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Sample records for neurologic cardiac pulmonary

  1. Hemorrhagic Stroke Associated with Pulmonary Edema and Catastrophic Cardiac Failure

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    Jiun-Chang Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral arteriovenous fistula (AVF is a vascular malformation that is rare in the pediatric population. Older children with cerebral AVF tend to present with neurologic problems related to intracranial venous hypertension or intracranial hemorrhage. Cardiac and pulmonary complications following acute neurologic injury such as subarachnoid hemorrhage are common in adults, but are rarely reported in children. However, complications have been reported in cases of enterovirus 71 rhombencephalitis in infants and children and can cause high morbidity and mortality. Here, we report a 14-year-old boy who presented with cardiac failure associated with pulmonary edema following cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to AVF. After aggressive investigation and management, we intervened before significant hypoxia and hypotension developed, potentially reducing the risk of long-term adverse neurologic consequences in this patient.

  2. Early and Late Neurological Complications after Cardiac Transplantation

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    Mehmet Balkanay; Cengiz Köksal; Deniz Çevirme; Hasan Sunar

    2011-01-01

    The clinical use of cyclosporine as an immunosuppressant improved the recipient’s life span and revolutionized the field of cardiac transplantation. But most of the immunesuppressant drugs including cyclosporine may cause neurological and many other side effects. In this article we present three cases, from 58 patients, undergoing cardiac transplantation at our hospital from 1989 to 2008 in whom developed transient neurological complications.

  3. Early and Late Neurological Complications After Cardiac Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Çevirme, Deniz; Köksal, Cengiz; Balkanay, Mehmet; Sunar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    The clinical use of cyclosporine as an immunosuppressant improved the recipient's life span and revolutionized the field of cardiac transplantation. But most of the immunesuppressant drugs including cyclosporine may cause neurological and many other side effects. In this article we present three cases, from 58 patients, undergoing cardiac transplantation at our hospital from 1989 to 2008 in whom developed transient neurological complications.

  4. Early and Late Neurological Complications after Cardiac Transplantation

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    Mehmet Balkanay

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The clinical use of cyclosporine as an immunosuppressant improved the recipient’s life span and revolutionized the field of cardiac transplantation. But most of the immunesuppressant drugs including cyclosporine may cause neurological and many other side effects. In this article we present three cases, from 58 patients, undergoing cardiac transplantation at our hospital from 1989 to 2008 in whom developed transient neurological complications.

  5. Multiple cardiac arrests induced by pulmonary embolism in a traumatically injured patient

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    Sun, Shu-Qing; Li, Ke-Peng; Zhi, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pulmonary embolism-induced cardiac arrest should not be given up arbitrarily, knowing that the etiology of pulmonary embolism is reversible in most cases. Patient concerns: We present a case of continuous resuscitation lasting approximately 4 hours, during which 21 episodes of cardiac arrest occurred in a 46-year-old man who sustained high-level paraplegia after a road traffic accident. Diagnoses: Multiple cardiac arrests induced by pulmonary embolism. Interventions: The patient received cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolytic therapy. Outcomes: The patient was discharged in 2 weeks when his condition turned for the better. Lessons: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of patients with pulmonary embolism-induced cardiac arrest should not be given up arbitrarily, knowing that the etiology of pulmonary embolism is reversible in most cases. Effective external cardiac compression can not only save the patient's life but also attenuate neurological sequelae. Thrombolytic therapy is the key to the final success of resuscitation. PMID:29245284

  6. Serum tau and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest

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    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nielsen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test serum tau as a predictor of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. METHODS: We measured the neuronal protein tau in serum at 24, 48, and 72 h after cardiac arrest in 689 patients in the prospective international Target Temperature Management trial. The main outcome was poor...... neurological outcome, defined as Cerebral Performance Category 3-5 at 6 months. RESULTS: Increased tau was associated with poor outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest (median 38.5 [IQR 5.7-245] ng/L in poor versus 1.5 [0.7-2.4] ng/L in good outcome, for tau at 72 h, p... and 36°C targeted temperature after cardiac arrest. INTERPRETATION: Serum tau is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological outcome in patients with cardiac arrest. It may be significantly better than serum NSE, which is recommended in guidelines and currently used in clinical practice...

  7. Neurological manifestations of cardiac myxoma: experience in a referral hospital.

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    Pérez Andreu, J; Parrilla, G; Arribas, J M; García-Villalba, B; Lucas, J J; Garcia Navarro, M; Marín, F; Gutierrez, F; Moreno, A

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma is an important but uncommon cause of stroke in younger patients. Few published case series analyse the frequency and clinical presentation of neurological complications in patients with myxoma. To list all neurological complications from cardiac myxoma recorded in our hospital in the past 28 years. We retrospectively reviewed the neurological manifestations of cardiac myxoma in patients treated in our hospital between December 1983 and March 2012. Of the 36 patients with cardiac myxoma, 8 (22%) presented neurological manifestations. Half were women and mean age of patients was 52.4 ± 11.6 years. Sudden-onset hemiparesis was the most frequent neurological symptom (63%). Established ischaemic stroke was the most common clinical manifestation (75%), followed by transient ischemic attack. The most commonly affected territory corresponded to the middle cerebral artery. Myxoma was diagnosed by echocardiography in all cases. Mean myxoma size was 4.1cm and most of the tumours (63%) had a polypoid surface. All tumours were successfully removed by surgery. There were no in-hospital deaths. Cardiac myxomas frequently present with neurological symptoms, especially ischaemic events (established stroke or transient ischaemic attack), in younger patients with no cardiovascular risk factors. The anterior circulation is more frequently affected, especially the middle cerebral artery. Echocardiography can facilitate prompt diagnosis and early treatment of the lesion. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Serum tau and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest

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    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nielsen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test serum tau as a predictor of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. METHODS: We measured the neuronal protein tau in serum at 24, 48, and 72 hours after cardiac arrest in 689 patients in the prospective international Target Temperature Management trial. The main outcome...... was poor neurological outcome, defined as Cerebral Performance Categories 3-5 at 6 months. RESULTS: Increased tau was associated with poor outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest (median = 38.5, interquartile range [IQR] = 5.7-245ng/l in poor vs median = 1.5, IQR = 0.7-2.4ng/l in good outcome, for tau....... The accuracy in predicting outcome by serum tau was equally high for patients randomized to 33 °C and 36 °C targeted temperature after cardiac arrest. INTERPRETATION: Serum tau is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological outcome in patients with cardiac arrest. It may be significantly better...

  9. [Features of neurologic semiotics at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

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    Litvinenko, I V; Baranov, V L; Kolcheva, Iu A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is actual pathology, when it forms the mixed hypoxemia. In the conditions of a chronic hypoxemia structures of organism with high level of metabolic processes, namely brain tissues, suffer. Character of defeat of the central nervous system at that pathology is insufficiently studied. In this article we studied and analysed the presence of such changes as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment and features of neurologic semiotics at COPD in 50 patients.

  10. Multiple cardiac arrests induced by pulmonary embolism in a traumatically injured patient: A case report and review of the literature.

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    Sun, Shu-Qing; Li, Ke-Peng; Zhi, Jianming

    2017-12-01

    Pulmonary embolism-induced cardiac arrest should not be given up arbitrarily, knowing that the etiology of pulmonary embolism is reversible in most cases. We present a case of continuous resuscitation lasting approximately 4 hours, during which 21 episodes of cardiac arrest occurred in a 46-year-old man who sustained high-level paraplegia after a road traffic accident. Multiple cardiac arrests induced by pulmonary embolism. The patient received cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolytic therapy. The patient was discharged in 2 weeks when his condition turned for the better. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of patients with pulmonary embolism-induced cardiac arrest should not be given up arbitrarily, knowing that the etiology of pulmonary embolism is reversible in most cases. Effective external cardiac compression can not only save the patient's life but also attenuate neurological sequelae. Thrombolytic therapy is the key to the final success of resuscitation.

  11. Cardiac Dysrhythmias and Neurological Dysregulation: Manifestations of Profound Hypomagnesemia

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    Sagger Mawri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the second most common intracellular cation and serves as an important metabolic cofactor to over 300 enzymatic reactions throughout the human body. Among its various roles, magnesium modulates calcium entry and release from sarcoplasmic reticulum and regulates ATP pumps in myocytes and neurons, thereby regulating cardiac and neuronal excitability. Therefore, deficiency of this essential mineral may result in serious cardiovascular and neurologic derangements. In this case, we present the clinical course of a 76-year-old woman who presented with marked cardiac and neurological signs and symptoms which developed as a result of severe hypomagnesemia. The patient promptly responded to magnesium replacement once the diagnosis was established. We herein discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of severe hypomagnesemia and emphasize the implications of magnesium deficiency in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Furthermore, this case highlights the importance of having high vigilance for hypomagnesemia in the appropriate clinical setting.

  12. Survey on current practices for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest.

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    Friberg, Hans; Cronberg, Tobias; Dünser, Martin W; Duranteau, Jacques; Horn, Janneke; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    To investigate current practices and timing of neurological prognostication in comatose cardiac arrest patients. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to the 8000 members of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine during September and October 2012. The survey had 27 questions divided into three categories: background data, clinical data, decision-making and consequences. A total of 1025 respondents (13%) answered the survey with complete forms in more than 90%. Twenty per cent of respondents practiced outside of Europe. Overall, 22% answered that they had national recommendations, with the highest percentage in the Netherlands (>80%). Eighty-nine per cent used induced hypothermia (32-34 °C) for comatose cardiac arrest patients, while 11% did not. Twenty per cent had separate prognostication protocols for hypothermia patients. Seventy-nine per cent recognized that neurological examination alone is not enough to predict outcome and a similar number (76%) used additional methods. Intermittent electroencephalography (EEG), brain computed tomography (CT) scan and evoked potentials (EP) were considered most useful. Poor prognosis was defined as cerebral performance category (CPC) 3-5 (58%) or CPC 4-5 (39%) or other (3%). When prognosis was considered poor, 73% would actively withdraw intensive care while 20% would not and 7% were uncertain. National recommendations for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest are uncommon and only one physician out of five uses a separate protocol for hypothermia treated patients. A neurological examination alone was considered insufficient to predict outcome in comatose patients and most respondents advocated a multimodal approach: EEG, brain CT and EP were considered most useful. Uncertainty regarding neurological prognostication and decisions on level of care was substantial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of pulmonary infection pathogens in neurological intensive care unit

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    Fengying Quan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fengying Quan, Guangwei Liu, Liang Wang, Xuefeng WangDepartment of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, ChinaPurpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogenic bacteria in inpatients with pulmonary infection in the neurological intensive care unit (NICU.Methods: A total of 947 sputum specimens of 428 inpatients from May 2007 to May 2008 in the NICU were enrolled in the study, and bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility tests were analyzed using a VITEK 2 system.Results: A total of 400 positive bacterial strains were separated from 947 sputum specimens, with Gram-negative bacteria accounting for 69.0% of the total strains collected. The most common strain of Gram-negative bacteria was Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.5%. Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 10.0% of the total strains, with the most common strain being Staphylococcus aureus (2.5%. Fungal species accounted for 21.0% of the total strains, and the most common strain collected was Candida albicans (12.25%. Imipenem was the most effective antibiotic against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The drug resistance rate of Gram-positive bacteria to penicillin G was 100%, and the Gram-positive bacteria were 100% sensitive to teicoplanin, vancomycin, and linezolid.Conclusions: Gram-negative bacterial infections account for the majority of pulmonary infections in the NICU, with fungal infections being the second most common infection type observed. In addition, fungal infections seem to be related to mortality in the NICU.Keywords: nosocomial infection, pulmonary infection, drug resistance, neurological intensive care unit

  14. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery

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    Alsatli Raed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pulmonary artery catheter (PAC is an important tool in the preoperative cardiac management, and it provides measurements which helps in the patient management During open heart surgery the catheter tends to rest against the anterior lateral wall of the right atrium where the catheter may be caught by a suture in the cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass. We describe a very rare complication which is inadvertent surgical suturing of the PAC to the inferior vena cava that necessitated reopening the chest, cutting, the suture and removing the catheter.

  15. Neurological and cardiac complications in a cohort of children with end-stage renal disease

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    Jumana H Albaramki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with chronic kidney disease are at risk of major neurologic and cardiac complications. The purpose of this study is to review the neurological and cardiac complications in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. A retrospective review of medical records of children with ESRD at Jordan University Hospital was performed. All neurological and cardiac events were recorded and analyzed. Data of a total of 68 children with ESRD presenting between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed. Neurological complications occurred in 32.4%; seizures were the most common event. Uncontrolled hypertension was the leading cause of neurological events. Cardiac complications occurred in 39.7%, the most common being pericardial effusion. Mortality from neurological complications was 45%. Neurological and cardiac complications occurred in around a third of children with ESRD with a high mortality rate. More effective control of hypertension, anemia, and intensive and gentle dialysis are needed.

  16. Cardiac causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessment with multidetector CT

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    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Gopalan, Deepa; Agrawal, S.K.B. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Screaton, Nicholas J. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Papworth Hospital NHS Trust, Diagnostic Centre, Department of Radiology, Papworth Everard, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    The causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse and include multiple congenital and acquired cardiac diseases as well as diseases primarily affecting the pulmonary vasculature, lung, pleura and chest wall. The traditional role of CT in evaluating PAH includes assessment of pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma with limited assessment of the heart. Advances in multidetector CT technology with improved spatial and temporal resolution now permit accurate delineation of cardiac morphology. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is widely utilised in the workup of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease and can identify both pulmonary and cardiac causes. As the initial presentation for CTPA is often precipitated by nonspecific, unexplained symptoms and therefore undertaken by a general radiologist, it is important that a systematic approach to the interpretation of these studies, including cardiac evaluation, is routinely adopted. This paper reviews the CT evaluation in pulmonary hypertension with a particular focus on the cardiac causes, their subclassification into congenital systemic to pulmonary shunts and secondary to left heart disease, and their imaging features. It emphasises the use of a systematic approach to interpretation of CTPA examinations both in patients with known PAH and those with previously unsuspected disease. (orig.)

  17. Contemporary approach to neurologic prognostication of coma after cardiac arrest.

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    Ben-Hamouda, Nawfel; Taccone, Fabio S; Rossetti, Andrea O; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Coma after cardiac arrest (CA) is an important cause of admission to the ICU. Prognosis of post-CA coma has significantly improved over the past decade, particularly because of aggressive postresuscitation care and the use of therapeutic targeted temperature management (TTM). TTM and sedatives used to maintain controlled cooling might delay neurologic reflexes and reduce the accuracy of clinical examination. In the early ICU phase, patients' good recovery may often be indistinguishable (based on neurologic examination alone) from patients who eventually will have a poor prognosis. Prognostication of post-CA coma, therefore, has evolved toward a multimodal approach that combines neurologic examination with EEG and evoked potentials. Blood biomarkers (eg, neuron-specific enolase [NSE] and soluble 100-β protein) are useful complements for coma prognostication; however, results vary among commercial laboratory assays, and applying one single cutoff level (eg, > 33 μg/L for NSE) for poor prognostication is not recommended. Neuroimaging, mainly diffusion MRI, is emerging as a promising tool for prognostication, but its precise role needs further study before it can be widely used. This multimodal approach might reduce false-positive rates of poor prognosis, thereby providing optimal prognostication of comatose CA survivors. The aim of this review is to summarize studies and the principal tools presently available for outcome prediction and to describe a practical approach to the multimodal prognostication of coma after CA, with a particular focus on neuromonitoring tools. We also propose an algorithm for the optimal use of such multimodal tools during the early ICU phase of post-CA coma.

  18. [Hydatidosis simulating a cardiac tumour with pulmonary metastases].

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    Martín-Izquierdo, Marta; Martín-Trenor, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The presence of multiple symptomatic pulmonary nodules and one cardiac tumour in a child requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Until a few decades ago, the diagnosis of a cardiac tumour was difficult and was based on a high index of suspicion from indirect signs, and required angiocardiography for confirmation. Echocardiography and other imaging techniques have also helped in the detection of cardiac neoplasms. However, it is not always easy to make the correct diagnosis. The case is presented of a 12 year-old boy with pulmonary symptoms, and diagnosed with a cardiac tumour with lung metastases. The presence of numerous pulmonary nodules was confirmed in our hospital. The echocardiogram detected a solid cardiac nodule in the right ventricle. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the findings and the diagnosis. Puncture-aspiration of a lung nodule gave the diagnosis of hydatidosis. He underwent open-heart surgery with cardiac cyst resection and treated with anthelmintics. The lung cysts were then excised, and he recovered uneventfully. This child had multiple pulmonary nodules and a solid cardiac nodule, and was suspected of having a cardiac tumour with pulmonary metastases. However, given the clinical history, background and morphology of pulmonary nodules, another possible aetiology for consideration is echinococcosis. The clinical picture of cardiac hydatidosis and its complications is highly variable. The clinical history is essential in these cases, as well as having a high index of suspicion. Hydatidosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a solid, echogenic, cardiac nodule. The treatment for cardiopulmonary hydatid cysts is surgical, followed by anthelmintics. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac biomarkers in prognostic stratification of patients with pulmonary thrombembolism

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    Nina Kmet-Lunaček

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary thrombembolism represents a spectrum of clinical syndromes ranging from small embolism presenting with dyspnea alone to massive thrombembolism causing shock or cardiac arrest. Majority of patients with pulmonary thrombembolism present with normal blood pressure, however, some may rapidly deteriorate despite therapeutic anticoagulation with heparine. Identification of such patients by risk stratification is of utmost importance for the care of pulmonary thrombembolism. It has been known for several years that a strong corellation exists between the prognosis of acute pulmonary thrombembolism and the degree of right ventricular dysfunction. Recently, some cardiac biomarkers have shown to be a promising predictive factor in evaluating right ventricular dysfunction and consequently establishing the prognosis of the clinical course in submassive and massive pulmonary thrombembolism. In the article the most important recent studies are represented confirming the important role of cardiac biomarkers in connection with prognosis in acute pulmonary thrombembolism. The most important are troponins, B-type of natriuretic peptide (BNP with its pro-types and myoglobin.Conclusions: Elevated levels of troponins, in combination with echocardiographic signs of right ventricular dysfunction, are powerful predictors of adverse events and early mortality in normotensive patients with pulmonary thrombembolism. Normal or only slightly elevated levels of brain natriuretic peptides identify favourable prognosis in patients with pulmonary thrombembolism.

  20. Cardiac Arrest Caused by Multiple Recurrent Pulmonary Embolism

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    Kjartan Eskjaer Hannig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism is a common condition with a high mortality. We describe a previously healthy 68-year-old male who suffered three pulmonary embolisms during a short period of time, including two embolisms while on anticoagulant treatment. This paper illustrates three important points. (1 The importance of optimal anticoagulant treatment in the prevention of pulmonary embolism reoccurrence. (2 The benefit of immediate accessibility to echocardiography in the handling of haemodynamically unstable patients with an unknown underlying cause. (3 Thrombolytic treatment should always be considered and may be life-saving in patients with cardiac arrest suspected to be caused by pulmonary embolism.

  1. SYSTEMIC IMBALANCE OF ESSENTIAL METALS AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION IN RATS FOLLOWING ACUTE PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

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    We have recently demonstrated that PM containing water-soluble zinc may cause cardiac injury following pulmonary exposure. To investigate if pulmonary zinc exposure causes systemic metal imbalance and direct cardiac effects, we intratracheally (IT) instilled male Wistar Kyoto (WK...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5365 - Posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary treatment... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5365 Posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary treatment. (a) Identification. A posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary...

  3. [Cardiac catheterization and pulmonary vasoreactivity testing in children with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension].

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    Zhang, Chen; Li, Qiangqiang; Liu, Tianyang; Gu, Hong

    2014-06-01

    As an important method of hemodynamic assessment in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), cardiac catheterization combined with pulmonary vasoreactivity testing remains with limited experience in children, and the acute pulmonary vasodilator agents as well as response criteria for vasoreactivity testing remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical importance, agent selection, and responder definition of cardiac catheterization combined with pulmonary vasoreactivity testing in pediatric IPAH. The patients admitted to Department of Pediatric Cardiology of Beijing Anzhen Hospital between April 2009 and September 2013 with suspected IPAH, under 18 years of age, with WHO functional class II or III, were enrolled. All the patients were arranged to receive left and right heart catheterization and pulmonary vasoreactivity testing with inhalation of pure oxygen and iloprost (PGI2) respectively. Hemodynamic changes were analyzed, and two criteria, the European Society of Cardiology recommendation criteria (Sitbon criteria) and traditional application criteria (Barst criteria), were used to evaluate the test results. Thirty-nine cases of children with suspected IPAH underwent cardiac catheterization. In 4 patients IPAH was excluded; 4 patients developed pulmonary hypertension crisis. The other 31 patients received standard cardiac catheterization and pulmonary vasoreactivity testing. Baseline mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) was (66 ± 16) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) (17 ± 8) Wood U · m². After inhalation of pure oxygen, mPAP fell to (59 ± 16) mmHg, and PVRI to (14 ± 8) Wood U · m² (t = 4.88 and 4.56, both P children with IPAH, cardiac catheterization combined with pulmonary vasoreactivity testing has important value in differential diagnosis, severity estimation, and treatment (including the emergency treatment) choices. Pulmonary hypertension crisis is an important

  4. A rat model of pulmonary infection after cardiac transplant.

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    Chen, Hao; Yu, Weiyong; Lu, Chen; Zhan, Yanxia; Cheng, Yunfeng; Mei, Yunqing

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac allograft rejection and infection are leading causes of morbidity and mortality after transplant. The lack of an animal model has hindered related research. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary infection after cardiac transplant to address this issue. Lewis rats received Wistar rat heart allografts, cardiac rejection was induced by cessation of cyclosporine injection, and pulmonary infection was induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa intrabronchial inoculation. Development of pulmonary infection and/or heart rejection was assessed by histopathology. Histopathologic findings showed that a dose of 2 × 108 colony forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa intrabronchial inoculation is sufficient to cause severe pneumonia without being lethal to transplanted animals. Daily administration of 10 mg/kg of cyclosporine reliably suppressed rejection, and withdrawal for 7 days can obtain a consistent International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation 3R rejection. The current study represents a simple and effective rat model of pulmonary infection along, or in combination, with rejection after heart transplant, which can be used for research of infection-rejection in cardiac transplant settings.

  5. Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society 2014 Consensus Statement: Pharmacotherapies in Cardiac Critical Care Pulmonary Hypertension.

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    Kim, John S; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2016-03-01

    To review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of pulmonary arterial hypertension therapies. Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension have been applied for the benefit of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no pulmonary arterial hypertension medications approved for children in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension as infusions (IV and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first-line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and is commonly used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in the ICU. Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with pulmonary arterial

  6. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

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    Yee, Seonghwan, E-mail: Seonghwan.Yee@Beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States); Scalzetti, Ernest M. [Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  7. Pulmonary embolism as a cause of cardiac arrest: Hypothermia in post-resuscitation period (cooling therapy

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    Niković Vuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary embolism as a possible cause of acute heart failure is a potentially fatal condition that can cause death in all age groups. Patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest have a high risk of increased mortality and their poor long­term outcome is often associated with severe neurological complications. Case Outline. This is a case report of a 67­year­old man after a successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR which was followed by therapeutic hypothermia (TH. The patient visited the dermatological outpatients’ department with clinical presentation of pain and swelling of the right leg, shortness of breath and chest pain. During examination the patient lost consciousness, stopped breathing and had cardiac arrest. ECG was done which registered asystole. We began CPR. After 59 minutes of resuscitation return of heartbeat was achieved. The patient was transported to the Emergency Department. On admission, after computerized tomography (CT of the chest confirmed massive pulmonary embolism (PE, the patient was administered thrombolytic therapy with Metalyse (tenecteplase and anti­coagulation therapy (heparin. After stabilization, therapeutic hypothermia was applied. Combination of EMCOOLSpad on the chest and abdomen and cold Ringer lactate 500 ml at 4°C was flushed. Temperature was decreased to 33°C and kept stabile for 24 hours. After eight days the patient was conscious with a minimal neurological deficit. Conclusion. As shown in this case report, and according to the rich experience elsewhere, cooling therapy after out­of­hospital cardiac arrest and successful CRP may be useful in preventing neurological complications.

  8. Prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and occurrence of neurological symptoms in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)

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    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms....

  9. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use....... METHODS: A community-based case-control study was performed, with 1310 cases of SCA of the ARREST study and 5793 age, sex and SCA-date matched non-SCA controls from the PHARMO database. Only incident SCA cases, age older than 40 years, that resulted from unequivocal cardiac causes...

  10. Characteristics and prognosis of pulmonary infection in patients with neurologic disease and hypoproteinemia.

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    Li, Feng; Yuan, Mei-zhen; Wang, Liang; Wang, Xue-feng; Liu, Guang-wei

    2015-04-01

    To examine the characteristics and the prognostic influence of pulmonary infections in neurologic disease patients with mild-to-severe hypoproteinemia. We used a retrospective survey method to analyze the characteristics and prognoses of 220 patients with hypoproteinemia complicated with pulmonary infection in the Internal Medicine-Neurology Intensive Care Unit at the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University from January 2010 to December 2013. The patients were divided into mild, moderate and severe hypoproteinemia groups according to their serum albumin levels. The analysis included patient age, sex, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II score), and characteristics of the pulmonary infection, nutritional support and prognosis, among others. Differences in the general information of the 220 cases of hypoalbuminemia patients complicated with varying degrees of pulmonary infection (APACHE II score, age, disease distribution) were statistically significant. The pulmonary infection onset time and pathogen susceptibility in the patients with mild-to-severe hypoalbuminemia were not significantly different. Pulmonary infection onset was more frequently observed within the first 3-11 days following admission in all groups. The nutritional support method did not significantly influence serum albumin protein levels. However, the neurological intensive care unit stay length, total hospitalization cost and disease distribution were significantly different among the patient groups. Patients with cerebrovascular disease, intracranial infections and epilepsy complicated with pulmonary infection represent the high-risk groups for hypoalbuminemia. The Acinetobacter baumannii complex represents the main group of pathogenic bacteria causing lung infections, and the high-risk period for lung infections is 3-11 days after the occurrence of hypoalbuminemia. Patients with severe hypoalbuminemia complicated with pulmonary infection have the worst

  11. Pulmonary Arterial Capacitance Predicts Cardiac Events in Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Sugimoto

    Full Text Available Although pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (LHD-PH accounts for the largest proportion of pulmonary hypertension, few reports on the epidemiological analysis of LHD-PH exist. Recently, pulmonary arterial capacitance (PAC has attracted attention as a possible factor of right ventricular afterload along with pulmonary vascular resistance. We therefore investigated the clinical significance of PAC in LHD-PH.The subject consisted of 252 LHD-PH patients (145 men, mean age 63.4 ± 14.7 years diagnosed by right heart catheterization. PAC was estimated by the ratio between stroke volume and pulmonary arterial pulse pressure. Patients were classified into four groups according to the PAC (1st quartile was 0.74 to 1.76 ml/mmHg, the 2nd quartile 1.77 to 2.53 ml/mmHg, the 3rd quartile 2.54 to 3.59 ml/mmHg, and the 4th quartile 3.61 to 12.14 ml/mmHg. The end-points were defined as rehospitalization due to worsening heart failure and/or cardiac death. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to determine what variables were associated with cardiac events.The patients in the 1st quartile had the lowest cardiac index and stroke volume index, and the highest mean pulmonary arterial pressure, mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance compared with the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles. Fifty-four patients experienced cardiac events during the follow-up period (median 943 days. The event-free rate of the 1st quartile was significantly lower than that of the 3rd and 4th quartiles (66.7% vs 82.5% [3rd quartile], P = 0.008; and 92.1% [4th quartile], P < 0.001. The Cox hazard analysis revealed that PAC was significantly associated with cardiac events (HR 0.556, 95% CI 0.424-0.730, P < 0.001.PAC is useful in the prediction of cardiac event risk in LHD-PH patients.

  12. The Association Between Arterial Oxygen Tension and Neurological Outcome After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas J; Dodampahala, Kalani; Rosselot, Babette; Perman, Sarah M; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Goyal, Munish; Gaieski, David F; Grossestreuer, Anne V

    2017-03-01

    A number of observational studies have evaluated the association between arterial oxygen tensions and outcome after cardiac arrest with variable results. The objective of this study is to determine the association between arterial oxygen tension and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed using the Penn Alliance for Therapeutic Hypothermia registry. Adult patients who experienced return of spontaneous circulation after in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and had a partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) recorded within 48 hours were included. Our primary exposure of interest was PaO2. Hyperoxemia was defined as PaO2 > 300 mmHg, hypoxemia as PaO2 arrests were witnessed, and pulseless electrical activity was the most common initial rhythm (40%). More than 72% of the patients had cardiac etiology for their arrests, and 55% underwent targeted temperature management. A total of 38% of patients survived to hospital discharge. There was no significant association between PaO2 at any time interval and neurological outcome at hospital discharge. Hyperoxemia at 12 hours after cardiac arrest was associated with decreased odds of survival (OR 0.17 [0.03-0.89], p = 0.032). There was no significant association between arterial oxygen tension measured within the first 48 hours after cardiac arrest and neurological outcome.

  13. Postoperative Pulmonary Dysfunction and Mechanical Ventilation in Cardiac Surgery

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    Rafael Badenes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction (PPD is a frequent and significant complication after cardiac surgery. It contributes to morbidity and mortality and increases hospitalization stay and its associated costs. Its pathogenesis is not clear but it seems to be related to the development of a systemic inflammatory response with a subsequent pulmonary inflammation. Many factors have been described to contribute to this inflammatory response, including surgical procedure with sternotomy incision, effects of general anesthesia, topical cooling, and extracorporeal circulation (ECC and mechanical ventilation (VM. Protective ventilation strategies can reduce the incidence of atelectasis (which still remains one of the principal causes of PDD and pulmonary infections in surgical patients. In this way, the open lung approach (OLA, a protective ventilation strategy, has demonstrated attenuating the inflammatory response and improving gas exchange parameters and postoperative pulmonary functions with a better residual functional capacity (FRC when compared with a conventional ventilatory strategy. Additionally, maintaining low frequency ventilation during ECC was shown to decrease the incidence of PDD after cardiac surgery, preserving lung function.

  14. A structured approach to neurologic prognostication in clinical cardiac arrest trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cronberg, Tobias; Horn, Janneke; Kuiper, Michael A.; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Brain injury is the dominant cause of death for cardiac arrest patients who are admitted to an intensive care unit, and the majority of patients die after withdrawal of life sustaining therapy (WLST) based on a presumed poor neurologic outcome. Mild induced hypothermia was found to decrease the

  15. Impact of initial intervention on long-term neurological recovey after cardiac arrest: data from the Luxembourg "North Pole" cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammet, P; Collas, D; Werer, C; Muenster, L; Clarens, C; Wagner, D

    2012-01-01

    Prognosis after cardiac arrest is variable and difficult to predict. Early prognostic markers would facilitate the care of these patients. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of initial interventions after resuscitation on neurological outcome at 6 months. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the patient charts from consecutive cardiac arrest patients admitted to our intensive care unit and treated with induced hypothermia. Over a 3-year period, 90 patients were included in our study. Sixty-four percent of the patients had bystander cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. An automated external defibrillator (AED) was used in 19% of the patients and the mean time to first defibrillation was 11 +/- 8.9 minutes. Patients being resuscitated and defibrillated by bystanders did better than those who had CPR only and far better than those patients in whom no rescue measures where attempted at all (73% vs. 56% vs. 32% for good neurological outcome, respectively, p= 0.03). Witnessed cardiac arrest was more frequent in patients with a good outcome than in those who collapsed without a witness (91% vs 75%, p = 0.03). In 76% of the patients with good outcome, CPR was performed whereas only 52% benefited from these measures in the bad outcome group (p = 0.01). Although the use of an AED was not significantly different between good and bad outcome groups (26% vs. 11%, p = 0.06), time to first defibrillation was significantly lower in patients with good outcome (8.7 +/- 6.3 vs. 13.3 +/- 11.3 minutes, p = 0.05). In the 17 patients in whom an AED was used, 12 (71%) recovered without major sequelae whereas in the 73 cases where no AED was used, only 34 (47%) had a good outcome (p = 0.06). At 6 months follow-up, 46 (51%) survivors had a good outcome (cerebral performance category 1-2), 5 (6%) survived with severe neurological sequelae or stayed in coma and 39 (43%) died. Our local data confirm that early interventions have a major impact on survival of cardiac arrest patients. Efforts

  16. Optimizing Neurologically Intact Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Call to Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Goodloe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. national out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates, although improving recently, have remained suboptimal despite the collective efforts of individuals, communities, and professional societies. Only until very recently, and still with inconsistency, has focus been placed specifically on survival with pre-arrest neurologic function. The reality of current approaches to sudden cardiac arrest is that they are often lacking an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach, and without deserved funding and outcome analysis. In this manuscript, a multidisciplinary group of authors propose practice, process, technology, and policy initiatives to improve cardiac arrest survival with a focus on neurologic function. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  17. [Acute neurological complications after pediatric cardiac surgery: still a long way to go].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Gonzalez-Rivera, I; Ferrer-Barba, A; Portela-Torron, F; Gonzalez-Garcia, E; Fernandez-Trisac, J L; Ramil-Fraga, C

    2012-04-01

    There has been an increasing concern over the neurological complications associated with congenital heart disease and cardiac surgery. We performed a retrospective, case-control, observational review of the postoperative period in the intensive care unit of patients undergoing cardiac surgery over the past 10 years. We selected 2 control patients for each case, matched for surgical complexity. A total of 900 patients were reviewed. We found 38 neurological complications (4.2%), of which 21 (55.3%) were in the peripheral nervous system and 17 (44.7%) in the central nervous system. The complications involving the central nervous system (1.9% of total) consisted of 8 seizures, 4 cerebrovascular accidents, 4 hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy events, and 1 reversible neurological deficit. At the time of discharge, 35.3% were symptomatic and 17.6% had died. Patients with neurological complications had a longer bypass time (P=.009), longer aortic cross time (P=.012), longer hospitalization in intensive care (P=.001), longer duration of mechanical ventilation (P=.004) and an increased number of days under inotropic support (P=.001). Our incidence of neurological complications after cardiac surgery is similar to that previously described. Clinical seizures are the most common complication. Central nervous system complications are associated with a higher morbidity and hospitalization time. Units caring for patients with congenital heart disease must implement neurological monitoring during and after cardiac surgery to prevent and to detect these complications earlier. Copyright © 2011 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Initial arterial carbon dioxide tension is associated with neurological outcome after resuscitation from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolins, Molly L; Henning, Daniel J; Gaieski, David F; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Jaworski, Alison; Johnson, Nicholas J

    2017-05-01

    To determine the relationships between partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2), prescribed minute ventilation (MV), and neurologic outcome in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. This was a retrospective cohort study utilizing a multicenter database of adult patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest. The primary outcome was neurologic status at hospital discharge, defined by Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score: CPC 1-2 was favorable, CPC 3-5 was poor. We compared rates of initial normocarbia (PaCO2 31-49mmHg) and mean sequential PaCO2 measurements obtained over the first 24h. We also assessed the influence of MV on the PaCO2 at initial, 6, 12, 18, and 24h after cardiac arrest using univariate linear regression. One hundred and fourteen patients from 3 institutions met inclusion criteria. Overall, 46/114 (40.4%, 95% CI: 31.4-49.4%) patients survived to hospital discharge, and 33/114 (28.9%, 20.6-37.2%) had CPC 1-2 at the time of discharge. A total of 38.9% (95% CI: 29.9-47.9%) of patients had initial normocarbia; 43.2% (28.6-57.8%) of these patients were discharged with CPC 1-2, compared with 20.3% (10.8-29.8%) of dyscarbic patients. By 6h, neurologic outcomes were not significantly associated with PaCO2. Prescribed MV was not associated with PaCO2 at any time point with the exception of a weak correlation at hour 18. Initial normocarbia was associated with favorable neurological outcome in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. This relationship was not seen at subsequent time points. There was no significant association between prescribed MV and PaCO2 or neurologic outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preoperative pulmonary function and mortality after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabag, A Selcuk; Wassif, Heba S; Rice, Kathryn; Mithani, Salima; Johnson, Deborah; Bonawitz-Conlin, Jana; Ward, Herbert B; McFalls, Edward O; Kuskowski, Michael A; Kelly, Rosemary F

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between preoperative pulmonary function and outcomes after cardiac surgery. We performed preoperative pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in 1,169 patients undergoing cardiac surgery at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Airway obstruction was defined as forced expiratory volume in 1 minute (FEV(1)) to forced vital capacity ratio <0.7. Of the 1,169 patients, 483 (41%) had a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, 178 patients with a history of COPD had no airway obstruction on PFT. Conversely, 186 patients without a COPD history had airway obstruction on PFT. Thus, PFT results helped reclassify the COPD status of 364 patients (31%). Operative mortality was 2% in patients with no or mild airway obstruction versus 6.7% in those with moderate or severe obstruction (ie, FEV(1) to forced vital capacity ratio <0.7 and FEV(1) <80% predicted). Postoperative mortality was higher (odds ratio 3.2, 95% CI 1.6-6.2, P = .001) in patients with moderate or severe airway obstruction and in patients with diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide <50% of predicted (odds ratio 4.9, 95% CI 2.3-10.8, P = .0001). Notably, mortality risk was 10x higher (95% CI 3.4-27.2, P = .0001) in patients with moderate or severe airway obstruction and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide <50% of predicted. These data show that PFT before cardiac surgery reclassifies the COPD status of a substantial number of patients and provides important prognostic information that the current risk estimate models do not capture. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  20. [Neurological disorders after cardiac surgery: Diagnosis of cerebral tumors in the postoperative period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Álvarez, A; Rodríguez Fernández, P; Román Fernández, A; Filgueira Dávila, E; Gálvez Gómez, D; González Monzón, V

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of neurologic disorders in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery is high and usually due to a combination of pre- and intraoperative factors. We present 2 patients with brain tumors diagnosed in the immediate postoperative period after sudden onset of neurologic dysfunction. Image studies yielded clinically useful information in these 2 cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Combination of initial neurologic examination and continuous EEG to predict survival after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Chun Song; Callaway, Clifton W; Rittenberger, Jon C

    2015-09-01

    Prognosticating outcome following cardiac arrest requires a multimodal approach. We tested whether the combination of initial neurologic examination combined with continuous EEG was superior to either test alone for predicting survival after cardiac arrest. Review of consecutive patients receiving continuous EEG monitoring between April 2010 and June 2013. Initial neurologic examination was evaluated using the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) score and organ system dysfunction determined using the SOFA score. We defined four categories of initial post-cardiac arrest illness severity (PCAC): (I) awake, (II) coma (not following commands but intact brainstem responses) + mild cardiopulmonary dysfunction (SOFA cardiac + respiratory score cardiac + respiratory score ≥ 4), and (IV) coma without brainstem reflexes. A second analysis focusing on neurologic injury divided subjects into three groups according to initial FOUR_B score; FOUR_B = 0-1, FOUR_B = 2 and FOUR_B = 4. A blinded rater dichotomized continuous EEG patterns during the first 48h into malignant patterns (non-convulsive status epilepticus, convulsive status epilepticus, myoclonic status epilepticus and generalized periodic epileptiform discharges). The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Of 331 subjects, mean age was 58 (SD 17) years and 206 (62.2%) subjects were male. Ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia (VF/VT) was the initial rhythm for 93 (28.1%) subjects. Among subjects with malignant cEEG, survival to hospital discharge rate was 0% for FOUR_B 0-1, 8.1% for FOUR_B 2 and 12.5% for FOUR_B 4, respectively. In one multivariate analysis, survival was independently associated with VF/VT, FOUR_B of 2, FOUR_B of 4, and non-malignant cEEG. In a separate model, survival was associated with VF/VT, PCAC cardiac arrest. We caution against using these findings to speed prognostication until they are externally validated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Respiratory physiotherapy in the pulmonary dysfunction after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Julia Alencar; Costa-Val, Ricardo; Rossetti, Márcia Braz

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to make a critical review about the different techniques of respiratory physiotherapy used following cardiac surgery and this effectiveness in reverting pulmonary dysfunction. It has been used as reference publications in English and Portuguese using as key words thoracic surgery, respiratory exercises, physical therapy modalities, postoperative complications and myocardial revascularization, contained in the following databases BIREME, SciELO Brazil, LILACS, PUBMED, from 1997 to 2007. A secondary search of the reference list of identified articles also was made. It has been selected eleven randomized trials (997 patients). For the articles included incentive spirometry was used in three; deep breathing exercises in six; deep breathing exercises added to positive expiratory pressure in four and positive airway pressure added to inspiratory resistance in two. Three trials used intermittent positive pressure breathing. Continuous positive airway pressure and bi-level positive airway pressure has been used in three and two trials. The protocols used in the studies were varied and the co interventions were present in a big part of these. The different analyzed varieties and the time of postoperatory follow up make a comparative analysis difficult. Pulmonary dysfunction is evident in the postoperatory period of cardiac surgery. The use of noninvasive ventilation has been associated with good results in the first postoperatory days. Despite the known importance of postoperatory respiratory physiotherapy, until now, there is no literary consensus about the superiority of one technique over the others.

  3. Atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins: a rare and dismal anomaly identified on cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang-Hyub; Koo, Hyun Jung; Cho, Young Hoon; Lee, Eunsol [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Imaging findings of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia have not been described. To describe cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia. Three newborns with bilateral pulmonary vein atresia were encountered at our institution during a period of 8 years. We evaluated prenatal echocardiographic findings, clinical presentations, postnatal echocardiographic findings, chest radiographic findings, cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes. All newborns presented immediately after birth with severe cyanosis, respiratory distress and acidosis that were unresponsive to medical management. Prenatal and postnatal echocardiographic studies and chest radiography were misleading, inconclusive or nonspecific in making the diagnosis in these children; however cardiac CT clearly demonstrated atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins with multiple small mediastinal collateral veins and pulmonary edema. Surgical treatments were not feasible for this anomaly. Their clinical outcomes were universally dismal and all infants died within 3 days. Cardiac CT provides an accurate diagnosis of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia and leads to prompt treatment decision in these children. (orig.)

  4. Eculizumab in atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome with severe cardiac and neurological involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hushi; Nagra, Arvind; Haq, Mushfequr R; Gilbert, Rodney D

    2014-06-01

    Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disorder usually caused by dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Uncontrolled complement activation results in systemic complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and subsequent multi-organ damage. The two most common extrarenal complications comprise neurological and cardiovascular involvement. Eculizumab, a humanised anti-C5 monoclonal antibody, has recently been introduced as a therapy for this condition. A 19-month-old child suffering from aHUS with severe neurological involvement, dilated cardiomyopathy and renal impairment requiring dialysis received eculizumab as first-line treatment, initiated within 12 h of admission, resulting in significant improvements in her neurological state and normalisation of cardiac and renal function. These positive outcomes have been sustained with fortnightly eculizumab therapy (at the time of writing, on-going for 1 year). No further complications of TMA have occurred. Severe cardiac involvement in a child with aHUS is an important indication for prompt, first-line treatment with eculizumab, resulting in rapid normalisation of cardiac function.

  5. High-rise buildings and neurologically favorable outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Nishiyama, Chika; Hayashida, Sumito; Fujii, Tomoko; Izawa, Junichi; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Katayama, Yusuke; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Iwami, Taku

    2016-12-01

    The number of people living in high-rise buildings has recently been increasing in Japan, and delayed transport time by emergency-medical-service (EMS) personnel from higher floors could lead to lower survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, there are no clinical studies assessing the association between the floor where patients reside and neurologically favorable outcome after OHCA. This was a prospective, population-based study conducted in Osaka City, Japan that enrolled adults aged >=18years suffering an OHCA of cardiac origin before EMS arrival between 2013 and 2014. The primary outcome measure was one-month survival with neurologically favorable outcome. We divided OHCA patients into the following groups: those residing on >=3 floors (the high floor group) and <3 floors (the low floor group). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with neurologically favorable outcome. A total of 2979 patients were eligible for analysis. Of them, 1885 (62.3%) occurred below the third floor and 1094 (37.4%) occurred at or above the third floor. The proportion of neurologically favorable outcome after OHCA was significantly lower in the high floor group than in the low floor group (2.7% [30/1094] versus 4.8% [91/1885], P=0.005). In a multivariate analysis, neurologically favorable outcome after OHCA was significantly lower in the high floor group than in the low floor group (adjusted odds ratio, 0.59 [95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.96]). In this population, one-month survival with neurologically favorable outcome from OHCA was lower in the high floor group than in the low floor group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulmonary perfusion with oxygenated blood or custodiol HTK solution during cardiac surgery for postoperative pulmonary function in COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Wetterslev, Jørn; Secher, Niels H

    2013-01-01

    Five to thirty percent of patients undergoing cardiac surgery present with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and have a 2- to 10-fold higher 30-day mortality risk. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) creates a whole body systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) that could impair pulmonary...

  7. Electroencephalography (EEG) for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management; rationale and study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhall, Erik; Rosén, Ingmar; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Cronberg, Tobias

    2014-08-16

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is widely used to assess neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after cardiac arrest, but its value is limited by varying definitions of pathological patterns and by inter-rater variability. The American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) has recently proposed a standardized EEG-terminology for critical care to address these limitations. In the TTM-trial, 399 post cardiac arrest patients who remained comatose after rewarming underwent a routine EEG. The presence of clinical seizures, use of sedatives and antiepileptic drugs during the EEG-registration were prospectively documented. A well-defined terminology for interpreting post cardiac arrest EEGs is critical for the use of EEG as a prognostic tool. The TTM-trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01020916).

  8. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rosuvastatin improves myocardial and neurological outcomes after asphyxial cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yun; Wu, Yichen; Meng, Min; Luo, Man; Zhao, Hongmei; Sun, Hong; Gao, Sumin

    2017-03-01

    Rosuvastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is cholesterol-lowering drugs and reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. This study is to explore whether rosuvastatin improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 8min of cardiac arrest (CA) by asphyxia and randomly assigned to three experimental groups immediately following successful resuscitation: Sham; Control; and Rosuvastatin. The survival, hemodynamics, myocardial function, neurological outcomes and apoptosis were assessed. The 7-d survival rate was greater in the rosuvastatin treated group compared to the Control group (P=0.019 by log-rank test). Myocardial function, as measured by cardiac output and ejection fraction, was significantly impaired after CA and notably improved in the animals treated with rosuvastatin beginning at 60min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (Pcardiac troponin T and neuron-specific enolase and the caspase-3 activity were significantly decreased in the Rosuvastatin group when compared with the Control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, rosuvastatin treatment substantially improves the 7-d survival rate as well as myocardial function and neurological outcomes after ROSC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of Pulmonary Embolism During Cardiac Arrest-Ultrasonographic Findings Should Be Interpreted With Caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Rasmus; Caap, Philip; Hansson, Nicolaj C; Bøtker, Morten T; Granfeldt, Asger; Løfgren, Bo

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the right ventricle is more dilated during resuscitation from cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism, compared with hypoxia and primary arrhythmia. Twenty-four pigs were anesthetized and cardiac arrest was induced using three different methods. Pigs were resuscitated after 7 minutes of untreated cardiac arrest. Ultrasonographic images were obtained and the right ventricular diameter was measured. University hospital animal laboratory. Female crossbred Landrace/Yorkshire/Duroc pigs (27-32 kg). Pigs were randomly assigned to cardiac arrest induced by pulmonary embolism, hypoxia, or primary arrhythmia. There was no difference at baseline. During induction of cardiac arrest, the right ventricle dilated in all groups (p cardiac ultrasonography were able to detect a difference in right ventricle diameter of approximately 10 mm with a sensitivity of 79% (95% CI, 64-94) and a specificity of 68% (95% CI, 56-80). The right ventricle was more dilated during resuscitation when cardiac arrest was caused by pulmonary embolism compared with hypoxia and primary arrhythmia. However, the right ventricle was dilated, irrespective of the cause of arrest, and diagnostic accuracy by physicians with basic training in focused cardiac ultrasonography was modest. These findings challenge the paradigm that right ventricular dilatation on ultrasound during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is particularly associated with pulmonary embolism.

  11. Non-cardiac complications during pregnancy in women with isolated congenital pulmonary valvar stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, W.; Pieper, P. G.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Schmidt, A. C. M.; Mulder, B. J. M.; van Dijk, A. P. J.; Vliegen, H. W.; Sollie, K. M.; Voors, A. A.; Ebels, T.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Information on the outcome of pregnancy in patients with pulmonary valvar stenosis is scarce, mostly limited to cardiac complications observed during pregnancy. Objectives: To investigate the magnitude and determinants of non-cardiac and fetal risks during pregnancy of women with

  12. Cardiac metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma complicated by pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Sonaz; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Cardiac metastasis is known as a rare complication of head and neck malignancy. Patient concerns: We present a 58-year-old woman patient with a history of tongue carcinoma who was admitted in emergency department for sudden chest pain. Imaging work-up by computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) diagnosed a cardiac metastasis complicated by intraventricular thrombus and pulmonary embolism. Diagnosis: Cardiac metastasis from tongue carcinoma complicated by pulmonary embolism. Interventions: After undergoing 2 cycles of palliative chemotherapy, the patient declined any further treatment. Outcomes: Patient died 3 months after the diagnosis of cardiac metastasis. Lessons: Cardiac metastasis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with a history of head and neck malignancy who present non-specific cardiac symptoms. PMID:28700484

  13. Cardiac metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma complicated by pulmonary embolism: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Sonaz; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac metastasis is known as a rare complication of head and neck malignancy. We present a 58-year-old woman patient with a history of tongue carcinoma who was admitted in emergency department for sudden chest pain. Imaging work-up by computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) diagnosed a cardiac metastasis complicated by intraventricular thrombus and pulmonary embolism. Cardiac metastasis from tongue carcinoma complicated by pulmonary embolism. After undergoing 2 cycles of palliative chemotherapy, the patient declined any further treatment. Patient died 3 months after the diagnosis of cardiac metastasis. Cardiac metastasis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with a history of head and neck malignancy who present non-specific cardiac symptoms.

  14. Is pulmonary gas exchange during exercise in hypoxia impaired with the increase of cardiac output?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J.A.; Robach, P.; Lundby, C.

    2008-01-01

    that the main mechanism limiting pulmonary gas exchange is diffusion limitation. It is presumed that an elevation of cardiac output during exercise in acute hypoxia should increase the (A-a)DO(2). However, no studies have examined how variations in cardiac output independently affect pulmonary diffusion......-a)DO(2) is accentuated. Using the multiple inert gas elimination technique it has been shown that during exercise in acute hypoxia the contribution of ventilation-perfusion inequality to (A-a)DO(2) is rather small and in the absence of pulmonary edema intrapulmonary shunts can be ruled out. This implies...

  15. Primary cardiac leiomyosarcoma originating from the pulmonary valve. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, S; Walker, T; Greschniok, A; Herdeg, C; Karsch, K R; Ziemer, G

    2001-02-01

    Primary cardiac tumours are rare findings (incidence 0.02% according to a recent meta-analysis) with dismal prognosis. Approximately 25% are malignant, mostly represented by sarcomas. Among these, leiomyosarcomas are exceptional. Treatment for primary cardiac leiomyosarcomas consists of radical surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. The mean survival after surgery and adjuvant therapies is 6.8 months. We present a rare case of a 40- year-old male patient with a primary cardiac leiomysarcoma originating from the pulmonary valve. This patient died after surgery and implantation of a homograft of the pulmonary trunk. Furthermore, the literature has been reviewed.

  16. Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Secondary to Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ryan W; Stinson, Hannah R; Wolfe, Heather; Lindell, Robert B; Topjian, Alexis A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Sutton, Robert M; Berg, Robert A; Kilbaugh, Todd J

    2017-12-19

    Pulmonary embolism is a rarely reported and potentially treatable cause of cardiac arrest in children and adolescents. The objective of this case series is to describe the course of five adolescent patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest secondary to pulmonary embolism. Case series. Single, large academic children's hospital. All patients under the age of 18 years (n = 5) who experienced an in-hospital cardiac arrest due to apparent pulmonary embolism from August 1, 2013, to July 31, 2017. All five patients received systemic thrombolytic therapy (IV tissue plasminogen activator) during cardiac arrest or periarrest during ongoing resuscitation efforts. Five adolescent patients, 15-17 years old, were treated for pulmonary embolism-related cardiac arrests during the study period. These accounted for 6.3% of all children and 25% of adolescents (12-17 yr old) receiving at least 5 minutes of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation during the study period. All five had venous thromboembolism risk factors. Two patients had known, extensive venous thrombi at the time of cardiac arrest, and one was undergoing angiography at the time of arrest. The diagnoses of pulmonary embolism were based on clinical suspicion, bedside echocardiography (n = 4), and low end-tidal CO2 levels relative to arterial CO2 values (n = 5). IV tissue plasminogen activator was administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in three patients and after the return of spontaneous circulation, in the setting of severe hemodynamic instability, in the other two patients. Four of five patients were successfully resuscitated and survived to hospital discharge. Pulmonary embolism was recognized as the etiology of multiple adolescent cardiac arrests in this single-center series and may be more common than previously reported. Recognition, high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and treatment with thrombolytic therapy resulted in survival in four of five patients.

