection. Negative controls had none of these findings. Six surgeons reviewed randomized deidentified arthroscopic pictures of enrolled patients The surgeons were asked whether the images demonstrated LHB tendinitis and if the lipstick sign was present. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 49% and 66%, respectively, for detecting LHB tendinitis and 64% and 31%, respectively, for erythema. The nonweighted κ score for interobserver reliability ranged from 0.042 to 0.419 (mean, 0.215 ± 0.116) for tendinitis and from 0.486 to 0.835 (mean, 0.680 ± 0.102) for erythema. The nonweighted κ score for intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.264 to 0.854 (mean, 0.615) for tendinitis and from 0.641 to 0.951 (mean, 0.783) for erythema. The presence of the lipstick sign performed only moderately well in a rigorously designed level III study to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity. There is only fair agreement among participating surgeons in diagnosing LHB tendinitis arthroscopically. Consequently, LHB tendinitis requiring tenodesis remains a clinical diagnosis that should be made before arthroscopic examination. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Cholelithiasis: WES Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ehsani-Nia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 33-year-old female with multiple previous episodes of biliary colic presented to the emergency department with severe right upper quadrant pain that started 30 minutes prior to arrival. She characterized her pain as sharp and pulling and radiating to the back. Upon physical examination, patient was in acute distress with severe tenderness to right upper quadrant palpation. Her abdomen was soft, with no guarding or rebound tenderness. Significant findings: Abdominal ultrasound showed the classic presentation of the Wall-Echo-Shadow (WES sign. The superficial aspect of the gallbladder wall is represented by a hyperechogenic curve. Below this, bile fluid is represented by hypoechogenicity. Underneath the bile fluid is the echo of the dense border created by the collection of gallstones, represented by a hyperechogenic curve. Due to the high density of the gallstones, nothing deeper can be visualized (including other gallstones or the far end of the gallbladder; this is the shadow. Discussion: The WES sign, first described in the early 1980s, is a clear way of identifying cholelithiasis when the condition has progressed to fill the entire lumen of the gallbladder.1 In this case, the lumen of the gallbladder looks hypoechogenic relative to the surrounding tissue, much like an empty gallbladder. This is due to the border of the dense stones opposing the near wall of the gallbladder casting a shadow over everything distal to the stones. These key visualization techniques decrease non-visualization of chronic cholelithiasis.2,3,4 In most cases, WES sign is sufficient to diagnose cholelithiasis. Of note, “porcelain gallbladder” or collapsed duodenum can have the potential produce similar ultrasonographic findings.4,5

  5. Neurological manifestaions among Sudanese patients with multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study demonstrated that the most common non- neurological symptoms was locomotor symptoms (24%) ,while the most common neurological symptoms were backache and neck pain .The most common neurological findings were cord compression (8%) followed by peripheral neuropathy (2%) and CVA (2%). 22% of ...

  6. Signs In Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting; however, it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below...

  7. Signs in Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting, however it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can also influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below....

  8. Brief assessment of negative dysmorphic signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Fiori

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Patrizia Fiori1, Antonio Monaco1, Maria Giannetti Luigi21Central Operative Unit of Neurology, 2Infantile Neuropsychiatry and Social Service, ASL AV, Civil Hospital of Ariano Irpino, University of Naples, ItalyAbstract: Body dysmorphic disorder is a body image dysperception, characterized either by an excessive preoccupation with a presumed or minimal flaw in appearance, or by unrecognition, denial, or even neglect regarding an obvious defect. These features are evaluated by a novel questionnaire, the Brief Assessment of Negative Dysmorphic Signs (BANDS. Moreover, the temperament and character background is examined. The relationship with addictive mentality/behavior and schizoaffectivity is also highlighted. Lastly, the potential shift toward cognitive impairment and dementia is considered.Keywords: body dysmorphic disorder, schizoaffectivity, addiction, behavioral-cognitive impairment

  9. 21 CFR 1311.140 - Requirements for signing a controlled substance prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prescription. 1311.140 Section 1311.140 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.140 Requirements for signing a controlled substance prescription. (a) For a practitioner to sign an electronic...

  10. Traffic sign detection and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Trivedi, Mohan M.; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Traffic sign recognition (TSR) is a research field that has seen much activity in the recent decade. This paper introduces the problem and presents 4 recent papers on traffic sign detection and 4 recent papers on traffic sign classification. It attempts to extract recent trends in the field...

  11. Say It with Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Wendy

    2001-01-01

    Impressed by Marilyn Daniels' research on the educational benefits of signing for hearing children, a New Jersey early childhood education center trained its staff in sign language as a teaching tool. Students enthusiastically incorporated sign language into their activities as they increased word recognition and vocabulary growth. (MLH)

  12. Issues in Sign Language Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwitserlood, Inge; Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    ge lexicography has thus far been a relatively obscure area in the world of lexicography. Therefore, this article will contain background information on signed languages and the communities in which they are used, on the lexicography of sign languages, the situation in the Netherlands as well...... as a review of a sign language dictionary that has recently been published in the Netherlands...

  13. Sign language: an international handbook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfau, R.; Steinbach, M.; Woll, B.

    2012-01-01

    Sign language linguists show here that all the questions relevant to the linguistic investigation of spoken languages can be asked about sign languages. Conversely, questions that sign language linguists consider - even if spoken language researchers have not asked them yet - should also be asked of

  14. Kinship in Mongolian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Information and research on Mongolian Sign Language is scant. To date, only one dictionary is available in the United States (Badnaa and Boll 1995), and even that dictionary presents only a subset of the signs employed in Mongolia. The present study describes the kinship system used in Mongolian Sign Language (MSL) based on data elicited from…

  15. Sign language for telemanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pook, Polly K.; Ballard, Dana H.

    1995-12-01

    Literal teleoperation doesn't work very well. Limited bandwidth, long latencies, non- anthropomorphic mappings all make the effort of teleoperation tedious at best and ineffective at worst. Instead, users of teleoperated and semi-autonomous systems want their robots to `just do it for them,' without sacrificing the operator's intent. Our goal is to maximize human strategic control in teleoperator assisted robotics. In our teleassisted regime, the human operator provides high-level contexts for low-level autonomous robot behaviors. The operator wears an EXOS hand master to communicate via a natural sign language, such as pointing to objects and adopting a grasp preshape. Each sign indicates intention: e.g., reaching or grasping; and, where applicable, a spatial context: e.g., the pointing axis or preshape frame. The robot, a Utah/MIT hand on a Puma arm, acts under local servo control within the proscribed contexts. This paper extends earlier work [Pook & Ballard 1994a] by adding remote visual sensors to the teleassistance repertoire. To view the robot site, the operator wears a virtual research helmet that is coupled to binocular cameras mounted on a second Puma 760. The combined hand-head sensors allows teleassistance to be performed remotely. The example task is to open a door. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the teleassistance model by bootstrapping a `pick and place' task from the door opening task.

  16. INFINITY construction contract signed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Key state and community leaders celebrated April 6 with the signing of a construction contract for the state-of-the-art INFINITY Science Center planned near John C. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel (l to r), chair of non-profit INFINITY Science Center Inc., was joined for the signing ceremony at the Hancock Bank in Gulfport by Virginia Wagner, sister of late Hancock Bank President Leo Seal Jr.; and Roy Anderson III, president and CEO of Roy Anderson Corp. Seal was the first chair of INFINITY Science Center Inc., which has led in development of the project. Roy Anderson Corp. plans to begin construction on the 72,000-square-foot, $28 million science and education center in May. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) also is set to begin construction of a $2 million access road to the new center. The April 6 ceremony was attended by numerous officials, including former Stennis Space Center Directors Jerry Hlass and Roy Estess; Mississippi Senate President Pro Tempore Billy Hewes, R-Gulfport; Mississippi Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian; and MDOT Southern District Commissioner Wayne Brown.

  17. Development of a prehospital vital signs chart sharing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Taka-aki; Masunaga, Naohisa; Nakao, Shota; Narita, Maiko; Fuse, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Physiological parameters are crucial for the caring of trauma patients. There is a significant loss of prehospital vital signs data of patients during handover between prehospital and in-hospital teams. Effective strategies for reducing the loss remain a challenging research area. We tested whether the newly developed electronic automated prehospital vital signs chart sharing system would increase the amount of prehospital vital signs data shared with a remote trauma center prior to hospital arrival. Fifty trauma patients, transferred to a level I trauma center in Japan, were studied. The primary outcome variable was the number of prehospital vital signs shared with the trauma center prior to hospital arrival. The prehospital vital signs chart sharing system significantly increased the number of prehospital vital signs, including blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation, shared with the in-hospital team at a remote trauma center prior to patient arrival at the hospital (P prehospital vital signs during ambulance transfer between patients who had severe bleeding and non-severe bleeding within 24 hours after injury onset. Vital signs data collected during ambulance transfer via patient monitors could be automatically converted to easily visible patient charts and effectively shared with the remote trauma center prior to hospital arrival. The prehospital vital signs chart sharing system increased the number of precise vital signs shared prior to patient arrival at the hospital, which can potentially contribute to better trauma care without increasing labor and reduce information loss during clinical handover. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Neurological Manifestations of H1N1 Influenza Infection; Diagnostic Challenges and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Asadi-Pooya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: World Health Organization declared pandemic phase of human infection with novel influenza A (H1N1 in April 2009. There are very few reports about the neurological complications of H1N1 virus infection in the literature. Occasionally, these complications are severe and even fatal in some individuals. The aims of this study were to report neurological complaints and/or complications associated with H1N1 virus infection. Methods: The medical files of all patients with H1N1 influenza infection admitted to a specified hospital in the city of Shiraz, Iran from October through November 2009 were reviewed. More information about the patients were obtained by phone calls to the patients or their care givers. All patients had confirmed H1N1 virus infection with real-time PCR assay. Results: Fifty-five patients with H1N1 infection were studied. Twenty-three patients had neurological signs and/or symptoms. Mild neurological complaints may be reported in up to 42% of patients infected by H1N1 virus. Severe neurological complications occurred in 9% of the patients. The most common neurological manifestations were headache, numbness and paresthesia, drowsiness and coma. One patient had a Guillain-Barre syndrome-like illness, and died in a few days. Another patient had focal status epilepticus and encephalopathy. Conclusions: The H1N1 infection seems to have been quite mild with a self-limited course in much of the world, yet there appears to be a subset, which is severely affected. We recommend performing diagnostic tests for H1N1influenza virus in all patients with respiratory illness and neurological signs/symptoms. We also recommend initiating treatment with appropriate antiviral drugs as soon as possible in those with any significant neurological presentation accompanied with respiratory illness and flu-like symptoms

  19. Negation switching invariant signed graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Sinha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A signed graph (or, $sigraph$ in short is a graph G in which each edge x carries a value $\\sigma(x \\in \\{-, +\\}$ called its sign. Given a sigraph S, the negation $\\eta(S$ of the sigraph S is a sigraph obtained from S by reversing the sign of every edge of S. Two sigraphs $S_{1}$ and $S_{2}$ on the same underlying graph are switching equivalent if it is possible to assign signs `+' (`plus' or `-' (`minus' to vertices of $S_{1}$ such that by reversing the sign of each of its edges that has received opposite signs at its ends, one obtains $S_{2}$. In this paper, we characterize sigraphs which are negation switching invariant and also see for what sigraphs, S and $\\eta (S$ are signed isomorphic.

  20. Heed the signs: Operation signs have spatial associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhas, Michal; Shaki, Samuel; Fischer, Martin H

    2014-01-01

    Mental arithmetic shows systematic spatial biases. The association between numbers and space is well documented, but it is unknown whether arithmetic operation signs also have spatial associations and whether or not they contribute to spatial biases found in arithmetic. Adult participants classified plus and minus signs with left and right button presses under two counterbalanced response rules. Results from two experiments showed that spatially congruent responses (i.e., right-side responses for the plus sign and left-side responses for the minus sign) were responded to faster than spatially incongruent ones (i.e., left-side responses for the plus sign and right-side responses for the minus sign). We also report correlations between this novel operation sign spatial association (OSSA) effect and other spatial biases in number processing. In a control experiment with no explicit processing requirements for the operation signs there were no sign-related spatial biases. Overall, the results suggest that (a) arithmetic operation signs can evoke spatial associations (OSSA), (b) experience with arithmetic operations probably underlies the OSSA, and (c) the OSSA only partially contributes to spatial biases in arithmetic.

  1. Atypical Neurological Manifestations Of Hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    pal P K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A part from the well-established syndrome of motor paralysis, hypokalemia may present with atypical neurological manifestations, which are not well documented in literature. Methods: We treated 30 patients of hypokalemia whose neurological manifestations improved after corrections of hypokalemia. A retrospective chart review of the clinical profile was done with emphasis on the evolution of symptoms and occurrence of unusual manifestations. Results: Twenty-eight patients had subacute quadriparesis with duration of symptoms varying from 10hrs to 7 days and two had slowly progressive quadriparesis. Fifty percent of patients had more than one attack of paralysis. Early asymmetric weakness (11, stiffness and abnormal posture of hands (7, predominant bibrachial weakness (4, distal paresthesias (4, hemiparesthesia (1, hyperreflexia(4, early severe weakness of neck muscles (3, chorea (1, trismus (1,and, retention of urine (1 were the unusual features observed. The means level of serum potassium on admission was 2.1+0.6mEq/L.and the serum creatine kinase was elevated in 14 out of 17 patients. All patients except two had complete recovery.

  2. [Oliver Sacks and literary neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola, Elena; Banos, Josep E

    2014-03-16

    Popular medical literature attempts to discuss medical topics using a language that is, as far as possible, free of all medical jargon so as to make it more easily understandable by the general public. The very complexity of neurology makes it more difficult for the stories dealing with this specialty to be understood easily by an audience without any kind of medical training. This paper reviews the works written by Oliver Sacks involving the field of neurology aimed at the general public, and the main characteristics and the clinical situation discussed by the author are presented. Some biographical notes about Oliver Sacks are also included and the 11 books published by this author over the last 40 years are also analysed. In each case they are put into a historical context and the most outstanding aspects justifying what makes them an interesting read are commented on. In most cases, the genesis of the work is explained together with its most significant features. The works of Sacks contain a wide range of very interesting clinical situations that are usually explained by means of a language that is readily comprehensible to the general public. It also provides neurologists with a holistic view of different clinical situations, together with a discussion of their biographical, historical and developmental components.

  3. Signes et artefacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Périgois

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Les opérations de requalification des centres des petites villes se sont multipliées depuis deux décennies. Cet article analyse comment le réaménagement des centres-villes s’inscrit dans un processus de patrimonialisation qui participe à une nouvelle conception de l’urbanité à travers une mise en scène des espaces centraux. Cette mise en scène des espaces publics passe par la multiplication de signes d’ancienneté. On peut distinguer des modalités différentes selon que les artefacts mobilisés renvoient à l’histoire du lieu, à des éléments hérités du passé et réinscrits dans l’espace ou qu’ils relèvent d’une ancienneté générique telle qu’elle s’est popularisée dans l’usage des mobiliers urbains « de style » — comme les candélabres « tradition » et bornes en fonte symbolisant l’appartenance à une urbanité d’apparence. Ce phénomène identitaire particulier vise à produire une urbanité, au moins physique. Cette artefactualisation amène à une redéfinition de la patrimonialisation. La tendance actuelle à la substitution d’« objets patrimoines » par des signes rappelant leur existence passée et les artefacts simulant de l’ancienneté et suscitant de l’historicité mobilisent les notions d’ambiance, d’esthétique et de « simulacre » selon le terme utilisé par Jean Baudrillard. La combinaison des références au patrimoine local et à l’ancien générique participe d’une mise en scène plus globale visant à inscrire le centre dans le temps long et à la production esthétique d’une néo-archéo urbanité « petite ville ». Refitting operations of downtown areas of small cities have increased for two decades. This article analyzes how this restructuring falls under a process of “patrimonialisation” which takes part in a new design of “urbanity” through a setting in scene of central spaces. This setting in scene of public spaces finds expression in

  4. Organ Support After Death by Neurologic Criteria in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ariane; Adams, Nellie; Chopra, Arun; Kirschen, Matthew P

    2017-09-01

    We sought to 1) evaluate how pediatricians approach situations in which families request continuation of organ support after declaration of death by neurologic criteria and 2) explore potential interventions to make these situations less challenging. A survey on management and personal experience with death by neurologic criteria was distributed electronically to pediatric intensivists and neurologists. We compared responses from individuals who practice in states with accommodation exceptions (accommodation states where religious or moral beliefs must be taken into consideration when declaring death: California, Illinois, New Jersey, New York) to those from non-accommodation states. United States. The survey was opened by 254 recipients, with 186 meeting inclusion criteria and providing data about the region in which they practice; of these, 26% were from accommodation states. None. More than half of physicians (61% from both accommodation states and non-accommodation states) reported they cared for a pediatric patient whose family requested continuation of organ support after declaration of death by neurologic criteria (outside of organ donation; range, 1-17 times). Over half of physicians (53%) reported they would not feel comfortable handling a situation in which a pediatric patient's family requested care be continued after declaration of death by neurologic criteria. Nearly every physician (98%) endorsed that something needs to be done to make situations involving families who object to discontinuation of organ support after declaration of death by neurologic criteria easier to handle. Respondents felt that public education, physician education, and uniform state laws about these situations are warranted. It is relatively common for pediatricians who care for critically ill patients to encounter families who object to discontinuation of organ support after death by neurologic criteria. Management of these situations is challenging, and guidance for medical

  5. Neurological effects of fat embolism syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacklock, Emma; Gemmell, Andrew; Hollister, Nigel

    2017-11-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is a serious multi-system pathology which classically affects the respiratory system, neurological system and causes a petechial rash. We present the case of a 20-year-old farmer who developed fat embolism syndrome following a traumatic femoral fracture. Features developed within 24 h of injury and necessitated a prolonged stay in Intensive Care. He exhibited significant signs of cerebral fat embolism syndrome including coma and seizures but went on to make full functional recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging is the recommended imaging modality for patients with suspected cerebral fat embolism. In this case, computerised tomography was inconclusive, but magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the "starfield pattern" of multiple high signal foci on a dark background. Supportive treatment of fat embolism syndrome is required in an appropriate setting, such as High Dependency or Intensive Care, for patients at risk of hypoxia or neurological deterioration. Despite major neurological involvement of fat embolism syndrome, full recovery is described by several cases including ours.

  6. Translating Signs, Producing Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Neilson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper moves between two streets: Liverpool Road in the Sydney suburb of Ashfield and Via Sarpi in the Italian city of Milan. What connects these streets is that both have become important sites for businesses in the Chinese diaspora. Moreover, both are streets on which locals have expressed desires for Chinese signs to be translated into the national lingua franca. The paper argues that the cultural politics inherent in this demand for translation cannot be fully understood in the context of national debates about diversity and integration. It is also necessary to consider the emergence of the official Chinese Putonghua as global language, which competes with English but also colonizes dialects and minority languages. In the case of these dual language signs, the space between languages can neither be reduced to a contact zone of minority and majority cultures nor celebrated as a ‘third space’ where the power relations implied by such differences are subverted. At stake is rather a space characterised by what Naoki Sakai calls the schema of co-figuration, which allows the representation of translation as the passage between two equivalents that resemble each other and thus makes possible their determination as conceptually different and comparable. Drawing on arguments about translation and citizenship, the paper critically interrogates the ethos of interchangeability implied by this regime of translation. A closing argument is made for a vision of the common that implies neither civilisational harmony nor the translation of all values into a general equivalent. Primary sources include government reports, internet texts and media stories. These are analyzed using techniques of discourse analysis and interpreted with the help of secondary literature concerning globalisation, language and migration. The disciplinary matrix cuts and mixes between cultural studies, translation studies, citizenship studies, globalization studies and

  7. Basilar artery occlusion: Prognostic signs of severity on computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Canel, Lucie; Sztajzel, Roman; Becker, Minerva; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    To determine the computed tomography (CT) signs that are predictive of the clinical outcome of basilar artery occlusion (BAO). The study population consisted in 37 patients (14 women, 23 men, mean age: 63 years), admitted with onset of neurological deficit, starting 1-72 h prior to admission, who were diagnosed with BAO on the basis of a CT examination with intravenous contrast agent. The following signs were collected on CT scans performed on admission: clot density on noncontrast images, clot length, and clot location, as well as the presence of acute ischemic lesions. The results were compared against the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of patients at 3 months, favorable clinical outcome being defined as a mRS score ≤3. The clinical outcome was favorable in 13 (35%) of the 37 patients and unfavorable in 24 (65%). Signs of acute ischemia were visible in 13 of the 24 patients with unfavorable outcome but in none of the 13 patients with favorable outcome (p<0.001). None of the other CT signs analyzed were significantly correlated with clinical prognosis. Of all the CT signs analyzed, only the presence of signs of acute ischemia on the admission CT of patients with BAO was associated with poor prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rigler’s sign and the football sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Daya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rigler’s sign was first described in 1941 by L G Rigler as a new radiological sign for recognising free air in the peritoneal cavity on supine radiograph. The presence of pneumoperitoneum allows free intraperitoneal air to be contrasted with intraluminal gas, accentuating the wall of gas-containing viscera. It is observed in infants and very ill patients where only limited radiographs of the abdomen are possible. The football sign was first described by R E Miller in the 1960s. Seen on supine abdominal radiographs, this describes an oval radiolucency resembling an American football. It is important for the radiologist to recognise the supporting signs of pneumoperitoneum, such as Rigler’s sign and the football sign, on supine abdominal radiographs, especially in neonates and infants, where erect chest/abdominal radiographs are not always possible.

  9. LSE-Sign: A lexical database for Spanish Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Costello, Brendan; Baus, Cristina; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The LSE-Sign database is a free online tool for selecting Spanish Sign Language stimulus materials to be used in experiments. It contains 2,400 individual signs taken from a recent standardized LSE dictionary, and a further 2,700 related nonsigns. Each entry is coded for a wide range of grammatical, phonological, and articulatory information, including handshape, location, movement, and non-manual elements. The database is accessible via a graphically based search facility which is highly flexible both in terms of the search options available and the way the results are displayed. LSE-Sign is available at the following website: http://www.bcbl.eu/databases/lse/.

  10. [Post-ischemia neurologic recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud-Chaumeil, Bernard; Pariente, Jérémie; Albucher, Jean-François; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common affliction of patients with neurological symptoms. Rehabilitation of stroke patients is a difficult task. Our knowledge on rehabilitation has recently improved with the emergence of data from new neuroimaging techniques. A prospective, double blind, cross over, placebo, controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia, is conducted to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke. Each patient undergoes two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations, one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. A single dose of fluoxetine is enough to modulate cerebral sensori-motor activation and significantly improves motor skills of the affected side. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine on motor function.

  11. Neurology of foreign language aptitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Biedroń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This state-of-the art paper focuses on the poorly explored issue of foreign language aptitude, attempting to present the latest developments in this field and reconceptualizations of the construct from the perspective of neuroscience. In accordance with this goal, it first discusses general directions in neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude, starting with the earliest attempts to define the neurological substrate for talent, sources of difficulties in the neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude and modern research methods. This is followed by the discussion of the research on the phonology of foreign language aptitude with emphasis on functional and structural studies as well as their consequences for the knowledge of the concept. The subsequent section presents the studies which focus on lexical and morphosyntactic aspects of foreign language aptitude. The paper ends with a discussion of the limitations of contemporary research, the future directions of such research and selec ed methodological issues.

  12. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  13. Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. How to describe mouth patterns in the Danish Sign Language Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Boye Niemela, Janne

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Sign Language dictionary project aims at creating an electronic dictionary of the basic vocabulary of Danish Sign Language. One of many issues in compiling the dictionary has been to analyse the status of mouth patterns in Danish Sign Language and, consequently, to decide at which level...

  15. The clothes maketh the sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Bryan; Chan, Victoria O; Mitchell, David P; McDermott, Shaunagh; Eisenberg, Ron L; Heffernan, Eric J; Ridge, Carole A

    2016-08-01

    Pattern recognition is a key tool that enables radiologists to evoke certain diagnoses based on a radiologic appearance. In Shakespeare's Hamlet, Polonius tells his son Laertes to dress well because "apparel oft proclaims the man"; this phrase is now expressed in modern parlance as "the clothes maketh the man". Similarly in radiology, appearances are everything, and in the case of radiologic signs, occasionally "the clothes maketh the sign". The radiologic signs described in this pictorial review resemble items of clothing, fabric types, headwear, or accessories and are found in the musculoskeletal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. These "clothing signs" serve as a useful visual trigger to help radiologists to identify particular disease entities. • Pattern recognition enables radiologists to evoke a diagnosis based on radiologic appearance. • The radiologic signs described in this review resemble clothing, fabric, or accessories. • These "clothing signs" serve as visual triggers that evoke particular disease entities.

  16. Basilar artery occlusion: Prognostic signs of severity on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre, E-mail: pierre-alexandre.poletti@hcuge.ch [Service of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Pereira, Vitor Mendes [Service of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto (Canada); Lovblad, Karl-Olof [Service of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Canel, Lucie [Service of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Sztajzel, Roman [Service of Neurology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Becker, Minerva [Service of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Perneger, Thomas [Division of Clinical Epidemiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Platon, Alexandra [Service of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The main CT signs associated with basilar artery occlusion were analyzed. • CT sign of acute ischemic lesion is significantly associated with a bad outcome. • The site of the basilar artery occlusion is not associated to the patients’ outcome. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the computed tomography (CT) signs that are predictive of the clinical outcome of basilar artery occlusion (BAO). Materials and methods: The study population consisted in 37 patients (14 women, 23 men, mean age: 63 years), admitted with onset of neurological deficit, starting 1–72 h prior to admission, who were diagnosed with BAO on the basis of a CT examination with intravenous contrast agent. The following signs were collected on CT scans performed on admission: clot density on noncontrast images, clot length, and clot location, as well as the presence of acute ischemic lesions. The results were compared against the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of patients at 3 months, favorable clinical outcome being defined as a mRS score ≤3. Results: The clinical outcome was favorable in 13 (35%) of the 37 patients and unfavorable in 24 (65%). Signs of acute ischemia were visible in 13 of the 24 patients with unfavorable outcome but in none of the 13 patients with favorable outcome (p < 0.001). None of the other CT signs analyzed were significantly correlated with clinical prognosis. Conclusion: Of all the CT signs analyzed, only the presence of signs of acute ischemia on the admission CT of patients with BAO was associated with poor prognosis.

  17. Pediatric neurology of the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavely, James A

    2006-05-01

    The neurologic examination in the puppy or kitten can be a challenging experience. Understanding the development of behavior reflexes and movement in puppies and kittens enables us to overcome some of these challenges and to recognize the neurologically abnormal patient. Subsequently,we can identify the neuroanatomic localization and generate a differential diagnosis list. This article first reviews the pediatric neurologic examination and then discusses diseases unique to these individuals.

  18. Sign Languages of the World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This handbook provides information on some 38 sign languages, including basic facts about each of the languages, structural aspects, history and culture of the Deaf communities, and history of research. The papers are all original, and each has been specifically written for the volume by an expert...... or team of experts in the particular sign language, at the invitation of the editors. Thirty-eight different deaf sign languages and alternate sign languages from every continent are represented, and over seventy international deaf and hearing scholars have contributed to the volume....

  19. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Tolaymat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep problems are frequently addressed as a primary or secondary concern during the visit to the pediatric neurology clinic. Sleep disorders can mimic other neurologic diseases (e.g., epilepsy and movement disorders, and this adds challenges to the diagnostic process. Sleep disorders can significantly affect the quality of life and functionality of children in general and those with comorbid neurological diseases in particular. Understanding the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, recognizing the implications of sleep disorder in children with neurologic diseases and behavioral difficulties, and early intervention continue to evolve resulting in better neurocognitive outcomes.

  20. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  1. Automatic sign language recognition inspired by human sign perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Holt, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Automatic sign language recognition is a relatively new field of research (since ca. 1990). Its objectives are to automatically analyze sign language utterances. There are several issues within the research area that merit investigation: how to capture the utterances (cameras, magnetic sensors,

  2. Inuit Sign Language: a contribution to sign language typology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, J.; Baker, A.; Pfau, R.

    2011-01-01

    Sign language typology is a fairly new research field and typological classifications have yet to be established. For spoken languages, these classifications are generally based on typological parameters; it would thus be desirable to establish these for sign languages. In this paper, different

  3. Planning Sign Languages: Promoting Hearing Hegemony? Conceptualizing Sign Language Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    In light of the absence of a codified standard variety in British Sign Language and German Sign Language ("Deutsche Gebardensprache") there have been repeated calls for the standardization of both languages primarily from outside the Deaf community. The paper is based on a recent grounded theory study which explored perspectives on sign…

  4. Can Post mTBI Neurological Soft Signs Predict Postconcussive and PTSD Symptoms : A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    from the Partners Health Care System and the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and the Department of Defense IRB...Screener Hansen, Paul - Screener Howell, Melissa - Screener Mooncai, Theodore - Screener Rubin, John - Screener Pruzansky, Alix - Screener Zafonte

  5. Africa: signs of hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Kirsten

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The dawning of the 21st century generally brought new hope to African leaders and countless thousands of ordinary citizens of many countries on the continent. The first signs of a new turn of events shone through by the end of the last decade of the previous century. This was manifested by economic growth rates that started to pick up in a number of African states, by pro-democracy movements which in country after country succeeded in replacing authoritarian regimes, and by the winding down and termination of some of Africa’s most devastating wars. The results of this analysis confirm the above-mentioned positive political, economic and conflict trends in Africa. It is clearly a significant turn of events given the well-known political and economic predicament with which Africa is struggling. When this negative legacy and Cold War background of Africa is considered, the importance of present developments is clear to see. The identified heightened sense of purpose among the leaders and peoples of Africa and the changed mood and need among Africans to take charge of their own future that found expression in the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD are indeed significant and bode well for the future of the continent. A word of warning here is, however, necessary. Our conduct with Africa must be very cautious and we must guard against over-optimism and the exaggerated belief that Africa is now on a trajectory of sustained development and peace. We cannot generalise about Africa – for that the continent is just too big and diverse from a geographical, cultural, economic and political point of view.