  17. Pulmonary infection in patients with cyclosporine, azathioprine, and corticosteroids after cardiac transplantation; Clinical and radiographic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Ikezoe, Junpei; Godwin, J.D.; Marglin, S.I.; Allen, M.D. (University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1991-07-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1989, 54 patients have undergone 55 cardiac transplants, 5 of whom died during operation or one week after transplantation. The remaining 49 patients with a minimum follow-up of 5 months were studied to examine pulmonary infection clinically and radiologically while receiving triple drug immunosuppression consisting of cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone. Pulmonary infection occurred in 14 patients (29%) with a total of 21 occasions. Causative organisms were identified in 9 occasions, with the most common organism being Cytomegalovirus (CMV). One patient died of pulmonary infection with Aspergillus. Causative organisms occurring in the remaining 12 occasions of pulmonary infection were unknown, which did not lead to death. Because pulmonary infection of unknown organisms rapidly responded to convensional antibiotics, it seemed to have been caused by bacteria. Pulmonary infection of unknown organism occurred 13.2{+-}3.2 months after transplantation, as compared with 3.3{+-}1.0 months in pulmonary infection of known organisms. Chest plain radiographic features fell into four types: (1) interstitial shadow seen in pulmonary infection of CMV, Pneumocystis carinii, or Hemophilia influenza, (2) patchy, and basilar and lobular consolidation shadows in bacterial pneumonia, (3) localized nodular shadow in aspergillosis, and (4) multiple patchy and confluent opacity patterns occurring in herpes simplex viral infection. Pulmonary infection of influenza bacteria for one patient and pulmonary infection of unknown organisms for 4 patients were difficult to identify from pulmonary infection of CMV. (N.K.).

  18. Cardiac Body Surface Potentials in Rats with Experimental Pulmonary Hypertension during Ventricular Depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslonova, O V; Smirnova, S L; Roshchevskaya, I M

    2016-11-01

    The spatial and the amplitude-temporal parameters of cardiac body surface potentials were examined in female Wistar rats with experimental pulmonary hypertension during ventricular depolarization. The cardiac body surface potentials have been led from 64 subcutaneous electrodes evenly distributed across the chest surface prior to and 4 weeks after subcutaneous injection of a single dose of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Right ventricular hypertrophy and electrophysiological remodeling of the heart developed in rats with experimental pulmonary hypertension in 4 weeks after monocrotaline injection; these changes led to a significant increase in amplitude and temporal characteristics of the cardioelectric field on the body surface in comparison with the initial state.

  19. [A statement the Polish Cardiac Society Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation on screening for CTEPH patients after acute pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurzyński, Michał; Kurzyna, Marcin; Kopeć, Grzegorz; Błaszczak, Piotr; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Kamiński, Karol; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Mularek-Kubzdela, Tatiana; Mroczek, Ewa; Biederman, Andrzej; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Torbicki, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Both pharmacological and invasive treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is now available in Poland and the awareness of the disease among physicians is growing. Thus, the Polish Cardiac Society's Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation in cooperation with independent experts in this field, have launched the statement on algorithm to guide a CTEPH diagnosis in patients with previous acute pulmonary embolism (APE). In Poland, every year this disease affects about 250 patients. CTEPH should be suspected in individuals after APE with dyspnea, despite at least 3 months period of effective anticoagulation, particularly when specified risk factors are present. Echocardiography is a main screening tool. The authors suggest that a diagnostic process of patients with significant clinical suspicion of CTEPH and right ventricle overload in echocardiography should be performed in reference centres. The document contains a list of Polish centres diagnosing patients with suspected CTEPH. Pulmonary scintigraphy is a safe and highly sensitive screening test for CTEPH. Multi-detector computed tomography with precise detection of thromboembolic residues in pulmonary circulation is important for planning of pulmonary endarterectomy. Right heart catheterisation definitely confirms the presence of pulmonary hypertension and direct pulmonary angiography allows for identification of lesions suitable for thromboendarterectomy or pulmonary balloon angioplasty. In this document a diagnostic algorithm in patients with suspected CTEPH is also proposed. With individualised sequential diagnostic strategy each patient can be finally qualified for a particular mode of therapy by dedicated CTEPH Heart Team. Moreover the document contains short information for the primary care physician about the management of patients after APE.

  20. Current role of cardiac and extra-cardiac pathologies in clinically indicated cardiac computed tomography with emphasis on status before pulmonary vein isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohns, J.M.; Lotz, J. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Menke, J.; Staab, W.; Fasshauer, M.; Kowallick, J.T.; Zwaka, P.A.; Schwarz, A. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Spiro, J. [Koeln University Hospital (Germany). Radiology; Bergau, L.; Unterberg-Buchwald, C. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Cardiology and Pneumology

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of cardiac and significant extra-cardiac findings in clinical computed tomography of the heart in patients with atrial fibrillation before pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Materials and Methods: 224 patients (64 ± 10 years; male 63%) with atrial fibrillation were examined by cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT before PVI. Extra-cardiac findings were classified as 'significant' if they were recommended to additional diagnostics or therapy, and otherwise as 'non-significant'. Additionally, cardiac findings were documented in detail. Results: A total of 724 cardiac findings were identified in 203 patients (91% of patients). Additionally, a total of 619 extra-cardiac findings were identified in 179 patients (80% of patients). Among these extra-cardiac findings 196 (32%) were 'significant', and 423 (68%) were 'non-significant'. In 2 patients (1%) a previously unknown malignancy was detected (esophageal cancer and lung cancer, local stage, no metastasis). 203 additional imaging diagnostics followed to clarify the 'significant' findings (124 additional CT, costs 38,314.69 US dollars). Overall, there were 3.2 cardiac and 2.8 extra-cardiac findings per patient. Extra-cardiac findings appear significantly more frequently in patients over 60 years old, in smokers and in patients with a history of cardiac findings (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Cardiac CT scans before PVI should be screened for extracardiac incidental findings that could have important clinical implications for each patient. (orig.)

  1. Survival and neurological status after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the pediatric population in Andalusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell-Ortiz, F; Mellado-Vergel, F J; López-Messa, J B; Fernández-Valle, P; Ruiz-Montero, M M; González-Lobato, I; Martínez-Lara, M; Vergara-Pérez, S; Vivar-Díaz, I; García-Alcántara, Á; García del Águila, J

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the evolution and long-term neurological status of pediatric patients who survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our aim is to describe long-term survival and neurological status. Retrospective observational study, based on the Andalusian Register of out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest. Pre-hospital Care. The study included patients aged 0-15 years between January 2008 and December 2012. Patients follow up. Prehospital and hospital care variables were analyzed and one-year follow-up was performed, along with a specific follow-up of survivors in June 2014. Of 5069 patients included in the register, 125 (2.5%) were aged ≤15 years. Cardiac arrest was witnessed in 52.8% of cases and resuscitation was performed in 65.6%. The initial rhythm was shockable in 7 (5.2%) cases. Nearly half (48.8%) the patients reached the hospital alive, of whom 20% did so while receiving resuscitation maneuvers. Only 9 (7.2%) patients survived to hospital discharge; 5 showed ad integrum recovery and 4 showed significant neurological impairment. The 5 patients with complete recovery continued their long-term situation. The remaining 4 patients, although slight improvement, were maintained in situation of neurological disability. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatric patients was low. The long-term prognosis of survivors with good neurological recovery remains, although improvement in the rest was minimal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  2. [Anomalous pulmonary venous return in a pregnant woman identified by cardiac magnetic resonance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Fernanda Maria; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Barreto, Ana Terra Fonseca; Souto, Maria Júlia Silveira; Russo, Maria Amélia; de Mendonça, José Teles; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes; Gonçalves, Luiz Flávio Galvão

    2014-06-01

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return (APVR) is a rare cardiac anomaly defined as one or more pulmonary veins draining into a structure other than the left atrium, with venous return directly or indirectly to the right atrium. The most common form is partial APVR, in which one to three pulmonary veins drain into systemic veins or into the right atrium. We report the case of a woman diagnosed with partial APVR by magnetic resonance imaging during pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. [The possible clinical role of the cardiac pulmonary power in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension. Initial observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Eulo Lupi; Zárate, Julio Sandoval; Valenzuela, Eduardo Chuquiure; Carrillo, Arturo

    2006-01-01

    The heart is a muscular mechanical pump with an ability to generate both flow [cardiac output] and pressure in the systemic circulation as well in the pulmonary vascular bed. The product of flow output and systemic arterial pressure is the rate of useful work done, or cardiac power output [CP], therefore for the right ventricle and the pulmonary arterial vascular bed it will be: the product of flow output and mean pulmonary arterial pressure will be the rate of useful work done, or cardiac pulmonary power output [CPP]. Cardiac pulmonary pumping reserve capability can be defined as the maximal cardiac pulmonary power output [CPP] achieved by the right heart during maximal stimulation. Therefore, CPP reserve is the increase in power output as the cardiac performance is increased from the resting to the maximally stimulated state. Recently, several studies have shown that CP is a direct indicator of overall cardiac function, as well is an indicator of exercise capacity and a powerful predictor of prognosis for patients with severe heart failure and ischemic cardiogenic shock. On this basis: 1. we decided to investigate the possible previously mentioned roles of the CP and CPP in patients with different degrees of pulmonary arterial hypertension [n = 137], but mainly in those with primary pulmonary arterial hypertension [PPH]. PPH patients [n = 50], as well as those with Eisenmenger's syndrome [n = 10] were found to have most abnormal resting CPP Indexes [I], [0.431 +/- 0.171, 0.607 +/- 0.124 watts/m2, respectively]. During exercise in PPH patients [n = 14], both CPI and CPPI reserves although they increase, were also found to be significantly diminished [CPI: from 0.546 +/- 170 to 1,116 +/- 0.275 watts/m2, p CPPI: from 0.373 +/- 0.156 to 0.837 +/- 0.226 watts/m2, p CPPI between PPH responders and no responders patients to hydralazine [0.273 +/- 0.04, 0.507 +/- 0.142 watts/m2, respectively, p CPPI "reserve" was significantly diminished in those patients considered as

  4. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis.

  5. Pulmonary emboli cardiac arrest with CPR complication: Liver laceration and massive abdominal bleed, a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lundqvist

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Pulmonary emboli with subsequent right ventricular failure may cause backwards stasis, and parenchymal organ e.g. liver enlargement. The risk for laceration injuries and internal bleed must be acknowledged when applying external forces as in case of cardiac arrest and need for resuscitation. Frequent and vigilant control of positioning of manual as well as mechanical compressions is of importance.

  6. PRO-COAGULANT CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION IN RESPONSE TO PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRO-COAGULANT CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION IN RESPONSE TO PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSUREPS Gilmour, MC Schladweiler, AD Ledbetter, and UP Kodavanti, CEMALB, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC, and US-EPA, DURHAM, NC. Zinc is one of the major transition metal components of ambient and combustio...

  7. Predictors of cardio pulmonary resuscitation outcome in postoperative cardiac children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bana Agha Nasser

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Higher heart rate, lower core body temperature, lower O2 saturation, and higher lactic acid measured 6 hours before arrest are possible predictors of poorer outcome and mortality following CPR in postoperative cardiac children.

  8. The Cumulative Partial Pressure of Arterial Oxygen Is Associated With Neurological Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest Treated With Targeted Temperature Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Chun Song; Park, Kyu Nam; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Byung Kook; Oh, Sang Hoon; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Seung Pill

    2017-12-19

    Hyperoxia could lead to a worse outcome after cardiac arrest. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the cumulative partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest treated with targeted temperature management. Retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort. An academic tertiary care hospital. A total of 187 consecutive patients treated with targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest. None. The area under the curve of PaO2 for different cutoff values of hyperoxia (≥ 100, ≥ 150, ≥ 200, ≥ 250, and ≥ 300 mm Hg) with different time intervals (0-24, 0-6, and 6-24 hr after return of spontaneous circulation) was calculated for each patient using the trapezoidal method. The primary outcome was the neurologic outcome, as defined by the cerebral performance category, at 6 months after cardiac arrest. Of 187 subjects, 77 (41%) had a good neurologic outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest. The median age was 54 (43-69) years, and 128 (68%) were male. The area under the curve of PaO2 with cutoff values of greater than or equal to 200, greater than or equal to 250, and greater than or equal to 300 was higher in the poor outcome group at 0-6 and 0-24 hours. The adjusted odds ratios of area under the curve of PaO2 greater than or equal to 200 mm Hg were 1.659 (95% CI, 1.194-2.305) for 0-24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation and 1.548 (95% CI, 1.086-2.208) for 0-6 hours after return of spontaneous circulation. With a higher cumulative exposure to oxygen tension, we found significant increasing trends in the adjusted odds ratio for poor neurologic outcomes. In a new method for PaO2 analysis, cumulative exposure to hyperoxia was associated with neurologic outcomes in a dose-dependent manner. Greater attention to oxygen supply during the first 6 hours appears to be important for outcome after cardiac arrest.

  9. Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma Coexisting With Pulmonary Cavernous Hemangiomas and Giant Hepatic Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunping; Chen, Hao; Sun, Lin; Mei, Yunqing

    2017-02-01

    We describe a case of cardiac cavernous hemangioma with coexisting pulmonary cavernous hemangiomas and hepatic hemangioma. A 35-year-old woman who had previously received a living donor liver transplant to cure giant hepatic hemangioma was seen because of chest pain. A cardiac neoplasm and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected. The tumor was surgically removed, and biopsy specimens were taken from the lung nodules. Histopathologic examination confirmed that both lesions were cavernous hemangiomas. The patient was discharged without adverse events postoperatively. Cardiac hemangioma is an extremely rare entity; the present case is unique for its multiorgan involvement. Suspicion of this entity should be aroused if the imaging manifestation suggests a vascular nature. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Søreide, Eldar; de Haas, Inge

    2017-01-01

    hours results in better neurologic outcomes compared with currently recommended, standard, 24-hour TTM. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was an international, investigator-initiated, blinded-outcome-assessor, parallel, pragmatic, multicenter, randomized clinical superiority trial in 10 intensive...... (33 ± 1°C) for 48 hours (n = 176) or 24 hours (n = 179), followed by gradual rewarming of 0.5°C per hour until reaching 37°C. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was 6-month neurologic outcome, with a Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) score of 1 or 2 used to define favorable outcome......: In unconscious survivors from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest admitted to the ICU, targeted temperature management at 33°C for 48 hours did not significantly improve 6-month neurologic outcome compared with targeted temperature management at 33°C for 24 hours. However, the study may have had limited power...

  11. A cardiac hydatid cyst underlying pulmonary embolism: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydatid cysts located in the interatrial septum are especially rare but when they occur, they might cause intracavity rupture. We report on a patient with acute pulmonary embolism caused by an isolated, ruptured hydatid cyst on the right side of the interatrial septum. A 16-year-old-boy with an uneventful history was ...

  12. Pulmonary Protection Strategies in Cardiac Surgery: Are We Making Any Progress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Al Jaaly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary dysfunction is a common complication of cardiac surgery. The mechanisms involved in the development of pulmonary dysfunction are multifactorial and can be related to the activation of inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways. Clinical manifestation varies from mild atelectasis to severe respiratory failure. Managing pulmonary dysfunction postcardiac surgery is a multistep process that starts before surgery and continues during both the operative and postoperative phases. Different pulmonary protection strategies have evolved over the years; however, the wide acceptance and clinical application of such techniques remain hindered by the poor level of evidence or the sample size of the studies. A better understanding of available modalities and/or combinations can result in the development of customised strategies for the different cohorts of patients with the potential to hence maximise patients and institutes benefits.

  13. Cardiac MRI in pulmonary artery hypertension: correlations between morphological and functional parameters and invasive measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alunni, Jean-Philippe; Otal, Philippe; Rousseau, Herve; Chabbert, Valerie [CHU Rangueil, Department of Radiology, Toulouse (France); Degano, Bruno; Tetu, Laurent; Didier, Alain [CHU Larrey, Department of Pneumology, Toulouse (France); Arnaud, Catherine [CHU Rangueil, Department of Methods in Clinical Research, Toulouse (France); Blot-Souletie, Nathalie [CHU Rangueil, Department of Cardiology, Toulouse (France)

    2010-05-15

    To compare cardiac MRI with right heart catheterisation in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and to evaluate its ability to assess PH severity. Forty patients were included. MRI included cine and phase-contrast sequences, study of ventricular function, cardiac cavity areas and ratios, position of the interventricular septum (IVS) in systole and diastole, and flow measurements. We defined four groups according to the severity of PH and three groups according to IVS position: A, normal position; B, abnormal in diastole; C, abnormal in diastole and systole. IVS position was correlated with pulmonary artery pressures and PVR (pulmonary vascular resistance). Median pulmonary artery pressures and resistance were significantly higher in patients with an abnormal septal position compared with those with a normal position. Correlations were good between the right ventricular ejection fraction and PVR, right ventricular end-systolic volume and PAP, percentage of right ventricular area change and PVR, and diastolic and systolic ventricular area ratio and PVR. These parameters were significantly associated with PH severity. Cardiac MRI can help to assess the severity of PH. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of Cardiac and Non-Cardiac Biomarkers for Risk Stratification in Elderly Patients with Non-Massive Pulmonary Embolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Vuilleumier

    Full Text Available Biomarkers unrelated to myocardial necrosis, such as cystatin C, copeptin, and mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM, showed promise for cardiovascular risk prediction. Knowing whether they are comparable to cardiac biomarkers such as high-sensitive cardiac-troponin T (hs-cTnT or N-terminal pro-Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP in elderly patients with acute non-massive pulmonary embolism (NMPE remains elusive. This study aims at comparing the prognostic accuracy of cardiac and non-cardiac biomarkers in patients with NMPE aged ≥65 years over time. In the context of the SWITCO65+ cohort, we evaluated 227 elderly patients with an available blood sample taken within one day from diagnosis. The primary study endpoint was defined as PE-related mortality and the secondary endpoint as PE-related complications. The biomarkers' predictive ability at 1, 3, 12 and 24 months was determined using C-statistics and Cox regression. For both study endpoints, C-statistics (95% confidence interval were stable over time for all biomarkers, with the highest value for hs-cTnT, ranging between 0.84 (0.68-1.00 and 0.80 (0.70-0.90 for the primary endpoint, and between 0.74 (0.63-0.86 and 0.65 (0.57-0.73 for the secondary endpoint. For both study endpoints, cardiac biomarkers were found to be independently associated with risk, NT-proBNP displaying a negative predictive value of 100%. Among non-cardiac biomarkers, only copeptin and MR-proADM were independent predictors of PE-related mortality but they were not independent predictors of PE-related complications, and displayed lower negative predictive values. In elderly NMPE patients, cardiac biomarkers appear to be valuable prognostic to identify very low-risk individuals.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00973596.

  15. Predictors of good neurologic outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 min in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Byung Kook; Youn, Chun Song; Kim, Youn-Jung; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong-Woo; Kim, Won Young

    2017-04-07

    Neurologically intact survival after cardiac arrest is possible even after prolonged resuscitation efforts. However, the factors associated with good neurologic outcome in these patients remain unknown. This study identifies predictors associated with good neurologic outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 min in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated with targeted temperature management (TTM). This multicenter, registry-based, retrospective cohort study conducted in 24 hospitals across South Korea between 2007 and 2012 includes adult (≥18 years) non-traumatic OHCA patients with prolonged (>30 min) downtime who underwent TTM treatment. Good neurologic outcomes were defined as cerebral performance category scores of ≤2. Of the 930 comatose adult cardiac arrest patients treated with TTM, 423 patients with prolonged downtime were included. A total of 76 (18.0%) had good neurologic outcome. Multivariable analysis reveal that age good neurologic outcome. The sensitivity and specificity for good neurologic outcome in patients with age <65 years, shockable rhythm, and witnessed arrest are 90.8% and 41.2, 67.6 and 79.5%, and 81.6 and 41.2%, respectively. In prolonged cardiac arrest patients, initial shockable rhythm, age <65 years, or witnessed arrest are predictors for neurologic intact survival.

  16. Pulmonary physiotherapy effect on patients undergoing open cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kazem Shakuri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and Objectives — Respiratory complications after open heart surgeries are common problems which can lead to death if not properly managed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of pulmonary rehabilitation before and after surgery for reducing the risk of pulmonary complications after surgery also correlations of the six-minute walk test and respiratory following open heart surgery. Material and Methods — In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients undergoing heart surgery were divided into two groups randomly (groups A and B. In group A it was performed physiotherapy before and after chest physiotherapy surgery, but on patients in group B were done only chest physiotherapy after surgery. Effects of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation were compared between two groups, using spirometry and six-minute walk test. Results — Thirty nine of males (65% and 21 females (35% with a mean age of 8.10±9.56 was been analyzed. The mean difference in predicted forced vital capacity (CI95%: 1.3 to 8.7 and predicted peak flow indices (CI95%: 1.9 to 9.4 of spirometery indicator was significant, also evaluation of six-minute walk test showed, mean difference in walking distant (CI95%: 8.8 to 21.0 and mean oxyhemoglobin saturation (CI95%: 0.59 to 1.67 in group A was more than group B. Inverse correlation of heart rate with forced vital capacity showed that patients with more restriction had more heart rate during the walking test. Conclusion — Pulmonary rehabilitation program before surgery is recommended to reduce complications of heart surgery. Further evaluations are necessary in relation to the sensitivity and specificity of six-minute walk test parameters alone in the evaluation of respiratory performance.

  17. Fractal Dimension in Quantifying Experimental-Pulmonary-Hypertension-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Lopes Pacagnelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Right-sided heart failure has high morbidity and mortality, and may be caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Fractal dimension is a differentiated and innovative method used in histological evaluations that allows the characterization of irregular and complex structures and the quantification of structural tissue changes. Objective: To assess the use of fractal dimension in cardiomyocytes of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, in addition to providing histological and functional analysis. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: control (C; n = 8 and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (M; n = 8. Five weeks after pulmonary arterial hypertension induction with monocrotaline, echocardiography was performed and the animals were euthanized. The heart was dissected, the ventricles weighed to assess anatomical parameters, and histological slides were prepared and stained with hematoxylin/eosin for fractal dimension analysis, performed using box-counting method. Data normality was tested (Shapiro-Wilk test, and the groups were compared with non-paired Student t test or Mann Whitney test (p < 0.05. Results: Higher fractal dimension values were observed in group M as compared to group C (1.39 ± 0.05 vs. 1.37 ± 0.04; p < 0.05. Echocardiography showed lower pulmonary artery flow velocity, pulmonary acceleration time and ejection time values in group M, suggesting function worsening in those animals. Conclusion: The changes observed confirm pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-induced cardiac dysfunction, and point to fractal dimension as an effective method to evaluate cardiac morphological changes induced by ventricular dysfunction.

  18. CMR fluoroscopy right heart catheterization for cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance: results in 102 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Khan, Jaffar M; Stine, Annette; Schenke, William H; Grant, Laurie P; Mazal, Jonathan R; Grant, Elena K; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne; Hansen, Michael S; Ramasawmy, Rajiv; Herzka, Daniel A; Xue, Hui; Kellman, Peter; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Lederman, Robert J

    2017-07-27

    Quantification of cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) are critical components of invasive hemodynamic assessment, and can be measured concurrently with pressures using phase contrast CMR flow during real-time CMR guided cardiac catheterization. One hundred two consecutive patients underwent CMR fluoroscopy guided right heart catheterization (RHC) with simultaneous measurement of pressure, cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance using CMR flow and the Fick principle for comparison. Procedural success, catheterization time and adverse events were prospectively collected. RHC was successfully completed in 97/102 (95.1%) patients without complication. Catheterization time was 20 ± 11 min. In patients with and without pulmonary hypertension, baseline mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 ± 12 mmHg vs. 18 ± 4 mmHg (p < 0.001), right ventricular (RV) end diastolic volume was 104 ± 64 vs. 74 ± 24 (p = 0.02), and RV end-systolic volume was 49 ± 30 vs. 31 ± 13 (p = 0.004) respectively. 103 paired cardiac output and 99 paired PVR calculations across multiple conditions were analyzed. At baseline, the bias between cardiac output by CMR and Fick was 5.9% with limits of agreement -38.3% and 50.2% with r = 0.81 (p < 0.001). The bias between PVR by CMR and Fick was -0.02 WU.m 2 with limits of agreement -2.6 and 2.5 WU.m 2 with r = 0.98 (p < 0.001). Correlation coefficients were lower and limits of agreement wider during physiological provocation with inhaled 100% oxygen and 40 ppm nitric oxide. CMR fluoroscopy guided cardiac catheterization is safe, with acceptable procedure times and high procedural success rate. Cardiac output and PVR measurements using CMR flow correlated well with the Fick at baseline and are likely more accurate during physiological provocation with supplemental high-concentration inhaled oxygen. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01287026 , registered January 25, 2011.

  19. Fractal Dimension in Quantifying Experimental-Pulmonary-Hypertension-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Sabela, Ana Karênina Dias de Almeida; Mariano, Thaoan Bruno; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Castoldi, Robson Chacon; Carmo, Edna Maria do; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel; Okoshi, Katashi; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-07-01

    Right-sided heart failure has high morbidity and mortality, and may be caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Fractal dimension is a differentiated and innovative method used in histological evaluations that allows the characterization of irregular and complex structures and the quantification of structural tissue changes. To assess the use of fractal dimension in cardiomyocytes of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, in addition to providing histological and functional analysis. Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: control (C; n = 8) and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (M; n = 8). Five weeks after pulmonary arterial hypertension induction with monocrotaline, echocardiography was performed and the animals were euthanized. The heart was dissected, the ventricles weighed to assess anatomical parameters, and histological slides were prepared and stained with hematoxylin/eosin for fractal dimension analysis, performed using box-counting method. Data normality was tested (Shapiro-Wilk test), and the groups were compared with non-paired Student t test or Mann Whitney test (p cardiac dysfunction, and point to fractal dimension as an effective method to evaluate cardiac morphological changes induced by ventricular dysfunction.

  20. Primary cardiac fibrosarcoma with pulmonary metastasis in a Labrador Retriever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speltz, M C; Manivel, J C; Tobias, A H; Hayden, D W

    2007-05-01

    A 6-year-old, neutered male Labrador Retriever was diagnosed with congestive heart failure, and an echocardiogram revealed a large mass inside the pericardial sac associated with the left ventricle. At necropsy, the dog had marked ascites, mild hydrothorax, marked hydropericardium, and an 11.0 x 7.0 x 6.0 cm, tan and red, firm, well-demarcated mass attached to the left ventricular free wall. The mass was diagnosed as a fibrosarcoma based on the morphologic appearance and supportive immunohistochemical staining. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a primary fibrosarcoma involving the left ventricular free wall myocardium, epicardium, and pericardium with a pulmonary metastasis in a dog.

  1. Correlation between Pulmonary Vascular Resistance and Some Cardiac Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Assadpour Piranfar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Pulmonary Vascular Resistance (PVR index is an important hemodynamic variable in making determinations regarding cardiopulmonary diseases and can be measured echocardiographically. The objective of this report is to examine the relationship between echocardiographic parameters of ventricular function using PVR measurements. Materials and Methods: This study included 40 patients. PVR and left ventricular function indexes (left ventricle diastolic function and Systolic Pulmonary Arterial Pressure (SPAP were measured echocardiographically and analyzed using a linear regression test. The relationship between the right ventricular Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion (TAPSE index and the mean PVR index was assessed with the Mann–Whitney test using SPSS Ver. 15. Results: A comparison between PVR and TAPSE showed that the mean PVR was significantly reduced when TAPSE increased, with a cut-off point of 1.8 (P= 0.026. Examination of the relationship between SPAP and PVR made it clear that increased SPAP (mean PAP>25 mmHg caused PVR to significantly increase (P<0.0001. Analysis of the relationship between LVEF and PVR showed that PVR decreased significantly in parallel with an increasing ejection fraction (P= 0.004. Determination of the mean PVR in the LV Diastolic dysfunction group showed that the mean difference between the PVR indexes of the LV diastolic dysfunction group and the restrictive pattern group was significantly higher than the mean difference between the PVR indexes of the LV diastolic dysfunction group and the normal group(P<0.0001. Conclusion: Considering the significance of PVR measurement in treating cardiovascular diseases, we recommend echocardiography as a simple, accessible and noninvasive method for determining this metric. In this study, we demonstrated that the strongest relationship between echocardiographically determined measurements exists for the correlation between PVR and diastolic dysfunction and

  2. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  3. Pulmonary Dead Space Fraction and Extubation Success in Children After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devor, Renee L; Kang, Paul; Wellnitz, Chasity; Nigro, John J; Velez, Daniel A; Willis, Brigham C

    2018-01-16

    1) Determine the correlation between pulmonary dead space fraction and extubation success in postoperative pediatric cardiac patients; and 2) document the natural history of pulmonary dead space fractions, dynamic compliance, and airway resistance during the first 72 hours postoperatively in postoperative pediatric cardiac patients. A retrospective chart review. Cardiac ICU in a quaternary care free-standing children's hospital. Twenty-nine with balanced single ventricle physiology, 61 with two ventricle physiology. None. We collected data for all pediatric patients undergoing congenital cardiac surgery over a 14-month period during the first 72 hours postoperatively as well as prior to extubation. Overall, patients with successful extubations had lower preextubation dead space fractions and shorter lengths of stay. Single ventricle patients had higher initial postoperative and preextubation dead space fractions. Two-ventricle physiology patients had higher extubation failure rates if the preextubation dead space fraction was greater than 0.5, whereas single ventricle patients had similar extubation failure rates whether preextubation dead space fractions were less than or equal to 0.5 or greater than 0.5. Additionally, increasing initial dead space fraction values predicted prolonged mechanical ventilation times. Airway resistance and dynamic compliance were similar between those with successful extubations and those who failed. Initial postoperative dead space fraction correlates with the length of mechanical ventilation in two ventricle patients but not in single ventricle patients. Lower preextubation dead space fractions are a strong predictor of successful extubation in two ventricle patients after cardiac surgery, but may not be as useful in single ventricle patients.

  4. Design, Construction and Evaluation of Cardiac Massage Facilitator Device on Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation: an Innovation Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Gazerani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Cardiac massage is the first and most important step during Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR. Effective massage restores blood flow to the brain and heart and plays a remarkable role in a successful CPR. Exhaustion of treatment team during resuscitation is one of the factors which may lead to reduced quality of resuscitation massages or failure in some cases. The aim of this study was to design, construct and evaluate a new cardiac massage facilitator to improve the quality of CPR in adult patients. Methods: In this study, the massage facilitator was designed and registered as a glove which was worn by rescuers during cardiac massage (number of invention: 80797. A load cell sensor was placed under the surface of the glove and the facilitator could be displayed number and depth of massage in centimeters. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the designed system, an experimental study was conducted among 30 emergency students. All statistical analyses were performed by SPSS 19 software using Pearson correlation and independent sample t-test. P-values lower than  0.05 were considered to be significant. Results: The mean age of all participants was 23.41±2.02 years, the mean height was 175±4.43 centimeters and the mean weight was 65.45±5.02 kilograms. The instrument validity was evaluated using standard validation method of concurrent validity. Our findings revealed a significant correlation between the cardiac massage facilitator and Sim Pad system (more than 0.9. Accordingly, the validity of cardiac massage facilitator was confirmed. While assessing the efficient massage criteria during cardiac massage facilitator utilization, the massage possessed suitable depth (less than 5 cm in 98% of participants. The numbers of massages were at least 100 massages per minute in 93% of participants. Conclusion: The results showed that designed system could be used as an effective tool to improve quality of cardiac massage in

  5. Preoperative physiotherapy in prevention of pulmonary complications in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felcar, Josiane Marques; Guitti, José Carlos dos Santos; Marson, Antônio César; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence and risk of pulmonary complications in children who underwent pre-and postoperative physiotherapeutic intervention in cardiac surgeries, as well as to compare these patients to those who underwent only postoperative physiotherapeutic intervention. A randomized controlled trial was performed with 135 patients from 6 years of age and younger with congenital heart disease who had undergone cardiac surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (G1) in which they underwent pre- and postoperative physiotherapy or to the control group (G2) in which they underwent only postoperative physiotherapy. Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square tests were used to compare the variables between the groups. The magnitude of the absolute risk was calculated by the number of patients needed to treat. Statistical significance was set at 5% (Ppneumonia was the most frequent complication, and among the 17 patients in G1, seven (10.3%) developed pneumonia, six (8.8%) developed atelectasis, and four (5.9%) presented complications due to both complications. In G2, 13 patients (19.4%) developed pneumonia, eight (11.9%) developed atelectasis, and eight (11.9%) developed pneumonia associated with atelectasis. Absolute risk reduction for the primary outcome was of 18.3% and the number of needed to treat was 5.5. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy significantly reduced the risk of pulmonary complications in postoperative pediatric cardiac surgery.

  6. The impact of therapeutic hypothermia on neurological function and quality of life after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Horsted, Tina I

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the impact of therapeutic hypothermia on cognitive function and quality of life in comatose survivors of out of Hospital Cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: We prospectively studied comatose survivors of OHCA consecutively admitted in a 4-year period. Therapeutic hypothermia...

  7. Improved Early Postresuscitation EEG Activity for Animals Treated with Hypothermia Predicted 96 hr Neurological Outcome and Survival in a Rat Model of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bihua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of hypothermia on 96 hr neurological outcome and survival by quantitatively characterizing early postresuscitation EEG in a rat model of cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods. In twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats, cardiac arrest was induced through high frequency transesophageal cardiac pacing. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 5 mins untreated arrest. Immediately after resuscitation, animals were randomized to either 2 hrs of hypothermia (N=10 or normothermia (N=10. EEG, ECG, aortic pressure, and core temperature were continuously recorded for 6 hrs. Neurological outcome was evaluated daily during the 96 hrs postresuscitation period. Results. No differences in the baseline measurements and resuscitation outcome were observed between groups. However, 96 hr neurological deficit score (204 ± 255 versus 500 ± 0, P=0.005 and survival (6/10 versus 0/10, P=0.011 were significantly better in the hypothermic group. Quantitative analysis of early postresuscitation EEG revealed that burst frequency and spectrum entropy were greatly improved in the hypothermic group and correlated with 96 hr neurological outcome and survival. Conclusion. The improved burst frequency during burst suppression period and preserved spectrum entropy after restoration of continuous background EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted favorable neurological outcome and survival in this rat model of cardiac arrest.

  8. Improved early postresuscitation EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted 96 hr neurological outcome and survival in a rat model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihua; Song, Feng-Qing; Sun, Lei-Lei; Lei, Ling-Yan; Gan, Wei-Ni; Chen, Meng-Hua; Li, Yongqin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hypothermia on 96 hr neurological outcome and survival by quantitatively characterizing early postresuscitation EEG in a rat model of cardiac arrest. In twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats, cardiac arrest was induced through high frequency transesophageal cardiac pacing. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 5 mins untreated arrest. Immediately after resuscitation, animals were randomized to either 2 hrs of hypothermia (N = 10) or normothermia (N = 10). EEG, ECG, aortic pressure, and core temperature were continuously recorded for 6 hrs. Neurological outcome was evaluated daily during the 96 hrs postresuscitation period. No differences in the baseline measurements and resuscitation outcome were observed between groups. However, 96 hr neurological deficit score (204 ± 255 versus 500 ± 0, P = 0.005) and survival (6/10 versus 0/10, P = 0.011) were significantly better in the hypothermic group. Quantitative analysis of early postresuscitation EEG revealed that burst frequency and spectrum entropy were greatly improved in the hypothermic group and correlated with 96 hr neurological outcome and survival. The improved burst frequency during burst suppression period and preserved spectrum entropy after restoration of continuous background EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted favorable neurological outcome and survival in this rat model of cardiac arrest.

  9. Pulmonary function, cholinergic bronchomotor tone, and cardiac autonomic abnormalities in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Melo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This prospective study analyzed the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in pulmonary and cardiac function by evaluating cardiovascular reflex and its correlation with pulmonary function abnormalities of type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients (N = 17 and healthy subjects (N = 17 were evaluated by 1 pulmonary function tests including spirometry, He-dilution method, N2 washout test, and specific airway conductance (SGaw determined by plethysmography before and after aerosol administration of atropine sulfate, and 2 autonomic cardiovascular activity by the passive tilting test and the magnitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA. Basal heart rate was higher in the diabetic group (87.8 ± 11.2 bpm; mean ± SD than in the control group (72.9 ± 7.8 bpm, P<0.05. The increase of heart rate at 5 s of tilting was 11.8 ± 6.5 bpm in diabetic patients and 17.6 ± 6.2 bpm in the control group (P<0.05. Systemic arterial pressure and RSA analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups. Diabetes intragroup analysis revealed two behaviors: 10 patients with close to normal findings and 7 with significant abnormalities in terms of RSA, with the latter subgroup presenting one or more abnormalities in other tests and clear evidence of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. End-expiratory flows were significantly lower in diabetic patients than in the control group (P<0.05. Pulmonary function tests before and after atropine administration demonstrated comparable responses by both groups. Type 2 diabetic patients have cardiac autonomic dysfunction that is not associated with bronchomotor tone alterations, probably reflecting a less severe impairment than that of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Yet, a reduction of end-expiratory flow was detected.

  10. Dose-effect relationships between manganese exposure and neurological, neuropsychological and pulmonary function in confined space bridge welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Rosemarie M; Roels, Harry A; Nakagawa, Sanae; Drezgic, Marija; Diamond, Emily; Park, Robert; Koller, William; Bowler, Russell P; Mergler, Donna; Bouchard, Maryse; Smith, Donald; Gwiazda, Roberto; Doty, Richard L

    2007-03-01

    Although adverse neuropsychological and neurological health effects are well known among workers with high manganese (Mn) exposures in mining, ore-processing and ferroalloy production, the risks among welders with lower exposures are less well understood. Confined space welding in construction of a new span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge without adequate protection was studied using a multidisciplinary method to identify the dose-effect relationship between adverse health effects and Mn in air or whole blood. Bridge welders (n = 43) with little or no personal protection equipment and exposed to a welding fume containing Mn, were administered neurological, neuropsychological, neurophysiological and pulmonary tests. Outcome variables were analysed in relation to whole blood Mn (MnB) and a Cumulative Exposure Index (CEI) based on Mn-air, duration and type of welding. Welders performed a mean of 16.5 months of welding on the bridge, were on average 43.8 years of age and had on average 12.6 years of education. The mean time weighted average of Mn-air ranged from 0.11-0.46 mg/m(3) (55% >0.20 mg/m(3)). MnB >10 microg/l was found in 43% of the workers, but the concentrations of Mn in urine, lead in blood and copper and iron in plasma were normal. Forced expiratory volume at 1s: forced vital capacity ratios (FEV(1)/FVC) were found to be abnormal in 33.3% of the welders after about 1.5 years of welding at the bridge. Mean scores of bradykinesia and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale exceeded 4 and 6, respectively. Computer assisted tremor analysis system hand tremor and body sway tests, and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test showed impairment in 38.5/61.5, 51.4 and 88% of the welders, respectively. Significant inverse dose-effect relationships with CEI and/or MnB were found for IQ (p

  11. Dose–effect relationships between manganese exposure and neurological, neuropsychological and pulmonary function in confined space bridge welders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Rosemarie M; Roels, Harry A; Nakagawa, Sanae; Drezgic, Marija; Diamond, Emily; Park, Robert; Koller, William; Bowler, Russell P; Mergler, Donna; Bouchard, Maryse; Smith, Donald; Gwiazda, Roberto; Doty, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    Background Although adverse neuropsychological and neurological health effects are well known among workers with high manganese (Mn) exposures in mining, ore‐processing and ferroalloy production, the risks among welders with lower exposures are less well understood. Methods Confined space welding in construction of a new span of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge without adequate protection was studied using a multidisciplinary method to identify the dose–effect relationship between adverse health effects and Mn in air or whole blood. Bridge welders (n = 43) with little or no personal protection equipment and exposed to a welding fume containing Mn, were administered neurological, neuropsychological, neurophysiological and pulmonary tests. Outcome variables were analysed in relation to whole blood Mn (MnB) and a Cumulative Exposure Index (CEI) based on Mn‐air, duration and type of welding. Welders performed a mean of 16.5 months of welding on the bridge, were on average 43.8 years of age and had on average 12.6 years of education. Results The mean time weighted average of Mn‐air ranged from 0.11–0.46 mg/m3 (55% >0.20 mg/m3). MnB >10 µg/l was found in 43% of the workers, but the concentrations of Mn in urine, lead in blood and copper and iron in plasma were normal. Forced expiratory volume at 1s: forced vital capacity ratios (FEV1/FVC) were found to be abnormal in 33.3% of the welders after about 1.5 years of welding at the bridge. Mean scores of bradykinesia and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale exceeded 4 and 6, respectively. Computer assisted tremor analysis system hand tremor and body sway tests, and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test showed impairment in 38.5/61.5, 51.4 and 88% of the welders, respectively. Significant inverse dose–effect relationships with CEI and/or MnB were found for IQ (p⩽0.05), executive function (p⩽0.03), sustaining concentration and sequencing (p⩽0.04), verbal learning (p

  12. Pulmonary Microwave Ablation Near the Heart: Antenna Positioning Can Mitigate Cardiac Complications in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, George A; Nocerino, Elisabetta; Mason, Peter J; Schwahn, Denise J; Hetzel, Scott; Turnquist, Alyssa M; Lee, Fred T; Brace, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To determine how close to the heart pulmonary microwave ablation can be performed without causing cardiac tissue injury or significant arrhythmia. Materials and Methods The study was performed with approval from the institutional animal care and use committee. Computed tomographic fluoroscopically guided microwave ablation of the lung was performed in 12 swine. Antennas were randomized to either parallel (180° ± 20°) or perpendicular (90° ± 20°) orientation relative to the heart surface and to distances of 0-10 mm from the heart. Ablations were performed at 65 W for 5 minutes or until a significant arrhythmia (asystole, heart block, bradycardia, supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia) developed. Heart tissue was evaluated with vital staining and histologic examination. Data were analyzed with mixed effects logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic curves, and the Fisher exact test. Results Thirty-four pulmonary microwave ablations were performed with the antenna a median distance of 4 mm from the heart in both perpendicular (n = 17) and parallel (n = 17) orientation. Significant arrhythmias developed during six (18%) ablations. Cardiac tissue injury occurred with 17 ablations (50%). Risk of arrhythmia and tissue injury decreased with increasing antenna distance from the heart with both antenna orientations. No cardiac complication occurred with a distance of greater than or equal to 4.4 mm from the heart. The ablation zone extended to the pleural surface adjacent to the heart in 71% of parallel and 17% of perpendicular ablations performed 5-10 mm from the heart. Conclusion Microwave lung ablations performed more than or equal to 5 mm from the heart were associated with a low risk of cardiac complications. © RSNA, 2016.

  13. Neurological prognostication of outcome in patients in coma after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Management of coma after cardiac arrest has improved during the past decade, allowing an increasing proportion of patients to survive, thus prognostication has become an integral part of post-resuscitation care. Neurologists are increasingly confronted with raised expectations of next of kin and the necessity to provide early predictions of long-term prognosis. During the past decade, as technology and clinical evidence have evolved, post-cardiac arrest prognostication has moved towards a multimodal paradigm combining clinical examination with additional methods, consisting of electrophysiology, blood biomarkers, and brain imaging, to optimise prognostic accuracy. Prognostication should never be based on a single indicator; although some variables have very low false positive rates for poor outcome, multimodal assessment provides resassurance about the reliability of a prognostic estimate by offering concordant evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and one-month neurological outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiura, Masahiro; Hamabe, Yuichi; Akashi, Akiko; Sakurai, Atsushi; Tahara, Yoshio; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagao, Ken; Yaguchi, Arino; Morimura, Naoto

    2017-04-21

    The duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important factor associated with the outcomes for an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the appropriate CPR duration remains unclear considering pre- and in-hospital settings. The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the CPR duration (including both the pre- and in-hospital duration) and neurologically favorable outcomes 1-month after cardiac arrest. Data were utilized from a prospective multi-center cohort study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients transported to 67 emergency hospitals between January 2012 and March 2013 in the Kanto area of Japan. A total of 3,353 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (age ≥18 years) who underwent CPR by emergency medical service personnel and achieved the return of spontaneous circulation in a pre- or in-hospital setting were analyzed. The primary outcome was a 1-month favorable neurological outcome. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the influence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. The CPR duration that achieved a cumulative proportion >99% of cases with a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome was determined. Of the 3,353 eligible cases, pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation was obtained in 1,692 cases (50.5%). A total of 279 (8.3%) cases had a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome. The CPR duration was significantly and inversely associated with 1-month neurologically favorable outcomes with adjustment for pre- and in-hospital confounders (adjusted odds ratio: 0.911, per minute, 95% CI: 0.892-0.929, p CPR, the probability of a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome decreased from 8.3 to 0.7%. At 45 min of CPR, the cumulative proportion for a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome reached >99%. The CPR duration was independently and inversely associated with 1-month neurologically favorable outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The CPR duration required to achieve return

  15. Agreement between ccNexfin CO-trek cardiac output and intermittent cold-bolus pulmonary thermodilution in a prospective multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperna Weiland, Nicolaas H.; de Wever, Jim W.; van Duivenvoorde, Yoni; Boer, Christa; Mitrev, Ludmil; Muntazar, Muhammad; Patel, Kinjal; Hollmann, Markus W.; Preckel, Benedikt

    2017-01-01

    The ccNexfin system uses the CO-trek algorithm to analyse a non-invasively obtained arterial pressure waveform and calculate cardiac output (NEXCO). It remains matter of debate whether NEXCO can replace invasive, pulmonary artery catheter derived, cold-bolus pulmonary thermodilution cardiac output

  16. Discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction in the general population with dyspnea by plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, R; Goetze, JP; Schnohr, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine whether measurement of plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) could be used in discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dyspnea in the general population. BACKGROUND: Natriuretic peptides are useful markers in ruling out acute cardiac...... with dyspnea, left ventricular hypertrophy and/or systolic dysfunction was associated with a 2.6-fold increase in plasma proBNP concentration (p ...% to 17%). CONCLUSIONS: In the general population with dyspnea, plasma proBNP concentrations are increased in left ventricular dilatation, hypertrophy, systolic dysfunction, or diastolic dysfunction, but are unaffected by pulmonary dysfunction....

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Production following Cardiopulmonary Bypass Was Not Associated with Pulmonary Dysfunction after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tso-Chou Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB causes release of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9, contributing to pulmonary infiltration and dysfunction. The aims were to investigate MMP-9 production and associated perioperative variables and oxygenation following CPB. Methods. Thirty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were included. Arterial blood was sampled at 6 sequential points (before anesthesia induction, before CPB and at 2, 4, 6, and 24 h after beginning CPB for plasma MMP-9 concentrations by ELISA. The perioperative laboratory data and variables, including bypass time, PaO2/FiO2, and extubation time, were also recorded. Results. The plasma MMP-9 concentrations significantly elevated at 2–6 h after beginning CPB (P<0.001 and returned to the preanesthesia level at 24 h (P=0.23, with predominant neutrophil counts after surgery (P<0.001. The plasma MMP-9 levels at 4 and 6 h were not correlated with prolonged CPB time and displayed no association with postoperative PaO2/FiO2, regardless of reduced ratio from preoperative 342.9±81.2 to postoperative 207.3±121.3 mmHg (P<0.001. Conclusion. Elective cardiac surgery with CPB induced short-term elevation of plasma MMP-9 concentrations within 24 hours, however, without significant correlation with CPB time and postoperative pulmonary dysfunction, despite predominantly increased neutrophils and reduced oxygenation.

  18. Pulmonary hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in children recipients of orthotopic living related liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magd A. Kotb

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surgical stress, liberation of cytokines associated with re-perfusion injury, and long standing use of immune suppressive medications in children recipients of orthotopic living related liver transplantation (OLRLT pose cardiovascular risk. Reported cardiovascular adverse effects vary from left ventricular wall thickening, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to resting ECG abnormalities, asymptomatic ST depression following increased heart rate and ventricular arrhythmias. Twenty-five consecutive children recipients of OLRLT were assessed by conventional 2-D, M-mode echocardiography and Doppler. The mean age ± SD at transplantation and at enrollment in study was 6.3 ± 4.5 and 13.5 ± 5.6 years respectively. All children were on immunosuppressive medications, with tacrolimus being constant among all. Long-term post-transplant echocardiography revealed statistically significant interventricular septal hypertrophy among all (mean thickness 0.89 ± 0.16 cm, (P = 0.0001 in comparison to reference range for age, 24 had pulmonary hypertension (mean mPAP 36.43 ± 5.60 mm Hg, P = 0.0001, and early diastolic dysfunction with a mean Tei index of 0.40 ± 0.10. However cardiac function was generally preserved. Children recipients of OLRLT have cardiac structural and functional abnormalities that can be asymptomatic. Pulmonary hypertension, increased cardiac mass, de novo aortic stenosis and diastolic heart failure were among abnormalities encountered in the studied population. Echocardiography is indispensible in follow-up of children recipients of OLRLT.

  19. Evaluation of the influence of pulmonary hypertension in ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the influence of pulmonary hypertension in the ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult cardiac surgery. Methods: A retrospective study. They were included 40 patients divided into two groups: GI (without pulmonary hypertension and GII (with pulmonary hypertension. Based on data obtained by transthoracic echocardiography. We considered as the absence of pulmonary hypertension: a pulmonary artery systolic pressure (sPAP 40 mmHg associated with additional echocardiographic signs of PH. It was established as influence of pulmonary hypertension: the impossibility of extubation in the operating room, the increase in the time interval for extubation and reintubation the first 24 hours postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate analyzes were performed when necessary. Considered significant a P value <0.05. Results: The GI was composed of 21 patients and GII for 19. All patients (100% were extubated in the operating room in a medium time interval of 17.58±8.06 min with a median of 18 min in GII and 17 min in GI. PH did not increase the time interval for extubation (P=0.397. It required reintubation of 2 patients in GII (5% of the total, without statistically significant as compared to GI (P=0.488. Conclusion: In this study, pulmonary hypertension did not influence on ultra-fast-track anesthesia in adult cardiac surgery.

  20. Prospectively ECG Gated CT pulmonary angiography versus helical ungated CT pulmonary angiography: Impact on cardiac related motion artifacts and patient radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuman, William P., E-mail: wshuman@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Leipsic, Jonathon A., E-mail: JLeipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca [University of British Columbia and St. Paul' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z1Y6 (Canada); Busey, Janet M., E-mail: jbonny@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Green, Douglas E., E-mail: dougreen@uw.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Pipavath, Sudhakar N., E-mail: snjp@u.wwashington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hague, Cameron J., E-mail: cjhague@interchange.ubc.ca [University of British Columbia and St. Paul' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z1Y6 (Canada); Koprowicz, Kent M., E-mail: kentk@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To compare prospectively ECG gated CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) with routine helical ungated CTPA for cardiac related motion artifacts and patient radiation dose. Subjects and methods: Twenty patients with signs and symptoms suspicious for pulmonary embolism and who had a heart rate below 85 were scanned with prospectively ECG gated CTPA. These gated exams were matched for several clinical parameters to exams from twenty similar clinical patients scanned with routine ungated helical CTPA. Three blinded independent reviewers subjectively evaluated all exams for overall pulmonary artery enhancement and for several cardiac motion related artifacts, including vessel blurring, intravascular shading, and double line. Reviewers also measured pulmonary artery intravascular density and image noise. Patient radiation dose for each technique was compared. Fourteen clinical prospectively ECG gated CTPA exams from a second institution were evaluated for the same parameters. Results: Prospectively ECG gated CTPA resulted in significantly decreased motion-related image artifact scores in lung segments adjacent to the heart compared to ungated CTPA. Measured image noise was not significantly different between the two types of CTPA exams. Effective dose was 28% less for prospectively ECG gated CTPA (4.9 mSv versus 6.8 mSv, p = 0.02). Similar results were found in the prospectively ECG gated exams from the second institution. Conclusion: Compared to routine helical ungated CTPA, prospectively ECG gated CTPA may result in less cardiac related motion artifact in lung segments adjacent to the heart and significantly less patient radiation dose.