  6. Coenzyme Q10 and Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Siciliano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, or ubiquinone is a small electron carrier of the mitochondrial respiratory chain with antioxidant properties. CoQ10 supplementation has been widely used for mitochondrial disorders. The rationale for using CoQ10 is very powerful when this compound is primary decreased because of defective synthesis. Primary CoQ10 deficiency is a treatable condition, so heightened “clinical awareness” about this diagnosis is essential. CoQ10 and its analogue, idebenone, have also been widely used in the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders. These compounds could potentially play a therapeutic role in Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich’s ataxia, and other conditions which have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. This article reviews the physiological roles of CoQ10, as well as the rationale and the role in clinical practice of CoQ10 supplementation in different neurological diseases, from primary CoQ10 deficiency to neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Learning to Detect Traffic Signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Trivedi, Mohan M.; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the performance of sign detection based on synthetic training data to the performance of detection based on real-world training images. Viola-Jones detectors are created for 4 different traffic signs with both synthetic and real data, and varying numbers of training samples...

  8. Sign Facilitation in Word Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Loes N.; Knoors, Harry E. T.; Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.; Aarnoutse, Cor A. J.

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether use of sign language would facilitate reading word recognition by 16 deaf children (6- to 1 years-old) in the Netherlands. Results indicated that if words were learned through speech, accompanied by the relevant sign, accuracy of word recognition was greater than if words were learned solely through speech. (Contains…

  9. Concise Lexicon for Sign Linguistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Jan Nijen Twilhaar; Dr. Beppie van den Bogaerde

    2016-01-01

    This extensive, well-researched and clearly formatted lexicon of a wide variety of linguistic terms is a long overdue. It is an extremely welcome addition to the bookshelves of sign language teachers, interpreters, linguists, learners and other sign language users, and of course of the Deaf

  10. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  11. PYRITINOL USAGE IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Zavadenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of developmental disorders, correction of learning disabilities and behavioral problems in children should be prompt, complex and include pharmacotherapy with nootropic agents. The results of recent studies shown in this review proved effectiveness of pharmacotherapy with pyritinol in children with perinatal injury of central nervous system and its consequences, psychomotor and speech development delay, dyslexia, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, cognitive disorders and learning disabilities (including manifestations of epilepsy, chronic tic disorders and Tourette syndrome. Due to its ability to optimize metabolic processes in central nervous system, pyritinol is used in treatment of vegetative dysfunction in children and adolescents, especially associated with asthenical manifestations, as well as in complex therapy of exertion headache and migraine. The drug is effective in treatment of cognitive disorders in children and adolescents with epilepsy, pyritinol was administered without changing of the basic anticonvulsive therapy and no deterioration (increase of severity of seizures or intensity of epileptiform activity on electroencephalogramms was observed. Significant nootropic effect of pyritinol, including neurometabolic, neuroprotective, neurodynamic and other mechanisms, in association with safety and rare side effects of this drug determines its wide usage in pediatric neurology.

  12. Toward a Neurology of Loneliness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter century. The brain is the key organ of social connections and processes, however, and the same objective social relationship can be experienced as caring and protective or as exploitive and isolating. We review evidence that the perception of social isolation (i.e., loneliness) impacts brain and behavior and is a risk factor for broad-based morbidity and mortality. However, the causal role of loneliness on neural mechanisms and mortality is difficult to test conclusively in humans. Mechanistic animal studies provide a lens through which to evaluate the neurological effects of a member of a social species living chronically on the social perimeter. Experimental studies show that social isolation produces significant changes in brain structures and processes in adult social animals. These effects are not uniform across the brain or across species but instead are most evident in brain regions that reflect differences in the functional demands of solitary versus social living for a particular species. The human and animal literatures have developed independently, however, and significant gaps also exist. The current review underscores the importance of integrating human and animal research to delineate the mechanisms through which social relationships impact the brain, health, and well-being. PMID:25222636

  13. Endocannabinoid System in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Roberta; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Marasco, Daniela; Malfitano, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Several studies support the evidence that the endocannabinoid system and cannabimimetic drugs might have therapeutic potential in numerous pathologies. These pathologies range from neurological disorders, atherosclerosis, stroke, cancer to obesity/metabolic syndrome and others. In this paper we review the endocannabinoid system signaling and its alteration in neurodegenerative disorders like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease and discuss the main findings about the use of cannabinoids in the therapy of these pathologies. Despite different etiologies, neurodegenerative disorders exhibit similar mechanisms like neuro-inflammation, excitotoxicity, deregulation of intercellular communication, mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of brain tissue homeostasis. Current treatments ameliorate the symptoms but are not curative. Interfering with the endocannabinoid signaling might be a valid therapeutic option in neuro-degeneration. To this aim, pharmacological intervention to modulate the endocannabinoid system and the use of natural and synthetic cannabimimetic drugs have been assessed. CB1 and CB2 receptor signaling contributes to the control of Ca2+ homeostasis, trophic support, mitochondrial activity, and inflammatory conditions. Several studies and patents suggest that the endocannabinoid system has neuro-protective properties and might be a target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Electronics engineer's reference book

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, L W

    1976-01-01

    Electronics Engineer's Reference Book, 4th Edition is a reference book for electronic engineers that reviews the knowledge and techniques in electronics engineering and covers topics ranging from basics to materials and components, devices, circuits, measurements, and applications. This edition is comprised of 27 chapters; the first of which presents general information on electronics engineering, including terminology, mathematical equations, mathematical signs and symbols, and Greek alphabet and symbols. Attention then turns to the history of electronics; electromagnetic and nuclear radiatio

  15. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T.; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  16. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  17. Task analysis in neurosciences programme design - neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Defining educational objectives is the key to achieving the goal of professional competence in students. The technique of task analysis was selected to determine components of competence in clinical neurology appropriate to the needs of primary care. A survey of neurological problems in general practice revealed that ...

  18. Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 28 of 28 ... Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  19. Suspecting Neurological Dysfunction From E Mail Messages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non medical person suspected and confirmed neurological dysfunction in an individual, based only on e mail messages sent by the individual. With email communication becoming rampant “peculiar” email messages may raise the suspicion of neurological dysfunction. Organic pathology explaining the abnormal email ...

  20. Neurological and neurosurgical manifestations of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adults in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire and in Kinshasa and among inpatients in Ugandan hospitals. Ninety per cent of deaths ... various parts of the continent. Neurological manifestations. The spectrum of neurological diseases reported in ... Primary effects of HIV. HEADACHE. Case report. A Malawian 46-year-old male senior ...

  1. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  2. The sawtooth sign is predictive of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Michael H; Scanlon, Paul D; Schroeder, Darrell R; Olson, Eric J

    2017-05-01

    The sawtooth sign in spirometry is associated with redundant upper airway tissue and snoring, but its predictive value for identifying obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is disputed. We retrospectively assessed the predictive value of the spirometric sawtooth sign in terms of the odds ratio (OR) of association with a diagnosis of OSA compared to those without the sign. Consecutive spirometry reports showing a sawtooth sign were identified from our laboratory. We identified 50 subjects with sawtooth sign and 100 control subjects without sawtooth sign, matched for age, BMI, and gender. The electronic medical record of each patient was queried for a diagnosis of OSA based on physician-reported diagnoses. Of the 50 subjects with sawtooth sign, 22 were found to have a current diagnosis of OSA (44%). Twenty-seven of the 100 controls (27%) also had OSA. From logistic regression analysis, sawtooth sign was associated with an increased likelihood of OSA (OR = 2.12, 95% C.I. 1.04 to 4.35). Similar results were obtained after adjustment for age, gender, pack years, and BMI (OR = 2.61, 95% C.I. 1.13 to 6.21). Patients with the sawtooth sign have greater odds of having a diagnosis of OSA compared with those without the sign. If prospectively evaluated, as a result of improved identification, we hypothesize that the sawtooth sign may show an even stronger association with OSA. This relatively common finding, which adds no cost to routine spirometry, may serve as an indicator for OSA workup for some individuals not already identified as having OSA.

  3. Monitoring of clinical signs in goats with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldmann Wilfred

    2010-03-01

    individual neurological signs.

  4. Black Hole Sign: Novel Imaging Marker That Predicts Hematoma Growth in Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Gang; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Xing-Chen; Yang, Wen-Song; Li, Ke-Wei; Wei, Xiao; Xie, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Early hematoma growth is a devastating neurological complication after intracerebral hemorrhage. We aim to report and evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) black hole sign in predicting hematoma growth in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were screened for the presence of CT black hole sign on admission head CT performed within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. The black hole sign was defined as hypoattenuatting area encapsulated within the hyperattenuating hematoma with a clearly defined border. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of CT black hole sign in predicting hematoma expansion were calculated. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the presence of the black hole sign and early hematoma growth. A total of 206 patients were enrolled. Black hole sign was found in 30 (14.6%) of 206 patients on the baseline CT scan. The black hole sign was more common in patients with hematoma growth (31.9%) than those without hematoma growth (5.8%; Phole sign in predicting early hematoma growth were 31.9%, 94.1%, 73.3%, and 73.2%, respectively. The time-to-admission CT scan, baseline hematoma volume, and the presence of black hole sign on admission CT independently predict hematoma growth in multivariate model. The CT black hole sign could be used as a simple and easy-to-use predictor for early hematoma growth in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Isolation of Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus from a Horse with Neurological Disease in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Roberta; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Marques, Rafael Elias; Oliveira, Taismara Simas; Furtini, Ronaldo; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2013-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a causative agent of encephalitis in humans in the Western hemisphere. SLEV is a positive-sense RNA virus that belongs to the Flavivirus genus, which includes West Nile encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Dengue virus and other medically important viruses. Recently, we isolated a SLEV strain from the brain of a horse with neurological signs in the countryside of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The SLEV isolation was confirmed by reverse-transcription RT-PCR and sequencing of the E protein gene. Virus identity was also confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence using commercial antibodies against SLEV. To characterize this newly isolated strain in vivo, serial passages in newborn mice were performed and led to hemorrhagic manifestations associated with recruitment of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system of newborns. In summary this is the first isolation of SLEV from a horse with neurological signs in Brazil. PMID:24278489

  6. Sign Inference for Dynamic Signed Networks via Dictionary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile online social network (mOSN is a burgeoning research area. However, most existing works referring to mOSNs deal with static network structures and simply encode whether relationships among entities exist or not. In contrast, relationships in signed mOSNs can be positive or negative and may be changed with time and locations. Applying certain global characteristics of social balance, in this paper, we aim to infer the unknown relationships in dynamic signed mOSNs and formulate this sign inference problem as a low-rank matrix estimation problem. Specifically, motivated by the Singular Value Thresholding (SVT algorithm, a compact dictionary is selected from the observed dataset. Based on this compact dictionary, the relationships in the dynamic signed mOSNs are estimated via solving the formulated problem. Furthermore, the estimation accuracy is improved by employing a dictionary self-updating mechanism.

  7. Neurology in the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Carl H; Daroff, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Between December 1965 and December 1971, the United States maintained armed forces in Vietnam never less than 180,000 men and women in support of the war. At one time, this commitment exceeded half a million soldiers, sailors, and airmen from both the United States and its allies. Such forces required an extensive medical presence, including 19 neurologists. All but two of the neurologists had been drafted for a 2-year tour of duty after deferment for residency training. They were assigned to Vietnam for one of those 2 years in two Army Medical Units and one Air Force facility providing neurological care for American and allied forces, as well as many civilians. Their practice included exposure to unfamiliar disorders including cerebral malaria, Japanese B encephalitis, sleep deprivation seizures, and toxic encephalitis caused by injection or inhalation of C-4 explosive. They and neurologists at facilities in the United States published studies on all of these entities both during and after the war. These publications spawned the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Study, which was conceived during the Korean War and continues today as the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Center. It initially focused on post-traumatic epilepsy and later on all effects of brain injury. The Agent Orange controversy arose after the war; during the war, it was not perceived as a threat by medical personnel. Although soldiers in previous wars had developed serious psychological impairments, post-traumatic stress disorder was formally recognized in the servicemen returning from Vietnam. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  9. Neurology advanced practice providers: A position paper of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Heidi B; Fritz, Joseph V; Govindarajan, Raghav; Penfold Murray, Rebecca; Boyle, Kathryn B; Getchius, Thomas S D; Freimer, Miriam

    2015-08-01

    There are many factors driving health care reform, including unsustainable costs, poor outcomes, an aging populace, and physician shortages. These issues are particularly relevant to neurology. New reimbursement models are based on value and facilitated by the use of multidisciplinary teams. Integration of advanced practice providers (APPs) into neurology practice offers many advantages with new models of care. Conversely, there are many and varied challenges financially and logistically with these practice models. The American Academy of Neurology has formed a Work Group to address the needs of both neurologists and neurologic APPs and monitor the effect of APPs on quality and cost of neurologic care.

  10. Sanal Lidzhiev, Signs and Omens

    OpenAIRE

    Gedeeva, Darina; Ubushieva, Bamba

    2017-01-01

    Seeing a hare is a good sign, because your plans will materialize. It is a bad sign to see a fox or a corsac on the road. It is also a bad sign when children snort. It is forbidden for pregnant women to eat long intestines or mildly cooked meat with blood. Only one person can eat a cooked sheep's head. If two people eat the same head, they will quarrel. A sheep's head that people present to each other at weddings should be burnt on a fire. If someone brings meat, show it to all who are pres...

  11. MOLAR TOOTH SIGN - JOUBERT SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Ranđelović

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The molar tooth sign is seen in very few conditions and is a very rare pediatric central nervous system congenital anomaly. Molar tooth sign is the result of cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, thick and maloriented superior cerebellar peduncles, and an abnormally deep interpeduncular fossa. In Joubert syndrome, this is seen in about 85% of patients. We present a case of a two-year old girl with flaccid paraparesis, regression of milestones and developmental delay. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed the characteristic molar tooth sign with apposition of cerebellar hemispheres, batwing-shaped fourth ventricle, cerebellar vermis agenesis and deep interpeduncular fossa consistent with the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome.

  12. Abductor sign: a reliable new sign to detect unilateral non-organic paresis of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, M

    2004-01-01

    To test a new neurological sign, the "abductor sign," which can distinguish between organic and non-organic leg paresis using synergic movements of the bilateral hip abductors. The subjects were 33 patients presenting with paresis of one leg, 17 of organic origin and 16 of non-organic origin (hysteria). To test the abductor sign, the examiner told the patient to abduct each leg, and opposed this movement with his hands placed on the lateral surfaces of the patient's legs. The leg contralateral to the abducted one showed opposite actions for organic paresis and non-organic paresis: for example, when the paretic leg was abducted, the sound leg stayed fixed in organic paresis, but moved in the hyperadducting direction in non-organic paresis. Hoover's sign was used for comparison in the same patients. The abductor sign gave the correct classification for all 33 cases. Hoover's sign was reliable if the results were carefully interpreted, but it was non-diagnostic for 16 patients because of strong hip extensors and in two because of strong hip flexors. Two patients with non-organic paresis succeeded in tricking the examiner by pretending full effort to lift the paretic leg. The abductor sign is a useful test to detect non-organic paresis, because (1) it is difficult for a hysterical patient to deceive the examiner, (2) the hip abductor is one of the most commonly involved muscles in pyramidal weakness, and (3) the results are easily visible as movement or non-movement of the unabducted leg.

  13. CRIOTHERMOAPPLICATIONAL THERAPY IN NEUROLOGY WITH THE USE OF THERMOELECTRIC ENERGY CONVERTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Ismailov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The etiology of neurological diseases caused by stress situations and other signs of technological progress is analyzed.Methods. The methods of physical therapy effects on the human body used in therapeutic neurology, which are of high priority because of safety and noninvasiveness are investigated.Results.The necessity of using thermoelectric converters in therapeutic neurology is proved. The design of the semiconductor thermoelectric device for massage with the detailed description of the working principle is suggested. The advantages of the developed design of the device are pointed out, consisting in high environmental safety, noiselessness, reliability, functionality, versatility. The mathematical model of the local thermal effects (criothermoapplicational and the results of numerical experiment are considered.Conclusion.The possibilities of combining in the device the functions of mechanical massage, heating, cooling, and magnetic effects.

  14. The relationship between insight and neurological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hill, M

    2012-04-01

    Impaired insight is commonly seen in psychosis and some studies have proposed that is a biologically based deficit. Support for this view comes from the excess of neurological soft signs (NSS) observed in patients with psychoses and their neural correlates which demonstrate a degree of overlap with the regions of interest implicated in neuroimaging studies of insight. The aim was to examine the relationship between NSS and insight in a sample of 241 first-episode psychosis patients.

  15. Outcomes from a US military neurology and traumatic brain injury telemedicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkiewicz, Ilana R; Lappan, Charles M; Neely, Edward T; Hesselbrock, Roger R; Girard, Philip D; Alphonso, Aimee L; Tsao, Jack W

    2012-09-18

    This study evaluated usage of the Army Knowledge Online (AKO) Telemedicine Consultation Program for neurology and traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases in remote overseas areas with limited access to subspecialists. We performed a descriptive analysis of quantity of consults, response times, sites where consults originated, military branches that benefitted, anatomic locations of problems, and diagnoses. This was a retrospective analysis that searched electronic databases for neurology consults from October 2006 to December 2010 and TBI consults from March 2008 to December 2010. A total of 508 consults were received for neurology, and 131 consults involved TBI. For the most part, quantity of consults increased over the years. Meanwhile, response times decreased, with a mean response time of 8 hours, 14 minutes for neurology consults and 2 hours, 44 minutes for TBI consults. Most neurology consults originated in Iraq (67.59%) followed by Afghanistan (16.84%), whereas TBI consults mainly originated from Afghanistan (40.87%) followed by Iraq (33.91%). The most common consultant diagnoses were headaches, including migraines (52.1%), for neurology cases and mild TBI/concussion (52.3%) for TBI cases. In the majority of cases, consultants recommended in-theater management. After receipt of consultant's recommendation, 84 known neurology evacuations were facilitated, and 3 known neurology evacuations were prevented. E-mail-based neurology and TBI subspecialty teleconsultation is a viable method for overseas providers in remote locations to receive expert recommendations for a range of neurologic conditions. These recommendations can facilitate medically necessary patient evacuations or prevent evacuations for which on-site care is preferable.

  16. [Rheumatoid arthritis with cervical localization. Description of a case with neurological symptomatology and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbiati, C; Pricolo, R; Montani, A; Vimercati, M E

    1989-06-01

    A case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with a cranio-cervical junction involvement is presented. Medullary compression was present and was partially invalidating. Radiological and CT scan signs are explained and their relationship with a clinical symptomatology is discussed. The importance of radiological monitoring is emphasised in order to avoid dangerous neurological complications.

  17. [Charles Miller Fisher: a giant of neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    C. Miller Fisher MD, one of the great neurologists in the 20th century, died in April 2012. Born in Canada, he studied medicine at the University of Toronto. As a Canadian Navy medical doctor he participated in World War II and was a war prisoner from 1941 to 1944. He did a residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute between 1946 and 1948, and later on was a Fellow in Neurology and Neuropathology at the Boston City Hospital. In 1954 he entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as a neurologist and neuropathologist, where he remained until his retirement, in 2005. His academic career ended as Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. His area of special interest in neurology was cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In 1954 he created the first Vascular Neurology service in the world and trained many leading neurologists on this field. His scientific contributions are present in more than 250 publications, as journal articles and book chapters. Many of his articles, certainly not restricted to CVD, were seminal in neurology. Several concepts and terms that he coined are currently used in daily clinical practice. The chapters on CVD, in seven consecutive editions of Harrison's Internal Medicine textbook, are among his highlights. His death was deeply felt by the neurological community.

  18. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  19. Post Traumatic Tension Pneumocephalus: The Mount Fuji Sign

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, J

    2017-04-01

    Pneumocephalus is defined as the presence of intracranial air. This is most commonly secondary to a traumatic head injury. Tension pneumocephalus presents radiologically with compression of the frontal lobes and widening of the interhemispheric space between the frontal lobes. It is often termed the Mount Fuji sign due to a perceived similarity with an iconic mountain peak in Japan. We present the case of a 52-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency department shortly before 8am on a Saturday morning following an assault. He was alert and ambulatory with no clinical evidence of raised intracranial pressure. A plain radiograph of the facial bones showed significant pneumocephalus. A later CT was consistent with a tension pneumocephalus which usually necessitates urgent decompression.The patient showed no clinical signs or symptoms of raised intracranial pressure and was managed conservatively. He was discharged home 16 days later with no neurological deficit

  20. Standardized patient outcomes trial (SPOT in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E. Safdieh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurologic examination is a challenging component of the physical examination for medical students. In response, primarily based on expert consensus, medical schools have supplemented their curricula with standardized patient (SP sessions that are focused on the neurologic examination. Hypothesis-driven quantitative data are needed to justify the further use of this resource-intensive educational modality, specifically regarding whether using SPs to teach the neurological examination effects a long-term benefit on the application of neurological examination skills. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data from medical students at Weill Cornell Medical College. The control group (n=129 received the standard curriculum. The intervention group (n=58 received the standard curriculum and an additional SP session focused on the neurologic examination during the second year of medical school. Student performance on the neurologic examination was assessed in the control and intervention groups via an OSCE administered during the fourth year of medical school. A Neurologic Physical Exam (NPE score of 0.0 to 6.0 was calculated for each student based on a neurologic examination checklist completed by the SPs during the OSCE. Composite NPE scores in the control and intervention groups were compared with the unpaired t-test. Results: In the fourth year OSCE, composite NPE scores in the intervention group (3.5±1.1 were statistically significantly greater than those in the control group (2.2±1.1 (p<0.0001. Conclusions: SP sessions are an effective tool for teaching the neurologic examination. We determined that a single, structured SP session conducted as an adjunct to our traditional lectures and small groups is associated with a statistically significant improvement in student performance measured 2 years after the session.

  1. Autoimmune neurological syndromes associated limbic encephalitis and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayas, Zeynep Özözen; Kotan, Dilcan; Aras, Yeşim Güzey

    2016-10-06

    Autoimmune neurological syndrome is a group of disorders caused by cancer affecting nervous system by different immunological mechanisms. In this study, we aim to study the clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings, autoantibody tests, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs and treatment outcome of patients with autoimmune syndromes. In this study, 7 patients (4 male, 3 female) diagnosed with autoimmune neurological syndrome were retrospectively examined. Five of patients were diagnosed with limbic encephalitis, two of them were paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Confusion and seizure were the most seen symptoms. Two patients had psychiatric disturbances (28,5%) followed by seizure. Headache was seen in 2 patients (% 28,5), disartria in 1 patient (% 14,2), and gait disorder in 2 patients (28,5%). The duration of symptoms was 46 (3-150) days on average. CSF abnormalities were detected in 2 patients. CT and MRI of the brain was available in all patients. Five patients had involvement of mesiotemporal region, two patients had diffuse cerebellar atrophy. One of patients had anti-GABAR B1 positivity. Tumors were detected in 2 patients while investigation for paraneoplasia screening. Remission is only possible with the detection and treatment of the malignancy. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Harmonization of European neurology education: the junior doctor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macerollo, Antonella; Struhal, Walter; Sellner, Johann

    2013-10-29

    The objective of this article, written by executives of the European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees (EAYNT), is to illustrate the status quo of neurology training in Europe and give an outlook on ongoing efforts and prospects for junior neurologists. The European Union is an economic and political union that currently encompasses 27 member states with more than 500 million inhabitants (or 7.3% of the world population) (interested readers are referred to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union). Countries of the European Union act as a single market with free movement of citizens, goods, services, and finances. As a consequence, a diploma and postgraduate training obtained in one EU country will be automatically recognized by all other EU member states. At the Lisbon European Council in March 2000, the Heads of State or Government signed a treaty that expresses their ambition of making Europe "the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion" (www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisbon_Strategy). More than 1.6 million physicians in all the different medical specialties are represented by the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS). The UEMS was founded in 1958 and the objectives include the study, promotion, and harmonization of the highest level of training of medical specialists, medical practice, and health care within the European Union. The European Board of Neurology (UEMS-EBN; www.uems-neuroboard.org) is in charge of the implementation of the UEMS policy regarding neurology.

  3. [Neurological symptoms and disability in HTLV-1 associated myelopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J; Mesquita, H Mourao; Ribeiro, L da Silveira

    2008-03-01

    The human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is a retrovirus that causes tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). Objectives. To describe neurological characteristics and the severity of disability in a sample of patients with TSP/HAM. All TSP/HAM patients consecutively admitted during 2006 at the Brasilia Sarah Hospital, neurology outpatient clinic were included in the study. HTLV-I infected patient fulfilled criteria for serological positivity at both ELISA and western blot. Ashworth spasticity scale, Barthel index of activities of daily living, kurtzke functional systems and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were applied. All patients performed electrophysiological studies (evoked potentials, electromyogram) and brain/spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Forty two of 249 paraparetic patients (16.9%; 26 females; mean age: 49.8 years) were diagnosed as having TSP/HAM. Mean time of evolution was 11.2 years. Most common neurological syndrome was a chronic progressive spastic paraparesis with hyperreflexia, ankle clonus and bilateral Babinski sign (97.7 %). Other findings were proximal muscle atrophy in lower limbs (28.6 %) , ataxia (21.4%), and peripheral neuropathy (7.1%). Half of patients were wheel-chair restricted or had a domiciliary walk. EDSS median was 6 and Barthel index mean score was 65. Most common findings on spinal cord MRI were thoracic spinal cord atrophy (66.7%) and white matter hyper-intensity areas in cerebral subcortical (42.8 %) and spinal cord (21.4%) regions. TSP/HAM is a very disabilitating disorder. Peripheral neuropathy and ataxia are other syndromes that should be included in the spectrum of HTLV-I infection.

  4. Aging changes in vital signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004019.htm Aging changes in vital signs To use the sharing ... Normal body temperature does not change much with aging. But as you get older, it becomes harder ...

  5. Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  6. Wavelets for sign language translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Beth J.; Anspach, Gretel

    1993-10-01

    Wavelet techniques are applied to help extract the relevant parameters of sign language from video images of a person communicating in American Sign Language or Signed English. The compression and edge detection features of two-dimensional wavelet analysis are exploited to enhance the algorithms under development to classify the hand motion, hand location with respect to the body, and handshape. These three parameters have different processing requirements and complexity issues. The results are described for applying various quadrature mirror filter designs to a filterbank implementation of the desired wavelet transform. The overall project is to develop a system that will translate sign language to English to facilitate communication between deaf and hearing people.

  7. Quantifiers in Russian Sign Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimmelman, V.; Paperno, D.; Keenan, E.L.

    2017-01-01

    After presenting some basic genetic, historical and typological information about Russian Sign Language, this chapter outlines the quantification patterns it expresses. It illustrates various semantic types of quantifiers, such as generalized existential, generalized universal, proportional,

  8. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  9. 23 CFR 750.710 - Landmark signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Landmark signs. 750.710 Section 750.710 Highways FEDERAL... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.710 Landmark signs. (a) 23 U.S.C. 131(c) permits the existence of signs... Secretary, to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic or...

  10. The expressions of spatial relations during interaction in american sign language, croatian sign language, and turkish sign language

    OpenAIRE

    Arık, Engin

    2012-01-01

    Signers use their body and the space in front of them iconically. Does iconicity lead to the same mapping strategies in construing space during interaction across sign languages? The present study addressed this question by conducting an experimental study on basic static and motion event descriptions during interaction (describer input and addressee re-signing/retelling) in American Sign Language, Croatian Sign Language, and Turkish Sign Language. I found that the three sign languages are si...

  11. LEARNERS SATISFACTION FACTORS IN NEUROLOGY RELATED MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela MANIU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to investigate the factors that are influencing student satisfaction in case of neurology related massive open online courses (MOOCs. We analyzed data collected from learners enrolled in 40 neurology related MOOCs, by manually looking for information in these courses reviews. The main identified satisfaction factors can be grouped into the following categories: content related factors: course content, additional materials, assignments, external research and teaching - learning related factors (teacher presentation techniques / style: engaging, clear, coherent, knowledgeable, sharing / explanation, interactive, excitement, considering student’s needs, inspiring, sense of humor. Competences, skills and objectives pursued by neurology related MOOCs are also discussed. Analyzing these factors can be useful in new courses management (design and implementation and also in understanding the needs (motivation, behaviors, perception of 21st century learners interested in neurology related fields.

  12. [Voice disorders caused by neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Mate, M A; Cobeta, I

    To review voice disorders in neurological diseases, with special emphasis to acoustic analysis. In the first part of this article we describe data regarding neural control of voice, physiology of phonation, and examination of the patient with voice disturbances, including the use of voice laboratory, acoustic analysis fundamentals, phonetometric measures and aerodynamic measures. In the second part, we review the voice disturbances associated to neurological diseases, emphasizing into movement disorders (specially Parkinson s disease, essential tremor, and spasmodic dysphonia). A number of neurological diseases causing alterations of corticospinal pathway, cerebellum, basal ganglia and upper and/or lower motoneurons can induce voice disturbances. Voice examination using ear, nose & throat examination, endoscopy and videorecording of laryngeal movements, acoustic analysis, elecroglottography, laryngeal electromyography, and aerodynamic measures, could be useful in the clinical examination of some neurological diseases.

  13. Axon guidance proteins in neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Battum, Eljo Y.; Brignani, Sara; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/197768814

    2015-01-01

    Many neurological disorders are characterised by structural changes in neuronal connections, ranging from presymptomatic synaptic changes to the loss or rewiring of entire axon bundles. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this perturbed connectivity are poorly understood, but recent studies

  14. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gano, Lindsey B; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation...

  15. Transient Neurological Symptoms after Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has been used for more than 50 years for spinal anesthesia and has a remarkable safety record. In 1993, a new adverse effect, transient neurologic toxicity was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. Transient neurological symptoms have been defined as pain in the lower extremities (buttocks, thighs and legs after an uncomplicated spinal anesthesia and after an initial full recovery during the immediate postoperative period (less than 24 h. The incidence of transient neurological symptoms reported in prospective, randomized trials varies from 4% to 37%. The etiology of transient neurological symptoms remains unkonwn. Despite the transient nature of this syndrome, it has proven to be difficult to treat effectively. Drug or some interventional therapy may be necessary. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 33-44

  16. Severe hypernatremia: survival without neurologic sequelae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borrego Domínguez, R R; Imaz Roncero, A; López-Herce Cid, J; Seriñá Ramírez, C

    2003-01-01

    .... She had a convulsive crisis without subsequent neurologic impairment. The second patient, a 3-year-old girl with pseudohypoaldosteronism type I and encephalopathy, had hypernatremia (203 mEq/l...