  1. Pulmonary perfusion with oxygenated blood or custodiol HTK solution during cardiac surgery for postoperative pulmonary function in COPD patients: a trial protocol for the randomized, clinical, parallel group, assessor and data analyst blinded Pulmonary Protection Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buggeskov Katrine B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Five to thirty percent of patients undergoing cardiac surgery present with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and have a 2- to 10-fold higher 30-day mortality risk. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB creates a whole body systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS that could impair pulmonary function. Impaired pulmonary function can, however, be attenuated by pulmonary perfusion with oxygenated blood or custodiol HTK (histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution. Methods/Design The Pulmonary Protection Trial (PP-Trial randomizes 90 patients undergoing CPB-dependent cardiac surgery to evaluate whether pulmonary perfusion with oxygenated blood or custodiol HTK solution reduces postoperative pulmonary dysfunction in COPD patients. Further, we aim for a non-randomized evaluation of postoperative pulmonary function after transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI. The primary outcome measure is the oxygenation index measured from anesthesia induction to the end of surgery and until 24 hours after anesthesia induction for a total of six evaluations. Discussion Patients with COPD may be impaired by hypoxemia and SIRS. Thus, prolonged recovery and even postoperative complications and death may be reflected by the degree of hypoxemia and SIRS. The limited sample size does not aim for confirmatory conclusions on mortality, cardiovascular complications or risk of pneumonia and sepsis, but the PP-Trial is considered an important feasibility trial paving the road for a multicenter confirmatory trial. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01614951.

  2. Impact of Dispatcher‐Assisted Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Neurological Outcomes in Children With Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Prospective, Nationwide, Population‐Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Goto, Yumiko

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of dispatcher‐assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on neurological outcomes in children is unclear. We investigated whether dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR shows favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2) in children with out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods and Results Children (n=5009, ageCPR (n=2287); bystander CPR with dispatcher instruction (n=2019); and bystander CPR without dispatcher instruction (n=703) groups. The primary endpoint was favorable neurological outcome at 1 month post‐OHCA. Dispatcher CPR instruction was offered to 53.9% of patients, significantly increasing bystander CPR provision rate (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 7.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.60 to 8.57). Bystander CPR with and without dispatcher instruction were significantly associated with improved 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes (aOR, 1.81 and 1.68; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.67 and 1.07 to 2.62, respectively), compared to no bystander CPR. Conventional CPR was associated with increased odds of 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes irrespective of etiology of cardiac arrest (aOR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.56 to 3.41). However, chest‐compression‐only CPR was not associated with 1‐month meaningful outcomes (aOR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.67 to 1.64). Conclusions In children with OHCA, dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR increased bystander CPR provision rate and was associated with improved 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes, compared to no bystander CPR. Conventional bystander CPR was associated with greater likelihood of neurologically intact survival, compared to chest‐compression‐only CPR, irrespective of cardiac arrest etiology. PMID:24785780

  3. Native myocardial T1 mapping in pulmonary hypertension: correlations with cardiac function and hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Ursula; Reiter, Gert; Kovacs, Gabor; Adelsmayr, Gabriel; Greiser, Andreas; Olschewski, Horst; Fuchsjäger, Michael

    2017-01-01

    To analyze alterations in left ventricular (LV) myocardial T1 times in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and to investigate their associations with ventricular function, mass, geometry and hemodynamics. Fifty-eight patients with suspected PH underwent right heart catheterization (RHC) and 3T cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Ventricular function, geometry and mass were derived from cine real-time short-axis images. Myocardial T1 maps were acquired by a prototype modified Look-Locker inversion-recovery sequence in short-axis orientations. LV global, segmental and ventricular insertion point (VIP) T1 times were evaluated manually and corrected for blood T1. Septal, lateral, global and VIP T1 times were significantly higher in PH than in non-PH subjects (septal, 1249 ± 58 ms vs. 1186 ± 33 ms, p T1 (r = 0.72). Septal, lateral and global T1 showed strong correlations with VIP T1 (r = 0.81, r = 0.59 and r = 0.75, respectively). In patients with PH, T1 times in VIPs and in the entire LV myocardium are elevated. LV eccentricity strongly correlates with VIP T1 time, which in turn is strongly associated with T1 time changes in the entire LV myocardium. • Native T1 mapping detects left ventricular myocardial alterations in pulmonary hypertension • In pulmonary hypertension, native T1 times at ventricular insertion points are increased • These T1 times correlate strongly with left ventricular eccentricity • In pulmonary hypertension, global and segmental myocardial T1 times are increased • Global, segmental and ventricular insertion point T1 times are strongly correlated.

  4. Pulmonary embolism in patients with transvenous cardiac implantable electronic device leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noheria, Amit; Ponamgi, Shiva P; Desimone, Christopher V; Vaidya, Vaibhav R; Aakre, Christopher A; Ebrille, Elisa; Hu, Tiffany; Hodge, David O; Slusser, Joshua P; Ammash, Naser M; Bruce, Charles J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Friedman, Paul A; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are commonly associated with transvenous lead-related thrombi that can cause pulmonary embolism (PE). We retrospectively evaluated all patients with transvenous CIED leads implanted at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1 January 2000, and 25 October 2010. Pulmonary embolism outcomes during follow-up were screened using diagnosis codes and confirmed with imaging study reports. Of 5646 CIED patients (age 67.3 ± 16.3 years, 64% men, mean follow-up 4.69 years) 88 developed PE (1.6%), incidence 3.32 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.68-4.07] per 1000 person-years [men: 3.04 (95% CI 2.29-3.96) per 1000 person-years; women: 3.81 (95% CI 2.72-5.20) per 1000 person-years]. Other than transvenous CIED lead(s), 84% had another established risk factor for PE such as deep vein thrombosis (28%), recent surgery (27%), malignancy (25%), or prior history of venous thromboembolism (15%). At the time of PE, 22% had been hospitalized for ≥ 48 h, and 59% had been hospitalized in the preceding 30 days. Pulmonary embolism occurred in 22% despite being on systemic anticoagulation therapy. Out of 88 patients with PE, 45 subsequently died, mortality rate 93 (95% CI 67-123) per 1000 person-years (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.7, P < 0.0001). Though lead-related thrombus is commonly seen in patients with transvenous CIED leads, clinical PE occurs with a low incidence. It is possible that embolism of lead thrombus is uncommon or emboli are too small to cause consequential pulmonary infarction. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Breathing adapted radiotherapy of breast cancer: reduction of cardiac and pulmonary doses using voluntary inspiration breath-hold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Korreman, Stine; Nyström, Håkan

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer using wide tangential photon fields implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This CT-study evaluates the detailed potential dosimetric consequences of applying breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART), and the feasibility...

  6. Evaluation of commissural malalignment of aortic-pulmonary sinus using cardiac CT for arterial switch operation: comparison with transthoracic echocardiography

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    Bang, Ji Hyun; Park, Jeong-Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Divisions of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Hyun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    There are limited data regarding the influence of commissural malalignment of the aortic-pulmonary sinus on the arterial switch operation. To compare diagnostic accuracy between cardiac CT and echocardiography for evaluating commissural malalignment of aortic-pulmonary sinus in children with complete transposition of the great arteries and to seek potential clinical implication of commissural malalignment on the arterial switch operation. In 37 patients (35 boys; median age: 8 days, range: 3-80 days) with complete transposition of the great arteries who had tricuspid semilunar valves and underwent an arterial switch operation, the degree of the commissural rotation of the aortic-pulmonary sinus was assessed on cardiac CT (n=37) and echocardiography (n=35). With surgical finding as a reference, cardiac CT was compared with echocardiography in identifying commissural malalignment in 35 patients. The influence of the height difference between the semilunar valves measured by cardiac CT on the identification of commissural malalignment with cardiac CT and echocardiography was evaluated. The impact of commissural malalignment on coronary transfer techniques was evaluated. In operative findings, the commissures of the semilunar valves were aligned in 24 patients and malaligned in 13. With surgical findings as a reference, cardiac CT showed higher, but not statistically significant (P>0.05), sensitivity (91.7% vs. 75.0%), specificity (87.0% vs. 78.3%) and accuracy (88.6% vs. 77.1%) for the diagnosis of the malalignment than echocardiography. The measured height difference between the semilunar valves did not affect the identification of the malalignment with cardiac CT and echocardiography. The surgical malalignment group showed a higher requirement of modified coronary transfer techniques than the surgical aligned group (11/13 vs. 11/24, P=0.03). Cardiac CT and echocardiography appear useful for evaluating commissural malalignment of the semilunar valves in patients with

  7. Measurements of cardiac output obtained with transesophageal echocardiography and pulmonary artery thermodilution are not interchangeable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Graeser, K; Hansen, K L

    2014-01-01

    was placed in the following successive positions: supine, head-down tilt, head-up tilt, supine, supine with phenylephrine administration, pace heart rate 80 beats per minute (bpm), pace heart rate 110 bpm. TEE CO and PAC CO were measured simultaneously. The agreement was analysed by Bland-Altman plots......BACKGROUND: Echocardiography is increasingly becoming an integrated tool for circulatory evaluation in the intensive care unit and the operating room. Therefore, it is imperative to know the reproducibility of measurements obtained by echocardiography. In this study, a comparison of cardiac output...... (CO) measurements obtained with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) thermodilution (TD) was carried out to test the precision, accuracy and trending ability of CO measurements obtained with TEE. METHODS: Twenty-five patients completed the study. Each patient...

  8. Preoperative intervention reduces postoperative pulmonary complications but not length of stay in cardiac surgical patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Snowdon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Question: Does preoperative intervention in people undergoing cardiac surgery reduce pulmonary complications, shorten length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU or hospital, or improve physical function? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of (quasi randomised trials. Participants: People undergoing coronary artery bypass grafts and/or valvular surgery. Intervention: Any intervention, such as education, inspiratory muscle training, exercise training or relaxation, delivered prior to surgery to prevent/reduce postoperative pulmonary complications or to hasten recovery of function. Outcome measures: Time to extubation, length of stay in ICU and hospital (reported in days. Postoperative pulmonary complications and physical function were measured as reported in the included trials. Results: The 17 eligible trials reported data on 2689 participants. Preoperative intervention significantly reduced the time to extubation (MD -0.14 days, 95% CI -0.26 to -0.01 and the relative risk of developing postoperative pulmonary complications (RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.66. However, it did not significantly affect the length of stay in ICU (MD -0.15 days, 95% CI -0.37 to 0.08 or hospital (MD -0.55 days, 95% CI -1.32 to 0.23, except among older participants (MD -1.32 days, 95% CI -2.36 to -0.28. When the preoperative interventions were separately analysed, inspiratory muscle training significantly reduced postoperative pulmonary complications and the length of stay in hospital. Trial quality ranged from good to poor and considerable heterogeneity was present in the study features. Other outcomes did not significantly differ. Conclusion: For people undergoing cardiac surgery, preoperative intervention reduces the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications and, in older patients, the length of stay in hospital. [Snowdon D, Haines TP, Skinner EH (2014 Preoperative intervention reduces postoperative pulmonary complications but not length of stay in

  9. The state of affairs of neurologic monitoring by near-infrared spectroscopy in pediatric cardiac critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshat Vahid, Samira; Panisello, Jose M

    2014-06-01

    The decreasing postoperative mortality in patients with congenital heart disease has enabled an increasing interest in preventing morbidity, especially from the central nervous system. Near-infrared spectroscopy, a noninvasive technology that provides an estimate of tissue oxygenation, has been introduced in the intensive care unit and has gained popularity over the last decade. This review aims to ascertain its ability to affect outcome. Recent studies have started to incorporate cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy in the assessment, evolution, and outcomes of surgical patients with congenital heart disease. These studies often represent small single-center high-risk cohorts that are evaluated in a retrospective or an observational manner. Nevertheless, new data are starting to indicate that near-infrared spectroscopy may be helpful not only in the assessment of critical care parameters, such as cardiac output performance or likelihood of adverse events, but, most notably, in the long-term neurological outcome. In addition to additional corroborative trials from different centers, a critical question that remains to be answered is whether targeting cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy values, as part of goal-directed therapy protocols, can help to improve outcome overall.

  10. [Lung function influenced the prognosis of cardiac surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C T; Zhao, J H; Wei, D; Shi, Y X; Zhu, G F

    2017-02-12

    Objective: To investigate the value of lung function for the prognosis of cardiac surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD). Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted on the hospitalized patients with coronary heart disease or valvular heart disease in Beijing Anzhen hospital during Janury 2013 to December 2015. The relationship between lung function and extubation time, time of staying in ICU, second time tracheal incubation, tracheotomy and mortality rate were analyzed. Results: There were 355 patients without surgery in a total 1 729 of patients, of which 65 (18.31%)suffered from severe pulmonary dysfunction. There were 242 patients with obstructive ventilation dysfunction, 75 with mild, 127 with moderate, and 40 with severe and very severe obstructive ventilation dysfunction. There were significant differences in the rates of planned extubation and late extubation between patients with normal lung function (81.6% and 10.7%) and those with abnormal lung function(74.4% and 12.8%). In patients with different GOLD classification (Ⅰ, Ⅱ, and Ⅲ-Ⅳ), there were significant differences in the rates of early extubation 14.7%, 14.2% and 5%, planned extubation (80%, 74% and 65%) and late extubation (5.3%, 11.8% and 30%). By comparison with patients without COPD, the extubation time of COPD patients increased by 20.3%, the time of staying in ICU prolonged by 14.2%, and the mortality rate increased to 180%(Ppulmonary dysfunction.

  11. The Unpredictable Effect of Changing Cardiac Output on Hypoxemia after Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Y. C. Tsang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported that the degree of hypoxemia following acute pulmonary thromboembolism (APTE was highly variable and that its mechanism was mainly due to the creation of many high and low ventilation/perfusion (V/Q units, as a result of the heterogeneous regional blood flow (Q caused by embolic obstruction. We studied the effect of changing cardiac output (Q t on gas exchange after APTE in 5 embolized piglets (23 ± 3 Kg, using Dobutamine intermittently at approximately 20 μg/kg/min for 120 minutes. The distribution of ventilation (V and perfusion (Q at various times was mapped using fluorescent microspheres in 941 ± 60 lung regions. After APTE, increase in Q t by Dobutamine improved venous oxygen tension (PvO 2 but arterial PaO 2 did not change consistently. On the other hand, cluster analysis showed that the V/Q ratio of most lung regions was lowered due to increases in Q at the same time. We concluded that the effect of changing cardiac output on gas exchange following APTE was affected by the simultaneous and varying balance between the changing V/Q mismatch and the concomitantly changing PvO 2 , which might explain the unpredictability of PaO 2 in the clinical setting.

  12. Accuracy, Precision, and Trending Ability of Electrical Cardiometry Cardiac Index versus Continuous Pulmonary Artery Thermodilution Method: A Prospective, Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. W. Cox

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Evaluation of accuracy, precision, and trending ability of cardiac index (CI measurements using the Aesculon™ bioimpedance electrical cardiometry (Aesc compared to the continuous pulmonary artery thermodilution catheter (PAC technique before, during, and after cardiac surgery. Methods. A prospective observational study with fifty patients with ASA 3-4. At six time points (T, measurements of CI simultaneously by continuous cardiac output pulmonary thermodilution and thoracic bioimpedance and standard hemodynamics were performed. Analysis was performed using Bland-Altman, four-quadrant plot, and polar plot methodology. Results. CI obtained with pulmonary artery thermodilution and thoracic bioimpedance ranged from 1.00 to 6.75 L min−1 and 0.93 to 7.25 L min−1, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias between CIBIO and CIPAC of 0.52 liters min−1 m−2, with LOA of [−2.2; 1.1] liters min−1 m−2. Percentage error between the two techniques was above 30% at every time point. Polar plot methodology and 4-quadrant analysis showed poor trending ability. Skin incision had no effect on the results. Conclusion. CI obtained by continuous PAC and CI obtained by Aesculon bioimpedance are not interchangeable in cardiac surgical patients. No effects of skin incision were found. International clinical trial registration number is ISRCTN26732484.

  13. Osteosarcoma of the lumbosacral spine invading the central venous pathways, right-sided cardiac chambers, and pulmonary artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hines, Neely; Lantos, George; Hochzstein, Jay [Jacobi Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Gitig, Alon [Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Bronx, NY (United States); DeAnda, Abe [Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2007-11-15

    We report an unusual case of lumbosacral osteogenic sarcoma with cauda equina syndrome and invasion into the central venous and cardiac system. A 41-year-old Hispanic man presented to the emergency department complaining of severe low back pain, cauda equina syndrome, bilateral lower extremity edema, and an extra heart sound on physical examination. CT of the lumbosacral spine done in the emergency department demonstrated a sclerotic lesion in the sacrum with cortical destruction, extension into the spinal canal and a bulky soft tissue mass containing calcifications. Supplemental MRI demonstrated marrow replacement of L4, L5, and the sacrum, soft tissue extension of the tumor, and invasion iliac veins extending into the IVC; however, the full extent of the intravascular tumor was not seen on this examination. Surgical laminectomy and biopsy of the spinal tumor provided the diagnosis of osteogenic sarcoma. A transthoracic echocardiogram was performed while the patient was recovering due to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, which showed an echogenic mass within the right atrium and ventricle. CT pulmonary angiogram confirmed the echocardiogram showing a tumor extending through the pulmonary valve into the main pulmonary artery. The patient underwent en bloc resection of the tumor from the venous and cardiac systems. Histologic examination of the tumor confirmed osteogenic sarcoma. While vertebral osteogenic sarcoma is uncommon, invasion of the spinal canal is common in these tumors. However, tumor extending into the central venous and cardiac system is rare. The previously reported cases of central venous and cardiac involvement have been related to distant metastases or primary cardiac osteosarcomas. There is only one other reported case of direct extension into the venous system by an iliac bone osteosarcoma in an adolescent; however, the tumor did not extend into the pulmonary circulation. (orig.)

  14. Association between hospital rates of early Do-Not-Resuscitate orders and favorable neurological survival among survivors of inhospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendler, Timothy J; Spertus, John A; Kennedy, Kevin F; Chan, Paul S

    2017-11-01

    Current guidelines recommend deferring prognostication for 48 to 72 hours after resuscitation from inhospital cardiac arrest. It is unknown whether hospitals vary in making patients who survive an arrest Do-Not-Resuscitate (DNR) early after resuscitation and whether a hospital's rate of early DNR is associated with its rate of favorable neurological survival. Within Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation, we identified 24,899 patients from 236 hospitals who achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after inhospital cardiac arrest between 2006 and 2012. Hierarchical models were constructed to derive risk-adjusted hospital rates of DNR status adoption ≤12 hours after ROSC and risk-standardized rates of favorable neurological survival (without severe disability; Cerebral Performance Category ≤2). The association between hospitals' rates of early DNR and favorable neurological survival was evaluated using correlation statistics. Of 236 hospitals, 61.7% were academic, 83% had ≥200 beds, and 94% were urban. Overall, 5577 (22.4%) patients were made DNR ≤12 hours after ROSC. Risk-adjusted hospital rates of early DNR varied widely (7.1%-40.5%, median: 22.7% [IQR: 19.3%-26.1%]; median OR of 1.48). Significant hospital variation existed in risk-standardized rates of favorable neurological survival (3.5%-44.8%, median: 25.3% [IQR: 20.2%-29.4%]; median OR 1.72). Hospitals' risk-adjusted rates of early DNR were inversely correlated with their risk-standardized rates of favorable neurological survival (r=-0.179, P=.006). Despite current guideline recommendations, many patients with inhospital cardiac arrest are made DNR within 12 hours after ROSC, and hospitals vary widely in rates of early DNR. Higher hospital rates of early DNR were associated with worse meaningful survival outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Post-robotic Radiosurgical Pulmonary Vein Isolation (RRPVI): First Case in the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpiri, Jose; De La Peña, Cuauhtémoc; Cardona, Carlos; Hinojosa, Miguel; Zamarripa, Rafael; Assad, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation using robotic radiosurgery system CyberKnife is a new non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation, currently in clinical phase. Robotic radiosurgical pulmonary vein isolation (RRPVI) uses stereotactic, non-invasive (painless) pinpoint radiation energy delivery to a small, precise area to accomplish ablation. The purpose of this report is to describe the finding of an increase in the enhancement of the left atrium demonstrated with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE-CMR) as a result of RRPVI in the first case in the world in humans using CyberKnife as a treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). PMID:27660737

  16. Discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction in the general population with dyspnea by plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, R; Goetze, JP; Schnohr, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to determine whether measurement of plasma pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) could be used in discriminating between cardiac and pulmonary dyspnea in the general population. BACKGROUND: Natriuretic peptides are useful markers in ruling out acute cardiac...... the expected concentration of plasma proBNP based on age and gender was established for dyspneic subjects: an actual plasma proBNP concentration below half of the expected value ruled out left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction (sensitivity 100%, 95% CI 100% to 100%; specificity 15%, 95% CI 12...

  17. Chest radiographic pulmonary changes reflecting extrapulmonary involvement in paediatric HIV disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, Richard D. [University of Cape Town, Division of Paediatric Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital and School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Goddard, Elizabeth [University of Cape Town, Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Hendricks, Marc [University of Cape Town, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Lawrenson, John [University of Cape Town, Paediatric Cardiology Service of the Western Cape Province, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); University of Stellenbosch, Paediatric Cardiology Service of the Western Cape Province, Tygerberg Children' s Hospital, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2009-06-15

    Respiratory infections are the commonest cause of pulmonary change on chest radiographs of HIV-infected children. However, HIV-related neurological, oropharyngeal, oesophageal, cardiac and haematological abnormalities may also manifest with pulmonary changes and must be considered in the interpretation of the chest radiograph in HIV-infected children. (orig.)

  18. Differences of cardiac output measurements by open-circuit acetylene uptake in pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiblmair, Martin; Faul, Christian; von Scheidt, Wolfgang; Berghaus, Thomas M

    2012-03-12

    As differences in gas exchange between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) have been demonstrated, we asked if cardiac output measurements determined by acetylene (C2H2) uptake significantly differed in these diseases when compared to the thermodilution technique. Single-breath open-circuit C2H2 uptake, thermodilution, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed in 72 PAH and 32 CTEPH patients. In PAH patients the results for cardiac output obtained by the two methods showed an acceptable agreement with a mean difference of -0.16 L/min (95% CI -2.64 to 2.32 L/min). In contrast, the agreement was poorer in the CTEPH group with the difference being -0.56 L/min (95% CI -4.96 to 3.84 L/min). Functional dead space ventilation (44.5 ± 1.6 vs. 32.2 ± 1.4%, p < 0.001) and the mean arterial to end-tidal CO2 gradient (9.9 ± 0.8 vs. 4.1 ± 0.5 mmHg, p < 0.001) were significantly elevated among CTEPH patients. Cardiac output evaluation by the C2H2 technique should be interpreted with caution in CTEPH, as ventilation to perfusion mismatching might be more relevant than in PAH.

  19. Differences of cardiac output measurements by open-circuit acetylene uptake in pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwaiblmair Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As differences in gas exchange between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH have been demonstrated, we asked if cardiac output measurements determined by acetylene (C2H2 uptake significantly differed in these diseases when compared to the thermodilution technique. Method Single-breath open-circuit C2H2 uptake, thermodilution, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed in 72 PAH and 32 CTEPH patients. Results In PAH patients the results for cardiac output obtained by the two methods showed an acceptable agreement with a mean difference of -0.16 L/min (95% CI -2.64 to 2.32 L/min. In contrast, the agreement was poorer in the CTEPH group with the difference being -0.56 L/min (95% CI -4.96 to 3.84 L/min. Functional dead space ventilation (44.5 ± 1.6 vs. 32.2 ± 1.4%, p 2 gradient (9.9 ± 0.8 vs. 4.1 ± 0.5 mmHg, p Conclusion Cardiac output evaluation by the C2H2 technique should be interpreted with caution in CTEPH, as ventilation to perfusion mismatching might be more relevant than in PAH.

  20. Automatic external defibrillation and its effects on neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest patients in an urban, two-tiered EMS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J; Held, T; Heegaard, W; Crimmins, T

    1997-01-01

    To describe the use of the Automatic External Defibrillation (AED) device in an urban, two-tiered Emergency Medical Service (EMS) response setting with regard to its potential effects on cardiac arrest patient survival and neurologic outcome. A retrospective and descriptive design was utilized to study all cardiac arrest patients that had resuscitations attempted in the prehospital environment over a 30-month period. The study took place in a two-tiered EMS system serving an urban population of 368,383 persons. The first tier of EMS response is provided by the City Fire Department, which is equipped with a standard AED device. All first-tier personnel are trained to the level of Emergency Medical Technician-Basic. The second tier of EMS response is provided by personnel from one of two ambulance services. All second-tier personnel are trained to the level of Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic. 271 cardiac arrest patients were identified for inclusion. One-hundred nine of these patients (40.2%) had an initial rhythm of either ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia and were shocked using the AED upon the arrival of first-tier personnel. Forty-two patients (38.5%) in this group had a return of spontaneous circulation in the field and 22 (20.2%) survived to hospital discharge. Of the survivors, 17 (77.3%) had moderate to good neurologic function at discharge based on the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories. Faster response times by the first-tier personnel appeared to correlate with better neurologic outcomes. First responder-based AED usage on patients in ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia can be applied successfully in an urban setting utilizing a two-tiered EMS response. In this study, a 20.2% survival to hospital discharge rate was obtained. Seventy-seven percent of these survivors had a moderate to good neurologic outcome based on the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories.

  1. Summary of recommendations for the haemodynamic and angiographic assessment of the pulmonary circulation. Joint statement of the Polish Cardiac Society's Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation and Association of Cardiovascular Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzyna, Marcin; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander; Błaszczak, Piotr; Grabka, Marek; Hawranek, Michał; Kopeć, Grzegorz; Mroczek, Ewa; Zembala, Marian; Torbicki, Adam; Ochała, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Right heart catheterisation (RHC) is the 'gold standard' for haemodynamic assessment of the pulmonary circulation. For the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH), the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology require a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg to be confirmed by direct haemodynamic measurement. Additionally, RHC provides a lot of valuable information about the differential diagnosis and severity of PH, and also helps determine the patient's prognosis. Acute vasoreactivity testing performed in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension is intended to identify the group of patients who should be treated with calcium channel blockers. Patients referred for heart transplantation require advanced pulmonary vascular disease to be ruled out either on resting examination or during vasoreactivity testing. RHC is a component of such interventional procedures as balloon atrial septostomy, closure of intracardiac shunts in congenital heart and great vessel defects, valvuloplasty for pulmonary valve stenosis, and pulmonary angioplasty. Pulmonary angiography is an examination recommended when selecting patients for pulmonary endarterectomy or balloon pulmonary angioplasty in thromboembolic PH. Due to the dynamic growth in the number of patients diagnosed with and treated for PH in Poland, the Boards of the Polish Cardiac Society's Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation and Association of Cardiovascular Interventions have undertaken a joint project to develop recommendations to standardise guidelines for RHC procedure, acute vasoreactivity testing and pulmonary angiography at cardiac wards and haemodynamic laboratories in Poland. This document has been prepared by experts delegated by the Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation and the Association of Cardiovascular Interventions, and subsequently approved by the Boards of both organs of the Polish Cardiac Society.

  2. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy: The hidden cardiovascular comorbidity in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attending primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheedy, Doha; Taha, Hend M

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the prevalence of chronic comorbidities including cardiac autonomic neuropathy among elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A cross-sectional study was carried out on 175 elderly male patients with COPD attending Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. The comorbidities that might alter cardiac autonomic function in patients with COPD were identified. The patients without reported comorbidities underwent arterial blood gas analysis, pulmonary function tests and autonomic function assessment using cardiovascular reflexes. A total of 69.14% of the participants presented with comorbidities (group 1), whereas 30.85% of the participants reported no comorbidity (group 2). Among the participants, the most prevalent comorbid diseases were hypertension (34.20%), cor pulmonale (31.42%), ischemic heart disease (20.00%), diabetes (18.28%) and congestive heart failure (13.70%). In group 2, 29.60% and 22.20% of the patients had early and definite cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) respectively. CAN occurred early in the course of the disease with 40.90% of mild COPD cases being affected. The patients with definite CAN had the highest resting heart rate. The presence of CAN was related to hypercapnia, but not hypoxemia or COPD severity. COPD has a complex spectrum of comorbidities. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in elderly male patients with COPD correlated with hypercapnia, but not hypoxemia or the disease severity. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sudden cardiac death: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Marten E; Stricker, Bruno H; Brusselle, Guy G; Lahousse, Lies

    2016-10-01

    Both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are major health burdens. A number of studies have addressed their interrelationship, but currently no systematic review has been published. Our objective is to give an overview of the literature of the association between COPD and SCD. A search on PubMed with both MeSH headings and free-text keywords was performed. We selected all original articles of studies in humans that assessed COPD on the one hand and SCD, electrocardiographic markers for SCD, ventricular arrhythmias, or asystole on the other. The electronic search yielded 251 articles, from which 27 full publications were selected after careful evaluation of the full-text articles. In these studies, COPD was associated with a prolonged and shortened QT interval. In patients with a myocardial infarction (MI), COPD was associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and decreased survival. COPD was a risk factor for SCD both in cardiovascular patient groups and in community-based studies, independent from cardiovascular risk profile. Studies of the potential impact of respiratory treatment on the occurrence of SCD showed conflicting results. In conclusion, cumulating evidence associates COPD with an increased risk of SCD. Asystole and pulseless electric activity could be more common than VT/VF in deaths associated with COPD. Underlying mechanisms explaining this association require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Re-expansion pulmonary oedema after minimally invasive cardiac surgery with right mini-thoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisawa, Yusuke; Hiraoka, Arudo; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Chikazawa, Genta; Nakajima, Kosuke; Tamura, Kentaro; Yoshitaka, Hidenori; Sakaguchi, Taichi

    2016-02-01

    Re-expansion pulmonary oedema (RPO) sometimes occurs after minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) with single-lung ventilation. However, it has not been widely recognized as a serious complication. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence rate and risk factors of RPO. A total of 381 consecutive patients who underwent MICS with right mini-thoracotomy from March 2005 to October 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. RPO was observed in 8 (2.1%) patients. In the preoperative data, greater percentages of preoperative use of steroid or immunosuppressant were found in patients with RPO (25% [2/8] vs 1% [4/373]; P = 0.0056). In the operative data, significantly longer operation, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamping (ACC) times as well as greater percentages of second CPB run were found in patients with RPO (388 ± 80 vs 272 ± 61 min; P unit and postoperative hospital stay were observed in patients with RPO (P = 0.0022, 731.4]; P < 0.001). RPO should be recognized as one of the most serious complications after MICS with right mini-thoracotomy. More accurate risk factors of prolonged lung malperfusion and steroid use on RPO after MICS should be investigated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulmonary Carbon Dioxide Elimination for Cardiac Output Monitoring in Peri-operative and Critical Care Patients: History and Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Peyton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive measurement of cardiac output as a central component of advanced haemodynamic monitoring has been increasingly recognised as a potential means of improving perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing major surgery. Methods based upon pulmonary carbon dioxide elimination are among the oldest techniques in this field, with comparable accuracy and precision to other techniques. Modern adaptations of these techniques suitable for use in the perioperative and critical are environment are based on the differential Fick approach, and include the partial carbon dioxide rebreathing method. The accuracy and precision of this approach to cardiac output measurement has been shown to be similar to other minimally invasive techniques. This paper reviews the underlying principles and evolution of the method, and future directions including recent adaptations designed to deliver continuous breath-by-breath monitoring of cardiac output.

  6. Preserved heart rate variability during therapeutic hypothermia correlated to 96 hrs neurological outcomes and survival in a pig model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqin; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Guan, Jun; Barbut, Denise; Bisera, Joe; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2012-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia initiated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves neurologic outcomes and survival after prolonged cardiac arrest. However, the potential mechanism by which hypothermia improves neurologic outcomes remains unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effect of rapid head cooling on 96-hr neurologic outcomes and survival by heart rate variability analysis in a pig model of prolonged cardiac arrest. Prospective randomized controlled animal study. University-affiliated research laboratory. Yorkshire-X domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). A protocol of 10 mins of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by 5 mins of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a pig model of cardiac arrest was used in this study. Sixteen male domestic pigs weighing between 39 and 45 kg were randomized into two groups, hypothermia (n = 8) and control (n = 8). For the hypothermia group, intranasal-induced head cooling was initiated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and persisted for 4 hrs after resuscitation. For the control group, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started with normothermia. Time and frequency domain heart rate variability was calculated in 5-min sections of electrocardiographic recordings at baseline and 4 hrs after resuscitation. Neurologic outcomes were evaluated every 24 hrs during the 96-hr postresuscitation observation period. No differences in the baseline measurement and resuscitation outcome were observed between the groups. However, the 96-hr cerebral performance categories of the hypothermic group were significantly lower than control (1.0 ± 0.0 vs. 4.0 ± 1.9, p = .003). Four hrs after resuscitation, mean RR interval, heart rate variability triangular index, and normalized very-low-frequency power were restored to baseline in the hypothermia group. Square root of the mean squared differences of successive RR intervals and SD of instantaneous RR intervals were significantly improved in the cooled animals compared with controls. A significant

  7. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Pulmonary Pressures and Right Ventricular Function after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: A Simple Approach for the Intensivist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Beghetti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is diagnosed using cardiac catheterization and is defined as an elevation of mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP greater than 25 mmHg. Although invasive hemodynamics remains the gold standard and is mandatory for disease confirmation, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE is an extremely useful non-invasive and widely available tool that allows for screening and follow-up, in particular, in the acute setting. TTE may be a valuable alternative, allowing for direct measurement and/or indirect assessment of PAP. Because of the complex geometric shape and pattern of contraction of the right ventricle (RV, as well as the inherent complexity of cardiac repair, no single view or measurement can provide definite information on RV function and PAP and/or pulmonary vascular resistance. In addition, specific training and expertise may be necessary to obtain the views and measurements required. Some simple measurements may be of help when rapid evaluation is mandatory and potentially life saving: the assessment of tricuspid and/or pulmonary valve regurgitant jet and the use of the Bernoulli equation allow for measurement of PAP. Measurements such as the analysis of the pulmonary Doppler wave flow, the septal curvature, or the eccentricity index, assessing ventricular interdependence, are useful for indirect assessment. A four-chamber view of the RV gives information on its size, hypertrophy, function (fractional area change, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion as an evaluation of the longitudinal function. Based on these simple measurements, TTE can provide detection of PH, measurement or estimation of PAP, and assessment of cardiac function. TTE is also of importance in follow up of PH as well as providing an assessment of therapeutic strategies in the postoperative setting of cardiac surgery. However, PAP may be misleading as it is dependent on cardiac output and requires accurate measurements. In the presence of

  8. Neurologic Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Following Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C vs 36°C After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cronberg, Tobias; Lilja, Gisela; Horn, Janneke; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wise, Matt P.; Pellis, Tommaso; Hovdenes, Jan; Gasche, Yvan; Åneman, Anders; Stammet, Pascal; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Hassager, Christian; Kuiper, Michael; Wanscher, Michael; Bosch, Frank; Cranshaw, Julius; Kleger, Gian-Reto; Persson, Stefan; Undén, Johan; Walden, Andrew; Winkel, Per; Wetterslev, Jørn; Nielsen, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury affects neurologic function and quality of life in survivors after cardiac arrest. To compare the effects of 2 target temperature regimens on long-term cognitive function and quality of life after cardiac arrest. In this multicenter, international, parallel group, assessor-masked

  9. No Benefit in Neurologic Outcomes of Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest with Mechanical Compression Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Ryan; Redman, Ted; Ross, Elliot; Ely, Rachel; Saidler, Clayton; Arana, Allyson; Wampler, David; Miramontes, David

    2018-01-18

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major cause of death and morbidity in the United States. Quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has proven to be a key factor in improving survival. The aim of our study was to investigate the outcomes of OHCA when mechanical CPR (LUCAS 2 Chest Compression System™) was utilized compared to conventional CPR. Although controlled trials have not demonstrated a survival benefit to the routine use of mechanical CPR devices, there continues to be an interest for their use in OHCA. We conducted a retrospective observational study of OHCA comparing the outcomes of mechanical and manual chest compressions in a fire department based EMS system serving a population of 1.4 million residents. Mechanical CPR devices were geographically distributed on 11 of 33 paramedic ambulances. Data were collected over a 36-month period and outcomes were dichotomized based on utilization of mechanical CPR. The primary outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge with a cerebral performance category (CPC) score of 1 or 2. This series had 3,469 OHCA reports, of which 2,999 had outcome data and met the inclusion criteria. Of these 2,236 received only manual CPR and 763 utilized a mechanical CPR device during the resuscitation. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was attained in 44% (334/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitations and in 46% (1,020/2,236) of the standard manual CPR resuscitations (p = 0.32). Survival to hospital discharge was observed in 7% (52/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitations and 9% (191/2,236) of the manual CPR group (p = 0.13). Discharge with a CPC score of 1 or 2 was observed in 4% (29/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitation group and 6% (129/2,236) of the manual CPR group (p = 0.036). In our study, use of the mechanical CPR device was associated with a poor neurologic outcome at hospital discharge. However, this difference was no longer evident after logistic regression adjusting for confounding variables

  10. Mortality and neurological outcome in the elderly after target temperature management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael

    2015-01-01

    allocation was not statistically significant for either mortality or neurological outcome. CONCLUSION: Increasing age is associated with significantly increased mortality after OHCA, but mortality rate is not influenced by level of target temperature. Risk of poor neurological outcome also increases with age...

  11. Effect of Admission Glasgow Coma Scale Motor Score on Neurological Outcome in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients Receiving Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hifumi, Toru; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kawakita, Kenya; Sawano, Hirotaka; Tahara, Yoshio; Hase, Mamoru; Nishioka, Kenji; Shirai, Shinichi; Hazui, Hiroshi; Arimoto, Hideki; Kashiwase, Kazunori; Kasaoka, Shunji; Motomura, Tomokazu; Yasuga, Yuji; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Ken; Nonogi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Because the initial (on admission) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) examination has not been fully evaluated in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest (CA) who receive therapeutic hypothermia (TH), the aim of the present study was to determine any association between the admission GCS motor score and neurologic outcomes in patients with out-of-hospital CA who receive TH. In the J-PULSE-HYPO study registry, patients with bystander-witnessed CA were eligible for inclusion. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on GCS motor score (1, 2-3, and 4-5) to assess various effects on neurologic outcome. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of good neurologic outcome at 90 days. Of 452 patients, 302 were enrolled. There was a significant difference among the 3 patient groups with regard to neurologic outcome at 90 days in the univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the GCS motor score on admission, age >65 years, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the time from collapse to return of spontaneous circulation, and pupil size patients sustaining out-of-hospital CA who receive TH.

  12. Diagnostic value of Doppler echocardiography for identifying hemodynamic significant pulmonary valve regurgitation in tetralogy of Fallot: comparison with cardiac MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurskens, Niek E G; Gorter, Thomas M; Pieper, Petronella G; Hoendermis, Elke S; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Ebels, Tjark; Berger, Rolf M F; Willems, Tineke P; van Melle, Joost P

    2017-11-01

    Quantification of pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is essential in the management of patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). We sought to evaluate the accuracy of first-line Doppler echocardiography in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify hemodynamic significant PR. Paired cardiac MRI and echocardiographic studies (n = 97) in patients with repaired TOF were retrospectively analyzed. Pressure half time (PHT) and pulmonary regurgitation index (PRi) were measured using continuous wave Doppler. The ratio of the color flow Doppler regurgitation jet width to pulmonary valve (PV) annulus (jet/annulus ratio) and diastolic to systolic time velocity integral (DSTVI; pulsed wave Doppler) were assessed. Accuracy of echocardiographic measurements was tested to identify significant PR as determined by phase-contrast MRI (PR fraction [PRF] ≥ 20%). Mean PRF was 29.4 ± 15.7%. PHT Doppler echocardiography, especially when combined, are highly accurate in identifying significant PR and therefore seem useful in the follow-up of patients with repaired TOF.

  13. Prognostication of neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest patients after mild therapeutic hypothermia: a meta-analysis of the current literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, M.J.; Horn, J.; Oddo, M.; Fugate, J.E.; Storm, C.; Cronberg, T.; Wijman, C.A.; Wu, O.; Binnekade, J.M.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the sensitivity and false positive rate (FPR) of neurological examination and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) to predict poor outcome in adult patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). METHODS: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched

  14. Impact of cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration on neurologically favourable outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A population-based study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Tasuku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Nishiyama, Chika; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Yasuyuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Ohta, Bon; Iwami, Taku

    2017-04-01

    The optimal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unclear. We aimed to assess the association between CPR duration and outcome after OHCA. This prospective, population-based observational study conducted in Osaka, Japan enrolled 6981 adult patients with non-traumatic witnessed OHCA who achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) from January 2005 through December 2012. CPR duration was defined as the time of CPR initiation by emergency medical service personnel to the ROSC in pre-hospital settings or after hospital admission. The primary outcome was one-month survival with neurologically favourable outcome (cerebral performance category scale 1 or 2). Overall, median CPR duration was 25min (interquartile range: 15-34) and the proportion of neurologically favourable outcome was 12.5% (875/6,981). The proportion of neurologically favourable outcome among the CPR duration ≥31min group was significantly lower compared with that among the 0-5min group (55.1% [320/581] versus 2.2% [54/2424], adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.04; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.03-0.05 in all patients, 78.4% [240/306] versus 11.4% [30/264], AOR 0.04; 95% CI 0.02-0.06 in the shockable group, 29.1% [80/275] versus 1.1% [24/2160], and AOR 0.03; 95% CI 0.02-0.05 in the non-shockable group). The cumulative proportion for neurologically favourable outcome reached 99% after 44, 41, and 43min of CPR in all patients, the shockable group, and the non-shockable group, respectively. The proportion of patients with neurologically favourable outcome declined with increasing CPR duration, but some OHCA patients could benefit from prolonged CPR duration >30min. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy monitoring and neurologic outcomes in adult cardiac surgery patients: a systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Fei; Sheinberg, Rosanne; Yee, May-Sann; Ono, Masa; Zheng, Yueyging; Hogue, Charles W

    .... In this systematic review, we evaluated available data for adult patients to determine (1) whether decrements in cerebral oximetry during cardiac surgery are associated with stroke, postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), or delirium; and (2...

  16. Exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension in a patient with compensated cardiac disease: hemodynamic and functional response to sildenafil therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Memon, Nabeel; O'Murchu, Brian

    2015-02-01

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with exertional dyspnea and fatigue that had worsened over the preceding 2 years, despite a normally functioning bioprosthetic aortic valve and stable, mild left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction, 0.45). His symptoms could not be explained by physical examination, an extensive biochemical profile, or multiple cardiac and pulmonary investigations. However, abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise test results and a right heart catheterization-combined with the use of a symptom-limited, bedside bicycle ergometer-revealed that the patient's exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension was out of proportion to his compensated left heart disease. A trial of sildenafil therapy resulted in objective improvements in hemodynamic values and functional class.

  17. Preoperative Cardiac, Pulmonary and Digestive Comorbidities of Morbidly Obese Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: Morbidity, Assessment and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao; Zhang, Si-Qin; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Yang; Tian, Hao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Kun; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2014-05-01

    To investigate a proper preoperative assessment and management of preoperative cardiac, pulmonary and digestive comorbidities in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A general description of comorbidities in bariatric patients was reviewed and a clinical practice path in assessment and management of comorbidities was summarized. Morbidly obese patients frequently carried serious comorbidities in cardiovascular, pulmonary and digestive systems. The most common abnormalities included hypertension, left ventricular wall hypertrophy, ST and T wave abnormalities, obstructive sleep apnea, ventilatory dysfunction, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A routine specialized preoperative evaluation could find the potential abnormality and screen the appropriate patients. Prophylactic treatments obviously reduced the morbidity of peri-operative complications Comprehensive preoperative evaluation and proper management is essential to appropriately select and prepare bariatric patients, and minimize surgical risk.

  18. PULMONARY ARTERIAL DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH RIGHT-SIDED CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY AND CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN ZOO MAMMALS HOUSED AT 2,100 M ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Martínez, Liliana Sofía; Rosas-Rosas, Arely G; Parás, Alberto; Martínez, Osvaldo; Hernández, Alejandra; Garner, Michael M

    2015-12-01

    Subacute and chronic mountain sickness of humans and the related brisket disease of cattle are characterized by right-sided congestive heart failure in individuals living at high altitudes as a result of sustained hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Adaptations to high altitude and disease resistance vary among species, breeds, and individuals. The authors conducted a retrospective survey of right-sided cardiac hypertrophy associated with pulmonary arterial hypertrophy or arteriosclerosis in zoo mammals housed at Africam Safari (Puebla, México), which is located at 2,100 m above sea level. Seventeen animals with detailed pathology records matched the study criterion. Included were 10 maras (Dolichotis patagonum), 2 cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus oedipus), 2 capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris), and 1 case each of Bennet's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus), nilgai antelope (Boselaphus tragocamelus), and scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah). All had right-sided cardiac hypertrophy and a variety of arterial lesions restricted to the pulmonary circulation and causing arterial thickening with narrowing of the arterial lumen. Arterial lesions most often consisted of medial hypertrophy or hyperplasia of small and medium-sized pulmonary arteries. All maras also had single or multiple elevated plaques in the pulmonary arterial trunk consisting of fibrosis, accompanied by chondroid metaplasia in some cases. Both antelopes were juvenile and died with right-sided congestive heart failure associated with severe pulmonary arterial lesions. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of cardiac and pulmonary arterial disease in zoo mammals housed at high altitudes.

  19. Impedance Threshold Device Combined With High-Quality Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival With Favorable Neurological Function After Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Duval, Sue; Nakamura, Yuji; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2016-09-23

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been recently shown to affect clinical outcome. The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Prehospital Resuscitation Impedance Valve and Early Versus Delayed Analysis (PRIMED) trial showed no differences in outcomes with an active vs. sham impedance threshold device (ITD), a CPR adjunct that enhances circulation. It was hypothesized the active ITD would improve survival with favorable neurological outcomes in witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients when used with high-quality CPR. Using the publicly accessible ROC PRIMED database, a post-hoc analysis was performed on all witnessed subjects with both compression rate and depth data (n=1,808) who received CPR within the study protocol definition of adequate CPR quality (compression rate 80-120/min and depth 4-6 cm; n=929). Demographics were similar between sham and active ITD groups. In witnessed subjects who received quality CPR, survival with favorable neurological function was 11.9% for the active ITD subjects (56/470) vs. 7.4% for the sham (34/459) (odds ratio 1.69 [95% confidence interval 1.08, 2.64]). There were no statistically significant differences for this primary outcome when CPR was performed outside the boundaries of the definition of adequate CPR quality. Multivariable models did not change these associations. An active ITD combined with adequate-quality conventional CPR has the potential to significantly improve survival after witnessed cardiac arrest. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2124-2132).

  20. Aborted sudden cardiac death in a young male with anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Han Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA is a rare type of congenital coronary abnormality that may be associated with early infant mortality and sudden adult cardiac death. We report a case regarding a 23-year-old male who collapsed during a marathon race and was resuscitated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Subsequent workups verified the diagnosis of ALCAPA. The patient underwent surgical intervention with obliteration of the ALCAPA orifice and coronary artery bypass grafting with left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending coronary artery. The procedure was done smoothly, and he was discharged uneventfully.

  1. Pulmonary and cardiac function in asymptomatic obese subjects and changes following a structured weight reduction program: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Held

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of obesity is rising. Obesity can lead to cardiovascular and ventilatory complications through multiple mechanisms. Cardiac and pulmonary function in asymptomatic subjects and the effect of structured dietary programs on cardiac and pulmonary function is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To determine lung and cardiac function in asymptomatic obese adults and to evaluate whether weight loss positively affects functional parameters. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated bodyplethysmographic and echocardiographic data in asymptomatic subjects undergoing a structured one-year weight reduction program. RESULTS: 74 subjects (32 male, 42 female; mean age 42±12 years with an average BMI 42.5±7.9, body weight 123.7±24.9 kg were enrolled. Body weight correlated negatively with vital capacity (R = -0.42, p<0.001, FEV1 (R = -0.497, p<0.001 and positively with P 0.1 (R = 0.32, p = 0.02 and myocardial mass (R = 0.419, p = 0.002. After 4 months the study subjects had significantly reduced their body weight (-26.0±11.8 kg and BMI (-8.9±3.8 associated with a significant improvement of lung function (absolute changes: vital capacity +5.5±7.5% pred., p<0.001; FEV1+9.8±8.3% pred., p<0.001, ITGV+16.4±16.0% pred., p<0.001, SR tot -17.4±41.5% pred., p<0.01. Moreover, P0.1/Pimax decreased to 47.7% (p<0.01 indicating a decreased respiratory load. The change of FEV1 correlated significantly with the change of body weight (R = -0.31, p = 0.03. Echocardiography demonstrated reduced myocardial wall thickness (-0.08±0.2 cm, p = 0.02 and improved left ventricular myocardial performance index (-0.16±0.35, p = 0.02. Mitral annular plane systolic excursion (+0.14, p = 0.03 and pulmonary outflow acceleration time (AT +26.65±41.3 ms, p = 0.001 increased. CONCLUSION: Even in asymptomatic individuals obesity is associated with abnormalities in pulmonary and cardiac function and increased myocardial mass. All the

  2. Early enhanced external counter pulsation improves neurological recovery after the return of spontaneous circulation in a mongrel dog cardiac arrest model*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chun-Lin; Liu, Rong; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Wei, Hong-Yan; Li, Xin; Zhan, Hong; Jing, Xiao-Li; Xiong, Yan; Huang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Gui-Fu

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether early enhanced external counter pulsation therapy after cardiopulmonary resuscitation improved neurological outcome in a mongrel dog cardiac arrest model. Randomized, animal study. Assisted circulation laboratory. Twenty-four healthy male adult dogs (12-14 kg). After minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by 2 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the dogs were randomized to receive 4 hours of enhanced external counter pulsation therapy, to receive 4 hours of hypertension with over 140 mm Hg or to be a control. Blood pressure and left ventricular ejection fraction were recorded. Cerebral flow was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Arterial blood gases and endothelium-derived vasoactive substances were assessed before cardiac arrest and 4 hours after the return of spontaneous circulation. Neurological outcome was assessed by the neurologic deficit score and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining. Enhanced external counter pulsation significantly improved the left ventricular ejection fraction and increased common carotid artery blood flow and shear stress. Enhanced external counter pulsation increased both relative cerebral blood volume (RCBV, p = 0.043) and relative cerebral blood flow (RCBF, p = 0.012) in animals 4 hours after return of spontaneous circulation. Enhanced external counter pulsation therapy promoted the production of nitric oxide and tissue plasminogen activator and decreased the release of endothelin-1 (p = 0.013) after return of spontaneous circulation. Treatment with norepinephrine in the high mean artery pressure also increased common carotid artery blood flow and shear stress. However, no effects on the left ventricular ejection fraction, the production of nitric oxide and tissue plasminogen activator, or the release of endothelin-1 were found. The neurologic deficit scores of the animals were significantly lower at 24, 48, 72

  3. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management 33°C versus 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragancea, Irina; Horn, Janneke; Kuiper, Michael

    2015-01-01

    the prognostic accuracy of clinical neurological findings and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) in comatose patients. METHODS: We calculated sensitivity and false positive rate for Glasgow Coma Scale motor score (GCS M), pupillary and corneal reflexes and SSEP to predict poor neurological outcome using....... RESULTS: 313 patients (33%) were prognostically assessed; 168 in the 33 °C, and 145 in the 36 °C group. A GCS M ≤ 2 had a false positive rate of 19.1% to predict poor outcome due to nine false predictions. Bilaterally absent pupillary reflexes had a false positive rate of 2.1% and absent corneal reflexes...

  4. Survival and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest. Results of the Andalusian Out-of-hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; Mellado Vergel, Francisco; López Messa, Juan Bautista; Fernández Valle, Patricia; Ruiz Montero, María M; Martínez Lara, Manuela; Vergara Pérez, Santiago; Vivar Díaz, Itziar; Caballero García, Auxiliadora; García Alcántara, Ángel; García Del Águila, Javier

    2016-05-01

    There is a paucity of data on prehospital cardiac arrest in Spain. Our aim was to describe the incidence, patient characteristics, and outcomes of out-of-hospital emergency care for this event. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective registry of cardiopulmonary arrest handled by an out-of-hospital emergency service between January 2008 and December 2012. The registry included all patients considered to have a cardiac etiology as the cause of arrest, with a descriptive analysis performed of general patient characteristics and factors associated with good neurologic outcome at hospital discharge. A total of 4072 patients were included, with an estimated incidence of 14.6 events per 100000 inhabitants and year; 72.6% were men. The mean age was 62.0 ± 15.8 years, 58.6% of cases occurred in the home, 25% of patients had initial defibrillable rhythm, 28.8% of patients arrived with a pulse at the hospital (58.3% of the group with defibrillable rhythm), and 10.2% were discharged with good neurologic outcome. The variables associated with this recovery were: witnessed arrest (P=.04), arrest witnessed by emergency team (P=.005), previous life support (P=.04), initial defibrillable rhythm (P=.0001), and performance of a coronary interventional procedure (P=.0001). More than half the cases of sudden cardiac arrest occur at home, and the population was found to be relatively young. Although recovery was satisfactory in 1 out of every 10 patients, there is a need for improvement in the phase prior to emergency team arrival. Coronary interventional procedures had an impact on patient prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Forensic pathological evaluation of postmortem pulmonary CT high-density areas in serial autopsy cases of sudden cardiac death.