  17. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy: An uncommon neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    access article is distributed under. Creative Commons licence CC-BY-NC 4.0. CASE REPORT. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy: An uncommon neurological complication of diabetes. A Iyagba, MBBS, FWACP, FMCP; A Onwuchekwa, MBBS, FMCP.

  18. Neurological Complications Of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: Any ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , of the neurological deficits complicating chronic myeloid leukaemia. Method: Using patients\\' case folders and haematological malignancy register all cases of chronic myeloid leukaemia seen in Jos University Teaching Hospital between July ...

  19. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    OpenAIRE

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa; Amit Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospectiv...

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS IN NEUROLOGY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les principaux diagnostics étaient: un Accident vasculaire cérébral (42,1%), un abcès cérébral (17,9%) et une méningo-encéphalite (ME) dans 11,9%. ... Death risk was in the one hand higher for neurological infectious than for stroke and in the second hand higher for neurological infectious than for all other diseases.

  1. Cognitive and noncognitive neurological features of young-onset dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brendan J; Boeve, Bradley F; Josephs, Keith A

    2009-01-01

    The rarity of young-onset dementia (YOD), the broad differential diagnosis and unusual clinical presentations present unique challenges to correctly recognize the condition and establish an accurate diagnosis. Limited data exist regarding clinical features associated with dementia prior to the age of 45. We retrospectively assessed cognitive and noncognitive neurological characteristics of 235 patients who presented for evaluation of YOD to investigate the clinical characteristics of YOD compared to later-onset dementias and to identify clinical features associated with specific etiologies that may aid in the evaluation of YOD. Multiple cognitive domains were affected in most patients, and no significant differences in affected domains existed between groups. Early psychiatric and behavioral features occurred at very high frequencies. Nearly 80% of this YOD cohort had additional noncognitive symptoms or signs as a feature of their disease. Chorea was strongly associated with Huntington disease. Parkinsonism was not seen in patients having an autoimmune/inflammatory etiology. The rarity of YOD and the high frequency of early psychiatric features led to frequent misdiagnosis early in the clinical course. The high frequency of noncognitive symptoms and signs may aid clinicians in distinguishing patients requiring a more extensive evaluation for YOD.

  2. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  3. EEG in Sarcoidosis Patients Without Neurological Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin Topçuoğlu, Özgür; Kavas, Murat; Öztaş, Selahattin; Arınç, Sibel; Afşar, Gülgün; Saraç, Sema; Midi, İpek

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease affecting nervous system in 5% to 10% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as the most sensitive method for detecting neurosarcoidosis. However, the most common findings in MRI are the nonspecific white matter lesions, which may be unrelated to sarcoidosis and can occur because of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and other inflammatory or infectious disorders, as well. Autopsy studies report more frequent neurological involvement than the ante mortem studies. The aim of this study is to assess electroencephalography (EEG) in sarcoidosis patients without neurological findings in order to display asymptomatic neurological dysfunction. We performed EEG on 30 sarcoidosis patients without diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis or prior neurological comorbidities. Fourteen patients (46.7%) showed intermittant focal and/or generalized slowings while awake and not mentally activated. Seven (50%) of these 14 patients with EEG slowings had nonspecific white matter changes while the other half showed EEG slowings in the absence of MRI changes. We conclude that EEG slowings, when normal variants (psychomotor variant, temporal theta of elderly, frontal theta waves) are eliminated, may be an indicator of dysfunction in brain activity even in the absence of MRI findings. Hence, EEG may contribute toward detecting asymptomatic neurological dysfunction or probable future neurological involvement in sarcoidosis patients. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2016.

  4. Neurological manifestations of dengue viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carod-Artal FJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Javier Carod-Artal1,21Neurology Department, Raigmore hospital, Inverness, UK; 2Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. There is increased evidence for dengue virus neurotropism, and neurological manifestations could make part of the clinical picture of dengue virus infection in at least 0.5%–7.4% of symptomatic cases. Neurological complications have been classified into dengue virus encephalopathy, dengue virus encephalitis, immune-mediated syndromes (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, myelitis, Guillain–Barré syndrome, neuritis brachialis, acute cerebellitis, and others, neuromuscular complications (hypokalemic paralysis, transient benign muscle dysfunction and myositis, and dengue-associated stroke. Common neuro-ophthalmic complications are maculopathy and retinal vasculopathy. Pathogenic mechanisms include systemic complications and metabolic disturbances resulting in encephalopathy, direct effect of the virus provoking encephalitis, and postinfectious immune mechanisms causing immune-mediated syndromes. Dengue viruses should be considered as a cause of neurological disorders in endemic regions. Standardized case definitions for specific neurological complications are still needed. Keywords: encephalitis, encephalopathy, dengue fever, neurological complications

  5. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Sign Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is...

  6. Learning Sign Language: A Whole Language Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Daniel D.; Teller, Henry

    1996-01-01

    Applies principles of whole-language instruction to the teaching of sign language skills. Emphasis is on the holistic use of sign language in natural communicative situations. Some materials for this approach to sign language instruction are suggested. (DB)

  7. Parkinsonian axial signs in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, Francesca; Barbui, Corrado; Tinazzi, Michele

    2017-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated evidence of nigro-striatal denervation, disease progression and response to levodopa in a subgroup of patients with schizophrenia who developed parkinsonism. In the present study, we investigated whether axial parkinsonian signs might be an early manifestation of parkinsonism in schizophrenia not necessarily related to chronic administration of antipsychotic drugs (AP) drugs. From a baseline cohort of 299 schizophrenic patients who did not satisfy the diagnostic criteria for parkinsonism (presence of at least two of the following appendicular signs: bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity), we identified a group of patients who manifested two out of three axial parkinsonian signs (abnormality of trunk posture, hypomimia and short-step gait). Accordingly, we obtained two sub-groups of patients with schizophrenia, with (Schiz-Axial, N = 26), and without parkinsonian axial signs (Schiz-NO-Axial, N = 273). Clinical and demographical variables were compared between groups. The motor section of the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) was employed to measure motor disability. Schiz-Axial patients were significantly older (p = 0.007) and had longer disease duration (p = 0.04) compared to Schiz-NO-Axial. The two groups did not differ for variables related to AP treatment. Total UPDRS motor score (p signs might be an early manifestation of parkinsonism in schizophrenia associated to older age and longer disease duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chagas disease in a Texan horse with neurologic deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Laura K; Hamer, Sarah A; Shaw, Sarah; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Auckland, Lisa D; Hodo, Carolyn L; Chaffin, Keith; Rech, Raquel R

    2016-01-30

    A 10-year-old Quarter Horse gelding presented to the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a six month-history of ataxia and lameness in the hind limbs. The horse was treated presumptively for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) based on clinical signs but was ultimately euthanized after its condition worsened. Gross lesions were limited to a small area of reddening in the gray matter of the thoracic spinal cord. Histologically, trypanosome amastigotes morphologically similar to Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, were sporadically detected within segments of the thoracic spinal cord surrounded by mild lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Ancillary testing for Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. was negative. Conventional and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of affected paraffin embedded spinal cord were positive for T. cruzi, and sequencing of the amplified T. cruzi satellite DNA PCR fragment from the horse was homologous with various clones of T. cruzi in GenBank. While canine Chagas disease cases have been widely reported in southern Texas, this is the first report of clinical T. cruzi infection in an equid with demonstrable amastigotes in the spinal cord. In contrast to previous instances of Chagas disease in the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and humans, no inflammation or T. cruzi amastigotes were detected in the heart of the horse. Based on clinical signs, there is a potential for misdiagnosis of Chagas disease with other infectious diseases that affect the equine CNS. T. cruzi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with neurologic clinical signs and histologic evidence of meningomyelitis that originate in areas where Chagas disease is present. The prevalence of T. cruzi in horses and the role of equids in the parasite life cycle require further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurology in a globalizing world: World Congress of Neurology, Vienna, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir

    2013-06-11

    The World Congress of Neurology (figure 1) theme "Neurology in a Globalizing World" acknowledges that science and increasingly medicine and neurology are becoming globalized. The best way to manage change is to shape it. It is becoming increasingly clear that brain diseases, particularly stroke and dementia, are projected to rise at a rate that could overwhelm our clinics and hospitals. Hence a new emphasis on prevention and the need to work across disciplines beyond our traditional roles. Neurologists are the guardians of the brain and need to take the lead role in advancing new approaches in stemming the tide of neurologic diseases.

  10. CERN Single Sign On Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ormancey, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    The need for Single Sign On has always been restricted by the absence of cross platform solutions: a single sign on working only on one platform or technology is nearly useless. The recent improvements in Web Services Federation (WS-Federation) standard enabling federation of identity, attribute, authentication and authorization information can now provide real extended Single Sign On solutions. Various solutions have been investigated at CERN and now, a Web SSO solution using some parts of WS-Federation technology is available. Using the Shibboleth Service Provider module for Apache hosted web sites and Microsoft ADFS as the identity provider linked to Active Directory user, users can now authenticate on any web application using a single authentication platform, providing identity, user information (building, phone...) as well as group membership enabling authorization possibilities. A typical scenario: a CERN user can now authenticate on a Linux/Apache website using Windows Integrated credentials, and his ...

  11. Signed Networks in Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    Leskovec, Jure; Kleinberg, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Relations between users on social media sites often reflect a mixture of positive (friendly) and negative (antagonistic) interactions. In contrast to the bulk of research on social networks that has focused almost exclusively on positive interpretations of links between people, we study how the interplay between positive and negative relationships affects the structure of on-line social networks. We connect our analyses to theories of signed networks from social psychology. We find that the classical theory of structural balance tends to capture certain common patterns of interaction, but that it is also at odds with some of the fundamental phenomena we observe --- particularly related to the evolving, directed nature of these on-line networks. We then develop an alternate theory of status that better explains the observed edge signs and provides insights into the underlying social mechanisms. Our work provides one of the first large-scale evaluations of theories of signed networks using on-line datasets, as ...

  12. Malaysian sign language dataset for automatic sign language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hearing impaired individuals have issues to communicate with normal people. They have their own language called Sign Language (SL) to express their feeling or to communicate with others. As communication is an essential part of normal everyday life, it is particularly important for deaf people to communicate as ...

  13. SIGNS Molar tooth sign − looking beyond the obvious

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The molar tooth sign refers to the characteristic appearance on axial CT or MRI of enlarged and horizontally directed columnar structures on each side of the midline flanking a deep interpeduncular fossa.[1] This appearance is a result of absence or hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, lack of normal dorsal decussation and ...

  14. Status of neurology medical school education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran I.; Isaacson, Richard S.; Safdieh, Joseph E.; Finney, Glen R.; Sowell, Michael K.; Sam, Maria C.; Anderson, Heather S.; Shin, Robert K.; Kraakevik, Jeff A.; Coleman, Mary; Drogan, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To survey all US medical school clerkship directors (CDs) in neurology and to compare results from a similar survey in 2005. Methods: A survey was developed by a work group of the American Academy of Neurology Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and sent to all neurology CDs listed in the American Academy of Neurology database. Comparisons were made to a similar 2005 survey. Results: Survey response rate was 73%. Neurology was required in 93% of responding schools. Duration of clerkships was 4 weeks in 74% and 3 weeks in 11%. Clerkships were taken in the third year in 56%, third or fourth year in 19%, and fourth year in 12%. Clerkship duration in 2012 was slightly shorter than in 2005 (fewer clerkships of ≥4 weeks, p = 0.125), but more clerkships have moved into the third year (fewer neurology clerkships during the fourth year, p = 0.051). Simulation training in lumbar punctures was available at 44% of schools, but only 2% of students attempted lumbar punctures on patients. CDs averaged 20% protected time, but reported that they needed at least 32%. Secretarial full-time equivalent was 0.50 or less in 71% of clerkships. Eighty-five percent of CDs were “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied,” but more than half experienced “burnout” and 35% had considered relinquishing their role. Conclusion: Trends in neurology undergraduate education since 2005 include shorter clerkships, migration into the third year, and increasing use of technology. CDs are generally satisfied, but report stressors, including inadequate protected time and departmental support. PMID:25305155

  15. The city as a sign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharlamov, Nikita

    2012-01-01

    . This question is tackled through Jaan Valsiner’s notions of semiotic mediation and regulation. I specifically focus on spatial signs that humans use to regulate the meaning-making process that creates as meaningful what Georges Perec called species of spaces, such as towns and cities. “The city,” from...... this standpoint, becomes one of the most important signs that mediate and regulate our experience of environments we inhabit. I discuss a number of theoretical and methodological directions in which this framework could be further developed to revive the urban, or settlement, psychology, which failed to develop...

  16. Eye movements in essential tremor patients with parkinsonian and cerebellar signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik-Pędziwiatr, Magdalena; Mirek, Elżbieta; Rudzińska-Bar, Monika; Szczudlik, Andrzej

    Apart from intention tremor essential tremor (ET) patients may display other cerebellar signs, like dysmetria or tandem gait disturbances as well as parkinsonian signs like resting tremor, cogwheel sign, subtle bradykinesia. Previous reports claimed the occurrence of the eye movement abnormalities characteristic for dysfunction of cerebellar dorsal vermis in ET patients with concomitant cerebellar signs. There are no previous reports evaluating the eye movement abnormalities in ET patients with concomitant parkinsonian signs. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the occurrence of parkinsonian and cerebellar signs and the oculomotor abnormalities in ET patients. Fifty ET patients including 6 (12.0%) patients with concomitant parkinsonian signs (ET-P), 20 (40.0%) patients with cerebellar signs (ET-C), 7 (14.0%) with mixed parkinsonian and cerebellar signs (ET-M), 17 (34.0%) patients with the only tremor (ET-T) together with 42 healthy controls were included to the study. Reflexive, pace-induced and cued saccades were recorded using Saccadometer Advanced. Smooth pursuit and fixation were tested using EOG. Latency of pace-induced saccades was significantly longer in ET-C and ET-M patients compared to ET-T and ET-P patients. Latency of cued saccades was significantly longer in ET-M patients compared to ET-T. There were no significant differences of the eye movement parameters between ET-P patients compared to ET-T patients. In ET patient with concomitant cerebellar signs prolonged volitional saccades latency was detected. There are no particular differences in the eye movements in ET patients with concomitant parkinsonian signs compared to ET patients without concomitant signs. Copyright © 2017 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  17. [Early prediction of the neurological result at 12 months in newborns at neurological risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbón, F; Garibotti, G; Moguilevsky, J

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Amiel-Tison neurological examination (AT) and cranial ultrasound at term for predicting the neurological result at 12 months in newborns with neurological risk. The study included 89 newborns with high risk of neurological damage, who were discharged from the Neonatal Intensive Care of the Hospital Zonal Bariloche, Argentina. The assessment consisted of a neurological examination and cranial ultrasound at term, and neurological examination and evaluation of development at 12 months. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictor value was calculated. The relationship between perinatal factors and neurodevelopment at 12 month of age was also calculated using logistic regression models. Seventy children completed the follow-up. At 12 months of age, 14% had an abnormal neurological examination, and 17% abnormal development. The neurological examination and the cranial ultrasound at term had low sensitivity to predict abnormal neurodevelopment. At 12 months, 93% of newborns with normal AT showed normal neurological results, and 86% normal development. Among newborns with normal cranial ultrasound the percentages were 90 and 81%, respectively. Among children with three or more perinatal risk factors, the frequency of abnormalities in the neurological response was 5.4 times higher than among those with fewer risk factors, and abnormal development was 3.5 times more frequent. The neurological examination and cranial ultrasound at term had low sensitivity but high negative predictive value for the neurodevelopment at 12 months. Three or more perinatal risk factors were associated with neurodevelopment abnormalities at 12 months of age. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Standards in Neurological Rehabilitation, June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Barnes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS Scientific Panel on Neurorehabilitation established a Task Force on standards in neurological rehabilitation in June 1996. The remit for the Task Force was to: (1 produce a report on the state of neurological rehabilitation across Europe; and (2 recommend standards for the provision of neurological services for disabled people. The main conclusions of the Task Force were as follows: (1 A questionnaire circulated to each European member country has indicated a significant lack of adequate neurological rehabilitation facilities across Europe. Very few countries have any established network of neurological rehabilitation centres. Few countries have adequately trained neurological rehabilitation physicians, therapists or nurses. Such poor facilities should be seen in the context of the large numbers and increasing prevalence of people with neurological disabilities. (2 The Task Force has summarized the significant benefits that can follow from the establishment of a dedicated and cost effective neurological rehabilitation service including functional improvement, reduction of unnecessary complications, better coordination and use of limited resources, improved opportunities for education, training and research and a clear point of contact for the disabled person. (3 The Task Force recommends minimum standards for the prevention of neurological disability including access to health education, genetic counselling and emergency resources. The Task Force also encourages governments to invest in improved legislation for accident prevention. (4 The Task Force has outlined some minimum standards for the staffing of a neurological rehabilitation service including improved training both for neurologists and rehabilitation physicians. Such training could include a cross-national training programme both for physicians and other health care staff. (5 The Task Force supports a two-tier system of

  19. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and television series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Martínez-Martínez, Ariadna; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    The portrayal of neurological disability and deficiency on television has not always been approached in the same way, but has instead tended to reflect the standpoint taken by society with regard to these issues and how they are dealt with according to the prevailing conceptions and values at each particular time. To address the appearance of neurological pathologies in television series and to ponder on the image they have in such contexts. Deficiency and disability of neurological origin have often been depicted on television in series, telefilms and documentaries, and in a wide variety of ways. Here we examine different television series and how they have dealt with neurological pathology, its diagnosis and its treatment, as well as the figure of the healthcare professional and social-familial adaptation. Examples cited include series such as House MD, Glee, American Horror Story, Homeland or Game of Thrones. Television series are a useful tool for making some neurological pathologies better known to the public and for dispelling the myths surrounding others, provided that the pathologies are dealt with in a realistic manner, which is not always the case. More care should be taken with regard to the way in which health professionals are portrayed in television series, as it is not always done correctly and may mislead viewers, who take what they see on the TV as being real.

  20. [Neurologic presentation in haemolytic-uraemic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche-Martínez, A; Póo, P; Maristany-Cucurella, M; Jiménez-Llort, A; Camacho, J A; Campistol, J

    Haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia, thrombopenia and multiorganic aggression, specially renal, gastrointestinal and central nervous system disturbances. Sporadic in Spain (2/1,500,000 inhabitants), its clinical onset includes acute renal failure, hypertension and central nervous system symptoms (irritability, drowsiness, convulsions, cortical blindness, hemiparesia or coma), due to metabolic distress, hypertension or central nervous system microangiopathy. Few long-term outcome studies have been published. A retrospective analysis of a series of 58 patients with HUS between 1981 and 2006, is reported. Clinical onset, laboratory, electrophysiology, neuroimaging tests, and prognosis factors are reviewed, together with long-term clinical outcome. 22 children presented neurologic symptoms, seven had some neurological test; one patient died; in five some neurological sequelae persisted (hemiparesia, cognitive deficit, visual-perception deficit), the other 16 remaining asymptomatic. Neurological morbility is high in HUS (27% of the children with neurological symptoms), with a 1.7% mortality. Seizure at onset was not a poor prognosis factor in our group. No positive correlation can be established between neuroimaging and long-term outcome.

  1. Neurology referrals to a liaison psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, P

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the present study was to assess the activity of the Liaison Psychiatry service of Cork University Hospital in relation to all in-patient neurology referrals over a 12-month period. Of 1685 neurology admissions, 106 (6%) were referred to liaison psychiatry for assessment. 91 referrals (86%) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV, the commonest being major depression (24%) and somatoform disorder (23%). Patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy comprised nearly half of all referrals (48 cases; 45%). Approximately 20% of M.S. in-patients (21 cases) were referred for psychiatric assessment, with the corresponding figure in epilepsy being 25% (18 cases). Although only 106 (6%) neurology in-patients were referred to liaison psychiatry, psychiatric diagnoses were documented in 327 (20%) discharge forms, presumably reflecting previous diagnosis. The above findings indicate that psychiatric illness is common among neurology inpatients screened by liaison psychiatry yet referral rates are relatively low in terms of the overall number of neurology in-patients. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 86% of referrals indicating high concordance between neurologists and liaison psychiatry regarding the presence of a psychiatric disorder.

  2. [Neurologic involvement in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal-Rodríguez, L; Perea-Martínez, A; Loredo-Abdalá, A; Rodríguez-Herrera, R; del Angel-Aguilar, A; Reynes-Manzur, J N

    1991-07-01

    The neurologic complication seen in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) has hardly been studied for which therefore its prevalence is unknown. Some of the clinical manifestations surrounding this event have been studied and have been divided into the following two groups: cervical articular spinal disease and extra-articular manifestations, more commonly seen in adults, the atlas-axoidal subluxation and the neuropathies. A group of 213 children diagnosed as having JRA according to the criteria setforth by the American Association of Rheumatology and followed by the Department of Internal Medicine of the National Institute of Pediatrics, 10 patients were found to have neurologic symptomatology (4.6%). Their arthritis was studied as well as their association with activity data and seropositivity. We found 6 female and 4 male patients with neurologic manifestations; their ages ranged from 7 to 14 years. Six of them were diagnosed with sero-positive polyarticular JRA and the other four with polyarticular sero-negative. All patients showed some activity and the appearance of the neurologic complications ranged between two months and seven years. No correlation was found between the beginning of the arthritis and the neurologic symptomatology, their sex or the type of arthritis. Seven of the cases showed peripheral neuropathy. Two cases had atlas-atloid subluxation and another child showed having cervical column inflammation with a rheumatoid pannus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Neurological Manifestations of Medical Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Katharine; Rood, Corey; Patel, Anup; Thackeray, Jonathan D; Brink, Farah W

    2016-01-01

    Medical child abuse occurs when a child receives unnecessary and harmful, or potentially harmful, medical care at the instigation of a caretaker through exaggeration, falsification, or induction of symptoms of illness in a child. Neurological manifestations are common with this type of maltreatment. We sought to review common reported neurological manifestations that may alert the clinician to consider medical child abuse. In addition, the possible sequelae of this form of child maltreatment is discussed, as well as practice recommendations for establishing the diagnosis and stopping the abuse once it is identified. A review of the medical literature was conducted regarding the reported neurological presentations of this entity. Neurological manifestations of medical child abuse include false reports of apparent life-threatening events and seizures and reports of induction of symptoms from poisoning. Failure to correlate objective findings with subjective complaints may lead to unnecessary and potentially harmful testing or treatment. This form of child maltreatment puts a child at significant risk of long-term morbidity and mortality. A wide variety of neurological manifestations have been reported in cases of medical child abuse. It is important for the practicing neurologist to include medical child abuse on the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Arnold

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages.

  5. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Puccioni-Sohler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world’s population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturbance. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis, encephalopathy, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, and cerebromeningeal hemorrhage. The development of neurological symptoms in patients with positive Immunoglobulin M (IgM dengue serology suggests a means of diagnosing the neurological complications associated with dengue. Viral antigens, specific IgM antibodies, and the intrathecal synthesis of dengue antibodies have been successfully detected in cerebrospinal fluid. However, despite diagnostic advancements, the treatment of neurological dengue is problematic. The launch of a dengue vaccine is expected to be beneficial.

  6. Know the Signs of Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if they don't play contact sports. A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury -- or mTBI -- caused by a blow or ... to the head or body that causes the brain to shake, according to the Children's ... to get a concussion, it's important to know the signs of injury. ...

  7. Grammaticalization in American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the process of grammaticalization in American Sign Language, examining basic principles and patterns and drawing parallels with oral language. More advanced stages of grammaticalization (involving fusion and affecting syntax) are examined in depth, leading to proposal of a temporal-ordering analysis to explain sequencing of verbal…

  8. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research…

  9. Compiling a Sign Language Dictionary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Troelsgård, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    As we began working on the Danish Sign Language (DTS) Dictionary, we soon realised the truth in the statement that a lexicographer has to deal with problems within almost any linguistic discipline. Most of these problems come down to establishing simple rules, rules that can easily be applied eve...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Trucker Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is ...

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Child Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is ...

  13. 49 CFR 195.434 - Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signs. 195.434 Section 195.434 Transportation... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.434 Signs. Each operator must maintain signs visible to the public around each pumping station and breakout tank area. Each sign must contain the name of the operator and a...

  14. 36 CFR 1001.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1001.10... signs. (a) The signs pictured in 36 CFR 1.10 provide general information and regulatory guidance in the area administered by the Presidio Trust. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either...

  15. 47 CFR 2.302 - Call signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Call signs. 2.302 Section 2.302... RULES AND REGULATIONS Call Signs and Other Forms of Identifying Radio Transmissions § 2.302 Call signs. The table which follows indicates the composition and blocks of international call signs available for...

  16. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or prohibited...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously placed along each protective enclosure at intervals so that at least one sign is recognizable at night from a...

  18. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating that...

  19. Numeral Incorporation in Japanese Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ktejik, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the morphological process of numeral incorporation in Japanese Sign Language. Numeral incorporation is defined and the available research on numeral incorporation in signed language is discussed. The numeral signs in Japanese Sign Language are then introduced and followed by an explanation of the numeral morphemes which are…

  20. Eye Gaze in Creative Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Michiko; Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of eye gaze in creative sign language. Because eye gaze conveys various types of linguistic and poetic information, it is an intrinsic part of sign language linguistics in general and of creative signing in particular. We discuss various functions of eye gaze in poetic signing and propose a classification of gaze…

  1. Lexicography and sign language engineering: the Zambian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the genesis and implementation of a dictionary project for sign language, the Zambian Sign Language Dictionary Project, regarded as a first step towards the development of a Zambian National Sign Language. The article highlights the specificity of sign language lexicography. Keywords: american ...

  2. Nonlocal neurology: beyond localization to holonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, G G; O'Carroll, C P

    2010-11-01

    The concept of local pathology has long served neurology admirably. Relevant models include self-organizing nonlinear brain dynamics, global workspace and dynamic core theories. However such models are inconsistent with certain clinical phenomena found in Charles Bonnet syndrome, disjunctive agnosia and schizophrenia, where there is disunity of content within the unity of consciousness. This is contrasted with the split-brain case where there is disunity of content and disunity of consciousnesses. The development of quantum brain theory with it nonlocal mechanisms under the law of the whole ("holonomy") offers new possibilities for explaining disintegration within unity. Dissipative quantum brain dynamics and its approach to the binding problem, memory and consciousness are presented. A nonlocal neurology armed with a holonomic understanding might see more deeply into what clinical neurology has always aspired to: the patient as a whole. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The History of Reimbursements in Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E Lakhan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA addresses consumer protection, employer-provided insurance coverage, as well as the government's role in providing health care access to the most vulnerable populations. Within the practice of neurology, the PPACA has the challenging goal of reconciling the needs of the growing elderly population with the financial barriers to costly yet available health care services. To bridge that gap, all health care professionals working in the field of neurology must reflect on the effect previous Medicare reimbursement policies have had on the current practice of neurology, and utilize lessons learned in recent years. The test of time will tell whether the PPACA will achieve the goal of decreasing in health care spending while ensuring quality universal healthcare services.

  4. Cotard syndrome in neurological and psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Nente, Francisco; Mendez, Mario F

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations.

  5. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  6. Perinatal pharmacology: applications for neonatal neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Anne; Allegaert, Karel

    2011-11-01

    The principles of clinical pharmacology also apply to neonates, but their characteristics warrant a tailored approach. We focus on aspects of both developmental pharmacokinetics (concentration/time relationship) and developmental pharmacodynamics (concentration/effect relationship) in neonates. We hereby aimed to link concepts used in clinical pharmacology with compound-specific observations (anti-epileptics, analgosedatives) in the field of neonatal neurology. Although in part anecdotal, we subsequently illustrate the relevance of developmental pharmacology in the field of neonatal neurology by a specific intervention (e.g. whole body cooling), specific clinical presentations (e.g. short and long term outcome following fetal exposure to antidepressive agents, the development of new biomarkers for fetal alcohol syndrome) and specific clinical needs (e.g. analgosedation in neonates, excitocytosis versus neuro-apoptosis/impaired synaptogenesis). Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  8. What is the essential neurological examination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine which aspects would be essential to the neurological examination (NE in a given specific situation (a patient referred with a potential neurological complaint, but the history suggests that a neurological problem is unlikely, we presented the same questionnaire used by Moore and Chalk in Canada to 19 neurologists in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We considered significant aspects of NE, whose average responses were greater than or equal to 3.5: visual fields, fundoscopy, pursuit eye movements, facial muscle power testing, gait, pronator drift or rapid arm movement in upper limbs, finger-nose, tone in arms and legs, five tendon reflexes, and plantar responses. We concluded that, despite geographical and economical differences between Brazil and Canada, neurologists from both countries agree about the essential NE in the proposed scenario.

  9. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve i...... the testis. Once viable sperm cells have been obtained, these are used in assisted reproductive techniques, including intravaginal insemination, intrauterine insemination, and in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection....... of treatment is assisted ejaculation, preferably by penile vibratory stimulation. If vibratory stimulation is unsuccessful, then ejaculation can almost always be induced by electroejaculation. In cases where assisted ejaculation fails, sperm can be retrieved surgically from either the epididymis or from...

  10. Stem-cell therapy for neurologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of research on stem cell therapy for various diseases, an important need was felt in the field of neurological diseases. While congenital lesion may not be amenable to stem cell therapy completely, there is a scope of partial improvement in the lesions and halt in further progression. Neuro degenerative lesions like Parkinson′s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown improvement with stem cell therapy. This article reviews the available literature and summarizes the current evidence in the various neurologic diseases amenable to stem cell therapy, the plausible mechanism of action, ethical concerns with insights into the future of stem cell therapy.

  11. Advance care planning in progressive neurological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Anna

    2015-01-27

    Advance care planning in progressive neurological conditions is an essential part of care, allowing individuals to make decisions and record their wishes regarding the care they receive in the future. Nurses are ideally placed to become involved in this process and should understand how they can assist patients, carers and families through a dynamic process of consultation and discussion. This article considers the process of advance care planning in relation to progressive neurological conditions and discusses how the Mental Capacity Act 2005 provides the legislation within which professionals must work.