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    Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Oritani, Shigeki; Kamikodai, Yasunobu; Tsuda, Kohei; Okazaki, Shuji; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2013-10-10

    Previous studies suggested substantial postmortem interference with pulmonary CT findings. The present study evaluated postmortem CT (PM-CT) morphology of the lung, compared with histology, in autopsy cases of sudden cardiac death without recovery from cardiac arrest (SCD, n=22) with regard to the posture at the time of death and postmortem interference from a forensic pathological viewpoint. In witnessed cases (n=5), a case of SCD in a prone position had anterior consolidation with weak hypostatic opacification in the posterior about 18 h later. Among unwitnessed deaths (n=17), 8 cases of death lying prone, sitting facedown and lying laterally had possible gravity-dependent opacity about 15-38 h postmortem. Hypostatic opacification with 'niveau' formation was not evident in more than half of the cases (n=15). Histological findings for ground glass opacification and consolidation on PM-CT varied by case, involving intraalveolar edema and hemorrhages, accompanied by marked congestion; however, possible postmortem hypostatic opacification mostly represented intraalveolar edema. CT morphology of acute pulmonary congestion in SCD may often remain without serious postmortem interference in cases without clinical intervention involving massive fluid infusion, suggesting plain PM-CT findings of the lung to be useful for investigating the death process when combined with histology; however, the possible influence of the hydration status of the lungs at the time of death should be assessed by evaluation of CT and autopsy findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sudden cardiac death as a presentation of anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from pulmonary artery in a young adult.

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    Pachon, Ronald; Bravo, Claudio; Niemiera, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Sudden cardiac death in 5-10% of cases is explained by patients with congenital abnormalities that include coronary artery malformations such as anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA). We report a case of sudden cardiac death as the first presentation of ALCAPA in a young female with no history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  7. Pain-related somatosensory evoked potentials and functional brain magnetic resonance in the evaluation of neurologic recovery after cardiac arrest: a case study of three patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanatta Paolo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This case series investigates whether painful electrical stimulation increases the early prognostic value of both somatosensory-evoked potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging in comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Three single cases with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were considered. A neurophysiological evaluation with an electroencephalogram and somatosensory-evoked potentials during increased electrical stimulation in both median nerves was performed within five days of cardiac arrest. Each patient also underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging evaluation with the same neurophysiological protocol one month after cardiac arrest. One patient, who completely recovered, showed a middle latency component at a high intensity of stimulation and the activation of all brain areas involved in cerebral pain processing. One patient in a minimally conscious state only showed the cortical somatosensory response and the activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The last patient, who was in a vegetative state, did not show primary somatosensory evoked potentials; only the activation of subcortical brain areas occurred. These preliminary findings suggest that the pain-related somatosensory evoked potentials performed to increase the prognosis of comatose patients after cardiac arrest are associated with regional brain activity showed by functional magnetic resonance imaging during median nerves electrical stimulation. More importantly, this cases report also suggests that somatosensory evoked potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging during painful electrical stimulation may be sensitive and complementary methods to predict the neurological outcome in the acute phase of coma. Thus, pain-related somatosensory-evoked potentials may be a reliable and a cost-effective tool for planning the early diagnostic evaluation of comatose patients.

  8. Pain-related somatosensory evoked potentials and functional brain magnetic resonance in the evaluation of neurologic recovery after cardiac arrest: a case study of three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Paolo; Messerotti Benvenuti, Simone; Baldanzi, Fabrizio; Bendini, Matteo; Saccavini, Marsilio; Tamari, Wadih; Palomba, Daniela; Bosco, Enrico

    2012-03-31

    This case series investigates whether painful electrical stimulation increases the early prognostic value of both somatosensory-evoked potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging in comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Three single cases with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were considered. A neurophysiological evaluation with an electroencephalogram and somatosensory-evoked potentials during increased electrical stimulation in both median nerves was performed within five days of cardiac arrest. Each patient also underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging evaluation with the same neurophysiological protocol one month after cardiac arrest. One patient, who completely recovered, showed a middle latency component at a high intensity of stimulation and the activation of all brain areas involved in cerebral pain processing. One patient in a minimally conscious state only showed the cortical somatosensory response and the activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The last patient, who was in a vegetative state, did not show primary somatosensory evoked potentials; only the activation of subcortical brain areas occurred. These preliminary findings suggest that the pain-related somatosensory evoked potentials performed to increase the prognosis of comatose patients after cardiac arrest are associated with regional brain activity showed by functional magnetic resonance imaging during median nerves electrical stimulation. More importantly, this cases report also suggests that somatosensory evoked potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging during painful electrical stimulation may be sensitive and complementary methods to predict the neurological outcome in the acute phase of coma. Thus, pain-related somatosensory-evoked potentials may be a reliable and a cost-effective tool for planning the early diagnostic evaluation of comatose patients.

  9. [Nitrid oxide, levosimendan and sildenafile in a patient with right ventricle dysfunction and severe pulmonary hypertension after cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre, L; Cortell, J; Vicente, R; Herrera, P; Loro, J M; Valera, F

    2014-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) and the resulting right ventricle dysfunction are important risk factors in patients who undergo cardiac surgery. The treatment of PHT and right ventricle dysfunction should be focused on maintaining the correct right ventricle after load, improving right ventricle function and reducing the right ventricle pre-load and therefore reducing pulmonary vascular resistance by means of vasodilators. A combined therapy of vasodilators and medicines which have different mechanisms of action, is becoming an option for the treatment of PHT. We present a 65 year old woman that suffered from mitral regurgitation, aortic valve disease, tricuspid and ascending aortic dilation with 115mmHg of pulmonary artery pressure (by ultrasound evaluation). The patient was operated on of mitral, aortic valve and tricuspid plastia and proximal aortic artery plastia as well. Previosly to surgery the patient suffered right ventricle dysfunction and PHT and was treated with nitric oxide, intravenous sildenafil and levosimendan. Subsequent evolution was satisfactory, PHT being controlled, without arterial hypotension nor respiratory alterations. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. A moderate dose of propofol and rapidly induced mild hypothermia with extracorporeal lung and heart assist (ECLHA) improve the neurological outcome after prolonged cardiac arrest in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Keisuke; Okamoto, Taisuke; Tanimoto, Hironari; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Tashiro, Masafumi; Sugita, Michiko; Takeya, Motohiro; Terasaki, Hidenori

    2006-08-01

    Propofol has been shown to protect against neuronal damage induced by brain ischaemia in small animal models. We reported previously that mild hypothermia (33 degrees C) in combination with extracorporeal lung and heart assist (ECLHA) improved the neurological outcome in dogs with cardiac arrest (CA) of 15 min induced during normothermia. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of propofol infusion under mild hypothermia with ECLHA in this model. Twenty-one female dogs (15 mongrel dogs and 6 beagles) were divided into three groups: Midazolam 0.1 mg/(kg h) infusion group (M, n=7), Propofol 2 mg/(kg h) infusion group (P2, n=7), Propofol 4 mg/(kg h) infusion group (P4, n=7). Normothermic ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced in all dogs for 15 min, followed by brief ECLHA and 168 h of intensive care. The drug infusion was initiated at a constant rate after the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) to 24 h. Mild hypothermia (33 degrees C) was maintained for 20 h. Neurological deficit scores (NDS: 0%=normal, 100%=brain death) were evaluated for neurological function from 33 to 168 h. One dog in the M group died, and the remaining dogs survived for 168 h. The P4 group showed better neurological recovery compared with the M group (48 h, 21+/-16% versus 32+/-15%; 72 h, 7+/-6% versus 25+/-11%; 96 h, 6+/-6% versus 21+/-6%; 120 h, 5+/-5% versus 20+/-6%; 144 h, 4+/-4% versus 20+/-6%; 168 h, 4+/-4% versus 20+/-6%, pdog in the P2 and three dogs in the P4 group achieved full neurological recovery (NDS: 0%). The number of intact pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 was greater in the propofol groups than midazolam group (p<0.05). The combination of propofol infusion at a rate of 4 mg/(kg h), 24h and rapidly induced mild hypothermia (33 degrees C) with ECLHA might provide a successful means of cerebral resuscitation from CA.

  11. [Adult-onset Still's disease with pulmonary and cardiac involvement and response to intravenous immunoglobulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Nilton Salles Rosa; Waldrich, Leandro; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) include pericarditis, pleural effusion, transient pulmonary infiltrates, pulmonary interstitial disease and myocarditis. Serositis are common but pneumonitis and myocarditis are not and bring elevated risk of mortality. They may manifest on disease onset or flares. Previously reported cases were treated with high-dose glucocorticoids and immunosupressants and, when refractory, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). We report an AOSD patient whose flare presented with severe pleupneumonitis and myopericarditis and, following nonresponse to a methylprednisolone pulse, high dose of prednisone and cyclosporine A, recovered after a 2-day 1g/kg/day IVIG infusion.

  12. Prevalence, Diagnosis, Perioperative Monitoring and Treatment of Right Ventricular Dysfunction and/or Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Cardiac Surgical Patients in Germany-A Postal Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heringlake, Matthias; Schön, Julika; Pliet, Teresa; Haake, Nils; Reinecke, Alexander; Habicher, Marit; Sander, Michael; Markewitz, Andreas; Reuter, Daniel A; Groesdonk, Heinrich Volker; Trummer, Georg; Pilarzyk, Kevin; von der Brelie, Michael; Bein, Berthold; Schirmer, Uwe

    2017-12-01

    Background Sparse data are available on the prevalence of right ventricular dysfunction and/or pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery in Germany as well as on the intensity and modalities used for diagnosis, perioperative monitoring, and treatment of these comorbidities. Methods A postal survey including questions on the prevalence of preoperative right ventricular dysfunction and/or pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients undergoing cardiac surgery in 2009 was sent to 81 German heart centers. Total 47 of 81 (58%) heart centers returned the questionnaires. The centers reported data on 51,095 patients, and 49.8% of the procedures were isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. Results Data on the prevalence of preoperative pulmonary hypertension and/or right ventricular dysfunction were not available in 54% and 64.6% of centers. In the remaining hospitals, 19.5% of patients presented right heart dysfunction and 10% pulmonary arterial hypertension. Preoperative echocardiography was performed in only 45.3% of the coronary artery bypass grafting cases. Preoperative pharmacologic treatment of pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dysfunction with oral sildenafil, inhaled prostanoids, or nitric oxide was initiated in 71% and 95.7% of the centers, respectively. Intra- and postoperative treatment was most frequently accomplished with phosphodiesterase-III inhibitors. Conclusion The prevalence of preoperative right heart dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension in cardiac surgical patients in Germany seems to be substantial. However, in more than 50% of the patients, no preoperative data on right ventricular function and pulmonary arterial pressure are available. This may lead to underestimation of perioperative risk and inappropriate management of this high-risk population. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Enterosalivary nitrate metabolism and the microbiome: Intersection of microbial metabolism, nitric oxide and diet in cardiac and pulmonary vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Carl D; Gladwin, Mark T; Freeman, Bruce A; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Morris, Alison

    2017-04-01

    Recent insights into the bioactivation and signaling actions of inorganic, dietary nitrate and nitrite now suggest a critical role for the microbiome in the development of cardiac and pulmonary vascular diseases. Once thought to be the inert, end-products of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) heme-oxidation, nitrate and nitrite are now considered major sources of exogenous NO that exhibit enhanced vasoactive signaling activity under conditions of hypoxia and stress. The bioavailability of nitrate and nitrite depend on the enzymatic reduction of nitrate to nitrite by a unique set of bacterial nitrate reductase enzymes possessed by specific bacterial populations in the mammalian mouth and gut. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH), obesity, hypertension and CVD are linked to defects in NO signaling, suggesting a role for commensal oral bacteria to shape the development of PH through the formation of nitrite, NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. Oral supplementation with inorganic nitrate or nitrate-containing foods exert pleiotropic, beneficial vascular effects in the setting of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, ischemia-reperfusion injury and in pre-clinical models of PH, while traditional high-nitrate dietary patterns are associated with beneficial outcomes in hypertension, obesity and CVD. These observations highlight the potential of the microbiome in the development of novel nitrate- and nitrite-based therapeutics for PH, CVD and their risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolated supra-cardiac partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection causing right heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogomonian, Robert; Alkhawam, Hassan; Zaiem, Feras; Vyas, Neil; Jolly, JoshPaul; Nguyen, James; Moradoghli Haftevani, Emma A; Dijanic, Christopher; Lieber, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Right heart failure (RHF) has been overlooked as left heart failure has predominated. One of the many causes of RHF is partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC), an extremely rare entity in nature. Physicians should consider the unusual causes of RHF after ruling out the common causes.

  15. Isolated supra-cardiac partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection causing right heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sogomonian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Right heart failure (RHF has been overlooked as left heart failure has predominated. One of the many causes of RHF is partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC, an extremely rare entity in nature. Physicians should consider the unusual causes of RHF after ruling out the common causes.

  16. Atrial thrombi detection prior to pulmonary vein isolation: diagnostic accuracy of cardiac computed tomography versus transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Sohaib; Chang, Justues H; Salahudeen, Shafeequr R; Baranchuk, Adrian; Morris, Cheryl; O'Reilly, Michael; Pal, Raveen S

    2015-01-01

    Patients routinely undergo transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) prior to pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in order to rule out the presence of intra-atrial thrombi. Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is also routinely conducted prior to the procedure to determine cardiac anatomy. Although it has been demonstrated that CCT can also rule out intra-atrial thrombi, the use of CCT for thrombi detection is controversial. The primary objective was to determine the utility of CCT for detection of atrial thrombi as compared to TEE. Patients who underwent PVI between 2010 and 2011 with CTs and TEEs complet-ed within 3 days of each other were retrospectively identified. TEE reports were analyzed, while CCTs were interpreted by a cardiologist specializing in CCTs. Severe spontaneous echo contrast or thrombus detected on TEE were considered positive, as were filling defects found on CCT. A total of 51 patients undergoing PVI (mean age 59.4 ± 9.5 years; 75% male; ejection fraction 60 ± 12%) had both TEE and CCT in timely fashion. By TEE, 0 left atrial ap-pendage (LAA) thrombi were identified with mild to moderate spontaneous echo contrast in 4 patients. By CCT, 2 definite LAA thrombi were identified and thrombi in 4 patients could not be ruled out. Specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for CCT were 88%, 0%, and 100%, respectively. CCT is an effective tool in ruling out atrial thrombi prior to PVI. TEE should be completed only if CCT is positive.

  17. Assessments of pulmonary vein and left atrial anatomical variants in atrial fibrillation patients for catheter ablation with cardiac CT

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    Chen, Jing; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hua-Yan; Shi, Ke; Long, Qi-Hua [Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Guo, Ying-Kun [Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, West China Second University Hospital, Chengdu (China)

    2017-02-15

    To provide a road map of pulmonary vein (PV) and left atrial (LA) variants in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) before catheter ablation procedure using cardiac CT. Cardiac CT was performed in 1420 subjects for accurate anatomical information, including 710 patients with AF and 710 matched controls without AF. PV variants, PV ostia and spatial orientation, LA enlargement, and left atrial diverticulum (LAD) were measured, respectively. Differences between these two groups were also respectively compared. Some risk factors for the occurrence of LAD were analyzed. In total, PV variants were observed in 202 (28.5 %) patients with AF patients and 206 (29.0 %) controls without AF (p = 0.8153). The ostial sizes of all accessory veins were generally smaller than those of the typical four PVs (p = 0.0153 to 0.3958). There was a significant difference of LA enlargement between the AF and control groups (36.3 % vs. 12.5 %, p < 0.0001), while the prevalence of LAD was similar in these two groups (43.2 % vs. 41.9 %, p = 0.6293). PV variants are common. Detailed knowledge of PVs and LA variants are helpful for providing anatomical road map to determine ablation strategy. (orig.)

  18. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert A; Hood, Sally G; Jacobson, Beverley M; West, Malcolm J; Wan, Li; May, Clive N

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was -17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected -30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes.

  19. Intrathecal morphine plus general anesthesia in cardiac surgery: effects on pulmonary function, postoperative analgesia, and plasma morphine concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Moraes dos Santos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of intrathecal morphine on pulmonary function, analgesia, and morphine plasma concentrations after cardiac surgery. INTRODUCTION: Lung dysfunction increases morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Regional analgesia may improve pulmonary outcomes by reducing pain, but the occurrence of this benefit remains controversial. METHODS: Forty-two patients were randomized for general anesthesia (control group n=22 or 400 µg of intrathecal morphine followed by general anesthesia (morphine group n=20. Postoperative analgesia was accomplished with an intravenous, patient-controlled morphine pump. Blood gas measurements, forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume (FEV, and FVC/FEV ratio were obtained preoperatively, as well as on the first and second postoperative days. Pain at rest, profound inspiration, amount of coughing, morphine solicitation, consumption, and plasma morphine concentration were evaluated for 36 hours postoperatively. Statistical analyses were performed using the repeated measures ANOVA or Mann-Whiney tests (*p<0.05. RESULTS: Both groups experienced reduced FVC postoperatively (3.24 L to 1.38 L in control group; 2.72 L to 1.18 L in morphine group, with no significant decreases observed between groups. The two groups also exhibited similar results for FEV1 (p=0.085, FEV1/FVC (p=0.68 and PaO2/FiO2 ratio (p=0.08. The morphine group reported less pain intensity (evaluated using a visual numeric scale, especially when coughing (18 hours postoperatively: control group= 4.73 and morphine group= 1.80, p=0.001. Cumulative morphine consumption was reduced after 18 hours in the morphine group (control group= 20.14 and morphine group= 14.20 mg, p=0.037. The plasma morphine concentration was also reduced in the morphine group 24 hours after surgery (control group= 15.87 ng.mL-1 and morphine group= 4.08 ng.mL-1, p=0.029. CONCLUSIONS: Intrathecal morphine administration did not significantly alter

  20. [Complete neurological recovery in a patient with decerebrate rigidity following cardiac arrest from acute airway obstruction by advanced laryngeal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hajime; Takahashi, Shinji; Mizutani, Taro; Nakayama, Shin; Wada, Tetsuro; Toyooka, Hidenori

    2004-03-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with severe dyspnea caused by advanced laryngeal cancer. As he had disregarded the dyspnea for a month, we did not have enough information about the extent of the tumor. The pulse oximeter showed 88% with oxygen inhalation. Because of severe dyspnea, he could not maintain supine position. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy showed tumor bulk obstructing airway directly. In the operating room, at first, a cricothyroid membrane puncture was attempted under local anesthesia but the procedure was abandoned when the patient became hypoxic and unconscious. Immediately tracheostomy and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were performed. Tumor bulk had displaced the trachea and surrounding structures, making a tracheostomy difficult. Nine min after loss of consciousness, a secure airway was obtained. However, he was still unconscious and developed characteristic decerebrate rigidity. Therefore the patient was treated with infusion of thiamylal and free radical scavenger and mild hypothermia therapy (bladder temperature 34 degrees C). On the fifth day of this treatment, after rewarming and discontinuation of thiamylal, the patient responded to command. He recovered with no neurological deficits. This case suggests that combined treatment with barbiturate, free radical scavenger, and mild hypothermia therapy is effective to minimize ischemic brain damage after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  1. Neuron-Specific Enolase as a Predictor of Death or Poor Neurological Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C and 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammet, Pascal; Collignon, Olivier; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a widely-used biomarker for prognostication of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest, but the relevance of recommended cutoff values has been questioned due to the lack of a standardized methodology and uncertainties over the influence of temperature...... levels were assessed in blood samples obtained 24, 48, and 72 h after return of spontaneous circulation. The primary outcome was neurological outcome at 6 months using the cerebral performance category score. RESULTS: NSE was a robust predictor of neurological outcome in a baseline variable......-adjusted model, and target temperature did not significantly affect NSE values. Median NSE values were 18 ng/ml versus 35 ng/ml, 15 ng/ml versus 61 ng/ml, and 12 ng/ml versus 54 ng/ml for good versus poor outcome at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively (p neurological outcome...

  2. Temporal trends in survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients with and without underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sidsel G.; Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    ,480 included patients, 3056 (14.2%) had history of COPD. Compared to non-COPD patients, COPD patients were older (75 vs. 71 years), less likely male (61.2% vs. 68.5%), had higher prevalence of other comorbidities, and were less likely to have: arrests outside private homes (17.7% vs. 28.3%), witnessed arrests......Aim: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has tripled during the past decade in Denmark as a likely result of improvements in cardiac arrest management. This study analyzed whether these improvements were applicable for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD......). Methods: Patients ≥18 years with OHCA of presumed cardiac cause were identified through the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry, 2001-2011. Patients with a history of COPD up to ten years prior to arrest were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and compared to non-COPD patients. Results: Of 21...

  3. [Cardiac impairment after hanging attempt: a preliminary descriptive study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, S; Spagnoli, V; Deye, N; Mégarbane, B; Baud, F

    2013-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy has sometimes been reported after suicide attempts by hanging. The objective of this retrospective observational study was to describe cardiac dysfunction occurring after hanging and its consequences on prognosis. Fifteen patients admitted to the intensive care unit for hanging from 1997 to 2011 were included and divided into two groups according to presence or absence of cardiac arrest at initial presentation. Cardiac dysfunction was defined by the presence of clinical, biological, electrocardiographic or echocardiographic abnormalities. Cardiac impairment was diagnosed in nine patients over 15 (60%). Of the six patients with initial cardiac arrest, only one survived without severe neurological sequellae. Among the nine patients without cardiac arrest, eight survived and five patients (56%) had cardiac impairment, including two cases of echocardiographic aspect of Takotsubo complicated by pulmonary edema. Mortality in intensive care was significantly related to the severity of the initial neurological state assessed by the Glasgow Coma Score (OR=1.7; P=0.02), and the occurrence of cardiac arrest (OR=40; P=0.016). The presence of cardiac involvement, reversible after the acute phase in all surviving patients was not associated with increased mortality. In the aftermath of hanging, predictors of mortality are the presence of impaired consciousness or initial cardiac arrest, but not the occurrence of cardiac disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with cardiac synchronization in chronic thrombosis of main pulmonary arteries. A case review with CT scan imaging correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulomb, M.; Wolf, J.E.; Rose-Pittet, L.; Le Bas, J.F.; Dalsoglio, S.; Paramelle, B.

    Results of nuclear magnetic resonance exploration in a patient with chronic thrombosis of main pulmonary arteries are used to outline an elementary semiology in agreement with current documented data. Signs observed relate to the thrombosis and showing of flow due to associated pulmonary artery hypertension. Cardiac synchronization is essential: obtaining 2 echos by the spin-echo technique allows differentiation of circulatory slowing phenomena, which provoke increased strength of 2nd echo, from the thrombus itself. Correlations established with V/Q scintigraphy, angiography and CT scan findings in this case provided preliminary evaluation of use of this imaging technique in this affection.

  5. Comparison of an Endotracheal Cardiac Output Monitor to a Pulmonary Artery Catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Medicine, San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, TX, 3CREST Program, Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, Lackland AFB, TX 4University of...of a FDA approved device , the CONMED endotracheal cardiac output monitor (ECOM) ™ apparatus, by comparing it to the Edwards Vig ilance II monitor...3.1) suggested 8 an imals would be sufficient for comparisons. After induction of anesthesia, instrumentation, and stabilization in experiment 1

  6. Identification of Pulmonary Hypertension Caused by Left-Sided Heart Disease (World Health Organization Group 2) Based on Cardiac Chamber Volumes Derived From Chest CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Galit; Rozenbaum, Zach; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Berliner, Shlomo; Topilsky, Yan; Fleischmann, Dominik; Sung, Yon K; Zamanian, Roham T; Guo, Haiwei Henry

    2017-10-01

    Evaluations of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly include chest CT imaging. We hypothesized that cardiac chamber volumes calculated from the same CT scans can yield additional information to distinguish PH related to left-sided heart disease (World Health Organization group 2) from other PH subtypes. Patients who had PH confirmed by right heart catheterization and contrast-enhanced chest CT studies were enrolled in this retrospective multicenter study. Cardiac chamber volumes were calculated using automated segmentation software and compared between group 2 and non-group 2 patients with PH. This study included 114 patients with PH, 27 (24%) of whom were classified as group 2 based on their pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Patients with group 2 PH exhibited significantly larger median left atrial (LA) volumes (118 mL vs 63 mL; P heart disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Extra-pulmonary manifestations of sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardhanabhuti, V. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N. [St Michael' s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8 (Canada); Bhatnagar, G.; Maviki, M.; Iyengar, S.; Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Suresh, P., E-mail: sureshpriya2000@yahoo.com [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Although, the diagnosis and evaluation of sarcoidosis has traditionally remained confined to the chest, its multi-system nature has been widely recognized. Radiological features of pulmonary sarcoidosis are well known but extra-pulmonary manifestations can produce a plethora of non-specific imaging findings that can affect subcutaneous tissue, and the neurological, cardiac, gastrointestinal, urological, liver, spleen, and skeletal systems. In the literature, there are various case reports and specific system reviews but there are few reviews that encompass all the extra-pulmonary manifestations. In this paper, we comprehensively review the imaging features of extra-pulmonary sarcoidosis with characteristic features as well as atypical presentations. In addition, we discuss the emerging role of nuclear medicine in sarcoidosis.

  8. The long-term prognostic value of highly sensitive cardiac troponin I in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Chuy, Katherine; Hakemi, Emad Uddin; Alyousef, Tareq; Dang, Geetanjali; Doukky, Rami

    2017-12-01

    In patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), detectable levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) using a highly sensitive assay have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality. We sought to investigate the impact of detectable cTnI on long-term survival following acute PE. Detectable cTnI levels in patients presenting with acute PE predict increased long-term mortality following hospital discharge. In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed consecutive patients with confirmed acute PE and cTnI assay available from the index hospitalization. The detectable cTnI level was ≥0.012 ng/mL. Patients were classified into low and high clinical risk groups according to the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) at presentation. Subjects were followed for all-cause mortality subsequent to hospital discharge using chart review and Social Security Death Index. A cohort of 289 acute PE patients (mean age 56 years, 51% men), of whom 152 (53%) had a detectable cTnI, was followed for a mean of 3.1 ± 1.8 years after hospital discharge. A total of 71 deaths were observed; 44 (29%) and 27 (20%) in the detectable and undetectable cTnI groups, respectively (P = 0.05). Detectable cTnI was predictive of long-term survival among low-risk (P = 0.009) but not high-risk patients (P = 0.78) who had high mortality rates irrespective of cTnI status. In patients with acute PE, detectable cTnI is predictive of long-term mortality, particularly among patients who were identified as low risk according to PESI score. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Congenital giant cardiac tumor with severe left-ventricular inflow and outflow obstruction and arrhythmia treated with pulmonary artery banding and long-term amiodarone infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiji Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a congenital giant cardiac tumor that occupied the majority of left ventricular cavity with severe left ventricular inflow and outflow obstruction. The hemodynamics were similar to univentricular physiology. He was treated with prostaglandins and bilateral pulmonary artery banding. He had frequent supraventricular tachycardia associated with ventricular pre-excitation that was controlled by long-term administration of intravenous amiodarone. The patient died due to sepsis after 3 months.

  10. Cardiac mapping and pulmonary vein isolation using a novel ablation catheter with tip minielectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heringhaus, Florian; Lotz, Tanja; Loehr, Lena; Gelep, Julia; Lask, Sebastian; Kara, Kaffer; Mügge, Andreas; Wutzler, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a standard treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF). Identification of gaps in the ablation line is difficult. Tip-ring electrograms from ablation catheters represent relative large areas of myocardial tissue. Recently, an ablation catheter with three minielectrodes (ME) on the catheter tip with closer interelectrode spacing was introduced. The aim of our study was to evaluate the novel electrodes during PVI. PVI was performed with an irrigated ablation catheter equipped with conventional electrodes and three additional radial tip electrodes. Detection of pulmonary vein potentials (PVPs), local signal amplitude, amplitude reduction during ablation, and loss of capture after ablation were compared between the ME and the conventional tip-ring electrodes. Thirty-one patients (mean age 67.8 ± 10.3 years, 45.2 % men) were included. A total of 306 mapping/lesion points were analyzed. A PVP was significantly more often obtained with the ME compared to the conventional tip-ring electrodes (99.2% vs 83.5%, P PVP mapping and ablation is increased when ME are used. ME may facilitate catheter ablation of AF in the future. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Agreement between ccNexfin CO-trek cardiac output and intermittent cold-bolus pulmonary thermodilution in a prospective multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperna Weiland, Nicolaas H; de Wever, Jim W; van Duivenvoorde, Yoni; Boer, Christa; Mitrev, Ludmil; Muntazar, Muhammad; Patel, Kinjal; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt

    2017-12-13

    The ccNexfin system uses the CO-trek algorithm to analyse a non-invasively obtained arterial pressure waveform and calculate cardiac output (NEXCO). It remains matter of debate whether NEXCO can replace invasive, pulmonary artery catheter derived, cold-bolus pulmonary thermodilution cardiac output measurement (PACCO). This study aimed at testing NEXCO-PACCO agreement in a large sample size, multi-centre study. We hypothesized that agreement between NEXCO and PACCO would be demonstrated by a mean accuracy (bias) cycle to obtain one measurement pair. Mean accuracy and precision of ccNexfin were expressed as bias (mean of all NEXCO-PACCO differences) and limits of agreement (LOA; 1.96 · SD of bias). Percentage error was calculated as [LOA/ (NEXCO-PACCO average)]. Fifty-five patients were enrolled in the study, 51 completed the protocol. Median PACCO was 3.7 (IQR: 3.2 to 4.6) l·min-1 and median NEXCO was 3.8 (IQR: 3.1 to 4.7) l·min-1. NEXCO-PACCO bias was 0.1 (LOA: -1.4 to +1.6) l·min-1 with a 37% percentage error. In this study, cardiac output measurement with ccNexfin failed to meet the predefined criteria for agreement with cold-bolus pulmonary artery thermodilution.

  12. Cardiac magnetic resonance findings predicting mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggen, Vivan J.M. [AHMaZON Centre for Adult Congenital Heart Disease, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen and St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Leiner, Tim; Habets, Jesse [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Post, Marco C.; Dijk, Arie P. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan T. [AHMaZON Centre for Adult Congenital Heart Disease, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen and St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boersma, Eric [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To provide a comprehensive overview of all reported cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings that predict clinical deterioration in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were systematically searched for longitudinal studies published by April 2015 that reported associations between CMR findings and adverse clinical outcome in PAH. Studies were appraised using previously developed criteria for prognostic studies. Meta-analysis using random effect models was performed for CMR findings investigated by three or more studies. Eight papers (539 patients) investigating 21 different CMR findings were included. Meta-analysis showed that right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction was the strongest predictor of mortality in PAH (pooled HR 1.23 [95 % CI 1.07-1.41], p = 0.003) per 5 % decrease. In addition, RV end-diastolic volume index (pooled HR 1.06 [95 % CI 1.00-1.12], p = 0.049), RV end-systolic volume index (pooled HR 1.05 [95 % CI 1.01-1.09], p = 0.013) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (pooled HR 1.16 [95 % CI 1.00-1.34], p = 0.045) were of prognostic importance. RV and LV mass did not provide prognostic information (p = 0.852 and p = 0.983, respectively). This meta-analysis substantiates the clinical yield of specific CMR findings in the prognostication of PAH patients. Decreased RV ejection is the strongest and most well established predictor of mortality. (orig.)

  13. Cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities for breast cancer patients after routine end-inspiration gated radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Josipovic, Mirjana

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Substantial reductions of radiation doses to heart and lung can be achieved using breathing adaptation of adjuvant radiotherapy following conservative surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiobiological implications after routine use of an end......-inspiration gated treatment, and to compare the results with predictions based on pre-clinical CT-studies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen consecutive patients with axillary lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer were referred for adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. Treatment was performed......-inspiration gating technique compared to the uncoached end-inspiration technique employed in the CT-studies. CONCLUSIONS: In a routine clinical practice involving adjuvant breast radiotherapy gated in an enhanced end-inspiration phase, remarkably low doses to organs at risk are observed. The corresponding cardiac...

  14. Predictors of Catastrophic Adverse Outcomes in Children With Pulmonary Hypertension Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization: A Multi-Institutional Analysis From the Pediatric Health Information Systems Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Michael L; Glatz, Andrew C; Hanna, Brian D; Shinohara, Russell T; Gillespie, Matthew J; Dori, Yoav; Rome, Jonathan J; Kawut, Steven M

    2015-09-15

    Cardiac catheterization is the standard of care procedure for diagnosis, choice of therapy, and longitudinal follow-up of children and adults with pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the procedure is invasive and has risks associated with both the procedure and recovery period. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for catastrophic adverse outcomes in children with PH undergoing cardiac catheterization. We studied children and young adults up to 21 years of age with PH undergoing 1 or more cardiac catheterization at centers participating in the Pediatric Health Information Systems database between 2007 and 2012. Using mixed-effects multivariable regression, we assessed the association between pre-specified subject- and procedure-level covariates and the risk of the composite outcome of death or initiation of mechanical circulatory support within 1 day of cardiac catheterization after adjustment for patient- and procedure-level factors. A total of 6,339 procedures performed on 4,401 patients with a diagnosis of PH from 38 of 43 centers contributing data to the Pediatric Health Information Systems database were included. The observed risk of composite outcome was 3.5%. In multivariate modeling, the adjusted risk of the composite outcome was 3.3%. Younger age at catheterization, cardiac operation in the same admission as the catheterization, pre-procedural systemic vasodilator infusion, and hemodialysis were independently associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Pre-procedural use of pulmonary vasodilators was associated with reduced risk of composite outcome. The risk of cardiac catheterization in children and young adults with PH is high relative to previously reported risk in other pediatric populations. The risk is influenced by patient-level factors. Further research is necessary to determine whether knowledge of these factors can be translated into practices that improve outcomes for children with PH. Copyright © 2015 American

  15. Prehospital predictors of neurological outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients aged 95 years and older: A nationwide population-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funada, Akira; Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Tada, Hayato; Teramoto, Ryota; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Kenshi; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    Population aging has rapidly progressed in Japan. However, few data exist regarding the characteristics of extremely elderly patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to determine the prehospital predictors of one-month survival with favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale, category 1 or 2; CPC 1-2) in this population. We investigated 23,520 OHCA patients aged ≥95 years from a prospectively recorded, nationwide, Utstein-style Japanese database between 2008 and 2012. The primary study endpoint was one-month CPC 1-2 after OHCA. The one-month CPC 1-2 rate was 0.27% (63/23,520). Only two variables were significantly associated with one-month CPC 1-2 in a multivariate logistic regression model: prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 94.4; 95% confidential interval (CI), 50.1-191.7] and emergency medical service (EMS)-witnessed arrest (aOR, 5.1; 95% CI, 2.6-10.2). When stratified by these two predictors, the one-month CPC 1-2 rates were 20.2% (18/89) for patients who had both prehospital ROSC and EMS-witnessed arrest, 4.2% (33/783) for those who had prehospital ROSC without EMS-witnessed arrest, 0.28% (3/1065) for those who had EMS-witnessed arrest without prehospital ROSC, and 0.04% (9/21,583) for those who had neither predictor, respectively. The crucial prehospital predictors for one-month CPC 1-2 in elderly OHCA patients aged ≥95 years in Japan were prehospital ROSC and EMS-witnessed arrest and the former was the predominant predictor. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurologic Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Following Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C vs 36°C After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronberg, Tobias; Lilja, Gisela; Horn, Janneke

    2015-01-01

    from analysis for a total sample size of 939. INTERVENTIONS: Targeted temperature management at 33°C vs 36°C. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cognitive function was measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and assessed by observers through the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline...... summary score was 46.8 (13.8) and 47.5 (13.8) (P = .45), comparable to the population norm. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Quality of life was good and similar in patients with cardiac arrest receiving targeted temperature management at 33°C or 36°C. Cognitive function was similar in both intervention groups......IMPORTANCE: Brain injury affects neurologic function and quality of life in survivors after cardiac arrest. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of 2 target temperature regimens on long-term cognitive function and quality of life after cardiac arrest. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS...

  17. Reduction of cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities after breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine S; Pedersen, Anders N; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2006-01-01

    the remaining breast, internal mammary, and periclavicular nodes were optimized for each scan, prescription dose 48 Gy. Normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated using the relative seriality model for the heart, and the model proposed by Burman et al. for the lung. RESULTS: Previous computed...... tomography studies showed that both voluntary DIBH and IG provided reduction of the lung V50 (relative volume receiving more than 50% of prescription dose) on the order of 30-40%, and a 80-90% reduction of the heart V50 for left-sided cancers. Corresponding pneumonitis probability of 28.1% (range, 0.......7-95.6%) for FB could be reduced to 2.6% (range, 0.1-40.1%) for IG, and 4.3% (range, 0.1-59%) for DIBH. The cardiac mortality probability could be reduced from 4.8% (range, 0.1-23.4%) in FB to 0.5% (range, 0.1-2.6%) for IG and 0.1% (range, 0-3.0%) for DIBH. CONCLUSIONS: Remarkable potential is shown for simple...

  18. Thrombospondin-1 and CD47 regulation of cardiac, pulmonary and vascular responses in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Natasha M; Sharifi-Sanjani, Maryam; Csányi, Gábor; Pagano, Patrick J; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis and health is maintained through the balanced interactions of cardiac generated blood flow and cross-talk between the cellular components that comprise blood vessels. Central to this cross-talk is endothelial generated nitric oxide (NO) that stimulates relaxation of the contractile vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) layer of blood vessels. In cardiovascular disease this balanced interaction is disrupted and NO signaling is lost. Work over the last several years indicates that regulation of NO is much more complex than previously believed. It is now apparent that the secreted protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), that is upregulated in cardiovascular disease and animal models of the same, on activating cell surface receptor CD47, redundantly inhibits NO production and NO signaling. This inhibitory event has implications for baseline and disease-related responses mediated by NO. Further work has identified that TSP1-CD47 signaling stimulates enzymatic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production to further limit blood flow and promote vascular disease. Herein consideration is given to the most recent discoveries in this regard which identify the TSP1-CD47 axis as a major proximate governor of cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac Dual-source Computed Tomography for the Detection of Left Main Compression Syndrome in Patients with Pulmonary Hyper-tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerouti, Eftychia; Manginas, Athanassios; Petrou, Emmanouil; Katsilouli, Spyridoula; Karyofillis, Panagiotis; Athanassopoulos, George; Karatasakis, George; Iakovou, Ioannis; Mihas, Konstantinos; Mastorakou, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Left Main Compression Syndrome (LMCS) represents an entity described as the extrinsic compression of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) by a dilated pulmonary artery (PA) trunk. We examined the presence of LMCS in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT), as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. The following parameters were measured: PA trunk diameter (PAD), the distance between PAD and LMCA (LMPA) and the distance between PA and aorta (AoPA). These measurements were related with demographic, echocardiographic, hemodynamic and clinical parameters. Angiography was performed in two patients with LMCS suspected by cardiac computed tomographic angiography. Patients without PH but with angina were examined as controls, using DSCT cardiac angiography to assess the same measurements and to detect the prevalence of coronary artery disease. PA diameter value over 40.00 mm has been associated with PH and LMCS. Furthermore, LMCS did not occur at a distance smaller than 0.50 mm between the PA and the LMCA, and did not correlate with the distance between the PA and the aorta or with cardiac index and NT-proBNP. DSCT may represent the initial testing modality in PH patients with dilated PA trunk to exclude LMCS. A periodical rule-out of this rare entity, as assessed by DSCT, in patients with a severely dilated PA seems to be mandatory for PH patients contributing to survival improvement.

  20. Serum Levels of Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinase 2 in Patients With Systemic Sclerosis With Duration More Than 2 Years: Correlation With Cardiac and Pulmonary Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Shahin

    2006-01-01

    with elevated TIMP-2 levels was significantly higher than dSSc patients with normal levels (P=.013. Four patients out of five with elevated TIMP-2 levels showed diastolic dysfunction (80%, compared to 2 out of 15 lSSc patients with normal levels (13.3%, with P=.014. Our research, though involving a small group of patients, points to the probable role of TIMP-2 in the development of pulmonary lesions in dSSc patients and cardiac lesions in lSSc patients with duration equal to or more than 2 years.

  1. Examination of physiological function and biochemical disorders in a rat model of prolonged asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest followed by cardio pulmonary bypass resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Yin, Tai; Yin, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Selak, Mary A; Pappan, Kirk L; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs particularly the heart and the brain. There is clinical and preclinical evidence that neurological injury is responsible for high mortality and morbidity of patients even after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A better understanding of the metabolic alterations in the brain during ischemia will enable the development of better targeted resuscitation protocols that repair the ischemic damage and minimize the additional damage caused by reperfusion. A validated whole body model of rodent arrest followed by resuscitation was utilized; animals were randomized into three groups: control, 30 minute asphyxial arrest, or 30 minutes asphyxial arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) resuscitation. Blood gases and hemodynamics were monitored during the procedures. An untargeted metabolic survey of heart and brain tissues following cardiac arrest and after CPB resuscitation was conducted to better define the alterations associated with each condition. After 30 min cardiac arrest and 60 min CPB, the rats exhibited no observable brain function and weakened heart function in a physiological assessment. Heart and brain tissues harvested following 30 min ischemia had significant changes in the concentration of metabolites in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In addition, the brain had increased lysophospholipid content. CPB resuscitation significantly normalized metabolite concentrations in the heart tissue, but not in the brain tissue. The observation that metabolic alterations are seen primarily during cardiac arrest suggests that the events of ischemia are the major cause of neurological damage in our rat model of asphyxia-CPB resuscitation. Impaired glycolysis and increased lysophospholipids observed only in the brain suggest that altered energy metabolism and phospholipid degradation may be a central mechanism in unresuscitatable brain damage.

  2. Single versus Serial Measurements of Neuron-Specific Enolase and Prediction of Poor Neurological Outcome in Persistently Unconscious Patients after Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - A TTM-Trial Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Stammet, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prediction of neurological outcome is a crucial part of post cardiac arrest care and prediction in patients remaining unconscious and/or sedated after rewarming from targeted temperature management (TTM) remains difficult. Current guidelines suggest the use of serial measurements...... of the biomarker neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in combination with other predictors of outcome in patients admitted after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). This study sought to investigate the ability of NSE to predict poor outcome in patients remaining unconscious at day three after OHCA. In addition......) of 0.83. A combination of all three NSE measurements yielded the highest discovered AUC (0.88, p = .0002). Easily applicable combinations of serial NSE measurements did not significantly improve prediction over a single measurement at 48 hours (AUC 0.58-0.84 versus 0.83). CONCLUSION: NSE is a strong...

  3. Pleural and pulmonary involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Olga; Harari, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare complex autoimmune disease with a multisystem involvement. The clinical manifestations of this disease include an erythematous rash, oral ulcers, polyarthralgia, nonerosive arthritis, polyserositis, hematologic, renal, neurologic, pulmonary and cardiac abnormalties. The involvement of the respiratory system is frequent. Pleuro-pulmonary manifestations are present in almost half of the patients during the disease course and may be the presenting symptoms in 4-5% of patients with SLE. Complications directly associated to the disease include pleuritis with or without pleural effusion, alveolitis, interstitial lung disease, lupus pneumonitis, pulmonary hemorrhage, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Complications due to secondary causes include pleuro-pulmonary manifestations of cardiac and renal failure, atelectasis due to diaphragmatic dysfunction, opportunistic pneumonia, and drug toxicity. The prevalence, clinical presentation, prognosis and response to treatment vary, depending on the pattern of involvement. As with other connective tissue diseases, early and specific therapeutic intervention may be indicated for many of these pleuro-pulmonary manifestations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Esteves Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

  5. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

  6. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis. PMID:24826214

  7. Cardiac output measurement by bioimpedance and noninvasive pulse contour analysis compared with the continuous pulmonary artery thermodilution technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, Saskia W. M. C.; Roekaerts, Paul M. H. J.; Lance, Marcus D.

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare 2 noninvasive cardiac output measurement methods with the continuous cardiac output thermodilution (CCO-TD) method. Design: A single-center prospective design. Setting: A university hospital. Participants: Fifty-three consecutive patients

  8. Benefit of combining quantitative cardiac CT parameters with troponin I for predicting right ventricular dysfunction and adverse clinical events in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@umm.de [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Roeger, Susanne, E-mail: susanne.roeger@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Haghi, Dariush, E-mail: dariush.haghi@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Kaminski, Wolfgang E., E-mail: wolfgang.kaminski@umm.de [Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Neumaier, Michael, E-mail: michael.neumaier@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: Stefan.Schoenberg@umm.de [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of quantitative cardiac CT parameters alone and in combination with troponin I for the assessment of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) and adverse clinical events in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and results: This prospective study had institutional review board approval and was HIPAA compliant. In total 83 patients with confirmed PE underwent echocardiography and troponin I serum level measurements within 24 h. Three established cardiac CT measurements for the assessment of RVD were obtained (RV/LV{sub axial}, RV/LV{sub 4-CH}, and RV/LV{sub volume}). CT measurements and troponin I serum levels were correlated with RVD found on echocardiography and adverse clinical events according to Management Strategies and Prognosis in Pulmonary Embolism Trial-3 (MAPPET-3 criteria. 31 of 83 patients with PE had RVD on echocardiography and 39 of 83 patients had adverse clinical events. A RV/LV{sub volume} ratio > 1.43 showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) (0.65) for the prediction of adverse clinical events when compared to RV/LV{sub axial}, RV/LV{sub 4Ch} and troponin I. The AUC for the detection of RVD of RV/LV{sub axial}, RV/LV{sub 4Ch}, RV/LV{sub volume}, and troponin I were 0.86, 0.86, 0.92, and 0.69, respectively. Combination of RV/LV{sub axial}, RV/LV{sub 4Ch}, RV/LV{sub volume} with troponin I increased the AUC to 0.87, 0.87 and 0.93, respectively. Conclusion: A combination of cardiac CT parameters and troponin I measurements improves the diagnostic accuracy for detecting RVD and predicting adverse clinical events if compared to either test alone.

  9. Effects of sildenafil on cardiac structure and function, cardiopulmonary exercise testing and health-related quality of life measures in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Licette C Y; Hummel, Yoran M; van der Meer, Peter; Berger, Rolf M F; Damman, Kevin; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Voors, Adriaan A; Hoendermis, Elke S

    2017-01-01

    We recently showed that sildenafil did not improve pulmonary pressures and exercise capacity in a cohort of patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and predominantly postcapillary pulmonary hypertension. Here, we present the effects of sildenafil on cardiac structure and function, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, laboratory parameters and health-related quality of life measures. Fifty-two HFpEF patients with pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure >25 mmHg; pulmonary artery wedge pressure >15 mmHg) were randomized to sildenafil 60 mg three times a day or placebo and treated for 12 weeks. Sildenafil neither changed cardiac structure nor function on echocardiography compared with placebo. Considering all patients irrespective of maximal effort, sildenafil reduced peak heart rate by 8 b.p.m. [95% confidence interval (CI) -14.97 to -1.03] and peak blood pressure by 13.8 mmHg (95% CI -22.04 to -5.47)/7.3 mmHg (95% CI -13.60 to -1.07) (both P hypertension did not affect cardiac structure and function, integrative exercise responses, laboratory parameters, and/or quality of life. Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT01726049. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  10. Serum procalcitonin as a marker of post-cardiac arrest syndrome and long-term neurological recovery, but not of early-onset infections, in comatose post-anoxic patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Harald; Ben Hamouda, Nawfel; Portmann, Katharina; Delodder, Frederik; Suys, Tamarah; Feihl, François; Eggimann, Philippe; Rossetti, Andrea O; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-06-01

    To examine the relationship of early serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels with the severity of post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS), long-term neurological recovery and the risk of early-onset infections in patients with coma after cardiac arrest (CA) treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). A prospective cohort of adult comatose CA patients treated with TH (33°C, for 24h) admitted to the medical/surgical intensive care unit, Lausanne University Hospital, was studied. Serum PCT was measured early after CA, at two time-points (days 1 and 2). The SOFA score was used to quantify the severity of PCAS. Diagnosis of early-onset infections (within the first 7 days of ICU stay) was made after review of clinical, radiological and microbiological data. Neurological recovery at 3 months was assessed with Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC), and was dichotomized as favorable (CPC 1-2) vs. unfavorable (CPC 3-5). From December 2009 to April 2012, 100 patients (median age 64 [interquartile range 55-73] years, median time from collapse to ROSC 20 [11-30]min) were studied. Peak PCT correlated with SOFA score at day 1 (Spearman's R=0.44, p<0.0001) and was associated with neurological recovery at 3 months (peak PCT 1.08 [0.35-4.45]ng/ml in patients with CPC 1-2 vs. 3.07 [0.89-9.99] ng/ml in those with CPC 3-5, p=0.01). Peak PCT did not differ significantly between patients with early-onset vs. no infections (2.14 [0.49-6.74] vs. 1.53 [0.46-5.38]ng/ml, p=0.49). Early elevations of serum PCT levels correlate with the severity of PCAS and are associated with worse neurological recovery after CA and TH. In contrast, elevated serum PCT did not correlate with early-onset infections in this setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of Goal-Oriented Therapy with Different Infusion Media on Pulmonary Extravascular Water Levels in Cardiac Surgery Patients

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    G. B. Moroz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the impact of goal-oriented infusion therapy using balanced salt solution, 4% succinylated gelatin, and 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 solution on pulmonary extravascular water levels in coronary heart disease patients operated on under extracorporeal circulation.Materials and methods. A prospective, randomized, single-blind clinical study investigating the impact of goal-oriented infusion therapy using balanced salt solution, 4% succinylated gelatin, and 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 solution on pulmonary extravascular water levels was conducted in coronary heart disease patents operated on under extracorporeal circulation. The hemodynamic target was the global end-diastolic volume index which was maintained in the range from 680 to 850 ml/m2. Pulmonary extravascular water was measured by a transpulmonary thermodilution technique; hydrobalance, lactate, mixed venous oxygen saturation, hemodynamic parameters, and troponin I concentrations were also investigated.Results. Analysis of the values of the pulmonary extravascular water index revealed no differences between the groups in pulmonary extravascular water levels throughout the study. Large volumes of balanced crystalloid solution were required to maintain intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamics. Balance after surgery was considerably higher and amounted to 2000 [1415—2200] ml in the crystalloid group, 1020 [650—1563] ml in the gelatin group, and 1070 [550—1675] ml in the hydroxyethyl starch solution (p=0.001. Mixed venous oxygen saturation, lactate, and troponin I concentrations were comparable between the groups at the study stages.Conclusion. It was found the infusion therapy using balanced salt solution failed to result in an increase in pulmonary extravascular water levels in coronary heart disease patients operated on under extracorporeal circulation as did colloid solution-based infusion therapy. Achieving hemodynamic targets requires a large volume

  12. The feasibility of a heart block with an electron compensation as an alternative whole breast radiotherapy technique in patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Jin Kang

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of the heart block with electron compensation (HBE technique, based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT in left-sided breast cancer patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease.Twenty patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT were included in this study. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, 3D-CRT, and HBE treatment plans were generated for each patient. Based on the 3D-CRT plan, the HBE plan included a heart block from the medial tangential field to shield the heart and added an electron beam to compensate for the loss in target volume coverage. The dosimetric parameters for the heart and lung and the target volume between the three treatment types were compared.Of the three plans, the HBE plan yielded the most significant reduction in the doses received by the heart and lung (heart Dmean: 5.1 Gy vs. 12.9 Gy vs. 4.0 Gy and lung Dmean: 11.4 Gy vs. 13.2 Gy vs. 10.5 Gy, for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HBE, respectively. Target coverage with all three techniques was within the acceptable range (Dmean 51.0 Gy vs. 51.2 Gy vs. 50.6 Gy, for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HBE, respectively.The HBE plan effectively reduced the amount of radiation exposure to the heart and lung. It could be beneficial for patients who are vulnerable to radiation-related cardiac or pulmonary toxicities.

  13. The feasibility of a heart block with an electron compensation as an alternative whole breast radiotherapy technique in patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, Shin-Wook; Son, Seok Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of the heart block with electron compensation (HBE) technique, based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in left-sided breast cancer patients with underlying cardiac or pulmonary disease. Twenty patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) were included in this study. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), 3D-CRT, and HBE treatment plans were generated for each patient. Based on the 3D-CRT plan, the HBE plan included a heart block from the medial tangential field to shield the heart and added an electron beam to compensate for the loss in target volume coverage. The dosimetric parameters for the heart and lung and the target volume between the three treatment types were compared. Of the three plans, the HBE plan yielded the most significant reduction in the doses received by the heart and lung (heart Dmean: 5.1 Gy vs. 12.9 Gy vs. 4.0 Gy and lung Dmean: 11.4 Gy vs. 13.2 Gy vs. 10.5 Gy, for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HBE, respectively). Target coverage with all three techniques was within the acceptable range (Dmean 51.0 Gy vs. 51.2 Gy vs. 50.6 Gy, for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HBE, respectively). The HBE plan effectively reduced the amount of radiation exposure to the heart and lung. It could be beneficial for patients who are vulnerable to radiation-related cardiac or pulmonary toxicities.

  14. Sildenafil no tratamento da hipertensão pulmonar após cirurgia cardíaca Sildenafil for pulmonary hypertension treatment after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina Bentlin

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar o uso do Sildenafil no tratamento da hipertensão pulmonar em recém-nascido após cirurgia cardíaca. DESCRIÇÃO: Recém-nascido de termo, feminino, com diagnóstico de dupla via de saída de ventrículo direito, hipoplasia de pulmonar e comunicação interventricular subaórtica, foi submetido à cirurgia de Blalock na primeira semana de vida. No pós-operatório, evoluiu com hipertensão pulmonar e hipoxemia persistente, não-responsiva ao óxido nítrico, porém com melhora da oxigenação após infusão endovenosa contínua de prostaglandina E1. Depois de várias tentativas malsucedidas de retirada da prostaglandina E1, optou-se pela introdução do Sildenafil via oral. Houve queda da resistência vascular pulmonar, com conseqüente melhora na oxigenação e, 48 horas após, foi possível suspender a infusão de prostaglandina E1. COMENTÁRIOS: O Sildenafil pode ser alternativa terapêutica na hipertensão pulmonar, especialmente quando não houver resposta à terapia convencional.OBJECTIVE: To report on the use of sildenafil for pulmonary hypertension treatment of a newborn patient after cardiac surgery. DESCRIPTION: A female, full term newborn infant with diagnosis of double outlet right ventricle, pulmonary hypoplasia and subaortic ventricular septal defect, was submitted to Blalock surgery in the first week of life. In postoperative the newborn had pulmonary hypertension and persistent hypoxia, without response to nitric oxide, but with improved oxygenation after continuous intravenous infusion of prostaglandin E1. After several failed attempts to discontinue prostaglandin E1, oral sildenafil was used. There was a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance with consequent oxygenation improvement and 48 hours later it was possible to discontinue prostaglandin E1 infusion. COMMENTS: Sildenafil can be an alternative therapy for pulmonary hypertension, especially when there is no response to conventional therapy.

  15. Reduced in-hospital survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims with obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; Warnier, M J; Bardai, A

    2013-01-01

    with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have a lower survival rate after OHCA than non-OPD patients. METHODS: We performed a community-based cohort study of 1172 patients with non-traumatic OHCA with ECG-documented VT/VF between 2005 and 2008. We compared survival to emergency room (ER), to hospital admission...

  16. Cardiac output measurement by bioimpedance and noninvasive pulse contour analysis compared with the continuous pulmonary artery thermodilution technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Saskia W M C; Roekaerts, Paul M H J; Lancé, Marcus D

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare 2 noninvasive cardiac output measurement methods with the continuous cardiac output thermodilution (CCO-TD) method. A single-center prospective design. A university hospital. Fifty-three consecutive patients scheduled for elective, non-emergent cardiac surgery. With each participant the cardiac output was measured using 3 methods: CCO-TD, the Endotracheal Cardiac Output Monitor (ECOM), and the Nexfin monitor. Measurements were performed simultaneously at 7 time points: After induction, before cardiopulmonary bypass, after cardiopulmonary bypass, after protamine, after arrival in the intensive care unit, and before extubation on postoperative day 1. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation, Bland-Altman, percent error, and polar plots. Compared to CCO-TD, ECOM showed significant correlation of R0.619 with a bias of -0.13 L/min (95% confidence interval -2.19-1.93 L/min), a percent error of 40%, and trending ability of 87% and 97% within 0.5 L/min and 1.0 L/min, respectively. The Nexfin monitor showed significant correlation of R0.535 with a bias of-0.35 L/min (95% confidence interval-3.36-2.66 L/min), a percent error of 58% and trending ability of 84% and 97% were within 0.5 L/min and 1.0 L/min limits of agreement. Neither the ECOM nor the Nexfin had the ability to replace the thermodilution-based continuous cardiac output monitor. The ECOM did not have acceptable accuracy or trending ability and only could be utilized for intubated patients. The Nexfin lacked reliability and trending ability. Also, the Nexfin did not provide consistent results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pulmonary artery to aorta ratio is associated with cardiac structure and functional changes in mild-to-moderate COPD

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    Cuttica MJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Cuttica,1 Surya P Bhatt,2 Sharon R Rosenberg,1 Lauren Beussink,3 Sanjiv J Shah,3 Lewis J Smith,1 Mark T Dransfield,2 Ravi Kalhan1 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 2Division of Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 3Division of Cardiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA Background: The ratio of the diameter of the pulmonary artery (PA to the diameter of the aorta (PA:A on computed tomography (CT imaging is associated with both COPD exacerbation and pulmonary hypertension. The mechanisms of PA enlargement in COPD are poorly understood. Methods: In this retrospective, single center study we evaluated pulmonary function, CT scans, right heart catheterizations, and echocardiography in 88 subjects with mild-to-moderately severe COPD. A sensitivity analysis was performed in 43 subjects in whom CT scan and echocardiogram were performed within 50 days of each other. To evaluate the association between PA:A ratio and echocardiographic parameters and hemodynamics, we performed simple correlations and multivariable linear regression analysis adjusting for lung function, age, sex, race, and diastolic function. Results: All subjects had preserved left ventricular (LV systolic function (LV ejection fraction 62.7%±5.5%. Among them, 56.8% had evidence of diastolic dysfunction. There was no association between PA:A ratio and the presence of diastolic dysfunction. In a multivariable model, PA:A ratio was associated with right ventricular (RV chamber size (β=0.015; P<0.003, RV wall thickness (β=0.56; P<0.002, and RV function (–0.49; P=0.05. In the subgroup of subjects with testing within 50 days, the association with RV chamber size persisted (β=0.017; P=0.04, as did the lack of association with diastolic function. PA:A ratio was also associated with elevated PA systolic

  18. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  19. Automatic slice-alignment method in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of the right ventricle in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Yokoyama

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new automatic slice-alignment method, which enables right ventricular scan planning in addition to the left ventricular scan planning developed in our previous work, to simplify right ventricular cardiac scan planning and assess its accuracy and the clinical acceptability of the acquired imaging planes in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension. Steady-state free precession (SSFP sequences covering the whole heart in the end-diastolic phase with ECG gating were used to acquire 2D axial multislice images. To realize right ventricular scan planning, two morphological feature points are added to be detected and a total of eight morphological features of the heart were extracted from these series of images, and six left ventricular planes and four right ventricular planes were calculated simultaneously based on the extracted features. The subjects were 33 patients (25 with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and 8 with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. The four right ventricular reference planes including right ventricular short-axis, 4-chamber, 2-chamber, and 3-chamber images were evaluated. The acceptability of the acquired imaging planes was visually evaluated using a 4-point scale, and the angular differences between the results obtained by this method and by conventional manual annotation were measured for each view. The average visual scores were 3.9±0.4 for short-axis images, 3.8±0.4 for 4-chamber images, 3.8±0.4 for 2-chamber images, and 3.5±0.6 for 3-chamber images. The average angular differences were 8.7±5.3, 8.3±4.9, 8.1±4.8, and 7.9±5.3 degrees, respectively. The processing time was less than 2.5 seconds in all subjects. The proposed method, which enables right ventricular scan planning in addition to the left ventricular scan planning developed in our previous work, can provide clinically acceptable planes in a short time and is useful because special proficiency in performing

  20. Automatic slice-alignment method in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of the right ventricle in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Nitta, Shuhei; Kuhara, Shigehide; Ishimura, Rieko; Kariyasu, Toshiya; Imai, Masamichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Takeguchi, Tomoyuki; Shiodera, Taichiro

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new automatic slice-alignment method, which enables right ventricular scan planning in addition to the left ventricular scan planning developed in our previous work, to simplify right ventricular cardiac scan planning and assess its accuracy and the clinical acceptability of the acquired imaging planes in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension. Steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences covering the whole heart in the end-diastolic phase with ECG gating were used to acquire 2D axial multislice images. To realize right ventricular scan planning, two morphological feature points are added to be detected and a total of eight morphological features of the heart were extracted from these series of images, and six left ventricular planes and four right ventricular planes were calculated simultaneously based on the extracted features. The subjects were 33 patients (25 with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and 8 with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension). The four right ventricular reference planes including right ventricular short-axis, 4-chamber, 2-chamber, and 3-chamber images were evaluated. The acceptability of the acquired imaging planes was visually evaluated using a 4-point scale, and the angular differences between the results obtained by this method and by conventional manual annotation were measured for each view. The average visual scores were 3.9±0.4 for short-axis images, 3.8±0.4 for 4-chamber images, 3.8±0.4 for 2-chamber images, and 3.5±0.6 for 3-chamber images. The average angular differences were 8.7±5.3, 8.3±4.9, 8.1±4.8, and 7.9±5.3 degrees, respectively. The processing time was less than 2.5 seconds in all subjects. The proposed method, which enables right ventricular scan planning in addition to the left ventricular scan planning developed in our previous work, can provide clinically acceptable planes in a short time and is useful because special proficiency in performing cardiac MR for

  1. The use of 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging for therapeutic decisions in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices and significant neurological, neurosurgical and neuro-oncology diagnostic indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, Łukasz; Sterliński, Maciej; Marczak, Magdalena; Miśko, Jolanta; Podgórski, Jan Krzysztof; Szwed, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Between September 2009 and May 2014 the classification of 36 patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in terms of the feasibility of MRI scanning due to strong clinical indications was carried out. Finally MRI examinations were performed in 20 patients, of whom 27 studies were conducted and a total number of 35 anatomical regions were scanned. Neurological, neurosurgical and neuro-oncology indications for MRI were reported in 19 patients (95%) in whom 26 MRI studies (96.3%) were performed, and 34 anatomical regions (97.1%) were scanned. One patient had indications for MRI in the field of cardiology. Medical information obtained from 27 MRI studies allowed decisions to be made regarding the treatment in all patients. After 8 studies (29.6%), patients were classified into 9 different neurosurgical procedures. In the case of the remaining 19 studies (70.4%), there were no indications for surgical treatment and the decisions to implement conservative treatment were made. There were no complications related to the implanted CIEDs observed: neither immediate nor in the follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; ...

  4. Cardiac Malpositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Shi Joon; Im, Chung Gie; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Hasn, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    Cardiac Malposition refers to any position of the heart other than a left-sided heart in a situs solitus individual. Associated cardiac malformations are so complex that even angiocardiographic and autopsy studies may not afford an accurate information. Although the terms and classifications used to describe the internal cardiac anatomy and their arterial connections in cardiac malpositions differ and tend to be confusing, common agreement exists on the need for a segmental approach to diagnosis. Authors present 18 cases of cardiac malpositions in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between 1971 and 1979. Authors analyzed the clinical, radiographic, operative and autopsy findings with the emphasis on the angiocardiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 18 cases with cardiac malpositions, 6 cases had dextrocardia with situs inversus, 9 cases had dextrocardia with situs solitus and 3 cases had levocardia with situs inversus. 2. There was no genuine exception to visceroatrial concordance rule. 3. Associated cardiac malpositions were variable and complex with a tendency of high association of transposition and double outlet varieties with dextrocardia in situs solitus and levocardia in situs inversus. Only one in 6 cases of dextrocardia with situs inversus had pure transposition. 4. In two cases associated pulmonary atresia was found at surgery which was not predicted by angiocardiography. 5. Because many of the associated complex lesions can be corrected surgically provided the diagnosis is accurate, the selective biplane angiocardiography with or without cineradiography is essential.

  5. Cardiac "fitness" training: an experimental comparative study of three methods of pulmonary artery banding for ventricular training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bret, Emmanuel; Lupoglazoff, Jean Marc; Borenstein, Nicolas; Fromont, Gaelle; Laborde, François; Bachet, Jean; Vouhé, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    When the left ventricle is unable to sustain a systemic pressure in transposition of the great arteries (TGA), left ventricular retraining is mandatory before the morphologic left ventricle under the aorta is switched. This is currently achieved by creating a ventricular overload through pulmonary artery banding, usually associated with an aortopulmonary shunt in case of a TGA with an intact ventricular septum. Our experimental study compared three different modes of increased ventricular afterload to obtain ventricular hypertrophy. Fifteen lambs (mean weight 48 kg) underwent pulmonary artery banding. Five animals (group I) received a classic band; 5 (group II) received a classic band which was adjusted at week 1 and 3; and 4 (group III) received a band which was tightened for 1 hour, twice a day (early morning and late afternoon). After 5 weeks, the lambs were evaluated hemodynamically before they were sacrificed and their hearts harvested for histologic examination. No difference was noted in the hemodynamic data between groups 1 and II. Group III showed a greater ability to increase ventricular pressure in this model. No significant difference was noted between the three groups in terms of macroscopic alterations, but all animals demonstrated an increase in right ventricular wall thickness compared with control animals. Several fibrosis areas were evident in group I and II but none in group III. Intermittent pulmonary artery banding is able to induce hemodynamically sufficient ventricular hypertrophy without fibrosis.

  6. Side differences in cerebrovascular accidents after cardiac surgery: a statistical analysis of neurologic symptoms and possible implications for anatomic mechanisms of aortic particle embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivie, Patrik; Edström, Cecilia; Engström, Karl Gunnar

    2005-03-01

    Aortic manipulation and particle embolization have been identified to cause cerebrovascular accidents in cardiac surgery. Recent data suggest that left-hemispheric cerebrovascular accident (right-sided symptoms) is more common, and this has been interpreted as being caused by aortic cannula stream jets. Our aim was to evaluate symptoms of cerebrovascular accident and side differences from a retrospective statistical analysis. During a 2-year period, 2641 consecutive cardiac surgery cases were analyzed. Patients positive for cerebrovascular accident were extracted from a database designed to monitor clinical symptoms. A protocol was used to confirm symptom data with the correct diagnosis in patient records. Patients were subdivided into 3 groups: control, immediate cerebrovascular accident, and delayed cerebrovascular accident. Among pooled patients, immediate and delayed cerebrovascular accidents were 3.0% and 0.9%, respectively. The expected predisposing factors behind immediate cerebrovascular accidents were significant, although the type of operation affected this search. Aortic quality was a strong predictor ( P cerebrovascular accident was unaffected by surgery group. Left-sided symptoms of immediate cerebrovascular accident were approximately twice as frequent ( P = .016) as on the contralateral side. This phenomenon was observed for pooled patients and for isolated coronary bypass procedures (n = 1882; P = .025). Immediate cerebrovascular accident and aortic calcifications are linked. The predominance of left-sided symptoms may suggest that aortic manipulation and anatomic mechanisms in the aortic arch are more likely to cause cerebrovascular accidents than effects from cannula stream jets.

  7. Right Ventricular Volumes and Systolic Function by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and the Impact of Sex, Age, and Obesity in a Longitudinally Followed Cohort Free of Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Disease: The Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Murilo; Arora, Garima; Gona, Philimon; Ashrafi, Arman; Salton, Carol J; Yeon, Susan B; Blease, Susan J; Levy, Daniel; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Manning, Warren J; Chuang, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance is uniquely well suited for noninvasive imaging of the right ventricle. We sought to define normal cardiac magnetic resonance reference values and to identify the main determinants of right ventricular (RV) volumes and systolic function using a modern imaging sequence in a community-dwelling, longitudinally followed cohort free of clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. The Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort has been followed since 1971. We scanned 1794 Offspring cohort members using steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance and identified a reference group of 1336 adults (64±9 years, 576 men) free of prevalent cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. RV trabeculations and papillary muscles were considered cavity volume. Men had greater RV volumes and cardiac output before and after indexation to body size (all Pheart rate account for most of the variability in RV volumes and function in this community-dwelling population. We report sex-specific normative values for RV measurements among principally middle-aged and older adults. RV ejection fraction is greater in women. RV volumes increase with body size, are greater in men, and are smaller in older people. Body surface area seems to be appropriate for indexation of cardiac magnetic resonance-derived RV volumes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. The Impact of the Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Patch on Right Ventricular Strain in Tetralogy of Fallot: A Comparison with Valvar Pulmonary Stenosis Utilizing Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shafkat; Harris, Matthew A; Whitehead, Kevin K; Keller, Marc S; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Fogel, Mark A; Mercer-Rosa, Laura

    2017-03-01

    A non-contractile transannular patch (TAP) in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) contributes to ventricular dysfunction after tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair. We compared regional right ventricular (RV) strain in repaired TOF with valvar pulmonary stenosis (VPS) after balloon valvuloplasty to investigate the effects of TAP. Retrospective review of 26 cardiac magnetic resonance studies of TOF (n = 13) and VPS (n = 13) subjects matched by degree and duration of pulmonary regurgitation (PR). Feature tracking strain analysis was performed. Student's t tests, Pearson correlation, and linear regression were applied. RV ejection fraction (EF) was normal and similar between TOF and VPS (60 and 65%, respectively, p = 0.8). RV 4-chamber Lagrangian longitudinal strain (RV 4ch LS) was worse in both groups compared to normals but comparable to each other: -18.2 (95% CI -3.6 to -33) for TOF and -20.2 (95% CI -12.4 to -28) for VPS, p = 0.5. RVOT LS was worse than RV 4ch LS in TOF, p = 0.05, but not in VPS, p = 0.19. There were no significant differences in RVOT strain between groups, p = 0.18. RVOT strain and RV 4ch LS correlated positively with RV EF in VPS (r = 0.72, p = 0.003 and r = 0.55, p = 0.04). PR degree correlated negatively with RVOT LS for TOF and VPS. Longitudinal strain is diminished in VPS and TOF subjects with preserved RV EF. TAP could explain worse RVOT strain in TOF. Longitudinal studies are needed to ascertain if RV strain predicts worsening of RV EF.

  9. Evidence for Time-dependent Maximum Increase ofFree Radical Damage and Eicosanoid Formation in theBrain as Related to Duration of Cardiac Arrest andCardio-pulmonary Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Samar; Liu, Xiaoli; Nozari, Ala; Rubertsson, Sten; Miclescu, Adriana; Wiklund, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of neurological function in patients following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a complex event. Free radical induced oxidative stress is supposed to be involved in this process. We studied levels of 8-iso-PGF2alpha (indicating oxidative injury) and 15-keto-dihydro-PGF2alpha (indicating inflammatory response) in venous plasma obtained from the jugular bulb in a porcine model of experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where 2, 5, 8, 10 or 12 min of ve...

  10. 'Stand still …, and move on' , an early neurologically-focused follow-up for cardiac arrest survivors and their caregivers: a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulaert, Véronique R M; van Haastregt, Jolanda C M; Wade, Derick T; van Heugten, Caroline M; Verbunt, Jeanine A

    2014-01-23

    A cardiac arrest can lead to hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury which can result in cognitive and emotional impairments and may negatively affect daily functioning, participation in society and quality of life. Furthermore, the impact on the family of the patient can be high. We designed an intervention called 'Stand still …, and move on', which is a concise, individualised, semi-structured intervention for survivors of cardiac arrest and their caregivers, consisting of between one and six face-to-face consultations provided by a trained nurse. The intervention is directed at early detection of cognitive and emotional problems, provision of information, promotion of self-management and referral to specialised care if necessary. The effectiveness of the intervention is being examined in a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN74835019]. Alongside this trial we performed a process evaluation which aims to investigate the feasibility of the intervention by assessing: 1) the attendance and dose delivered; 2) performance according to protocol; and 3) the opinion of patients, caregivers and nurses on the intervention. Participants of this process evaluation were 97 patients allocated to the intervention group of the RCT, their 91 caregivers, and six nurses who conducted the intervention. Measurement instruments used were evaluation forms for patients and caregivers, registration and evaluation forms for nurses, and semi-structured interviews with nurses. Seventy-nine of the patients (81%) allocated to the intervention group and 65 caregivers (71%) participated in the intervention. The mean (SD) number of consultations per patient was 1.8 (1.0), and most consultations were conducted at the patients' home. The intervention was performed largely according to protocol, except that the intervention usually started later than intended, consultations were longer than expected, and the topic of self-management was not regularly addressed. Patients marked the quality of the

  11. Effectiveness of mild therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael N; Hollenbeck, Ryan D; Pollock, Jeremy S; McPherson, John A; Fredi, Joseph L; Piana, Robert N; Mah, May L; Fish, Frank A; Markham, Larry

    2014-07-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is an established therapy to improve survival and reduce neurologic injury after cardiac arrest. Adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death. The use of TH in this population has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study is to report our institutional experience using this treatment modality in patients with ACHD after cardiac arrest. We performed a retrospective observational study of a cohort of 245 consecutive patients treated with TH after cardiac arrest from 2007 to 2013. Five patients were identified as having complex ACHD with a mean age of 28 years. All were treated with TH according to an institutional protocol utilizing active surface cooling to maintain a core body temperature of 32°C to 34°C for 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Congenital lesions in these 5 patients included anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery; l-transposition of the great arteries; d-transposition of the great arteries status post atrial switch; unoperated tricuspid atresia, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect with Eisenmenger's physiology; and surgically corrected atrial septal defect, cleft mitral valve, and subaortic membrane. All 5 patients suffered cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmia and all survived to discharge without significant neurologic impairment. Therapeutic interventions included anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery ligation, percutaneous coronary intervention, and defibrillator implantation. In conclusion, in 5 patients with ACHD, the use of TH after cardiac arrest resulted in 100% survival to hospital discharge with good neurologic outcome postresuscitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Survival and neurological outcomes after nasopharyngeal cooling or peripheral vein cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Barbut, Denise; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Cho, Jun Hwi; Sun, Shijie; Li, Yongqin; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2010-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves the success of resuscitation. In this study, we compared the effects of nasopharyngeal cooling with cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on resuscitation outcome in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation would yield better resuscitation outcome when compared with cold saline infusion. Randomized, prospective animal study. University-affiliated research laboratory. Yorkshire-X domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 14 pigs weighing 38 +/- 2 kg. After 15 mins of untreated ventricular fibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed for 5 mins before defibrillation. Coincident with the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, animals were randomly assigned to receive nasopharyngeal cooling with the aid of the RhinoChill Device (BeneChill, San Diego, CA) or cold saline infusion with 30 mL/kg 4 degrees C saline. One hour after restoration of spontaneous circulation, surface cooling was begun with the aid of a water blanket in both groups and maintained for 4 hrs. Jugular vein temperature significantly decreased in animals subjected to nasopharyngeal cooling in comparison with those receiving cold saline infusion (p cold saline infusion (p cold saline infusion group (p = .02). In this model, nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improved the success of resuscitation compared to cooling with cold saline infusion.

  13. Multi-atlas propagation based left atrium segmentation coupled with super-voxel based pulmonary veins delineation in late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zhuang, Xiahai; Khan, Habib; Haldar, Shouvik; Nyktari, Eva; Li, Lei; Ye, Xujiong; Slabaugh, Greg; Wong, Tom; Mohiaddin, Raad; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David

    2017-02-01

    Late Gadolinium-Enhanced Cardiac MRI (LGE CMRI) is a non-invasive technique, which has shown promise in detecting native and post-ablation atrial scarring. To visualize the scarring, a precise segmentation of the left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) anatomy is performed as a first step—usually from an ECG gated CMRI roadmap acquisition—and the enhanced scar regions from the LGE CMRI images are superimposed. The anatomy of the LA and PVs in particular is highly variable and manual segmentation is labor intensive and highly subjective. In this paper, we developed a multi-atlas propagation based whole heart segmentation (WHS) to delineate the LA and PVs from ECG gated CMRI roadmap scans. While this captures the anatomy of the atrium well, the PVs anatomy is less easily visualized. The process is therefore augmented by semi-automated manual strokes for PVs identification in the registered LGE CMRI data. This allows us to extract more accurate anatomy than the fully automated WHS. Both qualitative visualization and quantitative assessment with respect to manual segmented ground truth showed that our method is efficient and effective with an overall mean Dice score of 0.91.

  14. Duration of Prehospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Favorable Neurological Outcomes for Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Funada, Akira; Goto, Yumiko

    2016-12-20

    The appropriate duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains unclear and may differ based on initial rhythm. We aimed to determine the relationship between the duration of prehospital CPR by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and post-OHCA outcomes. We analyzed the records of 12 877 pediatric patients who experienced OHCAs (Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration was defined as the time from CPR initiation by EMS personnel to prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or to hospital arrival when prehospital ROSC was not achieved during prehospital CPR efforts. The rates of 30-day survival and 30-day CPC 1 to 2 were 9.1% (n=1167) and 2.5% (n=325), respectively. Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration was significantly and inversely associated with 30-day outcomes (adjusted odds ratio for 1-minute increments: 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.93-0.95 for survival; adjusted odds ratio: 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-0.92 for CPC 1-2). The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for favorable outcomes diminished to prehospital EMS-initiated CPR durations beyond which the chance for 30-day survival with CPC 1 to 2 diminished to prehospital CPR duration, beyond which the chance for favorable outcome diminished to Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs was independently and inversely associated with 30-day favorable outcomes. The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for 30-day favorable outcomes diminished to <1%, was 42 minutes. However, the CPR duration to achieve this proportion of outcomes differed based on initial rhythm. Further research is required to elucidate appropriate CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs, including in-hospital CPR time. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02432196. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Complicações pulmonares em crianças submetidas à cirurgia cardíaca em um hospital universitário Pulmonary complications in pediatric cardiac surgery at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lago Borges

    2010-06-01

    . METHODS: The sample comprised 37 children of both genders, underwent cardiac surgery at the Hospital Universitário Presidente Dutra, São Luis (MA during the year of 2007. There were not included patients who had lung disease in pre-operative period, patients with neurological disorders, intra-operative death besides lack of data in medical records. The data were obtained from general medical and nursing staff of their medical records. RESULTS: The population of the study was predominantly composed by female children, from the countryside and at school age. Pathologies considered low risk were the majority, especially the patent ductus arteriosus, interventricular communication and interatrial communication. It was observed that the largest share of children made use of cardiopulmonary bypass for more than 30 minutes, with a median of 80 minutes, suffered a median sternotomy, using only the mediastinal drain and made use of mechanical ventilation after surgery, with the median about 6.6 hours. Only three (8.1% patients developed pulmonary complications, and of these, two died. CONCLUSION: Most of the sample was female, school aged and from the countryside. The low time of cardiopulmonary bypass and mechanical ventilation, and congenital heart disease with low risk, may have been factors that contributed to the low rate of pulmonary complications postoperative.

  16. Major adverse cardiac events and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease following percutaneous coronary intervention: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundhun, Pravesh Kumar; Gupta, Chakshu; Xu, Guang Ma

    2017-07-17

    We aimed to systematically compare Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACEs) and mortality following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) in patients with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD) through a meta-analysis. Electronic databases (Cochrane library, EMBASE and Medline/PubMed) were searched for English publications comparing in-hospital and long-term MACEs and mortality following PCI in patients with a past medical history of COPD. Statistical analysis was carried out by Revman 5.3 whereby Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were considered the relevant parameters. A total number of 72,969 patients were included (7518 patients with COPD and 65,451 patients without COPD). Results of this analysis showed that in-hospital MACEs were significantly higher in the COPD group with OR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.19-1.65; P = 0.0001, I 2  = 0%. Long-term MACEs were still significantly higher in the COPD group with OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.38-1.81; P = 0.00001, I 2  = 29%. Similarly, in-hospital and long-term mortality were significantly higher in patients with COPD, with OR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.78-2.85; P = 0.00001, I 2  = 0% and OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 1.33-3.71; P = 0.002, I 2  = 97% respectively. However, the result for the long-term death was highly heterogeneous. Since in-hospital and long-term MACEs and mortality were significantly higher following PCI in patients with versus without COPD, COPD should be considered a risk factor for the development of adverse clinical outcomes following PCI. However, the result for the long-term mortality was highly heterogeneous warranting further analysis.

  17. Mitral regurgitation recovery and atrial reverse remodeling following pulmonary vein isolation procedure in patients with atrial fibrillation: a clinical observation proof-of-concept cardiac MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sahadev T; Belden, William; Doyle, Mark; Thompson, Diane V; Williams, Ronald; Yamrozik, June; Shah, Moneal; Biederman, Robert W W

    2013-09-01

    Reverse remodeling of the left atrium (LA) following successful pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has been well documented. However, mitral regurgitation (MR) recovery after successful PVI has never been demonstrated systematically. The objective of our study was to retrospectively analyze the effectiveness of PVI in patients with AF on recovery of MR using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Prior to PVI, patients underwent a clinically indicated CMR imaging. Post-PVI (6 ± 2 months), patients underwent a follow-up MRI and were classified into two groups-responders (R) and non-responders (NR) to PVI-as assessed by cessation of AF at the end of the prespecified 6-month (14-day "P" sensitive event monitor defined) follow-up period. Furthermore, CMR was used to evaluate the severity of MR (0 to 4+) and to relate changes in MR to LA volumes as well as mitral apparatus geometry. Patients who had mild and higher MR (2+) on baseline CMR and had a post-PVI CMR were selected for final analysis. Out of the consecutive 122 patients with AF who underwent PVI, 74 patients that had mitral regurgitation on initial CMR were included in the study. Of these74 patients with AF with MR, 52 (70 %) were classified as R and 22 (30 %) were classified as NR. Baseline demographics were similar between the groups. In the subgroup with mild to severe MR, pre vs. post in the R group MR severity significantly improved (mean = 2.3, median = 2.0 vs. mean = 1.0, median = 1.0, p < 0.0001) and was matched by favorable reverse remodeling of the mitral apparatus geometry (annulus = 35 ± 4 vs. 33 ± 3 mm, p < 0.002; tenting area = 175 ± 56 vs.137 ± 37 mm(2), p < 0.003; tenting height = 8 ± 2 vs.7 ± 2 mm, p < 0.02; and tenting angle = 129 ± 10° vs. 131 ± 11°, p = 0.1). However, in the NR subgroup, MR failed to improve (mean = 2.2, median = 2.0 vs

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  19. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: 90...... perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood during cardiopulmonary bypass appears to improve postoperative oxygenation in patients with COPD undergoing cardiac surgery. Pulmonary artery perfusion with hypothermic HTK solution does not seem to improve postoperative oxygenation. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER...

  20. Rescue surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdulrahman Elassal

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a rescue operation in high-risk PE. It could save patients with preoperative cardiac arrest. Early diagnosis, interdisciplinary team action, appropriate and emergent treatment strategy are necessary for favorable outcome.

  1. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  2. TCT-312 Increased Cardiac Death and Stent Thrombosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. An analysis of the BASKET-PROVE I and II trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jatene, Tannas; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Nochioka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is associated with long-term all-cause death following PCI with bare-metal stents (BMS). Regarding other outcomes previous studies have shown conflicting results and the impact of drug-eluting stent (DES) in this population is not well known. We sought to evaluate the impact...... of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) outcomes, and the interaction with stent type. Methods We analyzed 4605 patients that underwent PCI with BMS (33.1%) or DES (66.9%) from the BASKET-PROVE trials I and II. Results COPD patients (n=283, 6.1%), were...... older and had more frequently a smoking or cardiovascular event history. At 2-year follow-up, cumulative event rates for patients with versus without COPD were the following: major adverse cardiac events [MACE: composite of cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) and target vessel...

  3. Advocacy in neurology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauranik, Apoorva

    2008-01-01

    ...), launched the Neurological Alliance of Ireland, a nationwide coalition of patient advocacy groups and physicians and authored Standards of Care, the "blueprint" for the development of neurological...

  4. Neurology and diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sildenafil vs. Nitroprussiato de Sódio durante Teste de Reatividade Pulmonar pré-transplante cardíaco Sildenafil vs. sodium before nitroprusside for the pulmonary hypertension reversibility test before cardiac transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguinaldo Figueiredo Freitas Jr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A hipertensão pulmonar é associada ao pior prognóstico no pós-transplante cardíaco. O teste de reatividade pulmonar com Nitroprussiato de Sódio (NPS está associado a elevados índices de hipotensão arterial sistêmica, disfunção ventricular do enxerto transplantado e elevadas taxas de desqualificação para o transplante. OBJETIVO: Neste estudo, objetivou-se comparar os efeitos do Sildenafil (SIL e NPS sobre variáveis hemodinâmicas, neuro-hormonais e ecocardiográficas durante teste de reatividade pulmonar. MÉTODOS: Os pacientes foram submetidos, simultaneamente, ao cateterismo cardíaco direito, ao ecocardiograma e à dosagem de BNP e gasometria venosa, antes e após administração de NPS (1 - 2 µg/Kg/min ou SIL (100 mg, dose única. RESULTADOS: Ambos reduziram a hipertensão pulmonar, porém o nitrato promoveu hipotensão sistêmica significativa (Pressão Arterial Média - PAM: 85,2 vs. 69,8 mmHg, p BACKGROUND: Pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis after cardiac transplantation. The pulmonary hypertension reversibility test with sodium nitroprusside (SNP is associated with a high rate of systemic arterial hypotension, ventricular dysfunction of the transplanted graft and high rates of disqualification from transplantation. OBJECTIVE: This study was aimed at comparing the effects of sildenafil (SIL and SNP on hemodynamic, neurohormonal and echocardiographic variables during the pulmonary reversibility test. METHODS: The patients underwent simultaneously right cardiac catheterization, echocardiography, BNP measurement, and venous blood gas analysis before and after receiving either SNP (1 - 2 µg/kg/min or SIL (100 mg, single dose. RESULTS: Both drugs reduced pulmonary hypertension, but SNP caused a significant systemic hypotension (mean blood pressure - MBP: 85.2 vs. 69.8 mm Hg; p < 0.001. Both drugs reduced cardiac dimensions and improved left cardiac function (SNP: 23.5 vs. 24.8%, p = 0

  6. Acute Pulmonary Edema in Patients with Cushing’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Niafar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dyspnea refers to difficulty in breathing, and short and shallow breaths. This sign is seen in numerous diseases due to pulmonary, cardiac, metabolic and neurological causes. Among cardiac causes, heart failure is considered the main cause of dyspnea. Cardiac failure is a clinical syndrome associated with a set of symptoms (dyspnea, and fatigue and signs (edema and rales. Common causes of cardiac failure include: myocardial infarction, ischemic heart disease, hypertension, valvular heart diseases, and cardiomyopathy. Among uncommon causes of heart failure, endocrine disorders such as Cushing’s syndrome can be cited. Cushing’s syndrome can present itself in less common forms such as dyspnea due to heart failure. Cushing’s syndrome’s cardiovascular complications usually occur due to hypertension, end organ damage such as left ventricular heart failure, diastolic and ischemic myocardial heart failure, which are rather seen in chronic cases of the disease and are often irreversible. Transient heart failure in patients with Cushing’s syndrome, due to adrenal adenoma, has been reported in a number of patients. In this case report, a patient is introduced who presented to emergency department with severe dyspnea (FC III, and was ultimately diagnosed with Cushing’s syndrome after work up. Three months after treatment of Cushing’s syndrome, dramatic improvement was observed in this patient’s cardiac function.

  7. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  8. Validation of maternal cardiac output assessed by transthoracic echocardiography against pulmonary artery catheterization in severely ill pregnant women: prospective comparative study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornette, J; Laker, S; Jeffery, B; Lombaard, H; Alberts, A; Rizopoulos, D; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Pattinson, R C

    2017-01-01

    Most severe pregnancy complications are characterized by profound hemodynamic disturbances, thus there is a need for validated hemodynamic monitoring systems for pregnant women. Pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC) using thermodilution is the clinical gold standard for the measurement of cardiac output (CO), however this reference method is rarely performed owing to its invasive nature. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) allows non-invasive determination of CO. We aimed to validate TTE against PAC for the determination of CO in severely ill pregnant women. This study consisted of a meta-analysis combining data from a prospective study and a systematic review. The prospective arm was conducted in Pretoria, South Africa, in 2003. Women with severe pregnancy complications requiring invasive monitoring with PAC according to contemporary guidelines were included. TTE was performed within 15 min of PAC and the investigator was blinded to the PAC measurements. Comparative measurements were extracted from similar studies retrieved from a systematic review of the literature and added to a database. Simultaneous CO measurements by TTE and PAC were compared. Agreement between methods was assessed using Bland-Altman statistics and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Thirty-four comparative measurements were included in the meta-analysis. Mean CO values obtained by PAC and TTE were 7.39 L/min and 7.18 L/min, respectively. The bias was 0.21 L/min with lower and upper limits of agreement of -1.18 L/min and 1.60 L/min, percentage error was 19.1%, and ICC between the two methods was 0.94. CO measurements by TTE show excellent agreement with those obtained by PAC in pregnant women. Given its non-invasive nature and availability, TTE could be considered as a reference for the validation of other CO techniques in pregnant women. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Las complicaciones del embarazo más graves se caracterizan por trastornos hemodin

  9. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  10. Interposed Abdominal Compression CPR for an Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Victim Failing Traditional CPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D. McClung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Interposed abdominal compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR is an alternative technique to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR that can improve perfusion and lead to restoration of circulation in patients with chest wall deformity either acquired through vigorous CPR or co-morbidity such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where IAC-CPR allowed for restoration of spontaneous circulation and eventual full neurologic recovery when traditional CPR was failing to generate adequate pulses with chest compression alone.

  11. Utilization of Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Massive Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasrija, Chetan; Kronfli, Anthony; George, Praveen; Raithel, Maxwell; Boulos, Francesca; Herr, Daniel L; Gammie, James S; Pham, Si M; Griffith, Bartley P; Kon, Zachary N

    2018-02-01

    The management of massive pulmonary embolism remains challenging, with a considerable mortality rate. Although veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) for massive pulmonary embolism has been reported, its use as salvage therapy has been associated with poor outcomes. We reviewed our experience utilizing an aggressive, protocolized approach of VA-ECMO to triage, optimize, and treat these patients. All patients with a massive pulmonary embolism who were placed on VA-ECMO, as an initial intervention determined by protocol, were retrospectively reviewed. ECMO support was continued until organ optimization was achieved or neurologic status was determined. At that time, if the thrombus burden resolved, decannulation was performed. If substantial clot burden was still present with evidence of right ventricular (RV) strain, operative therapy was undertaken. Twenty patients were identified. Before cannulation, all patients had an RV-to-left ventricular ratio greater than 1.0 and severe RV dysfunction. The median duration of ECMO support was 5.1 days, with significant improvement in end-organ function. Ultimately, 40% received anticoagulation alone, 5% underwent catheter-directed therapy, and 55% underwent surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Care was withdrawn in 1 patient with a prolonged pre-cannulation cardiac arrest after confirmation of neurologic death. In-hospital and 90-day survival was 95%. At discharge, 18 of 19 patients had normal RV function, and 1 patient, who received catheter-directed therapy, had mild dysfunction. VA-ECMO appears to be an effective tool to optimize end-organ function as a bridge to recovery or intervention, with excellent outcomes. This approach may allow clinicians to better triage patients with massive pulmonary embolism to the appropriate therapy on the basis of recovery of RV function, residual thrombus burden, operative risk, and neurologic status. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier

  12. [Neurorehabilitation, neurology, rehabilitation medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbán, Edina; Szél, István; Fáy, Veronika; Dénes, Zoltán; Lippai, Zoltán; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-05-30

    We have read several publications of great authority on the neurological profession in the last two years in which were expressed assessments of the current situation combined with opinions about neurology and the necessity to reorganize neurological patient care. These articles took up the question of neurorehabilitation too. The authors, who on a daily basis, deal with the rehabilitation of people with disabilities as a consequence of neurological conditions, summarize some important definitions of rehabilitation medicine and the present system of neurological rehabilitation, as it is defined by the rehabilitation profession.

  13. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  14. Early detection and efficient therapy of cardiac angiosarcoma due to routine transesophageal echocardiography after cerebrovascular stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Vogelgesang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Dirk Vogelgesang1, Johannes B Dahm2, Holm Großmann3, Andre Hippe4, Astrid Hummel5, Christian Lotze6, Silke Vogelgesang71Practice of Cardiology, Greifswald, 2Practice of Cardiology, Goettingen, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Herzzentrum Karlsburg, 4Department of Neurology, 5Department of Cardiology, 6Department of Haematology and Oncology, 7Department of Pathology, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, GermanyAbstract: Primary malignant cardiac tumors (cardiac angiosarcomas are exceedingly rare. Since there are initially nonspecific or missing symptoms, these tumors are usually diagnosed only in an advanced, often incurable stage, after the large tumor mass elicits hemodynamic obstructive symptoms. A 59-year-old female presented with symptoms of cerebral ischemia. A computed tomography (CT scan showed changes suggestive of stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed an inhomogeneous, medium-echogenic, floating mass at the roof of the left atrium near the mouth of the right upper pulmonary vein, indicative of a thrombus. At surgery, a solitary tumor was completely enucleated. Histologically, cardiac angiosarcoma was diagnosed. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and was free of symptoms and recurrence of disease at 14 months follow-up. Due to the fortuitous appearance of clinical signs indicative of stroke, cardiac angiosarcoma was diagnosed and effectively treated at an early, nonmetastatic, and therefore potentially curable stage. Although cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare disease, it should be taken into consideration as a potential cause of cerebral embolic disease.Keywords: cardiac angiosarcoma, stroke, embolism

  15. Pulmonary hypertension in bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Mourani, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in bronchopulmonary dysplasia and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This pulmonary hypertension is due to abnormal microvascular development and pulmonary vascular remodeling resulting in reduced cross-sectional area of pulmonary vasculature. The epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, suggested management, and outcomes of pulmonary hypertension in the setting of bronchopulmonary dysplasia are reviewed. In summary, pulmonary hypertension is noted in a fifth of extremely low birth weight infants, primarily those with moderate or severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and persists to discharge in many infants. Diagnosis is generally by echocardiography, and some infants require cardiac catheterization to identify associated anatomic cardiac lesions or systemic-pulmonary collaterals, pulmonary venous obstruction or myocardial dysfunction. Serial echocardiography and B-type natriuretic peptide measurement may be useful for following the course of pulmonary hypertension. Currently, there is not much evidence to indicate optimal management approaches, but many clinicians maintain oxygen saturation in the range of 91 to 95%, avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia, and often provide inhaled nitric oxide, sometimes combined with sildenafil, prostacyclin, or its analogs, and occasionally endothelin-receptor antagonists. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A maximum entropy method to compute the 13NH3 pulmonary transit time from right to left ventricle in cardiac PET studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenstrup, Stig; Hove, Jens D; Kofoed, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    The distribution function of pulmonary transit times (fPTTs) contains information on the transit time of blood through the lungs and the dispersion in transit times. Most of the previous studies have used specific functional forms with adjustable parameters to characterize the fPTT. It is the pur...

  17. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding.

  18. Bidimensional measurements of right ventricular function for prediction of survival in patients with pulmonary hypertension: comparison of reproducibility and time of analysis with volumetric cardiac magnetic resonance imaging analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Ihab R.; Rastegar, Neda; Damico, Rachel; Kolb, Todd M.; Boyce, Danielle M.; Sager, Ala-Eddin S.; Skrok, Jan; Shehata, Monda L.; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Bluemke, David A.; Girgis, Reda E.; Mathai, Stephen C.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Zimmerman, Stefan L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We tested the hypothesis that bidimensional measurements of right ventricular (RV) function obtained by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are faster than volumetric measures and highly reproducible, with comparable ability to predict patient survival. CMR-derived tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), RV fractional shortening (RVFS), RV fractional area change (RVFAC), standard functional and volumetric measures, and ventricular mass index (VMI) were compared with right heart catheterization data. CMR analysis time was recorded. Receiver operating characteristic curves, Kaplan-Meier, Cox proportional hazard (CPH), and Bland-Altman test were used for analysis. Forty-nine subjects with PAH and 18 control subjects were included. TAPSE, RVFS, RVFAC, RV ejection fraction, and VMI correlated significantly with pulmonary vascular resistance and mean pulmonary artery pressure (all P < 0.05). Patients were followed up for a mean (± standard deviation) of 2.5 ± 1.6 years. Kaplan-Meier curves showed that death was strongly associated with TAPSE <18 mm, RVFS <16.7%, and RVFAC <18.8%. In CPH models with TAPSE as dichotomized at 18 mm, TAPSE was significantly associated with risk of death in both unadjusted and adjusted models (hazard ratio, 4.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.0–11.3; P = 0.005 for TAPSE <18 mm). There was high intra- and interobserver agreement. Bidimensional measurements were faster (1.5 ± 0.3 min) than volumetric measures (25 ± 6 min). In conclusion, TAPSE, RVFS, and RVFAC measures are efficient measures of RV function by CMR that demonstrate significant correlation with invasive measures of PAH severity. In patients with PAH, TAPSE, RVFS, and RVFAC have high intra- and interobserver reproducibility and are more rapidly obtained than volumetric measures. TAPSE <18 mm by CMR was strongly and independently associated with survival in PAH. PMID:26401254

  19. The effect of acute and 7-days dietary nitrate on mechanical efficiency, exercise performance and cardiac biomarkers in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, R.J.H.C.G.; Huysmans, S.M.D.; Bool, C. van de; Kingma, B.R.M.; Verdijk, A.B.; Loon, L.J.C.; Meex, S.J.R.; Gosker, H.R.; Schols, A.M.W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims : Many COPD patients have a reduced exercise capacity and mechanical efficiency and are at increased cardiometabolic risk. This study aimed to assess acute and 7-days effects of dietary nitrate on mechanical efficiency, exercise performance and cardiac biomarkers in patients with

  20. A rare complication of viper envenomation: cardiac failure. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chara, K; Baccouche, N; Turki, O; Regaig, K; Chaari, A; Bahloul, M; Bouaziz, M

    2017-02-01

    Viper envenomation is common in North Africa. Cardiac complications are not common features of snakebites, the clinical picture of which is usually dominated by toxin-associated neurological, hematological, and vascular damage. There are rare reports of acute myocardial infarction and/or ischemia caused by snakebites, while myocarditis after envenomation has not yet been reported, to our knowledge. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman admitted to our intensive care unit after viper envenomation complicated by acute heart failure with acute pulmonary edema, in a state of cardiogenic shock, accompanied by multi-organ failure, intravascular disseminated coagulation, and neurological damage. Some of the mechanisms that may be involved in this heart failure are discussed, including the possibility of acute myocarditis.

  1. Genetics of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mottagui-Tabar, Salim; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2004-05-01

    Neurological diseases are defined as an inappropriate function of the peripheral or central nervous system due to impaired electrical impulses throughout the brain and/or nervous system that may present with heterogeneous symptoms according to the parts of the system involved in these pathologic processes. Growing evidence on genetic components of neurological disease have been collected during recent years. Genetic studies have opened the way for understanding the underlying pathology of many neurological disorders. The outcome of current intense research into the genetics of neurological disorders will hopefully be the introduction of new diagnostic tools and the discovery of potential targets for new and more effective medications and preventive measures.

  2. Focal neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or head Electromyogram (EMG), nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap Alternative Names Neurological deficits - focal Images Brain References Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  3. The effect of acute and 7-days dietary nitrate on mechanical efficiency, exercise performance and cardiac biomarkers in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijers, Rosanne J H C G; Huysmans, Stephanie M D; van de Bool, Coby; Kingma, Boris R M; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Meex, Steven J R; Gosker, Harry R; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2017-10-31

    Many COPD patients have a reduced exercise capacity and mechanical efficiency and are at increased cardiometabolic risk. This study aimed to assess acute and 7-days effects of dietary nitrate on mechanical efficiency, exercise performance and cardiac biomarkers in patients with COPD. This double-blind, randomized cross-over placebo controlled trial included 20 mild-to-moderate COPD patients (66.6 ± 7.5 years) with moderate exercise impairments and decreased mechanical efficiency, normal BMI (26 ± 3 kg/m 2 ) but high prevalence of abdominal obesity (83.3%). Subjects were randomly allocated to the treatment order of 7 days sodium nitrate ingestion (∼8 mmol/day) and 7 days placebo (NaCl solution) or vice versa, separated by a washout period. Before (Day-1) and after (Day-7) both intervention periods resting metabolic rate and the metabolic response during submaximal cycle ergometry, cycling endurance time, plasma nitrate and nitrite levels, cardiac plasma biomarkers (e.g. cardiac troponin T, Nt-proBNP and creatinine kinase) and blood pressure were measured. Subsequently, gross, net and delta mechanical efficiency were calculated. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations increased at Day-1 and Day-7 after sodium nitrate but not after placebo ingestion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not change following nitrate ingestion. Furthermore, no differences were observed in gross, net, and delta mechanical efficiency during submaximal exercise, cycling endurance time and cardiac biomarkers between nitrate and placebo on Day-1 and Day-7. Meta-analysis of all available studies in COPD also showed no beneficial effect of beetroot juice on systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Acute as well as 7-days sodium nitrate supplementation does not modulate mechanical efficiency, blood pressure or cardiac biomarkers in mild-to-moderate COPD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Positive Airway Pressure and Mechanical Ventilation of the Lungs During Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Pulmonary Adverse Events After Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2017-09-14

    To investigate whether different ventilation strategies during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can improve outcomes in adult cardiac surgery patients. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials with meta-analyses. Clinical trials for human studies up to July 2016 were obtained from electronic databases (Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) and reference lists of relevant randomized trials and review articles. Adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients who underwent cardiac surgery with CPB and ventilation or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Fifteen randomized controlled trials with 748 patients were analyzed. In cardiac surgery, CPAP use during CPB was associated with an improved alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient difference compared with no CPAP (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 4.11 kPa; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85-7.37; I2 = 28.8%). Ventilation during CPB did not improve the postoperative hypoxemia score (WMD = 30.94; 95% CI = -20.76 to 82.63; I2 = 61%) or diffusion capacity compared with the apnea group (WMD = 2.59 kPa; 95% CI = -2.49 to 7.67; I2 = 81.3%). Neither CPAP nor ventilation during CPB was associated with a shorter mechanical ventilation time or hospital stay. CPAP during CPB improved the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient difference compared with apnea, but ventilation during CPB did not. Neither CPAP nor ventilation during CPB demonstrated evidence of improving clinical outcomes in low- or intermediate-risk patients for elective cardiac surgery. The findings are inconclusive because of heterogeneity and small sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TB; Tuberculosis - pulmonary; Mycobacterium - pulmonary ... Pulmonary TB is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M tuberculosis) . TB is contagious. This means the bacteria is easily spread from an infected person ...

  6. Late presentation of an anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery treated with conservative surgical management with long-term cardiac magnetic resonance imaging follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishoy Gouda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery is rare congenital abnormality that most commonly presents in childhood and is associated with a high mortality. In the elderly, patients may present acutely with arrhythmias or signs of ischemia or with vague chronic presentations of shortness of breath and fatigue. In the high-risk elderly population, it is unclear as to whether conservative surgical management by means of suture ligation of the left coronary artery is associated with positive long-term outcomes. We present a case of a 69-year-old patient diagnosed with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery, which was treated with conservative surgical management and followed up for 15 years with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, with positive outcomes.

  7. Cardiovascular function in pulmonary emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function.

  8. Aerobic exercise intensity assessment and prescription in cardiac rehabilitation: a joint position statement of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and the Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzani, Alessandro; Hamm, Larry F; Jones, Andrew M; McBride, Patrick E; Moholdt, Trine; Stone, James A; Urhausen, Axel; Williams, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic exercise intensity prescription is a key issue in cardiac rehabilitation, being directly linked to both the amount of improvement in exercise capacity and the risk of adverse events during exercise. This joint position statement aims to provide professionals with up-to-date information regarding the identification of different exercise intensity domains, the methods of direct and indirect determination of exercise intensity for both continuous and interval aerobic training, the effects of the use of different exercise protocols on exercise intensity prescription and the indications for recommended exercise training prescription in specific cardiac patients' groups. The importance of functional evaluation through exercise testing prior to starting an aerobic training program is strongly emphasized, and ramp incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test, when available, is proposed as the gold standard for a physiologically comprehensive exercise intensity assessment and prescription. This may allow a shift from a 'range-based' to a 'threshold-based' aerobic exercise intensity prescription, which, combined with thorough clinical evaluation and exercise-related risk assessment, could maximize the benefits obtainable by the use of aerobic exercise training in cardiac rehabilitation.

  9. Functional neurological disorders: imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, V

    2014-10-01

    Functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorder, are unexplained neurological symptoms. These symptoms are common and can be associated with significant consequences. This review covers the neuroimaging literature focusing on functional motor symptoms including motor functioning and upstream influences including self-monitoring and internal representations, voluntariness and arousal and trauma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS × What research is being done? The National Institute of Neurological ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS See More About Research The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke ( ...

  11. Clinical study on the cardiac hemodynamics and the possibility of demonstration of the left intraatrial thrombi by echocardiography, angiocardiography and computed tomography and the neurological symptoms in patients with heart disorder and cerebral embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kazuo

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to elucidate risk factors for developing cerebral embolism (CE) in patients with heart disease, hemodynamic, sonographic or radiologic, and neurologic manifestations of heart disease developing into CE were retrospectively analyzed in 44 patients with CE and 122 patients with mitral valve disease (MVD). The most common underlying disease of CE was valve disease (50 %), followed by myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and infectious endocarditis. In MVD patients, risk factors for CE were considered to be atrial fibrillation, mitral stenosis, and intraatrial thrombi. Combined use of various imaging modalities revealed the presence of intraatrial thrombi in 65 % of the CE patients. Cranial computed tomography showed hemorrhagic infarction in 22 %, and found the mid-arotic artery to be the commonest responsible region (81 %). The frequent initial neurologic symptom was hemiplegia. Half of the patients had disturbance of consciousness on admission. Prognosis was better in patients with MVD than those with the other types of heart disease. (Namekawa, K.). 117 refs.

  12. Assessment of factors that influence weaning from long-term mechanical ventilation after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Nozawa

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze parameters of respiratory system mechanics and oxygenation and cardiovascular alterations involved in weaning tracheostomized patients from long-term mechanical ventilation after cardiac surgery. METHODS: We studied 45 patients in their postoperative period of cardiac surgery, who required long-term mechanical ventilation for more than 10 days and had to undergo tracheostomy due to unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation. The parameters of respiratory system mechanics, oxigenation and the following factors were analyzed: type of surgical procedure, presence of cardiac dysfunction, time of extracorporeal circulation, and presence of neurologic lesions. RESULTS: Of the 45 patients studied, successful weaning from mechanical ventilation was achieved in 22 patients, while the procedure was unsuccessful in 23 patients. No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups in regard to static pulmonary compliance (p=0.23, airway resistance (p=0.21, and the dead space/tidal volume ratio (p=0.54. No difference was also observed in regard to the variables PaO2/FiO2 ratio (p=0.86, rapid and superficial respiration index (p=0.48, and carbon dioxide arterial pressure (p=0.86. Cardiac dysfunction and time of extracorporeal circulation showed a significant difference. CONCLUSION: Data on respiratory system mechanics and oxygenation were not parameters for assessing the success or failure. Cardiac dysfunction and time of cardiopulmonary bypass, however, significantly interfered with the success in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation.

  13. [Pulmonary manifestations associated with malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovette, P; Camara, P; Burgel, P R; Mbaye, P S; Sane, M; Klotz, F

    1998-12-01

    Pulmonary manifestations are frequently observed in children, pregnant women and travellers with malaria. The pathophysiology of these pulmonary manifestations is poorly understood but would appear to be secondary to an interaction between the parasitized red cells and the pulmonary capillary endothelium. Bronchitis and pneumonia do not directly compromise outcome but, left unrecognized, the delay in diagnosis and treatment may be fatal. Acute respiratory distress in children is the first cause of overmortality, coming before neurological involvement. The acute respiratory distress caused by severe malaria has no specific characteristics. Iatrogenic complications and pulmonary superinfections must be differentiated. The prevention of pulmonary manifestations associated with malaria can easily be accomplished by limiting water intake and carefully monitoring urinary output and weight. Treatment is the same as for acute flare-ups in combination with symptomatic respiratory treatment when required.

  14. Fisioterapia pré-operatória na prevenção das complicações pulmonares em cirurgia cardíaca pediátrica Preoperative physiotherapy in prevention of pulmonary complications in pediatric cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Marques Felcar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência e o risco de complicações pulmonares em crianças submetidas a intervenção fisioterapêutica pré e pós-operatória nas cirurgias cardíacas, bem como comparar com aquelas submetidas apenas a intervenção fisioterapêutica pós-operatória. MÉTODOS: Ensaio clínico aleatório, que incluiu 135 pacientes de zero a 6 anos com cardiopatias congênitas, submetidos à cirurgia cardíaca. Os pacientes foram aleatorizados para grupo intervenção (G1, que realizou fisioterapia pré e pós-operatória, ou para grupo controle (G2, somente fisioterapia pós-operatória. Para comparar as variáveis entre os grupos foi utilizado o teste de Mann-Whitney e o Qui quadrado. Foi calculado o risco absoluto e sua magnitude por meio do número necessário para tratar. A significância estatística foi estipulada em 5% (POBJECTIVE: To evaluate the occurrence and risk of pulmonary complications in children who underwent pre-and postoperative physiotherapeutic intervention in cardiac surgeries, as well as to compare these patients to those who underwent only postoperative physiotherapeutic intervention. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was performed with 135 patients from 6 years of age and younger with congenital heart disease who had undergone cardiac surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (G1 in which they underwent pre- and postoperative physiotherapy or to the control group (G2 in which they underwent only postoperative physiotherapy. Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square tests were used to compare the variables between the groups. The magnitude of the absolute risk was calculated by the number of patients needed to treat. Statistical significance was set at 5% (P<0.05. RESULTS: 17 patients (25% in G1, and 29 patients (43.3% in G2 presented pulmonary complications (P= 0.025, pneumonia was the most frequent complication, and among the 17 patients in G1, seven (10.3% developed pneumonia, six (8

  15. Cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Möller Petrun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developments in the measuring of cardiac output and other haemodynamic variables are focused on the so-called minimally invasive methods. The aim of these methods is to simplify the management of high-risk and haemodynamically unstable patients. Due to the need of invasive approach and the possibility of serious complications the use of pulmonary artery catheter has decreased. This article describes the methods for measuring cardiac output, which are based on volume measurement (Fick method, indicator dilution method, pulse wave analysis, Doppler effect, and electrical bioimpedance.

  16. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Anesthesia in neurologic and psychiatric diseases: is there a 'best anesthesia' for certain diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachenberg, Thomas; Schneemilch, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Patients with diseases affecting the central nervous system present a wide range of clinical manifestations increasing the perioperative risk. The following review focused on recommendations for anaesthesiological management in patients with both neurologic and psychiatric diseases. The heterogeneity of disorders affecting the central nervous system and the variability of comorbidities make definition of standards for anaesthesiological management difficult. Anatomical malpositions, pulmonary and cardiac co-morbidities determine the perioperative risk. Patients require a careful preoperative assessment, including interdisciplinary communication between neurologists, psychiatrists or paediatric physicians. Adequate devices and equipment for airway management should be available before induction of general anesthesia. For premedication in patients with limited respiratory function, clonidine, given orally, is a good alternative. The use of short-acting hypnotic and analgesic drugs (e.g. propofol/remifentanil) can be safely administered for induction and maintenance of anesthesia. The use of volatile agents and succinylcholine is strictly avoided in patients with muscular dystrophy and myopathies. Peripheral and neuroaxial regional anesthesia is not contraindicated in patients with neuromuscular diseases unless there is a rapid deterioration of the neurological status. The 'best' anesthesia includes adequate preoperative evaluation of the individual risk, optimization of comorbidities before elective surgery, the use of short-acting anesthetic agents for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, avoidance of volatile agents and succinylcholine in muscular dystrophy and myopathies.

  20. Acute pulmonary embolism: prediction of cor pulmonale and short-term patient survival from assessment of cardiac dimensions in routine multidetector-row CT; Mehrschicht-Spiral-CT bei vermuteter und inzidenteller akuter Lungenembolie: prognostischer Wert morpholoqischer Herzparameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engeike, C. [Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Rummeny, E.; Marten, K. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: evaluation of the prognostic value of morphological cardiac parameters in patients with suspected and incidental acute pulmonary embolism (PE) using multidetector-row chest CT (MSCT). Materials and methods: 2335 consecutive MSCT scans were evaluated for the presence of PE. The arterial enhancement and analysability of pulmonary arteries and the heart were assessed as parameters of the scan quality. The diastolic right and left ventricular short axes (RV{sub D}, LV{sub D}) and the interventricular septal deviation (ISD) were measured in all PE-positive patients and the echocardiography reports were reviewed. The clinical data assessment included cardio-respiratory and other co-morbidities, systemic anticoagulant therapy (ACT), and the 30-day outcome. Predictors of acute cor pulmonale and the short-term outcome were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions including odds ratios (OR) and ROC analyses using positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV). Results: 90 patients with acute PE were included (36 with clinically suspected PE, 54 with incidental PE). 26 patients had cardio-respiratory co-morbidities. Four patients underwent systemic thrombolysis, 43 underwent anticoagulation in therapeutic doses, 19 underwent anticoagulation in prophylactic doses, and 24 patients did not undergo ACT. 15 of 41 patients had echocardiographic evidence of acute cor pulmonale. 8 patients died within 30 days. The RV{sub D} was the best independent predictor of acute cor pulmonale (p = 0,002, OR = 9.16, PPV = 0.68, NPV=1 at 4.49 cm cut off) and short-term outcome (p= 0,0005, OR = 2.82, PPV = 0.23, NPV = 0.98 at 4.75 cm cut off). The RV{sub D}/LV{sub D} ratio had a PPV of 0.85 for cor pulmonale. (orig.)

  1. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  2. Anesthetic Management of Pediatric Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mediha Turktan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality associated with congenital heart disease. Patients in this group have a greater peroperative cardiovascular risks including cardiac arrest, pulmonary hypertensive crisis and death compared the normal population. The main purpose of anesthesia is to avoid increased pulmonary vascular resistance and myocardial depression. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(2.000: 149-158

  3. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Association with PulmonaryArtery Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Peighambari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is an uncommon condition constituting 1% -2% of the cases with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM diagnosis. We interestingly report two patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in association with significant pulmonary artery hypertension without any other underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension. The patients were assessed by echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and pulmonary function parameters study.

  4. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Association with Pulmonary Artery Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Peighambari, Mehdi; Parsaei, Mozghan; Sadeghpour, Anita; Alizadehasl, Azin

    2012-01-01

    Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is an uncommon condition constituting 1% -2% of the cases with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) diagnosis. We interestingly report two patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in association with significant pulmonary artery hypertension without any other underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension. The patients were assessed by echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and pulmonary function parameters study.

  5. Detailed statistical analysis plan for the pulmonary protection trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Jakobsen, Janus C; Secher, Niels H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary dysfunction complicates cardiac surgery that includes cardiopulmonary bypass. The pulmonary protection trial evaluates effect of pulmonary perfusion on pulmonary function in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This paper presents the statistical plan...... for the main publication to avoid risk of outcome reporting bias, selective reporting, and data-driven results as an update to the published design and method for the trial. RESULTS: The pulmonary protection trial is a randomized, parallel group clinical trial that assesses the effect of pulmonary perfusion......: The pulmonary protection trial investigates the effect of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. A preserved oxygenation index following pulmonary perfusion may indicate an effect and inspire to a multicenter confirmatory trial to assess a more...

  6. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  7. Neurological diseases and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequentl...

  8. Effect of pre-cardiac and adult stages of Dirofilaria immitis in pulmonary disease of cats: CBC, bronchial lavage cytology, serology, radiographs, CT images, bronchial reactivity, and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray Dillon, A; Tillson, D M; Wooldridge, A; Cattley, R; Hathcock, J; Brawner, W R; Cole, R; Welles, B; Christopherson, P W; Lee-Fowler, T; Bordelon, S; Barney, S; Sermersheim, M; Garbarino, R; Wells, S Z; Diffie, E B; Schachner, E R

    2014-11-15

    of all pulmonary arteries and a random pattern of parenchymal disease with severe lesions immediately adjacent to normal areas. Analysis of CT 3D reconstruction and Hounsfield units demonstrated lung disease consistent with restrictive pulmonary fibrosis with an interstitial infiltrate, absence of air trapping, and decrease in total lung volume in Group IU as compared to Groups UU and PreS I. The clinical implications of this study are that cats pretreated with selamectin 1 month before D. immitis L3 infection did not become serologically positive and did not develop pulmonary arterial hypertrophy and myofibrosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Coronary to pulmonary fistula as the primary source of pulmonary blood supply in pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isman Firdaus

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A communication between the coronary and pulmonary arteries, so called coronary to pulmonary fistula, is a rare source of pulmonary supply in pulmonary atresia (PA with ventricular septal defect (VSD. A 4 year old girl referred to National Cardiovascular Center Harapan Kita, Jakarta with symptoms and signs of increased pulmonary blood flow since infancy and was confirmed by the chest x-rays. Heart examination revealed normal first heart sound with single loud second heart sound and an ejection systolic murmur at the pulmonary area. ECG demonstrated sinus rhythm with normal axis and biventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography was performed and truncus arteriosus (TA type I was suspected with perimembranus VSD, overriding of the aorta, and dilated main pulmonary artery. But on cardiac catheterization studies, a non obstructive fistula was found between the left coronary and main pulmonary artery coexisted with PA and VSD. A successful surgery was performed subsequently and confirmed the above diagnosis. Although there were episodes of pulmonary hypertension crisis during early post operative course, she was then discharge from the hospital in a good condition. Since irreversible pulmonary vascular disease may develop in a non restrictive coronary to pulmonary fistula, early recognition of this anomaly is very important for better surgical result. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 237-40Keywords: coronary to pulmonary fistula, pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect

  11. A regional comparison of cardiac rehabilitation personnel. Adherence to the 1995 American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Guidelines by Staff Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S B; Pescatello, L S

    1997-01-01

    The American Association of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) established guidelines for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) personnel regarding educational degree attainment, licensure, and certification. New England hospital-based CR personnel were surveyed by staff position to determine their adherence to these guidelines. The New England Hospital-Based CR Program Questionnaire was designed to obtain information regarding program characteristics and personnel credentialing. Initially, 117 program directors agreed to participate, and 108 returned completed questionnaires for a response rate of 92.3%. Of the CR programs surveyed, 41% were within hospitals containing 101 to 250 beds, whereas most of those providing inpatient (66.6%) and outpatient (82.4%) CR enrolled less than 200 patients annually. Overall, 40.7% of personnel (n = 450) by staff position reported that they met the minimum recommendations, whereas 7.0% (n = 470) met the preferred AACVPR recommendations. Registered nurses (n = 67) and physical therapists (n = 58) were most compliant with the minimum guidelines: 89.6% and 84.5%, respectively. In contrast, 10.9% of the program directors/coordinators (PD/C; n = 128) met the minimum qualifications, and 5.5% met the preferred AACVPR qualifications. Most PD/C had Advanced Cardiac Life Support Certification (84.4%), but few (18%) attained American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) certification. Overall, compliance of New England hospital-based CR personnel with the AACVPR minimum/preferred guidelines for educational degree and certification was lacking, as was acquisition of ACSM certification. The effect of these findings on the future status of recommended and required CR personnel qualifications for hire merits attention.

  12. Patient-Specific MRI-Based Right Ventricle Models Using Different Zero-Load Diastole and Systole Geometries for Better Cardiac Stress and Strain Calculations and Pulmonary Valve Replacement Surgical Outcome Predictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalin Tang

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of ventricular stress and strain is critical for cardiovascular investigations. Sarcomere shortening in active contraction leads to change of ventricular zero-stress configurations during the cardiac cycle. A new model using different zero-load diastole and systole geometries was introduced to provide more accurate cardiac stress/strain calculations with potential to predict post pulmonary valve replacement (PVR surgical outcome.Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR data were obtained from 16 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot prior to and 6 months after pulmonary valve replacement (8 male, 8 female, mean age 34.5 years. Patients were divided into Group 1 (n = 8 with better post PVR outcome and Group 2 (n = 8 with worse post PVR outcome based on their change in RV ejection fraction (EF. CMR-based patient-specific computational RV/LV models using one zero-load geometry (1G model and two zero-load geometries (diastole and systole, 2G model were constructed and RV wall thickness, volume, circumferential and longitudinal curvatures, mechanical stress and strain were obtained for analysis. Pairwise T-test and Linear Mixed Effect (LME model were used to determine if the differences from the 1G and 2G models were statistically significant, with the dependence of the pair-wise observations and the patient-slice clustering effects being taken into consideration. For group comparisons, continuous variables (RV volumes, WT, C- and L- curvatures, and stress and strain values were summarized as mean ± SD and compared between the outcome groups by using an unpaired Student t-test. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify potential morphological and mechanical predictors for post PVR surgical outcome.Based on results from the 16 patients, mean begin-ejection stress and strain from the 2G model were 28% and 40% higher than that from the 1G model, respectively. Using the 2G model results, RV EF changes correlated negatively with

  13. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary ...

  14. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  15. Suicide in Neurologic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, David B.; Anderson, C. Alan

    2002-11-01

    The risk of attempted or completed suicide is increased in patients with migraine with aura, epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and Huntington's disease. Contrary to the general perception that the risk of suicide among patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing conditions is low, several reports suggest that the risk of suicide in these patients increases relative to the general population. Some patients at risk for neurologic disorders are also at increased risk for suicide; in particular, the risk of suicide is increased among persons at risk for Huntington's disease, independent of the presence or absence of the Huntington's gene mutation. The risk of attempted or completed suicide in neurologic illness is strongly associated with depression, feelings of hopelessness or helplessness, and social isolation. Additional suicide risk factors in persons with neurologic illness include cognitive impairment, relatively younger age (under 60 years), moderate physical disability, recent onset or change in illness, a lack of future plans or perceived meaning in life, recent losses (personal, occupational, or financial), and prior history of psychiatric illness or suicidal behavior. Substance dependence, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, and some personality disorders (eg, borderline personality disorder) may also contribute to increased risk of suicide among persons with neurologic illnesses. Identification and aggressive treatment of psychiatric problems, especially depression, as well as reduction of modifiable suicide risk factors among patients with neurologic illness is needed to reduce the risk of attempted and completed suicide in this population.

  16. Neurologic manifestations of achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jacqueline T; Bodensteiner, John B; Butler, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the best described and most common form of the congenital short-limbed dwarfing conditions. Achondroplasia is apparent at birth and has a birth prevalence of 1 in 20000-30000 live-born infants. Achondroplasia is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition, although 80% of cases occur sporadically as new events in their families. Achondroplasia is caused, in virtually all of the cases, by a G380R mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Patients with achondroplasia should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians including geneticists, neurologists, and orthopedists, since there are numerous bony and neurological complications. The most severe complication results from craniocervical stenosis and medullary and upper spinal cord compression, which can have devastating and even lethal sequelae during early childhood. In subsequent decades, including adolescence, spinal cord and nerve compression are more prominent. The neurological complications of achondroplasia have been recognized in adults for more than a century and are attributed to bony defects, connective tissue structures, or both. Similar neurological complications are now appreciated in infants, young children, and teenagers with achondroplasia. Defective connective tissue elements in achondroplasia frequently lead to ligamentous laxity, which can aggravate the complications associated with bony stenosis. Bony abnormalities are known to cause neurological morbidity and lead to a shortened lifespan. Neurological complications associated with achondroplasia are reviewed, including recommendations for the evaluation and management of these clinical problems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Puzzle Used to Teach the Cardiac Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Fernanda K.; Moura, Maria J. C. S.; Sanches, Andrea; Costa, Rafaela; Oliveira de Lima, Patricia; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Amaral, Maria E. C.; Zeni, Paula; Gaviao, Kelly Cristina; Montrezor, Luís H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to describe a puzzle developed for use in teaching cardiac physiology classes. The puzzle presents figures of phases of the cardiac cycle and a table with five columns: phases of cardiac cycle, atrial state, ventricular state, state of atrioventricular valves, and pulmonary and aortic valves. Chips are provided…

  18. The pulmonary vasculature in a neonatal porcine model with increased pulmonary blood flow and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbøg, Elisabeth Vidstid; Steinbruchel, Daniel Andreas; Thomsen, Anne Bloch

    2001-01-01

    models which reflect the disease process. Material and Results: We randomly allocated 45 newborn pigs, at the age of 48 hrs, to groups in which there was either construction of a 3 mm central aorto-pulmonary shunt, undertaken in 9, or ligation of the left pulmonary artery, achieved in 13. Controls...... artery. Conclusion: In neonatal porcine models of pulmonary vascular disease, created by construction of 3 mm central aorto-pulmonary shunts and ligation of one pulmonary artery, we observed histopathological changes of the pulmonary vasculature similar to early hypertensive pulmonary vascular disease...... in humans. Elevated circulating levels of endothelin were associated with abnormal haemodynamics rather than abnormal pathology. These findings could be valuable for future studies on the pathogenesis of hypertensive pulmonary vascular disease associated with congenital cardiac malformations....

  19. Predictors for outcome among cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrandt-Johansen, Ida Maria; Norsted, Kristine; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundIn the past decade, early treatment of cardiac arrest (CA) victims has been improved in several ways, leading to more optimistic over all prognoses. However, the global survival rate after out-of-hospital CA (OHCA) is still not more than 5-10%. With a better knowledge of the predictors...... circulation (ROSC).ResultsThe overall mortality was 44% and a favorable neurological outcome was seen among 52%. Strong predictors for survival and favorable neurological outcome were ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) as initial rhythm, cardiac etiology and time to ROSC¿... rhythm of VT/VF and a cardiac etiology were the strongest....

  20. Pulmonary Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by viral infections such as the hantavirus and dengue virus. Lung injury. Pulmonary edema can occur after ... it may be fatal even if you receive treatment. Prevention Pulmonary edema is not always preventable, but ...

  1. Pulmonary atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    As with most congenital heart diseases, there is no known cause of pulmonary atresia. The condition is linked with another type of congenital heart defect called a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Pulmonary atresia may occur with or without a ventricular ...

  2. Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in the ... and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can cause Permanent ...

  3. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This ... blood may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  4. Possible protection by inhaled budesonide against ischaemic cardiac events in mild COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lofdahl, C-G.; Postma, D. S.; Pride, N. B.; Boe, J.; Thoren, A.

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be associated with an increased incidence of ischaemic cardiac events. The current authors performed a post hoc analysis of the European Respiratory Society's study on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  5. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  6. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Goetting, Michael; Schwarzer, Mario; Gerber, Alexander; Klingelhoefer, Doris; David A. Groneberg

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by the increase of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure in the lung circulation. Despite the large number of experimental and clinical studies conducted on pulmonary hypertension, there is no comprehensive work that analyzed the global research activity on PH so far. We retrieved the bibliometric data of the publications on pulmonary hypertension for two periods from the Web of science database. Here, we set the first investigation period from 1900...

  8. Cardiac leiomyosarcoma, a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Gill, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    In this case report we present the history of a patient admitted with recurrent pulmonary edema. Transesophageal chocardiography showed a tumour in the left atrium, occluding the ostium of the mitral valve and mimicking intermittent mitral stenosis. Cardiac surgery followed by pathological...

  9. Neurologic Diseases and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Chokroverty, Sudansu

    2017-03-01

    Sleep disorders and neurologic illness are common and burdensome in their own right; when combined, they can have tremendous negative impact at an individual level as well as societally. The socioeconomic burden of sleep disorders and neurologic illness can be identified, but the real cost of these conditions lies far beyond the financial realm. There is an urgent need for comprehensive care and support systems to help with the burden of disease. Further research in improving patient outcomes in those who suffer with these conditions will help patients and their families, and society in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The neurology literature 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoujah, Danya; Chang, Wan-Tsu W; Abraham, Michael K

    2017-09-06

    Emergency neurology is a complex and rapidly changing field. Its evolution can be attributed in part to increased imaging options, debates about optimal treatment, and simply the growth of emergency medicine as a specialty. Every year, a number of articles published in emergency medicine or other specialty journals should become familiar to the emergency physician. This review summarizes neurology articles published in 2016, which the authors consider crucial to the practice of emergency medicine. The articles are categorized according to disease process, with the understanding that there can be significant overlap among articles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection: Preoperative Anatomy, Physiology, Imaging, and Interventional Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Venous Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Matthew D; Morray, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection refers to a spectrum of cardiac anomalies where the pulmonary veins fail to return to the left atrium and the pulmonary venous blood returns through a systemic vein or directly to the right atrium. There is a wide anatomical variety of venous connections and degrees of pulmonary venous obstruction that affect the presentation, surgical repair, and outcomes. In this review, we explore the preoperative physiology, echocardiographic diagnosis, and approach to postoperative complications.

  13. EVALUATION OF RIGHT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION AND PULMONARY ARTERY HYPERTENSION SECONDARY TO COPD SEVERITY BY ELECTROCARDIOGRAM AND ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Bhupendra Kumar; Nikhilesh; Ashok; Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Patient with COPD carry increased risk of morbidity and mortality due to pulmonary artery hypertension, corpulmonale, cardiac arrhythmias, congestive heart fa ilure and pulmonary embolism. Echocardiography provides a rapid, noninvasive, portable, and accurate method to evaluate the cardiac changes secondary to severe COPD. AIM : To evaluate right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary artery hypertension secondary to COPD severity as per GOLD gui...

  14. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Hyponatremia in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Data from the Akershus Cardiac Examination (ACE 2 Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A Winther

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is prevalent and associated with mortality in patients with heart failure (HF. The prevalence and prognostic implications of hyponatremia in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary (AECOPD have not been established.We included 313 unselected patients with acute dyspnea who were categorized by etiology of dyspnea according to established guidelines (derivation cohort. Serum Na+ was determined on hospital admission and corrected for hyperglycemia, and hyponatremia was defined as [Na+]<137 mmol/L. Survival was ascertained after a median follow-up of 816 days and outcome was analyzed in acute HF (n = 143 and AECOPD (n = 83 separately. Results were confirmed in an independent AECOPD validation cohort (n = 99.In the derivation cohort, median serum Na+ was lower in AECOPD vs. acute HF (138.5 [135.9-140.5] vs. 139.2 [136.7-141.3] mmol/L, p = 0.02, while prevalence of hyponatremia (27% [22/83] vs. 20% [29/143], p = 0.28 and mortality rate (42% [35/83] vs. 46% [66/143], p = 0.56 were similar. By univariate Cox regression analysis, hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality in acute HF (HR 1.85 [95% CI 1.08, 3.16], p = 0.02, but not in AECOPD (HR 1.00 [0.47, 2.15], p = 1.00. Analogous to the results of the derivation cohort, hyponatremia was prevalent also in the AECOPD validation cohort (25% [25/99], but not associated with mortality. The diverging effect of hyponatremia on outcome between AECOPD and acute HF was statistically significant (p = 0.04.Hyponatremia is prevalent in patients with acute HF and AECOPD, but is associated with mortality in patients with acute HF only.

  15. An adult with central cyanosis and differential pulmonary vascularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Moorthy, Nagaraja; Rao, Dattatreya Pv; Nanjappa, Manjunath C

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male patient presented with progressive effort intolerance of 2-years duration. Clinical findings and investigations were suggestive of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). In addition, there was a conspicuous difference in the pulmonary vascularity with oligemia on the left side and relative hypervascularity on the right side. The right pulmonary artery was arising from the proximal ascending aorta and the main pulmonary artery was continuing as the left pulmonary artery. The anomalous origin of a branch pulmonary artery from the aorta (AOPA) is a rare cardiac anomaly. We report this condition in association with TOF, highlighting the differential pulmonary vascularity.

  16. An adult with central cyanosis and differential pulmonary vascularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Ananthakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old male patient presented with progressive effort intolerance of 2-years duration. Clinical findings and investigations were suggestive of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF. In addition, there was a conspicuous difference in the pulmonary vascularity with oligemia on the left side and relative hypervascularity on the right side. The right pulmonary artery was arising from the proximal ascending aorta and the main pulmonary artery was continuing as the left pulmonary artery. The anomalous origin of a branch pulmonary artery from the aorta (AOPA is a rare cardiac anomaly. We report this condition in association with TOF, highlighting the differential pulmonary vascularity.

  17. Neurological aspects of eclampsia

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    Jovanović Dejana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficult types of preeclampsia and eclampsia are presented with the neurological symptoms. The break of cerebral autoregulation mechanism plays the most important role in pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm. Nevertheless eclampsia isn’t just an ordinary hypertensive encephalopathy because other pathogenic mechanisms are involved in its appearance. The main neuropathologic changes are multifocal vasogenic edema, perivascular multiple microinfarctions and petechial hemorrhages. Neurological clinical manifestations are convulsions, headache, visual disturbances and rarely other discrete focal neurological symptoms. Eclampsia is a high-risk factor for onset of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. This is a reason why neurological diagnostic tests are sometimes needed. The method of choice for evaluation of complicated eclampsia is computerized brain topography that shows multiple areas of hypodensity in occipitoparietal regions. These changes are focal vasogenic cerebral edema. For differential diagnosis of eclampsia and stroke other diagnostic methods can be used - fundoscopic exam, magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebral angiography and cerebrospinal fluid exam. The therapy of eclampsia considers using of magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive, anticonvulsive and antiedematous drugs.

  18. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a

  19. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  20. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildtrup, Mads; Shattock, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal, hereditary, neurodegenerative disorder best known for its clinical triad of progressive motor impairment, cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. Although a disease of the central nervous system, mortality surveys indicate that heart disease is a leading cause of death. The nature of such cardiac abnormalities remains unknown. Clinical findings indicate a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction - dysautonomia - which may be a result of pathology of the central autonomic network. Dysautonomia can have profound effects on cardiac health, and pronounced autonomic dysfunction can be associated with neurogenic arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Significant advances in the knowledge of neural mechanisms in cardiac disease have recently been made which further aid our understanding of cardiac mortality in Huntington's disease. Even so, despite the evidence of aberrant autonomic activity the potential cardiac consequences of autonomic dysfunction have been somewhat ignored. In fact, underlying cardiac abnormalities such as arrhythmias have been part of the exclusion criteria in clinical autonomic Huntington's disease research. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac function in Huntington's disease patients is warranted. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to clarify how the autonomic nervous system is controlled and regulated in higher, central areas of the brain - and how these regions may be altered in neurological pathology, such as Huntington's disease. Ultimately, research will hopefully result in an improvement of management with the aim of preventing early death in Huntington's disease from cardiac causes.

  1. The neurology of proverbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, D

    1990-01-01

    Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are "concrete", recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests) point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH). Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  2. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  3. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  4. [Vitamin D and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Éric; Camu, William

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk of multiple sclerosis and also with a higher relapse rate as well as a higher number of MRI lesions. Elders with vitamin D deficiency have worse cognitive performance. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease. Ischemic stroke are more frequent and more severe in patients with low vitamin D levels. Carotid atherosclerosis is more frequent and more severe in patients with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk and worse prognosis of Parkinson's disease. In the different neurological disorders discussed herein, gene polymorphisms that could alter vitamin D metabolism are also associated with a higher incidence or a worse disease prognosis. Despite the links between vitamin D deficiency and the risks of developing neurological disorders, there is, to date, no proof that supplementation could alter the course of these diseases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  6. Neurologic complications of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Weimer, Louis H

    2014-06-01

    This review serves as an overview of neurologic conditions associated with alcohol abuse or withdrawal, including epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic approach, and treatment. Frequent alcohol abuse and frank alcoholism are very common among adults in the United States. Although rates decline with each decade, as many as 10% of the elderly drink excessively. Given the ubiquitous nature of alcoholism in society, its complications have been clinically recognized for generations, with recent advances focusing on improved understanding of ethanol's biochemical targets and the pathophysiology of its complications. The chronic effects of alcohol abuse are myriad and include neurologic complications through both direct and indirect effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. These disorders include several encephalopathic states related to alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, and related nutritional deficiencies; acute and chronic toxic and nutritional peripheral neuropathies; and myopathy. Although prevention of alcoholism and its neurologic complications is the optimal strategy, this article reviews the specific treatment algorithms for alcohol withdrawal and its related nutritional deficiency states.

  7. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  8. Immersion Pulmonary Edema in Female Triathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Carter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary edema has been reported in SCUBA divers, apnea divers, and long-distance swimmers however, no instances of pulmonary edema in triathletes exist in the scientific literature. Pulmonary edema may cause seizures and loss of consciousness which in a water environment may become life threatening. This paper describes pulmonary edema in three female triathletes. Signs and symptoms including cough, fatigue, dyspnea, haemoptysis, and rales may occur within minutes of immersion. Contributing factors include hemodynamic changes due to water immersion, cold exposure, and exertion which elevate cardiac output, causing pulmonary capillary stress failure, resulting in extravasation of fluid into the airspace of the lung. Previous history is a major risk factor. Treatment involves immediate removal from immersion and in more serious cases, hospitalization, and oxygen administration. Immersion pulmonary edema is a critical environmental illness of which triathletes, race organizers, and medical staff, should be made aware.

  9. Comparison of computed tomography pulmonary angiography and point-of-care tests for pulmonary thromboembolism diagnosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggs, R; Chan, D L; Benigni, L; Hirst, C; Kellett-Gregory, L; Fuentes, V L

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of CT pulmonary angiography for identification of naturally occurring pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs using predefined diagnostic criteria and to assess the ability of echocardiography, cardiac troponins, D-dimers and kaolin-activated thromboelastography to predict the presence of pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs. Twelve dogs with immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia and evidence of respiratory distress were prospectively evaluated. Dogs were sedated immediately before CT pulmonary angiography using intravenous butorphanol. Spiral CT pulmonary angiography was performed with a 16 detector-row CT scanner using a pressure injector to infuse contrast media through peripheral intravenous catheters. Pulmonary thromboembolism was diagnosed using predefined criteria. Contemporaneous tests included echocardiography, arterial blood gas analysis, kaolin-activated thromboelastography, D-dimers and cardiac troponins. Based on predefined criteria, four dogs were classified as pulmonary thromboembolism positive, three dogs were suspected to have pulmonary thromboembolism and the remaining five dogs had negative scans. The four dogs identified with pulmonary thromboembolism all had discrete filling defects in main or lobar pulmonary arteries. None of the contemporaneous tests was discriminant for pulmonary thromboembolism diagnosis, although the small sample size was limiting. CT pulmonary angiography can be successfully performed in dogs under sedation, even in at-risk patients with respiratory distress and can both confirm and rule out pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  10. Pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Martins Júnior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is a pathological condition associated with various diseases, which must be remembered by the physicians, since early diagnosis may anticipate and avoid dangerous complications and even death if appropriate measures were not taken. The relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, important pathological process that is in increasing prevalence in developing countries, and leading position as cause of death, emphasizes its importance. Here are presented the classifications, pathophysiology, and general rules of treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  11. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  12. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences (AJNS) is owned and controlled by the Pan African Association of Neurological Sciences (PAANS). The AJNS's aim is to publish scientific papers of any aspects of Neurological Sciences. AJNS is published quarterly. Articles submitted exclusively to the AJNS are accepted if neither ...

  13. Strategies for the use of mechanical ventilation in the neurologic intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wan-Tsu W; Nyquist, Paul A

    2013-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation in neurologically injured patients presents unique challenges. Patients with acute neurologic injuries may require mechanical ventilation for reasons beyond respiratory failure. There is also a subset of pulmonary pathologic abnormality directly associated with neurologic injuries. Balancing the need to maintain brain oxygenation, cerebral perfusion, and control of intracranial pressure can be in conflict with concurrent ventilator strategies aimed at lung protection. Weaning and liberation from mechanical ventilation also require special considerations. These issues are examined in the ventilator management of the neurologically injured patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Persistent tachypnea in children: keep pulmonary embolism in mind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommen, C. H.; Heyboer, H.; Groothoff, J. W.; Teeuw, R.; Aronson, D. C.; Peters, M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tachypnea in children is associated with respiratory disorders and nonrespiratory disorders such as cardiac disease, metabolic acidosis, fever, pain, and anxiety. Pulmonary embolism is seldom considered by pediatricians as a cause of tachypnea. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Three children of

  15. Electrocardiographic characteristics of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnier, Miriam J.; Rutten, Frans H.; Numans, Mattijs E.; Kors, Jan A.; Tan, Hanno L.; de Boer, Anthonius; Hoes, Arno W.; de Bruin, Marie L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Electrocardiography (ECG) carries information about cardiac disease and prognosis, but studies comparing ECG characteristics between patients with and without COPD are lacking. We related ECG

  16. Electrocardiographic Characteristics of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnier, M.J.; Rutten, F.H.; Numans, M.E.; Kors, J.A.; Tan, H.L.; de Boer, A.; Hoes, A.W.; de Bruin, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Electrocardiography (ECG) carries information about cardiac disease and prognosis, but studies comparing ECG characteristics between patients with and without COPD are lacking. We related ECG

  17. Pulmonary vascular complications of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circo, Sebastian; Gossage, James R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the latest advances and recommendations in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary vascular complications associated with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary hypertension associated with high output cardiac failure or liver vascular malformations, haemoptysis, haemothorax and thromboembolic disease. Transthoracic contrast echocardiography has been validated as a screening tool for PAVM in patients with suspected HHT. Advancements in genetic testing support its use in family members at risk as a cost-effective measure. Therapy with bevacizumab in patients with high output cardiac failure and severe liver AVMs showed promising results. PAH tends to be more aggressive in HHT type 2 patients. Patients suffering from this elusive disease should be referred to HHT specialized centres to ensure a standardized and timely approach to diagnosis and management.

  18. Learn About Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Become An Advocate Volunteer Ways To Give Pulmonary Fibrosis www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung ... Pulmonary Fibrosis > Introduction Share this page: Introduction to Pulmonary Fibrosis What Is Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis is a ...

  19. Neurology and literature 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2014-05-01

    Good literary fiction has the potential to move us, extend our sense of life, transform our prospective views and help us in the face of adversity. A neurological disorder is likely to be the most challenging experience a human being may have to confront in a lifetime. As such, literary recreations of illnesses have a doubly powerful effect. Study the synergies between neurology and fictional literature with particular reference to narrative based medicine (NBM). Doctors establish boundaries between the normal and the abnormal. Taking a clinical history is an act of interpretation in which the doctor integrates the science of objective signs and measurable quantities with the art of subjective clinical judgment. The more discrepancy there is between the patient's experience with the illness and the doctor's interpretation of that disease, the less likely the doctor-patient interaction is to succeed. NBM contributes to a better discernment of the meanings, thus considering disease as a biographical event rather than just a natural fact. Drawing from their own experience with disease, writers of fiction provide universal insights through their narratives, whilst neuroscientists, like Cajal, have occasionally devoted their scientific knowledge to literary narratives. Furthermore, neurologists from Alzheimer to Oliver Sacks remind us of the essential value of NBM in the clinic. Integrating NBM (the narrative of patients) and the classic holistic approach to patients with our current paradigm of evidence based medicine represents a challenge as relevant to neurologists as keeping up with technological and scientific advances. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  1. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002 on the admitted cases with neurological complications after chickenpox (with rash or scar. Patients were investigated with CT/MRI, CSF study, EEG and nerve conduction studies and hematological workup. They were followed-up for 1 year and outcome assessed using modified Rankin scale. Results: The latency for the neurological complications was 4-32 days (mean: 16.32 days. There were 18 cases: 10 adults (64% and 8 children (36%. Cerebellar ataxia (normal CT/MRI was observed in 7 cases (32% (mean age: 6.85 years. One patient (6 years had acute right hemiparesis in the fifth week due to left capsular infarct. All these cases spontaneously recovered by 4 weeks. The age range of the adult patients was 13-47 years (mean: 27 years. The manifestations included cerebellar and pyramidal signs (n-4 with features of demyelination in MRI who recovered spontaneously or with methylprednisolone by 8 weeks. Patient with encephalitis recovered in 2 weeks with acyclovir. Guillain Barre syndrome of the demyelinating type (n-2 was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and they had a slow recovery by a modified Rankin scale (mRs score of 3 and 2 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. One case died after hemorrhage into the occipital infarct. There were two cases of asymmetrical neuropathy, one each of the seventh cranial and brachial neuritis. Conclusion: Spontaneous recovery occurs in post-chickenpox cerebellar ataxia. Rarely, serious complications can occur in adults. The demyelinating disorders, either of the central or peripheral

  2. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Boueiz

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we summarize available information about the pulmonary vascular and cardiac manifestations of SSc with special emphasis on their prognostic implications as well as the peculiarity of their detection.

  3. Cardio-pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis: A study at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetakiran Arakkal

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In our patients, pulmonary involvement was more common than cardiac involvement. Interstitial lung disease and cardiac involvement were more commonly seen in diffuse systemic sclerosis whereas pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in limited systemic sclerosis. Hence, it is important to screen the patients for cardiopulmonary involvement for early diagnosis and treatment and a better prognostic outcome.

  4. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  5. Neurological aspects of grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Adriana C; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flavia; Nardi, Antonio E; Machado, Sergio; Pessoa, Tamires M

    2014-01-01

    Despite grief being a universal experience and the increased scientific attention paid to grief and bereavement in recent years, studies that seek to better understand the role of the neurological aspects of grief are still scarce. We found 5 studies that discussed the relationship between the neurological aspects of grief due to the death of a loved one. All studies showed an activation of common areas, i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), insula and amygdala. These findings could indicate that there is a group of areas working together and responding to generate the symptomatology of grief. Because grief is a universal experience, it is essential that the necessary and effective support can be provided to those who experience the loss of someone considered important in their lives, and this requires understanding grief's manifestation, its differential diagnosis in reference to other clinical conditions, mainly psychiatric ones, and adequate forms of intervention and treatment when necessary. Proper understanding and support can help prevent the emergence of more serious health problems.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmadakis, George; Aguilera, Didier; Carceles, Odette; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Boletis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage renal disease patients is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients is relatively high and varies in different studies from 17% to 49.53% depending on the mode of dialysis and other selection factors, such as the presence of other cardiovascular comorbidities. The etiopathogenic mechanisms that have been studied in relatively small studies mainly include arteriovenous fistula-induced increased cardiac output, which cannot be accomodated by, the spacious under normal conditions pulmonary circulation. Additionally, pulmonary vessels show signs of endothelial dysfunction, dysregulation of vascular tone due to an imbalance in vasoactive substances, and local as well as systemic inflammation. It is also believed that microbubbles escaping from the dialysis circuit can trigger vasoconstriction and vascular sclerosis. The non-specific therapeutic options that proved to be beneficial in pulmonary artery pressure reduction are endothelin inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, and vasodilatory prostaglandins in various forms. The specific modes of treatment are renal transplantation, size reduction or closure of high-flow arteriovenous fistulas, and transfer from hemodialysis to peritoneal dialysis-a modality that is associated with a lesser prevalence of pulmonary hypertension.

  7. Primary care perceptions of neurology and neurology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Angela M; Wade, Carrie; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-06-01

    Neurophobia (fear of neural sciences) and evaluation of independent sector contracts in neurology have seldom been examined among general practitioners (GPs). A questionnaire determined GPs' perceptions of neurology compared with other medical specialties. GP experiences of neurology services with independent sector companies and the local National Health Service (NHS) were compared. Areas of potential improvement in NHS neurology services were recorded from thematic analyses. Among 76 GPs neurology was perceived to be as interesting as other medical specialties. GPs reported less knowledge, more difficulty and less confidence in neurology compared with other medical specialties. There was a preference for a local NHS neurology service (pneurology services provided better patient satisfaction. GPs prefer local NHS neurology services to independent sector contracts. GPs' evaluations should inform commissioning of neurology services. Combating neurophobia should be an integral part of responsive commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Anomalous pulmonary venous drainage associated with mitral valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruschke, A.V.G.; Bloch, Antoine

    1969-01-01

    Four cases of mitral stenosis associated with anomalous pulmonary venous return are described. In two of these cases there was severe mitral regurgitation as well. A pulmonary arteriovenous shunt was also found in one of these. A review of the records of patients admitted for cardiac

  9. Deja vu in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The significance of deja vu is widely recognised in the context of temporal lobe epilepsy, and enquiry about deja vu is frequently made in the clinical assessment of patients with possible epilepsy. Deja vu has also been associated with several psychiatric disorders. The historical context of current understanding of deja vu is discussed. The literature reveals deja vu to be a common phenomenon consistent with normality. Several authors have suggested the existence of a "pathological" form of deja vu that differs, qualitatively or quantitatively, from "non-pathological" deja vu. The features of deja vu suggesting neurological or psychiatric pathology are discussed. Several neuroanatomical and psychological models of the deja vu experience are highlighted, implicating the perceptual, mnemonic and affective regions of the lateral temporal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala in the genesis of deja vu. A possible genetic basis for a neurochemical model of deja vu is discussed. Clinical approaches to the patient presenting with possible deja vu are proposed.

  10. Consciousness: A Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking.

  11. Fisioterapia respiratória na disfunção pulmonar pós-cirurgia cardíaca Respiratory physiotherapy in the pulmonary dysfunction after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Alencar Renault

    2008-12-01

    respiratory physiotherapy used following cardiac surgery and this effectiveness in reverting pulmonary dysfunction. It has been used as reference publications in English and Portuguese using as key words thoracic surgery, respiratory exercises, physical therapy modalities, postoperative complications and myocardial revascularization, contained in the following databases BIREME, SciELO Brazil, LILACS, PUBMED, from 1997 to 2007. A secondary search of the reference list of identified articles also was made. It has been selected eleven randomized trials (997 patients. For the articles included incentive spirometry was used in three; deep breathing exercises in six; deep breathing exercises added to positive expiratory pressure in four and positive airway pressure added to inspiratory resistance in two. Three trials used intermittent positive pressure breathing. Continuous positive airway pressure and bi-level positive airway pressure has been used in three and two trials. The protocols used in the studies were varied and the co interventions were present in a big part of these. The different analyzed varieties and the time of postoperatory follow up make a comparative analysis difficult. Pulmonary dysfunction is evident in the postoperatory period of cardiac surgery. The use of noninvasive ventilation has been associated with good results in the first postoperatory days. Despite the known importance of postoperatory respiratory physiotherapy, until now, there is no literary consensus about the superiority of one technique over the others.

  12. Pregnancy After Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozicka, Urszula; Weroński, Krzysztof; Rużyłło, Witold; Demkow, Marcin; Kowalski, Mirosław; Śpiewak, Mateusz; Piotrowicz, Ewa; Siudalska, Hanna; Hoffman, Piotr; Biernacka, Elżbieta K

    2017-12-01

    Transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation (TPVI) is a relatively new method of treating patients with significant pulmonary regurgitation or pulmonary stenosis, or both, after reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. It is an attractive alternative to conduit replacement in this group of patients, who are typically young and active. This report includes 4 young women who after successful TPVI became pregnant and gave birth. Transthoracic echocardiography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging were performed in all patients. The results suggest that pregnancy and delivery after successful TPVI is safe when the appropriate precautions have been taken. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, M; Sommer, N; Hecker, A; Bandorski, D; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Mayer, E; Walmrath, D

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a potentially fatal disorder and frequently seen in critical care and emergency medicine. Due to a high mortality rate within the first few hours, the accurate initiation of rational diagnostic pathways in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism and timely consecutive treatment is essential. In this review, the current European guidelines on the diagnosis and therapy of acute pulmonary embolism are presented. Special focus is put on a structured patient management based on the individual risk of early mortality. In particular risk assessment and new risk-adjusted treatment recommendations are presented and discussed in this article.

  14. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  15. Pulmonary capillary recruitment in response to hypoxia in healthy humans: a possible role for hypoxic pulmonary venoconstriction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Bryan J; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Snyder, Eric M

    2011-01-01

    We examined mechanisms by which hypoxia may elicit pulmonary capillary recruitment in humans. On separate occasions, twenty-five healthy adults underwent exposure to intravenous saline infusion (30 ml/kg ∼ 15 min) or 17-h normobaric hypoxia ( [FIO2 = 12.5%). Cardiac output (Q) and pulmonary capil...

  16. Prehospital cooling to improve successful targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, D C; Cheskes, S; Verbeek, P R; Pinto, R; Austin, D; Brooks, S C; Dainty, K N; Goncharenko, K; Mamdani, M; Thorpe, K E; Morrison, L J

    2017-10-05

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) improves survival with good neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but is delivered inconsistently and often with delay. To determine if prehospital cooling by paramedics leads to higher rates of 'successful TTM', defined as achieving a target temperature of 32-34°C within 6h of hospital arrival. Pragmatic RCT comparing prehospital cooling (surface ice packs, cold saline infusion, wristband reminders) initiated 5min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) versus usual resuscitation and transport. The primary outcome was rate of 'successful TTM'; secondary outcomes were rates of applying TTM in hospital, survival with good neurological outcome, pulmonary edema in emergency department, and re-arrest during transport. 585 patients were randomized to receive prehospital cooling (n=279) or control (n=306). Prehospital cooling did not increase rates of 'successful TTM' (30% vs 25%; RR, 1.17; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91-1.52; p=0.22), but increased rates of applying TTM in hospital (68% vs 56%; RR, 1.21; 95%CI 1.07-1.37; p=0.003). Survival with good neurological outcome (29% vs 26%; RR, 1.13, 95%CI 0.87-1.47; p=0.37) was similar. Prehospital cooling was not associated with re-arrest during transport (7.5% vs 8.2%; RR, 0.94; 95%CI 0.54-1.63; p=0.83) but was associated with decreased incidence of pulmonary edema in emergency department (12% vs 18%; RR, 0.66; 95%CI 0.44-0.99; p=0.04). Prehospital cooling initiated 5min after ROSC did not increase rates of achieving a target temperature of 32-34°C within 6h of hospital arrival but was safe and increased application of TTM in hospital. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Echocardiography may help detect pulmonary vasculopathy in the early stages of pulmonary artery hypertension associated with systemic sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Serra Walter; Chetta Alfredo; Santilli Daniele; Mozzani Flavio; Dall'Aglio Pier; Olivieri Dario; Cattabiani Maria; Ardissino Diego; Gherli Tiziano

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients with systemic sclerosis is associated with a poor prognosis, but this can be improved by early disease detection. Abnormal pulmonary and cardiac function can be detected early by means of echocardiography, whereas right heart catheterization is usually performed later. Objectives The purpose of this prospective study was to detect early the presence of pulmonary artery vasculopathy in patients with verified systemic scleros...

  18. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-07-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Adults with pneumococcal meningitis have the highest risk of developing focal neurological deficits, which are most commonly caused by cerebral infarction, but can also be due to cerebritis, subdural empyema, cerebral abscess or intracerebral bleeding. Focal deficits may improve during clinical course and even after discharge, but a proportion of patients will have persisting focal neurological deficits that often interfere in patient's daily life. Hearing loss occurs in a high proportion of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and has been associated with co-existing otitis. Children and adults recovering from bacterial meningitis without apparent neurological deficits are at risk for long-term cognitive deficits. Early identification of neurological sequelae is important for children to prevent additional developmental delay, and for adults to achieve successful return in society after the disease. Neurological sequelae occur in a substantial amount of patients following bacterial meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  20. Splicing Regulation in Neurologic Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Licatalosi, Donny D; Darnell, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    .... It is becoming evident that alternative splicing plays a particularly important role in neurologic disease, which is perhaps not surprising given the important role splicing plays in generating...

  1. A unique case of pulmonary artery catheter bleeding from the oximetry connection port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Rajagopalan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery catheter is an invasive monitor usually placed in high-risk cardiac surgical patients to optimize the cardiac functions. We present this case of blood oozing from the oximetry connection port of the pulmonary artery catheter that resulted in the inability to monitor continuous cardiac output requiring replacement of the catheter. The cause of this abnormal bleeding was later confirmed to be due to a manufacturing defect.

  2. Pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect with collaterals to right lung associated with anomalous left pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khositseth, Anant [Mahidol University, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn; Pornkul, Ratanaporn [Mahidol University, Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2010-12-15

    We present a 10-month-old boy with cyanosis. This is a rare case of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect (VSD), major aorto-pulmonary collateral arteries (MAPCAs) to the right lung with absent native right pulmonary artery (RPA) in association with anomalous left pulmonary artery (LPA) from the ascending aorta (AAo). Echocardiography was unable to identify all of the cardiovascular abnormalities. Multidetector CT demonstrated all of these abnormalities and is the investigation of choice instead of cardiac catheterization. (orig.)

  3. Pulmonary nocardiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a weak immune system may need to take antibiotics for long periods of time to prevent the infection from returning. Alternative Names Nocardiosis - pulmonary; Mycetoma; Nocardia Images Respiratory system ...

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... that carry blood from your heart to your lungs become hard and narrow. Your heart has to ...

  5. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fungus. It grows on dead leaves, stored grain, bird droppings, compost piles, and other decaying vegetation. ... Complications of pulmonary aspergilloma may include: Difficulty breathing that gets worse Massive bleeding from the lung Spread of the infection

  6. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. D. Brucki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA. Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  7. Cardiac Troponin T and Creatine Kinase MB Fraction Levels Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... stroke.[17] It has been suggested that the elevated levels of cardiac markers in acute ischemic stroke patients could be related to cardiac myocytolysis that occurred as a result of activation of the sympathetic nervous system.[19] The presumed cause for this elevation in acute neurologic disease is related to ...

  8. Cooling the crisis: Therapeutic hypothermia after sickle cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metske, Hennie A.; Postema, Pieter G.; Biemond, Bart J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The management of patients with sickle-cell disease and cardiac arrest presents special challenges. Mild therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival and neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest, however, it may also precipitate sickling in patients with sickle-cell disease. Rigorous

  9. A Case of Primary Bacterial Pericarditis with Recurrent Cardiac Tamponade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizane, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Mitsunobu; Miyachi, Hideki; Hosokawa, Yusuke; Akutsu, Koichi; Shimizu, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is an important and potentially lethal complication of acute pericarditis. However, recurrence of cardiac tamponade is rare when it is treated appropriately. We present a 49-year-old man with bacterial pericarditis and recurrent cardiac tamponade, which was caused by the rupture of an upper part of the left atrium (LA). According to the autopsy findings, bacteremia from Staphylococcus aureus developed on a substrate of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and spread to the pericardium via the blood. Subsequently, tissue necrosis developed from the pulmonary trunk and aorta to the LA, leading to recurrence of cardiac rupture and cardiac tamponade.

  10. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  11. Evidence-based guideline summary: diagnosis and treatment of limb-girdle and distal dystrophies: report of the guideline development subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the practice issues review panel of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Weiss, Michael; Selcen, Duygu; David, William; Raynor, Elizabeth; Carter, Gregory; Wicklund, Matthew; Barohn, Richard J; Ensrud, Erik; Griggs, Robert C; Gronseth, Gary; Amato, Anthony A

    2014-10-14

    To review the current evidence and make practice recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs). Systematic review and practice recommendation development using the American Academy of Neurology guideline development process. Most LGMDs are rare, with estimated prevalences ranging from 0.07 per 100,000 to 0.43 per 100,000. The frequency of some muscular dystrophies varies based on the ethnic background of the population studied. Some LGMD subtypes have distinguishing features, including pattern of muscle involvement, cardiac abnormalities, extramuscular involvement, and muscle biopsy findings. The few published therapeutic trials were not designed to establish clinical efficacy of any treatment. For patients with suspected muscular dystrophy, clinicians should use a clinical approach to guide genetic diagnosis based on clinical phenotype, inheritance pattern, and associated manifestations (Level B). Clinicians should refer newly diagnosed patients with an LGMD subtype and high risk of cardiac complications for cardiology evaluation even if they are asymptomatic from a cardiac standpoint (Level B). In patients with LGMD with a known high risk of respiratory failure, clinicians should obtain periodic pulmonary function testing (Level B). Clinicians should refer patients with muscular dystrophy to a clinic that has access to multiple specialties designed specifically to care for patients with neuromuscular disorders (Level B). Clinicians should not offer patients with LGMD gene therapy, myoblast transplantation, neutralizing antibody to myostatin, or growth hormone outside of a research study designed to determine efficacy and safety of the treatment (Level R). Detailed results and recommendations are available on the Neurology® Web site at Neurology.org. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello BT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting system disease, and arrhythmias predisposing to sudden cardiac death. A number of investigations are available to assist in making the diagnosis. The diagnosis may be made from the clinical history and evidence of inflammation on imaging modalities in the active phase and evidence of myocardial scarring in the chronic phase. Keywords: cardiac magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, sarcoidosis, sudden cardiac death

  13. Pregnancy in women with pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, P. G.; Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Women with pulmonary hypertension have a high risk of morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. The inability to increase cardiac output leads to heart failure while further risks are introduced with hypercoagulability and decrease in systemic vascular resistance. There is no proof that new advanced

  14. Interventional neurology: a reborn subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Randall C; Alshekhlee, Amer; Yavagal, Dileep R; Vora, Nirav; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2012-10-01

    Neurologists have a long history of involvement in cerebral angiography; however, the roots of neurologist involvement in therapeutic endovascular procedures have not been previously documented. As outlined in this article, it has taken the efforts of several early pioneers to lay the ground work for interventional neurology, a specialty that has become one of the fastest growing neurological subspecialties. The ground work, along with a great clinical need, has allowed the modern interventional neurologist to tackle some of the most intractable diseases, especially those affecting the cerebral vasculature. The institutionalization of interventional neurology as a subspecialty was first advocated in 1995 in an article entitled, "Interventional Neurology, a subspecialty whose time has come." The institutions created in the wake of this article have provided the framework that has allowed interventional neurology to transition from "a subspecialty whose time has come" to a subspecialty that is here to stay and thrive. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  15. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  16. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  17. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matter Find HBP Tools & Resources Stroke Vascular Health Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pulmonary ... five groups of pulmonary hypertension. Group 1 pulmonary arterial ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and interstitial lung disease, as ...

  18. Cardiac ablation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheter ablation; Radiofrequency catheter ablation; Cryoablation - cardiac ablation; AV nodal reentrant tachycardia - cardiac ablation; AVNRT - cardiac ablation; Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome - cardiac ablation; Atrial fibrillation - cardiac ablation; Atrial flutter - ...

  19. Interrater variability of EEG interpretation in comatose cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rosén, Ingmar; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-01-01

    of cardiac arrest patients included in the Target Temperature Management trial. The main objective was to evaluate if malignant EEG-patterns could reliably be identified. METHODS: Full-length EEGs from 103 comatose cardiac arrest patients were interpreted by four EEG-specialists with different nationalities...... in an international context with high reliability. SIGNIFICANCE: The establishment of strict criteria with high transferability between interpreters will increase the usefulness of routine EEG to assess neurological prognosis after cardiac arrest....

  20. Neurologic Manifestations of Enterovirus 71 Infection in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Yeon; Lee, Myoung Sook; Kim, Dong Bin

    2016-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 frequently involves the central nervous system and may present with a variety of neurologic manifestations. Here, we aimed to describe the clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profiles of patients presenting with neurologic complications of enterovirus 71 infection. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 pediatric patients hospitalized with acute neurologic manifestations accompanied by confirmed enterovirus 71 infection at Ulsan University Hospital between 2010 and 2014. The patients' mean age was 2.9 ± 5.5 years (range, 18 days to 12 years), and 80.6% of patients were less than 4 years old. Based on their clinical features, the patients were classified into 4 clinical groups: brainstem encephalitis (n = 21), meningitis (n = 7), encephalitis (n = 2), and acute flaccid paralysis (n = 1). The common neurologic symptoms included myoclonus (58.1%), lethargy (54.8%), irritability (54.8%), vomiting (48.4%), ataxia (38.7%), and tremor (35.5%). Twenty-five patients underwent an MRI scan; of these, 14 (56.0%) revealed the characteristic increased T2 signal intensity in the posterior region of the brainstem and bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei. Twenty-six of 30 patients (86.7%) showed CSF pleocytosis. Thirty patients (96.8%) recovered completely without any neurologic deficits; one patient (3.2%) died due to pulmonary hemorrhage and shock. In the present study, brainstem encephalitis was the most common neurologic manifestation of enterovirus 71 infection. The characteristic clinical symptoms such as myoclonus, ataxia, and tremor in conjunction with CSF pleocytosis and brainstem lesions on MR images are pathognomonic for diagnosis of neurologic involvement by enterovirus 71 infection.

  1. Autoimmune Response Confers Decreased Cardiac Function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Valve replacement in patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) does not attenuate ... valve replacement. Clinically, two-dimensional echocardiography is widely used as an effective approach to evaluate cardiac function heart function of patients with ... neurologic disorders, renal or liver disease, acute.

  2. Pressure-Flow During Exercise Catheterization Predicts Survival in Pulmonary Hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    Hasler Elisabeth; Müller-Mottet Séverine; Furian Michael; Saxer Stéphanie; Huber Lars Christian; Maggiorini Marco; Speich Rudolf; Bloch Konrad Ernst; Ulrich Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension manifests with impaired exercise capacity. Our aim was to investigate whether the mean pulmonary arterial pressure to cardiac output relationship (mPAP/CO) predicts transplant free survival in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Hemodynamic data according to right heart catheterization in patients with PAH and CTEPH at rest and during supine incremental cycle exercise were analyzed. Tr...

  3. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  4. Successful Resuscitation of Maternal Cardiac Arrest With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Guided by Rotational Thromboelastometry and Transesophageal Echocardiography: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hannah; Barrett, Helen L; Lee, Julie; Pincus, Jason M; Kimble, Rebecca M; Eley, Victoria A

    2017-10-26

    We present a case of maternal cardiac arrest during an elective cesarean delivery. Transesophageal echocardiography identified a large pulmonary artery mass, and guided resuscitation efforts. After return of spontaneous circulation, the patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation with massive hemorrhage. Blood product selection and volume replacement were guided by rotational thromboelastometry and transesophageal echocardiography, respectively. Correction of coagulopathy was observed clinically and confirmed by rotational thromboelastometry. The patient fully recovered without neurological deficit.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  5. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  6. Why neurology? Factors which influence career choice in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Hoyle, Chad; Yin, Han; McCoyd, Matthew; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the factors which influence the decision to pursue a career in neurology. An anonymous survey was developed using a Likert scale to rate responses. The survey was sent to adult and child neurology faculty, residents and fellows, as well as medical students applying for neurology. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the factors of influence. Respondents were subsequently categorized into pre-neurology trainees, neurology trainees, child neurologists and adult neurologists, and differences between the groups were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test. One hundred and thirty-three anonymous responses were received. The respondents were neurologists across all levels of training and practice. Across all respondents, the most common factor of high importance was intellectual content of specialty, challenging diagnostic problems, type of patient encountered and interest in helping people. Responses were similar across the groups; however, the earliest trainees cited interest in helping people as most important, while those in neurology training and beyond cite intellectual content of the specialty as most important. As trainees transition from their earliest levels of clinical experience into working as residents and faculty, there is a shift in the cited important factors. Lifestyle and financial factors seem to be the least motivating across all groups. Encouragement from peers, mentors, faculty and practicing physicians is considered high influences in a smaller number of neurologists. This may present an opportunity for practicing neurologists to make connections with medical students early in their education in an effort to encourage and mentor candidates.

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  8. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25503364 . Balady GJ, Williams MA, Ades PA, et al. Core components of ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22070836 . Thompson PD. Exercise-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation. In: Mann DL, Zipes ...

  9. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also run other tests, depending on your health history and the results of these tests. Treatment Cardiac arrest needs emergency treatment right away to get the heart started again. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) . This is often the first type of ...

  10. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diagnostic imaging techniques and chemical and metabolic analyses to detect, manage, and treat neurological disease. Some ... performed in a doctor’s office or at a clinic. Fluoroscopy is a type of x-ray that ...

  11. Neurologic Complications of Smallpox Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox and smallpox vaccination is reviewed from the Departments of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

  12. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  13. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

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    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  15. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ankles A bluish color on your lips and skin Diagnosis Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based ... and legs for swelling and your lips and skin for a bluish color. These are signs of ... and procedures to confirm a diagnosis of PH and to look for its underlying ...

  17. Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia

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    Campisi Corradino

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia (PL is a rare developmental disorder involving the lung, and characterized by pulmonary subpleural, interlobar, perivascular and peribronchial lymphatic dilatation. The prevalence is unknown. PL presents at birth with severe respiratory distress, tachypnea and cyanosis, with a very high mortality rate at or within a few hours of birth. Most reported cases are sporadic and the etiology is not completely understood. It has been suggested that PL lymphatic channels of the fetal lung do not undergo the normal regression process at 20 weeks of gestation. Secondary PL may be caused by a cardiac lesion. The diagnostic approach includes complete family and obstetric history, conventional radiologic studies, ultrasound and magnetic resonance studies, lymphoscintigraphy, lung functionality tests, lung biopsy, bronchoscopy, and pleural effusion examination. During the prenatal period, all causes leading to hydrops fetalis should be considered in the diagnosis of PL. Fetal ultrasound evaluation plays a key role in the antenatal diagnosis of PL. At birth, mechanical ventilation and pleural drainage are nearly always necessary to obtain a favorable outcome of respiratory distress. Home supplemental oxygen therapy and symptomatic treatment of recurrent cough and wheeze are often necessary during childhood, sometimes associated with prolonged pleural drainage. Recent advances in intensive neonatal care have changed the previously nearly fatal outcome of PL at birth. Patients affected by PL who survive infancy, present medical problems which are characteristic of chronic lung disease.

  18. Circulatory Management Focusing on Preventing Intraventricular Hemorrhage and Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-Horng Su

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of modern neonatal care of extremely preterm infants is to reduce mortality and long-term neurological impairments. Preterm infants frequently experience cerebral intraventricular or pulmonary hemorrhage, which usually occurs within 72 hours after birth and can lead to long-term neurological sequelae and mortality. These serious hemorrhagic complications are closely related to perinatal hemodynamic changes, including an increase in the afterload on the left ventricle of the heart after the infant is separated from the placenta, and an increased preload from a left-to-right shunt caused by a hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (PDA. The left ventricle of a preterm myocardium has limited ability to respond to such an increase in afterload and preload, and this can result in cardiac dysfunction and hemodynamic deterioration. We suggest that delayed umbilical cord clamping or umbilical cord milking to maintain optimal blood pressure and systemic blood flow (SBF, careful assessment to keep the afterload at an acceptable level, and a strategy of early targeted treatment of significant PDA to improve perfusion during this critical time period may reduce or prevent these serious complications in preterm infants.

  19. Thrombolysis during extended cardiopulmonary resuscitation for autoimmune-related pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian-Ping; Ying, Ke-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (MPE) and acute myocardial infarction are the two most common causes of cardiac arrest (CA). At present, lethal hemorrhage makes thrombolytic therapy underused during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, despite the potential benefits for these underlying conditions. Hypercoagulability of the blood in autoimmune disorders (such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia) carries a risk of MPE. It is critical to find out the etiology of CA for timely thrombolytic intervention. A 23-year-old woman with a 10-year medical history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia suffered from CA in our emergency intensive care unit. ECG and echocardiogram indicated the possibility of MPE, so fibrinolytic therapy (alteplase) was successful during prolonged resuscitation. Neurological recovery of the patient was generally good, and no fatal bleeding developed. MPE was documented by CT pulmonary angiography. A medical history of autoimmune disease poses a risk of PE, and the causes of CA (such as this) should be investigated etiologically. A therapy with alteplase may be used early during cardiopulmonary resuscitation once there is presumptive evidence of PE. Clinical trials are needed in this setting to study patients with hypercoagulable states.

  20. A randomised controlled trial of roller versus centrifugal cardiopulmonary bypass pumps in patients undergoing pulmonary endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlejnsky, F; Klein, A A; Lindner, J; Maruna, P; Kvasnicka, J; Kvasnicka, T; Zima, T; Pecha, O; Lips, M; Rulisek, J; Porizka, M; Kopecky, P; Kunstyr, J

    2015-10-01

    There is some controversy as to whether there is a benefit from the use of a centrifugal pump compared with a roller pump during cardiopulmonary bypass to facilitate cardiac surgery. We compared the two pumps, with the primary aim of determining any difference in the effects on inflammation after pulmonary endarterectomy surgery which required prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Between September 2010 and July 2013, 58 elective patients undergoing pulmonary endarterectomy were included in this prospective, randomised, controlled study; 30 patients were randomly allocated to the control group, which used a roller pump, and 28 patients to the treatment group, which used a centrifugal pump. Interleukin-6, procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, thromboelastographic parameters, P-selectin, international normalised ratio, activated prothrombin time, free haemoglobin, haematocrit, red blood cell count, white blood cell count, platelet count and protein S100β were recorded during and after the procedure. We also recorded the length of intensive care unit stay, blood loss and transfusion, neurological outcomes and respiratory and renal failure. There was a significant difference in the primary outcome measure: Interleukin-6 was significantly higher in the roller pump group (587 ± 38 ng · l(-1) vs. 327 ± 37 ng · l(-1); pcardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is associated with a reduced inflammatory response compared to the standard roller pump. Larger multi-centre trials in this area of practice are required. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Unusual migration of pulmonary artery catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kuravinakop

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery catheter is widely used in intensive care. Distal migration of the catheter is a know complication. Diagnosis of such a migration is made by both clinical criteria and radiographs. A 55 year old septic lady was admitted to the intensive care unit. Pulmonary artery catheter introduced for cardiac output monitoring migrated from right lung to left lung. Diagnosis was made following a chest radiograph the following day of insertion with the clinical criteria remaining unaltered. Migration of pulmonary artery catheter can occur not only distally but from one lung to another. Clinical criteria alone cannot rule out migration. Chest radiographs form an important part in monitoring the position of the pulmonary artery catheter.

  2. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema (A Case Report

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    Funda Gümüş

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a life threatening complication of severe central nervous system injury. The most common cause of neurogenic pulmonary edema is subarachnoid hemorrhage followed by head trauma and epilepsy. The rare causes are cervical spine trauma, multiplesclerosis, cerebellar hemorrhage and intracranial tumors. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is characterized by an increase in extravascular lung water in patients who have sustained a sudden change in neurologic condition. The exact pathophysiology is unclear but it probably involves an adrenergic response to the central nervous system injury which leads to increased catecholamine, pulmonary hydrostatic pressure and increased lung capillary permeability. The presenting symptoms are nonspecific and often include dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, hypoxemia, pinkfroty secretion, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and crackles. These symptoms start within minutes or hours and resolves 48-72 hours that typically for neurogenic pulmonary edema. Basic principles of treatment, surgical decompression, reduce intracranial pressure, controlled ventilation with suplemental oxygen, positive end expiratory pressure and diuresis. We report a case with neurogenic pulmonary edema that occured after head trauma. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 59-62

  3. Unilateral pulmonary veins atresia: evaluation by computed tomography; Atresia unilateral das veias pulmonares: avaliacao por tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eifer, Diego Andre; Arsego, Felipe Veras, E-mail: felipesoarestorres@gmail.com [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), RS (Brazil). Serv. de Radiologia; Torres, Felipe Soares [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Medicina

    2013-11-15

    Unilateral pulmonary vein atresia is a rare congenital condition. In addition to cardiac malformations or pulmonary hypertension, patients may present with recurrent pulmonary infections or hemoptysis in childhood or adolescence. The authors report a case where the typical findings of such condition were observed at computed tomography in an adult patient. (author)

  4. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V Tsapenko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mykola V Tsapenko1,5, Arseniy V Tsapenko2, Thomas BO Comfere3,5, Girish K Mour1,5, Sunil V Mankad4, Ognjen Gajic1,51Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; 3Division of Critical Care Medicine; 4Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (M.E.T.R.I.C, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brown University, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in

  5. Detailed statistical analysis plan for the pulmonary protection trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Jakobsen, Janus C; Secher, Niels H; Jonassen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars W; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2014-12-23

    Pulmonary dysfunction complicates cardiac surgery that includes cardiopulmonary bypass. The pulmonary protection trial evaluates effect of pulmonary perfusion on pulmonary function in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This paper presents the statistical plan for the main publication to avoid risk of outcome reporting bias, selective reporting, and data-driven results as an update to the published design and method for the trial. The pulmonary protection trial is a randomized, parallel group clinical trial that assesses the effect of pulmonary perfusion with oxygenated blood or Custodiol™ HTK (histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate) solution versus no pulmonary perfusion in 90 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Patients, the statistician, and the conclusion drawers are blinded to intervention allocation. The primary outcome is the oxygenation index from 10 to 15 minutes after the end of cardiopulmonary bypass until 24 hours thereafter. Secondary outcome measures are oral tracheal intubation time, days alive outside the intensive care unit, days alive outside the hospital, and 30- and 90-day mortality, and one or more of the following selected serious adverse events: pneumothorax or pleural effusion requiring drainage, major bleeding, reoperation, severe infection, cerebral event, hyperkaliemia, acute myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmia, renal replacement therapy, and readmission for a respiratory-related problem. The pulmonary protection trial investigates the effect of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. A preserved oxygenation index following pulmonary perfusion may indicate an effect and inspire to a multicenter confirmatory trial to assess a more clinically relevant outcome. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01614951, registered on 6 June 2012.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258116129; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  7. Clinical and haemodynamic evaluation of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension patients scheduled for pulmonary thromboendarterectomy: Is schistosomiasis hypertension an important confounding factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Terra-Filho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a disease affecting approximately 4,000 people per year in the United States. The incidence rate in Brazil, however, is unknown. The estimated survival for patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without treatment is approximately three years. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy for select patients is a potentially curative procedure when correctly applied. In Brazil, the clinical and hemodynamic profiles of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension patients have yet to be described. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical and hemodynamic characteristics of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension patients scheduled for pulmonary thromboendarterectomy in a referral center for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension treatment in Brazil. METHODS: From December 2006 to November 2009, patients were evaluated and scheduled for pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. The subjects were classified according to gender, age and functional class and were tested for thrombofilia and brain natriuretic peptide levels. RESULTS: Thirty-five consecutive chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension patients were evaluated. Two patients tested positive for schistosomiasis, and 31 were enrolled in the study (19 female, 12 male. The majority of patients were categorized in functional classes III and IV. Hemodynamic data showed a mean pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR of 970.8 ± 494.36 dynas·s·cm-5 and a low cardiac output of 3.378 ± 1.13 L/min. Linear regression revealed a direct relation between cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance. Paradoxical septal movement was strongly correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac output (p=0.001. Brain natriuretic peptide serum levels were elevated in 19 of 27 patients. CONCLUSIONS: In a referral center for pulmonary hypertension in Brazil, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension patients evaluated for

  8. Postoperative cardiac arrest after heart surgery: does extracorporeal perfusion support a paradigm change in management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gologorsky, Edward; Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Carvalho, Enisa M; Gologorsky, Angela; Ricci, Marco; Salerno, Tomas A

    2010-01-01

    Early institution of extracorporeal perfusion support (ECPS) may improve survival after cardiac arrest. Two patients sustained unexpected cardiac arrest in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) following cardiac interventions. ECPS was initiated due to failure to restore hemodynamics after prolonged (over 60 minutes) advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) protocol-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Despite relatively late institution of ECPS, both patients survived with preserved neurological function. This communication focuses on the utility of ECPS in the ICU as a part of resuscitative efforts.

  9. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with pulmonary embolism in surgical patients - a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swol, J; Buchwald, D; Strauch, J; Schildhauer, T A

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) devices maintain the circulation and oxygenation of organs during acute right ventricular failure and cardiogenic shock, bypassing the lungs. A pulmonary embolism can cause this life-threatening condition. ECLS is a considerably less invasive treatment than surgical embolectomy. Whether to bridge embolectomy or for a therapeutic purpose, ECLS is used almost exclusively following failure of all other therapeutic options. From January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2014, five patients in cardiac arrest and with diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE) were cannulated with the ECLS system. PE was diagnosed using computer tomography scanning or echocardiography. Cardiac arrest was witnessed in the hospital in all cases and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) was initiated immediately. Cannulation of the femoral vein and femoral artery was always performed under CPR conditions. Right heart failure regressed during the ECLS therapy, usually under a blood flow of 4-5 L/min after 48 hours. Three patients were weaned from ECLS and one patient became an organ donor. Finally, two of the five PE patients treated with ECLS were discharged from inpatient treatment without neurological dysfunction. The duration of ECLS therapy depends on the patient's condition. Irreversible damage to the organs after hypoxemia limits ECLS treatment and leads to futile multiorgan failure. Hemorrhages after thrombolysis and cerebral dysfunction were further complications. Veno-arterial cannulation for ECLS can be feasibly achieved and should be established during active CPR for cardiac arrest. In the case of PE, the immediate diagnosis and rapid implantation of the system are decisive for therapeutic success. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Acute Pulmonary Embolism Mimics Acute Coronary Syndrome in Older Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chieh Liu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a fatal disease and an often missed diagnosis. There are no specific symptoms or signs. Accurate diagnosis followed by effective therapy can reduce mortality. We report on a 67-year-old man who underwent lumbar laminectomy and developed an acute anterior compressive-like chest pain and jaw numbness rather than dyspnea on the fifth postoperative day. Owing to refractory chest pain with suspicious posterior myocardial infarction or unstable angina on surface electrocardiogram, the patient received emergency coronary catheterization, which demonstrated normal coronary arteries. Further investigation provided a final diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Acute pulmonary embolism with simultaneous recent neuro-surgery was a therapeutic dilemma because of the risk of postoperative hemorrhage threatening neurologic function. After treatment with enoxaparin and close monitoring of his neurologic condition, his symptoms were eliminated. Clinicians must keep in mind a differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in a postoperative high-risk patient.

  11. [Penetrating cardiac injury in blunt trauma: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereli, Yüksel; Öncel, Murat

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac injuries may rarely be observed due to blunt thoracic traumas. Cardiac injury often creates a life-threatening condition requiring urgent surgical intervention, and follow-up of these patients should be carefully carried out in the perioperative period. These injuries depend on various factors including clinical presentation, type of injury, the time that passes until the patient reaches the hospital, bleeding, cardiac tamponade, or additional injuries. This article aimed to report a case who suffered penetrating cardiac injury in blunt thoracic trauma. Evaluated in the emergency department due to a motor vehicle accident, the 61-year-old male patient's chest x-ray revealed pulmonary contusion, rib fractures and cardiac tamponade. The patient was operated emergently. Right atrial injury was observed in the operation. The cardiac injury was repaired with primary suture technique. Cardiac injury in patients with blunt thoracic trauma is likely to be observed. In these patients, careful physical examination, early diagnosis, and treatment are very important.

  12. Effect of pulmonary hyperinflation on central blood volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijacika, Tanja; Kyhl, Kasper; Frestad, Daria

    2017-01-01

    assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in twelve breath-hold divers at rest and during apnea with GPI. Pulmonary blood volume was determined from pulmonary blood flow and transit times for gadolinium during first-pass perfusion after intravenous injection. During GPI, the lung volume increased by 0.8±0.6L...... (11±7%) above the total lung capacity. All cardiac chambers decreased in volume and despite a heart rate increase of 24±29 bpm (39±50%), pulmonary blood flow decreased by 2783±1820mL (43±20%). The pulmonary transit time remained unchanged at 7.5±2.2s and pulmonary blood volume decreased by 354±176m......Pulmonary hyperinflation attained by glossopharyngeal insufflation (GPI) challenges the circulation by compressing the heart and pulmonary vasculature. Our aim was to determine the amount of blood translocated from the central blood volume during GPI. Cardiac output and cardiac chamber volumes were...

  13. [Pulmonary paragonimiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Seco, Julio; Rodríguez-Guzmán, Marcel José; Rodríguez-Nieto, María Jesús; Gómez-Escolar, Pablo Fernández; Presa-Abos, Teresa; Fortes-Alen, José

    2011-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is a food-borne zoonosis caused by a trematode of the genus Paragonimus(1,2). Infestation is rare in Spain, but the influx of people from endemic areas should make us keep this condition in the differential diagnosis of our patients(2,5). We report the case a patient from Ecuador and resident in Spain for 7 years with active pulmonary tuberculosis on arrival in Spain and later diagnosed with of pulmonary paragonimiasis due to persistent haemoptysis. The diagnosis was established by surgical lung specimen showing granulomas containing parasite eggs and the macroscopic view of the fluke within a lung cavity. Initial tuberculosis treatment and current treatment with praziquantel controlled both conditions. Copyright © 2010 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Invasive hemodynamic monitoring in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery

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    Desanka Dragosavac

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: To assess the hemodynamic profile of cardiac surgery patients with circulatory instability in the early postoperative period (POP. METHODS: Over a two-year period, 306 patients underwent cardiac surgery. Thirty had hemodynamic instability in the early POP and were monitored with the Swan-Ganz catheter. The following parameters were evaluated: cardiac index (CI, systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary shunt, central venous pressure (CVP, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP, oxygen delivery and consumption, use of vasoactive drugs and of circulatory support. RESULTS: Twenty patients had low cardiac index (CI, and 10 had normal or high CI. Systemic vascular resistance was decreased in 11 patients. There was no correlation between oxygen delivery (DO2 and consumption (VO2, p=0.42, and no correlation between CVP and PCWP, p=0.065. Pulmonary vascular resistance was decreased in 15 patients and the pulmonary shunt was increased in 19. Two patients with CI < 2L/min/m² received circulatory support. CONCLUSION: Patients in the POP of cardiac surgery frequently have a mixed shock due to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. Therefore, invasive hemodynamic monitoring is useful in handling blood volume, choice of vasoactive drugs, and indication for circulatory support.

  15. Cardiac echinococcosis

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    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  16. Neurologic presentation of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushara, Khalafalla O

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) long has been associated with neurologic and psychiatric disorders including cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, and depression. Earlier reports mainly have documented the involvement of the nervous system as a complication of prediagnosed CD. However, more recent studies have emphasized that a wider spectrum of neurologic syndromes may be the presenting extraintestinal manifestation of gluten sensitivity with or without intestinal pathology. These include migraine, encephalopathy, chorea, brain stem dysfunction, myelopathy, mononeuritis multiplex, Guillain-Barre-like syndrome, and neuropathy with positive antiganglioside antibodies. The association between most neurologic syndromes described and gluten sensitivity remains to be confirmed by larger epidemiologic studies. It further has been suggested that gluten sensitivity (as evidenced by high antigliadin antibodies) is a common cause of neurologic syndromes (notably cerebellar ataxia) of otherwise unknown cause. Additional studies showed high prevalence of gluten sensitivity in genetic neurodegenerative disorders such as hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia and Huntington's disease. It remains unclear whether gluten sensitivity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders or whether it represents an epiphenomenon. Studies of gluten-free diet in patients with gluten sensitivity and neurologic syndromes have shown variable results. Diet trials also have been inconclusive in autism and schizophrenia, 2 diseases in which sensitivity to dietary gluten has been implicated. Further studies clearly are needed to assess the efficacy of gluten-free diet and to address the underlying mechanisms of nervous system pathology in gluten sensitivity.

  17. Neurological aspects of vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Mood and behavioral abnormalities are the most common early findings related to vibroacoustic disease (VAD). Other signs and symptoms have been observed in VAD patients. Brain MRI discloses small multifocal lesions in about 50% of subjects with more than 10 yr of occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or = 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or = 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. However, to date, there have been no studies globally integrating all the neurological, imaging and neurophysiological data of VAD patients. This is the main goal of this study. The 60 male Caucasians diagnosed with VAD were neurologically evaluated in extreme detail in order to systematically identify the most common and significant neurological disturbances in VAD. This population demonstrates cognitive changes (identified through psychological and neurophysiological studies (ERP P300)), vertigo and auditory changes, visual impairment, epilepsy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Neurological examination reveals pathological signs and reflexes, most commonly the palmo-mental reflex. A vascular pattern underlying the multifocal hyperintensities in T2 MR imaging, with predominant involvement of the small arteries of the white matter, is probably the visible organic substratum of the neurological picture. However, other pathophyisological mechanisms are involved in epileptic symptomatology.

  18. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussabah, Elhem; Zakhama, Lilia; Ksontini, Iméne; Ibn Elhadj, Zied; Boukhris, Besma; Naffeti, Sana; Thameur, Moez; Ben Youssef, Soraya

    2008-09-01

    PREREQUIS: Amyloidosis is a rare infiltrative disease characterized by multiple clinical features. Various organs are involved and the cardiovascular system is a common target of amyloidosis. Cardiac involvement may occur with or without clinical manifestations and is considered as a major prognostic factor. To analyze the clinical features of cardiac involvement, to review actual knowledgement concerning echocardiographic diagnostic and to evaluate recent advances in treatment of the disease. An electronic search of the relevant literature was carried out using Medline and Pubmed. Keys words used for the final search were amyloidosis, cardiopathy and echocardiography. We considered for analysis reviews, studies and articles between 1990 and 2007. Amyloidosis represents 5 to 10% of non ischemic cardiomyoparhies. Cardiac involvement is the first cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy witch must be evoked in front of every inexplained cardiopathy after the age of forty. The amyloid nature of cardiopathy is suggered if some manifestations were associated as a peripheric neuropathy, a carpal tunnel sydrome and proteinuria > 3g/day. Echocardiography shows dilated atria, a granular sparkling appearance of myocardium, diastolic dysfunction and thickened left ventricle contrasting with a low electric voltage. The proof of amyloidosis is brought by an extra-cardiac biopsy, the indications of endomyocardial biopsy are very limited. The identification of the amyloid nature of cardiopathy has an direct therapeutic implication: it indicates the use of digitalis, calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers. Today the treatment of amyloidosis remains very unsatisfactory especially in the cardiac involvement. An early diagnosis before the cardiac damage may facilitate therapy and improve prognosis.

  19. Neurologic considerations in propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, John; Chapman, Kimberly A; Summar, Marshall L; Ah Mew, Nicholas; Sutton, V Reid; MacLeod, Erin; Stagni, Kathy; Ueda, Keiko; Franks, Jill; Island, Eddie; Matern, Dietrich; Peña, Loren; Smith, Brittany; Urv, Tiina; Venditti, Charles; Chakarapani, Anupam; Gropman, Andrea L

    2012-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an organic acidemia which has a broad range of neurological complications, including developmental delay, intellectual disability, structural abnormalities, metabolic stroke-like episodes, seizures, optic neuropathy, and cranial nerve abnormalities. As the PA consensus conference hosted by Children's National Medical Center progressed from January 28 to 30, 2011, it became evident that neurological complications were common and a major component of morbidity, but the role of imaging and the basis for brain pathophysiology were unclear. This paper reviews the hypothesized pathophysiology, presentation and uses the best available evidence to suggest programs for treatment, imaging, and monitoring the neurological complications of PA. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acupuncture application for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyangsook; Park, Hi-Joon; Park, Jongbae; Kim, Mi-Ja; Hong, Meesuk; Yang, Jongsoo; Choi, Sunmi; Lee, Hyejung

    2007-01-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used for a range of neurological disorders. Despite its popularity, the evidence to support the use of acupuncture is contradictory. This review was designed to summarize and to evaluate the available evidence of acupuncture for neurological disorders. Most of the reviewed studies suffer from lack of methodological rigor. Owing to paucity and poor quality of the primary studies, no firm conclusion could be drawn on the use of acupuncture for epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ataxic disorders, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. For stroke rehabilitation, the evidence from recent high-quality trials and previous systematic reviews is not convincing. More rigorous trials are warranted to establish acupuncture's role in neurological disorders.

  1. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. [Child neurology and multimedia technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Methods of computer technology (intelligent technology, IT), such as multimedia and virtual reality, are utilized more and more in all medical fields including child neurology. Advances in the digitalization of individual medical data and multi-media technology have enabled patients to be able to obtain their own medical data by small media and to receive medical treatment at any hospitals even if they are located in distance place. Changes from a doctor oriented to patients oriented medicine is anticipated. It is necessary to store medical data from birth to adulthood and to accumulate epidemiological data of rare diseases such as metabolic diseases or degenerative diseases especially in child neurology, which highly require tele medicine and telecare at home. Moreover, IT may improve in the QOL of patients with neurological diseases and of their families. Cooperation of medicine and engineering is therefore necessary. Results of our experiments on telemedicine, telecare and virtual reality are described.

  3. Transient neurological attacks in the general population. Prevalence, risk factors, and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Bots (Michiel); E.C. van der Wilk (Eline); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Hofman (Albert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with typical transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) have a higher risk of stroke but a lower risk of cardiac events than patients with nonspecific transient neurological symptoms. We assessed the prevalences of typical TIAs and nonspecific transient

  4. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout your body. While the heart is one organ, it ...

  5. Facts about Pulmonary Atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Websites Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Pulmonary Atresia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Click ... pick up oxygen for the body. What is Pulmonary Atresia? Pulmonary atresia is a birth defect of ...

  6. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most current news and updates from the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Life with PF Education & Support About PF ... abstract submissions. MORE We Imagine a World Without Pulmonary Fibrosis The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation mobilizes people and resources ...

  7. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... more members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  8. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  9. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  10. Sleep disorders in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Guryevich Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are closely associated with both nervous system diseases and mental disorders; however, such patients prefer to seek just neurological advice. Insomnia is the most common complaint in routine clinical practice. It is characterized by different impairments in sleep and daytime awakening. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is less common, but more clinically important because of its negative impact on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The common neurological disorders are restless legs syndrome and REM sleep behavior disorder, as well as narcolepsy, the major manifestations of which are impaired nocturnal sleep and daytime awakening.

  11. Immersion Pulmonary Edema in the Setting of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Reed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immersion Pulmonary Edema (IPE is a unique medical condition being increasingly described in the medical literature as sudden-onset pulmonary edema in the setting of scuba diving and/or swimming. We report on three patients with unique presentations of IPE with associated development of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC. All three cases occurred in Oahu, Hawaii and were seen by the same cardiologist within a span of seven years. Each patient was scuba diving with sudden onset dyspnea with pulmonary edema on chest x-ray. Cardiac catheterization revealed no significant epicardial stenosis or thrombosis. EKGs showed typical evolution of symmetric T wave inversion. Wall motion abnormalities resolved. IPE and TTC may occur together and may be more common than initially thought. Physical and emotional stressors are known to trigger TTC. TTC should be considered as a possible complication of IPE. Initial workup should include EKGs, cardiac enzymes, echocardiogram and, in the appropriate situation, cardiac catheterization.

  12. [Absent pulmonary valve syndrome with ductal origin of the left pulmonary artery. Diagnosis only by 2-D echo doppler color flow mapping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, M; Rico Gómez, F; Ros Pérez, P; Quero Jiménez, C; Rodríguez Vázquez del Rey, M

    2000-01-01

    A two-month old infant is described with the rare combination of absent pulmonary valve syndrome, ventricular septal defect, pulmonar "anular" stenosis and ductal origin of the left pulmonary artery. The diagnosis that was confirmed in the operating room was made by 2-D echocardiographic Doppler color flow mapping study without the support of cardiac catheterization.

  13. Clinical characteristics and vital and functional prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors admitted to five cardiac intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Aboal, Jaime; Sanz, Maria; Caballero, Ángel; Vila, Montserrat; Lorente, Victoria; Sánchez-Salado, José Carlos; Sionis, Alessandro; Curós, Antoni; Lidón, Rosa-Maria

    2013-08-01

    Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest constitute an increasing patient population in cardiac intensive care units. Our aim was to characterize these patients and determine their vital and functional prognosis in accordance with the latest evidence. A multicenter, prospective register was constructed with information from patients admitted to 5 cardiac intensive care units from January 2010 through January 2012 with a diagnosis of resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The information included clinical status, cardiac arrest characteristics, in-hospital course, and vital and neurologic status at discharge and at 6 months. A total of 204 patients were included. In 64% of cases, a first shockable rhythm was identified. The time to return of spontaneous circulation was 29 (18) min. An etiologic diagnosis was made in 86% of patients; 44% were discharged with no neurologic sequelae; 40% died in the hospital. At 6 months, 79% of survivors at discharge were still alive and neurologically intact with minimal sequelae. Short resuscitation time, first recorded rhythm, pH on admission >7.1, absence of shock, and use of hypothermia were the independent variables associated with a good neurologic prognosis. Half the patients who recovered from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had good neurologic prognosis at discharge, and 79% of survivors were alive and neurologically intact after 6 months of follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Good neurological outcome after accidental hyopthermia presenting with asytole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, I; Imboden, P; Paal, P; Koppenberg, J

    2017-03-01

    A 43-year-old woman became exhausted and fainted on descent at 1127 MAMSL altitude and snowfall. A rescue team diagnosed asystole. With manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) she was transported to the next extracorporeal life support (ECLS) center. Admission temperature was 20.7 °C. CPR continued until ECLS was initiated. Two days later she was awake, orientated, and with no neurological deficits. With hypothermic cardiac arrest, a favorable outcome depends on early continuous CPR, triage, and ECLS rewarming. It holds true that "nobody is dead until they are warmed and dead" if one cools first and arrests thereafter.

  15. Cardiac Physiology for Radiologists: Review of Relevant Physiology for Interpretation of Cardiac MR Imaging and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Pooja J; Danton, Gary H; Siegel, Yoel; Kardon, Richard E; Infante, Juan C; Ghersin, Eduard; Fishman, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provide clinicians with important insights into cardiac physiology and pathology. However, not all radiologists understand the language and concepts of cardiac physiology that are used daily by cardiologists. This review article covers basic cardiac physiology as it relates to cardiac CT and MR imaging. Topics include a review of the cardiac cycle and left ventricular pressure-volume loops as they relate to different pathologic states, evaluation of cardiac function, and calculation of key parameters such as left ventricular volumes and the ejection fraction. The hemodynamics of cardiac shunts are covered, with an emphasis on factors important to cardiologists, including the ratio of pulmonary flow to systemic flow. Additionally, valvular physiologic function is reexamined, with a focus on understanding pressure gradients within the heart and also the changes associated with valvular pathologic conditions, including measurement of regurgitant fractions in patients with valvular insufficiency. Understanding these basic concepts will help radiologists tailor the reporting of cardiac studies to clinically relevant information. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  16. Computational simulation of postoperative pulmonary flow distribution in Alagille patients with peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiguang; Hanley, Frank L; Chan, Frandics P; Marsden, Alison L; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E; Feinstein, Jeffrey A

    2017-12-01

    Up to 90% of individuals with Alagille syndrome have congenital heart diseases. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPS), resulting in right ventricular hypertension and pulmonary flow disparity, is one of the most common abnormalities, yet the hemodynamic effects are ill-defined, and optimal patient management and treatment strategies are not well established. The purpose of this pilot study is to use recently refined computational simulation in the setting of multiple surgical strategies, to examine the influence of pulmonary artery reconstruction on hemodynamics in this population. Based on computed tomography angiography and cardiac catheterization data, preoperative pulmonary artery models were constructed for 4 patients with Alagille syndrome with PPS (all male, age range: 0.6-2.9 years), and flow simulations with deformable walls were performed. Surgeon directed virtual surgery, mimicking the surgical procedure, was then performed to derive postoperative models. Postoperative simulation-derived hemodynamics and blood flow distribution were then compared with the clinical results. Simulations confirmed substantial resistance, resulting from preoperative severe ostial stenoses, and the use of newly developed adaptive outflow boundary conditions led to excellent agreement with in vivo measurements. Relief of PPS decreased pulmonary artery pressures and improved pulmonary flow distribution both in vivo and in silico with good correlation. Using adaptive outflow boundary conditions, computational simulations can estimate postoperative overall pulmonary flow distribution in patients with Alagille syndrome after pulmonary artery reconstruction. Obstruction relief along with pulmonary artery vasodilation determines postoperative pulmonary flow distribution and newer methods can incorporate these physiologic changes. Evolving blood flow simulations may be useful in surgical or transcatheter planning and in understanding the complex interplay among various

  17. Thermodilution versus inert gas rebreathing for estimation of effective pulmonary blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P; Clemensen, P; Andersen, P K

    2000-01-01

    To compare measurements of the effective pulmonary blood flow (Qep, i.e., nonshunted fraction of cardiac output, Qt) by the inert gas rebreathing (RB) method and the thermodilution (TD) technique in critically ill patients....

  18. Sudden cardiac death in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Camilo Pellegrino dos Santos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The most accepted definition of sudden cardiac death nowadays is an unexplained death occurred suddenly within one hour of symptom onset. If it was not witnessed, individuals need to had been observed for at least 24 hours before the event and should be discarded the possibility of non cardiac causes of sudden death, pulmonary embolism or extensive malignancy. The term athlete refers to individuals of any age who participate in collective or individual regular physical activity, as well as physical training program for regular competitions. The sudden death of a young athlete, whether amateur or professional, especially during competitions, is always dramatic, with strong negative social impact and in the media. The fact that sports are recommended as a formula for longevity and quality of life makes these events a cause for concern in sports and society in general.

  19. [Pulmonary hypertension in pediatric heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, N

    2001-12-01

    Congenital heart disease can increase or decrease pulmonary blood flow, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) or pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). PAP is the product of PVR and pulmonary minute volume (Qp), such that pulmonary hypertension (PHT) may develop as a result of an increase in either PVR or Qp or both. Given that the pulmonary vascular bed is a low pressure system with high flow, any increase in resistance would generate PHT. The normal value of PVR is 2 Woods units (mm Hg/l/min). Increased PAP is due to hypoxic lesions of the endothelium, which release proteolytic enzymes that alter the balance of metabolites of arachidonic acid, regulators of pulmonary vasomotor tone. Hypoxia and acidosis cause intense pulmonary vasoconstriction (hypoxic vasoconstrictor reflex). An increase of PVR is due to a combination of vasoconstrictive processes and remodeling, with hypertrophy of the pulmonary artery. Structural lesions are related to hypertrophy of the endothelium, the transformation of fibroblasts to myocytes and the decrease of the alveolar/arteriolar ratio with the formation of new vessels.PHT may be primary or secondary to another disease. Primary PHT is a rare genetic disease. The most common secondary forms of PHT in pediatrics are due to persistence of neonatal anatomy (neonatal PHT), to heart diseases with left-right shunt (CIV, DAP, etc.), to diseases of the pulmonary parenchyma (interstitial viral infection, mucoviscidosis), and complications of heart surgery. All congenital heart diseases can lead to PHT if not treated promptly. Clinical signs of PHT are highly non-specific: dyspnea, fatigue, syncopes, exercise intolerance, precordialgia, cyanosis and edema. The best approaches to diagnosis and prognosis are echocardiography and cardiac catheterization with vasodilators. Anesthetics that do not alter PVR should be used in such patients, who are sensitive to changes in pulmonary ventilation, to changes in cardiac output and to anesthetics. The treatment of

  20. Expanding the neurological examination using functional neurologic assessment: part II neurologic basis of applied kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W H; Yanuck, S F

    1999-03-01

    Functional Neurologic Assessment and treatment methods common to the practice of applied kinesiology are presented. These methods are proposed to enhance neurological examination and treatment procedures toward more effective assessment and care of functional impairment. A neurologic model for these procedures is proposed. Manual assessment of muscular function is used to identify changes associated with facilitation and inhibition, in response to the introduction of sensory receptor-based stimuli. Muscle testing responses to sensory stimulation of known value are compared with usually predictable patterns based on known neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, guiding the clinician to an understanding of the functional status of the patient's nervous system. These assessment procedures are used in addition to other standard diagnostic measures to augment rather than replace the existing diagnostic armamentarium. The proper understanding of the neurophysiologic basis of muscle testing procedures will assist in the design of further investigations into applied kinesiology. Accordingly, the neurophysiologic basis and proposed mechanisms of these methods are reviewed.

  1. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  2. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  3. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify

  4. [Neurology in medieval regimina sanitatis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frutos González, V; Guerrero Peral, A L

    2011-09-01

    In medical medieval literature some works about dietetics stand out. Dietetics, as a separate branch of medicine, includes not only food or drinks, but other environmental factors influencing on health. They are known as regimina sanitatis or salutis, and specially developed in the Christian west. They generally consisted of a balance between the Galenic "six non-natural things"; factors regulating health and its protection: environment, exercise, food, sleep, bowel movements and emotions. After reviewing the sources and defining the different stages of this genre, we have considered three of the most out-standing medieval regimina, the anonymous Regimen sanitatis salernitanum, Arnaldo de Vilanova's Regimen sanitatis ad regem aragonum and Bernardo de Gordon's Tractatus of conservatione vite humane. In them we review references to neurological disease. Though not independently considered, there is a significant presence of neurological diseases in the regimina. Dietetics measures are proposed to preserve memory, nerves, or hearing, as well as for the treatment of migraine, epilepsy, stroke or dizziness. Regimina are quiet representative among medical medieval literature, and they show medieval physicians vision of neurological diseases. Dietetics was considered useful to preserve health, and therapeutics was based on natural remedies. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  6. Congenital cardiac disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, E; McCaw, D

    1984-09-01

    Aortic stenosis is a heritable cardiac anomaly most common in German Shepherds, Boxers and Newfoundlands, and less common in Pugs, English Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, Fox Terriers, Schnauzers and Bassets. Clinical signs are associated with secondary left-sided heart failure and include coughing, moist rales, exercise intolerance, arrhythmias and a weak femoral pulse. It causes an ejection-type crescendo-decrescendo, systolic murmur best heard on the left side near the elbow. The ECG may be normal or may show signs of left ventricular hypertrophy, including an axis of less than 40 degrees, a QRS complex of greater than 60 seconds in duration, R waves greater than 3 mv in amplitude, ST segment slurring or depression, or T waves of an amplitude greater than 25% of that of R waves. A LAT radiograph usually reveals an enlarged cardiac silhouette, loss of the cranial cardiac waist, and normal pulmonary vasculature, while DV projections show an elongated cardiac silhouette, rounding of the left ventricular border, and a normal descending aorta. Nonselective angiocardiography reveals poststenotic dilatation of the aorta. Treatment of severely affected dogs involves surgical correction.

  7. International electives in neurology training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L.; Coleman, Mary E.; Engstrom, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. Background: There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. Methods: A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012–February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Results: Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health–related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%–9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%–19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. Conclusions: In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority

  8. Treatment of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn: Use of Pulmonary Vasodilators in Term Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Caitlyn; McPherson, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) represents a challenging condition associated with significant morbidity. A successful transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life is contingent on adequate pulmonary vasodilation. Several pathophysiologies contribute to the failure of this cascade and may result in life-threatening hypoxia and acidosis in the newborn. Management includes optimal respiratory support, adequate sedation and analgesia, and support of vascular tone and cardiac function. Pulmonary vasodilation has the potential to overcome the cycle of hypoxia and acidosis, improving outcome in these infants. Oxygen and inhaled nitric oxide represent the foundation of therapy. Tertiary pulmonary vasodilators represent a greater challenge, selecting between therapies that include prostanoids, sildenafil, and milrinone. Variable levels of evidence exist for each agent. Thorough review of available data informing efficacy and adverse effects contributes to the development of an informed approach to neonates with refractory PPHN.

  9. Pulmonary artery catheter-directed thrombolysis for intermediate high risk acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of 60-year-old male with acute pulmonary embolism without hypotension but signs of right ventricular dysfunction and elevated cardiac biomarkers is reported in this study. The patient comes under intermediate high-risk category and was successfully thrombolysed with alteplase infused through pulmonary artery catheter. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT can be considered as much safer and effective alternative to systemic thrombolysis in such patients with lower risk of bleeding. This novel bedside method of pulmonary artery CDT with the advantage of no radiation exposure and real time monitoring of pulmonary artery pressures as an end-point of thrombolysis can be utilized in the near future.

  10. Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage pulmonary sarcoidosis: therapeutic effect of sildenafil?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N.; Burton, C.M.; Iversen, M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objectives of this study were to assess the frequency and severity of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the effect of sildenafil treatment in patients with recalcitrant pulmonary sarcoidosis. METHODS: This investigation was a single-center, retrospective study of all patients (n = 25......) with end-stage pulmonary sarcoidosis referred for lung transplantation. Hemodynamic measurements were evaluated by right-side cardiac catheterization in 24 of 25 patients. Sildenafil treatment for patients with sarcoidosis-associated PH was introduced in April 2004. RESULTS: The study group of 24 patients...... (16 men, 8 women) had a median age of 45 (range 35 to 58) years, and duration of sarcoidosis of 11 (range 2 to 38) years. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) was median 36 (range 18 to 73) mm Hg. PH (MPAP >25 mm Hg) was present in 19 of 24 patients (79%). Sildenafil was administered to 12 of 13...

  11. Thermodilution versus inert gas rebreathing for estimation of effective pulmonary blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P; Clemensen, P; Andersen, P K

    2000-01-01

    To compare measurements of the effective pulmonary blood flow (Qep, i.e., nonshunted fraction of cardiac output, Qt) by the inert gas rebreathing (RB) method and the thermodilution (TD) technique in critically ill patients.......To compare measurements of the effective pulmonary blood flow (Qep, i.e., nonshunted fraction of cardiac output, Qt) by the inert gas rebreathing (RB) method and the thermodilution (TD) technique in critically ill patients....

  12. Preadmission interventions to prevent postoperative complications in older cardiac surgery patients : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Roelof G A; Van Koeven, Heleen; Peelen, Linda M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314038426; Kalkman, Cor J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/078251818; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    Objective(s): The literature on postoperative complications in cardiac surgery patients shows high incidences of postoperative complications such as delirium, depression, pressure ulcer, infection, pulmonary complications and atrial fibrillation. These complications are associated with functional

  13. Right ventricular involvement in cardiac sarcoidosis demonstrated with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, Jan-Peter; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Ainslie, Gillian; Ector, Joris; Heidbuchel, Hein; Crijns, Harry J G M

    2017-11-01

    Cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis is reported in up to 30% of patients. Left ventricular involvement demonstrated by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance has been well validated. We sought to determine the prevalence and distribution of right ventricular late gadolinium enhancement in patients diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis. We prospectively evaluated 87 patients diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis with contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance for right ventricular involvement. Pulmonary artery pressures were non-invasively evaluated with Doppler echocardiography. Patient characteristics were compared between the groups with and without right ventricular involvement, and right ventricular enhancement was correlated with pulmonary hypertension, ventricular mass, volume, and systolic function. Left ventricular late gadolinium enhancement was demonstrated in 30 patients (34%). Fourteen patients (16%) had right ventricular late gadolinium enhancement, with sole right ventricular enhancement in only two patients. The pattern of right ventricular enhancement consisted of right ventricular outflow tract enhancement in 1 patient, free wall enhancement in 8 patients, ventricular insertion point enhancement in 10 patients, and enhancement of the right side of the interventricular septum in 11 patients. Pulmonary arterial hypertension correlated with the presence of right ventricular enhancement (P Right ventricular enhancement correlated with systolic ventricular dysfunction (P Right ventricular enhancement was present in 16% of patients diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis and in 48% of patients with left ventricular enhancement. The presence of right ventricular enhancement correlated with pulmonary arterial hypertension, right ventricular systolic dysfunction, hypertrophy, and dilation. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  14. Refractory cardiac arrest treated with mechanical CPR, hypothermia, ECMO and early reperfusion (the CHEER trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stub, Dion; Bernard, Stephen; Pellegrino, Vincent; Smith, Karen; Walker, Tony; Sheldrake, Jayne; Hockings, Lisen; Shaw, James; Duffy, Stephen J; Burrell, Aidan; Cameron, Peter; Smit, De Villiers; Kaye, David M

    2015-01-01

    Many patients who suffer cardiac arrest do not respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation. There is growing interest in utilizing veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) in the management of refractory cardiac arrest. We describe our preliminary experiences in establishing an E-CPR program for refractory cardiac arrest in Melbourne, Australia. The CHEER trial (mechanical CPR, Hypothermia, ECMO and Early Reperfusion) is a single center, prospective, observational study conducted at The Alfred Hospital. The CHEER protocol was developed for selected patients with refractory in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and involves mechanical CPR, rapid intravenous administration of 30 mL/kg of ice-cold saline to induce intra-arrest therapeutic hypothermia, percutaneous cannulation of the femoral artery and vein by two critical care physicians and commencement of veno-arterial ECMO. Subsequently, patients with suspected coronary artery occlusion are transferred to the cardiac catheterization laboratory for coronary angiography. Therapeutic hypothermia (33 °C) is maintained for 24h in the intensive care unit. There were 26 patients eligible for the CHEER protocol (11 with OHCA, 15 with IHCA). The median age was 52 (IQR 38-60) years. ECMO was established in 24 (92%), with a median time from collapse until initiation of ECMO of 56 (IQR 40-85) min. Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed on 11 (42%) and pulmonary embolectomy on 1 patient. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 25 (96%) patients. Median duration of ECMO support was 2 (IQR 1-5) days, with 13/24 (54%) of patients successfully weaned from ECMO support. Survival to hospital discharge with full neurological recovery (CPC score 1) occurred in 14/26 (54%) patients. A protocol including E-CPR instituted by critical care physicians for refractory cardiac arrest which includes mechanical CPR, peri-arrest therapeutic hypothermia and

  15. Evidence-based guideline summary: Evaluation, diagnosis, and management of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Issues Review Panel of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Rabi; Kissel, John T; Heatwole, Chad; Pandya, Shree; Gronseth, Gary; Benatar, Michael

    2015-07-28

    To develop recommendations for the evaluation, diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) from a systematic review and analysis of the evidence. Relevant articles were analyzed in accordance with the American Academy of Neurology classification of evidence schemes for diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment studies. Recommendations were linked to the strength of the evidence and other factors. Available genetic testing for FSHD type 1 is highly sensitive and specific. Although respiratory insufficiency occurs rarely in FSHD, patients with severe FSHD should have routine pulmonary function testing. Routine cardiac screening is not necessary in patients with FSHD without cardiac symptoms. Symptomatic retinal vascular disease is very rare in FSHD. Exudative retinopathy, however, is potentially preventable, and patients with large deletions should be screened through dilated indirect ophthalmoscopy. The prevalence of clinically relevant hearing loss is not clear. In clinical practice, patients with childhood-onset FSHD may have significant hearing loss. Because undetected hearing loss may impair language development, screening through audiometry is recommended for such patients. Musculoskeletal pain is common in FSHD and treating physicians should routinely inquire about pain. There is at present no effective pharmacologic intervention in FSHD. Available studies suggest that scapular fixation is safe and effective. Surgical scapular fixation might be cautiously offered to selected patients. Aerobic exercise in FSHD appears to be safe and potentially beneficial. On the basis of the evidence, patients with FSHD might be encouraged to engage in low-intensity aerobic exercises. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Prehospital surface cooling is safe and can reduce time to target temperature after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uray, Thomas; Mayr, Florian B; Stratil, Peter; Aschauer, Stefan; Testori, Christoph; Sterz, Fritz; Haugk, Moritz

    2015-02-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia proved to be beneficial when induced after cardiac arrest in humans. Prehospital cooling with i.v. fluids was associated with adverse side effects. Our primary objective was to compare time to target temperature of out-of hospital cardiac arrest patients cooled non-invasively either in the prehospital setting vs. the in-hospital (IH) setting, to assess surface-cooling safety profile and long term outcome. In this retrospective, single center cohort study, a group of adult patients with restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after out-of hospital cardiac arrest were cooled with a surface cooling pad beginning either in the prehospital or IH setting for 24h. Time to target temperature (33.9°C), temperature on admission, time to admission after ROSC and outcome were compared. Also, rearrests and pulmonary edema were assessed. Neurologic outcome at 12 months was evaluated (Cerebral Performance Category, CPC 1-2, favorable outcome). Between September 2005 and February 2010, 56 prehospital cooled patients and 54 IH-cooled patients were treated. Target temperature was reached in 85 (66-117)min (prehospital) and in 135 (102-192)min (IH) after ROSC (ptemperature was 35.2 (34.2-35.8)°C, and in the IH-cooling patients initial temperature was 35.8 (35.2-36.3)°C (p=0.001). No difference in numbers of rearrests and pulmonary edema between groups was observed. In both groups, no skin lesions were observed. Favorable outcome was reached in 26.8% (prehospital) and in 37.0% (IH) of the patients (p=0.17). Using a non-invasive prehospital surface cooling method after cardiac arrest, target temperature can be reached faster without any major complications than starting cooling IH. The effect of early non-invasive cooling on long-term outcome remains to be determined in larger studies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. [Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis with dendriform pulmonary ossification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Ana Madeleine; Vargas, Leslie

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary ossification is a rare and usually asymptomatic finding reported as incidental in lung biopsies. Similarly, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a rare cause of pulmonary infiltrates. We report the case of a 64-year old man with chronic respiratory symptoms in whom these two histopathological findings converged.

  18. Interventional Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinski, David M; Giri, Jay; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a serious and prevalent cause of vascular disease. Nevertheless, optimal treatment for many phenotypes of PE remains uncertain. Treating PE requires appropriate risk stratification as a first step. For the highest-risk PE, presenting as shock or arrest, emergent systemic thrombolysis or embolectomy is reasonable, while for low-risk PE, anticoagulation alone is often chosen. Normotensive patients with PE but with indicia of right heart dysfunction (by biomarkers or imaging) constitute an intermediate-risk group for whom there is controversy on therapeutic strategy. Some intermediate-risk patients with PE may require urgent stabilization, and ≈10% will decompensate hemodynamically and suffer high mortality, though identifying these specific patients remains challenging. Systemic thrombolysis is a consideration, but its risks of major and intracranial hemorrhages rival overall harms from intermediate PE. Multiple hybrid pharmacomechanical approaches have been devised to capture the benefits of thrombolysis while reducing its risks, but there is limited aggregate clinical experience with such novel interventional strategies. One method to counteract uncertainty and generate a consensus multidisciplinary prognostic and therapeutic plan is through a Pulmonary Embolism Response Team, which combines expertise from interventional cardiology, interventional radiology, cardiac surgery, cardiac imaging, and critical care. Such a team can help determine which intervention-catheter-directed fibrinolysis, ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombus fragmentation, or percutaneous or surgical embolectomy-is best suited to a particular patient. This article reviews these various modalities and the background for each. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  20. Cardiac arrhythmias in stroke unit patients. Evaluation of the cardiac monitoring data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Menéndez, S; García-Santiago, R; Vega-Primo, A; González Nafría, N; Lara-Lezama, L B; Redondo-Robles, L; Montes-Montes, M; Riveira-Rodríguez, M C; Tejada-García, J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are frequent in acute stroke. Stroke units are widely equipped with cardiac monitoring systems. Pre-existing heart diseases and heart-brain interactions may be implicated in causing cardiac arrhythmias in acute stroke. This article analyses cardiac arrhythmias detected in patients hospitalised in a stroke unit. Prospective observational study of consecutive patients admitted to a stroke unit with cardiac monitoring. We collected clinical data from patients and the characteristics of their cardiac arrhythmias over a 1-year period (2013). Time of arrhythmia onset, associated predisposing factors, and the therapeutic decisions made after detection of arrhythmia were examined. All patients underwent continuous cardiac monitoring during no less than 48hours. Of a total of 332 patients admitted, significant cardiac arrhythmias occurred in 98 patients (29.5%) during their stay in the stroke unit. Tachyarrhythmia (ventricular tachyarrhythmias, supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, complex ventricular ectopy) was present in 90 patients (27.1%); bradyarrhythmia was present in 13 patients (3.91%). Arrhythmias were independently associated with larger size of brain lesion and older age. In 10% of the patient total, therapeutic actions were taken after detection of significant cardiac arrhythmias. Most events occurred within the first 48hours after stroke unit admission. Systematic cardiac monitoring in patients with acute stroke is useful for detecting clinically relevant cardiac arrhythmias. Incidence of arrhythmia is higher in the first 48hours after stroke unit admission. Age and lesion size were predicted appearance of arrhythmias. Detection of cardiac arrhythmias in a stroke unit has important implications for treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Early onset of retrograde flow in the main pulmonary artery is a characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helderman, Frank; Mauritz, Gert-Jan; Andringa, Kirsten E; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Marcus, J Tim

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate if early onset of retrograde flow in the main pulmonary artery is a characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Fifty-five patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension (PH) underwent right-sided heart catheterization and retrospectively ECG-gated MR phase-contrast velocity quantification in the main pulmonary artery. Pulmonary hypertension was defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure being larger than 25 mmHg. The onset time of the retrograde flow relative to the cardiac cycle duration (Relative Onset Time = ROT) was compared with mean pulmonary artery pressure. By the catheterization, 38 patients were identified as having PAH. The ROT for these PAH patients was significantly different from those found in the 17 non-PH subjects (0.14 ± 0.06 versus 0.37 ± 0.06, P < 0.001). The mean pulmonary artery pressure was related to the ROT (r(2) = 0.62, P < 0.001) and could be estimated from the ROT with a standard deviation of 11.7 mmHg. With a cutoff value of 0.25, the ROT distinguished PAH patients from non-PH subjects. Early onset of retrograde flow in the main pulmonary artery is a characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension and is visible by standard MR phase-contrast velocity quantification. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Giant right atrial myxoma: characterization with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, Carole A

    2012-02-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of dyspnoea and chest pain. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography was performed to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE). This demonstrated a large right atrial mass and no evidence of PE. Transthoracic echocardiography followed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a mobile right atrial mass. Surgical resection was then performed confirming a giant right atrial myxoma. We describe the typical clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of right atrial myxoma.

  3. Neurologic manifestations of hypothyroidism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertalan, Abigail; Kent, Marc; Glass, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine disease in dogs. A variety of clinicopathologic abnormalities may be present; however, neurologic deficits are rare. In some instances, neurologic deficits may be the sole manifestation of hypothyroidism. Consequent ly, the diagnosis and management of the neurologic disorders associated with hypothyroidism can be challenging. This article describes several neurologic manifestations of primary hypothyroidism in dogs; discusses the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism-induced neurologic disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous systems; and reviews the evidence for the neurologic effects of hypothyroidism.

  4. [Sudden cardiac death due to sarcoidosis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejben, István; Som, Zoltán; Cserni, Gábor

    2017-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology, which is characterized by bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy and pulmonary disease. Clinically detected cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of sarcoid patients, although cardiac manifestations are discovered in 25% of the cases at autopsy. Sarcoid heart disease frequently causes atrioventricular block. The authors present the case of a 44-year-old man with bradycardia. On admission, second degree Mobitz II, then third degree atrioventricular block was diagnosed. Coronarography showed normal coronary arteries. 2.5 years following artificial Biotronik Entovis DR type pacemaker implantation, sudden cardiac death occurred. Autopsy revealed sarcoidosis with cardiac, pulmonary, splenic, renal and lymph node involvement. In case of young or middle-aged patients with atrioventricular block, it is best to search for other causes if the most common coronary origin can be excluded. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(27): 1067-1070.

  5. [The expression of thrombospondin-1 in serum and pulmonary arterioles of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Juan; Zheng, Xi-Wei; Yang, Gui-Lan; Cheng, De-Yun; Zhang, Peng

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) in serum and pulmonary arterioles of rats with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Twenty male Wistar rats were divided into two groups and exposed to air and isobaric hypoxia for 3 weeks respectively. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) was measured by right cardiac catheterization. The rates of wall thickness/external diameter (WT%) and wall area/total vascular area (WA%) were calculated. The TSP-1 level in serum was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TSP-1 mRNA expression in lung tissue was evaluated by quantitative PCR. The pulmonary artery pressure increased in the hypoxia exposed rats. The chronic hypoxia also elicited the thicking of the wall and the narrowing of the lumen of pulmonary arterioles. It led to the increases of pulmonary artery pressure, the index of right ventricular hypertrophy [RV/(LV+S)], WA% and WT% compared to the controls [mPAP:(2.86 +/- 0.39) kPa vs. (1.35 +/- 40.28) kPa; RV/(LV+ S): (43.53 +/- 3.38)% vs. (23.68 +/- 3.48)%; WT%: (35.24 +/- 11.20)% vs. (23.63 +/- 9.74)%; WA%: (55.09 +/- 12.38)% vs. (41.62 +/- 12.83)% respectively, Ppulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

  6. Mechanical CPR devices compared to manual CPR during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and ambulance transport: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Aims The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of the published literature to address the question: “In pre-hospital adult cardiac arrest (asystole, pulseless electrical activity, pulseless Ventricular Tachycardia and Ventricular Fibrillation), does the use of mechanical Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) devices compared to manual CPR during Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and ambulance transport, improve outcomes (e.g. Quality of CPR, Return Of Spontaneous Circulation, Survival)”. Methods Databases including PubMed, Cochrane Library (including Cochrane database for systematic reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), Embase, and AHA EndNote Master Library were systematically searched. Further references were gathered from cross-references from articles and reviews as well as forward search using SCOPUS and Google scholar. The inclusion criteria for this review included manikin and human studies of adult cardiac arrest and anti-arrhythmic agents, peer-review. Excluded were review articles, case series and case reports. Results Out of 88 articles identified, only 10 studies met the inclusion criteria for further review. Of these 10 articles, 1 was Level of Evidence (LOE) 1, 4 LOE 2, 3 LOE 3, 0 LOE 4, 2 LOE 5. 4 studies evaluated the quality of CPR in terms of compression adequacy while the remaining six studies evaluated on clinical outcomes in terms of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital admission, survival to discharge and Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC). 7 studies were supporting the clinical question, 1 neutral and 2 opposing. Conclusion In this review, we found insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of mechanical CPR devices in settings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and during ambulance transport. While there is some low quality evidence suggesting that mechanical CPR can improve consistency and reduce interruptions in chest compressions, there is no evidence that

  7. Association between blood pressure and outcomes in patients after cardiac arrest: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Tahara D; McDonald, Braedon; Sekhon, Mypinder S; Griesdale, Donald E G

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxic ischaemic brain injury (HIBI) is a major cause of disability after cardiac arrest. HIBI leads to impaired cerebral autoregulation such that adequate cerebral perfusion becomes critically dependent on blood pressure. However, the optimal blood pressure after cardiac arrest remains unclear. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to investigate the association between blood pressure and neurologic outcome patients after cardiac arrest. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, conference abstracts and article references to identify randomized and observational studies investigating the relationship between blood pressure and neurologic outcome. We included studies that reported adjusted point estimates for the relationship between blood pressure and neurologic status in adult patients after cardiac arrest. We included 9 studies with a total of 13,150 patients. Three studies included only patients with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. There was marked between-study heterogeneity with respect to blood pressure definition (MAP vs. systolic), exposure duration and modelling (dichotomous vs. continuous). All studies examined either mortality or neurological status as an outcome. Seven of nine studies demonstrated that higher blood pressure was associated with improved outcomes either by an association between higher MAP and good neurologic outcome or the presence of hypotension and increased odds of mortality. The included studies suggest improved neurologic outcomes are associated with higher blood pressures in patients after cardiac arrest. This study highlights a need for further research to define the optimal management of blood pressure in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Application of psychophysics to neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2008-04-01

    Although psychophysics has already been used in many neurological evaluations including the visual and hearing tests, the use of psychophysics has been limited to the evaluation of sensory disorders. In this review paper, however, the author introduced recent attempts to apply psychophysics to the evaluation of higher cognitive functions such as perception of scenes and facial expressions. Psychophysics was also used to measure visual hypersensitivity in a patient with migraine. The benefits of the use of psychophysics in neurological and neuropsychological settings would be as follows. (1) We can evaluate higher cognitive functions quantitatively. (2) We can measure performance both above and below the normal range by the same method. (3) We can use the same stimulus and task as other research areas such as neuroscience and neuroimaging, and compare results between research areas.

  9. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  11. Proust, neurology and Stendhal's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Postoperative Acute Pulmonary Embolism Following Pulmonary Resections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonyela, Felix Samuel; Liu, Bo; Jiao, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections is highly fatal complication. Many literatures have documented cancer to be the highest risk factor for acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections. Early diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism is highly recommended and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography is the gold standard in diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic therapy have shown a great success in treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. Surgical therapies (embolectomy and inferior vena cava filter replacement) proved to be lifesaving but many literatures favored medical therapy as the first choice. Prophylaxis pre and post operation is highly recommended, because there were statistical significant results in different studies which supported the use of prophylaxis in prevention of acute pulmonary embolism. Having reviewed satisfactory number of literatures, it is suggested that thoroughly preoperative assessment of patient conditions, determining their risk factors complicating to pulmonary embolism and the use of appropriate prophylaxis measures are the key options to the successful minimization or eradication of acute pulmonary embolism after lung resections. PMID:26354232

  13. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  14. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and cinema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Jiménez-Antona, Carmen

    2010-12-16

    Cinema has been defined in many different ways, but most of them agree that it should be considered both a technique and an art. Although films often depict fantasy stories, in many cases they also reflect day-to-day realities. In its earliest days cinema was already attracted to the world of health and sickness, and frequently addressed topics like medical practice, how patients lived with their illnesses, bioethical issues, the relationship between physician and patient or research. To review the presence of neurological pathologies in the cinema with a view to identifying the main neurological disorders that have been portrayed in films. Likewise it also intends to describe the medical praxis that is employed, the relationship between physician and patient, how the experiences of the patient and the family are represented, the adaptation to social and occupational situations, and the intervention of other health care professionals related with neurological patients. Some of the most significant films that have addressed these topics were reviewed and it was seen that in some of them the illness is dealt with in a very true-to-life manner, whereas others tend to include a greater number of inaccuracies and a larger degree of fiction. Cinema has helped to shape certain ways of thinking about the health care professionals who work with neurological patients, the importance of support from the family and the social role, among other things. This confirms that resorting to cinematographic productions is a fruitful tool for stimulating a critical interest in the past and present of medical practice.

  15. Canine pulmonary vein-to-pulmonary artery ratio: echocardiographic technique and reference intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birettoni, F; Caivano, D; Patata, V; Moïse, N S; Guglielmini, C; Rishniw, M; Porciello, F

    2016-12-01

    The size of the pulmonary veins (PVs) and pulmonary arteries (PAs) changes in response to hemodynamic alterations caused by physiological events and disease. We sought to create standardized echocardiographic methods for imaging the right ostium of the pulmonary veins (RPVs) and the right pulmonary artery (RPA) using specific landmarks and timing to quantify vessel diameters and phasic changes during the cardiac cycle. Fifty client-owned healthy dogs prospectively recruited. M-mode and 2-dimensional images were obtained from modified right parasternal long and short axis views. Right ostium of the pulmonary veins and RPA measurements were timed with electrical [peak of the QRS complex (RPVQRS and RPAQRS) and end of T wave (RPVT and RPAT)] or mechanical events [RPV and RPA vessels at their respective maximal (RPVMAX; RPAMAX) and minimal (RPVMIN; RPAMIN) diameters]. Right ostium of the pulmonary veins and RPA measurements were also indexed to the aorta. In normal dogs regardless of the echocardiographic view or time in the cardiac cycle, the RPV/RPA ratio approximated 1.0. Mechanically timed fractional changes (distensibility indices) in RPV and RPA diameters did not differ (p=0.99; 36.9% and 36.8%, respectively). ECG-timed fractional changes (distensibility indices) in RPV and RPA diameter were at least 50% smaller than mechanically timed changes (p<0.05). RPV:Ao and RPA:Ao ranged between 0.3 and 0.6, with lower values obtained in diastole and larger values in systole (p<0.0001). Multiple positive and negative deflections were identified on the RPV and RPA M-mode tracings. This study provides detailed methodology and 2D and M-mode reference intervals for the RPV and RPA dimensions and the phasic changes during the cardiac cycle of the dog using echocardiography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prospects for neurology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, W M; Kandel, E R

    2001-02-07

    Neurological and psychiatric illnesses are among the most common and most serious health problems in developed societies. The most promising advances in neurological and psychiatric diseases will require advances in neuroscience for their elucidation, prevention, and treatment. Technical advances have improved methods for identifying brain regions involved during various types of cognitive activity, for tracing connections between parts of the brain, for visualizing individual neurons in living brain preparations, for recording the activities of neurons, and for studying the activity of single-ion channels and the receptors for various neurotransmitters. The most significant advances in the past 20 years have come from the application to the nervous system of molecular genetics and molecular cell biology. Discovery of the monogenic disorder responsible for Huntington disease and understanding its pathogenesis can serve as a paradigm for unraveling the much more complex, polygenic disorders responsible for such psychiatric diseases as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness, and borderline personality disorder. Thus, a new degree of cooperation between neurology and psychiatry is likely to result, especially for the treatment of patients with illnesses such as autism, mental retardation, cognitive disorders associated with Alzheimer and Parkinson disease that overlap between the 2 disciplines.

  17. Primitive Tumour of the Pulmonary Valve: Discussion of the Differential Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hannecart

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of information concerning cardiac tumours of the pulmonary valve due to their rarity at this location. We report a case of a 47-year-old patient suffering from haemoptysis, asthenia, and acute kidney injury (AKI. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE revealed a mass on the pulmonary valve. Further diagnostic investigation was completed until he exhibited worsening hemodynamic instability. This case emphasizes the lack of information regarding the management of a pulmonary valve tumour.

  18. Primitive Tumour of the Pulmonary Valve: Discussion of the Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannecart, A; Ndjekembo-Shango, D; Vallot, F; Simonet, O; De Kock, M

    2017-01-01

    There is a paucity of information concerning cardiac tumours of the pulmonary valve due to their rarity at this location. We report a case of a 47-year-old patient suffering from haemoptysis, asthenia, and acute kidney injury (AKI). A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed a mass on the pulmonary valve. Further diagnostic investigation was completed until he exhibited worsening hemodynamic instability. This case emphasizes the lack of information regarding the management of a pulmonary valve tumour.

  19. Pulmonary artery rupture in a patient receiving an orthotopic heart transplant after total artificial heart explant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Koichi; Weiner, Menachem M; Evans, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Our case illustrates a patient who suffered a pulmonary artery rupture despite previous total artificial heart implantation and replacement with orthotopic heart transplant. Pulmonary artery rupture during or following cardiac surgery has been reported to occur due to both pulmonary artery catheter use and surgical technique. Our case is the first to demonstrate the occurrence of this complication in the total artificial heart patient population.

  20. Successful Surgical Treatment of Massive Pulmonary Embolism after Coronary Bypass Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Akay, Tankut Hakki; Sezgin, Atilla; Ozkan, Suleyman; Gultekin, Bahadir; Aslim, Erdal; Aslamaci, Sait

    2006-01-01

    Acute massive pulmonary embolism after cardiac surgery is very rare. Although accurate diagnosis and rapid treatment are crucial to a successful outcome, there is no standard treatment option. Thrombolytic therapy and catheter embolectomy are the usual treatment options, but they are associated with risks, especially in patients who experience massive pulmonary embolism after coronary artery bypass surgery. Open pulmonary embolectomy may be the best choice for treating these patients. This re...

  1. Cardiac angiosarcoma: an unexpected diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Roberto Furst Crenitte

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare entity. The incidence through autopsy findings ranges between 0.001% and 0.03%. The disease usually presents with non-specific symptoms, although asymptomatic cases are frequent; therefore, diagnosis is unexpected and consequently delayed. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man with a recent onset cough and dyspnea. He sought medical care several times without receiving a definite diagnosis until a plain chest radiography was taken showing a mediastinal enlargement, which was the reason why he was hospitalized for clinical investigation. During the diagnostic workup, an echodopplercardiogram and a thoracic computed tomography were performed, showing a heterogeneous soft-tissue mass infiltrating the pericardium and the anterior atrial wall. Multiple and scattered pulmonary nodules were also present. A pulmonary nodule was biopsied, which revealed an angiosarcoma. The clinical features added to the radiological and histological findings permitted the diagnosis of right atrial angiosarcoma. The authors highlight the unexpected pattern in the presentation of cardiac tumors.

  2. Alterations in Cerebral Blood Flow after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra Iordanova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Greater than 50% of patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest have evidence of neurological disability. Numerous studies in children and adults, as well as in animal models have demonstrated that cerebral blood flow (CBF is impaired after cardiac arrest. Stages of cerebral perfusion post-resuscitation include early hyperemia, followed by hypoperfusion, and finally either resolution of normal blood flow or protracted hyperemia. At the level of the microcirculation the blood flow is heterogeneous, with areas of no flow, low flow, and increased flow. CBF directed therapies in animal models of cardiac arrest improved neurological outcome, and therefore, the alterations in CBF after cardiac arrest likely contribute to the development of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Current intensive care after cardiac arrest is centered upon maintaining systemic oxygenation, normal blood pressure values for age, maintaining general homeostasis, and avoiding hyperthermia. Assessment of CBF and oxygenation is not routinely performed after cardiac arrest. Currently available and underutilized techniques to assess cerebral perfusion include transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging. Limited clinical studies established the role of CBF and oxygenation monitoring in prognostication after cardiac arrest and few studies suggest that guiding critical care post-resuscitation to mean arterial pressures above the minimal autoregulatory range might improve outcome. Important knowledge gaps thus remain in cerebral monitoring and CBF and oxygen goal-directed therapies post-resuscitation from cardiac arrest.

  3. Recent developments in the management of patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Clements, Casey M; Murphy, Joseph G; Scott Wright, R

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in Europe and the United States. Many patients who are initially resuscitated die in the hospital, and hospital survivors often have substantial neurologic dysfunction. Most cardiac arrests are caused by coronary artery disease; patients with coronary artery disease likely benefit from early coronary angiography and intervention. After resuscitation, cardiac arrest patients remain critically ill and frequently suffer cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Early cardiopulmonary stabilization is important to prevent worsening organ injury. To achieve best patient outcomes, comprehensive critical care management is needed, with primary goals of stabilizing hemodynamics and preventing progressive brain injury. Targeted temperature management is frequently recommended for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest to mitigate the neurologic injury that drives outcomes. Accurate neurologic assessment is central to managing care of cardiac arrest survivors and should combine physical examination with objective neurologic testing, with the caveat that delaying neurologic prognosis is essential to avoid premature withdrawal of supportive care. A combination of clinical findings and diagnostic results should be used to estimate the likelihood of functional recovery. This review focuses on recent advances in care and specific cardiac intensive care strategies that may improve morbidity and mortality for patients after cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  5. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  6. Anesthetic dilemma in planning bilateral cataract surgery for an infant associated with congenital cardiac anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devalina Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a patient with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF and pulmonary atresia, treating the cardiac problem or the associated congenital illness is always a challenge. We describe the challenges and successful initial management of bilateral cataract to prevent visual loss in an infant with TOF with pulmonary atresia.

  7. Takayasu's arteritis: A rare cause of cardiac death in a Caucasian teenage female patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A.M. Saïd (Salah); J.C. Koetsveld-Baart (J.); J.C. den Hollander (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA Caucasian teenage Dutch schoolgirl with known chronic low visual acuity and albinism, presented with frank acute pulmonary oedema, died after 1 h of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation for bradyarrhythmia and cardiac arrest. Two weeks prior to presentation, during sport training, she

  8. Pulmonary Artery Occlusion and Mediastinal Fibrosis in a Patient on Dopamine Agonist Treatment for Hyperprolactinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjing Su

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Unusual forms of pulmonary hypertension include pulmonary hypertension related to mediastinal fibrosis and the use of serotonergic drugs. Here, we describe a patient with diffuse mediastinal fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension while she was on dopamine agonist therapy. A young woman, who was treated with cabergoline and bromocriptine for hyperprolactinemia, presented with progressive dyspnea over several months. Based on the clinical investigation results, in particular, elevated pulmonary arterial pressures and significant perfusion defects on computed tomography (CT pulmonary angiography and ventilation/perfusion (V/Q scintigraphy, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH was initially considered the most plausible diagnosis. However, during an attempted pulmonary endarterectomy, loose fibrous tissues were observed in the mediastinum and cryosection of the right pulmonary artery showed fibrosis and chronic inflammation. Subsequent investigations revealed that diffuse mediastinal fibrosis with concurrent pulmonary hypertension, and not CTEPH, was the most likely diagnosis and cabergoline and bromocriptine may have triggered the fibrotic changes. Both drugs are ergot-derived dopamine agonists, which are known to cause cardiac valve fibrosis and less frequently, non-cardiac fibrotic changes. The underlying mechanism is attributed to their interactions with serotonin receptors. There is much evidence that serotonin, a potent vasoconstrictor and mitogen, is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. In conclusion, as CT and V/Q scintigraphy findings can occasionally be deceptive, physicians should be particularly aware of differential diagnoses in patients without obvious history of venous thromboembolism that are suspected of having chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

  9. Thiamine as a neuroprotective agent after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kohei; Liu, Xiaowen; Kida, Kotaro; Marutani, Eizo; Hirai, Shuichi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Andersen, Lars W; Bagchi, Aranya; Cocchi, Michael N; Berg, Katherine M; Ichinose, Fumito; Donnino, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    Reduction of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the brain is associated with neurological deficits in animals resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Thiamine is an essential co-factor of PDH. The objective of this study was to examine whether administration of thiamine improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in mice. Secondarily, we aimed to characterize the impact of cardiac arrest on PDH activity in mice and humans. Animal study: Adult mice were subjected to cardiac arrest whereupon cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed. Thiamine or vehicle was administered 2min before resuscitation and daily thereafter. Mortality, neurological outcome, and metabolic markers were evaluated. Human study: In a convenience sample of post-cardiac arrest patients, we measured serial PDH activity from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and compared them to healthy controls. Animal study: Mice treated with thiamine had increased 10-day survival (48% versus 17%, Pcardiac arrest patients had lower PDH activity in mononuclear cells than did healthy volunteers (estimated difference: -5.8O.D./min/mg protein, Pcardiac arrest improved neurological outcome and 10-day survival in mice. PDH activity was markedly depressed in post-cardiac arrest patients suggesting that this pathway may represent a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  11. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  12. [Secondary pulmonary embolism to right atrial myxoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico Besó, L; Zúñiga Cedó, E

    2013-10-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to atrial myxoma right. The myxoma is a primary cardiac tumor, namely, has his origin in the cardiac tissue. Primary cardiac tumors are rare, including myxomas, the most common type. Have a predilection for females and the most useful tool for diagnosis is echocardiography. About 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart and rest are in the right atrium. Right atrial myxomas in some sometimes associated with tricuspid stenosis and atrial fibrillation. The most common clinical manifestations include symptoms of this neoplasm constitutional, and embolic phenomena resulting from the obstruction to the flow intracavitary. The treatment of this condition is surgical. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Takayasu's arteritis: A rare cause of cardiac death in a Caucasian teenage female patient

    OpenAIRE

    Saïd, Salah; Koetsveld-Baart, J.; Hollander, Jan

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA Caucasian teenage Dutch schoolgirl with known chronic low visual acuity and albinism, presented with frank acute pulmonary oedema, died after 1 h of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation for bradyarrhythmia and cardiac arrest. Two weeks prior to presentation, during sport training, she complained of oppressive chest pain on exertion accompanied with vomiting without any other systemic symptoms. Post-mortem examination revealed supravalvular stenosis of the pulmonary trunk and ascending...

  14. Neurological manifestaions among Sudanese patients with multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study demonstrated that the most common non- neurological symptoms was locomotor symptoms (24%) ,while the most common neurological symptoms were backache and neck pain .The most common neurological findings were cord compression (8%) followed by peripheral neuropathy (2%) and CVA (2%). 22% of ...

  15. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the ... contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle of ...

  16. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrest (SCA) Back to Heart Diseases & Disorders Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Sudden Cardiac Arrest ( SCA ) occurs when the heart stops beating, abruptly ... to saving someone who is having a sudden cardiac arrest , it is important to understand the difference. The ...

  17. CARDIAC INJURY FROM LONG TERM EPISODIC EXPOSURE TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM): SOLUBLE COMPONENTS OR SOLID PARTICLES?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term exposure to PM has been associated with cardiac injury in rats. The purpose of this study was to investigate if cardiac injury was due to soluble metals (i.e., zinc), insoluble PM, or pulmonary injury/inflammation. Male Wistar Kyoto rats (n=8) were exposed intratracheal...

  18. Kredsløbsmonitorering af kritisk syge patienter med "pulse contour cardiac output"-systemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Perner, Anders; Bonde, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The Pulse Contour Cardiac Output (PiCCO) monitoring system measures cardiac output with high precision and accuracy. The system may replace the pulmonary artery catheter in most critically ill patients because the rate of serious complications may be lower. Whether the use of dynamic or static...

  19. MRI assessment of bronchial compression in absent pulmonary valve syndrome and review of the syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taragin, Benjamin H.; Berdon, Walter E. [Children' s Hospital of New York, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Prinz, B. [Children' s Hospital of New York, Department of Cardiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Absent pulmonary valve syndrome (APVS) is a rare cardiac malformation with massive pulmonary insufficiency that presents with short-term and long-term respiratory problems secondary to severe bronchial compression from enlarged central and hilar pulmonary arteries. Association with chromosome 22.Q11 deletions and DiGeorge syndrome is common. This historical review illustrates the airway disease with emphasis on assessment of the bronchial compression in patients with persistent respiratory difficulties post-valvular repair. Cases that had MRI for cardiac assessment are used to illustrate the pattern of airway disease. (orig.)

  20. Earlier Pulmonary Valve Replacement in Down Syndrome Patients Following Tetralogy of Fallot Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Rachel T; Frommelt, Peter C; Hill, Garick D

    2017-08-01

    The association between Down syndrome and pulmonary hypertension could contribute to more severe pulmonary regurgitation after tetralogy of Fallot repair and possibly earlier pulmonary valve replacement. We compared cardiac magnetic resonance measures of pulmonary regurgitation and right ventricular dilation as well as timing of pulmonary valve replacement between those with and without Down syndrome after tetralogy of Fallot repair. Review of our surgical database from 2000 to 2015 identified patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary stenosis. Those with Down syndrome were compared to those without. The primary outcome of interest was time from repair to pulmonary valve replacement. Secondary outcomes included pulmonary regurgitation and indexed right ventricular volume on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. The cohort of 284 patients included 35 (12%) with Down syndrome. Transannular patch repair was performed in 210 (74%). Down syndrome showed greater degree of pulmonary regurgitation (55 ± 14 vs. 37 ± 16%, p = 0.01) without a significantly greater rate of right ventricular dilation (p = 0.09). In multivariable analysis, Down syndrome (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.5, p = 0.02) and transannular patch repair (HR 5.5, 95% CI 1.7-17.6, p = 0.004) were significant risk factors for valve replacement. Those with Down syndrome had significantly lower freedom from valve replacement (p = 0.03). Down syndrome is associated with an increased degree of pulmonary regurgitation and earlier pulmonary valve replacement after tetralogy of Fallot repair. These patients require earlier assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to determine timing of pulmonary valve replacement and evaluation for and treatment of preventable causes of pulmonary hypertension.

  1. Pulmonary Vascular Distensibility Predicts Pulmonary Hypertension Severity, Exercise Capacity, and Survival in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rajeev; Dhakal, Bishnu P; Eisman, Aaron S; Pappagianopoulos, Paul P; Dress, Ashley; Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L; Semigran, Marc J; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular (PV) distensibility, defined as the percent increase in pulmonary vessel diameter per mm Hg increase in pressure, permits the pulmonary vessels to increase in size to accommodate increased blood flow. We hypothesized that PV distensibility is abnormally low in patients with heart failure (HF) and serves as an important determinant of right ventricular performance and exercise capacity. Patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction (n=48), HF with reduced ejection fraction (n=55), pulmonary arterial hypertension without left heart failure (n=18), and control subjects (n=30) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing with invasive hemodynamic monitoring and first-pass radionuclide ventriculography. PV distensibility was derived from 1257 matched measurements (mean±SD, 8.3±2.8 per subject) of pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary arterial wedge pressure and cardiac output. PV distensibility was lowest in the pulmonary arterial hypertension group (0.40±0.24% per mm Hg) and intermediate in the HF with preserved ejection fraction and HF with reduced ejection fraction groups (0.92±0.39 and 0.84±0.33% per mm Hg, respectively) compared to the control group (1.39±0.32% per mm Hg, Phypertension and is closely related to RV systolic function during exercise, maximal exercise capacity, and survival. Furthermore, PV distensibility is modifiable with selective pulmonary vasodilator therapy and may represent an important target for therapy in selected HF patients with pulmonary hypertension. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00309790. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. [Rehabilitation of hypoplastic pulmonary arteries and anatomic correction of pulmonary atresia with interventricular communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetaille, P; Fraisse, A; Ghez, O; Kreitmann, B; Voisin, M; Aubert, F; Metras, D

    2001-05-01

    Conventional treatment of pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect (VSD), hypoplastic pulmonary arteries (PA) and major aorto-pulmonary collaterals (MAPCAs) is controversial: from symptomatic and palliative treatment for some authors to surgery with unifocalisation of collaterals for others. These treatments never use native pulmonary arteries as only source of pulmonary flow, but create "neo-pulmonary arteries". Nine cases of pulmonary atresia with VSD, hypoplastic PA and MAPCAs were treated by rehabilitation of native PA through a staged approach: 1) surgical neonatal connection between right ventricule (RV) and hypoplastic PA, 2) evaluation and interventionnal catheterism with angioplasty of PA stenosis and closure of collaterals, 3) complete surgical correction with reconstruction of right outflow track and PA and closure of VSD. After first surgical stage of RV-PA connection at the mean age of 4.8 months (+/- 5.6 months), 8 patients were alive and underwent 22 cardiac catheterisms (mean of 2.7 per patient), with angioplasty of PA, and occlusion of MAPCAs in 6 and 2 patients respectively. Seven patients underwent complete anatomical correction at the mean age of 28.8 months (+/- 17.7 months) with one late death. The 6 remaining patients had encouraging hemodynamic status (RV pressure/LV pressure ratio at 0.6 +/- 0.26; mean left and right distal pulmonary pressure at 15.2 mmHg (+/- 9.1 mmHg)), and good functionnal status (3 in NYHA functionnal class 1, and 3 in class 2), for a mean follow-up of 79.5 months (+/- 41.4 months). One patient had reoperation on right outflow track stenosis, 6 years after correction. This small series enhances the feasibility of a staged approach with rehabilitation of small PA, allowing complete surgical correction with the native PA with good hemodynamic and functional results in pulmonary atresia, with VSD, hypoplastic PA and MAPCAs.

  3. DJ-1 activates autophagy in the repression of cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ruicong; Jiang, Jingzhou; Dong, Bin; Tan, Weiping; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Jingjing; Chen, Yili; Dong, Yugang; Liu, Chen

    2017-11-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the risk factor of heart failure when the heart is confronted with pressure overload or neurohumoral stimuli. Autophagy, a conserved degradative pathway, is one of the important mechanisms involved in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy. DJ-1 is a traditional anti-oxidative protein and emerging evidence suggested that DJ-1 might modulate autophagy. However, the regulation of autophagy by DJ-1 in the process of cardiac hypertrophy remains unknown. In our study, we firstly discovered that the expression of DJ-1declined in the process of pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy, and its alteration was parallel with the impairment of autophagy. Furthermore, we proved that DJ-1 knockout mice exhibited a more hypertrophied phenotype than wildtype mice in cardiac hypertrophy which indicated that DJ-1 is responsible for the repression of cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, DJ-1 knockout significantly exacerbated pulmonary edema due to cardiac hypertrophy. In the process of cardiac hypertrophy, DJ-1 knockout significantly impaired autophagy activation and enhanced mTORC1 and mTORC2 phosphorylation were found. Similarly, our in vitro study proved that DJ-1 overexpression ameliorated phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and promoted autophagy activation. Taken together, DJ-1 might repress both pressure overload and PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy via the activation of autophagy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum and hypoplastic right ventricle in an Arabian foal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, M U; Wünschmann, A; Ward, C; Stauthammer, C D

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum, rudimentary tricuspid valve, hypoplastic right ventricle, and right-to-left atrial shunting were identified in a four-day-old, male Arabian foal with clinical signs of cyanotic heart disease. Pulmonary blood flow was apparently derived from a ductus arteriosus. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed the majority of cardiac abnormalities and also findings compatible with right-sided congestive heart failure. Congenital cardiac defects have a high incidence in this breed, and this is the first description of this combination of congenital cardiac defects. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Moebius syndrome with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Jyoti; Bagnawar, Mahananda; Deshmukh, C T

    2006-05-01

    Moebius syndrome is characterized by congenital complete or partial facial nerve palsy with or without paralysis of cranial nerves and often associated with other malformations. Cardiac anomalies though known are very rare and till date only 4 cases have been reported. We present a case of Moebius syndrome with supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous connection which has not yet been reported in literature.

  6. Teaching Pulmonary Gas Exchange Physiology Using Computer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, Kent S.

    2008-01-01

    Students often have difficulty understanding the relationship of O[subscript 2] consumption, CO[subscript 2] production, cardiac output, and distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios in the lung to the final arterial blood gas composition. To overcome this difficulty, I have developed an interactive computer simulation of pulmonary gas exchange…

  7. What Causes Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Sudden Cardiac Arrest Sudden Cardiac Arrest Also known as Cardiac Arrest , Sudden Cardiac Death ... the condition For People Who Have Survived Sudden Cardiac Arrest If you've already had SCA, you're ...

  8. What Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Sudden Cardiac Arrest Sudden Cardiac Arrest Also known as Cardiac Arrest , Sudden Cardiac Death ... the condition For People Who Have Survived Sudden Cardiac Arrest If you've already had SCA, you're ...

  9. Treatment goals of pulmonary hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLaughlin, Vallerie V

    2013-12-24

    With significant therapeutic advances in the field of pulmonary arterial hypertension, the need to identify clinically relevant treatment goals that correlate with long-term outcome has emerged as 1 of the most critical tasks. Current goals include achieving modified New York Heart Association functional class I or II, 6-min walk distance >380 m, normalization of right ventricular size and function on echocardiograph, a decreasing or normalization of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and hemodynamics with right atrial pressure <8 mm Hg and cardiac index >2.5 mg\\/kg\\/min(2). However, to more effectively prognosticate in the current era of complex treatments, it is becoming clear that the "bar" needs to be set higher, with more robust and clearer delineations aimed at parameters that correlate with long-term outcome; namely, exercise capacity and right heart function. Specifically, tests that accurately and noninvasively determine right ventricular function, such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and BNP\\/N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, are emerging as promising indicators to serve as baseline predictors and treatment targets. Furthermore, studies focusing on outcomes have shown that no single test can reliably serve as a long-term prognostic marker and that composite treatment goals are more predictive of long-term outcome. It has been proposed that treatment goals be revised to include the following: modified New York Heart Association functional class I or II, 6-min walk distance ≥ 380 to 440 m, cardiopulmonary exercise test-measured peak oxygen consumption >15 ml\\/min\\/kg and ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide <45 l\\/min\\/l\\/min, BNP level toward "normal," echocardiograph and\\/or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating normal\\/near-normal right ventricular size and function, and hemodynamics showing normalization of right ventricular function with right atrial pressure <8 mm Hg and cardiac index >2.5 to 3.0 l\\/min\\/m(2).

  10. Pulmonary artery intramural leiomyosarcoma mimicking pulmonary aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaoka, Rie; Takahashi, Yusuke; Morita, Shigeki; Dejima, Hitoshi; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2016-11-01

    Chest radiography indicated a well-defined rounded mass at the left lung hilum in a 77-year-old former smoker. Chest computed tomography revealed a longitudinal saccular enlargement of the left pulmonary artery with surrounding soft tissue opacity. Resection of the left lower lobe with segment 1 + 2c was carried out to completely remove the dilated pulmonary artery. The resected specimen revealed obvious dilatation of the interlobar pulmonary artery and its branches. A small yellowish well-demarcated myxoid tumor was contained in this lesion, which was diagnosed as a primary pulmonary artery intramural leiomyosarcoma. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  12. The seminal role played by Pierre Marie in Neurology and Internal Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo M Almeida

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors review the most important contributions of Pierre Marie to the elucidation and description of several neurological diseases, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth’s disease and hereditary cerebellar ataxia, as well as his contributions to Internal Medicine, including his pioneering studies on acromegaly, ankylosing spondylitis, and hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy. His works led to incontestable advances in the medical sciences that transcended his time.

  13. Pathophysiology and clinical implications of pulmonary arterial enlargement in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells JM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available J Michael Wells, Mark T Dransfield Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama Birmingham and the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a complex condition defined by progressive airflow limitation in response to noxious stimuli, inflammation, and vascular changes. COPD exacerbations are critical events in the natural history of the disease, accounting for the majority of disease burden, cost, and mortality. Pulmonary vascular disease is an important risk factor for disease progression and exacerbation risk. Relative pulmonary artery enlargement on computed tomography scan, defined by a pulmonary artery to aortic (PA:A ratio >1, has been evaluated as a marker of pulmonary vascular disease. The PA:A ratio can be measured reliably independent of electrocardiographic gating or the use of contrast, and in healthy patients a PA:A ratio >0.9 is considered to be abnormal. The PA:A ratio has been compared with invasive hemodynamic parameters, primarily mean pulmonary artery pressure in various disease conditions and is more strongly correlated with mean pulmonary artery pressure in obstructive as compared with interstitial lung disease. In patients without known cardiac or pulmonary disease, the PA:A ratio is predictive of mortality, while in COPD, an elevated PA:A ratio is correlated with increased exacerbation risk, outperforming other well established predictors of these events. Future studies should be aimed at determining the stability of the metric over time and evaluating the utility of the PA:A ratio in guiding specific therapies. Keywords: pulmonary artery enlargement, aorta, ratio, pulmonary hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, computed tomography

  14. Atypical Neurological Manifestations Of Hypokalemia

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    pal P K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A part from the well-established syndrome of motor paralysis, hypokalemia may present with atypical neurological manifestations, which are not well documented in literature. Methods: We treated 30 patients of hypokalemia whose neurological manifestations improved after corrections of hypokalemia. A retrospective chart review of the clinical profile was done with emphasis on the evolution of symptoms and occurrence of unusual manifestations. Results: Twenty-eight patients had subacute quadriparesis with duration of symptoms varying from 10hrs to 7 days and two had slowly progressive quadriparesis. Fifty percent of patients had more than one attack of paralysis. Early asymmetric weakness (11, stiffness and abnormal posture of hands (7, predominant bibrachial weakness (4, distal paresthesias (4, hemiparesthesia (1, hyperreflexia(4, early severe weakness of neck muscles (3, chorea (1, trismus (1,and, retention of urine (1 were the unusual features observed. The means level of serum potassium on admission was 2.1+0.6mEq/L.and the serum creatine kinase was elevated in 14 out of 17 patients. All patients except two had complete recovery.

  15. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

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    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  16. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

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    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  17. [Oliver Sacks and literary neurology].

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    Guardiola, Elena; Banos, Josep E

    2014-03-16

    Popular medical literature attempts to discuss medical topics using a language that is, as far as possible, free of all medical jargon so as to make it more easily understandable by the general public. The very complexity of neurology makes it more difficult for the stories dealing with this specialty to be understood easily by an audience without any kind of medical training. This paper reviews the works written by Oliver Sacks involving the field of neurology aimed at the general public, and the main characteristics and the clinical situation discussed by the author are presented. Some biographical notes about Oliver Sacks are also included and the 11 books published by this author over the last 40 years are also analysed. In each case they are put into a historical context and the most outstanding aspects justifying what makes them an interesting read are commented on. In most cases, the genesis of the work is explained together with its most significant features. The works of Sacks contain a wide range of very interesting clinical situations that are usually explained by means of a language that is readily comprehensible to the general public. It also provides neurologists with a holistic view of different clinical situations, together with a discussion of their biographical, historical and developmental components.

  18. Near continuous cardiac output by thermodilution.

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    Jansen, J R; Johnson, R W; Yan, J Y; Verdouw, P D

    1997-07-01

    A new thermodilution method for frequent (near continuous) estimation of cardiac output, without manual injection of fluid into the blood, was tested. The method utilizes a pulmonary artery catheter equipped with a fluid filled heat exchanger. The technique is based on cyclic cooling of the blood in the right atrium and measurement of the temperature changes in the pulmonary artery. Using this technique, a new estimate of cardiac output can be obtained every 32 s. Cardiac output estimates, obtained for a running mean of three measurements with this method, were compared to the mean of three conventional thermodilution measurements. The measurements were obtained during short periods of stable respiration and circulation. In six pigs, we made 46 paired measurements of conventional thermodilution (TD) and near continuous (TDc) thermodilution. The cardiac output (COTD) ranged from 2.4-13.7 l/min (mean 5.4 l/min). The best linear fit through the paired data points was COTDc = -0.57 + 1.01 COTD. The mean difference between the methods was -0.50 l/min (S.D. = 0.39). The mean coefficient of variation of repeated measurements with the near continuous thermodilution was 3.6%. Considering changes of more than 0.25 l/min to be significant, all changes in cardiac output measured by conventional thermodilution were followed by the running mean of three near continuous thermodilution estimates. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the new method to monitor cardiac output, and to detect all changes greater than 0.25 l/min.

  19. Plexiform pulmonary arteriopathy in a 2 year-old boy.

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    Boudjemaa, Sabah; Meau-Petit, Valerie; Hallalel, Fazia; Coulomb, Aurore; Lipsett, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare disease in children. We report a case of a 2-year old boy admitted to the intensive care unit of our hospital for severe dyspnea and epistaxis. Laboratory investigations showed hemolytic anemia with schizocytes and severe thrombocytopenia. Cardiac investigations diagnosed supra-systemic pulmonary arterial hypertension, which was refractory to maximal medical treatment. On evolution, he had several cardiac arrests and finally died 8 days after admission. Autopsy was performed and showed typical lesions of idiopathic pulmonary hypertensive arteriopathy characterized by plexiform lesions of the interlobular arteries containing numerous disseminated intravascular microthrombi. The rest of the family was screened, DNA was stored, and genetic study of BMPR2 was planned.

  20. Três protocolos fisioterapêuticos: efeitos sobre os volumes pulmonares após cirurgia cardíaca Three physiotherapy protocols: effects on pulmonary volumes after cardiac surgery

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    Cristina Márcia Dias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o volume inspiratório e os efeitos da espirometria de incentivo (EI e da técnica breath stacking (BS sobre a CVF em pacientes submetidos a cirurgia cardíaca. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo controlado e randomizado com 35 pacientes submetidos a cirurgia cardíaca no Hospital de Força Aérea do Galeão, Rio de Janeiro (RJ. Todos os pacientes realizaram procedimentos de mobilização e tosse e foram randomicamente alocados em três grupos: grupo exercício controle (EC, que realizou somente esses procedimentos; grupo EI, que realizou inspirações profundas utilizando um espirômetro de incentivo; e grupo BS, que realizou esforços inspiratórios sucessivos utilizando uma máscara facial acoplada a uma válvula unidirecional. A espirometria forçada foi realizada no período pré-operatório e do primeiro ao quinto dia de pós-operatório. O volume inspiratório foi medido durante as manobras nos grupos EI e BS. RESULTADOS: No primeiro dia de pós-operatório, a CVF diminuiu significativamente em todos os grupos (EC: 87,1 vs. 32,0%; EI: 75,3 vs. 29,5%; e BS: 81,9 vs. 33,2%; p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate inspiratory volume in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and to determine the effects that incentive spirometry (IS and the breath stacking (BS technique have on the recovery of FVC in such patients. METHODS: A prospective, controlled, randomized clinical trial involving 35 patients undergoing cardiac surgery at the Hospital de Força Aérea do Galeão (HFAG, Galeão Air Force Hospital, in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The patients, all of whom performed mobilization and cough procedures, were randomly divided into three groups: exercise control (EC, performing only the abovementioned procedures; IS, performing the abovementioned procedures and instructed to take long breaths using an incentive spirometer; and BS, performing the abovementioned procedures, together with successive inspiratory efforts using a facial mask coupled