  12. Pilot Data Bank Networks for Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitz, Selma C.; Havekost, Charles L.; Gross, Cynthia R.

    1979-01-01

    National pilot data bank networks for stroke and traumatic coma have recently been initiated at multiple centers by the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke. The characteristics of these pilot data bank projects include: 1) the overall development and statement of research issues by a multidisciplinary team; 2) dual emphasis on patient management and clinical research; 3) the definition and use of a uniform clinical vocabulary; 4) the use of a clinically-oriented data base management system; and 5) the use of intelligent terminals for data entry, retrieval, and patient management. This paper will describe the data bank approach used by the neurological disorders programs.

  13. Acupuncture for Small Animal Neurologic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roynard, Patrick; Frank, Lauren; Xie, Huisheng; Fowler, Margaret

    2018-01-01

    Modern research on traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM), including herbal medicine and acupuncture, has made evident the role of the nervous system as a cornerstone in many of the mechanisms of action of TCVM. Laboratory models and clinical research available are supportive for the use of TCVM in the management of neurologic conditions in small animals, specifically in cases of intervertebral disk disease, other myelopathies, and painful conditions. This article is meant to help guide the use of TCVM for neurologic disorders in small animals, based on available information and recommendations from experienced TCVM practitioners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Avoiding Misdiagnosis in Patients with Neurological Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Jennifer V.; Edlow, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 5% of patients presenting to emergency departments have neurological symptoms. The most common symptoms or diagnoses include headache, dizziness, back pain, weakness, and seizure disorder. Little is known about the actual misdiagnosis of these patients, which can have disastrous consequences for both the patients and the physicians. This paper reviews the existing literature about the misdiagnosis of neurological emergencies and analyzes the reason behind the misdiagnosis by specific presenting complaint. Our goal is to help emergency physicians and other providers reduce diagnostic error, understand how these errors are made, and improve patient care. PMID:22888439

  15. Neurologic uses of botulinum neurotoxin type A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Ney

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available John P Ney, Kevin R JosephMadigan Army Medical Center, Neurology Service, Tacoma, WA, USAAbstract: This article reviews the current and most neurologic uses of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A, beginning with relevant historical data, neurochemical mechanism at the neuromuscular junction. Current commercial preparations of BoNT-A are reviewed, as are immunologic issues relating to secondary failure of BoNT-A therapy. Clinical uses are summarized with an emphasis on controlled clinical trials (as appropriate, including facial movement disorders, focal neck and limb dystonias, spasticity, hypersecretory syndromes, and pain.Keywords: botulinum neurotoxins, BOTOX®, Dysport®, chemodenervation

  16. How to write a neurology case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, Richard A

    2016-04-06

    Neurology case reports have a long history of transmitting important medical information across many generations for the improvement of patient care. Case reports contribute much to the physician's knowledge base from which treatment hypotheses and ideas form. Elements of a modern case report, as presented in the CARE (CAse REport) guidelines, include the abstract, introduction, case presentation, discussion, conclusion, patient's perspective, and consent statement. The sections are described here, as well as the application of CARE guidelines to a published neuromuscular case report. Writing case reports offer an ideal opportunity for neurologists to publish interesting case findings and carry on the tradition of neurologic case reporting.

  17. Design semiotica: the sign as event

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, Christopher Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Designers rely on the consistent interpretation of visual signs to achieve stable, effective communication. When signs produce unpredictable, ambiguous, or non-sensical interpretations, they are usually disregarded as signifying errors. However, anomalous signs actually reveal insights into the dynamic nature of graphic semiosis. What is the significance of signs that unexpectedly change their identity? How can communication designers interpret phenomena produced by the actions of signs? What...

  18. Spanish sign language interpreter for mexican linguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Barragán, Francisco Javier; Pérez Grana, José Arturo; Cervantes, Francisco; Schwarzblat y Katz, Morris; Olide Márquez, María Guadalupe; Pérez Sánchez, Ana Paola

    2013-01-01

    We present here the first visual interface for a Mexican Spanish Sign Language translator on its first development stage: sign-writing recognition. The software was developed for the unique characteristics of Mexican linguistics and was designed in order to use sentences or a sequence of signs in sign-writing system which are decoded by the program and converted into a series of images with movement that correspond to the Mexican sign language system. Using a lexical, syntactic and semantic...

  19. Old Signs, New Signs, Whose Signs? Sociolinguistic Variation in the NZSL Lexicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rachel; McKee, David

    2011-01-01

    Lexicographers, teachers and interpreters of New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) are challenged by the degree of lexical variation that exists in this young language. For instance, most numerals between one and twenty have two or more variants in common use (McKee, McKee, and Major 2008), a situation that contrasts with most established spoken…

  20. [Swiss scrapie surveillance. I. Clinical aspects of neurological diseases in sheep and goats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, E; Botteron, C; Ehrensperger, F; Fatzer, R; Jaggy, A; Kolly, C; Meylan, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2005-10-01

    Small ruminants infected with scrapie show a large range of often unspecific clinical symptoms. The most-often described signs, locomotion, sensibility and behavioural disorders and emaciation, rarely occur together, and cases have been described in which only one of those signs was detectable.Thus, formulating a well-circumscribed definition of a clinical suspect case is difficult. Most animals with CNS-effecting diseases such as listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, cerebrospinal nematidiasis and enterotoxemia will, in a thorough neurological examination, show at least some scrapie-like symptoms. Among the 22 neurological field cases examined in this study, a goat with cerebral gliomatosis and hair lice showed the closest similarity to clinical scrapie. The unilateral deficiency of the cerebral nerves has potential as an clinical exclusion criterion for scrapie. However, the laboratory confirmation--or exclusion--of scrapie remains important. It thus needs to be realized that a consistent and thorough examination of neurologically diseased small ruminants (including fallen stock) is the backbone of a good surveillance system for these diseases. This should be a motivation for submitting adult sheep and goats for neuropathological examination.

  1. Magnetic field control of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign domain wall resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, Roya, E-mail: royamajidi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, 16788-15811 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, we have compared the resistance of the 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign domain walls in the presence of external magnetic field. The calculations are based on the Boltzmann transport equation within the relaxation time approximation. One-dimensional Neel-type domain walls between two domains whose magnetization differs by angle of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 360 Degree-Sign are considered. The results indicate that the resistance of the 360 Degree-Sign DW is more considerable than that of the 90 Degree-Sign and 180 Degree-Sign DWs. It is also found that the domain wall resistance can be controlled by applying transverse magnetic field. Increasing the strength of the external magnetic field enhances the domain wall resistance. In providing spintronic devices based on magnetic nanomaterials, considering and controlling the effect of domain wall on resistivity are essential.

  2. History of the extensor plantar response: Babinski and Chaddock signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G

    2002-12-01

    The testing of reflexes involving the lower extremities is a pivotal part of the modern neurological examination. The normal response to noxious stimulation of the foot is plantar flexion of the toes, causing them to curl downward toward the undersurface of the foot. In 1896, Joseph Babinski described an extensor toe response that he claimed was a consistent finding among patients with pyramidal tract lesions of the cortex, subcortex, brain stem, or spinal cord. He considered it a distinct sign of organic disease and found it to be absent in cases of hysterical weakness. Charles Gilbert Chaddock admired the work of Babinski and described a modification of the Babinski technique, demonstrating that stimulation of the lateral surface of the foot could induce the same type of toe extension in patients with pyramidal tract lesions. The two reflexes are complementary, and each can occur without the other, although both are usually present in cases of pyramidal tract impairment. Although these two reflexes are the most commonly described pathological reflexes indicative of pyramidal tract disruption, the names of other celebrated neurologists are also linked to the study of extensor toe signs, each having identified a variant of the Babinski sign.

  3. Is there an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Lisa M; Mills, Kerry; Clarke, Robert; Dangour, Alan D

    2015-08-28

    Low vitamin B12 status is common in older people; however, its public health significance in terms of neurological manifestations remains unclear. The present systematic review evaluated the association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function and clinically relevant neurological outcomes in adults aged 50+ years. A systematic search of nine bibliographic databases (up to March 2013) identified twelve published articles describing two longitudinal and ten cross-sectional analyses. The included study populations ranged in size (n 28-2287) and mean/median age (range 65-81 years). Studies reported various neurological outcomes: nerve function; clinically measured signs and symptoms of nerve function; self-reported neurological symptoms. Studies were assessed for risk of bias, and results were synthesised qualitatively. Among the general population groups of older people, one longitudinal study reported no association, and four of seven cross-sectional studies reported limited evidence of an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes. Among groups with clinical and/or biochemical evidence of low vitamin B12 status, one longitudinal study reported an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes and three cross-sectional analyses reported no association. Overall, there is limited evidence from observational studies to suggest an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people. The heterogeneity and quality of the evidence base preclude more definitive conclusions, and further high-quality research is needed to better inform understanding of public health significance in terms of neurological function of vitamin B12 status in older people.

  4. Neurological outcomes in children with and without amalgam-related mercury exposure: seven years of longitudinal observations in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Martin; Martins, Isabel P; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre; Bernardo, Mario; Luis, Henrique; Amaral, Helena; Leitão, Jorge; Martin, Michael D; Townes, Brenda; Rosenbaum, Gail; Woods, James S; Derouen, Timothy

    2008-02-01

    Although large-scale, randomized trials involving children have been completed and their results demonstrate an absence of neurobehavioral effects from clinical exposure to mercury amalgam, neurological findings from such studies have not been reported. The authors conducted a randomized, prospective trial examining the safety of dental amalgam in which 507 children aged 8 through 12 years were assigned to treatment with either amalgam or resin-based composite. During seven years of follow-up, the authors performed annual clinical neurological examinations, including an evaluation of neurological hard signs (NHSs), presence of tremor and neurological soft signs (NSSs). The authors found no significant differences between treatment groups in any of the neurological measures. Groups did not differ with respect to the presence or absence of NHSs or tremor, nor the presence or absence or severity of NSSs at any point. As expected, NSS severity scores diminished with increasing age. Even at the levels of amalgam exposure in this study (a mean of 7.7-10.7 amalgam surfaces per subject across the seven years of follow-up), the authors conclude that exposure to mercury from dental amalgam does not adversely affect neurological status. The current evidence is that potential neurobehavioral or neurological effects from dental amalgam mercury exposure in children are inconsequential.

  5. 21 CFR 1311.145 - Digitally signing the prescription with the individual practitioner's private key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.145 Digitally signing the prescription with the individual practitioner's... digital certificate. (b) The electronic prescription application must require the individual practitioner...

  6. Nonadiabatic Eigenfunctions Can Have Amplitude, Signed Conical Nodes, or Signed Higher Order Nodes at a Conical Intersection with Circular Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Peter W; Jonas, David M

    2017-10-05

    Numerically exact nonadiabatic eigenfunctions are computed for a two-dimensional conical intersection with circular symmetry, for which a pseudorotation quantum number is conserved and all eigenstates are doubly degenerate. In the calculations reported here, the conical intersection is submerged, with energy below the zero point level. The complete real-valued vibrational-electronic eigenfunctions are visualized using Hunter's exact factorization for the total vibrational amplitude factor and color for the electronic factor. The zero-point levels have nonzero amplitude at the conical intersection. Nodes in the degenerate nonadiabatic eigenfunctions are classified as accidental if they can be moved or removed by a change in degenerate basis and as essential if they cannot. An integer electronic index defines the order of the nodes for nonadiabatic eigenfunctions by simple closed counterclockwise line integrals. Higher eigenstates can have accidental conical nodes around the conical intersection and essential nodes of varying circular orders at the conical intersection. The signs of the essential nodes are all opposite the sign of the conical intersection and the signed node orders obey sum rules. Even for submerged conical intersections, the appearance of the exact eigenstates motivates use of signed, half-odd-integral, pseudorotation quantum numbers j. Essential nodes of absolute order (|j| - 1/2) are located on the conical intersection for |j| greater than or equal to 3/2. The eigenfunctions around essential first order nodes are right circular cones with their vertex at the conical intersection.

  7. Dynamic diseases in neurology and psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, John; Black, Deborah

    1995-03-01

    Thirty-two (32) periodic diseases of the nervous system are identified in which symptoms and/or signs recur. In 10/32, the recurrence of a symptom complex is one of the defining features of the illness, whereas in 22/32 oscillatory signs occur in the setting of an ongoing nervous system disorder. We discuss the possibility that these disorders may be dynamic diseases.

  8. Technology of Electronic Signatur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Sadovsky

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An electronic signature uses a hash of message and an asymetrical algorithm of encryption for its generation. During verification of message on receiver side the hash of original message must be identical with the hash of received message. Electronic message is secured autentization of author and integrity of transmission date. By electronic signature it is possible to sign everything what is in digital form.

  9. Tension pneumocephalus: Mount Fuji sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulastya Sanyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old male was operated for a space occupying lesion in the brain. A noncontrast computed tomography scan done in the late postoperative period showed massive subdural air collection causing compression of bilateral frontal lobes with widening of interhemispheric fissure and the frontal lobes acquiring a peak like configuration - causing tension pneumocephalus-"Mount Fuji sign." Tension pneumocephalus occurs when air enters the extradural or intradural spaces in sufficient volume to exert a mass or pressure effect on the brain, leading to brain herniation. Tension pneumocephalus is a surgical emergency, which needs immediate intervention in the form of decompression of the cranial cavity by a burr hole or needle aspiration. The Mount Fuji sign differentiates tension pneumocephalus from pneumocephalus.

  10. DYSLEXIA--READING DISABILITY WITH NEUROLOGICAL INVOLVEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GEHRING, KATHRYN B.

    THE SYMPTOMATOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF DYSLEXIA ARE DISCUSSED. A DESCRIPTION OF THE DYNAMIC NATURE OF DYSLEXIA, INCLUDING VISUAL PERCEPTION, AUDITORY PERCEPTION AND SPEECH, NEUROLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES, AND AUDITORY-VISUAL RELATIONSHIPS, IS PRESENTED. TREATMENT FOR DYSLEXIC CHILDREN IS DEPENDENT ON DIAGNOSIS AND CONSTANT EVALUATION. SOME METHODS OF…

  11. Advances in genetic diagnosis of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, M

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenetics has developed enormously in recent years, and the genetic basis of human disorders is being unravelled rapidly. Many neurological disorders are Mendelian disorders, caused by mutations in genes involved in normal function of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves or muscles. Due to high costs and time-consuming procedures, genetic tests have normally been performed late in the diagnostic process, when clinical examination and other tests have indicated a specific gene as the likely disease cause. Many neurological phenotypes are genetically very heterogeneous, and testing of all possible disease genes has been impossible. As a result, many patients with genetic neurological disorders have remained without a specific diagnosis, even when the disease is caused by mutations in known disease genes. Recent technological advances, in particular next-generation DNA sequencing techniques, have resulted in rapid identification of genes involved in Mendelian disorders and provided new possibilities for diagnostic genetic testing. The development of methods for coupling targeted capture and massively parallel DNA sequencing has made it possible to examine a large number of genes in a single reaction. Diagnostic genetic testing can today be performed by the use of gene panels and exome sequencing. This allows a more precise diagnosis of many neurological disorders, and genetic testing should now be considered earlier in the diagnostic procedure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A NIGERIAN NEUROLOGY CLINIC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-28

    May 28, 2013 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 89 No. 2 February 2012. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A NIGERIAN NEUROLOGY CLINIC. P. O. Ajiboye, FWACP, Senior Lecturer/ Consultant Psychiatrist, Department of Behavioural Sciences, University of Ilorin/. University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Kwara State, ...

  13. Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Review of Neurologic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Grimm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma is a hematolymphoid neoplasm, primarily of B cell lineage, that has unique histologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. Neurologic complications of Hodgkin's Lymphoma can be separated into those that result directly from the disease, indirectly from the disease, or from its treatment. Direct neurologic dysfunction from Hodgkin's Lymphoma results from metastatic intracranial spinal disease, epidural metastases causing spinal cord/cauda equina compression, leptomeningeal metastases, or intradural intramedullary spinal cord metastases. Indirect neurologic dysfunction may be caused by paraneoplastic disorders (such as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration or limbic encephalitis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system. Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment typically includes chemotherapy or radiotherapy with potential treatment-related complications affecting the nervous system. Neurologic complications resulting from mantle-field radiotherapy include the “dropped head syndrome,” acute brachial plexopathy, and transient ischemic attacks/cerebral infarcts. Chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma may cause cerebral infarction (due to emboli from anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy and peripheral neuropathy.

  14. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A NIGERIAN NEUROLOGY CLINIC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-28

    May 28, 2013 ... medication effects and psychological reactions to the illness. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a good example of a disabling neurological disorder and it is now apparent that the underlying neurodegenerative disorder is a major cause of psychiatric disturbances even though the psychological reactions to the ...

  15. Neurological disorders in children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Zavadenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During a clinical examination of children with autistic spectrum disorders, attention should be drawn to both their major clinical manifestations and neurological comorbidities. The paper considers the mechanisms of autism-induced neurological disorders, the spectrum of which may include manifestations, such as retarded and disharmonic early psychomotor development; the specific features of sensory perception/processing; rigidity and monotony of motor and psychic reactions; motor disinhibition and hyperexcitability; motor stereotypies; uncoordinated movements; developmental coordination disorders (dyspraxia; impaired expressive motor skills; speech and articulation disorders; tics; epilepsy. It describes the specific features of neurological symptoms in Asperger’s syndrome, particularly in semantic-pragmatic language disorders, higher incidence rates of hyperlexia, motor and vocal tics. The incidence rate of epilepsy in autistic spectrum disorders is emphasized to be greater than the average population one. At the same time, the risk of epilepsy is higher in mentally retarded patients with autism. Identification of neurological disorders is of great importance in determining the tactics of complex care for patients with autistic spectrum disorders. 

  16. Thoracic myelocystomeningocele in a neurologically intact infant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case is an example of a high congenital spinal lesion with very minimal or negligible neurological deficits, with no other congenital malformations. Key Words: Thoracic spine, Myelocystomeningocele, Intact nervous system. Résumé Rapporter un cas peu commun et un cas rare d'une anomalie congenitale vertébrale ...

  17. Neurology of widely embedded free will

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Bauke M.

    2011-01-01

    Free will is classically attributed to the prefrontal cortex. In clinical neurology, prefrontal lesions have consistently been shown to cause impairment of internally driven action and increased reflex-like behaviour. Recently, parietal contributions to both free selection at early stages of

  18. Distinguishing neurological from non-organic conditions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Waddell's test and can easily be incorporated into any bench-side examination to identify potential non-organic back pain. Nausea and vomiting. Nausea and vomiting are common. There are, however, associated features that may indicate a neurological cause. Cerebellar lesions are probably the most commonly.

  19. 14 CFR 67.309 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified...

  20. 14 CFR 67.109 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified...

  1. 14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified...

  2. Sleep disorders in children with neurologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, M; Bruni, O

    2001-12-01

    Pediatric neurologic diseases are often associated with different kinds of sleep disruption (mainly insomnia, less frequently hypersomnia or parasomnias). Due to the key-role of sleep for development, the effort to ameliorate sleep patterns in these children could have important prognostic benefits. Study of sleep architecture and organization in neurologic disorders could lead to a better comprehension of the pathogenesis and a better treatment of the disorders. This article focuses on the following specific neurologic diseases: nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and abnormal motor behaviors of epileptic origin, evaluating differential diagnosis with parasomnias; achondroplasia, confirming the crucial role of craniofacial deformity in determining sleep-disordered breathing; neuromuscular diseases, mainly Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and myotonic dystrophy; cerebral palsy, evaluating either the features of sleep architecture and the importance of the respiratory problems associated; headaches, confirming the strict relationships with sleep in terms of neurochemical and neurobehavioral substrates; and finally a review on the effectiveness of melatonin for sleep problems in children with neurologic syndromes and mental retardation, blindness, and epilepsy.

  3. [Gait disorders due to neurological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Snijders, A.H.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    Gait disorders are seen frequently and often have a neurological cause. The clinical management of patients presenting with a gait disorder is often complicated due to the large number of diseases that can cause a gait disorder and to the difficulties in interpreting a specific gait disorder

  4. Neurologic Complications of Pre-eclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeman, Gerda G.

    Pre-eclampsia is mainly responsible for the world's large maternal mortality rates, mostly due to acute cerebral complications. This review provides insight into the pathogenesis of the neurologic complications of hypertensive disease in pregnancy. In addition, practical relevance for clinical care

  5. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  6. Minor neurological dysfunction in children with dyslexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Marja; De Jong, Marianne; De Groot, Erik; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    AIM To improve understanding of brain function in children with severe dyslexia in terms of minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). METHOD One hundred and four children (81 males, 23 females; age range 7-12y; mean age 9y 7mo, SD 1y 2mo;) with severe dyslexia (the presence of a Full-scale IQ score of

  7. Neuroprotective and neurological properties of Melissa officinalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Víctor; Martín, Sara; Gómez-Serranillos, Maria Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Melissa officinalis has traditionally been used due to its effects on nervous system. Both methanolic and aqueous extracts were tested for protective effects on the PC12 cell line, free radical scavenging properties and neurological activities (inhibition of MAO-A and acetylcholinesterase enzymes...

  8. Vital Signs - Child Passenger Safety

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    This podcast is based on the February 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Over the past 10 years, more than 9,000 children 12 and under died in motor vehicle crashes, and a third who died in 2011 weren't buckled up. Buckling up is the best way to reduce injuries and save lives.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 2/4/2014.

  9. Deaf children learning to sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Kyle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It used to be thought that deaf children had a language difficulty. Research we have carried out on deaf children in deaf families from the age of three months, indicates that deaf children learn sign language as effectively as hearing children learn to speak. In contrast, deaf children from hearing homes, even in signing programmes at school lag behind in the acquisition of sign language even up to the age of 11 years. Some initial intervention work has been carried out with families to introduce sign language earlier and several possible means of improving the language environment of deaf children are explored in this paper. Costumava-se pensar que as crianças surdas tinham dificuldade de linguagem. Uma pesquisa que realizamos com crianças surdas, de famílias surdas, a partir de 3 meses de idade, indica que crianças surdas aprendem a língua de sinais tão eficazmente quanto crianças ouvintes aprendem a falar. Em contraste, crianças surdas, de lares ouvintes, mesmo estando em programas para o aprendizado de sinais na escola, ficam atrás na aquisição da língua de sinais até a idade de 11 anos de idade. Alguns trabalhos iniciais de intervenção, que têm sido realizados com as famílias para introduzir a língua de sinais mais cedo, bem como vários meios possíveis de enriquecer o meio lingüístico de crianças surdas são explorados nesse artigo.

  10. Vital Signs-Secondhand Smoke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-03

    This podcast is based on the February 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Secondhand smoke kills more than 400 infants and 41,000 adult nonsmokers every year. Learn what can be done to prevent secondhand smoke exposure.  Created: 2/3/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/3/2015.

  11. The Role of Sign Phonology and Iconicity During Sign Processing: The Case of Deaf Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, E.A.; Hermans, D.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the influence of sign phonology and iconicity during sign processing in deaf children, the roles of these sign features were examined using an experimental sign-picture verification paradigm. Participants had to make decisions about sign-picture pairs, manipulated according to

  12. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospective study in a neurological setup, which included data from hospital dermatology consultation request forms over a period of one year. The data included demographic profile of the patient investigation where needed, neurological diagnosis and final dermatological diagnosis. The data was analyzed using SPSS. Results: A total of 285 patients who were requested for consultation were included in the study. Face was the commonest site of involvement (19.6%. Laboratory examination of referred patients revealed abnormal blood counts in 2% cases, renal function tests in 0.7% and urine in 0.4% cases. CT scan showed abnormal findings in 65.6% patients. The most common drug used in these patients was phenytoin (29.1%. The most common dermatological diagnosis was Infection and Infestation (34.7% followed by eczema (46.6%. Drug rash was seen in 3.9% cases. Out of which one had phenytoin induced Steven Johnson syndrome. Skin biopsy was done in 5 patients. Topicals was advised in 80%. Upon discharge 10% of inpatients didn’t require any follow-up. The patients who were followed up after 4 weeks, about 48% had their symptoms resolved with topicals and oral treatment as required. About 38% required more than two follow ups due to chronic course of the diseases. Conclusions: This present study discussed about various manifestations of skin disorders in a neurological set up and emphasizes the role of dermatologist in treating skin problems both in outpatient as well as inpatient

  13. Analysis of discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings in 60 patients with herniated nucleus pulposus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun; Kim, Kab Tae; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan(Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    The herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is a major cause of low back pain and sciatica. High resolution computed tomography is the most accurate diagnostic tool to define a HNP, because it provides a complete in vivo analysis of bony framework of lumbar spine as well as the supporting soft tissue structures and neural elements. But the discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings is often confusing. From May 1983 to August 1986, sixty patients with HNP who had both CT and surgical intervention at Pusan National University Hospital were analyzed. The feasibility of the neurologic examination on HNP and the effect of HNP on nerve root were evaluated on the basis of CT findings. The results were as follows : 1. Thirty-four cases (56.7%) of clinical impression were matched to CT findings in determining level of HNP and affected nerve root. 2. In evaluation of affected level, there was high trend to cause discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings in multiple disc involvement than in single involvement. 3. There was no correlation between degree of nerve root compression determined by CT and pattern of neurologic signs (motor weakness, sensory deficit, and reflex change)

  14. H1N1 encephalitis with malignant edema and review of neurologic complications from influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Paul Taylor; Belko, John; Uyeki, Timothy M; Axelrod, Yekaterina; Lee, Kenneth K; Silverthorn, James

    2010-12-01

    Influenza virus infection of the respiratory tract is associated with a range of neurologic complications. The emergence of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus has been linked to neurological complications, including encephalopathy and encephalitis. Case report and literature review. We reviewed case management of a 20-year old Hispanic male who developed febrile upper respiratory tract signs and symptoms followed by a confusional state. He had rapid neurologic decline and his clinical course was complicated by refractory seizures and malignant brain edema. He was managed with oseltamavir and peramavir, corticosteroids, intravenous gamma globulin treatment, anticonvulsants, intracranial pressure management with external ventricular drain placement, hyperosmolar therapy, sedation, and mechanical ventilation. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of nasal secretions confirmed 2009 H1N1 virus infection; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was negative for 2009 H1N1 viral RNA. Follow-up imaging demonstrated improvement in brain edema but restricted diffusion in the basal ganglia. We provide a review of the clinical spectrum of neurologic complications of seasonal influenza and 2009 H1N1, and current approaches towards managing these complications. 2009 H1N1-associated acute encephalitis and encephalopathy appear to be variable in severity, including a subset of patients with a malignant clinical course complicated by high morbidity and mortality. Since the H1N1 influenza virus has not been detected in the CSF or brain tissue in patients with this diagnosis, the emerging view is that the host immune response plays a key role in pathogenesis.

  15. Child neurology: Past, present, and future: part 1: history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millichap, John J; Millichap, J Gordon

    2009-08-18

    The founding period of child neurology occurred in 3 phases: 1) early individual contributory phase, 2) organized training phase, and 3) expansion phase. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, individuals in pediatrics, neurology, and psychiatry established clinics and made important contributions to the literature on childhood epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and pediatric neurology. The latter half of the 20th century saw the organization of training programs in pediatric neurology, with fellowships supported by the NIH. This development was followed by a rapid expansion in the number of trainees certified in child neurology and their appointment to divisions of neurology in children's hospitals. In recent years, referrals of children with neurologic disorders have increased, and disorders previously managed by pediatricians are often seen in neurology clinics. The era of subspecialization is embraced by the practicing physician. The present day status of pediatric neurology and suggestions for the future development of the specialty are subjects for further discussion.

  16. Newer insights to the neurological diseases among biblical characters of old testament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people over the years have studied the Bible from a medical point of view offering diagnoses for the symptoms and signs that appear to have afflicted numerous individuals in the Bible. We review the biblical characters in the Old Testament and offer newer insights to their neurological diseases. We first look at the battle between Goliath and David. Interestingly, Goliath probably suffered from acromegaly. We propose autism as a diagnosis for Samson which would precede the first known case of autism by centuries. Isaac was a diabetic, and he probably had autonomic neuropathy. Few verses from the books of I Samuel, Psalms, and Ezekiel reveal symptoms suggestive of stroke. Jacob suffered from sciatica, and the child of the Shunnamite woman in II Kings had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These instances among others found in the Old Testament of the Bible offer newer insights on the history of current neurological diseases.

  17. [Neurological complications of chronic alcoholism: study of 42 observations in Guinea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisse, F A; Keita, M M; Diallo, I M; Camara, M I; Konate, M M; Konate, F; Conde, K; Diallo, A N; Nyassinde, J; Djigue, B S; Camara, M; Koumbassa, M L; Diakhate, I; Cisse, A

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic disorders related to chronic alcoholism in traditional areas of Guinea are frequent, but reports about them are rare. We conducted the first study in Guinea on this subject and retrospectively collected 42 cases of neurologic manifestations related to alcoholism over a 7-year period. The standard findings of the literature were confirmed in our population: peak frequency after the age of 40 years (82.8%) and clear male overrepresentation (M/F sex ratio: 13/1). All the standard signs and symptoms are reported, with a clear predominance of alcoholic polyneuropathy and hepatic encephalopathy. The study of nutritional status by both body mass index (BMI) and the Detsky criteria showed that these patients were severely malnourished. The brain MRI was a crucial contribution for diagnosing the standard central nervous system complications of alcoholism: Gayet Wernicke encephalopathy, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, Korsakoff syndrome, central pontine myelinolysis, and cerebellar degeneration.

  18. Contemporary Teaching of Neurology. Teaching Neurological Behavior to General Practitioners: A Fresh Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouesne, C.; Salamon, R.

    1977-01-01

    Ways in which teaching neurology can be simplified for the nonspecialist practitioner are addressed in this assessment of the state-of-the-art in France. The hypothesis implies simplifying both the diagnoses and symptomatology. (LBH)

  19. Bridging Neuroanatomy, Neuroradiology and Neurology: Three-Dimensional Interactive Atlas of Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Nowinski, W. L.; Chua, B.C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. ...

  20. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional