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Sample records for neurofibromin inhibits ras

  1. Classic Ras Proteins Promote Proliferation and Survival Via Distinct Phosphoproteome Alterations in Neurofibromin-Null Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, Nicole M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Longo, Jody Fromm; Barnes, Stephen; Wilson, Landon S.; Byer, Stephanie J.; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Carroll, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromin, the tumor suppressor encoded by the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, potentially suppresses the activation of H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras. However, it is not known whether these classic Ras proteins are hyperactivated in NF1-null nerve sheath tumors, how they contribute to tumorigenesis and what signaling pathways mediate their effects. Here we show that H-Ras, N-Ras and K-Ras are coexpressed with their activators, (guanine nucleotide exchange factors), in neurofibromin-null malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells and that all 3 Ras proteins are activated. Dominant negative (DN) H-Ras, a pan-inhibitor of the classic Ras family, inhibited MPNST proliferation and survival, but not migration. However, NF1-null MPNST cells were variably dependent on individual Ras proteins. In some lines, ablation of H-Ras, N-Ras and/or K-Ras inhibited mitogenesis. In others, ablation of a single Ras protein had no effect on proliferation; in these lines, ablation of a single Ras protein resulted in compensatory increases in the activation and/or expression of other Ras proteins. Using mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified 7 signaling networks affecting morphology, proliferation and survival that are regulated by DN H-Ras. Thus, neurofibromin loss activates multiple classic Ras proteins that promote proliferation and survival by regulating several distinct signaling cascades. PMID:25946318

  2. Neurofibromin controls macropinocytosis and phagocytosis in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gareth; Traynor, David; Sander, Sophia P; Veltman, Douwe M; Pachebat, Justin A; Kay, Robert R

    2015-03-27

    Cells use phagocytosis and macropinocytosis to internalise bulk material, which in phagotrophic organisms supplies the nutrients necessary for growth. Wildtype Dictyostelium amoebae feed on bacteria, but for decades laboratory work has relied on axenic mutants that can also grow on liquid media. We used forward genetics to identify the causative gene underlying this phenotype. This gene encodes the RasGAP Neurofibromin (NF1). Loss of NF1 enables axenic growth by increasing fluid uptake. Mutants form outsized macropinosomes which are promoted by greater Ras and PI3K activity at sites of endocytosis. Relatedly, NF1 mutants can ingest larger-than-normal particles using phagocytosis. An NF1 reporter is recruited to nascent macropinosomes, suggesting that NF1 limits their size by locally inhibiting Ras signalling. Our results link NF1 with macropinocytosis and phagocytosis for the first time, and we propose that NF1 evolved in early phagotrophs to spatially modulate Ras activity, thereby constraining and shaping their feeding structures.

  3. Inhibition of RAS in diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoub R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rabi Yacoub, Kirk N Campbell Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Diabetic kidney disease (DKD is a progressive proteinuric renal disorder in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is a common cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide, particularly in developed countries. Therapeutic targeting of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS is the most validated clinical strategy for slowing disease progression. DKD is paradoxically a low systematic renin state with an increased intrarenal RAS activity implicated in its pathogenesis. Angiotensin II (AngII, the main peptide of RAS, is not only a vasoactive peptide but functions as a growth factor, activating interstitial fibroblasts and mesangial and tubular cells, while promoting the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. AngII also promotes podocyte injury through increased calcium influx and the generation of reactive oxygen species. Blockade of the RAS using either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers can attenuate progressive glomerulosclerosis in animal models, and slows disease progression in humans with DKD. In this review, we summarize the role of intrarenal RAS activation in the pathogenesis and progression of DKD and the rationale for RAS inhibition in this population. Keywords: renin–angiotensin system, diabetic kidney disease, angiotensin II, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers

  4. Latest Advances Towards Ras Inhibition: A Medicinal Chemistry Perspective.

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    Sautier, Brice; Nising, Carl F; Wortmann, Lars

    2016-12-23

    Owing to their high occurrence rate across many human cancers and their lack of druggability so far, mutant forms of the signaling protein Ras are currently among the most attractive (and elusive) oncology targets. This strong appeal explains the sustained effort in the field, and the ensuing progress has rekindled optimism regarding the discovery of Ras inhibitors. In this Minireview, we discuss the most recent advances towards irreversible inhibitors, and highlight approaches to inhibitors of Ras-effector interactions that have been overshadowed by the current focus on direct Ras inhibition. At the same time, we provide a critical assessment from a medicinal chemistry perspective. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Neurofibromin regulates somatic growth through the hypothalamic–pituitary axis

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    Hegedus, Balazs; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Lee, Da Yong; Emnett, Ryan J.; Li, Jia; Gutmann, David H.

    2008-01-01

    To study the role of the neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) gene in mammalian brain development, we recently generated mice in which Nf1 gene inactivation occurs in neuroglial progenitor cells using the brain lipid binding protein (BLBP) promoter. We found that Nf1BLBPCKO mice exhibit significantly reduced body weights and anterior pituitary gland sizes. We further demonstrate that the small anterior pituitary size reflects loss of neurofibromin expression in the hypothalamus, leading to reduced growth hormone releasing hormone, pituitary growth hormone (GH) and liver insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) production. Since neurofibromin both negatively regulates Ras activity and positively modulates cAMP levels, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for these abnormalities. While BLBP-mediated expression of an activated Ras molecule did not recapitulate the body weight and hypothalamic/pituitary defects, treatment of Nf1BLBPCKO mice with rolipram to increase cAMP levels resulted in a partial restoration of the body weight phenotype. Furthermore, conditional expression of the Ras regulatory GAP domain of neurofibromin also did not rescue the body weight or Igf1 mRNA defects in Nf1BLBPCKO mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate a critical role for neurofibromin in hypothalamic–pituitary axis function and provide further insights into the short stature and GH deficits seen in children with NF1. PMID:18614544

  6. The Role of the Neurofibromin-Syndecan-CASK Complex in the Regulation of Synaptic Ras-MAPK Signaling and Dendritic Spine Plasticity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Gang-Yi

    2006-01-01

    ... and dendritic spine maturation. Using several siRNAs and dominant negative constructs for NF1 GAP activity to specifically knockdown or inhibit NF1, we have obtained compelling evidence showing that NF1 deficiency indeed leads...

  7. Inhibition of activated Ras suppresses multiple oncogenic Hub genes in human epithelial tumors.

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    Cao, Lei; Wang, Ping; Luo, Hui; Wang, Xi-Rui; Wang, Xie-Feng; Zhang, Jun-Xia; Wang, Ying-Yi; Yao, Lei; Liu, Ning; You, Yong-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells may involve diverse mutations, but they often rely on continued expression of a single oncoprotein for survival, as a response to targeting this protein. Generally, Ras is overexpressed in human epithelial tumors and cancellation of activated Ras inhibits carcinoma cell proliferation and differentiation ability, and induces apoptotosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanisms of inhibition of activated Ras that suppress the malignancy activity of human epithelial tumors remain to be illuminated. We utilized text-mining of MEDLINE abstracts with natural language processing to establish the Ras biologic association network, and identified several interactions of this network with the Ras pathway. Our investigation not only examined the expression of Ras and Hub genes (PIK3CA, MDM2, CCND1, EGFR, JUN, MYC, VEGFA, ERK1 and ERK2) but also confirmed inhibition of activated Ras reduced expression of multiple oncogene in vitro studies. Our studies provide strong support for the conclusion that cancellation of activated Ras specifically regulates defective Ras pathways in human tumor cells.

  8. Small molecule inhibition of protein depalmitoylation as a new approach towards downregulation of oncogenic Ras signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J.; Hedberg, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The H- and N-Ras GTPases are prominent examples of proteins, whose localizations and signalling capacities are regulated by reversible palmitoylations and depalmitoylations. Recently, the novel small molecule inhibitor palmostatin B has been described to inhibit Ras depalmitoylation and to revert

  9. Ras inhibitors display an anti-metastatic effect by downregulation of lysyl oxidase through inhibition of the Ras-PI3K-Akt-HIF-1α pathway.

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    Yoshikawa, Yoko; Takano, Osamu; Kato, Ichiro; Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Shima, Fumi; Kataoka, Tohru

    2017-09-23

    Metastasis stands as the major obstacle for the survival from cancers. Nonetheless most existing anti-cancer drugs inhibit only cell proliferation, and discovery of agents having both anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic properties would be more beneficial. We previously reported the discovery of small-molecule Ras inhibitors, represented by Kobe0065, that displayed anti-proliferative activity on xenografts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line SW480 carrying the K-ras(G12V)gene. Here we show that treatment of cancer cells carrying the activated ras genes with Kobe0065 or a siRNA targeting Ras downregulates the expression of lysyl oxidase (LOX), which has been implicated in metastasis. LOX expression is enhanced by co-expression of Ras(G12V) through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and concomitant accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Furthermore, Kobe0065 effectively inhibits not only migration and invasion of cancer cells carrying the activated ras genes but also lung metastasis of human CRC cell line SW620 carrying the K-ras(G12V) gene. Collectively, these results indicate that Kobe0065 prevents metastasis through inhibition of the Ras-PI3K-Akt-HIF-1α-LOX signaling and suggest that Ras inhibitors in general might exhibit both anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic properties toward cancer cells carrying the activated ras genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Ras Inhibition in Hematopoiesis and BCR/ABL Leukemogenesis

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    Baum Karina J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ras small GTPases are activated in many hematopoietic growth factor signaling and in hematological malignancies, but their role in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis is not completely known. Here we examined the effect of Ras inhibition by a dominant negative mutant of Ras, N17 H-Ras, in adult hematopoiesis and in BCR/ABL leukemogenesis using the mouse bone marrow transduction and transplantation approach. We found that N17 H-Ras expression suppressed B- and T-lymphopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Interestingly, N17 H-Ras did not suppress myelopoiesis in the bone marrow, yet it greatly attenuated BCR/ABL-induced chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-like myeloproliferative disease. Most BCR/ABL + N17 H-Ras mice eventually developed pro-B lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (B-ALL. These results suggest that Ras activation is essential for the development of lymphoid and erythroid cells but not myeloid cells and that Ras is a critical target of BCR/ABL in the pathogenesis of CML, but not B-ALL.

  11. Depletion of Pokemon gene inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth through inhibition of H-ras.

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    Zhang, Quan-Le; Tian, De-An; Xu, Xiang-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription repressor which plays a critical role in cell transformation and malignancy. However, little is known about its effect on the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Pokemon in human HCC tissues and the biological behavior of Pokemon in HCC cells in which it is overexpressed. We also explored the expression of potential downstream cofactors of Pokemon. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the expression of Pokemon in tissues of 30 HCC patients. We then examined cell proliferation or apoptosis and β-catenin or H-ras expression in Pokemon-depleted HepG(2) cells using DNA vector-based RNA interference technology. Pokemon was markedly expressed in 22/30 (73.3%) HCC tissues, with expression levels higher than in adjacent normal liver tissues (p Pokemon inhibited proliferation of HepG(2) or induced apoptosis. Also, H-ras expression decreased to a large extent. Pokemon exerts its oncogenic activity in the development of HCC by promoting cancer cell growth and reducing apoptosis, and the effect may be mediated by H-ras. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Novel Gbeta Mimic Kelch Proteins Gpb1 and Gpb2 Connect G-Protein Signaling to Ras via Yeast Neurofibromin Homologs Ira 1 and Ira 2: A Model for Human NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Gpa1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe , which functions in pheromone-mediated signaling, also fails to form a heterotrimeric G protein with...and Yamamoto, M. (1989). Characterization of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe ral2 gene implicated in activation of the ras1 gene product. Mol. Cell. Biol...cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe . Eukaryot. Cell 4, 495–503. Hou, Y., Chang, V., Capper, A. B., Taussig, R., and Gautam, N. (2001). G Protein

  13. NF2 Loss Promotes Oncogenic RAS-Induced Thyroid Cancers via YAP-Dependent Transactivation of RAS Proteins and Sensitizes Them to MEK Inhibition.

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    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E R; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C; Untch, Brian R; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A

    2015-11-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation is insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacologic disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. Intensification of mutant RAS signaling through copy-number imbalances is commonly associated with transformation. We show that NF2/merlin inactivation augments mutant RAS signaling by promoting YAP/TEAD-driven transcription of oncogenic and wild-type RAS, resulting in greater MAPK output and increased sensitivity to MEK inhibitors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Novel Gbeta Mimic Kelch Proteins (Gpb1 and Gpb2 Connect G-Protein Signaling to Ras via Yeast Neurofibromin Homologs Ira1 and Ira2. A Model for Human NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe , a kelch-repeat protein, Joseph Heitman, MD, PhD. 4 Ral2 (Ras-like), is involved in cell morphology, conjugation and...half of Kel1 (Kelch-repeat protein 1) is homologous to S. pombe or C. neoformans Ral2. S. cerevisiae Kel1 is involved in cell morphology and mating...Therefore, Kem1 and Kem2 are homologuous to S. pombe Ral2 and the amino terminal half of S. cerevisiae Kel1. We disrupted all three genes (KEM1

  15. Neurofibromin is required for barrel formation in the mouse somatosensory cortex.

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    Lush, Mark E; Li, Yun; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Chen, Jian; Parada, Luis F

    2008-02-13

    The rodent barrel cortex is a useful system to study the role of genes and neuronal activity in the patterning of the nervous system. Several genes encoding either intracellular signaling molecules or neurotransmitter receptors are required for barrel formation. Neurofibromin is a tumor suppressor protein that has Ras GTPase activity, thus attenuating the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and and PI-3 kinase (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase) pathways, and is mutated in humans with the condition neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin is widely expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, and a common feature of NF1 is deficits in intellectual development. In addition, NF1 is an uncommonly high disorder among individuals with autism. Thus, NF1 may have important roles in normal CNS development and function. To explore roles for neurofibromin in the development of the CNS, we took advantage of a mouse conditional allele. We show that mice that lack neurofibromin in the majority of cortical neurons and astrocytes fail to form cortical barrels in the somatosensory cortex, whereas segregation of thalamic axons within the somatosensory cortex appears unaffected.

  16. Ras-Related Tumorigenesis Is Suppressed by BNIP3-Mediated Autophagy through Inhibition of Cell Proliferation

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    Shan-Ying Wu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays diverse roles in Ras-related tumorigenesis. H-rasval12 induces autophagy through multiple signaling pathways including Raf-1/ERK pathway, and various ERK downstream molecules of autophagy have been reported. In this study, Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa–interacting protein 3 (BNIP3 is identified as a downstream transducer of the Ras/Raf/ERK signaling pathway to induce autophagy. BNIP3 was upregulated by H-rasval12 at the transcriptional level to compete with Beclin 1 for binding with Bcl-2. H-rasval12–induced autophagy suppresses cell proliferation demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo by expression of ectopic BNIP3, Atg5, or interference RNA of BNIP3 (siBNIP3 and Atg5 (shAtg5 using mouse NIH3T3 and embryo fibroblast cells. H-rasval12 induces different autophagic responses depending on the duration of Ras overexpression. After a short time (48 hours of Ras overexpression, autophagy inhibits cell proliferation. In contrast, a longer time (2 weeks of Ras overexpression, cell proliferation was enhanced by autophagy. Furthermore, overexpression of mutant Ras, BNIP3, and LC3-II was detected in bladder cancer T24 cells and the tumor parts of 75% of bladder cancer specimens indicating a positive correlation between autophagy and tumorigenesis. Taken together, our mouse model demonstrates a balance between BNIP3-mediated autophagy and H-rasval12–induced tumor formation and reveals that H-rasval12 induces autophagy in a BNIP3-dependent manner, and the threshold of autophagy plays a decisive role in H-rasval12–induced tumorigenesis. Our findings combined with others’ reports suggest a new therapeutic strategy against Ras-related tumorigenesis by negative or positive regulation of autophagic activity, which is determined by the level of autophagy and tumor progression stages.

  17. Social isolation in rats inhibits oxidative metabolism, decreases the content of mitochondrial K-Ras and activates mitochondrial hexokinase.

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    Zhuravliova, Elene; Barbakadze, Tamar; Zaalishvili, Elnari; Chipashvili, Manana; Koshoridze, Nana; Mikeladze, David

    2009-12-28

    Recent observations have suggested that Ras signaling includes combinations of extracellular-signal-regulated Ras activation at the plasma membrane and endomembranes, and translocation of Ras from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments. In this study we have shown that social isolation of rat decreases the content of Bcl-2-associated K-Ras in hippocampal mitochondria, whereas the amount of H-Ras is increased in the microsomal fraction. Furthermore, we have found that galectin 1, a binding partner of activated Ras, was increased in the soluble fractions. The redistribution of Ras isoforms was accompanied by acceleration in mitochondrial hexokinase and inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase, whereas the activity of aldolase, as well as cytoplasmic creatine kinase was not changed. Our data suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and compensatory elevation of glycolysis in hippocampus occurs during social isolation of rats and Ras trafficking could play an important role in switching of impaired oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis.

  18. Knockdown of Importin 7 Inhibits Lung Tumorigenesis in K-rasLA1 Lung Cancer Mice.

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    Lee, Ah Young; Kim, Sangwha; Lee, Somin; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Sang-Bum; Hong, Seong-Ho; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2017-05-01

    Background/Aim: Lung cancer shows the highest estimated deaths in both males and females in the Unites States. Importin 7 is overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the anticancer effect of importin 7 down-regulation, especially in lung cancer. Materials and Methods: Glycerol propoxylate triacrylate spermine (GPT-SPE) is a biocompatible carrier used for aerosol gene delivery. Repeated aerosol delivery of GPT-SPE/shImportin 7 complexes was performed to 10-week-old male K-rasLA1mice (a murine lung cancer model) twice a week for 4 weeks (8 times) in a nose-only exposure chamber. Results: Aerosol delivery of GPT-SPE/shImportin 7 inhibits lung cancer in K-rasLA1mice compared to control and scramble control groups. Moreover, importin 7-down-regulated stable cell-line demonstrates suppression of proliferation through Akt inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion: Down-regulation of importin 7 significantly suppresses lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic interactions between neurofibromin and endothelin receptor B in mice.

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    Mugdha Deo

    Full Text Available When mutations in two different genes produce the same mutant phenotype, it suggests that the encoded proteins either interact with each other, or act in parallel to fulfill a similar purpose. Haploinsufficiency of Neurofibromin and over-expression of Endothelin 3 both cause increased numbers of melanocytes to populate the dermis during mouse development, and thus we are interested in how these two signaling pathways might intersect. Neurofibromin is mutated in the human genetic disease, neurofibromatosis type 1, which is characterized by the development of Schwann cell based tumors and skin hyper-pigmentation. Neurofibromin is a GTPase activating protein, while the Endothelin 3 ligand activates Endothelin receptor B, a G protein coupled receptor. In order to study the genetic interactions between endothelin and neurofibromin, we defined the deletion breakpoints of the classical Ednrb piebald lethal allele (Ednrb(s-l and crossed these mice to mice with a loss-of-function mutation in neurofibromin, Dark skin 9 (Dsk9. We found that Neurofibromin haploinsufficiency requires Endothelin receptor B to darken the tail dermis. In contrast, Neurofibromin haploinsufficiency increases the area of the coat that is pigmented in Endothelin receptor B null mice. We also found an oncogenic mutation in the G protein alpha subunit, GNAQ, which couples to Endothelin receptor B, in a uveal melanoma from a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. Thus, this data suggests that there is a complex relationship between Neurofibromin and Endothelin receptor B.

  20. Targeting Ras-Driven Cancer Cell Survival and Invasion through Selective Inhibition of DOCK1

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    Hirotada Tajiri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenic Ras plays a key role in cancer initiation but also contributes to malignant phenotypes by stimulating nutrient uptake and promoting invasive migration. Because these latter cellular responses require Rac-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, we hypothesized that molecules involved in Rac activation may be valuable targets for cancer therapy. We report that genetic inactivation of the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor DOCK1 ablates both macropinocytosis-dependent nutrient uptake and cellular invasion in Ras-transformed cells. By screening chemical libraries, we have identified 1-(2-(3′-(trifluoromethyl-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl-2-oxoethyl-5-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl-2(1H-pyridone (TBOPP as a selective inhibitor of DOCK1. TBOPP dampened DOCK1-mediated invasion, macropinocytosis, and survival under the condition of glutamine deprivation without impairing the biological functions of the closely related DOCK2 and DOCK5 proteins. Furthermore, TBOPP treatment suppressed cancer metastasis and growth in vivo in mice. Our results demonstrate that selective pharmacological inhibition of DOCK1 could be a therapeutic approach to target cancer cell survival and invasion.

  1. Hypoxia activates the K-ras proto-oncogene to stimulate angiogenesis and inhibit apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

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    Min Zeng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The KRAS proto-oncogene plays a key role in the development of many human tumors and is commonly activated by somatic mutation or signaling through specific growth factor receptors. However, the interaction between the micro-environment and K-ras activity has not been defined. Hypoxia invariably develops as tumors outgrow their supply of oxygen. A series of well-orchestrated cellular adaptations occur that stimulate angiogenesis and enhance survival of the tumor in hypoxic conditions. Our previous studies demonstrated that mutant KRAS alleles can interact with hypoxia to induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in colon cancer. We sought to determine whether similar hypoxic responses are also present in tumors without a KRAS mutation. Hypoxia consistently increased the levels of activated, GTP-bound K-ras in colon cancer cell lines with a wild-type KRAS gene, and this depended upon the activation of c-Src. Inhibition of c-Src by PP2 treatment or siRNA knockdown blocked the hypoxic activation of K-ras. This activation of K-ras did not depend upon EGFR and resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt and induction of VEGF expression. In addition, activation of K-ras significantly blocked apoptosis in hypoxic conditions. These studies reveal a unique adaptive mechanism in hypoxia that activates K-ras signaling in the absence of a mutant KRAS oncogene.

  2. Activation of RAS/ERK alone is insufficient to inhibit RXRα function and deplete retinoic acid in hepatocytes

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    Wang, Ai-Guo, E-mail: wangaiguotl@hotmail.com; Song, Ya-Nan; Chen, Jun; Li, Hui-Ling; Dong, Jian-Yi; Cui, Hai-Peng; Yao, Liang; Li, Xue-Feng; Gao, Wen-Ting; Qiu, Ze-Wen; Wang, Fu-Jin; Wang, Jing-Yu, E-mail: wangjingyus@163.com

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • The activation of RAS/ERK is insufficient to inhibit RXRα function and deplete RA. • The retinoid metabolism-related genes are down-regulated by ras oncogene. • The atRA has no effect on preventing hepatic tumorigenesis or curing the developed hepatic nodules. - Abstract: Activation of RAS/ERK signaling pathway, depletion of retinoid, and phosphorylation of retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) are frequent events found in liver tumors and thought to play important roles in hepatic tumorigenesis. However, the relationships among them still remained to be elucidated. By exploring the transgenic mouse model of hepatic tumorigenesis induced by liver-specific expression of H-ras12V oncogene, the activation of RAS/ERK, the mRNA expression levels of retinoid metabolism-related genes, the contents of retinoid metabolites, and phosphorylation of RXRα were determined. RAS/ERK signaling pathway was gradually and significantly activated in hepatic tumor adjacent normal liver tissues (P) and hepatic tumor tissues (T) of H-ras12V transgenic mice compared with normal liver tissues (Wt) of wild type mice. On the contrary, the mRNA expression levels of retinoid metabolism-related genes were significantly reduced in P and T compared with Wt. Interestingly, the retinoid metabolites 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) and all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), the well known ligands for nuclear transcription factor RXR and retinoic acid receptor (RAR), were significantly decreased only in T compared with Wt and P, although the oxidized polar metabolite of atRA, 4-keto-all-trans-retinoic-acid (4-keto-RA) was significantly decreased in both P and T compared with Wt. To our surprise, the functions of RXRα were significantly blocked only in T compared with Wt and P. Namely, the total protein levels of RXRα were significantly reduced and the phosphorylation levels of RXRα were significantly increased only in T compared with Wt and P. Treatment of H-ras12V transgenic mice at 5-week

  3. PTPRG inhibition by DNA methylation and cooperation with RAS gene activation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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    Xiao, Jianqiao; Lee, Seung-Tae; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ma, Xiaomei; Houseman, E Andres; Hsu, Ling-I; Roy, Ritu; Wrensch, Margaret; de Smith, Adam J; Chokkalingam, Anand; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2014-09-01

    While the cytogenetic and genetic characteristics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL) are well studied, less clearly understood are the contributing epigenetic mechanisms that influence the leukemia phenotype. Our previous studies and others identified gene mutation (RAS) and DNA methylation (FHIT) to be associated with the most common cytogenetic subgroup of childhood ALL, high hyperdiploidy (having five more chromosomes). We screened DNA methylation profiles, using a genome-wide high-dimension platform of 166 childhood ALLs and 6 normal pre-B cell samples and observed a strong association of DNA methylation status at the PTPRG locus in human samples with levels of PTPRG gene expression as well as with RAS gene mutation status. In the 293 cell line, we found that PTPRG expression induces dephosphorylation of ERK, a downstream RAS target that may be critical for mutant RAS-induced cell growth. In addition, PTPRG expression is upregulated by RAS activation under DNA hypomethylating conditions. An element within the PTPRG promoter is bound by the RAS-responsive transcription factor RREB1, also under hypomethylating conditions. In conclusion, we provide evidence that DNA methylation of the PTPRG gene is a complementary event in oncogenesis induced by RAS mutations. Evidence for additional roles for PTPR family member genes is also suggested. This provides a potential therapeutic target for RAS-related leukemias as well as insight into childhood ALL etiology and pathophysiology. © 2014 UICC.

  4. Modulation of Ras signaling alters the toxicity of hydroquinone, a benzene metabolite and component of cigarette smoke.

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    North, Matthew; Shuga, Joe; Fromowitz, Michele; Loguinov, Alexandre; Shannon, Kevin; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Vulpe, Chris D

    2014-01-05

    Benzene is an established human leukemogen, with a ubiquitous environmental presence leading to significant population exposure. In a genome-wide functional screen in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of IRA2, a yeast ortholog of the human tumor suppressor gene NF1 (Neurofibromin), enhanced sensitivity to hydroquinone, an important benzene metabolite. Increased Ras signaling is implicated as a causal factor in the increased pre-disposition to leukemia of individuals with mutations in NF1. Growth inhibition of yeast by hydroquinone was assessed in mutant strains exhibiting varying levels of Ras activity. Subsequently, effects of hydroquinone on both genotoxicity (measured by micronucleus formation) and proliferation of WT and Nf1 null murine hematopoietic precursors were assessed. Here we show that the Ras status of both yeast and mammalian cells modulates hydroquinone toxicity, indicating potential synergy between Ras signaling and benzene toxicity. Specifically, enhanced Ras signaling increases both hydroquinone-mediated growth inhibition in yeast and genotoxicity in mammalian hematopoetic precursors as measured by an in vitro erythroid micronucleus assay. Hydroquinone also increases proliferation of CFU-GM progenitor cells in mice with Nf1 null bone marrow relative to WT, the same cell type associated with benzene-associated leukemia. Together our findings show that hydroquinone toxicity is modulated by Ras signaling. Individuals with abnormal Ras signaling could be more vulnerable to developing myeloid diseases after exposure to benzene. We note that hydroquinone is used cosmetically as a skin-bleaching agent, including by individuals with cafe-au-lait spots (which may be present in individuals with neurofibromatosis who have a mutation in NF1), which could be unadvisable given our findings.

  5. Mechanism of Metformin-dependent Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) and Ras Activity in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Abudayyeh, Ala; Rodrigues Hoffman, Aline; Safe, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity for multiple cancers including pancreatic cancer; however, the underlying mechanism of action of metformin is unclear. A recent study showed that metformin down-regulated specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors (TFs) Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors, and this was accompanied by down-regulation of several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes. Treatment with metformin or down-regulation of Sp TFs by RNAi also inhibits two major pro-oncogenic pathways in pancreatic cancer cells, namely mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and epidermal growth factor (EGFR)-dependent activation of Ras. Metformin and Sp knockdown by RNAi decreased expression of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), resulting in inhibition of mTOR signaling. Ras activity was also decreased by metformin and Sp knockdown of EGFR, another Sp-regulated gene. Thus, the antineoplastic activities of metformin in pancreatic cancer are due, in part, to down-regulation of Sp TFs and Sp-regulated IGF-1R and EGFR, which in turn results in inhibition of mTOR and Ras signaling, respectively. PMID:25143389

  6. Differential expression of IL-17, 22 and 23 in the progression of colorectal cancer in patients with K-ras mutation: Ras signal inhibition and crosstalk with GM-CSF and IFN-γ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savvas Petanidis

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that aberrant K-ras signaling is responsible for triggering immunological responses and inflammation-driven tumorigenesis. Interleukins IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23 have been reported in various types of malignancies, but the exact mechanistic role of these molecules remains to be elucidated. Given the role of K-ras and the involvement of interleukins in colorectal tumorigenesis, research efforts are reported for the first time, showing that differentially expressed interleukin IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23 levels are associated with K-ras in a stage-specific fashion along colorectal cancer progression. Specifically, a the effect of K-ras signaling was investigated in the overall expression of interleukins in patients with colorectal cancer and healthy controls, and b an association was established between mutant K-ras and cytokines GM-CSF and IFN-γ. The results indicate that specific interleukins are differentially expressed in K-ras positive patients and the use of K-ras inhibitor Manumycin A decreases both interleukin levels and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells by inhibiting cell viability. Finally, inflammation-driven GM-CSF and IFN-γ levels are modulated through interleukin expression in tumor patients, with interleukin expression in the intestinal lumen and cancerous tissue mediated by aberrant K-ras signaling. Collectively, the findings a indicate that interleukin expression is influenced by ras signaling and specific interleukins play an oncogenic promoter role in colorectal cancer, highlighting the molecular link between inflammation and tumorigenesis, and b accentuate the interwoven molecular correlations as leads to new therapeutic approaches in the future.

  7. Combined silencing of K-ras and Akt2 oncogenes achieves synergistic effects in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X H; Liang, Z Y; Ren, X Y; Liu, T H

    2009-03-01

    Cancer is a complex disease involving multiple oncogenes with diverse actions. Inhibiting only one oncogene is unlikely to eliminate the malignancy of cancer cells. The goal of this study was to investigate whether synergistic effects can be achieved by combined silencing of two oncogenes, K-ras and Akt2, which are key players in the Ras/MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. The pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc-1, was selected for these studies as it has elevated expression of K-ras and Akt2. Compared with inhibiting each oncogene alone, simultaneously silencing the two oncogenes with RNA interference (RNAi) more effectively inhibited Panc-1 cell proliferation and colony formation, induced a significantly higher percentage of apoptosis and resulted in greater inhibition of c-myc expression in vitro. Furthermore, when delivered by polyethyleneimine into Panc-1 tumors in nude mice, RNAi simultaneously targeting K-ras and Akt2 inhibited tumor growth more efficiently than RNAi targeting the individual oncogenes. Therefore, RNAi simultaneously silencing the oncogenes K-ras and Akt2 may offer potential opportunities for pancreatic cancer gene therapy.

  8. Inhibition of carcinogen induced c-Ha-ras and c-fos proto-oncogenes expression by dietary curcumin

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    Lipigorngoson Suwiwek

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the chemopreventive action of dietary curcumin on 7,12-dimethylbenz(aanthracene (DMBA-initiated and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA-promoted skin tumor formation in Swiss albino mice. Curcumin, a yellow coloring matter isolated from roots of Curcuma longa Linn, is a phenolic compound possessing antioxidant, free radical scavenger, and antiinflammatory properties. It has been shown by previously reported work that TPA-induced skin tumors were inhibited by topical application of curcumin, and curcumin has been shown to inhibit a variety of biological activities of TPA. Topical application of curcumin was reported to inhibit TPA-induced c-fos, c-jun and c-myc gene expression in mouse skin. This paper reports the effects of orally administered curcumin, which was consumed as a dietary component at concentrations of 0.2 % or 1 %, in ad libitum feeding. Results Animals in which tumors had been initiated with DMBA and promoted with TPA experienced significantly fewer tumors and less tumor volume if they ingested either 0.2% or 1% curcumin diets. Also, the dietary consumption of curcumin resulted in a significantly decreased expression of ras and fos proto-oncogenes in the tumorous skin, as measured by enhanced chemiluminesence Western blotting detection system (Amersham. Conclusions Whereas earlier work demonstrated that topical application of curcumin to mouse skin inhibited TPA-induced expression of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc oncogenes, our results are the first to show that orally consumed curcumin significantly inhibited DMBA- and TPA-induced ras and fos gene expression in mouse skin.

  9. PKI-587 and sorafenib targeting PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MAPK pathways synergistically inhibit HCC cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedaly, Roberto; Angulo, Paul; Hundley, Jonathan; Daily, Michael F; Chen, Changguo; Evers, B Mark

    2012-08-01

    Deregulated Ras/Raf/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways are found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to test the inhibitory effects of PKI-587 and sorafenib as single agents or in combination on HCC (Huh7 cell line) proliferation. (3)H-thymidine incorporation and MTT assay were used to assess Huh7 cell proliferation. Phosphorylation of the key enzymes in the Ras/Raf/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways was detected by Western blot. We found that PKI-587 is a more potent PI3K/mTOR inhibitor than PI-103. Combination of PKI-587 and sorafenib was a more effective inhibitor of Huh7 proliferation than the combination of PI-103 and sorafenib. Combination of PKI-587 and sorafenib synergistically inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated Huh7 proliferation compared with monodrug therapy. EGF increased phosphorylation of Ras/Raf downstream signaling proteins MEK and ERK; EGF-stimulated activation was inhibited by sorafenib. However, sorafenib, as a single agent, increased AKT (Ser473) phosphorylation. EGF-stimulated AKT (ser473) activation was inhibited by PKI-587. PKI-587 is a potent inhibitor of AKT (Ser473), mTOR (Ser2448), and S6K (Thr389) phosphorylation; in contrast, rapamycin stimulated mTOR complex 2 substrate AKT(Ser473) phosphorylation although it inhibited mTOR complex 1 substrate S6K phosphorylation. PKI-587, as a single agent, stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation. However, when PKI-587 and sorafenib were used in combination, they inhibited all the tested kinases in the Ras/Raf /MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. The combination of PKI-587 and sorafenib has the advantage over monodrug therapy on inhibition of HCC cell proliferation by blocking both PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MAPK signaling pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurofibromin Deficient Myeloid Cells are Critical Mediators of Aneurysm Formation In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Downing, Brandon D.; Smiley, Lucy C.; Mund, Julie A.; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Sarchet, Kara N.; Hinds, Daniel M.; Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Case, Jamie; Clapp, D. Wade; Conway, Simon J.; Stansfield, Brian K.; Ingram, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity in circulating hematopoietic and vascular wall cells, which are critical for maintaining vessel wall homeostasis. NF1 patients have evidence of chronic inflammation resulting in development of premature cardiovascular disease, including arterial aneurysms, which may manifest as sudden death. However, the molecular pathogenesis of NF1 aneurysm formation is unknown. Method and Results Utilizing an angiotensin II-induced aneurysm model, we demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1+/−) enhanced aneurysm formation with myeloid cell infiltration and increased oxidative stress in the vessel wall. Using lineage-restricted transgenic mice, we show loss of a single Nf1 allele in myeloid cells is sufficient to recapitulate the Nf1+/− aneurysm phenotype in vivo. Finally, oral administration of simvastatin or the antioxidant apocynin, reduced aneurysm formation in Nf1+/− mice. Conclusion These data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that Nf1+/− myeloid cells are the cellular triggers for aneurysm formation in a novel model of NF1 vasculopathy and provide a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24370551

  11. Repression of CD24 surface protein expression by oncogenic Ras is relieved by inhibition of Raf but not MEK or PI3K

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    Nikitha K. Pallegar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available CD24 is a dynamically regulated cell surface protein. High expression of CD24 leads to progression of lung, prostrate, colon and pancreatic cancers, among others. In contrast, low expression of CD24 leads to cell proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs. Activating mutations in Ras are found in 30% of all human cancers. Oncogenic Ras constitutively stimulates the Raf, PI3K and Ral GDS signaling pathways, leading to cellular transformation. Previous studies have shown that expression of oncogenic Ras in breast cancer cells generates CD24- cells from CD24+ cells. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of CD24- cells were not determined. Here, we demonstrate that oncogenic Ras (RasV12 expression suppresses CD24 mRNA, protein, and promoter levels when expressed in NIH/3T3 cells. Furthermore, activation of only the Raf pathway was sufficient to downregulate CD24 mRNA and protein expression to levels similar to those seen in with RasV12 expression. In contrast, activation of the PI3K pathway downregulated mRNA expression with a partial effect on protein expression whereas activation of the RalGDS pathway only partially affected protein expression. Surprisingly, inhibition of MEK with U0126 only partially restored CD24 mRNA expression but not surface protein expression. In contrast, inhibition of Raf with sorafenib did not restore CD24 mRNA expression but significantly increased the proportion of RasV12 cells expressing CD24. Therefore, the Raf pathway is the major repressor of CD24 mRNA and protein expression, with PI3K also able to substantially inhibit CD24 expression. Moreover, these data indicate that the levels of CD24 mRNA and surface protein are independently regulated. Although inhibition of Raf by sorafenib only partially restored CD24 expression, sorafenib should still be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy to alter CD24 expression in CD24- cells, such as BCSCs.

  12. [miR-143 inhibits cell proliferation through targeted regulating the expression of K-ras gene in HeLa cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, H X; Cui, H K; Pan, Y; Hu, R L; Zhu, L H; Wang, S J

    2016-12-23

    Objective: To explore the effect of microRNA miR-143 on the proliferation of cervical cancer HeLa cells through targeted regulating the expression of K-ras gene. Methods: The luciferase report carrier containing wild type 3'-UTR of K-ras gene (K-ras-wt) or mutated 3'-UTR of the K-ras (K-ras-mut) were co-transfected with iR-143 mimic into the HeLa cells respectively, and the targeting effect of miR-143 in the transfectants was verified by the dual luciferase report system. HeLa cells were also transfected with miR-143 mimic (miR-143 mimic group), mimic control (negative control group), and miR-143 mimic plus K-ras gene (miR-143 mimic+ K-ras group), respectively. The expression of miR-143 in the transfected HeLa cells was detected by real-time PCR (RT-PCR), and the expression of K-ras protein was detected by Western blot. The cell proliferation activity of each group was examined by MTT assay. In addition, human cervical cancer tissue samples (n=5) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue samples (n=5) were also examined for the expression of miR-143 and K-ras protein by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Results: The luciferase report assay showed that co-transfection with miR-143 mimic decreased the luciferase activity of the K-ras-wt significantly, but did not inhibit the luciferase activity of the K-ras-mut. The expression of miR-143 in the HeLa cells transfected with miR-143 mimic was significantly higher than that in the HeLa cells transfected with the mimic control (3.31±0.45 vs 0.97±0.22, Pras group was also significantly lower than the control group (Pras protein in the miR-143 mimic group, the negative control group and the miR-143 mimic+ K-ras group were lowest, moderate, and highest, respectively (115.27±34.08, 521.36±41.89, and 706.52±89.44, all Pras protein expression in the cervical cancer group was significantly higher than that in the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia group (584.39±72.34 vs. 114.23±25.82, Pras gene. In human cervical

  13. Post-transcriptional regulation of neurofibromin level in cultured human melanocytes in response to growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesser, J; Kaufmann, D; Maier, B; Mailhammer, R; Kuehl, P; Krone, W

    1997-03-01

    Among the symptoms that characterize neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are pigmentation anomalies such as cafe au lait spots. It has been suggested that the reduction of the neurofibromin level in the epidermis of NF1 patients is responsible for the observed signs such as altered melanogenesis and altered density of melanocytes. Our studies show that in cultured normal human melanocytes, the neurofibromin level can be varied in vitro over a wide range by using different culture conditions. The influence of factors that control differentiation and proliferation of melanocytes on neurofibromin levels was studied. Immunoprecipitation followed by western blotting showed a 3- to 4-fold increase of neurofibromin after stimulation by PMA or bFGF, respectively, and a 1.5-fold increase in cells stimulated with steel factor. The increase of neurofibromin was not paralleled by a higher NF1 mRNA level as proved by northern blotting. Pulse-chase experiments with 35S-labeled melanocytes revealed an approximately 3-fold increase in the half-life of neurofibromin in bFGF- or PMA-stimulated cells compared to controls. These results indicate that the neurofibromin level of cultured melanocytes can be regulated by a mechanism independent of NF1 gene transcription and translation, which might influence the degradation rate of the protein.

  14. K-Ras and B-Raf oncogenes inhibit colon epithelial polarity establishment through up-regulation of c-myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magudia, Kirti; Lahoz, Aurelia; Hall, Alan

    2012-07-23

    KRAS, BRAF, and PI3KCA are the most frequently mutated oncogenes in human colon cancer. To explore their effects on morphogenesis, we used the colon cancer-derived cell line Caco-2. When seeded in extracellular matrix, individual cells proliferate and generate hollow, polarized cysts. The expression of oncogenic phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3KCA H1047R) in Caco-2 has no effect, but K-Ras V12 or B-Raf V600E disrupts polarity and tight junctions and promotes hyperproliferation, resulting in large, filled structures. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase blocks the disruption of morphology, as well as the increased levels of c-myc protein induced by K-Ras V12 and B-Raf V600E. Apical polarity is already established after the first cell division (two-cell stage) in Caco-2 three-dimensional cultures. This is disrupted by expression of K-Ras V12 or B-Raf V600E but can be rescued by ribonucleic acid interference-mediated depletion of c-myc. We conclude that ERK-mediated up-regulation of c-myc by K-Ras or B-Raf oncogenes disrupts the establishment of apical/basolateral polarity in colon epithelial cells independently of its effect on proliferation.

  15. Mechanism of metformin-dependent inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Ras activity in pancreatic cancer: role of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Abudayyeh, Ala; Rodrigues Hoffman, Aline; Safe, Stephen

    2014-10-03

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity for multiple cancers including pancreatic cancer; however, the underlying mechanism of action of metformin is unclear. A recent study showed that metformin down-regulated specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors (TFs) Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors, and this was accompanied by down-regulation of several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes. Treatment with metformin or down-regulation of Sp TFs by RNAi also inhibits two major pro-oncogenic pathways in pancreatic cancer cells, namely mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and epidermal growth factor (EGFR)-dependent activation of Ras. Metformin and Sp knockdown by RNAi decreased expression of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), resulting in inhibition of mTOR signaling. Ras activity was also decreased by metformin and Sp knockdown of EGFR, another Sp-regulated gene. Thus, the antineoplastic activities of metformin in pancreatic cancer are due, in part, to down-regulation of Sp TFs and Sp-regulated IGF-1R and EGFR, which in turn results in inhibition of mTOR and Ras signaling, respectively. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Neurofibromin Loss of Function Drives Excessive Grooming in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanikea B. King

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis I is a common genetic disorder that results in tumor formation, and predisposes individuals to a range of cognitive/behavioral symptoms, including deficits in attention, visuospatial skills, learning, language development, and sleep, and autism spectrum disorder-like traits. The nf1-encoded neurofibromin protein (Nf1 exhibits high conservation, from the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to humans. Drosophila provides a powerful platform to investigate the signaling cascades upstream and downstream of Nf1, and the fly model exhibits similar behavioral phenotypes to mammalian models. In order to understand how loss of Nf1 affects motor behavior in flies, we combined traditional activity monitoring with video analysis of grooming behavior. In nf1 mutants, spontaneous grooming was increased up to 7x. This increase in activity was distinct from previously described dopamine-dependent hyperactivity, as dopamine transporter mutants exhibited slightly decreased grooming. Finally, we found that relative grooming frequencies can be compared in standard activity monitors that measure infrared beam breaks, enabling the use of activity monitors as an automated method to screen for grooming phenotypes. Overall, these data suggest that loss of nf1 produces excessive activity that is manifested as increased grooming, providing a platform to dissect the molecular genetics of neurofibromin signaling across neuronal circuits.

  17. Neurofibromin Loss of Function Drives Excessive Grooming in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lanikea B; Koch, Marta; Murphy, Keith R; Velazquez, Yoheilly; Ja, William W; Tomchik, Seth M

    2016-04-07

    Neurofibromatosis I is a common genetic disorder that results in tumor formation, and predisposes individuals to a range of cognitive/behavioral symptoms, including deficits in attention, visuospatial skills, learning, language development, and sleep, and autism spectrum disorder-like traits. The nf1-encoded neurofibromin protein (Nf1) exhibits high conservation, from the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to humans. Drosophila provides a powerful platform to investigate the signaling cascades upstream and downstream of Nf1, and the fly model exhibits similar behavioral phenotypes to mammalian models. In order to understand how loss of Nf1 affects motor behavior in flies, we combined traditional activity monitoring with video analysis of grooming behavior. In nf1 mutants, spontaneous grooming was increased up to 7x. This increase in activity was distinct from previously described dopamine-dependent hyperactivity, as dopamine transporter mutants exhibited slightly decreased grooming. Finally, we found that relative grooming frequencies can be compared in standard activity monitors that measure infrared beam breaks, enabling the use of activity monitors as an automated method to screen for grooming phenotypes. Overall, these data suggest that loss of nf1 produces excessive activity that is manifested as increased grooming, providing a platform to dissect the molecular genetics of neurofibromin signaling across neuronal circuits. Copyright © 2016 King et al.

  18. Sulforaphane, quercetin and catechins complement each other in elimination of advanced pancreatic cancer by miR-let-7 induction and K-ras inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPARI, MAHESH; BABU, KAMESH R.; KACZOROWSKI, ADAM; GROSS, WOLFGANG; HERR, INGRID

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has the worst prognosis of all malignancies, and current therapeutic options do not target cancer stem cells (CSCs), which may be the reason for the extreme aggressiveness. The dietary agents sulforaphane and quercetin enriched e.g., in broccoli, and the main and best studied green tea catechin EGCG hold promise as anti-CSC agents in PDA. We examined the efficacy of additional catechins and the combination of these bioactive agents to stem cell features and miRNA signaling. Two established and one primary PDA cell line and non-malignant pancreatic ductal cells were used. Whereas each agent strongly inhibited colony formation, the catechins ECG and CG were more effective than EGCG. A mixture of green tea catechins (GTCs) significantly inhibited viability, migration, expression of MMP-2 and -9, ALDH1 activity, colony and spheroid formation and induced apoptosis, but the combination of GTCs with sulforaphane or quercetin was superior. Following treatment with bioactive agents, the expression of miR-let7-a was specifically induced in cancer cells but not in normal cells and it was associated with K-ras inhibition. These data demonstrate that sulforaphane, quercetin and GTC complement each other in inhibition of PDA progression by induction of miR-let7-a and inhibition of K-ras. PMID:25017900

  19. Ras history

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Although the roots of Ras sprouted from the rich history of retrovirus research, it was the discovery of mutationally activated RAS genes in human cancer in 1982 that stimulated an intensive research effort to understand Ras protein structure, biochemistry and biology. While the ultimate goal has been developing anti-Ras drugs for cancer treatment, discoveries from Ras have laid the foundation for three broad areas of science. First, they focused studies on the origins of cancer to the molecular level, with the subsequent discovery of genes mutated in cancer that now number in the thousands. Second, elucidation of the biochemical mechanisms by which Ras facilitates signal transduction established many of our fundamental concepts of how a normal cell orchestrates responses to extracellular cues. Third, Ras proteins are also founding members of a large superfamily of small GTPases that regulate all key cellular processes and established the versatile role of small GTP-binding proteins in biology. We highlight some of the key findings of the last 28 years. PMID:21686117

  20. Breast tumors with elevated expression of 1q candidate genes confer poor clinical outcome and sensitivity to Ras/PI3K inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuswami, Muthulakshmi; Ramesh, Vignesh; Banerjee, Saikat; Viveka Thangaraj, Soundara; Periasamy, Jayaprakash; Bhaskar Rao, Divya; Barnabas, Georgina D; Raghavan, Swetha; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2013-01-01

    Genomic aberrations are common in cancers and the long arm of chromosome 1 is known for its frequent amplifications in breast cancer. However, the key candidate genes of 1q, and their contribution in breast cancer pathogenesis remain unexplored. We have analyzed the gene expression profiles of 1635 breast tumor samples using meta-analysis based approach and identified clinically significant candidates from chromosome 1q. Seven candidate genes including exonuclease 1 (EXO1) are consistently over expressed in breast tumors, specifically in high grade and aggressive breast tumors with poor clinical outcome. We derived a EXO1 co-expression module from the mRNA profiles of breast tumors which comprises 1q candidate genes and their co-expressed genes. By integrative functional genomics investigation, we identified the involvement of EGFR, RAS, PI3K / AKT, MYC, E2F signaling in the regulation of these selected 1q genes in breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Expression of EXO1 module was found as indicative of elevated cell proliferation, genomic instability, activated RAS/AKT/MYC/E2F1 signaling pathways and loss of p53 activity in breast tumors. mRNA-drug connectivity analysis indicates inhibition of RAS/PI3K as a possible targeted therapeutic approach for the patients with activated EXO1 module in breast tumors. Thus, we identified seven 1q candidate genes strongly associated with the poor survival of breast cancer patients and identified the possibility of targeting them with EGFR/RAS/PI3K inhibitors.

  1. Aliphatic acetogenin constituents of avocado fruits inhibit human oral cancer cell proliferation by targeting the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ambrosio, Steven M. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Han, Chunhua [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pan, Li; Douglas Kinghorn, A. [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Ding, Haiming, E-mail: ding.29@osu.edu [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} The aliphatic acetogenins [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] (1) and [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate] (2) isolated from avocado fruit inhibit phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). {yields} Aliphatic acetogenin 2, but not 1, prevents EGF-induced activation of EGFR (Tyr1173). {yields} Combination of both aliphatic acetogenins synergistically inhibits c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation and human oral cancer cell proliferation. {yields} The potential anticancer activity of avocado fruits is due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins targeting two key components of the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. {yields} Providing a double hit on a critical cancer pathway such as EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 by phytochemicals like those found in avocado fruit could lead to more effective approach toward cancer prevention. -- Abstract: Avocado (Persea americana) fruits are consumed as part of the human diet and extracts have shown growth inhibitory effects in various types of human cancer cells, although the effectiveness of individual components and their underlying mechanism are poorly understood. Using activity-guided fractionation of the flesh of avocado fruits, a chloroform-soluble extract (D003) was identified that exhibited high efficacy towards premalignant and malignant human oral cancer cell lines. From this extract, two aliphatic acetogenins of previously known structure were isolated, compounds 1 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] and 2 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate]. In this study, we show for the first time that the growth inhibitory efficacy of this chloroform extract is due to blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR (Tyr1173), c-RAF (Ser338), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) in the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. Compounds 1 and 2 both inhibited phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). Compound 2, but not

  2. Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-coupled Affinity Purification/Mass Spectrometry Analysis Revealed a Novel Role of Neurofibromin in mTOR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Gao, Min; Choi, Jong Min; Kim, Beom-Jun; Zhou, Mao-Tian; Chen, Zhen; Jain, Antrix N; Jung, Sung Yun; Yuan, Jingsong; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Yi; Chen, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Neurofibromin (NF1) is a well known tumor suppressor that is commonly mutated in cancer patients. It physically interacts with RAS and negatively regulates RAS GTPase activity. Despite the importance of NF1 in cancer, a high quality endogenous NF1 interactome has yet to be established. In this study, we combined c lustered, r egularly i nterspaced s hort p alindromic r epeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated gene knock-out technology with affinity purification using antibodies against endogenous proteins, followed by mass spectrometry analysis, to sensitively and accurately detect NF1 protein-protein interactions in unaltered in vivo settings. Using this system, we analyzed endogenous NF1-associated protein complexes and identified 49 high-confidence candidate interaction proteins, including RAS and other functionally relevant proteins. Through functional validation, we found that NF1 negatively regulates mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling (mTOR) in a LAMTOR1-dependent manner. In addition, the cell growth and survival of NF1-deficient cells have become dependent on hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway, and the tumorigenic properties of these cells have become dependent on LAMTOR1. Taken together, our findings may provide novel insights into therapeutic approaches targeting NF1-deficient tumors. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Mustard oil in "Shibori Daikon" a variety of Japanese radish, selectively inhibits the proliferation of H-ras-transformed 3Y1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Masao; Omi, Yusuke; Fujii, Naoko; Ozaki, Asako; Nakama, Akihiko; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Nishiyama, Kazuo

    2009-10-01

    Cruciferous vegetables and their isothiocyanates are promising foods and agents for cancer prevention. We focus here on the effects of mustard oil (SMO) in a variety of the Japanese radish, Shibori Daikon (Raphanus sativus), on the proliferation of 3Y1 rat fibroblasts and the H-ras-transformed derivative, HR-3Y1-2. SMO (1.6 microg/ml) inhibited the proliferation of HR-3Y1-2, but not 3Y1 after 24 h after treatment. A cell cycle analysis showed that SMO induced G2/M arrest after 6 h, although this effect was not observed 24 h after the treatment. SMO transiently decreased the cellular reduced glutathione level accompanied with up-regulation of the intracellular reactive oxygen species 2-3 h post-treatment. Glutathione ethyl ester and N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevented the growth inhibitory effect of SMO. This mustard oil extract consisted of 95.6% 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate and 4.4% 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate. SMO selectively inhibited H-ras-transformed 3Y1 cells associated with transient oxidative stress via reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion.

  4. Aliphatic acetogenin constituents of avocado fruits inhibit human oral cancer cell proliferation by targeting the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Ambrosio, Steven M.; Han, Chunhua; Pan, Li; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Ding, Haiming

    2011-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) fruits are consumed as part of the human diet and extracts have shown growth inhibitory effects in various types of human cancer cells, although the effectiveness of individual components and their underlying mechanism are poorly understood. Using activity-guided fractionation of the flesh of avocado fruits, a chloroform-soluble extract (D003), was identified that exhibited high efficacy towards premalignant and malignant human oral cancer cell lines. From this extract, two aliphatic acetogenins of previously known structure were isolated, compounds 1 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] and 2 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate]. In this study, we show for the first time that the growth inhibitory efficacy of this chloroform extract is due to blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR (Tyr1173), c-RAF (Ser338), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) in the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. Compound 1 and 2 both inhibited phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). Compound 2, but not compound 1, prevented EGF-induced activation of EGFR (Tyr1173). When compounds 1 and 2 were combined they synergistically inhibited c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation, and human oral cancer cell proliferation. The present data suggest that the potential anticancer activity of avocado fruits is due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins that target two key components of the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. PMID:21596018

  5. A gene expression signature of RAS pathway dependence predicts response to PI3K and RAS pathway inhibitors and expands the population of RAS pathway activated tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweletz Cloud

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperactivation of the Ras signaling pathway is a driver of many cancers, and RAS pathway activation can predict response to targeted therapies. Therefore, optimal methods for measuring Ras pathway activation are critical. The main focus of our work was to develop a gene expression signature that is predictive of RAS pathway dependence. Methods We used the coherent expression of RAS pathway-related genes across multiple datasets to derive a RAS pathway gene expression signature and generate RAS pathway activation scores in pre-clinical cancer models and human tumors. We then related this signature to KRAS mutation status and drug response data in pre-clinical and clinical datasets. Results The RAS signature score is predictive of KRAS mutation status in lung tumors and cell lines with high (> 90% sensitivity but relatively low (50% specificity due to samples that have apparent RAS pathway activation in the absence of a KRAS mutation. In lung and breast cancer cell line panels, the RAS pathway signature score correlates with pMEK and pERK expression, and predicts resistance to AKT inhibition and sensitivity to MEK inhibition within both KRAS mutant and KRAS wild-type groups. The RAS pathway signature is upregulated in breast cancer cell lines that have acquired resistance to AKT inhibition, and is downregulated by inhibition of MEK. In lung cancer cell lines knockdown of KRAS using siRNA demonstrates that the RAS pathway signature is a better measure of dependence on RAS compared to KRAS mutation status. In human tumors, the RAS pathway signature is elevated in ER negative breast tumors and lung adenocarcinomas, and predicts resistance to cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the RAS pathway signature is superior to KRAS mutation status for the prediction of dependence on RAS signaling, can predict response to PI3K and RAS pathway inhibitors, and is likely to have the most clinical

  6. A gene expression signature of RAS pathway dependence predicts response to PI3K and RAS pathway inhibitors and expands the population of RAS pathway activated tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperactivation of the Ras signaling pathway is a driver of many cancers, and RAS pathway activation can predict response to targeted therapies. Therefore, optimal methods for measuring Ras pathway activation are critical. The main focus of our work was to develop a gene expression signature that is predictive of RAS pathway dependence. Methods We used the coherent expression of RAS pathway-related genes across multiple datasets to derive a RAS pathway gene expression signature and generate RAS pathway activation scores in pre-clinical cancer models and human tumors. We then related this signature to KRAS mutation status and drug response data in pre-clinical and clinical datasets. Results The RAS signature score is predictive of KRAS mutation status in lung tumors and cell lines with high (> 90%) sensitivity but relatively low (50%) specificity due to samples that have apparent RAS pathway activation in the absence of a KRAS mutation. In lung and breast cancer cell line panels, the RAS pathway signature score correlates with pMEK and pERK expression, and predicts resistance to AKT inhibition and sensitivity to MEK inhibition within both KRAS mutant and KRAS wild-type groups. The RAS pathway signature is upregulated in breast cancer cell lines that have acquired resistance to AKT inhibition, and is downregulated by inhibition of MEK. In lung cancer cell lines knockdown of KRAS using siRNA demonstrates that the RAS pathway signature is a better measure of dependence on RAS compared to KRAS mutation status. In human tumors, the RAS pathway signature is elevated in ER negative breast tumors and lung adenocarcinomas, and predicts resistance to cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the RAS pathway signature is superior to KRAS mutation status for the prediction of dependence on RAS signaling, can predict response to PI3K and RAS pathway inhibitors, and is likely to have the most clinical utility in lung and breast

  7. Identifying Neurofibromin-Specific Regulatory Nodes for Therapeutic Targeting in NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    analysis and electron microscopy, as shown in Figure 9. Figure 9. Biophysical characterization of recombinant , full length neurofibromin. Left panel...libraries targeting cancer specific genetic alterations; ii) Identify recurrently mutated genes that regulate oncogenic pathways and drug responses...iii) Produce genetic interaction maps to uncover pathway relationships between candidate drivers. Overlap: None Funding Number: N/A PI

  8. The RAS Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI established the RAS Initiative to explore innovative approaches for attacking the proteins encoded by mutant forms of RAS genes and to ultimately create effective, new therapies for RAS-related cancers.

  9. PEITC inhibits human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cell migration and invasion through the inhibition of uPA, Rho A, and Ras with inhibition of MMP-2, -7 and -9 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain malignancy, and the efficacy of multimodality treatments remains unsatisfactory. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), one member of the isothiocyanate family, was found to inhibit the migration and invasion of many types of human cancer cells. In our previous study, PEITC induced the apoptosis of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the migration and invasion of GBM 8401 cells. PEITC decreased the migration of GBM 8401 cells in a dose-dependent manner as determined from scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. The percentage of inhibition ranged from 46.89 to 15.75%, and from 27.80 to 7.31% after a 48-h treatment of PEITC as determined from the Transwell migration assay and invasion assay, respectively. The western blot analysis indicated that PEITC decreased the levels of proteins associated with migration and invasion, Ras, uPA, RhoA, GRB2, p-p38, p-JNK, p-ERK, p65, SOS1, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that PEITC reduced the mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and RhoA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PEITC exhibited potent anticancer activities through the inhibition of migration and invasion in the GBM 8401 cells. Our findings elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of the anti-metastatic effects of PEITC on human brain glioblastoma cells, and PEITC may be considered as a therapeutic agent.

  10. RasGRP3, a Ras activator, contributes to signaling and the tumorigenic phenotype in human melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luowei; Kedei, Noemi; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E.; Czap, Alexandra; Velasquez, Julia F.; Mihova, Daniela; Michalowski, Aleksandra M.; Yuspa, Stuart H.; Blumberg, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    RasGRP3, an activator for H-Ras, R-Ras and Rap1/2, has emerged as an important mediator of signaling downstream from receptor coupled phosphoinositide turnover in B and T cells. Here, we report that RasGRP3 showed a high level of expression in multiple human melanoma cell lines as well as in a subset of human melanoma tissue samples. Suppression of endogenous RasGRP3 expression in these melanoma cell lines reduced Ras-GTP formation as well as c-Met expression and Akt phosphorylation downstream from HGF or EGF stimulation. RasGRP3 suppression also inhibited cell proliferation and reduced both colony formation in soft agar and xenograft tumor growth in immunodeficient mice, demonstrating the importance of RasGRP3 for the transformed phenotype of the melanoma cells. Reciprocally, overexpression of RasGRP3 in human primary melanocytes altered cellular morphology, markedly enhanced cell proliferation, and rendered the cells tumorigenic in a mouse xenograft model. Suppression of RasGRP3 expression in these cells inhibited downstream RasGRP3 responses and suppressed cell growth, confirming the functional role of RasGRP3 in the altered behavior of these cells. The identification of the role of RasGRP3 in melanoma highlights its importance, as a Ras activator, in the phosphoinositide signaling pathway in human melanoma and provides a new potential therapeutic target. PMID:21602881

  11. Molecular interaction between K-Ras and H-REV107 in the Ras signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang Woo; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2017-09-16

    Ras proteins are small GTPases that serve as master moderators of a large number of signaling pathways involved in various cellular processes. Activating mutations in Ras are found in about one-third of cancers. H-REV107, a K-Ras binding protein, plays an important role in determining K-Ras function. H-REV107 is a member of the HREV107 family of class II tumor suppressor genes and a growth inhibitory Ras target gene that suppresses cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Expression of H-REV107 was strongly reduced in about 50% of human carcinoma cell lines. However, the specific molecular mechanism by which H-REV107 inhibits Ras is still unknown. In the present study, we suggest that H-REV107 forms a strong complex with activating oncogenic mutation Q61H K-Ras from various biochemical binding assays and modeled structures. In addition, the interaction sites between K-Ras and H-REV107 were predicted based on homology modeling. Here, we found that some structure-based mutants of the K-Ras disrupted the complex formation with H-REV107. Finally, a novel molecular mechanism describing K-Ras and H-REV107 binding is suggested and insights into new K-Ras effector target drugs are provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a novel human GAP (GAP1M), GTPase-activating protein of Ras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaowei; Nakamura, Shun; Hattori, Seisuke [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    We have previously isolated a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras GAP), Gapl{sup m}, from rat brain. Gap1{sup m} is considered to be a negative regulator of the Ras signaling pathways, like other Ras GAPs, neurofibromin, which is a gene product of the neurofibromatosis type I gene, and p120GAP. In this study we have isolated a human cDNA of this Gap and mapped the gene. The gene encodes a protein of 853 amino acids that shows 89% sequence identity to rat Gapl{sup m}. The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 by PCR analysis on a panel of human-mouse hybrid cells. FISH analysis refined the location of the gene further to 3q22-q23. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  13. RAS Initiative - Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  14. RAP/RAS workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    : RAP & RAS increases mix stiffness : : Most WMA additives decrease stiffness : : Tear-Off shingles are stiffer than Man-waste shingles : : Using multiple recycled bins improves consistency : : Finer RAS material improves consiste...

  15. About the RAS Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Initiative, a "hub and spoke" model, connects researchers to better understand and target the more than 30% of cancers driven by mutations in RAS genes. Includes oversight and contact information.

  16. RAS Initiative - Community Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through community and technical collaborations, workshops and symposia, and the distribution of reference reagents, the RAS Initiative seeks to increase the sharing of knowledge and resources essential to defeating cancers caused by mutant RAS genes.

  17. Oncogenic K-Ras signals through epidermal growth factor receptor and wild-type H-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Keith A; Voong, K Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D; McKenna, W Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J

    2007-04-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor alpha was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers.

  18. Oncogenic K-Ras Signals through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Wild-Type H-Ras to Promote Radiation Survival in Pancreatic and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Keith A.; Voong, K. Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B.; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor α was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers. PMID:17460778

  19. Oncogenic K-Ras Signals through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Wild-Type H-Ras to Promote Radiation Survival in Pancreatic and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A. Cengel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor o was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFRactivated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers.

  20. The Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway induces autocrine-paracrine growth inhibition via the leukemia inhibitory factor/JAK/STAT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-In; Strock, Christopher J; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2003-01-01

    Sustained activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway can lead to cell cycle arrest in many cell types. We have found, with human medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cells, that activated Ras or c-Raf-1 can induce growth arrest by producing and secreting an autocrine-paracrine factor. This protein was purified from cell culture medium conditioned by Raf-activated MTC cells and was identified by mass spectrometry as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF expression upon Raf activation and subsequent activation of JAK-STAT3 was also observed in small cell lung carcinoma cells, suggesting that this autocrine-paracrine signaling may be a common response to Ras/Raf activation. LIF was sufficient to induce growth arrest and differentiation of MTC cells. This effect was mediated through the gp130/JAK/STAT3 pathway, since anti-gp130 blocking antibody or dominant-negative STAT3 blocked the effects of LIF. Thus, LIF expression provides a novel mechanism allowing Ras/Raf signaling to activate the JAK-STAT3 pathway. In addition to this cell-extrinsic growth inhibitory pathway, we find that the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway induces an intracellular growth inhibitory signal, independent of the LIF/JAK/STAT3 pathway. Therefore, activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway can lead to growth arrest and differentiation via at least two different signaling pathways. This use of multiple pathways may be important for "fail-safe" induction and maintenance of cell cycle arrest.

  1. Constitutive expression of the c-H-ras oncogene inhibits doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and promotes cell survival in a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooter, K.; Boersma, A. W.; Oostrum, R. G.; Burger, H.; Jochemsen, A. G.; Stoter, G.

    1995-01-01

    Drugs used in anti-cancer chemotherapy are thought to exert their cytotoxic action by induction of apoptosis. Genes have been identified which can mediate or modulate this drug-induced apoptosis, among which are c-myc, p53 and bcl-2. Since expression of oncogenic ras genes is a frequent observation in human cancer, we investigated the effects of the c-H-ras oncogene on anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis. Apoptosis induced by a 2 h doxorubicin exposure was measured by in situ nick translation and flow cytometry in a rat cell line (R2T24) stably transfected with the c-H-ras oncogene and in a control cell line (R2NEO) transfected only with the antibiotic resistance gene neo. Both cell lines (R2T24 and R2NEO) had nearly identical growth characteristics, including cell doubling time, distribution over the cell cycle phases and plating efficiency in soft agar. Doxorubicin exposure of the R2NEO cells led to massive induction of apoptosis. In contrast, R2T24 cells, expressing the c-H-ras oncogene, showed significantly less apoptosis after doxorubicin incubation. Doxorubicin induced approximately 3- to 5-fold less cytotoxicity in the R2T24 cells than in the R2NEO cells, as determined by clonogenic assay in soft agar. No difference was observed in intracellular doxorubicin accumulation between the two cell lines, indicating that the classical, P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance phenotype is not involved in the observed differences in drug sensitivity. In conclusion, our data show that constitutive expression of the c-H-ras oncogene suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and promotes cell survival, suggesting that human tumours with ras oncogene expression might be less susceptible to doxorubicin treatment. PMID:7880739

  2. XRP44X, an Inhibitor of Ras/Erk Activation of the Transcription Factor Elk3, Inhibits Tumour Growth and Metastasis in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semenchenko, K.; Wasylyk, C.; Cheung, H.; Tourrette, Y.; Maas, P.; Schalken, J.A.; Pluijm, G. van der; Wasylyk, B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors have an important role in cancer but are difficult targets for the development of tumour therapies. These factors include the Ets family, and in this study Elk3 that is activated by Ras oncogene /Erk signalling, and is involved in angiogenesis, malignant progression and

  3. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S.; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26260012

  4. NF1 regulation of RAS/ERK signaling is required for appropriate granule neuron progenitor expansion and migration in cerebellar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Cho, Woosung; Nazarenko, Inga; Mo, Wei; Chen, Jian; Parada, Luis F

    2014-11-01

    Cerebellar development is regulated by a coordinated spatiotemporal interplay between granule neuron progenitors (GNPs), Purkinje neurons, and glia. Abnormal development can trigger motor deficits, and more recent data indicate important roles in aspects of memory, behavior, and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Germline mutation in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene underlies Neurofibromatosis type 1, a complex disease that enhances susceptibility to certain cancers and neurological disorders, including intellectual deficits and ASD. The NF1 gene encodes for neurofibromin, a RAS GTPase-activating protein, and thus negatively regulates the RAS signaling pathway. Here, using mouse models to direct conditional NF1 ablation in either embryonic cerebellar progenitors or neonatal GNPs, we show that neurofibromin is required for appropriate development of cerebellar folia layering and structure. Remarkably, neonatal administration of inhibitors of the ERK pathway reversed the morphological defects. Thus, our findings establish a critical cell-autonomous role for the NF1-RAS-ERK pathway in the appropriate regulation of cerebellar development and provide a basis for using neonatal ERK inhibitor-based therapies to treat NF1-induced cerebellar disorders. © 2014 Sanchez-Ortiz et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Hippocampal dysregulation of neurofibromin-dependent pathways is associated with impaired spatial learning in engrailed 2 knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Pangrazzi, Luca; Poli, Andrea; Pernigo, Mattia; Sgadò, Paola; Genovesi, Sacha; Zunino, Giulia; Berardi, Nicoletta; Casarosa, Simona; Bozzi, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies indicated the homeobox-containing transcription factor Engrailed-2 (En2) as a candidate gene for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Accordingly, En2 knock-out (En2(-/-)) mice show anatomical and behavioral "ASD-like" features, including decreased sociability and learning deficits. The molecular pathways underlying these deficits in En2(-/-) mice are not known. Deficits in signaling pathways involving neurofibromin and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) have been associated with impaired learning. Here we investigated the neurofibromin-ERK cascade in the hippocampus of wild-type (WT) and En2(-/-) mice before and after spatial learning testing. When compared with WT littermates, En2(-/-) mice showed impaired performance in the Morris water maze (MWM), which was accompanied by lower expression of the activity-dependent gene Arc. Quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry experiments showed a marked downregulation of neurofibromin expression in the dentate gyrus of both naive and MWM-treated En2(-/-) mice. ERK phosphorylation, known to be induced in the presence of neurofibromin deficiency, was increased in the dentate gyrus of En2(-/-) mice after MWM. Treatment of En2(-/-) mice with lovastatin, an indirect inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation, markedly reduced ERK phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus, but was unable to rescue learning deficits in MWM-trained mutant mice. Further investigation is needed to unravel the complex molecular mechanisms linking dysregulation of neurofibromin-dependent pathways to spatial learning deficits in the En2 mouse model of ASD. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413281-08$15.00/0.

  6. DA-Raf–dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells controls alveolar formation

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Sakamoto, Akemi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Alveoli participating in gas exchange are essential for maintaining life in air-breathing vertebrates. In developing lungs, alveolar myofibroblasts (AMYFs) cause morphological changes of interalveolar walls and consequently generate alveoli. Although the Ras-ERK signaling pathway is known to regulate alveolar formation, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying its role remain largely obscure. Here, we clarified a critical role of DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf)—a dominant-negative antagonist of the ...

  7. H-Ras Exerts Opposing Effects on Type I Interferon Responses Depending on Its Activation Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guann-An; Lin, Yun-Ru; Chung, Hai-Ting; Hwang, Lih-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Using shRNA high-throughput screening, we identified H-Ras as a regulator of antiviral activity, whose depletion could enhance Sindbis virus replication. Further analyses indicated that depletion of H-Ras results in a robust increase in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and a decrease in Sendai virus (SeV)-induced retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling. Interestingly, however, ectopic expression of wild-type H-Ras results in a biphasic mode of RLR signaling regulation: while low-level expression of H-Ras enhances SeV-induced RLR signaling, high-level expression of H-Ras significantly inhibits this signaling. The inhibitory effects correlate with the activation status of H-Ras. As a result, oncogenic H-Ras, H-RasV12, strongly inhibits SeV-induced IFN-β promoter activity and type I interferon signaling. Conversely, the positive effects exerted by H-Ras on RLR signaling are independent of its signaling activity, as a constitutively inactive form of H-Ras, H-RasN17, also positively regulates RLR signaling. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that depletion of H-Ras reduces the formation of MAVS-TNF receptor-associated factor 3 signaling complexes. These results reveal that the H-Ras protein plays a role in promoting MAVS signalosome assembly in the mitochondria, whereas oncogenic H-Ras exerts a negative effect on type I IFN responses.

  8. Ras activation by SOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen

    2014-01-01

    SOS molecules catalyzing nucleotide exchange in H-Ras. Single-molecule kinetic traces revealed that SOS samples a broad distribution of turnover rates through stochastic fluctuations between distinct, long-lived (more than 100 seconds), functional states. The expected allosteric activation of SOS...... by Ras-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was conspicuously absent in the mean rate. However, fluctuations into highly active states were modulated by Ras-GTP. This reveals a mechanism in which functional output may be determined by the dynamical spectrum of rates sampled by a small number of enzymes, rather......Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual...

  9. Differential involvement of Ras-GRF1 and Ras-GRF2 in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bido, Simone; Solari, Nicola; Indrigo, Marzia; D’Antoni, Angela; Brambilla, Riccardo; Morari, Michele; Fasano, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    therapy based on Ras-ERK signaling inhibition in the striatum. PMID:26125041

  10. Transcriptional regulation of the interleukin-11 gene by oncogenic Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soon Young; Choi, Chan; Lee, Hong Ghi; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han

    2012-12-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11), which belongs to a class of IL6-type cytokines, plays an important role in inflammation, motility and invasion in cancer. The ras mutation is frequently found in human cancer, but little is known regarding the transcriptional activation of the IL-11 gene by the Ras signal pathway in tumour cells. In this study, we investigated the role of Ras in the regulation of IL-11 using two different cell model systems: mouse NIH3T3 cells over-expressing oncogenic Ras with a tet-on system and Capan-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cells harbouring a K-ras mutation. We found that IL-11 expression was up-regulated at the transcriptional level by oncogenic Ras. Activation of the AP-1 response element, located between -153 and -30 in the 5'-regulatory region of the IL-11 gene, was necessary for oncogenic Ras-induced IL-11 promoter activation. AP-1 proteins, including Fra-1 and Fra-2, were up-regulated through the Raf/MEK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways by oncogenic Ras. Knockdown of Fra-1 by siRNA in NIH3T3 or Capan-1 cells strongly attenuated oncogenic Ras-induced IL-11 expression. Additionally, inhibition of JNK, p38 and Stat3 abrogated oncogenic Ras-induced IL-11 expression. These results suggest that both the PI3K and Raf pathways are necessary for the expression of IL-11 in oncogenic Ras-mutated cells, and that JNK, p38 and Stat3 also contribute to oncogenic Ras-induced IL-11 expression.

  11. Functional Specificity of Ras Isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Esther; Santos, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    H-ras, N-ras, and K-ras are canonical ras gene family members frequently activated by point mutation in human cancers and coding for 4 different, highly related protein isoforms (H-Ras, N-Ras, K-Ras4A, and K-Ras4B). Their expression is nearly ubiquitous and broadly conserved across eukaryotic species, although there are quantitative and qualitative differences of expression depending on the tissue and/or developmental stage under consideration. Extensive functional studies have determined during the last quarter century that these Ras gene products are critical components of signaling pathways that control eukaryotic cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. However, because of their homology and frequent coexpression in various cellular contexts, it remained unclear whether the different Ras proteins play specific or overlapping functional roles in physiological and pathological processes. Initially, their high degree of sequence homology and the observation that all Ras isoforms share common sets of downstream effectors and upstream activators suggested that they were mostly redundant functionally. In contrast, the notion of functional specificity for each of the different Ras isoforms is supported at present by an increasing body of experimental observations, including 1) the fact that different ras isoforms are preferentially mutated in specific types of tumors or developmental disorders; 2) the different transforming potential of transfected ras genes in different cell contexts; 3) the distinct sensitivities exhibited by the various Ras family members for modulation by different GAPs or GEFs; 4) the demonstration that different Ras isoforms follow distinct intracellular processing pathways and localize to different membrane microdomains or subcellular compartments; 5) the different phenotypes displayed by genetically modified animal strains for each of the 3 ras loci; and 6) the specific transcriptional networks controlled by each isoform in different

  12. Ras signalling regulates differentiation and UCP1 expression in models of brown adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murholm, Maria; Dixen, Karen; Hansen, Jacob B

    2010-01-01

    on two unrelated models of mouse brown adipocyte differentiation. RESULTS: A constitutively active H-Ras mutant (Ras V12) caused a complete block of adipose conversion, as manifested by a lack of both lipid accumulation and induction of adipocyte gene expression. The Ras V12-mediated impediment...... mutant (Ras N17) did not inhibit differentiation, but led to increased expression of genes important for energy dissipation in brown fat cells, including UCP1. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that the intensity of Ras signalling is important for differentiation and UCP1 expression in models......BACKGROUND: The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway has been recognised as an important signalling module in adipogenesis and adipocyte function, but whether it promotes or inhibits the formation of fat cells has not been reconciled. METHODS: Here we investigate the significance of Ras signalling intensity...

  13. Wild-type H- and N-Ras promote mutant K-Ras driven tumorigenesis by modulating the DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabocka, Elda; Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Jones, Mathew JK; Lubkov, Veronica; Yemanaberhan, Eyoel; Taylor, Laura; Jeng, Hao Hsuan; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in KRAS are prevalent in human cancers and universally predictive of resistance to anti-cancer therapeutics. Although it is widely accepted that acquisition of an activating mutation endows RAS genes with functional autonomy, recent studies suggest that the wild-type forms of Ras may contribute to mutant Ras-driven tumorigenesis. Here we show that downregulation of wild-type H-Ras or N-Ras in mutant K-Ras cancer cells leads to hyperactivation of the Erk/p90RSK and PI3K/Akt pathways, and consequently, the phosphorylation of Chk1 at an inhibitory site, Ser 280. The resulting inhibition of ATR/Chk1 signaling abrogates the activation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint and confers specific sensitization of mutant K-Ras cancer cells to DNA damage chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24525237

  14. K‑ras gene mutation as a predictor of cancer cell responsiveness to metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu; Guo, Fu-Chun; Wang, Wei; Shi, Hua-Shan; Li, Dan; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    An increasing number of studies support the use of metformin, a common antidiabetic drug, as a novel anticancer therapeutic. However, its mechanism of action has yet to be identified. In the current study, metformin was observed to effectively inhibit the growth of the K-ras mutant but not wild-type tumors in vivo. The antitumor effects of metformin were mediated by the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in vivo. In addition, metformin induced apoptosis in the K-ras mutant tumors, A549 and PANC-1, but not in the K-ras wild-type tumor, A431, in vitro. Similarly, at lower concentrations, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in the K-ras mutant, but not in the K-ras wild-type tumor cells in vitro. These observations indicate that tumors with K-ras mutations are sensitive to metformin therapy. In addition, metformin significantly arrested K-ras mutant and wild-type tumor cells in G1 phase in vitro and metformin downregulated two important downstream effectors of the Ras signaling pathway in K-ras mutant tumors. Metformin was concluded to function as a potential K-ras-targeting agent that has potential for cancer therapy.

  15. Oncogenic Ras stimulates Eiger/TNF exocytosis to promote growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabu, Chiswili; Xu, Tian

    2014-12-01

    Oncogenic mutations in Ras deregulate cell death and proliferation to cause cancer in a significant number of patients. Although normal Ras signaling during development has been well elucidated in multiple organisms, it is less clear how oncogenic Ras exerts its effects. Furthermore, cancers with oncogenic Ras mutations are aggressive and generally resistant to targeted therapies or chemotherapy. We identified the exocytosis component Sec15 as a synthetic suppressor of oncogenic Ras in an in vivo Drosophila mosaic screen. We found that oncogenic Ras elevates exocytosis and promotes the export of the pro-apoptotic ligand Eiger (Drosophila TNF). This blocks tumor cell death and stimulates overgrowth by activating the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signal from the neighboring wild-type cells. Inhibition of Eiger/TNF exocytosis or interfering with the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signaling at various steps suppresses oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth. Our findings highlight important cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic roles of exocytosis during oncogenic growth and provide a new class of synthetic suppressors for targeted therapy approaches. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Brahma-related gene 1 inhibits proliferation and migration of human aortic smooth muscle cells by directly up-regulating Ras-related associated with diabetes in the pathophysiologic processes of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Lin; Tan, Meng-Wei; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Guo-Kun; Wang, Chong; Tang, Hao; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms of Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1) involvement in the pathophysiologic processes of aortic dissection. Seventeen dissecting, 4 dilated, and 10 healthy human aorta samples were collected. Expression of Brg1 in the medium of aorta was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. The regulation effect of Brg1 on proliferation and migration of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) was analyzed in 3 ways: using cell counting, a migration chamber, and a wound scratch assay. A polymerase chain reaction array was used for screening potential target genes of Brg1. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was adopted for direct deoxyribonucleic acid-protein binding detection. Expression levels of Brg1 were increased in aortic dissection and aortic dilation patients. In vitro results indicated that overexpression of Brg1 inhibited proliferation and migration of HASMCs. The candidate proliferation- and migration-related Brg1 target gene found was Ras-related associated with diabetes (RRAD), expression levels of which were enhanced in dissecting aortic specimens. The direct regulation effect of Brg1 on RRAD was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay results. Furthermore, down-regulating RRAD significantly alleviated the suppression effects of Brg1 on proliferation and migration of HASMCs. Our study illustrated that Brg1 inhibited the proliferation and migration capacity of HASMCs, via the mechanism of direct up-regulation of RRAD, thus playing an important role in the pathophysiologic processes of aortic dissection. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ras- ERK signaling in behavior: old questions and new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eFasano

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of Ras-ERK signaling in behavioral plasticity is well established. Inhibition studies using the blood-brain barrier permeable drug SL327 have conclusively demonstrated that this neuronal cell signaling cascade is a crucial component of the synaptic machinery implicated in the formation of various forms of long-term memory, from spatial learning to fear and operant conditioning. However, abnormal Ras-ERK signaling has also been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric conditions, including mental retardation syndromes (RASopathies, drug addiction and L-DOPA induced Dyskinesia (LID. The work recently done on these brain disorders has pointed to previously underappreciated roles of Ras-ERK in specific subsets of neurons, like GABAergic interneurons of the hippocampus or the cortex, as well as in the medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Here we will highlight the open questions related to Ras-ERK signaling in these behavioral manifestations and propose crucial experiments for the future.

  18. Essential role of Cdc42 in Ras-induced transformation revealed by gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Kristy R; Zheng, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The ras proto-oncogene is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. However, given the prevalence of activating mutations in Ras and its association with aggressive forms of cancer, attempts to therapeutically target aberrant Ras signaling have been largely disappointing. This lack of progress highlights the deficiency in our understanding of cellular pathways required for Ras-mediated tumorigenesis and suggests the importance of identifying new molecular pathways associated with Ras-driven malignancies. Cdc42 is a Ras-related small GTPase that is known to play roles in oncogenic processes such as cell growth, survival, invasion, and migration. A pan-dominant negative mutant overexpression approach to suppress Cdc42 and related pathways has previously shown a requirement for Cdc42 in Ras-induced anchorage-independent cell growth, however the lack of specificity of such approaches make it difficult to determine if effects are directly related to changes in Cdc42 activity or other Rho family members. Therefore, in order to directly and unambiguously address the role of Cdc42 in Ras-mediated transformation, tumor formation and maintenance, we have developed a model of conditional cdc42 gene in Ras-transformed cells. Loss of Cdc42 drastically alters the cell morphology and inhibits proliferation, cell cycle progression and tumorigenicity of Ras-transformed cells, while non-transformed cells or c-Myc transformed cells are largely unaffected. The loss of Cdc42 in Ras-transformed cells results in reduced Akt signaling, restoration of which could partially rescues the proliferation defects associated with Cdc42 loss. Moreover, disruption of Cdc42 function in established tumors inhibited continued tumor growth. These studies implicate Cdc42 in Ras-driven tumor growth and suggest that targeting Cdc42 is beneficial in Ras-mediated malignancies.

  19. Targeting Ras signaling in AML: RALB is a small GTPase with big potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Emily J; Eckfeldt, Craig E

    2017-07-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating malignancy for which novel treatment approaches are desperately needed. Ras signaling is an attractive therapeutic target for AML because a large proportion of AMLs have mutations in NRAS, KRAS, or genes that activate Ras signaling, and key Ras effectors are activated in virtually all AML patient samples. This has inspired efforts to develop Ras-targeted treatment strategies for AML. Due to the inherent difficulty and disappointing efficacy of targeting Ras proteins directly, many have focused on inhibiting Ras effector pathways. Inhibiting the major oncogenic Ras effectors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and/or phosphatidylinositiol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, has generally demonstrated modest efficacy for AML. While this may be in part related to functional redundancy between these pathways, it is now clear that other Ras effectors have key oncogenic roles. Specifically, the Ras-like (Ral) GTPases have emerged as critical mediators of Ras-driven transformation and AML cell survival. Our group recently uncovered a critical role for RALB signaling in leukemic cell survival and a potential mediator of relapse following Ras-targeted therapy in AML. Furthermore, we found that RALB signaling is hyperactivated in AML patient samples, and inhibiting RALB has potent anti-leukemic activity in preclinical AML models. While key questions remain regarding the importance of RALB signaling across the genetically diverse spectrum of AML, the specific mechanism(s) that promotes leukemic cell survival downstream of RALB, and how to pharmacologically target RALB signaling effectively - RALB has emerged as a critical Ras effector and potential therapeutic target for AML.

  20. Oncogenic RAS directs silencing of tumor suppressor genes through ordered recruitment of transcriptional repressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajapeyee, Narendra; Malonia, Sunil K; Palakurthy, Rajendra K; Green, Michael R

    2013-10-15

    We previously identified 28 cofactors through which a RAS oncoprotein directs transcriptional silencing of Fas and other tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Here we performed RNAi-based epistasis experiments and found that RAS-directed silencing occurs through a highly ordered pathway that is initiated by binding of ZFP354B, a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, and culminates in recruitment of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. RNAi and pharmacological inhibition experiments reveal that silencing requires continuous function of RAS and its cofactors and can be rapidly reversed, which may have therapeutic implications for reactivation of silenced TSGs in RAS-positive cancers.

  1. EGFR/ARF6 regulation of Hh signalling stimulates oncogenic Ras tumour overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabu, Chiswili; Li, Da-Ming; Xu, Tian

    2017-03-10

    Multiple signalling events interact in cancer cells. Oncogenic Ras cooperates with Egfr, which cannot be explained by the canonical signalling paradigm. In turn, Egfr cooperates with Hedgehog signalling. How oncogenic Ras elicits and integrates Egfr and Hedgehog signals to drive overgrowth remains unclear. Using a Drosophila tumour model, we show that Egfr cooperates with oncogenic Ras via Arf6, which functions as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. Oncogenic Ras induces the expression of Egfr ligands. Egfr then signals through Arf6, which regulates Hh transport to promote Hh signalling. Blocking any step of this signalling cascade inhibits Hh signalling and correspondingly suppresses the growth of both, fly and human cancer cells harbouring oncogenic Ras mutations. These findings highlight a non-canonical Egfr signalling mechanism, centered on Arf6 as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. This explains both, the puzzling requirement of Egfr in oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth and the cooperation between Egfr and Hedgehog.

  2. Activating Ras mutations fail to ensure efficient replication of adenovirus mutants lacking VA-RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schümann, Michael; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses lacking their PKR-antagonizing VA RNAs replicate poorly in primary cells. It has been suggested that these virus recombinants still replicate efficiently in tumor cells with Ras mutations and might therefore be useful in tumor therapy. The ability of interferon-sensitive viruses......-less viruses replicated with higher efficiency in Ras-mutant cells, as compared to cell lines without Ras mutation. However, several exceptions to this rule were observed, arguing against a direct inhibition of PKR by mutant Ras. Phosphorylation of the PKR-substrate eIF2alpha was observed regardless of the Ras...... the oncolytic effect of interferon-sensitive viruses. We propose that Ras mutations predispose tumor cells to undergo secondary changes that sometimes enable the replication of interferon-sensitive viruses....

  3. The Role of the Neurofibromin-Syndecan-Cask Complex in the Regulation of Synlaptic RAS-MAPK Signaling and Denoritic Spine Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    in NF1. VI. References Ahmadian, M. R., Hoffmann, U., Goody , R. S., and Wittinghofer, A. (1997). Individual rate constants for the...G. G., Stern, J., Ohno, M., Kucherlapati, R., Jacks , T., and Silva, A. J. (2002). Mechanism for the learning deficits in a mouse model of

  4. Induction of postmitotic neuroretina cell proliferation by distinct Ras downstream signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyssonnaux, C; Provot, S; Felder-Schmittbuhl, M P; Calothy, G; Eychène, A

    2000-10-01

    Ras-induced cell transformation is mediated through distinct downstream signaling pathways, including Raf, Ral-GEFs-, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-dependent pathways. In some cell types, strong activation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade leads to cell cycle arrest rather than cell division. We previously reported that constitutive activation of this pathway induces sustained proliferation of primary cultures of postmitotic chicken neuroretina (NR) cells. We used this model system to investigate the respective contributions of Ras downstream signaling pathways in Ras-induced cell proliferation. Three RasV12 mutants (S35, G37, and C40) which differ by their ability to bind to Ras effectors (Raf, Ral-GEFs, and the p110 subunit of PI 3-kinase, respectively) were able to induce sustained NR cell proliferation, although none of these mutants was reported to transform NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, they all repressed the promoter of QR1, a neuroretina growth arrest-specific gene. Overexpression of B-Raf or activated versions of Ras effectors Rlf-CAAX and p110-CAAX also induced NR cell division. The mitogenic effect of the RasC40-PI 3-kinase pathway appears to involve Rac and RhoA GTPases but not the antiapoptotic Akt (protein kinase B) signaling. Division induced by RasG37-Rlf appears to be independent of Ral GTPase activation and presumably requires an unidentified mechanism. Activation of either Ras downstream pathway resulted in ERK activation, and coexpression of a dominant negative MEK mutant or mKsr-1 kinase domain strongly inhibited proliferation induced by the three Ras mutants or by their effectors. Similar effects were observed with dominant negative mutants of Rac and Rho. Thus, both the Raf-MEK-ERK and Rac-Rho pathways are absolutely required for Ras-induced NR cell division. Activation of these two pathways by the three distinct Ras downstream effectors possibly relies on an autocrine or paracrine loop

  5. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  6. Epac activation sensitizes rat sensory neurons through activation of Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Behzad; Thompson, Eric L; Nicol, Grant D; Vasko, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) have emerged as important signaling molecules mediating persistent hypersensitivity in animal models of inflammation, by augmenting the excitability of sensory neurons. Although Epacs activate numerous downstream signaling cascades, the intracellular signaling which mediates Epac-induced sensitization of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that selective activation of Epacs with 8-CPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM (8CPT-AM) increases the number of action potentials (APs) generated by a ramp of depolarizing current and augments the evoked release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from isolated rat sensory neurons. Internal perfusion of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons with GDP-βS, substituted for GTP, blocks the ability of 8CPT-AM to increase AP firing, demonstrating that Epac-induced sensitization is G-protein dependent. Treatment with 8CPT-AM activates the small G-proteins Rap1 and Ras in cultures of sensory neurons. Inhibition of Rap1, by internal perfusion of a Rap1-neutralizing antibody or through a reduction in the expression of the protein using shRNA does not alter the Epac-induced enhancement of AP generation or CGRP release, despite the fact that in most other cell types, Epacs act as Rap-GEFs. In contrast, inhibition of Ras through expression of a dominant negative Ras (DN-Ras) or through internal perfusion of a Ras-neutralizing antibody blocks the increase in AP firing and attenuates the increase in the evoked release of CGRP induced by Epac activation. Thus, in this subpopulation of nociceptive sensory neurons, it is the novel interplay between Epacs and Ras, rather than the canonical Epacs and Rap1 pathway, that is critical for mediating Epac-induced sensitization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epac activation sensitizes rat sensory neurons via activation of Ras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Behzad; Thompson, Eric L.; Nicol, Grant D.; Vasko, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) have emerged as important signaling molecules mediating persistent hypersensitivity in animal models of inflammation, by augmenting the excitability of sensory neurons. Although Epacs activate numerous downstream signaling cascades, the intracellular signaling which mediates Epac-induced sensitization of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that selective activation of Epacs with 8-CPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP-AM (8CPT-AM) increases the number of action potentials (APs) generated by a ramp of depolarizing current and augments the evoked release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from isolated rat sensory neurons. Internal perfusion of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons with GDP-βS, substituted for GTP, blocks the ability of 8CPT-AM to increase AP firing, demonstrating that Epac-induced sensitization is G-protein dependent. Treatment with 8CPT-AM activates the small G-proteins Rap1 and Ras in cultures of sensory neurons. Inhibition of Rap1, by internal perfusion of a Rap1-neutralizing antibody or through a reduction in the expression of the protein using shRNA does not alter the Epac-induced enhancement of AP generation or CGRP release, despite the fact that in most other cell types, Epacs act as Rap-GEFs. In contrast, inhibition of Ras through expression of a dominant negative Ras (DN-Ras) or through internal perfusion of a Ras-neutralizing antibody blocks the increase in AP firing and attenuates the increase in the evoked release of CGRP induced by Epac activation. Thus, in this subpopulation of nociceptive sensory neurons, it is the novel interplay between Epacs and Ras, rather than the canonical Epacs and Rap1 pathway, that is critical for mediating Epac-induced sensitization. PMID:26596174

  8. Neurofibromin C terminus-specific antibody (clone NFC) is a valuable tool for the identification of NF1-inactivated GISTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sabrina; Gasparotto, Daniela; Cacciatore, Matilde; Sbaraglia, Marta; Mondello, Alessia; Polano, Maurizio; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Gronchi, Alessandro; Reuss, David E; von Deimling, Andreas; Maestro, Roberta; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo

    2017-09-01

    An increasing body of evidence supports the involvement of NF1 mutations, constitutional or somatic, in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Due to the large size of the NF1 locus, the existence of multiple pseudogenes and the wide spectrum of mechanisms of gene inactivation, the analysis of NF1 gene status is still challenging for most laboratories. Here we sought to assess the efficacy of a recently developed neurofibromin-specific antibody (NFC) in detecting NF1-inactivated GISTs. NFC reactivity was analyzed in a series of 98 GISTs. Of these, 29 were 'NF1-associated' (17 with ascertained NF1 mutations and 12 arising in the context of clinically diagnosed Neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome and thus considered bona fine NF1 inactivated); 38 were 'NF1-unrelated' (either wild-type or carrying non-pathogenic variants of NF1). Thirty-one additional GISTs with no available information on NF1 gene status or with NF1 gene variants of uncertain pathogenic significance were also included in the analysis. Cases were scored as NFC negative when, in the presence of NFC positive internal controls, no cytoplasmic staining was detected in the neoplastic cells. NFC immunoreactivity was lost in 24/29 (83%) NF1-associated GISTs as opposed to only 2/38 (5%) NF1-unrelated GISTs (P=3e-11). NFC staining loss significantly correlated (P=0.007) with the presence of biallelic NF1 inactivation, due essentially to large deletions or truncating mutations. NFC reactivity was instead retained in two cases in which the NF1 alteration was heterozygous and in one case where the pathogenic NF1 variant, although homo/hemizygous, was a missense mutation predicted not to affect neurofibromin half-life. Overall this study provides evidence that NFC is a valuable tool for identifying NF1-inactivated GISTs, thus serving as a surrogate for molecular analysis.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 1 September 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.105.

  9. Prevention of atrial fibrillation by Renin-Angiotensin system inhibition a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Markus; Hua, Tsushung A; Böhm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The authors reviewed published clinical trial data on the effects of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibition for the prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF), aiming to define when RAS inhibition is most effective....

  10. Induction of Ras by SAF-1/MAZ through a feed-forward loop promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alpana; Ray, Bimal K

    2015-01-01

    In the majority of breast cancers, overexpression and hyperactivation of Ras in the tumor microenvironment play significant role in promoting cancer cell growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We have previously shown that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in triple negative breast cancer cells is regulated, at least in part, by SAF-1 (serum amyloid A activating factor 1) transcription factor. In this study we show that transformation of normal MCF-10A breast epithelial cells by constitutively active, oncogenic Ras, induces the DNA-binding activity and transcription function of SAF-1. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of MEK/MAPK-signaling pathway prevents Ras-mediated activation of SAF-1. Interestingly, silencing of SAF-1 expression in breast cancer cells by SAF-1-specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) significantly reduced H-Ras and K-Ras mRNA level. We show that SAF-1 is a direct transcriptional regulator of H-Ras and K-Ras and overexpression of SAF-1 increases H-Ras and K-Ras gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses demonstrated in vivo interaction of SAF-1 at highly purine-rich sequences present at the proximal promoter region, upstream of the transcription start site, in H-Ras and K-Ras genes. Previous studies have shown that these sequences are nuclease hypersensitive and capable of forming G4 quadruplex structure. Together, our results show the presence of a novel transactivating loop, in which, Ras and SAF-1 are interconnected. These findings will help defining molecular mechanisms of abnormal overexpression of Ras in breast tumors, which seldom show genetic Ras mutations. PMID:25449683

  11. Identification of Mutant K-Ras-dependent Phenotypes Using a Panel of Isogenic Cell Lines*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Steffan; Bentley, Carolyn; Brauer, Matthew J.; Li, Li; Shirasawa, Senji; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Kim, Jung-Sik; Haverty, Pete; Stawiski, Eric; Modrusan, Zora; Waldman, Todd; Stokoe, David

    2013-01-01

    To assess the consequences of endogenous mutant K-Ras, we analyzed the signaling and biological properties of a small panel of isogenic cell lines. These include the cancer cell lines DLD1, HCT116, and Hec1A, in which either the WT or mutant K-ras allele has been disrupted, and SW48 colorectal cancer cells and human mammary epithelial cells in which a single copy of mutant K-ras was introduced at its endogenous genomic locus. We find that single copy mutant K-Ras causes surprisingly modest activation of downstream signaling to ERK and Akt. In contrast, a negative feedback signaling loop to EGFR and N-Ras occurs in some, but not all, of these cell lines. Mutant K-Ras also had relatively minor effects on cell proliferation and cell migration but more dramatic effects on cell transformation as assessed by growth in soft agar. Surprisingly, knock-out of the wild type K-ras allele consistently increased growth in soft agar, suggesting tumor-suppressive properties of this gene under these conditions. Finally, we examined the effects of single copy mutant K-Ras on global gene expression. Although transcriptional programs triggered by mutant K-Ras were generally quite distinct in the different cell lines, there was a small number of genes that were consistently overexpressed, and these could be used to monitor K-Ras inhibition in a panel of human tumor cell lines. We conclude that there are conserved components of mutant K-Ras signaling and phenotypes but that many depend on cell context and environmental cues. PMID:23188824

  12. Sprouty2 attenuates epidermal growth factor receptor ubiquitylation and endocytosis, and consequently enhances Ras/ERK signalling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Esther Sook Miin; Fong, Chee Wai; Yusoff, Permeen; Guy, Graeme R; Langdon, Wallace Y; Low, Boon Chuan; Lim, Jormay

    2002-01-01

    ... of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), where it acts to attenuate downstream signalling. Casci . (1999) identified dSpry to be an intracellular protein that interacts in vitro with Drk ( Drosophila homologue of Grb2) and Gap‐1, a Ras GTPase‐activating protein, to potentially inhibit Ras signalling. Currently, four mammalian genes ha...

  13. Regulation of p21ras activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowy, D R; Zhang, K; DeClue, J E

    1992-01-01

    The ras genes encode GTP/GDP-binding proteins that participate in mediating mitogenic signals from membrane tyrosine kinases to downstream targets. The activity of p21ras is determined by the concentration of GTP-p21ras, which is tightly regulated by a complex array of positive and negative control...

  14. Specificity in Ras and Rap signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.H.; Bos, Johannes L.

    2009-01-01

    Ras and Rap proteins are closely related small GTPases. Whereas Ras is known for its role in cell proliferation and survival, Rap1 is predominantly involved in cell adhesion and cell junction formation. Ras and Rap are regulated by different sets of guanine nucleotide exchange factors and

  15. Gene therapy of pancreatic cancer targeting the K-Ras oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiansky, V; Naumov, I; Shapira, S; Kazanov, D; Starr, A; Arber, N; Kraus, S

    2012-12-01

    Ras mutations are present in ∼95% of pancreatic cancer (PC) cases leading to increased proliferation and apoptosis resistance. The aim of this study is to selectively kill Ras-transformed cells by overexpressing the pro-apoptotic protein, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) under a Ras-responsive promoter. Colo357, Panc1 and MiaPaca, PC cell lines harboring K-Ras mutations, normal rat IEC18 enterocytes, and their K-Ras transformed R1 counterparts, were tested. We constructed adenoviral vectors containing the PUMA gene downstream to: (1) Four or five repetitive Ras-responsive elements (Ad-PY4/PY5-PUMA) and (2) a negative control (Ad-SV40-PUMA). Cell viability was estimated by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and apoptosis was evaluated by FACS. In vivo potency of the adenoviruses was evaluated in athymic nude mice. Infection with Ad-PY4/PY5-PUMA markedly inhibited cell growth (∼40-50%), and apoptosis was detected in all cells with high Ras activity, whereas IEC18 cells remained unaffected. The control vector, Ad-SV40-PUMA, did not induce any cell death. Selective and high expression of PUMA was detected in Ad-PY4-PUMA-infected cells. In vivo, Ad-PY4-PUMA inhibited by ∼35% the growth of established tumors compared with the Ad-SV40-PUMA. Selective overexpression of PUMA efficiently inhibits the growth of Ras-transformed cells while sparing the normal ones. This treatment modality may become a useful, effective and safe approach to selectively target Ras-mutated tumor cells.

  16. Ras in Cancer and Developmental Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Medarde, Alberto; Santos, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Somatic, gain-of-function mutations in ras genes were the first specific genetic alterations identified in human cancer about 3 decades ago. Studies during the last quarter century have characterized the Ras proteins as essential components of signaling networks controlling cellular proliferation, differentiation, or survival. The oncogenic mutations of the H-ras, N-ras, or K-ras genes frequently found in human tumors are known to throw off balance the normal outcome of those signaling pathways, thus leading to tumor development. Oncogenic mutations in a number of other upstream or downstream components of Ras signaling pathways (including membrane RTKs or cytosolic kinases) have been detected more recently in association with a variety of cancers. Interestingly, the oncogenic Ras mutations and the mutations in other components of Ras/MAPK signaling pathways appear to be mutually exclusive events in most tumors, indicating that deregulation of Ras-dependent signaling is the essential requirement for tumorigenesis. In contrast to sporadic tumors, separate studies have identified germline mutations in Ras and various other components of Ras signaling pathways that occur in specific association with a number of different familial, developmental syndromes frequently sharing common phenotypic cardiofaciocutaneous features. Finally, even without being a causative force, defective Ras signaling has been cited as a contributing factor to many other human illnesses, including diabetes and immunological and inflammatory disorders. We aim this review at summarizing and updating current knowledge on the contribution of Ras mutations and altered Ras signaling to development of various tumoral and nontumoral pathologies. PMID:21779504

  17. Global gene analysis identifying genes commonly regulated by the Ras/Raf/MEK and type I IFN pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Y; Hirasawa, K; Christian, S L

    2015-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses exploit alterations in cancer cells to specifically infect cancer cells but not normal healthy cells. Previous work has shown that oncogenic Ras interferes with interferon (IFN) signaling to promote viral replication. Furthermore, inhibition of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway at the level of Ras, MEK, or ERK was sufficient to restore IFN signaling. In order to identify genes that were commonly regulated by the inhibition of the Ras pathway and the IFN pathway, we treated NIH/3T3 cells that overexpress oncogenic Ras with the MEK inhibitor, U0126, or IFN-α for 6 h, and performed DNA microarray analysis (Gene Expression Omnibus accession number GSE49469). Here, we also provide additional information on the experimental and functional analysis of the genes responsive to U0126 and IFN.

  18. K-RAS and N-RAS mutations in testicular germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Muhammet Hacioglu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Testicular cancer is a relatively rare tumor type, accounting for approximately 1% of all cancers in men. However, among men aged between 15 and 40 years, testicular cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy. Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs are classified as seminoma and non-seminoma. The RAS oncogene controls several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and differentiation. Thus, RAS signaling is important for normal germ cell development. Mutations of the Kirsten RAS (K-RAS gene are present in over 20% of all cancers. RAS gene mutations have also been reported in TGCTs. We investigated K-RAS and N-RAS mutations in seminoma and non-seminoma TGCT patients. A total of 24 (55% pure seminoma cases and 19 (45% non-seminoma cases were included in the study. K-RAS and N-RAS analyses were performed in our molecular pathology laboratory, using K-RAS and N-RAS Pyro Kit 24 V1 (Qiagen. In total, a RAS mutation was present in 12 patients (27%: 7 seminoma (29% and 5 non-seminoma cases (26% [p = 0.55]. A K-RAS mutation was present in 4 pure seminoma tumors (16% and 3 non-seminoma tumors (15% [p = 0.63], and an N-RAS mutation was observed in 4 seminoma tumors (16% and 3 non-seminoma tumors (15% [p = 0.63]. Both, K-RAS and N-RAS mutations were present in two patients: one with seminoma tumor and the other with non-seminoma tumor. To date, no approved targeted therapy is available for the treatment of TGCTs. The analysis of K-RAS and N-RAS mutations in these tumors may provide more treatment options, especially in platinum-resistant tumors.

  19. Differential expression of the ras gene family in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Leon, J.; Guerrero, I; Pellicer, A

    1987-01-01

    We compared the expression of the ras gene family (H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras) in adult mouse tissues and during development. We found substantial variations in expression among different organs and in the amounts of the different transcripts originating from each gene, especially for the N-ras gene. The expression patterns were consistent with the reported preferential tissue activation of ras genes and suggested different cellular functions for each of the ras genes.

  20. Evaluating The Role Of Nitric Oxide Synthase In Oncogenic Ras-Driven Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Counter

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that oncogenic KRAS activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway stimulates the remaining wild-type HRAS and NRAS proteins in a manner dependent upon both eNOS expression and C118 in HRAS and NRAS, which promoted tumor growth. Interestingly however, we recently found that loss of wild-type HRAS, NRAS, and even more potently, loss of both of these genes actually enhanced oncogenic KRAS-driven early tumorigenesis. Taken together, these results indicate that wild-type RAS proteins are tumor suppressing early in tumorigenesis, but tumor promoting in more malignant settings. Knock-in of a C118S mutation into an endogenous wild-type RAS gene did not, however, hamper oncogenic KRAS-driven tumor initiation. As such, redox-dependent reactions with C118 of wild-type RAS proteins are unlikely to be responsible for the tumor suppressive role of wild-type RAS proteins. This suggests that the redox-dependent reactions with C118 of wild-type RAS proteins are more important in more malignant settings. Given this, it stands to reason that inhibiting redox-dependent reactions like S-nitrosylation of wild-type RAS proteins may be more effective in established cancer settings. Indeed, we find that in three different models of KRAS-driven cancers-skin, pancreatic and lung- the general NOS inhibitor l-NAME reduced tumor burden and/or extended the lifespan of mice. Since oncogenic RAS has so far proven refractory to pharmacologic inhibition, targeting NOS activity may be an actionable approach to inhibiting RAS signaling for the treatment of a broad spectrum of cancers.

  1. Ras-mediated deregulation of the circadian clock in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Relógio

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock.

  2. Ras-Mediated Deregulation of the Circadian Clock in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relógio, Angela; Thomas, Philippe; Medina-Pérez, Paula; Reischl, Silke; Bervoets, Sander; Gloc, Ewa; Riemer, Pamela; Mang-Fatehi, Shila; Maier, Bert; Schäfer, Reinhold; Leser, Ulf; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim; Sers, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential to the temporal regulation of molecular processes in living systems and as such to life itself. Deregulation of these rhythms leads to failures in biological processes and eventually to the manifestation of pathological phenotypes including cancer. To address the questions as to what are the elicitors of a disrupted clock in cancer, we applied a systems biology approach to correlate experimental, bioinformatics and modelling data from several cell line models for colorectal and skin cancer. We found strong and weak circadian oscillators within the same type of cancer and identified a set of genes, which allows the discrimination between the two oscillator-types. Among those genes are IFNGR2, PITX2, RFWD2, PPARγ, LOXL2, Rab6 and SPARC, all involved in cancer-related pathways. Using a bioinformatics approach, we extended the core-clock network and present its interconnection to the discriminative set of genes. Interestingly, such gene signatures link the clock to oncogenic pathways like the RAS/MAPK pathway. To investigate the potential impact of the RAS/MAPK pathway - a major driver of colorectal carcinogenesis - on the circadian clock, we used a computational model which predicted that perturbation of BMAL1-mediated transcription can generate the circadian phenotypes similar to those observed in metastatic cell lines. Using an inducible RAS expression system, we show that overexpression of RAS disrupts the circadian clock and leads to an increase of the circadian period while RAS inhibition causes a shortening of period length, as predicted by our mathematical simulations. Together, our data demonstrate that perturbations induced by a single oncogene are sufficient to deregulate the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:24875049

  3. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Niida, Ayumu; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Miwa, Masanori; Ohkubo, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Cho, Nobuo; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-03-11

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly 12 (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH 2 ) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. K D and IC 50 values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH 2 ) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC 50  = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RAS signaling and anti-RAS therapy: lessons learned from genetically engineered mouse models, human cancer cells, and patient-related studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bingliang

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations of oncogenic RAS genes are frequently detected in human cancers. The studies in genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) reveal that Kras-activating mutations predispose mice to early onset tumors in the lung, pancreas, and gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, most of these tumors do not have metastatic phenotypes. Metastasis occurs when tumors acquire additional genetic changes in other cancer driver genes. Studies on clinical specimens also demonstrated that KRAS mutations are present in premalignant tissues and that most of KRAS mutant human cancers have co-mutations in other cancer driver genes, including TP53, STK11, CDKN2A, and KMT2C in lung cancer; APC, TP53, and PIK3CA in colon cancer; and TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, and MED12 in pancreatic cancer. Extensive efforts have been devoted to develop therapeutic agents that target enzymes involved in RAS posttranslational modifications, that inhibit downstream effectors of RAS signaling pathways, and that kill RAS mutant cancer cells through synthetic lethality. Recent clinical studies have revealed that sorafenib, a pan-RAF and VEGFR inhibitor, has impressive benefits for KRAS mutant lung cancer patients. Combination therapy of MEK inhibitors with either docetaxel, AKT inhibitors, or PI3K inhibitors also led to improved clinical responses in some KRAS mutant cancer patients. This review discusses knowledge gained from GEMMs, human cancer cells, and patient-related studies on RAS-mediated tumorigenesis and anti-RAS therapy. Emerging evidence demonstrates that RAS mutant cancers are heterogeneous because of the presence of different mutant alleles and/or co-mutations in other cancer driver genes. Effective subclassifications of RAS mutant cancers may be necessary to improve patients' outcomes through personalized precision medicine. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

  5. Macropinocytosis of protein is an amino acid supply route in Ras-transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commisso, Cosimo; Davidson, Shawn M; Soydaner-Azeloglu, Rengin G; Parker, Seth J; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Hackett, Sean; Grabocka, Elda; Nofal, Michel; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Metallo, Christian M; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-05-30

    Macropinocytosis is a highly conserved endocytic process by which extracellular fluid and its contents are internalized into cells through large, heterogeneous vesicles known as macropinosomes. Oncogenic Ras proteins have been shown to stimulate macropinocytosis but the functional contribution of this uptake mechanism to the transformed phenotype remains unknown. Here we show that Ras-transformed cells use macropinocytosis to transport extracellular protein into the cell. The internalized protein undergoes proteolytic degradation, yielding amino acids including glutamine that can enter central carbon metabolism. Accordingly, the dependence of Ras-transformed cells on free extracellular glutamine for growth can be suppressed by the macropinocytic uptake of protein. Consistent with macropinocytosis representing an important route of nutrient uptake in tumours, its pharmacological inhibition compromises the growth of Ras-transformed pancreatic tumour xenografts. These results identify macropinocytosis as a mechanism by which cancer cells support their unique metabolic needs and point to the possible exploitation of this process in the design of anticancer therapies.

  6. Ras-induced epigenetic inactivation of the RRAD (Ras-related associated with diabetes) gene promotes glucose uptake in a human ovarian cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Guiling; Mao, Fengbiao; Li, Xianfeng; Liu, Qi; Chen, Lin; Lv, Lu; Wang, Xin; Wu, Jinyu; Dai, Wei; Wang, Guan; Zhao, Enfeng; Tang, Kai-Fu; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2014-05-16

    RRAD (Ras-related associated with diabetes) is a small Ras-related GTPase that is frequently inactivated by DNA methylation of the CpG island in its promoter region in cancer tissues. However, the role of the methylation-induced RRAD inactivation in tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, the Ras-regulated transcriptome and epigenome were profiled by comparing T29H (a Ras(V12)-transformed human ovarian epithelial cell line) with T29 (an immortalized but non-transformed cell line) through reduced representation bisulfite sequencing and digital gene expression. We found that Ras(V12)-mediated oncogenic transformation was accompanied by RRAD promoter hypermethylation and a concomitant loss of RRAD expression. In addition, we found that the RRAD promoter was hypermethylated, and its transcription was reduced in ovarian cancer versus normal ovarian tissues. Treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in demethylation in the RRAD promoter and restored RRAD expression in T29H cells. Additionally, treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI277 resulted in restored RRAD expression and inhibited DNA methytransferase expression and activity in T29H cells. By employing knockdown and overexpression techniques in T29 and T29H, respectively, we found that RRAD inhibited glucose uptake and lactate production by repressing the expression of glucose transporters. Finally, RRAD overexpression in T29H cells inhibited tumor formation in nude mice, suggesting that RRAD is a tumor suppressor gene. Our results indicate that Ras(V12)-mediated oncogenic transformation induces RRAD epigenetic inactivation, which in turn promotes glucose uptake and may contribute to ovarian cancer tumorigenesis. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Mutational analysis of a ras catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Kung, H F

    1986-01-01

    transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with approximately the same efficiency as the wild-type v-rasH gene to those that failed to induce any detectable morphologic changes. Correlation of transforming activity with the location of the mutations enabled us to identify three nonoverlapping segments within the catalytic......We used linker insertion-deletion mutagenesis to study the catalytic domain of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus v-rasH transforming protein, which is closely related to the cellular rasH protein. The mutants displayed a wide range of in vitro biological activity, from those that induced focal...... localization. We speculate that this latter region interacts with the putative cellular target of ras. The results suggest that transforming ras proteins require membrane localization, guanosine nucleotide binding, and an additional undefined function that may represent interaction with their target....

  8. Ras induces NBT-II epithelial cell scattering through the coordinate activities of Rac and MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edme, Natacha; Downward, Julian; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Boyer, Brigitte

    2002-06-15

    Cell dissociation and cell migration are the two main components of epithelium-mesenchyme transitions (EMT). We previously demonstrated that Ras is required for the accomplishment of both of these processes during the EGF-induced EMT of the NBT-II rat carcinoma cell line in vitro. In this study, we examined the downstream targets of Ras that are responsible for the dissociation and motility of NBT-II cells. Overexpression of activated forms of c-Raf and MEK1 (a component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, MAPK) led to cell dissociation, as inferred by the loss of desmosomes from the cell periphery. By contrast, active PI3K, RalA and RalB did not induce desmosome breakdown. The MEK1 inhibitor PD098059 inhibited EGF- and Ras-induced cell dispersion, whereas the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 had no effect. Accordingly, among the partial loss-of-function mutants of Ras (RasV12) that were used to distinguish between downstream targets of Ras, we found that the Raf-specific Ras mutants RasV12S35 and RasV12E38 induced cell dissociation. The PI3K- and RalGDS-activating Ras mutants had, in contrast, no effect on cell dispersion. However, MEK1 was unable to promote cell motility, whereas RasV12S35 and RasV12E38 induced cell migration, suggesting that another Ras effector was responsible for cell motility. We found that the small GTPase Rac is necessary for EGF-mediated cell dispersion since overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of Rac1 (Rac1N17) inhibited EGF-induced NBT-II cell migration. All stimuli that promoted cell migration also induced Rac activation. Finally, coexpression of active Rac1 and active MEK1 induced the motility of NBT-II cells, suggesting that Ras mediates NBT-II cell scattering through the coordinate activation of Rac and the Raf/MAPK pathway.

  9. Replacement of K-Ras with H-Ras supports normal embryonic development despite inducing cardiovascular pathology in adult mice

    OpenAIRE

    Potenza, Nicoletta; Vecchione, Carmine; Notte, Antonella; De Rienzo, Assunta; Rosica, Annamaria; Bauer, Lisa; Affuso, Andrea; De Felice, Mario; Russo, Tommaso; Poulet, Roberta; Cifelli, Giuseppe; De Vita, Gabriella; Lembo, Giuseppe; Di Lauro, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Ras proteins are highly related GTPases that have key roles in regulating growth, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Gene-targeting experiments have shown that, out of the three mammalian ras genes, only K-ras is essential for normal mouse embryogenesis, and that mice deprived of H-ras and/or N-ras show no major phenotype. We generated mice (HrasKI) in which the K-ras gene had been modified to encode H-Ras protein. HrasKI mice produce undetectable amounts of K-Ras but—in contrast to mice homo...

  10. Targeting mutant RAS in patient-derived colorectal cancer organoids by combinatorial drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verissimo, Carla S; Overmeer, René M; Ponsioen, Bas; Drost, Jarno; Mertens, Sander; Verlaan-Klink, Ingrid; Gerwen, Bastiaan van; van der Ven, Marieke; Wetering, Marc van de; Egan, David A; Bernards, René; Clevers, Hans; Bos, Johannes L; Snippert, Hugo J

    2016-11-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) organoids can be derived from almost all CRC patients and therefore capture the genetic diversity of this disease. We assembled a panel of CRC organoids carrying either wild-type or mutant RAS, as well as normal organoids and tumor organoids with a CRISPR-introduced oncogenic KRAS mutation. Using this panel, we evaluated RAS pathway inhibitors and drug combinations that are currently in clinical trial for RAS mutant cancers. Presence of mutant RAS correlated strongly with resistance to these targeted therapies. This was observed in tumorigenic as well as in normal organoids. Moreover, dual inhibition of the EGFR-MEK-ERK pathway in RAS mutant organoids induced a transient cell-cycle arrest rather than cell death. In vivo drug response of xenotransplanted RAS mutant organoids confirmed this growth arrest upon pan-HER/MEK combination therapy. Altogether, our studies demonstrate the potential of patient-derived CRC organoid libraries in evaluating inhibitors and drug combinations in a preclinical setting.

  11. Realgar bioleaching solution suppress ras excessive activation by increasing ROS in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, De Juan; Feng, Na; Liu, Dong Ling; Hou, Rong Li; Wang, Mei Zu; Ding, Xiao Xia; Li, Hong Yu

    2014-03-01

    Although realgar bioleaching solution (RBS) has been proved to be a potential candidate for cancer therapy, the mechanisms of RBS anticancer are still far from being completely understood. Dosed with RBS in C. elegans, the multivulva phenotype resulting from oncogenic ras gain-of-function was inhibited in a dose dependent manner. It could be abrogated by concurrent treatment C. elegans with RBS and the radical scavenger DMSO. However, RBS could not induce DAF-16 nuclear translocation in TJ356 or the increase of HSP 16.2 expression in CL2070, which both could be aroused visible GFP fluorescent variation to represent for oxidative stress generation. Treatment C. elegans with superoxide anion generator paraquat, similar results were also obtained. Our results indicated that RBS suppress excessive activated ras by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C. elegans. Secondly, ROS induced by RBS significantly accumulated on a higher level in C. elegans with a mutational ras than that with wild ras, thus leading to oxidative stress on ras gain-of-function background rather than on normal ras context. Our results firstly demonstrated that using C. elegans as a model organism for evaluating prooxidant drug candidates for cancer therapy.

  12. Ras-Mediated Suppression of TGFβRII Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells Involves Raf-Independent Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada M. Bulus

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Ras-transformed intestinal epithelial cells are resistant to the growth inhibitory actions of TGFβ and have a marked decrease in expression of the TGFβ type II receptor (TGFβRII. Rat intestinal epithelial cells (RIE were stably transfected with activated Ras, Sos and Raf constructs and tested for expression of TGFβRII and sensitivity to growth inhibition by TGFβ. The parental RIE line and the RIE-Raf cells were nontransformed in morphology and were sensitive to TGFβ (70–90% inhibited. In contrast, the RIE-Ras and RIE-Sos lines were transformed, resistant to TGFβ and expressed 5- to 10-fold decreased levels of the TGFβRII mRNA and protein. Cyclin D1 protein expression was repressed by TGFβ treatment in parental RIE and RIE-Raf cells, whereas levels of cyclin D1 in RIERas and RIE-Sos cells remained unchanged. Treatment of RIE-Ras cells with 25 μM farnesyl transferase inhibitor, FTI L739,749, for 48 hours restored expression of TGFβRII to levels equivalent to control cells. In addition, treatment of RIE-Ras cells for 48 hours with PD-98059, a specific MAPKK inhibitor, also increased expression of TGF,3RII to control levels. Collectively these results suggest that downregulation of TGFβRII and loss of sensitivity to growth inhibition by TGFβ in Ras-transformed intestinal epithelial cells is not mediated exclusively by the conventional Ras/Raf/ MAPKK/MAPK pathway. However, activation of MAPK, perhaps by an alternate Ras effector pathway, appears to be necessary for Ras-mediated downregulation of TGFβRII.

  13. RNAi-induced K-Ras gene silencing suppresses growth of EC9706 cells and enhances chemotherapy sensitivity of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Jie; Zheng, Yu-Ling; Fan, Qing-Xia; Zhang, Xu-Dong

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the growth, proliferation, apoptosis, invasiveness and chemotherapy sensitivity of EC9706 cells after K-Ras gene silencing, an expression carrier pSilencer-siK-Ras was constructed, and the EC9706 cell line was transfected using a liposome technique. Six groups were established: Control, siRNA NC (transfected with empty vector pSilencer2.1); Ras siRNA (transfected with pSilencer-siK-Ras2); Paclitaxel; Paclitaxel + siRNA NC; and Ras siRNA +Paclitaxel. After the treatment, RT-PCR, Western blotting, MTT assay, flow cytometry and the Transwell technique were used to assess expression of K-Ras mRNA and protein in EC9706 cells, as well as cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and invasiveness. The effect of Paclitaxel chemotherapy was also tested. pSilencer-siK-Ras2 effectively down-regulated expression of K-Ras mRNA and protein in EC9706 cells, growth being significantly inhibited. Flow cytometry indicated obvious apoptosis of cells in the experimental group, with arrest in the G1 phase; cell migration ability was also reduced. After pSilencer-siK-Ras2 transfection or the addition of Paclitaxel, EC9706 cells were suppressed to different extents; the suppressive effect was strengthened by combined treatment. The results suggested that RNAi-induced K-Ras gene silencing could enhance chemotherapy sensitivity of esophageal cancer.

  14. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Guo

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3 and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  16. Structure of the Dominant Negative S17N Mutant of Ras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassar, N.; Singh, K; Garcia-Diaz, M

    2010-01-01

    The use of the dominant negative mutant of Ras has been crucial in elucidating the cellular signaling of Ras in response to the activation of various membrane-bound receptors. Although several point mutants of Ras exhibit a dominant negative effect, the asparagine to serine mutation at position 17 (S17N) remains the most popular and the most effective at inhibiting the activation of endogenous Ras. It is now widely accepted that the dominant negative effect is due to the ability of the mutant to sequester upstream activators and its inability to activate downstream effectors. Here, we present the crystal structure of RasS17N in the GDP-bound form. In the three molecules that populate the asymmetric unit, the Mg{sup 2+} ion that normally coordinates the {beta}-phosphate is absent because of steric hindrance from the Asn17 side chain. Instead, a Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinating the {alpha}-phosphate. Also absent from one molecule is electron density for Phe28, a conserved residue that normally stabilizes the nucleotide's guanine base. Except for Phe28, the nucleotide makes conserved interactions with Ras. Combined, the inability of Phe28 to stabilize the guanine base and the absence of a Mg{sup 2+} ion to neutralize the negative charges on the phosphates explain the weaker affinity of GDP for Ras. Our data suggest that the absence of the Mg{sup 2+} should also dramatically affect GTP binding to Ras and the proper positioning of Thr35 necessary for the activation of switch 1 and the binding to downstream effectors, a prerequisite for the triggering of signaling pathways.

  17. Lead identification for the K-Ras protein: virtual screening and combinatorial fragment-based approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathan AAK

    2016-05-01

    off” state over “on” state conformation of K-Ras protein. Moreover, the designed compounds’ interactions are similar to guanosine diphosphate and, thus, could presumably act as a potential lead for K-Ras. The predicted drug-likeness properties of these compounds suggest that these compounds follow the Lipinski’s rule of five and have tolerable absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity values. Conclusion: Thus, through the current study, we propose targeting only “off” state conformations as a promising strategy for the design of reversible inhibitors to pharmacologically inhibit distinct conformations of K-Ras protein. Keywords: antitumor agent, K-Ras, molecular docking, molecular modeling, virtual screening

  18. Ras-dva, a member of novel family of small GTPases, is required for the anterior ectoderm patterning in the Xenopus laevis embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshina, Maria B; Zaraisky, Andrey G; Novoselov, Vladimir V

    2006-02-01

    Ras-like small GTPases are involved in the regulation of many processes essential for the specification of the vertebrate body plan. Recently, we identified the gene of novel small GTPase Ras-dva, which is specifically expressed at the anterior margin of the neural plate of the Xenopus laevis embryo. Now, we demonstrate that Ras-dva and its homologs in other species constitute a novel protein family, distinct from the previously known families of small GTPases. We show that the expression of Ras-dva begins during gastrulation throughout the anterior ectoderm and is activated by the homeodomain transcription factor Otx2; however, later on, Ras-dva expression is inhibited in the anterior neural plate by another homeodomain factor Xanf1. Downregulation of Ras-dva functioning by the dominant-negative mutant or by the antisense morpholino oligonucleotides results in severe malformations of the forebrain and derivatives of the cranial placodes. Importantly, although the observed abnormalities can be rescued by co-injection of the Ras-dva mRNA, they cannot be rescued by the mRNA of the closest Ras-dva homolog from another family of small GTPases, Ras. This fact indicates functional specificity of the Ras-dva signaling pathway. At the molecular level, downregulation of Ras-dva inhibits the expression of several regulators of the anterior neural plate and folds patterning, such as Otx2, BF-1 (also known as Foxg1), Xag2, Pax6, Slug and Sox9, and interferes with FGF8 signaling within the anterior ectoderm. By contrast, expression of the epidermal regulator BMP4 and its target genes, Vent1, Vent2b and Msx1, is upregulated. Together, the data obtained indicate that Ras-dva is an essential component of the signaling network that patterns the early anterior neural plate and the adjacent ectoderm in the Xenopus laevis embryos.

  19. Abnormal Ras signaling in Costello syndrome (CS) negatively regulates enamel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Alice F.; Tidyman, William E.; Jheon, Andrew H.; Sharir, Amnon; Zheng, Xu; Charles, Cyril; Fagin, James A.; McMahon, Martin; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.; Ganss, Bernhard; Rauen, Katherine A.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    RASopathies are syndromes caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Ras signaling pathway. One of these conditions, Costello syndrome (CS), is typically caused by an activating de novo germline mutation in HRAS and is characterized by a wide range of cardiac, musculoskeletal, dermatological and developmental abnormalities. We report that a majority of individuals with CS have hypo-mineralization of enamel, the outer covering of teeth, and that similar defects are present in a CS mouse model. Comprehensive analysis of the mouse model revealed that ameloblasts, the cells that generate enamel, lacked polarity, and the ameloblast progenitor cells were hyperproliferative. Ras signals through two main effector cascades, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. To determine through which pathway Ras affects enamel formation, inhibitors targeting either PI3K or MEK 1 and 2 (MEK 1/2), kinases in the MAPK pathway, were utilized. MEK1/2 inhibition rescued the hypo-mineralized enamel, normalized the ameloblast polarity defect and restored normal progenitor cell proliferation. In contrast, PI3K inhibition only corrected the progenitor cell proliferation phenotype. We demonstrate for the first time the central role of Ras signaling in enamel formation in CS individuals and present the mouse incisor as a model system to dissect the roles of the Ras effector pathways in vivo. PMID:24057668

  20. Regulation of Ras exchange factors and cellular localization of Ras activation by lipid messengers in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse E. Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and SOS-family GEFs.Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood.One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of Ras-GEFs´functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells.

  1. Galectin-3 mediates cross-talk between K-Ras and Let-7c tumor suppressor microRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Levy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Galectin-3 (Gal-3 and active (GTP-bound K-Ras contribute to the malignant phenotype of many human tumors by increasing the rate of cell proliferation, survival, and migration. These Gal-3-mediated effects result from a selective binding to K-Ras.GTP, causing increased nanoclustering in the cell membrane and leading to robust Ras signaling. Regulation of the interactions between Gal-3 and active K-Ras is not fully understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To gain a better understanding of what regulates the critical interactions between these two proteins, we examined the role of Gal-3 in the regulation of K-Ras by using Gal-3-knockout mouse embryonic-fibroblasts (Gal-3-/- MEFs and/or Gal-3/Gal-1 double-knockout MEFs. We found that knockout of Gal-3 induced strong downregulation (∼60% of K-Ras and K-Ras.GTP. The downregulation was somewhat more marked in the double-knockout MEFs, in which we also detected robust inhibition(∼50% of ERK and Akt activation. These additional effects are probably attributable to inhibition of the weak interactions of K-Ras.GTP with Gal-1. Re-expression of Gal-3 reversed the phenotype of the Gal-3-/- MEFs and dramatically reduced the disappearance of K-Ras in the presence of cycloheximide to the levels seen in wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Gal-3 by casein kinase-1 (CK-1 induced translocation of Gal-3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane, leading to K-Ras stabilization accompanied by downregulation of the tumor suppressor miRNA let-7c, known to negatively control K-Ras transcription. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a novel cross-talk between Gal-3-mediated downregulation of let 7c microRNA (which in turn negatively regulates K-Ras transcription and elucidates the association among Gal-3 let-7c and K-Ras transcription/translation, cellular compartmentalization and activity.

  2. Interfering with the interaction between ErbB1, nucleolin and Ras as a potential treatment for glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloog, Yoel; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    The three oncogenes, ErbB receptors, Ras proteins and nucleolin may contribute to malignant transformation. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleolin could bind both Ras protein and ErbB receptors. We also showed that the crosstalk between the three proteins facilitates anchorage independent growth and tumor growth in nude mice, and that inhibition of this interaction in prostate and colon cancer cells reduces tumorigenicity. In the present study, we show that treatment with Ras and nucleolin inhibitors reduces the oncogenic effect induced by ErbB1 receptor in U87-MG cells. This combined treatment enhances cell death, reduces cell proliferation and cell migration. Moreover, we demonstrate a pivotal role of nucleolin in ErbB1 activation by its ligand. Nucleolin inhibitor prevents EGF-induced receptor activation and its downstream signaling followed by reduced proliferation. Furthermore, inhibition of Ras by Salirasib (FTS), mainly reduces cell viability and motility. The combined treatment, which targets both Ras and nucleolin, additively reduces tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that targeting both nucleolin and Ras may represent an additional opportunity for inhibiting cancers, including glioblastoma, that are driven by these oncogenes. PMID:25261371

  3. A transforming ras gene can provide an essential function ordinarily supplied by an endogenous ras gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papageorge, A G; Willumsen, B M; Johnsen, M

    1986-01-01

    several transformation-competent mutant v-rasH genes whose protein products in transformed NIH 3T3 cells are not immunoprecipitated by this monoclonal antibody. These mutant proteins are, however, precipitated by a different anti-ras antibody. Each of these mutants lacks Met-72 of v-rasH. In contrast...... to the result for cells transformed by wild-type v-rasH, Y13-259 microinjection of NIH 3T3 cells transformed by these mutant ras genes did not prevent the cells from entering the S phase. These results imply that a transformation-competent ras gene can supply a normal essential function for NIH 3T3 cells. When...... the proteins encoded by the mutant ras genes were overproduced in Escherichia coli, several mutant proteins that lacked Met-72 failed to bind Y13-259 in a Western blot. However, a ras protein from a mutant lacking amino antibody, but a ras protein from a mutant lacking amino acids 72 to 84 did not...

  4. NAM: The 2004 RAS National Astronomy Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrie; Norton, Andrew

    2004-06-01

    This year's RAS National Astronomy Meeting was held at the Open University's Milton Keynes campus from 29 March to 2 April. The event was organized by members of the OU Physics & Astronomy Department and Planetary & Space Science Research Institute. Around 450 people attended the meeting, at which more than 220 talks were presented, along with around 90 posters. Co-chairs of RAS NAM04, Barrie Jones and Andrew Norton, summarize.

  5. Exploiting the bad eating habits of Ras-driven cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eileen

    2013-10-01

    Oncogenic Ras promotes glucose fermentation and glutamine use to supply central carbon metabolism, but how and why have only emerged recently. Ras-mediated metabolic reprogramming generates building blocks for growth and promotes antioxidant defense. To fuel metabolic pathways, Ras scavenges extracellular proteins and lipids. To bolster metabolism and mitigate stress, Ras activates cellular self-cannibalization and recycling of proteins and organelles by autophagy. Targeting these distinct features of Ras-driven cancers provides novel approaches to cancer therapy.

  6. Neurofibromin 1 (NF1 Defects Are Common in Human Ovarian Serous Carcinomas and Co-occur with TP53 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Sangha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC is the most common and lethal histologic type of ovarian epithelial malignancy. Mutations of TP53 and dysfunction of the Brca1 and/or Brca2 tumor-suppressor proteins have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of a large fraction of OSCs, but frequent somatic mutations in other well-established tumor-suppressor genes have not been identified. Using a genome-wide screen of DNA copy number alterations in 36 primary OSCs, we identified two tumors with apparent homozygous deletions of the NF1 gene. Subsequently, 18 ovarian carcinoma-derived cell lines and 41 primary OSCs were evaluated for NF1 alterations. Markedly reduced or absent expression of Nf1 protein was observed in 6 of the 18 cell lines, and using the protein truncation test and sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA, NF1 mutations resulting in deletion of exons and/or aberrant splicing of NF1 transcripts were detected in 5 of the 6 cell lines with loss of NF1 expression. Similarly, NF1 alterations including homozygous deletions and splicing mutations were identified in 9 (22% of 41 primary OSCs. As expected, tumors and cell lines with NF1 defects lacked mutations in KRAS or BRAF but showed Ras pathway activation based on immunohistochemical detection of phosphorylated MAPK (primary tumors or increased levels of GTP-bound Ras (cell lines. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene was mutated in all OSCs with documented NF1 mutation, suggesting that the pathways regulated by these two tumor-suppressor proteins often cooperate in the development of ovarian carcinomas with serous differentiation.

  7. [Effects of silencing H-ras gene by RNA interference on cetuximab-sensitivity of cetuximab-resistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Qiang; Luo, Rong-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    To explore the changes of the sensitivity of cetuximab-resistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (hNPC) cells 5-8F/Erbitux to cetuximab by silencing H-ras gene with RNA interference (RNAi). The 5-8F/Erbitux cells were induced by stepwise exposure to increasing doses of cetuximab. Western blot was conducted to detect the protein levels of H-ras and K-ras. Real-time PCR was employed to detect the expression of H-ras and K-ras. H-ras-shRNA plasmids (shRNA vector carrying the H-ras gene) were constructed and transferred into 5-8F/Erbitux cells. The gene and protein expression levels of H-ras and the changes of the sensitivity of 5-8F/Erbitux cells to cetuximab after transfection were measured, respectively. After treatment with cetuximab for 3 and 5 days, the resistance index (RI) of the 5-8F/Erbitux cells was 1.2 and 1.1, and the protein levels of H-ras and K-ras in 5-8F/Erbitux cells were 0.798 +/- 0.019 and 0.190 +/- 0.011, respectively, significantly higher than that in the 5-8F cells (Pgene expressions of H-ras and K-ras in 5-8F/Erbitux cells were 1.260 +/- 0.114 and 0.850 +/- 0.006, respectively. Compared with 5-8F cells, the former was higher (P = 0.016) and the latter was lower (P = 0.000). After transfection with H-ras-shRNA plasmid, the 5-8F/Erbitux cells showed reduced levels of H-ras gene and protein, and the cell apoptosis and inhibition rates increased significantly (Pras siRNA can reverse cetuximab-resistance of 5-8F/Erbitux cells through down-regulation of H-ras gene expression, indicating that the generation of cetuximab-resistance in 5-8F/Erbitux cells is associated with amplification and overexpression of the H-ras gene.

  8. A fraction of neurofibromin interacts with PML bodies in the nucleus of the CCF astrocytoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, Fabienne; Villette, Sandrine; Vallee, Beatrice; Doudeau, Michel; Morisset-Lopez, Severine [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Ardourel, Maryvonne; Hevor, Tobias [Laboratoire de Neurobiologie, Universite d' Orleans, BP 6759, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Pichon, Chantal [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Benedetti, Helene, E-mail: helene.benedetti@cnrs-orleans.fr [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We validate the use of specific anti-Nf1 antibodies for immunofluorescence studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect Nf1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of CCF cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML nuclear bodies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that there is a direct interaction between a fraction of Nf1 and the PML bodies. -- Abstract: Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a common genetic disease that causes nervous system tumors, and cognitive deficits. It is due to mutations within the NF1 gene, which encodes the Nf1 protein. Nf1 has been shown to be involved in the regulation of Ras, cAMP and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In this study, using immunofluorescence experiments, we have shown a partial nuclear localization of Nf1 in the astrocytoma cell line: CCF and we have demonstrated that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML (promyelocytic leukemia) nuclear bodies. A direct interaction between Nf1 and the multiprotein complex has further been demonstrated using 'in situ' proximity ligation assay (PLA).

  9. Quantitative Assays for RAS Pathway Proteins and Phosphorylation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CPTAC program is applying its expertise in quantitative proteomics to develop assays for RAS pathway proteins. Targets include key phosphopeptides that should increase our understanding of how the RAS pathway is regulated.

  10. Exploiting the bad eating habits of Ras-driven cancers

    OpenAIRE

    White, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras generates building blocks for growth, fuels metabolic pathways, and bolsters metabolism. In this review, White discusses advances that shed light on new opportunities with which to cripple the critical metabolic effector functions of Ras.

  11. Exploiting the bad eating habits of Ras-driven cancers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    .... To fuel metabolic pathways, Ras scavenges extracellular proteins and lipids. To bolster metabolism and mitigate stress, Ras activates cellular self-cannibalization and recycling of proteins and organelles by autophagy...

  12. The RAS Problem: Turning Off a Broken Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS gene is commonly mutated in cancer and researchers are working to better understand how to develop drugs that can target the RAS protein, which for many years has been considered to be “undruggable.”

  13. The R-Ras/RIN2/Rab5 complex controls endothelial cell adhesion and morphogenesis via active integrin endocytosis and Rac signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Chiara; Caccavari, Francesca; Valdembri, Donatella; Camillo, Chiara; Veltel, Stefan; Santambrogio, Martina; Lanzetti, Letizia; Bussolino, Federico; Ivaska, Johanna; Serini, Guido

    2012-01-01

    During developmental and tumor angiogenesis, semaphorins regulate blood vessel navigation by signaling through plexin receptors that inhibit the R-Ras subfamily of small GTPases. R-Ras is mainly expressed in vascular cells, where it induces adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through unknown mechanisms. We identify the Ras and Rab5 interacting protein RIN2 as a key effector that in endothelial cells interacts with and mediates the pro-adhesive and -angiogenic activity of R-Ras. Both R-Ras-GTP and RIN2 localize at nascent ECM adhesion sites associated with lamellipodia. Upon binding, GTP-loaded R-Ras converts RIN2 from a Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) to an adaptor that first interacts at high affinity with Rab5-GTP to promote the selective endocytosis of ligand-bound/active β1 integrins and then causes the translocation of R-Ras to early endosomes. Here, the R-Ras/RIN2/Rab5 signaling module activates Rac1-dependent cell adhesion via TIAM1, a Rac GEF that localizes on early endosomes and is stimulated by the interaction with both Ras proteins and the vesicular lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate. In conclusion, the ability of R-Ras-GTP to convert RIN2 from a GEF to an adaptor that preferentially binds Rab5-GTP allows the triggering of the endocytosis of ECM-bound/active β1 integrins and the ensuing funneling of R-Ras-GTP toward early endosomes to elicit the pro-adhesive and TIAM1-mediated activation of Rac1. PMID:22825554

  14. The ras1 protein of S. pombe mediates pheromone-induced transcription. Abstract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olaf; Davey, John; Egel, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Differentiering, signaltransduktion, parringstype feromon, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ras homolog, Transkription......Differentiering, signaltransduktion, parringstype feromon, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ras homolog, Transkription...

  15. Molecular cloning and chromosome assignment of murine N-ras.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, J.; Hart, C.P.; Ruddle, F H

    1984-01-01

    The murine N-ras gene was cloned by screening an EMBL-3 recombinant phage library with a human N-ras specific probe. Hybridization of two separate unique sequence N-ras probes, isolated from the 5' and 3' flanking sequences of the murine gene, to a mouse-Chinese hamster hybrid mapping panel assigns the N-ras locus to mouse chromosome three.

  16. The role of oncogenic Ras in human skin tumorigenesis depends on the clonogenic potential of the founding keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurelli, Riccardo; Tinaburri, Lavinia; Gangi, Fabio; Bondanza, Sergio; Severi, Anna Lisa; Scarponi, Claudia; Albanesi, Cristina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Guerra, Liliana; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Dellambra, Elena

    2016-03-01

    The role of Ras in human skin tumorigenesis induction is still ambiguous. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras causes premature senescence in cultured human cells and hyperplasia in transgenic mice. Here, we investigated whether the oncogenic insult outcome might depend on the nature of the founding keratinocyte. We demonstrate that overexpression of the constitutively active Ras-V12 induces senescence in primary human keratinocyte cultures, but that some cells escape senescence and proliferate indefinitely. Ras overexpression in transient-amplifying- or stem-cell-enriched cultures shows that p16 (encoded by CDKN2A) levels are crucial for the final result. Indeed, transient-amplifying keratinocytes expressing high levels of p16 are sensitive to Ras-V12-induced senescence, whereas cells with high proliferative potential, but that do not display p16, are resistant. The subpopulation that sustains the indefinite culture growth exhibits stem cell features. Bypass of senescence correlates with inhibition of the pRb (also known as RB1) pathway and resumption of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) activity. Immortalization is also sustained by activation of the ERK1 and ERK2 (ERK1/2, also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1) and Akt pathways. Moreover, only transduced cultures originating from cultures bearing stem cells induce tumors in nude mice. Our findings demonstrate that the Ras overexpression outcome depends on the clonogenic potential of the recipient keratinocyte and that only the stem cell compartment is competent to initiate tumorigenesis. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. A negative-feedback loop regulating ERK1/2 activation and mediated by RasGPR2 phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jinqi [Departments of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Cook, Aaron A.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang [Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Sondek, John, E-mail: sondek@med.unc.edu [Departments of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2016-05-20

    The dynamic regulation of ERK1 and -2 (ERK1/2) is required for precise signal transduction controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating the activation of ERK1/2 are not completely understood. In this study, we show that phosphorylation of RasGRP2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), inhibits its ability to activate the small GTPase Rap1 that ultimately leads to decreased activation of ERK1/2 in cells. ERK2 phosphorylates RasGRP2 at Ser394 located in the linker region implicated in its autoinhibition. These studies identify RasGRP2 as a novel substrate of ERK1/2 and define a negative-feedback loop that regulates the BRaf–MEK–ERK signaling cascade. This negative-feedback loop determines the amplitude and duration of active ERK1/2. -- Highlights: •ERK2 phosphorylates the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RasGRP2 at Ser394. •Phosphorylated RasGRP2 has decreased capacity to active Rap1b in vitro and in cells. •Phosphorylation of RasGRP2 by ERK1/2 introduces a negative-feedback loop into the BRaf-MEK-ERK pathway.

  18. The Ras antagonist, farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS), decreases fibrosis and improves muscle strength in dy/dy mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Yoram; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Elmakayes, Edva; Yanay, Nurit; Ettinger, Keren; Elbaz, Moran; Brunschwig, Zivia; Dadush, Oshrat; Elad-Sfadia, Galit; Haklai, Roni; Kloog, Yoel; Chapman, Joab; Reif, Shimon

    2011-03-22

    The Ras superfamily of guanosine-triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins regulates a diverse spectrum of intracellular processes involved in inflammation and fibrosis. Farnesythiosalicylic acid (FTS) is a unique and potent Ras inhibitor which decreased inflammation and fibrosis in experimentally induced liver cirrhosis and ameliorated inflammatory processes in systemic lupus erythematosus, neuritis and nephritis animal models. FTS effect on Ras expression and activity, muscle strength and fibrosis was evaluated in the dy(2J)/dy(2J) mouse model of merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. The dy(2J)/dy(2J) mice had significantly increased RAS expression and activity compared with the wild type mice. FTS treatment significantly decreased RAS expression and activity. In addition, phosphorylation of ERK, a Ras downstream protein, was significantly decreased following FTS treatment in the dy(2J)/dy(2J) mice. Clinically, FTS treated mice showed significant improvement in hind limb muscle strength measured by electronic grip strength meter. Significant reduction of fibrosis was demonstrated in the treated group by quantitative Sirius Red staining and lower muscle collagen content. FTS effect was associated with significantly inhibition of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. We conclude that active RAS inhibition by FTS was associated with attenuated fibrosis and improved muscle strength in the dy(2J)/dy(2J) mouse model of congenital muscular dystrophy.

  19. The Ras antagonist, farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS, decreases fibrosis and improves muscle strength in dy/dy mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoram Nevo

    Full Text Available The Ras superfamily of guanosine-triphosphate (GTP-binding proteins regulates a diverse spectrum of intracellular processes involved in inflammation and fibrosis. Farnesythiosalicylic acid (FTS is a unique and potent Ras inhibitor which decreased inflammation and fibrosis in experimentally induced liver cirrhosis and ameliorated inflammatory processes in systemic lupus erythematosus, neuritis and nephritis animal models. FTS effect on Ras expression and activity, muscle strength and fibrosis was evaluated in the dy(2J/dy(2J mouse model of merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. The dy(2J/dy(2J mice had significantly increased RAS expression and activity compared with the wild type mice. FTS treatment significantly decreased RAS expression and activity. In addition, phosphorylation of ERK, a Ras downstream protein, was significantly decreased following FTS treatment in the dy(2J/dy(2J mice. Clinically, FTS treated mice showed significant improvement in hind limb muscle strength measured by electronic grip strength meter. Significant reduction of fibrosis was demonstrated in the treated group by quantitative Sirius Red staining and lower muscle collagen content. FTS effect was associated with significantly inhibition of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. We conclude that active RAS inhibition by FTS was associated with attenuated fibrosis and improved muscle strength in the dy(2J/dy(2J mouse model of congenital muscular dystrophy.

  20. Novel Gbeta Mimic Kelch Proteins (Gpb1 and Gpb2 Connect G-Protein Signaling to Ras via Yeast Neurofibromin Homologs Ira1 and Ira2: A Model for Human NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    C) After 7 days on nitrogen replete or depleted medium , cells were replica-plated onto YPD . (D) Glycogen accumulation was assessed using iodine...into wild-type (MLY61a/α) or gpb1,2 mutant cells (THY212a/α) as controls. Cells were grown on SLAD agar medium at 30ºC for 5 days and photographed...and glucose-induced cAMP production (G). (D) Cells were grown on YPD at 30ºC for 5 days and photographed after weak (W), mild (M) or strong (S

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC MUTATIONS IN HUMAN RAS GENE

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Qumani Ahmed et al

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a group of disease characterized by unregulated cell growth and spread of cells from site of origin to other sites in body. Two main genetic changes lead to cancer they are inactivation of tumour suppressor gene and activation of proto-oncogene. Ras gene is a proto-oncogene, when this gene activated it stimulates signalling pathway and that causes unregulated proliferation of cells. Ras family is a group of three precursors H-Ras, K-Ras and N-Ras. It was analyzed that more than 30% ...

  2. SCD1 Expression is dispensable for hepatocarcinogenesis induced by AKT and Ras oncogenes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available Increased de novo lipogenesis is one of the major metabolic events in cancer. In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, de novo lipogenesis has been found to be increased and associated with the activation of AKT/mTOR signaling. In mice, overexpression of an activated form of AKT results in increased lipogenesis and hepatic steatosis, ultimately leading to liver tumor development. Hepatocarcinogenesis is dramatically accelerated when AKT is co-expressed with an oncogenic form of N-Ras. SCD1, the major isoform of stearoyl-CoA desaturases, catalyzing the conversion of saturated fatty acids (SFA into monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, is a key enzyme involved in de novo lipogenesis. While many studies demonstrated the requirement of SCD1 for tumor cell growth in vitro, whether SCD1 is necessary for tumor development in vivo has not been previously investigated. Here, we show that genetic ablation of SCD1 neither inhibits lipogenesis and hepatic steatosis in AKT-overexpressing mice nor affects liver tumor development in mice co-expressing AKT and Ras oncogenes. Molecular analysis showed that SCD2 was strongly upregulated in liver tumors from AKT/Ras injected SCD1(-/- mice. Noticeably, concomitant silencing of SCD1 and SCD2 genes was highly detrimental for the growth of AKT/Ras cells in vitro. Altogether, our study provides the evidence, for the first time, that SCD1 expression is dispensable for AKT/mTOR-dependent hepatic steatosis and AKT/Ras-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. Complete inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity may be required to efficiently suppress liver tumor development.

  3. Transformation by Oncogenic Ras Expands the Early Genomic Response to Transforming Growth Factor β in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl E. Allen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence implicates TGFβ as a tumor promoter in epithelial cells that have become resistant to its tumor suppressor activity. To better understand early, genome-wide TGFβ responses in cells resistant to growth inhibition by TGFβ, we used microarray analysis in a well-defined cell culture system of sensitive and resistant intestinal epithelial cells. TGFβ-regulated gene expression in TGFβ-growth-sensitive, nontransformed rat intestinal epithelial cells (RIE-1 was compared to expression in TGFβ-growth-resistant RIE cells stably transformed by oncogenic Ras(12V. Treatment of RIE-1 cells with 2 ng/ml TGFβ1 for 1 hour increased the expression of eight gene sequences by 2.6-fold or more, whereas eight were down regulated 2.6-fold. In RIE-Ras(12V cells, 42 gene sequences were upregulated and only 3 were down-regulated. Comparison of RIE and RIE-Ras(12V identified 37 gene sequences as unique, Ras-dependent genomic targets of TGFβ1. TGFβ-regulation of connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, two genes up-regulated in RIE-Ras cells and previously implicated in tumor promotion, was independently confirmed and further characterized by Northern analysis. Our data indicate that overexpression of oncogenic Ras in intestinal epithelial cells confers a significantly expanded repertoire of robust, early transcriptional responses to TGFβ via signaling pathways yet to be fully elucidated but including the canonical Raf-1/MAPK/Erk pathway. Loss of sensitivity to growth inhibition by TGFβ does not abrogate TGFβ signaling and actually expands the early transcriptional response to TGFβ1. Expression of some of these genes may confer to Ras-transformed cells characteristics favorable for tumor promotion.

  4. Toll-like receptor 9 agonist IMO cooperates with cetuximab in K-ras mutant colorectal and pancreatic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Roberta; Melisi, Davide; Damiano, Vincenzo; Bianco, Roberto; Garofalo, Sonia; Gelardi, Teresa; Agrawal, Sudhir; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Scarpa, Aldo; Bardelli, Alberto; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2011-10-15

    K-Ras somatic mutations are a strong predictive biomarker for resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in patients with colorectal and pancreatic cancer. We previously showed that the novel Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist immunomodulatory oligonucleotide (IMO) has a strong in vivo activity in colorectal cancer models by interfering with EGFR-related signaling and synergizing with the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab. In the present study, we investigated, both in vitro and in vivo, the antitumor effect of IMO alone or in combination with cetuximab in subcutaneous colon and orthotopic pancreatic cancer models harboring K-Ras mutations and resistance to EGFR inhibitors. We showed that IMO was able to significantly restore the sensitivity of K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cetuximab, producing a marked inhibition of cell survival and a complete suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, when used in combination with cetuximab. IMO interfered with EGFR-dependent signaling, modulating the functional interaction between TLR9 and EGFR. In vivo, IMO plus cetuximab combination caused a potent and long-lasting cooperative antitumor activity in LS174T colorectal cancer and in orthotopic AsPC1 pancreatic cancer. The capability of IMO to restore cetuximab sensitivity was further confirmed by using K-Ras mutant colorectal cancer cell models obtained through homologous recombination technology. We showed that IMO markedly inhibits growth of K-Ras mutant colon and pancreatic cancers in vitro and in nude mice and cooperates with cetuximab via multiple mechanisms of action. Therefore, we propose IMO plus cetuximab as a therapeutic strategy for K-Ras wild-type as well for K-Ras mutant, cetuximab-resistant colorectal and pancreatic cancers. ©2011 AACR.

  5. Bacillus subtilis Intramembrane Protease RasP Activity in Escherichia coli andIn Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrell, Daniel; Zhang, Yang; Olenic, Sandra; Kroos, Lee

    2017-10-01

    RasP is a predicted intramembrane metalloprotease of Bacillus subtilis that has been proposed to cleave the stress response anti-sigma factors RsiW and RsiV, the cell division protein FtsL, and remnant signal peptides within their transmembrane segments. To provide evidence for direct effects of RasP on putative substrates, we developed a heterologous coexpression system. Since expression of catalytically inactive RasP E21A inhibited expression of other membrane proteins in Escherichia coli , we added extra transmembrane segments to RasP E21A, which allowed accumulation of most other membrane proteins. A corresponding active version of RasP appeared to promiscuously cleave coexpressed membrane proteins, except those with a large periplasmic domain. However, stable cleavage products were not observed, even in clpP mutant E. coli Fusions of transmembrane segment-containing parts of FtsL and RsiW to E. coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) also resulted in proteins that appeared to be RasP substrates upon coexpression in E. coli , including FtsL with a full-length C-terminal domain (suggesting that prior cleavage by a site 1 protease is unnecessary) and RsiW designed to mimic the PrsW site 1 cleavage product (suggesting that further trimming by extracytoplasmic protease is unnecessary). Purified RasP cleaved His 6 -MBP-RsiW(73-118) in vitro within the RsiW transmembrane segment based on mass spectrometry analysis, demonstrating that RasP is an intramembrane protease. Surprisingly, purified RasP failed to cleave His 6 -MBP-FtsL(23-117). We propose that the lack of α-helix-breaking residues in the FtsL transmembrane segment creates a requirement for the membrane environment and/or an additional protein(s) in order for RasP to cleave FtsL. IMPORTANCE Intramembrane proteases govern important signaling pathways in nearly all organisms. In bacteria, they function in stress responses, cell division, pathogenesis, and other processes. Their membrane-associated substrates are

  6. Synergistic effects of sorafenib in combination with gemcitabine or pemetrexed in lung cancer cell lines with K-ras mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available K-ras is currently accepted as the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, including squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma. NSCLC patients with the K-ras mutation appear to be refractory to the majority of systemic therapies. In the present study, the in vitro antitumor effects and correlated molecular mechanisms of sorafenib combined with gemcitabine or pemetrexed were explored in the K-ras mutation-positive NSCLC A549 cell line. Sorafenib was seen to exhibit dose-dependent growth inhibition in the A549 cells, while sorafenib combined with pemetrexed demonstrated a greater synergism compared with sorafenib combined with gemcitabine. Sorafenib arrested the cell cycle at the G1 phase, while gemcitabine and pemetrexed caused arrest at the S phase. The molecular mechanism of this synergism was due to the downstream signalling pathways, which were efficiently suppressed by sorafenib, therefore increasing the incidence of the entry of the chemotherapeutic drugs into the apoptotic pathways. Moreover, sorafenib and pemetrexed demonstrated stronger synergism, demonstrating that inhibiting the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways concurrently may achieve improved antitumor effects.

  7. Hippo Reprograms the Transcriptional Response to Ras Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Justine; Jacobs, Jelle; Sansores-Garcia, Leticia; Natarajan, Malini; Zeitlinger, Julia; Aerts, Stein; Halder, Georg; Hamaratoglu, Fisun

    2017-09-25

    Hyperactivating mutations in Ras signaling are hallmarks of carcinomas. Ras signaling mediates cell fate decisions as well as proliferation during development. It is not known what dictates whether Ras signaling drives differentiation versus proliferation. Here we show that the Hippo pathway is critical for this decision. Loss of Hippo switches Ras activation from promoting cellular differentiation to aggressive cellular proliferation. Transcriptome analysis combined with genetic tests show that this excessive proliferation depends on the synergistic induction of Ras target genes. Using ChIP-nexus, we find that Hippo signaling keeps Ras targets in check by directly regulating the expression of two key downstream transcription factors of Ras signaling: the ETS-domain transcription factor Pointed and the repressor Capicua. Our results highlight how independent signaling pathways can impinge on each other at the level of transcription factors, thereby providing a safety mechanism to keep proliferation in check under normal developmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of forced expression of mutated K-RAS gene on gastrointestinal cancer cell lines and the IGF-1R targeting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Sasaki, Yasushi; Koide, Hideyuki; Motoya, Masayo; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Takagi, Hideyasu; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Tokino, Takashi; Carbone, David P; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2017-02-01

    Mutation in K-RAS (K-RAS-MT) plays important roles in both cancer progression and resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in gastrointestinal tumors. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling is required for carcinogenicity and progression of many tumors as well. We have previously shown successful therapy for gastrointestinal cancer cell lines bearing a K-RAS mutation using an anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody. In this study, we sought to evaluate effects of forced K-RAS-MT expression on gastrointestinal cancer cell lines representing a possible second resistance mechanism for anti-EGFR therapy and IGF-1R-targeted therapy for these transfectants. We made stable transfectants of K-RAS-MT in two gastrointestinal cancer cell lines, colorectal RKO and pancreatic BxPC-3. We assessed the effect of forced expression of K-RAS-MT on proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion in gastrointestinal cancer cells. Then we assessed anti-tumor effects of dominant negative IGF-1R (IGF-1R/dn) and an IGF-1R inhibitor, picropodophyllin, on the K-RAS-MT transfectants. Overexpression of K-RAS-MT in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines led to more aggressive phenotypes, with increased proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and increased motility and invasion. IGF-1R blockade suppressed cell growth, colony formation, migration, and invasion, and up-regulated chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of gastrointestinal cancer cells, even when K-RAS-MT was over-expressed. IGF-1R blockade inhibited the Akt pathway more than the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in the K-RAS-MT transfectants. IGF-1R/dn, moreover, inhibited the growth of murine xenografts expressing K-RAS-MT. Thus, K-RAS-MT might be important for progressive phonotype observed in gastrointestinal cancers. IGF-1R decoy is a candidate molecular therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal cancers even if K-RAS is mutated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals

  9. Systemic Regulation of RAS/MAPK Signaling by the Serotonin Metabolite 5-HIAA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schmid

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Human cancer is caused by the interplay of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and inherited variations in cancer susceptibility genes. While many of the tumor initiating mutations are well characterized, the effect of genetic background variation on disease onset and progression is less understood. We have used C. elegans genetics to identify genetic modifiers of the oncogenic RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. Quantitative trait locus analysis of two highly diverged C. elegans isolates combined with allele swapping experiments identified the polymorphic monoamine oxidase A (MAOA gene amx-2 as a negative regulator of RAS/MAPK signaling. We further show that the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, which is a product of MAOA catalysis, systemically inhibits RAS/MAPK signaling in different organs of C. elegans. Thus, MAOA activity sets a global threshold for MAPK activation by controlling 5-HIAA levels. To our knowledge, 5-HIAA is the first endogenous small molecule that acts as a systemic inhibitor of RAS/MAPK signaling.

  10. A novel oncogenic BTK isoform is overexpressed in colon cancers and required for RAS-mediated transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassilli, E; Pisano, F; Cialdella, A

    2016-01-01

    -transcriptionally regulated, via hnRNPK, by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. p65BTK is endowed with strong transforming activity that depends on active signal-regulated protein kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2) and its inhibition abolishes RAS transforming activity. Accordingly, p65BTK overexpression in colon cancer...

  11. Targeting the RAS pathway in melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Zhenyu; Flaherty, Keith T.; Tsao, Hensin

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a highly lethal type of skin cancer and is often refractory to all traditional chemo-therapeutic agents. Key insights into the genetic makeup of melanoma tumors have led to the development of promising targeted agents. An activated RAS pathway, anchored by oncogenic BRAF, appears to be the central motor driving melanoma proliferation. Although recent clinical trials have brought enormous hope to patients with melanoma, adverse effects and novel escape mechanisms of thes...

  12. Fetisisme Ras Kaukasoid dan Ras Mongoloid Sebagai Strategi Pemasaran dalam Sinetron Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Yudhistira

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRAK   Budaya populer yang tumbuh seiring dengan industrialisasi memengaruhi produksi per- filman di Indonesia. Salah satu genre perfilman di Indonesia adalah sinetron. Sinetron yang di- kategorikan sebagai produk seni kitsch memiliki dua kriteria yaitu sebagai komoditi seni yang populer dan sebagai komoditi dagang yang menghasilkan keuntungan ekonomis. Sebagai se- buah produk seni kitsch yang merupakan dasar pembuatan karyanya adalah selera masyarakat kebanyakan maka sinetron harus jeli dalam melihat keadaan dan latar belakang masyarakat. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode kualitatif. Hasil penelitian ini menggambarkan masyara- kat Indonesia yang merupakan ras Melayu telah dijajah oleh ras Kaukasoid dan Mongoloid sebelum tahun 1945 dan setelahnya. Efek dari penjajahan ini adalah ras Melayu telah ditanami fantasi yang menjadi stereotip mengenai ras Kaukasoid dan Mongoloid yang berakhir dengan fetisisme. Fetisisme ini dijadikan sebagai strategi pemasaran oleh produser dan sutradara un- tuk menarik antusiasme calon penonton sinetron. Caranya dengan menampilkan aktor dan aktris Melayu keturunan Kaukasoid dan Mongoloid sebagai pemeran utama.   Kata kunci: sinetron, seni kitsch, ras, fetisisme

  13. RAS mutations and oncogenesis: not all RAS mutations are created equally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Steven Miller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in RAS proteins is one of the most common genetic alterations observed in human and experimentally induced rodent cancers. In vivo, oncogenic mutations have been shown to occur at exons 12, 13, and 61, resulting in any one of 19 possible point mutations in a given tumor for a specific RAS isoform. While some studies have suggested a possible role of allele-specific mutation in determining tumor severity and phenotype, no general consensus has emerged on the oncogenicity of different mutant alleles in tumor formation and progression. Part of this may be due to a lack of a single, signature pathway that shows significant alterations between different mutations. Rather, it is likely that subtle differences in the activation, or lack thereof, of downstream effectors by different RAS mutant alleles may determine the eventual outcome in terms of tumor phenotype. This paper reviews our current understanding of the potential role of different RAS mutations on tumorigenesis, highlights studies in model cell culture and in vivo systems, and discusses the potential of expression array and computational network modeling to dissect out differences in activated RAS genes in conferring a transforming phenotype.

  14. IAA RAS Radio Telescope Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, A.; Lavrov, A.

    2007-07-01

    Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAA RAS) has three identical radio telescopes, the receiving complex of which consists of five two-channel receivers of different bands, six cryogen systems, and additional devices: four local oscillators, phase calibration generators and IF commutator. The design, hardware and data communication protocol are described. The most convenient way to join the devices of the receiving complex into the common monitoring system is to use the interface which allows to connect numerous devices to the data bus. For the purpose of data communication regulation and to exclude conflicts, a data communication protocol has been designed, which operates with complex formatted data sequences. Formation of such sequences requires considerable data processing capability. That is provided by a microcontroller chip in each slave device. The test version of the software for the central computer has been developed in IAA RAS. We are developing the Mark IV FS software extension modules, which will allow us to control the receiving complex of the radio telescope by special SNAP commands from both operator input and schedule files. We are also developing procedures of automatic measurements of SEFD, system noise temperature and other parameters, available both in VLBI and single-dish modes of operation. The system described has been installed on all IAA RAS radio telescopes at "Svetloe", "Zelenchukskaya" and "Badary" observatories. It has proved to be working quite reliably and to show the perfonmance expected.

  15. The Ras-ERK pathway modulates cytoskeleton organization, cell motility and lung metastasis signature genes in MDA-MB-231 LM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, C; Helfman, D M

    2014-07-10

    MDA-MB-231 LM2 (herein referred to as LM2) is a derivative of MDA-MB-231 cells that was selected for its ability to metastasize to lung tissue in vivo. We investigated cellular properties of LM2 including actin cytoskeleton organization, motility and signaling pathways that drive the expression of genes associated with the lung metastasis signature. Parental cells exhibit well-developed stress fibers, whereas LM2 had poorly organized stress fibers. LM2 exhibited higher levels of K-Ras protein and corresponding higher levels of phosphorylated ERK compared with parental cells. The Ras-ERK pathway was responsible for the disruption of stress fibers because inhibition of MEK with UO126 or small interfering RNA (siRNA) against K-Ras or ERK1/2 resulted in restoration of stress fibers and focal adhesions. We observed that the K-Ras-ERK pathway is important for the expression of genes associated with the lung metastasis signature. Paradoxically, inhibition of the Ras-ERK pathway did not result in inhibition of cell motility but was accompanied by activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Inhibition of both ERK and PI3K pathways was required to inhibit motility of LM2 cells. These results suggest that both ERK and PI3K pathways drive motile functions of metastatic LM2 cells and genes associated with the lung metastasis signature.

  16. Nuclear Ras2-GTP controls invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Serena; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Using an eGFP-RBD3 probe, which specifically binds Ras-GTP, we recently showed that the fluorescent probe was localized to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in wild type cells growing exponentially on glucose medium, indicating the presence of active Ras in these cellular compartments. To investigate the nuclear function of Ras-GTP, we generated a strain where Ras2 is fused to the nuclear export signal (NES) from the HIV virus, in order to exclude this protein from the nucleus. Our results show that nuclear active Ras2 is required for invasive growth development in haploid yeast, while the expression of the NES-Ras2 protein does not cause growth defects either on fermentable or non-fermentable carbon sources and does not influence protein kinase A (PKA) activity related phenotypes analysed. Moreover, we show that the cAMP/PKA pathway controls invasive growth influencing the localization of active Ras. In particular, we show that PKA activity plays a role in the localization of active Ras and influences the ability of the cells to invade the agar: high PKA activity leads to a predominant nuclear accumulation of active Ras and induces invasive growth, while low PKA activity leads to plasma membrane localization of active Ras and to a defective invasive growth phenotype.

  17. Overexpressed galectin-3 in pancreatic cancer induces cell proliferation and invasion by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Song

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PDAC is a lethal disease with a five-year survival of 3-5%. Mutations in K-Ras are found in nearly all cases, but K-Ras mutations alone are not sufficient for the development of PDAC. Additional factors contribute to activation of Ras signaling and lead to tumor formation. Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a multifunctional β-galactoside-binding protein, is highly expressed in PDAC. We therefore investigated the functional role of Gal-3 in pancreatic cancer progression and its relationship to Ras signaling. Expression of Gal-3 was determined by immunohistochemistry, Q-PCR and immunoblot. Functional studies were performed using pancreatic cell lines genetically engineered to express high or low levels of Gal-3. Ras activity was examined by Raf pull-down assays. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence were used to assess protein-protein interactions. In this study, we demonstrate that Gal-3 was highly up-regulated in human tumors and in a mutant K-Ras mouse model of PDAC. Down-regulation of Gal-3 by lentivirus shRNA decreased PDAC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and reduced tumor volume and size in an orthotopic mouse model. Gal-3 bound Ras and maintained Ras activity; down-regulation of Gal-3 decreased Ras activity as well as Ras down-stream signaling including phosphorylation of ERK and AKT and Ral A activity. Transfection of Gal-3 cDNA into PDAC cells with low-level Gal-3 augmented Ras activity and its down-stream signaling. These results suggest that Gal-3 contributes to pancreatic cancer progression, in part, by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling. Gal-3 may therefore be a potential novel target for this deadly disease.

  18. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors induce apoptosis of Ras-transformed cells denied substratum attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, P F; Sakamuro, D; Prendergast, G C

    1997-02-15

    Farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs) are a novel class of antitumor drugs that block the oncogenic activity of Ras. Because FTIs lack significant cell toxicity in vitro and in vivo, a significant question is how they cause tumor regression. We now report that FTIs are in fact potent activators of apoptosis in Ras-transformed cells if attachment to substratum is prevented. When cultured at high density or on polyHEMA, a nonadherent substrate, Ras-transformed cells exhibited massive DNA degradation and cell death within 24 h of treatment with the FTI L-739,749. Death was p53-independent and was inhibited by the apoptosis suppressor BCL-XL. Furthermore, apoptosis was significantly attenuated by ectopic expression of a farnesyl-independent form of RhoB, a Rho protein previously implicated as a critical target for inhibition by FTIs. The findings suggest a link between FTIs and Rho-dependent adhesion signaling. Furthermore, our work indicates that FTIs revert cells to a state in which cell-substratum attachment is necessary for viability and suggests that apoptosis forms the basis for drug-induced tumor regression.

  19. ERK1 and ERK2 mitogen-activated protein kinases affect Ras-dependent cell signaling differentially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonini Chiara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases p44ERK1 and p42ERK2 are crucial components of the regulatory machinery underlying normal and malignant cell proliferation. A currently accepted model maintains that ERK1 and ERK2 are regulated similarly and contribute to intracellular signaling by phosphorylating a largely common subset of substrates, both in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Results Here, we show that ablation of ERK1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts and NIH 3T3 cells by gene targeting and RNA interference results in an enhancement of ERK2-dependent signaling and in a significant growth advantage. By contrast, knockdown of ERK2 almost completely abolishes normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of ERK1 but not of ERK2 in NIH 3T3 cells inhibits oncogenic Ras-mediated proliferation and colony formation. These phenotypes are independent of the kinase activity of ERK1, as expression of a catalytically inactive form of ERK1 is equally effective. Finally, ectopic expression of ERK1 but not ERK2 is sufficient to attenuate Ras-dependent tumor formation in nude mice. Conclusion These results reveal an unexpected interplay between ERK1 and ERK2 in transducing Ras-dependent cell signaling and proliferation. Whereas ERK2 seems to have a positive role in controlling normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation, ERK1 probably affects the overall signaling output of the cell by antagonizing ERK2 activity.

  20. Death Pathways Triggered by Activated Ras in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Ras GTPases are best known for their ability to serve as molecular switches regulating cell growth, differentiation and survival. Gene mutations that result in expression of constitutively active forms of Ras proteins have been clearly linked to oncogenesis in animal models and humans. However, over the past two decades, evidence has gradually accumulated to support a paradoxical role for Ras proteins in the initiation of cell death pathways. The balance between the opposing functions of Ras in cell proliferation/survival versus cell death can be critical for determining the overall fate of the cancer cell. In this review we will survey the body of literature that points to the ability of activated Ras proteins to tip the scales toward cell death under conditions where cancer cells encounter adverse environmental conditions or are subjected to apoptotic stimuli. In some cases the consequences of Ras activation are mediated through interactions with known effectors and well defined apoptotic death pathways. However, in other cases it appears that Ras operates by triggering novel non-apoptotic death mechanisms that are just beginning to be characterized. Understanding the details of these pathways, and the various factors that go into changing the nature of Ras signaling from pro-survival to pro-death, could potentially set the stage for the development of novel therapeutic approaches aimed at manipulating the pro-death Ras effector pathways in cancers. PMID:21196257

  1. A Novel Ras Inhibitor (MDC-1016 Reduces Human Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo G Mackenzie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers partly because of its persistent resistance to chemotherapy. The currently limited treatment options for pancreatic cancer underscore the need for more efficient agents. Because activating Kras mutations initiate and maintain pancreatic cancer, inhibition of this pathway should have a major therapeutic impact. We synthesized phospho-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (PFTS; MDC-1016 and evaluated its efficacy, safety, and metabolism in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. PFTS inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in culture in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In an MIA PaCa-2 xenograft mouse model, PFTS at a dose of 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced tumor growth by 62% and 65% (P < .05 vs vehicle control. Furthermore, PFTS prevented pancreatitis-accelerated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in mice with activated Kras. PFTS appeared to be safe, with the animals showing no signs of toxicity during treatment. Following oral administration, PFTS was rapidly absorbed, metabolized to FTS and FTS glucuronide, and distributed through the blood to body organs. Mechanistically, PFTS inhibited Ras-GTP, the active form of Ras, both in vitro and in vivo, leading to the inhibition of downstream effector pathways c-RAF/mitogen-activated protein-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK/ERK1/2 kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT. In addition, PFTS proved to be a strong combination partner with phospho-valproic acid, a novel signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 inhibitor, displaying synergy in the inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth. In conclusion, PFTS, a direct Ras inhibitor, is an efficacious agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models, deserving further evaluation.

  2. Bisphenol A binds to Ras proteins and competes with guanine nucleotide exchange: implications for GTPase-selective antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpel, Miriam; Jockers, Katharina F G; Düppe, Peter M; Autzen, Jasmin; Potheraveedu, Veena N; Ince, Semra; Yip, King Tuo; Heumann, Rolf; Herrmann, Christian; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2013-12-12

    We show for the first time that bisphenol A (10) has the capacity to interact directly with K-Ras and that Rheb weakly binds to bisphenol A (10) and 4,4'-biphenol derivatives. We have characterized these interactions at atomic resolution suggesting that these compounds sterically interfere with the Sos-mediated nucleotide exchange in H- and K-Ras. We show that 4,4'-biphenol (5) selectively inhibits Rheb signaling and induces cell death suggesting that this compound might be a novel candidate for treatment of tuberous sclerosis-mediated tumor growth. Our results propose a new mode of action for bisphenol A (10) that advocates a reduced exposure to this compound in our environment. Our data may lay the foundation for the future design of GTPase-selective antagonists with higher affinity to benefit of the treatment of cancer because K-Ras inhibition is regarded to be a promising strategy with a potential therapeutic window for targeting Sos in Ras-driven tumors.

  3. Ecological and engineering importance of the Bet el Ras beach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A unique sandstone known as the Bet el Ras sandstone, supposedly of Holocene age, occurs profusely along the western coast of Unguja but more extensive at its locality area, Bet el Ras, where it forms a rocky shore. The sandstone has been blasted in the past for construction of the sea wall that fronts the Zanzibar Town, ...

  4. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  5. Two distinct Ras genes from Puccinia striiformis exhibit differential roles in rust pathogenicity and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yulin; Wang, Wumei; Yao, Juanni; Huang, Lili; Voegele, Ralf T; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-11-01

    Ras genes have been shown to regulate a variety of cellular processes in higher eukaryotes. However, much less is known about their function(s) in fungi, especially plant pathogenic fungi. Here, we report the identification and functional analysis of Ras genes from Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), an important fungal pathogen in wheat production worldwide. Pst contains two Ras genes, PsRas1 and PsRas2, which share 48.6% similarity at the protein level and fall into two different phylogenetic clades. Both PsRas1 and PsRas2 have conserved protein sequences among different Pst isolates, but exhibit different transcript profiles during Pst infection. Silencing of PsRas1 or PsRas2 indicates that PsRas2 but not PsRas1 contributes significantly to rust pathogenicity. However, overexpression of PsRas1, but not PsRas2, promotes cell death in yeast and plants. Further studies show that all conserved domains of Ras GTPases in PsRas1 are needed to induce this cell death. In plants, PsRas1-triggered cell death shows similar characteristics as plant hypersensitive response. Our findings suggest that PsRas1 and PsRas2 take over different functions in rust pathogenicity and cell death, thus facilitating the understanding of cell death, pathogenic mechanisms of plant pathogenic fungi and the search for novel pathogen control strategies. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downward, Julian

    2015-04-15

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacologic approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be "undruggable." This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS-mutant but not wild-type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS-mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a reevaluation of the approaches taken. On the basis of experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS-mutant cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1802-9. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Ras activation and symmetry breaking during Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortholt, Arjan; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kataria, Rama; Van Haastert, Peter J M

    2013-10-01

    Central to chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which a shallow spatial gradient of chemoattractant induces symmetry breaking of activated signaling molecules. Previously, we have used Dictyostelium mutants to investigate the minimal requirements for chemotaxis, and identified a basal signaling module providing activation of Ras and F-actin at the leading edge. Here, we show that Ras activation after application of a pipette releasing the chemoattractant cAMP has three phases, each depending on specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs). Initially a transient activation of Ras occurs at the entire cell boundary, which is proportional to the local cAMP concentrations and therefore slightly stronger at the front than in the rear of the cell. This transient Ras activation is present in gα2 (gpbB)-null cells but not in gβ (gpbA)-null cells, suggesting that Gβγ mediates the initial activation of Ras. The second phase is symmetry breaking: Ras is activated only at the side of the cell closest to the pipette. Symmetry breaking absolutely requires Gα2 and Gβγ, but not the cytoskeleton or four cAMP-induced signaling pathways, those dependent on phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3], cGMP, TorC2 and PLA2. As cells move in the gradient, the crescent of activated Ras in the front half of the cell becomes confined to a small area at the utmost front of the cell. Confinement of Ras activation leads to cell polarization, and depends on cGMP formation, myosin and F-actin. The experiments show that activation, symmetry breaking and confinement of Ras during Dictyostelium chemotaxis uses different G-protein subunits and a multitude of Ras GEFs and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs).

  8. Mitochondrial STAT3 contributes to transformation of Barrett's epithelial cells that express oncogenic Ras in a p53-independent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunhua; Huo, Xiaofang; Agoston, Agoston T; Zhang, Xi; Theiss, Arianne L; Cheng, Edaire; Zhang, Qiuyang; Zaika, Alexander; Pham, Thai H; Wang, David H; Lobie, Peter E; Odze, Robert D; Spechler, Stuart J; Souza, Rhonda F

    2015-08-01

    Metaplastic epithelial cells of Barrett's esophagus transformed by the combination of p53-knockdown and oncogenic Ras expression are known to activate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). When phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 (Tyr705), STAT3 functions as a nuclear transcription factor that can contribute to oncogenesis. STAT3 phosphorylated at serine 727 (Ser727) localizes in mitochondria, but little is known about mitochondrial STAT3's contribution to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus, which is the focus of this study. We introduced a constitutively active variant of human STAT3 (STAT3CA) into the following: 1) non-neoplastic Barrett's (BAR-T) cells; 2) BAR-T cells with p53 knockdown; and 3) BAR-T cells that express oncogenic H-Ras(G12V). STAT3CA transformed only the H-Ras(G12V)-expressing BAR-T cells (evidenced by loss of contact inhibition, formation of colonies in soft agar, and generation of tumors in immunodeficient mice), and did so in a p53-independent fashion. The transformed cells had elevated levels of both mitochondrial (Ser727) and nuclear (Tyr705) phospho-STAT3. Introduction of a STAT3CA construct with a mutated tyrosine phosphorylation site into H-Ras(G12V)-expressing Barrett's cells resulted in high levels of mitochondrial phospho-STAT3 (Ser727) with little or no nuclear phospho-STAT3 (Tyr705), and the cells still formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. Thus tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 is not required for tumor formation in Ras-expressing Barrett's cells. We conclude that mitochondrial STAT3 (Ser727) can contribute to oncogenesis in Barrett's cells that express oncogenic Ras. These findings suggest that agents targeting STAT3 might be useful for chemoprevention in patients with Barrett's esophagus. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Tumor RAS Gene Expression Levels Are Influenced by the Mutational Status of RAS Genes and Both Upstream and Downstream RAS Pathway Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Robert M; Yi, Ming; Kessing, Bailey; Nissley, Dwight V; McCormick, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The 3 human RAS genes play pivotal roles regulating proliferation, differentiation, and survival in normal cells and become mutated in 15% to 20% of all human tumors and amplified in many others. In this report, we examined data from The Cancer Genome Atlas to investigate the relationship between RAS gene mutational status and messenger RNA expression. We show that all 3 RAS genes exhibit increased expression when they are mutated in a context-dependent manner. In the case of KRAS, this increase is manifested by a larger proportional increase in KRAS4A than KRAS4B, although both increase significantly. In addition, the mutational status of RAS genes can be associated with expression changes in other RAS genes, with most of these cases showing decreased expression. The mutational status associations with expression are recapitulated in cancer cell lines. Increases in expression are mediated by both copy number variation and contextual differences, including mutational status of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and BRAF. These findings potentially reveal an adaptive response during tumor evolution that is dependent on the mutational status of proximal genes in the RAS pathway and cellular context. Cell contextual differences in these adaptations may influence therapeutic responsiveness and alternative resistance mechanisms.

  10. Chemopreventive effect of punicalagin, a novel tannin component isolated from Terminalia catappa, on H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Shern; Li, Jih-Heng

    2006-05-05

    Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, have been characterized to possess antioxidative and anti-genotoxic activities. However, their effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated carcinogenesis are still unclear. In the present study, H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells were used to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of T. catappa water extract (TCE) and punicalagin. In the cell proliferation assay, TCE and punicalagin suppressed the proliferation of H-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells with a dose-dependent manner but only partially affected non-transformed NIH3T3 cells proliferation. The differential cytotoxicity of TCE/punicalagin on the H-ras-transformed and non-transformed NIH3T3 cells indicated the selectivity of TCE/punicalagin against H-ras induced transformation. TCE or punicalagin treatment reduced anchorage-independent growth that could be due to a cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. The intracellular superoxide level, known to modulate downstream signaling of Ras protein, was decreased by punicalagin treatments. The levels of phosphorylated JNK-1 and p38 were also decreased with punicalagin treatments. Thus, the chemopreventive effect of punicalagin against H-ras induced transformation could result from inhibition of the intracellular redox status and JNK-1/p38 activation.

  11. Analysis of trade condition in Ras region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andelić Slavica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern academic literature in the field of trade in macro and mesoeconomic atmosphere, is trying to shed light on the data which defines exchange flows in intra and international environment. The study of this work is based on the database based through state registers, where with their sizing and analysis, we are coming to a deeper insight into the condition of market channels of Ras region and its relationship with the environment. The aim of this work is meticulous interpretation of trade patterns as a result of macro and meso trade policy, which could serve as an incentive for local and governmental structures in developing commercial potential of the southern part of our country.

  12. Targeting the RAS pathway in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhenyu; Flaherty, Keith T; Tsao, Hensin

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a highly lethal type of skin cancer and is often refractory to all traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Key insights into the genetic makeup of melanoma tumors have led to the development of promising targeted agents. An activated RAS pathway, anchored by oncogenic BRAF, appears to be the central motor driving melanoma proliferation. Although recent clinical trials have brought enormous hope to patients with melanoma, adverse effects and novel escape mechanisms of these inhibitors have already emerged. Definition of the limits of the first successful targeted therapies will provide the basis for further advances in management of disseminated melanoma. In this review, the current state of targeted therapy for melanoma is discussed, including the potent BRAF(V600E) inhibitor vemurafenib. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ras Laffan helium recovery unit 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauve, Eric Arnaud; Grabié, Veronique; Grillot, David; Delcayre, Franck; Deschildre, Cindy

    2012-06-01

    In May 2010, Air Liquide was awarded a contract for the Engineering Procurement and Construction (Turnkey EPC) for a second helium recovery unit [RLH II] dedicated to the Ras Laffan refinery in Qatar. This unit will come in addition to the one [RLH I] delivered and commissioned by Air Liquide in 2005. It will increase the helium production of Qatar from 10% to 28% of worldwide production. RLH I and RLH II use Air Liquide Advanced Technologies helium liquefiers. With a production of 8 tons of liquid helium per day, the RLH I liquefier is the world largest, but not for long. Thanks to the newly developed turbine TC7, Air Liquide was able to propose for RLH II a single liquefier able to produce over 20 tons per day of liquid helium without liquid nitrogen pre-cooling. This liquefier using 6 Air Liquide turbines (TC series) will set a new record in the world of helium liquefaction.

  14. RasGRP3 regulates the migration of glioma cells via interaction with Arp3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Finniss, Susan; Cazacu, Simona; Xiang, Cunli; Poisson, Laila M.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Brodie, Chaya

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive primary brain tumors, are highly infiltrative. Although GBM express high Ras activity and Ras proteins have been implicated in gliomagenesis, Ras-activating mutations are not frequent in these tumors. RasGRP3, an important signaling protein responsive to diacylglycerol (DAG), increases Ras activation. Here, we examined the expression and functions of RasGRP3 in GBM and glioma cells. RasGRP3 expression was upregulated in GBM specimens and glioma stem cells compared with normal brains and neural stem cells, respectively. RasGRP3 activated Ras and Rap1 in glioma cells and increased cell migration and invasion partially via Ras activation. Using pull-down assay and mass spectroscopy we identified the actin-related protein, Arp3, as a novel interacting protein of RasGRP3. The interaction of RasGRP3 and Arp3 was validated by immunofluorescence staining and co-immunoprecipitation, and PMA, which activates RasGRP3 and induces its translocation to the peri-nuclear region, increased the association of Arp3 and RasGRP3. Arp3 was upregulated in GBM, regulated cell spreading and migration and its silencing partially decreased these effects of RasGRP3 in glioma cells. In summary, RasGRP3 acts as an important integrating signaling protein of the DAG and Ras signaling pathways and actin polymerization and represents an important therapeutic target in GBM. PMID:25682201

  15. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  16. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  17. RasGRP1 promotes amphetamine-induced motor behavior through a Rhes interaction network ("Rhesactome") in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, Neelam; Swarnkar, Supriya; Giovinazzo, Vincenzo; Morgenweck, Jenny; Bohn, Laura M; Scharager-Tapia, Catherina; Pascal, Bruce; Martinez-Acedo, Pablo; Khare, Kshitij; Subramaniam, Srinivasa

    2016-11-15

    The striatum of the brain coordinates motor function. Dopamine-related drugs may be therapeutic to patients with striatal neurodegeneration, such as Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), but these drugs have unwanted side effects. In addition to stimulating the release of norepinephrine, amphetamines, which are used for narcolepsy and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), trigger dopamine release in the striatum. The guanosine triphosphatase Ras homolog enriched in the striatum (Rhes) inhibits dopaminergic signaling in the striatum, is implicated in HD and L-dopa-induced dyskinesia, and has a role in striatal motor control. We found that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RasGRP1 inhibited Rhes-mediated control of striatal motor activity in mice. RasGRP1 stabilized Rhes, increasing its synaptic accumulation in the striatum. Whereas partially Rhes-deficient (Rhes+/-) mice had an enhanced locomotor response to amphetamine, this phenotype was attenuated by coincident depletion of RasGRP1. By proteomic analysis of striatal lysates from Rhes-heterozygous mice with wild-type or partial or complete knockout of Rasgrp1, we identified a diverse set of Rhes-interacting proteins, the "Rhesactome," and determined that RasGRP1 affected the composition of the amphetamine-induced Rhesactome, which included PDE2A (phosphodiesterase 2A; a protein associated with major depressive disorder), LRRC7 (leucine-rich repeat-containing 7; a protein associated with bipolar disorder and ADHD), and DLG2 (discs large homolog 2; a protein associated with chronic pain). Thus, this Rhes network provides insight into striatal effects of amphetamine and may aid the development of strategies to treat various neurological and psychological disorders associated with the striatal dysfunction. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Of fads, fashion, surrogate endpoints and dual RAS blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Franz H; Staessen, Jan A; Zannad, Faiez

    2010-09-01

    Dual renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade, mostly by combining an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), is increasingly used in patients with hypertension and diabetes and/or proteinuria and in those with resistant heart failure. However, in the zest of achieving greater nephroprotection and cardioprotection, even patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension are not uncommonly treated with dual RAS blockade. In 2003 the COOPERATE trial, seemed to confirm that dual RAS blockade was beneficial and that proteinuria reduction was synonymous with nephroprotection. This study had to be withdrawn recently attesting to the suspicion that the data looked to good to be true. Moreover, the large prospective ONTARGET data argue against a nephroprotective effect of dual RAS blockade and together with renal findings from ACCOMPLISH, cast doubt on albuminuria/proteinuria being a reliable surrogate endpoint for renal outcome. Although in heart failure, dual RAS blockade had some benefit without reducing mortality, there remains a distinct safety issue with regard to hyperkalemia and elevated creatinine. Neither in ischaemic heart disease nor in left ventricular hypertrophy had dual RAS blockade any benefits when compared with single RAS blockade. Of note, the combination of an ACE inhibitor with an ARB was recently shown to reduce the risk of dementia. All dual RAS blockade may be created equal and the combination of valsartan with aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor will be evaluated in diabetic patients in the prospective, randomized ALTITUDE study. For the time being, given the adverse effects and lack of consistent survival benefits, the use of dual RAS blockade should be avoided unless ironclad data emerge to the contrary.

  19. A p53-inducible microRNA-34a downregulates Ras signaling by targeting IMPDH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwa-Ryeon; Roe, Jae-Seok; Lee, Ji-Eun; Hwang, In-Young [National Research Laboratory for Metabolic Checkpoint, Departments of Biomedical Sciences and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun-Jung [National Research Laboratory for Chromatin Dynamics, College of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Hong-Duk, E-mail: hdyoun@snu.ac.kr [National Research Laboratory for Metabolic Checkpoint, Departments of Biomedical Sciences and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); WCU Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 downregulates IMPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53-dependent miR-34a transactivation inhibits IMPDH transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-34a-mediated inhibition of IMPDH downregulates GTP-dependent Ras signal. -- Abstract: p53 is a well-known transcription factor that controls cell cycle arrest and cell death in response to a wide range of stresses. Moreover, p53 regulates glucose metabolism and its mutation results in the metabolic switch to the Warburg effect found in cancer cells. Nucleotide biosynthesis is also critical for cell proliferation and the cell division cycle. Nonetheless, little is known about whether p53 regulates nucleotide biosynthesis. Here we demonstrated that p53-inducible microRNA-34a (miR-34a) repressed inosine 5 Prime -monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a rate-limiting enzyme of de novo GTP biosynthesis. Treatment with anti-miR-34a inhibitor relieved the expression of IMPDH upon DNA damage. Ultimately, miR-34a-mediated inhibition of IMPDH resulted in repressed activation of the GTP-dependent Ras signaling pathway. In summary, we suggest that p53 has a novel function in regulating purine biosynthesis, aided by miR-34a-dependent IMPDH repression.

  20. Diagnostic RAS mutation analysis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A. Cree

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RAS mutation analysis is an important companion diagnostic test. Treatment of colorectal cancer with anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR therapy requires demonstration of RAS mutation status (both KRAS and NRAS, and it is good practice to include BRAF. In Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC and melanoma, assessment of RAS mutation status can be helpful in triaging patient samples for more extensive testing. This mini-review will discuss the role of PCR methods in providing rapid diagnostic information for cancer patients.

  1. p21-ras effector domain mutants constructed by "cassette" mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, J C; Vass, W C; Willumsen, B M

    1988-01-01

    A series of mutations encoding single-amino-acid substitutions within the v-rasH effector domain were constructed, and the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells was studied. The mutations, which spanned codons 32 to 40, were made by a "cassette" mutagenesis...... technique that involved replacing this portion of the v-rasH effector domain with a linker carrying two BspMI sites in opposite orientations. Since BspMI cleaves outside its recognition sequence, BspMI digestion of the plasmid completely removed the linker, creating a double-stranded gap whose missing ras...

  2. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide stimulates glial fibrillary acidic protein gene expression in cortical precursor cells by activating Ras and Rap1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastres-Becker, Isabel; Fernández-Pérez, Antonio; Cebolla, Beatriz; Vallejo, Mario

    2008-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) acts on cortical precursor cells to trigger glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene expression and astrocyte differentiation by stimulation of intracellular cAMP production. Here, we show that as expected, PACAP activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. However, inhibition of protein kinase A does not prevent PACAP-induced GFAP gene expression or astrocytogenesis. PACAP also activates the small GTPases Rap1 and Ras, but either activation of Rap1 alone by selective stimulation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Epac, or expression of a constitutively active form of Ras, do not induce GFAP gene expression. Ras is activated by PACAP in a cAMP-dependent manner, and inhibition of Ras and/or Rap1 decreases PACAP-induced GFAP promoter stimulation. Thus, cAMP-dependent PACAP-induced GFAP expression during astrocytogenesis involves the coordinated activation of both Ras and Rap1, but activation of either one of them in isolation is not sufficient to trigger this response.

  3. Diet, lifestyle and risk of K-ras mutation-positive and -negative colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wark, P.A.; Kuil, W. van der; Ploemacher, J.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Mulder, C.J.J.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2006-01-01

    K-ras mutation-positive (K-ras+) and -negative (K-ras-) colorectal adenomas may differ clinically and pathologically. As environmental compounds may cause mutations in the growth-related K-ras oncogene or affect clonal selection depending on mutational status, we evaluated whether the aetiology of

  4. Diet, Lifestyle and risk of K-ras mutation-positive and -negative colorectal adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wark, P.A.; Kuil, van der W.; Ploemacher, J.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Mulder, Ch.J.J.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2006-01-01

    K-ras mutation-positive (K-ras+) and -negative (K-ras-) colorectal adenomas may differ clinically and pathologically. As environmental compounds may cause mutations in the growth-related K-ras oncogene or affect clonal selection depending on mutational status, we evaluated whether the aetiology of

  5. Aberrant transmembrane signal transduction in Dictyostelium cells expressing a mutated ras gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Kesbeke, Fanja; Reymond, Christophe D.; Firtel, Richard A.; Luderus, Eva; Driel, Roel van

    1987-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum cells contain a single ras gene (Dd-ras) that is highly homologous to mammalian ras genes. Cell transformation with a vector carrying a ras gene with a (glycine → threonine) missense mutation at position 12 causes an altered morphogenesis. Extracellular cAMP signals regulate

  6. Lipoprotein-biomimetic nanostructure enables efficient targeting delivery of siRNA to Ras-activated glioblastoma cells via macropinocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia-Lin; Jiang, Gan; Song, Qing-Xiang; Gu, Xiao; Hu, Meng; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Song, Hua-Hua; Chen, Le-Pei; Lin, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Di; Chen, Jun; Feng, Jun-Feng; Qiu, Yong-Ming; Jiang, Ji-Yao; Jiang, Xin-Guo; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Gao, Xiao-Ling

    2017-05-01

    Hyperactivated Ras regulates many oncogenic pathways in several malignant human cancers including glioblastoma and it is an attractive target for cancer therapies. Ras activation in cancer cells drives protein internalization via macropinocytosis as a key nutrient-gaining process. By utilizing this unique endocytosis pathway, here we create a biologically inspired nanostructure that can induce cancer cells to `drink drugs' for targeting activating transcription factor-5 (ATF5), an overexpressed anti-apoptotic transcription factor in glioblastoma. Apolipoprotein E3-reconstituted high-density lipoprotein is used to encapsulate the siRNA-loaded calcium phosphate core and facilitate it to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, thus targeting the glioblastoma cells in a macropinocytosis-dependent manner. The nanostructure carrying ATF5 siRNA exerts remarkable RNA-interfering efficiency, increases glioblastoma cell apoptosis and inhibits tumour cell growth both in vitro and in xenograft tumour models. This strategy of targeting the macropinocytosis caused by Ras activation provides a nanoparticle-based approach for precision therapy in glioblastoma and other Ras-activated cancers.

  7. A comprehensive survey of Ras mutations in cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prior, Ian A; Lewis, Paul D; Mattos, Carla

    2012-01-01

    .... Although there is a high degree of similarity among the isoforms, K-Ras mutations are far more frequently observed in cancer, and each isoform displays preferential coupling to particular cancer types...

  8. The Protective Arm of the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The Protective Arm of the Renin Angiotensin System: Functional Aspects and Therapeutic Implications is the first comprehensive publication to signal the protective role of a distinct part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), providing readers with early insight into a complex system which...... will become of major medical importance in the near future. Focusing on recent research, The Protective Arm of the Renin Angiotensin System presents a host of new experimental studies on specific components of the RAS, namely angiotensin AT2 receptors (AT2R), the angiotensin (1-7) peptide with its receptor...... Mas, and the enzyme ACE 2, which exert significant beneficial, health-promoting actions by counterbalancing the well-known harmful arm of the RAS with its classical angiotensin AT1 receptor. This innovative concept of the protective arm of the RAS, examined in this reference, represents...

  9. Concomitant K- and N-ras gene point mutations in clonal murine lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Diamond, L E; Guerrero, I; Pellicer, A

    1988-01-01

    We have surveyed a panel of induced murine lymphomas for c-ras gene mutations. The K-ras gene seems to be preferentially activated in our system, and there are at least two examples of concomitant K- and N-ras gene mutations in the same tumor. This indicates that in some cases additional ras mutations may contribute to tumorigenesis and is evidence for a role of ras activation in tumor progression.

  10. Ras and Rap signaling in synaptic plasticity and mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stornetta, Ruth L; Zhu, J Julius

    2011-02-01

    The Ras family GTPases (Ras, Rap1, and Rap2) and their downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38MAPK) and PI3K signaling cascades control various physiological processes. In neuronal cells, recent studies have shown that these parallel cascades signal distinct forms of AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptor trafficking during experience-dependent synaptic plasticity and adaptive behavior. Interestingly, both hypo- and hyperactivation of Ras/ Rap signaling impair the capacity of synaptic plasticity, underscoring the importance of a "happy-medium" dynamic regulation of the signaling. Moreover, accumulating reports have linked various genetic defects that either up- or down-regulate Ras/Rap signaling with several mental disorders associated with learning disability (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Angelman syndrome, autism, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, Coffin-Lowry syndrome, Costello syndrome, Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes, fragile X syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, Noonan syndrome, schizophrenia, tuberous sclerosis, and X-linked mental retardation), highlighting the necessity of happy-medium dynamic regulation of Ras/Rap signaling in learning behavior. Thus, the recent advances in understanding of neuronal Ras/Rap signaling provide a useful guide for developing novel treatments for mental diseases.

  11. Resistance of R-Ras knockout mice to skin tumour induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ulrike; Prince, Stuart; Vähätupa, Maria; Laitinen, Anni M.; Nieminen, Katriina; Uusitalo-Järvinen, Hannele; Järvinen, Tero A. H.

    2015-01-01

    The R-ras gene encodes a small GTPase that is a member of the Ras family. Despite close sequence similarities, R-Ras is functionally distinct from the prototypic Ras proteins; no transformative activity and no activating mutations of R-Ras in human malignancies have been reported for it. R-Ras activity appears inhibitory towards tumour proliferation and invasion, and to promote cellular quiescence. Contrary to this, using mice with a deletion of the R-ras gene, we found that R-Ras facilitates DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumour induction. The tumours appeared in wild-type (WT) mice on average 6 weeks earlier than in R-Ras knockout (R-Ras KO) mice. WT mice developed almost 6 times more tumours than R-Ras KO mice. Despite strong R-Ras protein expression in the dermal blood vessels, no R-Ras could be detected in the epidermis from where the tumours arose. The DMBA/TPA skin tumourigenesis-model is highly dependent upon inflammation, and we found a greatly attenuated skin inflammatory response to DMBA/TPA-treatment in the R-Ras KO mice in the context of leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, these data suggest that despite its characterised role in promoting cellular quiescence, R-Ras is pro-tumourigenic in the DMBA/TPA tumour model and important for the inflammatory response to DMBA/TPA treatment. PMID:26133397

  12. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Imano, Motohiro [Department of Surgery, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Yanae, Masashi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Depeartment of Pharmacy, Sakai Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, Sakai, Osaka 590-0132 (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ► We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ► YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ► YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ► YM529/ONO-5920

  13. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ras1p and chimaeric constructs of Ras proteins reveals the hypervariable region and farnesylation as critical elements in the adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crechet, JB; Cool, RH; Jacquet, E; Lallemand, JY

    2003-01-01

    Ras1p and Ras2p, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are GTP-binding proteins that are essential elements in the signaling cascade leading to the activation of adenylyl cyclase. To overcome proteolytic activities that have hampered biochemical studies of Ras1p so far, its gene was genetically modified

  14. Another surprise from Metformin: novel mechanism of action via K-Ras influences endometrial cancer response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, David A; Yates, Melinda S; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Rodkey, Travis L; Zhang, Qian; Co, Ngai Na; Burzawa, Jennifer; Chigurupati, Sravanthi; Celestino, Joseph; Bowser, Jessica; Broaddus, Russell; Hancock, John F; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Lu, Karen H

    2013-12-01

    Metformin is an oral biguanide commonly used for the treatment of type II diabetes and has recently been demonstrated to possess antiproliferative properties that can be exploited for the prevention and treatment of a variety of cancers. The mechanisms underlying this effect have not been fully elucidated. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we examined the effects of metformin on endometrial tumors with defined aberrations in the PI3K/PTEN/mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways to understand metformin mechanism of action and identify clinically useful predictors of response to this agent. In vitro assays of proliferation, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis were used to quantify the effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cell lines with mutations in the PI3K/PTEN/mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. The in vivo effects of oral metformin on tumor progression were further examined using xenograft mouse models of endometrial cancer. K-Ras localization was analyzed by confocal microscopy using GFP-labeled oncogenic K-Ras and by immunoblot following subcellular fractionation. Metformin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and decreased tumor growth in preclinical endometrial cancer models, with the greatest response observed in cells harboring activating mutations in K-Ras. Furthermore, metformin displaces constitutively active K-Ras from the cell membrane, causing uncoupling of the MAPK signaling pathway. These studies provide a rationale for clinical trials using metformin in combination with PI3K-targeted agents for tumors harboring activating K-Ras mutations, and reveal a novel mechanism of action for metformin. ©2013 AACR.

  15. Blocking anaplerotic entry of glutamine into the TCA cycle sensitizes K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqcena, M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Hosny, C; Alhamed, A; Chatterjee, A; Foster, D A

    2015-05-14

    Cancer cells undergo a metabolic transformation that allows for increased anabolic demands, wherein glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates are shunted away for the synthesis of biological molecules required for cell growth and division. One of the key shunts is the exit of citrate from the mitochondria and the TCA cycle for the generation of cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A that can be used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. With the loss of mitochondrial citrate, cancer cells rely on the 'conditionally essential' amino acid glutamine (Q) as an anaplerotic carbon source for TCA cycle intermediates. Although Q deprivation causes G1 cell cycle arrest in non-transformed cells, its impact on the cancer cell cycle is not well characterized. We report here a correlation between bypass of the Q-dependent G1 checkpoint and cancer cells harboring K-Ras mutations. Instead of arresting in G1 in response to Q-deprivation, K-Ras-driven cancer cells arrest in either S- or G2/M-phase. Inhibition of K-Ras effector pathways was able to revert cells to G1 arrest upon Q deprivation. Blocking anaplerotic utilization of Q mimicked Q deprivation--causing S- and G2/M-phase arrest in K-Ras mutant cancer cells. Significantly, Q deprivation or suppression of anaplerotic Q utilization created synthetic lethality to the cell cycle phase-specific cytotoxic drugs, capecitabine and paclitaxel. These data suggest that disabling of the G1 Q checkpoint could represent a novel vulnerability of cancer cells harboring K-Ras and possibly other mutations that disable the Q-dependent checkpoint.

  16. Palbociclib, a selective CDK4/6 inhibitor, enhances the effect of selumetinib in RAS-driven non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianya; Zhang, Shumeng; Chen, Xi; Zheng, Xianan; Yao, Yinan; Lu, Guohua; Zhou, Jianying

    2017-11-01

    KRAS is one of the most commonly mutated oncogenes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Resistance to MEK inhibitor monotherapy develops through a variety of mechanisms. CDK4 was reported to have a synthetic lethal interaction with KRAS. In this study, we demonstrated the combination effects of the MEK inhibitor selumetinib and the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib in RAS-driven NSCLC. In vitro, cell lines with CDKN2A mutations were insensitive to selumetinib. We used siRNA and pharmacologic inhibition of CDK4 and found that the combination of selumetinib and palbociclib synergistically inhibited RAS-driven NSCLC cases with CDKN2A mutations but not those with wild type CDKN2A. The combination treatment potentiated growth inhibition and increased the population of cells in G1 phase. Selumetinib completely inhibited p-ERK but not p-RB. The addition of palbociclib markedly inhibited p-RB and downregulated survivin expression. In vivo, the combination treatment inhibited the growth of NSCLC xenografts, which correlated with decreased levels of p-RB, downregulated survivin and decreased Ki-67 staining. These data suggest that the combination treatment of palbociclib and selumetinib is effective in preclinical models of RAS-driven NSCLC with CDKN2A mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum amyloid P down-regulates CCL-1 expression, and inhibits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum amyloid P down-regulates CCL-1 expression, and inhibits Ras/MAPK signaling and development of breast cancer. Shuhong Ding, Hongzhi Li, Xiaohui Li, Wenwen Wang, Xiuling Du, Guoying Dong, Ping Zhang ...

  18. Expression patterns of genes encoding small GTPases Ras-dva-1 and Ras-dva-2 in the Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshina, Maria B; Bayramov, Andrey V; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases of the recently discovered Ras-dva family are specific to the Vertebrate phylum. In Xenopus laevis, Ras-dva-1 is expressed during gastrulation and neurulation in the anterior ectoderm where it regulates the early development of the forebrain and cranial placodes (Tereshina et al., 2006). In the present work, we studied the expression of Ras-dva-1 at later developmental stages. As a result, the Ras-dva-1 expression was revealed in the eye retina, epiphysis (pineal gland), hypophysis (pituitary), branchial arches, pharynx, oesophagus, stomach and gall bladder of swimming tadpoles. Additionally, we investigated for the first time the expression pattern of Ras-dva-2. This gene encodes a protein belonging to a novel sub-group of Ras-dva GTPases that we identified by phylogenetic analysis within Ras-dva family. In contrast to Ras-dva-1, Ras-dva-2 is not expressed before the swimming tadpole stage. At the swimming tadpole stage, however, Ras-dva-2 transcripts can be detected in the eye retina and brain. Later in development, the expression of Ras-dva-2 can also be revealed in the mesonephros and stomach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of Activated Ras in Gastric Chief Cells of Mice Leads to the Full Spectrum of Metaplastic Lineage Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunyoung; Hendley, Audrey M.; Bailey, Jennifer M.; Leach, Steven D.; Goldenring, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastric cancer develops in the context of parietal cell loss, spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), and intestinal metaplasia (IM). We investigated whether expression of the activated form of Ras in gastric chief cells of mice leads to development of SPEM, as well as progression of metaplasia. Methods We studied Mist1-CreERT2Tg/+;LSL-K-Ras(G12D)Tg/+ (Mist1-Kras) mice, which express the active form of Kras in chief cells upon tamoxifen exposure. We studied Mist1-CreERT2Tg/+;LSL-KRas (G12D)Tg/+;R26RmTmG/+ (Mist1-Kras-mTmG) mice to examine whether chief cells that express active Kras give rise to SPEM and IM. Some mice received intraperitoneal injections of the MEK inhibitor, selumetinib, for 14 consecutive days. Gastric tissues were collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and quantitative PCR. Results Mist1-Kras mice developed metaplastic glands, which completely replaced normal fundic lineages and progressed to IM within 3–4 months after tamoxifen injection. The metaplastic glands expressed markers of SPEM and IM, and were infiltrated by macrophages. Lineage tracing studies confirmed that the metaplasia developed directly from Kras (G12D)-induced chief cells. Selumetinib induced persistent regression of SPEM and IM and reestablished normal mucosal cells, which were derived from normal gastric progenitor cells. Conclusions Expression of activated Ras in chief cells of Mist1-Kras mice led to the full range of metaplastic lineage transitions, including SPEM and IM. Inhibition of Ras signaling by inhibition of MEK might reverse pre-neoplastic metaplasia in the stomach. PMID:26677984

  20. FOXO target gene CTDSP2 regulates cell cycle progression through Ras and p21Cip1/Waf1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, David E.A.; Polderman, Paulien E.; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Smits, Lydia M.; vanTriest, Miranda H.; vandenBerg, Maaike C.W.; Koerkamp, Marian J. Groot; vanLeenen, Dik; Lijnzaad, Philip; Holstege, Frank C.; Burgering, Boudewijn M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Activity of FOXO (forkhead box O) transcription factors is inhibited by growth factor–PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)–PKB (protein kinase B)/Akt signalling to control a variety of cellular processes including cell cycle progression. Through comparative analysis of a number of microarray datasets we identified a set of genes commonly regulated by FOXO proteins and PI3K–PKB/Akt, which includes CTDSP2 (C-terminal domain small phosphatase 2). We validated CTDSP2 as a genuine FOXO target gene and show that ectopic CTDSP2 can induce cell cycle arrest. We analysed transcriptional regulation after CTDSP2 expression and identified extensive regulation of genes involved in cell cycle progression, which depends on the phosphatase activity of CTDSP2. The most notably regulated gene is the CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1 and in the present study we show that p21Cip1/Waf1 is partially responsible for the cell cycle arrest through decreasing cyclin–CDK activity. Our data suggest that CTDSP2 induces p21Cip1/Waf1 through increasing the activity of Ras. As has been described previously, Ras induces p21Cip1/Waf1 through p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways and indeed both p53 and MEK inhibition can mitigate the CTDSP2-induced p21Cip1/Waf1 mRNA up-regulation. In support of Ras activation by CTDSP2, depletion of endogenous CTDSP2 results in reduced Ras activity and thus CTDSP2 seems to be part of a larger set of genes regulated by FOXO proteins, which increase growth factor signalling upon FOXO activation. PMID:25990325

  1. FOXO target gene CTDSP2 regulates cell cycle progression through Ras and p21(Cip1/Waf1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, David E A; Polderman, Paulien E; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Smits, Lydia M; van Triest, Miranda H; van den Berg, Maaike C W; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J; van Leenen, Dik; Lijnzaad, Philip; Holstege, Frank C; Burgering, Boudewijn M T

    2015-07-15

    Activity of FOXO (forkhead box O) transcription factors is inhibited by growth factor-PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)-PKB (protein kinase B)/Akt signalling to control a variety of cellular processes including cell cycle progression. Through comparative analysis of a number of microarray datasets we identified a set of genes commonly regulated by FOXO proteins and PI3K-PKB/Akt, which includes CTDSP2 (C-terminal domain small phosphatase 2). We validated CTDSP2 as a genuine FOXO target gene and show that ectopic CTDSP2 can induce cell cycle arrest. We analysed transcriptional regulation after CTDSP2 expression and identified extensive regulation of genes involved in cell cycle progression, which depends on the phosphatase activity of CTDSP2. The most notably regulated gene is the CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitor p21(Cip1/Waf1) and in the present study we show that p21(Cip1/Waf1) is partially responsible for the cell cycle arrest through decreasing cyclin-CDK activity. Our data suggest that CTDSP2 induces p21(Cip1/Waf1) through increasing the activity of Ras. As has been described previously, Ras induces p21(Cip1/Waf1) through p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways and indeed both p53 and MEK inhibition can mitigate the CTDSP2-induced p21(Cip1/Waf1) mRNA up-regulation. In support of Ras activation by CTDSP2, depletion of endogenous CTDSP2 results in reduced Ras activity and thus CTDSP2 seems to be part of a larger set of genes regulated by FOXO proteins, which increase growth factor signalling upon FOXO activation. © 2015 Authors.

  2. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: A neoplastic disorder driven by Ras-ERK pathway mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Gary; Huynh, Thy N; Paller, Amy S

    2018-03-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disorder of myeloid neoplasia of dendritic cells that affects 1 in 200,000 children <15 years of age and even fewer adults. LCH presents with a spectrum of clinical manifestations. High-risk stratification is reserved for infiltration of blood, spleen, liver, and lungs. After decades of debate on the disease pathogenesis, a neoplastic mechanism is now favored on the basis of LCH cell clonality, rare cases of familial clustering, and recent evidence of mutations involving the Ras/Raf/MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase)/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway in lesional biopsy specimens. Somatic mutations are most often found in BRAF (BRAF V600E in 47.1% of reported patients) and MAP2K1 (21.7%) and uncommonly found in MAP3K1 or ARAF. Increased levels of phospho-ERK in lesional tissue, activation of Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling with these mutations in vitro, and the mutual exclusivity of these mutations in a given patient suggest a central role for activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK oncogenic pathway in LCH. Immunohistochemical assessment of lesional tissue using the VE1 BRAF V600E mutation-specific antibody can serve as a screening tool for BRAF V600E -positive LCH. Case reports suggest that BRAF V600E -positive LCH unresponsive to standard therapy might respond to B-Raf-MEK pathway inhibition, but rigorous randomized clinical trials have yet to be performed. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of feed ingredients on water quality parameters in RAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Suhr, Karin Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Although feed by far is providing the major input to RAS, relatively little is published about the correlation between feed composition and the resulting water quality in such systems. In a set-up with 6 identical RAS, each consisting of a fish tank (0.5 m3), a swirl separator, a submerged...... had impact on water quality in the systems as well as on matter removed by the swirl separators. In the RAS water, phosphorous (Ptot and Pdiss) concentrations were reduced by guar gum. Organic matter content (CODdiss) in the water was also reduced. Corresponding to this, more dry matter, more COD...... to the systems for 49 consecutive days. Each week, 24h-water samples (1 sample/hour) were collected from each system. The sludge collected in the swirl separator that day was also collected. Water and sludge were subsequently analysed for nitrogen, phosphorous and organic matter content. Inclusion of guar gum...

  4. Intramembrane protease RasP boosts protein production in Bacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Jolanda; Bongiorni, Cristina; Goosens, Vivianne J; Schmidt, Brian; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2017-04-04

    The microbial cell factory Bacillus subtilis is a popular industrial platform for high-level production of secreted technical enzymes. Nonetheless, the effective secretion of particular heterologous enzymes remains challenging. Over the past decades various studies have tackled this problem, and major improvements were achieved by optimizing signal peptides or removing proteases involved in product degradation. On the other hand, serious bottlenecks in the protein export process per se remained enigmatic, especially for protein secretion at commercially significant levels by cells grown to high density. The aim of our present study was to assess the relevance of the intramembrane protease RasP for high-level protein production in B. subtilis. Deletion of the rasP gene resulted in reduced precursor processing and extracellular levels of the overproduced α-amylases AmyE from B. subtilis and AmyL from Bacillus licheniformis. Further, secretion of the overproduced serine protease BPN' from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was severely impaired in the absence of RasP. Importantly, overexpression of rasP resulted in threefold increased production of a serine protease from Bacillus clausii, and 2.5- to 10-fold increased production of an AmyAc α-amylase from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, depending on the culture conditions. Of note, growth defects due to overproduction of the two latter enzymes were suppressed by rasP-overexpression. Here we show that an intramembrane protease, RasP, sets a limit to high-level production of two secreted heterologous enzymes that are difficult to produce in the B. subtilis cell factory. This finding was unexpected and suggests that proteolytic membrane sanitation is key to effective enzyme production in Bacillus.

  5. Involvement of mitophagy in oncogenic K-Ras-induced transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Kyoung; Xu, Wei Guang; Yoon, Joon-Kee; Choi, Sung-E; Ko, Young-Gyu; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae; Wang, Hee-Jung

    2011-01-01

    Although mitochondrial impairment has often been implicated in carcinogenesis, the mechanisms of its development in cancer remain unknown. We report here that autophagy triggered by oncogenic K-Ras mediates functional loss of mitochondria during cell transformation to overcome an energy deficit resulting from glucose deficiency. When Rat2 cells were infected with a retrovirus harboring constitutively active K-RasV12, mitochondrial respiration significantly declined in parallel with the acquisition of transformation characteristics. Decreased respiration was not related to mitochondrial biogenesis but was inversely associated with the increased formation of acidic vesicles enclosing mitochondria, during which autophagy-related proteins such as Beclin 1, Atg5, LC3-II and vacuolar ATPases were induced. Interestingly, blocking autophagy with conventional inhibitors (bafilomycin A, 3-methyladenin) and siRNA-mediated knockdown of autophagy-related genes recovered respiratory protein expression and respiratory activity; JNK was involved in these phenomena as an upstream regulator. The cells transformed by K-RasV12 maintained cellular ATP level mainly through glycolytic ATP production without induction of GLUT1, the low Km glucose transporter. Finally, K-RasV12-triggered LC3-II formation was modulated by extracellular glucose levels, and LC3-II formation increased only in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues exhibiting low glucose uptake and increased K-Ras expression. Taken together, our observations suggest that mitochondrial functional loss may be mediated by oncogenic K-Ras-induced mitophagy during early tumorigenesis even in the absence of hypoxia, and that this mitophagic process may be an important strategy to overcome the cellular energy deficit triggered by insufficient glucose. PMID:21738012

  6. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation enhances H-RAS protein stability and causes abnormal cell cycle progression in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells treated with hydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Tang, Huanwen; Chen, Jialong; Wen, Qiaosheng; Zou, Fei

    2015-08-05

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important benzene-derived metabolites, can induce aberrant cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism of this induction remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), which is catalysed primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), participates in various biological processes, including cell cycle control. The results of the present study show an accumulation in G1 phase versus S phase of TK6 human lymphoblast cells treated with HQ for 48h compared with PBS-treated cells; after 72h of HQ treatment, the cells transitioned from G1 arrest to S phase arrest. We examined the expression of six genes related to the cell cycle or leukaemia to further explore the reason for this phenomenon. Among these genes, H-RAS was found to be associated with this phenomenon because its mRNA and protein expression decreased at 48h and increased at 72h. Experiments for PARP activity induction and inhibition revealed that the observed PARylation was positively associated with H-RAS expression. Moreover, in cells treated with HQ in conjunction with PARP-1 knockdown, expression of the H-RAS protein decreased and the number of cells in G1 phase increased. The degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl) modification of the H-RAS protein increased in cells treated with HQ for 72h, further supporting that changes in PARylation contributed to the rapid alteration of H-RAS protein expression, followed by abnormal progression of the cell cycle. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether protein complexes were formed by PARP-1 and H-RAS proteins, and the direct interaction between these proteins indicated that PARylation regulated H-RAS expression. As detected by confocal microscopy, the H-RAS protein was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal that H-RAS protein can be modified by PARylation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Evolution of AF6-RAS association and its implications in mixed-lineage leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Ottoni, Elizabeth; Ishiyama, Noboru; Goudreault, Marilyn; Haman, André; Meyer, Claus; Tucholska, Monika; Gasmi-Seabrook, Genevieve; Menezes, Serena; Laister, Rob C.; Minden, Mark D.; Marschalek, Rolf; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Hoang, Trang; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2017-10-23

    Elucidation of activation mechanisms governing protein fusions is essential for therapeutic development. MLL undergoes rearrangement with numerous partners, including a recurrent translocation fusing the epigenetic regulator to a cytoplasmic RAS effector, AF6/afadin. We show here that AF6 employs a non-canonical, evolutionarily conserved α-helix to bind RAS, unique to AF6 and the classical RASSF effectors. Further, all patients with MLL-AF6 translocations express fusion proteins missing only this helix from AF6, resulting in exposure of hydrophobic residues that induce dimerization. We provide evidence that oligomerization is the dominant mechanism driving oncogenesis from rare MLL translocation partners and employ our mechanistic understanding of MLL-AF6 to examine how dimers induce leukemia. Proteomic data resolve association of dimerized MLL with gene expression modulators, and inhibiting dimerization disrupts formation of these complexes while completely abrogating leukemogenesis in mice. Oncogenic gene translocations are thus selected under pressure from protein structure/function, underscoring the complex nature of chromosomal rearrangements.

  8. Watershed Analysis with the Hydrologic Engineering Center's River Analysis System (HEC-RAS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodell, Christopher R; Brunner, Gary W

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this document are to provide a general description of the HEC-RAS model, its capabilities and limitations, data requirements, traditional and innovative methods for HEC-RAS hydraulic...

  9. Guanosine triphosphatase activating protein (GAP) interacts with the p21 ras effector binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adari, H; Lowy, D R; Willumsen, B M

    1988-01-01

    -ras as well as with N-ras proteins. To identify the region of ras p21 with which GAP interacts, 21 H-ras mutant proteins were purified and tested for their ability to undergo stimulation of GTPase activity by GAP. Mutations in nonessential regions of H-ras p21 as well as mutations in its carboxyl....... Transforming mutations at positions 12, 59, and 61 (the phosphoryl binding region) abolished GTPase stimulation by GAP. Point mutations in the putative effector region of ras p21 (amino acids 35, 36, and 38) were also insensitive to GAP. However, a point mutation at position 39, shown previously not to impair...... effector function, did not alter GAP-p21 interaction. These results indicate that GAP interaction may be essential for ras p21 biological activity and that it may be a ras effector protein....

  10. Ras Umm Sidd Oxygen Isotope (delta 18O) Data for 1750 to 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ras Umm Sidd bimonthly coral oxygen isotope data (coral core RUS-95). Notes on the data: File (Ras Umm Sidd d18O.txt.) includes columns for Year AD (bimonthly...

  11. Raft protein clustering alters N-Ras membrane interactions and activation pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, Sharon; Beckett, Alison J; Prior, Ian A; Dekker, Frank J; Hedberg, Christian; Waldmann, Herbert; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Henis, Yoav I; Dekker, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking, membrane localization, and lipid raft association of Ras proteins, which are crucial oncogenic mediators, dictate their isoform-specific biological responses. Accordingly, their spatiotemporal dynamics are tightly regulated. While extensively studied for H- and K-Ras, such

  12. Harvey ras genes transform without mutant codons, apparently activated by truncation of a 5' exon (exon -1).

    OpenAIRE

    Cichutek, K; Duesberg, P H

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis is tested that the ras gene of Harvey sarcoma virus (Ha-SV) and the proto-ras DNAs from certain tumor cells derive transforming function from specific codons in which they differ from normal proto-ras genes. Molecularly cloned Harvey proviral vectors carrying viral ras, normal rat proto-ras, and recombinant ras genes in which the virus-specific ras codons 12 and 59 were replaced by proto-ras equivalents each transformed aneuploid mouse 3T3 cells after latent periods that ranged...

  13. [Regulation of [12Asp]K-ras4B on transcriptional activity of estrogen receptor in endometrial carcinoma HEC-1A cell lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Li-ming; Wei, Li-hui; Xu, Ming-xu; Wang, Jian-liu; Zhong, Ying-cheng; Li, Xiao-ping; Tu, Zheng; Sun, Peng-ming; Ma, Da-long

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of mutant-type [(12)Asp]K-ras4B gene on the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta and their transcriptional activity as a transcription factor in endometrial carcinoma HEC-1A cell line. (1) Effect of [(12)Asp]K-ras4B on the expression of ER alpha and beta were determined using Western blot assay. (2) Eukaryotic expression plasmid pGL3-luciferase-ERE containing luciferase report gene and estrogen receptor element (ERE) was constructed, and co-transfected into NIH3T3 and HEC-1A cell lines with pEGFP-N1 to examine the effect of [(12)Asp]K-ras4B on ER transcription that is regulated by estradiol. In addition, they were transfected into pSV5-HER0 (containing full length wide type ERalpha cDNA) and pCMV-rafS621A (inhibiting raf kinase) plasmids to test the effect of [(12)Asp]K-ras4B/raf signal pathway on transcriptional activity of ER proteins. (1) Protein level of ERs expressed in pcDI transfected control cells was low while it was increased for 3.6-fold (97 +/- 25, 349 +/- 67, P ras4B NIH3T3 cells after transfection. (2) In pcDI-[(12)Asp]K-ras4B NIH3T3 cells, the ratios for ERalpha and and ERbeta levels before transfection of rafS621A plasmids to that after the transfection, were 2.4:1 (724 +/- 45, 310 +/- 46, P HEC-1A cells, these ratios were 2.1:1 (566 +/- 22, 279 +/- 30, P ras4B NIH3T3 cells, 19-fold (141 +/- 39, 2644 +/- 331, P HEC-1A cells, respectively, when compared with those in the absence of E(2). (4) In pSV5-HER0 transfected pcDI-[(12)Asp] K-ras4B NIH3T3 cells and HEC-1A cells, compared to the untransfected cells, the ER transcriptional activity in the transfected cells increased markedly. The luciferase activity was increased for 8-fold (1048 +/- 91, 8099 +/- 452, P HEC-1A cells and pcDI-[(12)Asp]K-ras4B NIH3T3 cells. The ratio of luciferase activities in pcDI-[(12)Asp]K-ras4B NIH3T3 and HEC-1A cells, before and after transfection was 7.8:1 (1184 +/- 168, 152 +/- 27, P ras4B can enhance the expression of ERalpha and

  14. Cellular ras gene activity is required for full neoplastic transformation by polyomavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Raptis, L; Marcellus, R; Corbley, M J; Krook, A; Whitfield, J.; Anderson, S. K.; Haliotis, T

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the role of ras gene activity in cellular transformation by polyomavirus, murine C3H10T1/2 cells were rendered ras deficient by transfection with an antisense ras gene construct. Ras deficiency resulted in a partial suppression of the polyomavirus-induced transformed phenotype. The production of viral middle T antigen and its association with pp60c-src, increased membrane-associated protein kinase C activity, and morphological transformation were unaffected by the downregulatio...

  15. Essential roles of FoxM1 in Ras-induced liver cancer progression and in cancer cells with stem cell features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopanja, Dragana; Pandey, Akshay; Kiefer, Megan; Wang, Zebin; Chandan, Neha; Carr, Janai R; Franks, Roberta; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Guzman, Grace; Maker, Ajay; Raychaudhuri, Pradip

    2015-08-01

    Overexpression of FoxM1 correlates with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Moreover, the Ras-signaling pathway is found to be ubiquitously activated in HCC through epigenetic silencing of the Ras-regulators. We investigated the roles of FoxM1 in Ras-driven HCC, and on HCC cells with stem-like features. We employed a transgenic mouse model that expresses the oncogenic Ras in the liver. That strain was crossed with a strain that harbor floxed alleles of FoxM1 and the MxCre gene that allows conditional deletion of FoxM1. FoxM1 alleles were deleted after development of HCC, and the effects on the tumors were analyzed. Also, FoxM1 siRNA was used in human HCC cell lines to determine its role in the survival of the HCC cells with stem cell features. Ras-driven tumors overexpress FoxM1. Deletion of FoxM1 inhibits HCC progression. There was increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the FoxM1 deleted HCC cells. Moreover, FoxM1 deletion caused a disproportionate loss of the CD44+ and EpCAM+ HCC cells in the tumors. We show that FoxM1 directly activates expression of CD44 in human HCC cells. Moreover, the human HCC cells with stem cell features are addicted to FoxM1 for ROS-regulation and survival. Our results provide genetic evidence for an essential role of FoxM1 in the progression of Ras-driven HCC. In addition, FoxM1 is required for the expression of CD44 in HCC cells. Moreover, FoxM1 plays a critical role in the survival of the HCC cells with stem cell features by regulating ROS. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Molecular Characteristics of Clostridium perfringens TpeL Toxin and Consequences of Mono-O-GlcNAcylation of Ras in Living Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenberg, Gregor; Hornei, Sven; Jank, Thomas; Schwan, Carsten; Lü, Wei; Einsle, Oliver; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    TpeL is a member of the family of clostridial glucosylating toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens type A, B, and C strains. In contrast to other members of this toxin family, it lacks a C-terminal polypeptide repeat domain, which is suggested to be involved in target cell binding. It was shown that the glucosyltransferase domain of TpeL modifies Ras in vitro by mono-O-glucosylation or mono-O-GlcNAcylation (Nagahama, M., Ohkubo, A., Oda, M., Kobayashi, K., Amimoto, K., Miyamoto, K., and Sakurai, J. (2011) Infect. Immun. 79, 905–910). Here we show that TpeL preferably utilizes UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) as a sugar donor. Change of alanine 383 of TpeL to isoleucine turns the sugar donor preference from UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-glucose. In contrast to previous studies, we show that Rac is a poor substrate in vitro and in vivo and requires 1–2 magnitudes higher toxin concentrations for modification by TpeL. The toxin is autoproteolytically processed in the presence of inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) by an intrinsic cysteine protease domain, located next to the glucosyltransferase domain. A C-terminally extended TpeL full-length variant (TpeL1–1779) induces apoptosis in HeLa cells (most likely by mono-O-GlcNAcylation of Ras), and inhibits Ras signaling including Ras-Raf interaction and ERK activation. In addition, TpeL blocks Ras signaling in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. TpeL is a glucosylating toxin, which modifies Ras and induces apoptosis in target cells without having a typical C-terminal polypeptide repeat domain. PMID:22665487

  17. Molecular characteristics of Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin and consequences of mono-O-GlcNAcylation of Ras in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenberg, Gregor; Hornei, Sven; Jank, Thomas; Schwan, Carsten; Lü, Wei; Einsle, Oliver; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2012-07-20

    TpeL is a member of the family of clostridial glucosylating toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens type A, B, and C strains. In contrast to other members of this toxin family, it lacks a C-terminal polypeptide repeat domain, which is suggested to be involved in target cell binding. It was shown that the glucosyltransferase domain of TpeL modifies Ras in vitro by mono-O-glucosylation or mono-O-GlcNAcylation (Nagahama, M., Ohkubo, A., Oda, M., Kobayashi, K., Amimoto, K., Miyamoto, K., and Sakurai, J. (2011) Infect. Immun. 79, 905-910). Here we show that TpeL preferably utilizes UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) as a sugar donor. Change of alanine 383 of TpeL to isoleucine turns the sugar donor preference from UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-glucose. In contrast to previous studies, we show that Rac is a poor substrate in vitro and in vivo and requires 1-2 magnitudes higher toxin concentrations for modification by TpeL. The toxin is autoproteolytically processed in the presence of inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) by an intrinsic cysteine protease domain, located next to the glucosyltransferase domain. A C-terminally extended TpeL full-length variant (TpeL1-1779) induces apoptosis in HeLa cells (most likely by mono-O-GlcNAcylation of Ras), and inhibits Ras signaling including Ras-Raf interaction and ERK activation. In addition, TpeL blocks Ras signaling in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. TpeL is a glucosylating toxin, which modifies Ras and induces apoptosis in target cells without having a typical C-terminal polypeptide repeat domain.

  18. Two dominant inhibitory mutants of p21ras interfere with insulin-induced gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, R.H.; Wubbolts, R.; Bos, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Insulin induces a rapid activation of p21ras in NIH 3T3 and Chinese hamster ovary cells that overexpress the insulin receptor. Previously, we suggested that p21ras may mediate insulin-induced gene expression. To test such a function of p21ras more directly, we studied the effect of different

  19. Balanced RAP/RAS mix design and performance evaluation for project - specific service conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This presentation summarizes Projects 0-6092/0-6614. It includes accomplishments, best practices, field performance data of RAP/RAS test sections, balanced RAP/RAS mix design for project-specific conditions, and approaches for improving RAP/RAS mix p...

  20. Ras activation mediates WISP-1-induced increases in cell motility and matrix metalloproteinase expression in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Lin; Tsai, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Zhen-Wei; Wu, Chi-Ming; Li, Te-Mao; Fong, Yi-Chin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-12-01

    WISP-1 is a cysteine-rich protein that belongs to the CCN (Cyr61, CTGF, Nov) family of matrix cellular proteins. Osteosarcoma is a type of highly malignant tumor with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis. However, the effect of WISP-1 on migration activity in human osteosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. In this study, we first found that the expression of WISP-1 in osteosarcoma patients was significantly higher than that in normal bone and corrected with tumor stage. Exogenous treatment of osteosarcoma cells with WISP-1 promoted cell motility and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. In addition, the Ras and Raf-1 inhibitor or siRNA abolished WISP-1-induced cell migration and MMP expression. On the other hand, activation of the Ras, Raf-1, MEK, ERK, and NF-κB signaling pathway after WISP-1 treatment was demonstrated, and WISP-1-induced expression of MMPs and migration activity were inhibited by the specific inhibitor, and mutant of MEK, ERK, and NF-κB cascades. Taken together, our results indicated that WISP-1 enhances the migration of osteosarcoma cells by increasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression through the integrin receptor, Ras, Raf-1, MEK, ERK, and NF-κB signal transduction pathway. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Macropinocytosis of the PDGF β-receptor promotes fibroblast transformation by H-RasG12V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmees, C; Villaseñor, R; Zheng, W; Ma, H; Zerial, M; Heldin, C-H; Hellberg, C

    2012-07-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is frequently increased in tumor cells, sometimes as a result of decreased receptor down-regulation. The extent to which the endocytic trafficking routes can contribute to such RTK hyperactivation is unclear. Here, we show for the first time that fibroblast transformation by H-RasG12V induces the internalization of platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor (PDGFRβ) by macropinocytosis, enhancing its signaling activity and increasing anchorage-independent proliferation. H-RasG12V transformation and PDGFRβ activation were synergistic in stimulating phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase activity, leading to receptor macropinocytosis. PDGFRβ macropinocytosis was both necessary and sufficient for enhanced receptor activation. Blocking macropinocytosis by inhibition of PI 3-kinase prevented the increase in receptor activity in transformed cells. Conversely, increasing macropinocytosis by Rabankyrin-5 overexpression was sufficient to enhance PDGFRβ activation in nontransformed cells. Simultaneous stimulation with PDGF-BB and epidermal growth factor promoted macropinocytosis of both receptors and increased their activation in nontransformed cells. We propose that H-Ras transformation promotes tumor progression by enhancing growth factor receptor signaling as a result of increased receptor macropinocytosis.

  2. Realgar bioleaching solution is a less toxic arsenic agent in suppressing the Ras/MAPK pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongling; Zhi, Dejuan; Zhou, Ting; Yu, Qinghong; Wan, Fengqi; Bai, Yanli; Li, Hongyu

    2013-03-01

    To explore other arsenic derivatives with anticancer effects and fewer adverse effects, realgar bioleaching solution (RBS) has been found to be a viable approach. Here we used C. elegans as a model organism to its possible efficacy for anti-cancer effect of RBS. Our results indicated that RBS significantly suppressed the multivulva (Muv) phenotype of let-60 ras(gf) mutant that was positive correlated to arsenic concentrations in worms and also inhibited Muv phenotype of lin-15(lf) upstream of Ras/MAPK pathway, but did not affect the Muv phenotype resulting from loss-of-function mutations of lin-l(lf) downstream of Ras/MAPK pathway, which may be mechanism-based. In toxicity tests, RBS did not lead to reduction resulting from arsenic trioxide (ATO) in the number of pharyngeal pumping which was orthologous to vertebrate heart beating in wild type C. elegans. Overall, RBS was likely to be a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with high efficiency and low toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interplay between RAS and opioids: opening the Pandora of complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Anjana; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin and endogenous opioids are important bioactive neuropeptides, which are widely distributed in the brain and peripheral regions to produce diverse biological and neurobiological activities. An endogenous opioid system includes proopiomelanocortin-derived enkephalin, dynorphin and endorphin that act on their specific receptors such as delta (δ), kappa (κ) and mu (μ) receptors. Research evidence demonstrates significant positive as well as negative interactions between renin angiotensin system (RAS) and endogenous opioids in the brain and periphery. The diverse actions of Ang II are possibly mediated indirectly through endogenous opioids, while opioids are also shown to activate RAS components suggesting the up-regulation of each system in concern with each other. On the contrary, there are reports suggesting a negative correlation between RAS and opioid system. Research evidence also supports the notion that Ang II acts as anti-opioid peptide to decrease the actions of opioids. Moreover, opioids-induced decline in angiotensin release and functioning has also been reported. Co-administration of ACE inhibitors with opioids exhibits significant interactions possibly due to decreased metabolism of opioids leading to potentiation of their actions. The present review describes the complexities of positive and negative interactions between RAS and opioids along with possible mechanisms responsible for these interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of ras proteins in insulin signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, J.A.; Burgering, B.M.T.; Medema, R.H.; Osterop, A.P.R.M.; Zon, G.C.M. van der; Möller, W.; Bos, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Ras-proteins are guanine nucleotide binding proteins, which, in the GTP bound state emit a strong mitogenic signal. In the GDP bound state, the protein appears inactive. We have found that stimulation by insulin of cells expressing elevated levels of insulin receptors results in a rapid conversion

  5. Simvastatin induces a central hypotensive effect via Ras-mediated signalling to cause eNOS up-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Han; Ho, Wen-Yu; Chang, Chien-Feng; Lu, Pei-Jung; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Yeh, Tung-Chen; Hong, Ling-Zong; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Hsiao, Michael; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Clinical studies indicate that statins have a BP-lowering effect in hypercholesterolemic individuals with hypertension. Specifically, statins modulate BP through the up-regulation of endothelial NOS (eNOS) activation in the brain. However, the signalling mechanisms through which statins enhance eNOS activation remain unclear. Therefore, we examined the possible signalling pathways involved in statin-mediated BP regulation in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To investigate the involvement of Ras and other signalling pathways in simvastatin-induced effects on BP, BP and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) were determined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) before and after i.c.v. administration of simvastatin in the absence and presence of a Ras-specific inhibitor (farnesyl thiosalicylic acid, FTS), a geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor (GGTI-2133), a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) or a MAPK-ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059). KEY RESULTS FTS significantly attenuated the decrease in BP and increased NO evoked by simvastatin and reversed the decrease in basal RSNA induced by simvastatin. Immunoblotting and pharmacological studies showed that inhibition of Ras activity by FTS significantly abolished simvastatin-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK), Akt and decreased eNOS phosphorylation. Likewise, administration of Akt and ERK1/2 signalling inhibitors, LY294002 and PD98059, attenuated the reduction in BP evoked by simvastatin. Furthermore, i.c.v. simvastatin decreased Rac1 activation and the number of ROS-positive cells in the NTS. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Simvastatin modulates central BP control in the NTS of SHRs by increasing Ras-mediated activation of the PI3K-Akt and ERK1/2-RSK signalling pathways, which then up-regulates eNOS activation. PMID:23889671

  6. The response to PAK1 inhibitor IPA3 distinguishes between cancer cells with mutations in BRAF and Ras oncogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Ruchi; Kandel, Eugene S.

    2012-01-01

    While new drugs aimed at BRAF-mutated cancers are entering clinical practice, cells and tumors with activating Ras mutations are relatively resistant to those and quite a few other anti-cancer agents. This inspires the effort to reverse this resistance or to uncover new vulnerabilities in such resistant cancers. IPA3 has been originally identified as a small molecule inhibitor of p21-activated protein kinase 1 (PAK1), a candidate therapeutic target in human malignancies. We have tested a battery of melanoma and colon carcinoma cell lines that carry mutations in BRAF, NRAS and KRAS genes and have observed that those with NRAS and KRAS mutations are more sensitive to killing by IPA3. Genetic manipulations suggest that the differential response depends not just on these oncogenes, but also on additional events that were co-selected during tumor evolution. Furthermore, sublethal doses of IPA3 or ectopic expression of dominant-negative PAK1 sensitized Ras-mutated cells to GDC-0897 and AZD6244, which otherwise have reduced efficiency against cells with activated Ras. Dominant-negative PAK1 also reduced the growth of NRAS-mutated cells in confluent cultures, but, unlike IPA3, caused no significant toxicity. Although it remains to be proven that all the effects of IPA3 are exclusively due to inhibition of PAK1, our findings point to the existence of selective vulnerabilities, which are associated with Ras mutations and could be useful for better understanding and treatment of a large subset of tumors. PMID:22869096

  7. A novel SOS1 mutation in Costello/CFC syndrome affects signaling in both RAS and PI3K pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumurkhuu, Munkhtuya; Saitoh, Makiko; Takita, Junko; Mizuno, Yoko; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2013-04-01

    Pathological upregulation of the RAS/MAPK pathway causes Costello, Noonan and cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome; however, little is known about PI3K/AKT signal transduction in these syndromes. Previously, we found a novel mutation of the SOS1 gene (T158A) in a patient with Costello/CFC overlapping phenotype. The aim of this study was to investigate how this mutation affects RAS/MAPK as well as PI3K/AKT pathway signal transduction. Wild-type and mutant (T158A) Son of Sevenless 1 (SOS1) were transfected into 293T cells. The levels of phospho- and total ERK1/2, AKT, p70S6K and pS6 were examined under epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. After EGF stimulation, the ratio of phospho-ERK1/2 to total ERK1/2 was highest at 5 min in mutant (T158A) SOS1 cells, and at 15 min in wild-type SOS1 cells. Phospho-AKT was less abundant at 60 min in mutant than in wild-type SOS1 cells. Phosphorylation at various sites in p70S6K differed between wild-type and mutant cells. Eighteen hours after activation by EGF, the ratio of phospho-ERK1/2 to total ERK1/2 remained significantly higher in mutant than in wild-type SOS1 cells, but that of phospho-AKT to total AKT was unchanged. T158A is located in the histone-like domain, which may have a role in auto-inhibition of RAS exchanger activity of SOS1. T158A may disrupt auto-inhibition and enhance RAS signaling. T158A also affects PI3K/AKT signaling, probably via negative feedback via phospho-p70S6K. The SOS1 T158A mutation altered the phosphorylation of gene products involved in both RAS/MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways.

  8. [Correlation between ras gene and the resistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma to cetuximab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Qiang; Luo, Rong-cheng

    2010-06-01

    To explore the correlation of ras gene to the drug resistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma to cetuximab. Cultured 5-8F/Erbitux cells were induced by stepwise exposure to increasing doses of cetuximab. MTT assay was used to determine the IC50 (half inhibitory concentration) of cetuximab and the drug resistance index (RI). Western blotting was employed to detect the protein levels of H-ras and K-ras. Real-time PCR was used to detect the expression of H-ras and K-ras. Gene sequencing was performed to identify potential mutations in H-ras and K-ras genes. We successfully induced cetuximab-resistant 5-8F/Erbitux hNPC cells by stepwise exposure to increasing doses of cetuximab. After treatment with cetuximab for 3 and 5 days, the RI of 5-8F/Erbitux cells was 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The 5-8F/Erbitux cells had increased levels of H-ras and K-ras protein expressions (Pgene expressions of H-ras (P=0.016) and ras-p21 (P=0.113) with decreased K-ras gene expression (P=0.000). Sequence analysis identified no mutations in the H-ras and K-ras genes in codons 12, 13, 59, and 61. Gene amplification and overexpression of H-ras is the major mechanism that causes the drug resistance of 5-8F/Erbitux cells to cetuximab.

  9. Plasma membrane localization of Ras requires class C Vps proteins and functional mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Geng; Deschenes, Robert J

    2006-04-01

    Ras proteins are synthesized as cytosolic precursors, but then undergo posttranslational lipid addition, membrane association, and subcellular targeting to the plasma membrane. Although the enzymes responsible for farnesyl and palmitoyl lipid addition have been described, the mechanism by which these modifications contribute to the subcellular localization of Ras is not known. Following addition of the farnesyl group, Ras associates with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where palmitoylation occurs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The subsequent translocation of Ras from the ER to the plasma membrane does not require the classical secretory pathway or a functional Golgi apparatus. Vesicular and nonvesicular transport pathways for Ras proteins have been proposed, but the pathway is not known. Here we describe a genetic screen designed to identify mutants defective in Ras trafficking in S. cerevisiae. The screen implicates, for the first time, the class C VPS complex in Ras trafficking. Vps proteins are best characterized for their role in endosome and vacuole membrane fusion. However, the role of the class C Vps complex in Ras trafficking is distinct from its role in endosome and vacuole vesicle fusion, as a mitochondrial involvement was uncovered. Disruption of class C VPS genes results in mitochondrial defects and an accumulation of Ras proteins on mitochondrial membranes. Ras also fractionates with mitochondria in wild-type cells, where it is detected on the outer mitochondrial membrane by virtue of its sensitivity to protease treatment. These results point to a previously uncharacterized role of mitochondria in the subcellular trafficking of Ras proteins.

  10. Pathway- and expression level-dependent effects of oncogenic N-Ras: p27(Kip1) mislocalization by the Ral-GEF pathway and Erk-mediated interference with Smad signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfir, Shiri; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Goldshmid, Ayelet; Liu, Xuedong; Kloog, Yoel; Henis, Yoav I

    2005-09-01

    Overactivation of Ras pathways contributes to oncogenesis and metastasis of epithelial cells in several ways, including interference with cell cycle regulation via the CDK inhibitor p27(Kip1) (p27) and disruption of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) anti-proliferative activity. Here, we show that at high expression levels, constitutively active N-Ras induces cytoplasmic mislocalization of murine and human p27 via the Ral-GEF pathway and disrupts TGF-beta-mediated Smad nuclear translocation by activation of the Mek/Erk pathway. While human p27 could also be mislocalized via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, only Ral-GEF activation was effective for murine p27, which lacks the Thr157 Akt phosphorylation site of human p27. This establishes a novel role for the Ral-GEF pathway in regulating p27 localization. Interference with either Smad translocation or p27 nuclear localization was sufficient to disrupt TGF-beta growth inhibition. Moreover, expression of activated N-Ras or specific effector loop mutants at lower levels using retroviral vectors induced p27 mislocalization but did not inhibit Smad2/3 translocation, indicating that the effects on p27 localization occur at lower levels of activated Ras. These findings have important implications for the contribution of activated Ras to oncogenesis and for the conversion of TGF-beta from an inhibitory to a metastatic factor in some epithelial tumors.

  11. Structure of the G60A mutant of Ras: Implications for the Dominant Negative Effect.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford,B.; Skowronek, K.; Boykevisch, S.; Bar-Sagi, D.; Nassar, N.

    2005-01-01

    Substituting alanine for glycine at position 60 in v-H-Ras generated a dominant negative mutant that completely abolished the ability of v-H-Ras to transform NIH 3T3 cells and to induce germinal vesicle breakdown in Xenopus oocytes. The crystal structure of the GppNp-bound form of RasG60A unexpectedly shows that the switch regions adopt an open conformation reminiscent of the structure of the nucleotide-free form of Ras in complex with Sos. Critical residues that normally stabilize the guanine nucleotide and the Mg{sup 2+} ion have moved considerably. Sos binds to RasG60A but is unable to catalyze nucleotide exchange. Our data suggest that the dominant negative effect observed for RasG60A{center_dot}GTP could result from the sequestering of Sos in a non-productive Ras-GTP-guanine nucleotide exchange factor ternary complex.

  12. Orchestration of Morphogenesis in Filamentous Fungi: Conserved Roles for Ras Signaling Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortwendel, Jarrod R.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi undergo complex developmental programs including conidial germination, polarized morphogenesis, and differentiation of sexual and asexual structures. For many fungi, the coordinated completion of development is required for pathogenicity, as specialized morphological structures must be produced by the invading fungus. Ras proteins are highly conserved GTPase signal transducers and function as major regulators of growth and development in eukaryotes. Filamentous fungi typically express two Ras homologues, comprising distinct groups of Ras1-like and Ras2-like proteins based on sequence homology. Recent evidence suggests shared roles for both Ras1 and Ras2 homologues, but also supports the existence of unique functions in the areas of stress response and virulence. This review focuses on the roles played by both Ras protein groups during growth, development, and pathogenicity of a diverse array of filamentous fungi. PMID:26257821

  13. [Expressions of Ras and Sos1 in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and their clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zheng-Hua; Linghu, Hua; Liu, Qian-Fen

    2016-11-20

    To detect the expressions of Ras and Sos1 proteins in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tissues and explore their correlation with the clinicopathological features of the patients. The expressions of Ras and Sos1 proteins were detected immunohistochemically in 62 EOC tissues, 5 borderline ovarian cancer tissues, 15 benign epithelial ovarian neoplasm tissues, and 18 normal ovarian tissues. The EOC tissues showed significantly higher expression levels of both Ras and Sos1 than the other tissues tested (Ptissues, Ras and Sos1 proteins were expressed mostly on the cell membrane and in the cytoplasm. The expression level of Ras was correlated with pathological types of the tumor (Ptissue-specific variation of Ras expression can lend support to a specific diagnosis of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. The association of Ras and Sos1 protein expression with the tumor-free survival time of the patients awaits further investigation with a larger sample size.

  14. The ras1 function of Schizosaccharomyces pombe mediates pheromone-induced transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Davey, William John; Egel, R

    1992-01-01

    Loss of ras1+ function renders fission yeast cells unable to undergo morphological changes in response to mating pheromones, whereas cells carrying activated mutations in ras1 are hyper-responsive. This has led to the suggestion that the ras1 gene product plays a role in mating pheromone signal...... transduction. Using partially purified M factor we demonstrate that the mat1-Pm gene, which controls entry into meiosis, is transcribed in response to a pheromone signal. Strains mutated in the ras1 gene or in ste6, the fission yeast homologue of Ras protein GDP/GTP exchange factor, are unable to induce...... transcription of mat1-Pm in response to M factor. Furthermore, an activated ras1val17 mutant exhibits a stronger induction of the mat1-Pm transcript. However, transcription still depends on nitrogen deprivation as well as on the presence of pheromone, showing that activation of the Ras1 protein alone does...

  15. Expression of a mutated ras gene in Dictyostelium discoideum alters the binding of cyclic AMP to its chemotactic receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludérus, M.E.E.; Reymond, C.D.; Haastert, P.J.M. van; Driel, R. van

    1988-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum cells contain a ras gene that codes for a polypeptide that is highly homologous to the human ras proteins. Extra copies of the wild-type gene or a gene carrying a missense mutation in codon 12 (ras-Gly12 and ras-Thr12, respectively) have been introduced into Dictyostelium

  16. RasGRP1, but not RasGRP3, is required for efficient thymic β-selection and ERK activation downstream of CXCR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic P Golec

    Full Text Available T cell development is a highly dynamic process that is driven by interactions between developing thymocytes and the thymic microenvironment. Upon entering the thymus, the earliest thymic progenitors, called CD4(-CD8(- 'double negative' (DN thymocytes, pass through a checkpoint termed "β-selection" before maturing into CD4(+CD8(+ 'double positive' (DP thymocytes. β-selection is an important developmental checkpoint during thymopoiesis where developing DN thymocytes that successfully express the pre-T cell receptor (TCR undergo extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the DP stage. Signals transduced through the pre-TCR, chemokine receptor CXCR4 and Notch are thought to drive β-selection. Additionally, it has long been known that ERK is activated during β-selection; however the pathways regulating ERK activation remain unknown. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the β-selection events in mice lacking RasGRP1, RasGRP3 and RasGRP1 and 3. We report that RasGRP1 KO and RasGRP1/3 DKO deficient thymi show a partial developmental block at the early DN3 stage of development. Furthermore, DN3 thymocytes from RasGRP1 and RasGRP1/3 double knock-out thymi show significantly reduced proliferation, despite expression of the TCRβ chain. As a result of impaired β-selection, the pool of TCRβ(+ DN4 is significantly diminished, resulting in inefficient DN to DP development. Also, we report that RasGRP1 is required for ERK activation downstream of CXCR4 signaling, which we hypothesize represents a potential mechanism of RasGRP1 regulation of β-selection. Our results demonstrate that RasGRP1 is an important regulator of proliferation and differentiation at the β-selection checkpoint and functions downstream of CXCR4 to activate the Ras/MAPK pathway.

  17. RAS gene hot-spot mutations in canine neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A; Murua Escobar, H; Günther, K; Soller, J T; Winkler, S; Nolte, I; Bullerdiek, J

    2005-01-01

    Point mutations in the cellular homologues HRAS, KRAS2, and NRAS of the viral Harvey and Kirsten rat sarcoma virus oncogenes are commonly involved in the onset of malignancies in humans and other species such as dog, mouse, and rat. Most often, three particular hot-spot codons are affected, with one amino acid exchange being sufficient for the induction of tumor growth. While RAS genes have been shown to play an important role in canine tumors such as non-small lung cell carcinomas, data about RAS mutations in canine fibrosarcomas as well as KRAS2 mutations in canine melanomas is sparse. To increase the number of tumors examined, we recently screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot spots. The results were compared to the already existing data from other studies about these tumors in dogs.

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER TREATMENT WITH RAS MUTATIONS

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    L. V. Bolotina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge concerning impact of certain mutations on targeted therapy efficacy underlines the necessity to perform genetical analysis in order to choose appropriate treatment. Panitumumab addition to 1st line metastatic colorectal cancer chemotherapy in patients with wild-type RAS allows to achieve median progression-free survival up to 13 months and median overall survival of 41,3 months.

  19. Ras signal triggers β-Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) expression

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Natalia; Santa Bárbara Ruiz, Paula; Ferreira, Nuno; Serras, Florenci

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been discovered that the Drosophila β-amyloid protein precursor like (Appl) gene, the ortholog of the human β-Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) gene, is transcriptionally activated by receptor tyrosine kinase activity that involves Ras/MAPK signaling in vivo. This regulation is specifically controlled in photoreceptor neurons of the Drosophila retina. This suggests that some cases of Alzheimer disease, those which have been associated with high expression of the APP gene, may in...

  20. Gamma band activity in the reticular activating system (RAS

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    Francisco J Urbano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf, and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep-wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem-thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep-wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by preconscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the

  1. Maternal RAS influence on the ontogeny of thirst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillan, C; Costales, M; Vijande, M; Arguelles, J

    2007-11-23

    Perillan, C., Costales, M., Vijande, M., and J. Arguelles. Maternal RAS influence on the ontogeny of thirst. Physiol Behav XX (X) 000-000, 2006. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of an altered ambiance in utero, on the development of thirst mechanisms in the offspring. Female rats underwent a partial ligature of the aorta (PAL), which induces an intrinsic activation of the renin angiotensin system (RAS), thirst and sodium appetite. A second group of female rats was treated with desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) which depresses the RAS. The offspring of these two groups were tested for their responses to several thirst stimuli at 2, 4 and 6 days of age. The offspring from PAL mothers responded like their controls to cellular dehydration (NaCl hypertonic injection) at 2 days of age, and also did to extracellular dehydration by polyethyleneglycol at 4 days. Nevertheless, they responded more to isoproterenol at 6 days of age in comparison to their control group. The offspring from DOCA treated mothers did not show statistically significant responses (in comparison with vehicle injected pups) to hypertonic NaCl at two days nor to polyethyleneglycol at four days. Water intake at 6 days of age after isoproterenol administration in DOCA was statistically enhanced, but not differently from the response obtained from pseudo-DOCA treated pups. In particular, rats developed in a hypereninemic ambiance (O-PAL) during gestation, responded with higher water intake when treated with a strong RAS and thirst activator (isoproterenol) but responded normally to a more gentle and complex stimulus (PG). Therefore it seems that in utero conditions can determine the chronology and intensity of thirst responses in offspring.

  2. Biophysical mechanism for ras-nanocluster formation and signaling in plasma membrane.

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    Thomas Gurry

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Ras GTPases are lipid-anchored G proteins, which play a fundamental role in cell signaling processes. Electron micrographs of immunogold-labeled Ras have shown that membrane-bound Ras molecules segregate into nanocluster domains. Several models have been developed in attempts to obtain quantitative descriptions of nanocluster formation, but all have relied on assumptions such as a constant, expression-level independent ratio of Ras in clusters to Ras monomers (cluster/monomer ratio. However, this assumption is inconsistent with the law of mass action. Here, we present a biophysical model of Ras clustering based on short-range attraction and long-range repulsion between Ras molecules in the membrane. To test this model, we performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared statistical clustering properties with experimental data. We find that we can recover the experimentally-observed clustering across a range of Ras expression levels, without assuming a constant cluster/monomer ratio or the existence of lipid rafts. In addition, our model makes predictions about the signaling properties of Ras nanoclusters in support of the idea that Ras nanoclusters act as an analog-digital-analog converter for high fidelity signaling.

  3. R-Ras deficiency does not affect papain-induced IgE production in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummola, Laura; Ortutay, Zsuzsanna; Vähätupa, Maria; Prince, Stuart; Uusitalo-Järvinen, Hannele; Järvinen, Tero A H; Junttila, Ilkka S

    2017-09-01

    R-Ras GTPase has recently been implicated in the regulation of immune functions, particularly in dendritic cell (DC) maturation, immune synapse formation, and subsequent T cell responses. Here, we investigated the role of R-Ras in allergen-induced immune response (type 2 immune response) in Rras deficient (R-Ras KO) and wild type (WT) mice. Initially, we found that the number of conventional DC's in the lymph nodes (LNs) was reduced in R-Ras KO mice. The expression of co-stimulatory CD80 and CD86 molecules on these cells was also reduced on DC's from the R-Ras KO mice. However, there was no difference in papain-induced immune response between the R-Ras WT and KO as measured by serum IgE levels after the immunization. Interestingly, neither the DC number nor co-stimulatory molecule expression was different between WT and R-Ras KO animals after the immunization. Taken together, despite having reduced number of conventional DC's in the R-Ras KO mice and low expression of CD80 on DC's, the R-Ras KO mice are capable of mounting papain-induced IgE responses comparable to that of the WT mice. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing potential differences in in vivo allergen responses regulated by the R-Ras GTPase. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. K-ras/PI3K-Akt signaling is essential for zebrafish hematopoiesis and angiogenesis.

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    Lihui Liu

    Full Text Available The RAS small GTPases orchestrate multiple cellular processes. Studies on knock-out mice showed the essential and sufficient role of K-RAS, but not N-RAS and H-RAS in embryonic development. However, many physiological functions of K-RAS in vivo remain unclear. Using wild-type and fli1:GFP transgenic zebrafish, we showed that K-ras-knockdown resulted in specific hematopoietic and angiogenic defects, including the impaired expression of erythroid-specific gene gata1 and sse3-hemoglobin, reduced blood circulation and disorganized blood vessels. Expression of either K-rasC40 that links to phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activation, or Akt2 that acts downstream of PI3K, could rescue both hematopoietic and angiogenic defects in the K-ras knockdown. Consistently, the functional rescue by k-ras mRNA was significantly suppressed by wortmannin, a PI3K-specific inhibitor. Our results provide direct evidence that PI3K-Akt plays a crucial role in mediating K-ras signaling during hematopoiesis and angiogenesis in vivo, thus offering new targets and alternative vertebrate model for studying these processes and their related diseases.

  5. Chemical biology tools for regulating RAS signaling complexity in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hattum, Hilde; Waldmann, Herbert

    2014-09-18

    Rat sarcoma (RAS) family members are small GTPases that control a number of signaling pathways important for normal cellular proliferation. Therefore, it is no surprise that a significant portion of human tumors express constitutively active mutated RAS proteins, which leads to deregulation of RAS signaling pathways, resulting in pathological perturbations of cell growth and death. Although the molecular details of RAS signaling cascades are well understood, there is still a largely unmet need for small molecule probes to control RAS signaling in space and time. More broadly, given the prevalence of mutated RAS in cancer, the need to translate the insights obtained from using small molecule probes into clinically useful drugs is also significant. In this review, we introduce RAS proteins and the signaling pathways they are involved in, and discuss some of the innovative chemical biology approaches to regulate RAS signaling, which include the exploitation of newly identified binding pockets, covalent inhibitors for mutated RAS, and RAS localization impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of the cerebral renin-angiotensin system to limit cognitive decline in elderly hypertensive persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, Lionel H

    2011-08-01

    Inhibition of then renin-angiotensin system (RAS) ranks among the best established and most used cardiovascular therapies. By providing protection against hypertension and heart failure, and also the microvascular complications of diabetes, RAS inhibitors have contributed to the longer life-expectancy now found in higher income populations throughout the world. However, longevity propels aging persons closer to the inevitable cognitive decline. It is here that the RAS-inhibitors may also have a special role, especially in the many elderly persons with hypertension.

  7. Use of the Ras binding domain of c-Raf for biochemical and live-cell analysis of Ras activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, I

    2005-08-01

    Small modular GBDs (GTPase-binding domains) derived from GTPase-effector proteins are useful tools for the selective detection of the active GTP-loaded GTPase conformation, be it in biochemical assays or for imaging purposes. Use of GBD probes requires careful consideration of all features of the GDB-GTPase interaction. It is innate to the strong and specific interaction with the GTP-loaded GTPase, that GBDs will protect their partner GTPases from GAP (GTPase-activating protein) action. This feature is likely to cause an increase in cellular Ras-GTP levels, in particular in leucocytes and other cells with high steady-state Ras-GDP/GTP cycling rates. By the same token, high levels of GBD expression will interrupt GTPase-initiated signalling, with implications for the activation of the very same GTPase since feedback regulatory mechanisms can impinge on this process.

  8. Characterization of the MKS1 gene, a new negative regulator of the Ras-cyclic AMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, A; Anraku, Y

    1993-04-01

    In order to isolate genes that function downstream of the Ras-cAMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a YEp13-based genomic library was screened for clones that inhibit growth of cells with diminished A-kinase activity. One such gene, MKS1, was found to encode a hydrophilic 52 kDa protein that shares weak homology with the yeast SPT2/SIN1 gene product. Three lines of evidence suggest that the MKS1 gene product is a negative regulator downstream of the Ras-cAMP pathway: (i) overexpression of MKS1 inhibits growth of cyr1 disruptant cells on YPD medium containing a low concentration of cAMP; (ii) overexpression of MKS1 does not affect TPK1 expression; and (iii) the temperature-sensitive cyr1-230 mutation is partially suppressed by mks1 disruption. The mks1 mutant shows similar phenotypes to gal11/spt13, i.e., it cannot grow on YPGal containing ethidium bromide at 25 degrees C, or on YPGly or SGal at 37 degrees C. The mks1 gal11 double mutant shows more marked phenotypic changes than the single mutants. These results suggest that MKS1 is involved in transcriptional regulation of several genes by cAMP.

  9. k-RAS mutations in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with TKIs among smokers and non-smokers: a meta-analysis

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    Ai-Gui Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : Recent studies have suggested that k-RAS mutations are related to the response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitions (TKIs in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the relationship between smoking history and k-RAS mutations in NSCLC treated with TKIs. Material and methods : We searched MEDLINE and Web of Science up to 15 March 2014. The pooled relative risk (RR was estimated by using fixed effect model or random effect model, according to heterogeneity between studies. We also carried out power analyses. Results : We identified 12 studies with 1193 patients, including 196 patients (16.4% with k-RAS mutations. The pooled k-RAS mutations incidence was 22.8% (174/764 in patients with smoke expose vs. 5.4% (23/429 in those with no smoke exposure. The pooled RR was 2.991 (95% CI: 1.884–4.746; Z = 4.65, p = 0.000. No publication bias was found (Begg’s test: z = 1.09, p = 0.274 and Egger’s test: t = 1.38, p = 0.201. In subgroup analyses, the pooled RR was 3.336 (95% CI: 1.925–5.779; Z = 4.30, p = 0.000 in the Caucasian subgroup, while in the Asian subgroup the pooled RR was 2.093 (95% CI: 0.909–4.822; Z = 1.73, p = 0.083, but the sample size was underpowered (0.465. Conclusions : The current meta-analysis found that smoking was related to increased incidence of k-RAS mutations in non-small cell lung cancer treated with TKIs. This may be further evidence that smoking will lead to a worse prognosis in NSCLC patients treated with TKIs.

  10. C/EBPbeta represses p53 to promote cell survival downstream of DNA damage independent of oncogenic Ras and p19(Arf).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, S J; Zhu, S; Zhu, F; House, J S; Smart, R C

    2008-11-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta (C/EBPbeta) is a mediator of cell survival and tumorigenesis. When C/EBPbeta(-/-) mice are treated with carcinogens that produce oncogenic Ras mutations in keratinocytes, they respond with abnormally elevated keratinocyte apoptosis and a block in skin tumorigenesis. Although this aberrant carcinogen-induced apoptosis results from abnormal upregulation of p53, it is not known whether upregulated p53 results from oncogenic Ras and its ability to induce p19(Arf) and/or activate DNA-damage response pathways or from direct carcinogen-induced DNA damage. We report that p19(Arf) is dramatically elevated in C/EBPbeta(-/-) epidermis and that C/EBPbeta represses a p19(Arf) promoter reporter. To determine whether p19(Arf) is responsible for the proapoptotic phenotype in C/EBPbeta(-/-) mice, C/EBPbeta(-/-);p19(Arf-/-) mice were generated. C/EBPbeta(-/-);p19(Arf-/-) mice responded to carcinogen treatment with increased p53 and apoptosis, indicating p19(Arf) is not essential. To ascertain whether oncogenic Ras activation induces aberrant p53 and apoptosis in C/EBPbeta(-/-) epidermis, we generated K14-ER:Ras;C/EBPbeta(-/-) mice. Oncogenic Ras activation induced by 4-hydroxytamoxifen did not produce increased p53 or apoptosis. Finally, when C/EBPbeta(-/-) mice were treated with differing types of DNA-damaging agents, including alkylating chemotherapeutic agents, they displayed aberrant levels of p53 and apoptosis. These results indicate that C/EBPbeta represses p53 to promote cell survival downstream of DNA damage and suggest that inhibition of C/EBPbeta may be a target for cancer cotherapy to increase the efficacy of alkylating chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. Investigation on the Effect of Recycled Asphalt Shingle (RAS in Portland Cement Mortar

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    Jinwoo An

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tear-off roofing shingle, referred to as Reclaimed asphalt shingle (RAS, is the byproduct of construction demolition and it is a major solid waste stream in the U.S. Reuse of this byproduct in road construction sector can contribute to the success of materials sustainability as well as landfill conservation. Ground RAS has similar particle distribution as sand and its major component includes aggregate granules, fibers, and asphalt. To promote the beneficial utilization of RAS, this study evaluates the effect of RAS in cement mortar when used as replacement of sand. In addition, the study investigates how cellulose fibers from RAS behave under high alkaline environment during cement hydration process, which may significantly affect mortar’s strength performance. The laboratory study includes measurements of physical, mechanical, and durability behaviors of cement mortar containing RAS replacing sand up to 30%. It was found that the optimum mixture proportions are 5% and 10% for compressive strength and toughness, respectively.

  12. Absence of ras-gene hot-spot mutations in canine fibrosarcomas and melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murua Escobar, Hugo; Günther, Kathrin; Richter, Andreas; Soller, Jan T; Winkler, Susanne; Nolte, Ingo; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2004-01-01

    Point mutations within ras proto-oncogenes, particularly within the mutational hot-spot codons 12, 13 and 61, are frequently detected in human malignancies and in different types of experimentally-induced tumours in animals. So far little is known about ras mutations in naturally occurring canine fibrosarcomas or K-ras mutations in canine melanomas. To elucidate whether ras mutations exist in these naturally occurring tumours in dogs, in the present study we screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas, 2 feline fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot-spots, making this the first study to investigate a large number of canine fibrosarcomas. None of the samples showed a K- or N-ras hot spot mutation. Thus, our data strongly suggest that ras mutations at the hot-spot loci are very rare and do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of the spontaneously occurring canine tumours investigated.

  13. Activation of Bmp2-Smad1 signal and its regulation by coordinated alteration of H3K27 trimethylation in Ras-induced senescence.

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    Atsushi Kaneda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence involves epigenetic alteration, e.g. loss of H3K27me3 in Ink4a-Arf locus. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF, we here analyzed transcription and epigenetic alteration during Ras-induced senescence on genome-wide scale by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-sequencing and microarray. Bmp2 was the most activated secreted factor with H3K4me3 gain and H3K27me3 loss, whereas H3K4me3 loss and de novo formation of H3K27me3 occurred inversely in repression of nine genes, including two BMP-SMAD inhibitors Smad6 and Noggin. DNA methylation alteration unlikely occurred. Ras-activated cells senesced with nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated SMAD1/5/8. Senescence was bypassed in Ras-activated cells when Bmp2/Smad1 signal was blocked by Bmp2 knockdown, Smad6 induction, or Noggin induction. Senescence was induced when recombinant BMP2 protein was added to Bmp2-knocked-down Ras-activated cells. Downstream Bmp2-Smad1 target genes were then analyzed genome-wide by ChIP-sequencing using anti-Smad1 antibody in MEF that was exposed to BMP2. Smad1 target sites were enriched nearby transcription start sites of genes, which significantly correlated to upregulation by BMP2 stimulation. While Smad6 was one of Smad1 target genes to be upregulated by BMP2 exposure, Smad6 repression in Ras-activated cells with increased enrichment of Ezh2 and gain of H3K27me3 suggested epigenetic disruption of negative feedback by Polycomb. Among Smad1 target genes that were upregulated in Ras-activated cells without increased repressive mark, Parvb was found to contribute to growth inhibition as Parvb knockdown lead to escape from senescence. It was revealed through genome-wide analyses in this study that Bmp2-Smad1 signal and its regulation by harmonized epigenomic alteration play an important role in Ras-induced senescence.

  14. RasGRP1 confers the phorbol ester-sensitive phenotype to EL4 lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shujie; Knoepp, Stewart M; Hallman, Mark A; Meier, Kathryn E

    2007-01-01

    The murine EL4 lymphoma cell line exists in variants that are either sensitive or resistant to the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In sensitive EL4 cells, PMA causes robust Erk mitogen-activated protein kinase activation that results in growth arrest. In resistant cells, PMA induces minimal Erk activation, without growth arrest. PMA stimulates IL-2 production in sensitive, but not resistant, cells. The role of RasGRP1, a PMA-activated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras, in EL4 phenotype was examined. Endogenous RasGRP1 protein is expressed at much higher levels in sensitive than in resistant cells. PMA-induced Ras activation is observed in sensitive cells but not in resistant cells lacking Ras-GRP1. PMA induces down-regulation of RasGRP1 protein in sensitive cells but increases RasGRP1 in resistant cells. Transfection of RasGRP1 into resistant cells enhances PMA-induced Erk activation. In the reverse experiment, introduction of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for RasGRP1 suppresses PMA-induced Ras and Erk activations in sensitive cells. Sensitive cells incubated with siRNA for RasGRP1 exhibit the PMA-resistant phenotype, in that they are able to proliferate in the presence of PMA and do not secrete IL-2 when stimulated with PMA. These studies indicate that the PMA-sensitive phenotype, as previously defined for the EL4 cell line, is conferred by endogenous expression of RasGRP1 protein.

  15. Analisis Pendapatan Usaha Peternakan Ayam Ras Petelur di Kecamatan Mattirobulu Kab. Pinrang Sulawesi Selatan

    OpenAIRE

    Rohani, St; Sri Lestari, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Penelitian ini dilakukan dengan tujuan untuk mengetahui pendapatan usaha peternakan ayam ras petelur di Kecamatan Mattirobulu, Kabupaten Pinrang. Penelitian ini dilakukan selama dua bulan terhitung mulai bulan April sampai Mei tahun 2013. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, dapat disimpulkan bahwa usaha peternakan ayam ras petelur fase layer lebih menguntungkan daripada fase starter-grower. Rata-rata pendapatan peternak ayam ras petelur fase layer adalah Rp 55.130,65/ekor dan fase starter-grower...

  16. Cellular ras gene activity is required for full neoplastic transformation by the large tumor antigen of SV40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, L; Brownell, H L; Corbley, M J; Wood, K W; Wang, D; Haliotis, T

    1997-08-01

    To investigate the role of the cellular ras gene product in neoplastic transformation by the SV40 large tumor antigen (SVLT), murine C3H10T1/2 cells were rendered deficient in Ras activity by transfection with inducible or constitutive antisense ras gene constructs or through the introduction of the dominant-negative mutant, ras(asn17). Consistent with previous results, SVLT-induced morphological transformation was unaffected by the down-regulation of c-ras gene product activity. On the other hand, colony formation in soft agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice were drastically reduced in c-Ras-deficient cells. In addition, SVLT expression in C3H10T1/2 cells led to increased c-Ras activity, as determined by an increase in the Ras-bound GTP/GTP + GDP ratio. These results suggest that c-Ras is required for full neoplastic transformation by SVLT.

  17. In TCR-stimulated T-cells, N-ras regulates specific genes and signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Stephen J; Zavadil, Jiri; Pellicer, Angel

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently shown that N-ras plays a preferential role in immune cell development and function; specifically: N-ras, but not H-ras or K-ras, could be activated at and signal from the Golgi membrane of immune cells following a low level T-cell receptor stimulus. The goal of our studies was to test the hypothesis that N-ras and H-ras played distinct roles in immune cells at the level of the transcriptome. First, we showed via mRNA expression profiling that there were over four hundred genes that were uniquely differentially regulated either by N-ras or H-ras, which provided strong evidence in favor of the hypothesis that N-ras and H-ras have distinct functions in immune cells. We next characterized the genes that were differentially regulated by N-ras in T cells following a low-level T-cell receptor stimulus. Of the large pool of candidate genes that were differentially regulated by N-ras downstream of TCR ligation, four genes were verified in qRT-PCR-based validation experiments (Dntt, Slc9a6, Chst1, and Lars2). Finally, although there was little overlap between individual genes that were regulated by N-ras in unstimulated thymocytes and stimulated CD4(+) T-cells, there was a nearly complete correspondence between the signaling pathways that were regulated by N-ras in these two immune cell types.

  18. Nitrative and oxidative DNA damage caused by K-ras mutation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Shiho [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science (Japan); Saito, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Noboru [Department of Animal Genomics, Mie University Life Science Research Center (Japan); Ma, Ning [Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science (Japan); Hiraku, Yusuke; Murata, Mariko [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kawanishi, Shosuke, E-mail: kawanisi@suzuka-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science (Japan)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Mutated K-ras in transgenic mice caused nitrative DNA damage, 8-nitroguanine. {yields} The mutagenic 8-nitroguanine seemed to be generated by iNOS via Ras-MAPK signal. {yields} Mutated K-ras produces additional mutagenic lesions, as a new oncogenic role. -- Abstract: Ras mutation is important for carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis consists of multi-step process with mutations in several genes. We investigated the role of DNA damage in carcinogenesis initiated by K-ras mutation, using conditional transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that mutagenic 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were apparently formed in adenocarcinoma caused by mutated K-ras. 8-Nitroguanine was co-localized with iNOS, eNOS, NF-{kappa}B, IKK, MAPK, MEK, and mutated K-ras, suggesting that oncogenic K-ras causes additional DNA damage via signaling pathway involving these molecules. It is noteworthy that K-ras mutation mediates not only cell over-proliferation but also the accumulation of mutagenic DNA lesions, leading to carcinogenesis.

  19. Autophagy suppresses Ras-driven epithelial tumourigenesis by limiting the accumulation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manent, J; Banerjee, S; de Matos Simoes, R; Zoranovic, T; Mitsiades, C; Penninger, J M; Simpson, K J; Humbert, P O; Richardson, H E

    2017-10-05

    Activation of Ras signalling occurs in ~30% of human cancers; however, activated Ras alone is not sufficient for tumourigenesis. In a screen for tumour suppressors that cooperate with oncogenic Ras (Ras(V12)) in Drosophila, we identified genes involved in the autophagy pathway. Bioinformatic analysis of human tumours revealed that several core autophagy genes, including GABARAP, correlate with oncogenic KRAS mutations and poor prognosis in human pancreatic cancer, supporting a potential tumour-suppressive effect of the pathway in Ras-driven human cancers. In Drosophila, we demonstrate that blocking autophagy at any step of the pathway enhances Ras(V12)-driven epithelial tissue overgrowth via the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and activation of the Jun kinase stress response pathway. Blocking autophagy in Ras(V12) clones also results in non-cell-autonomous effects with autophagy, cell proliferation and caspase activation induced in adjacent wild-type cells. Our study has implications for understanding the interplay between perturbations in Ras signalling and autophagy in tumourigenesis, which might inform the development of novel therapeutics targeting Ras-driven cancers.

  20. EGFR gene copy number predicts response to anti-EGFR treatment in RAS wild type and RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wild type metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ålgars, Annika; Sundström, Jari; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Jokilehto, Terhi; Kytölä, Soili; Kaare, Milja; Vainionpää, Reetta; Orpana, Arto; Österlund, Pia; Ristimäki, Ari; Carpen, Olli; Ristamäki, Raija

    2017-02-15

    Anti-EGFR antibodies are used for the treatment of RAS wild type metastatic colorectal cancer. We previously showed that EGFR gene copy number (GCN) predicts response to anti-EGFR therapy in KRAS exon 2 wild type metastatic colorectal cancer. The aim of our study was to analyse the predictive role of EGFR GCN in RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wild type metastatic colorectal cancer. The material included 102 patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type metastatic colorectal cancer treated with anti-EGFR ± cytotoxic therapy. Next generation sequencing was used for KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA gene mutation analyses. EGFR GCN was analysed by EGFR immunohistochemistry guided automated silver in situ hybridisation. Increased EGFR GCN (≥4.0) predicted a better response and prolonged progression free survival in anti-EGFR treated RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wild type patients (Log-rank test, p = 0.0004). In contrast, survival of RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wild type, EGFR GCN below 4.0 patients did not differ from patients with mutant RAS, BRAF or PIK3CA. Our study indicates that EGFR GCN predicts anti-EGFR treatment efficacy in patients with RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wt metastatic CRC. Tumours with EGFR GCN below 4.0 appear to be as refractory to anti-EGFR treatment as tumours with mutation in any of the RAS/RAF/PIK3CA pathway genes. © 2016 UICC.

  1. Identification of H-Ras-Specific Motif for the Activation of Invasive Signaling Program in Human Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Young Yong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression and/or activation of H-Ras are often associated with tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer. Previously, we showed that H-Ras, but not N-Ras, induces MCF10A human breast epithelial cell invasion and migration, whereas both H-Ras and N-Ras induce cell proliferation and phenotypic transformation. In an attempt to determine the sequence requirement directing the divergent phenotype induced by H-Ras and N-Ras with a focus on the induction of human breast cell invasion, we investigated the structural and functional relationships between H-Ras and N-Ras using domain-swap and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Here, we report that the hypervariable region (HVR, consisting of amino acids 166 to 189 in H-Ras, determines the invasive/migratory signaling program as shown by the exchange of invasive phenotype by swapping HVR sequences between H-Ras and N-Ras. We also demonstrate that the H-Ras-specific additional palmitoylation site at Cys184 is not responsible for the signaling events that distinguish between H-Ras and N-Ras. Importantly, this work identifies the C-terminal HVR, especially the flexible linker domain with two consecutive proline residues Pro173 and Pro174, as a critical domain that contributes to activation of H-Ras and its invasive potential in human breast epithelial cells. The present study sheds light on the structural basis for the Ras isoform-specific invasive program of breast epithelial cells, providing information for the development of agents that specifically target invasion-related H-Ras pathways in human cancer.

  2. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hauling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12, both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria, which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity.

  3. Clinical Validation of a Multiplex Kit for RAS Mutations in Colorectal Cancer: Results of the RASKET (RAS KEy Testing) Prospective, Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Takayuki; Muro, Kei; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Nishina, Tomohiro; Denda, Tadamichi; Kudo, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Wataru; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Akagi, Kiwamu; Kajiwara, Takeshi; Hironaka, Shuichi; Satoh, Taroh

    2015-01-01

    Background RAS (KRAS and NRAS) testing is required to predict anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) treatment efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Although direct sequencing (DS) with manual microdissection (MMD) is widely used, a diagnostic kit providing rapid detections of RAS mutations would be clinically beneficial. We evaluated the MEBGENTM RASKET KIT (RASKET KIT), a multiplex assay using PCR-reverse sequence specific oligonucleotide and xMAP® technology to concurrently detect exon 2, 3, and 4 RAS mutations in a short turnaround time (4.5 h/96-specimens). Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues were obtained from 308 consenting patients with histologically-confirmed CRC at six hospitals in Japan. For the RASKET KIT, we used only 50–100 ng DNA from each FFPE specimen not processed by MMD. The primary endpoint was the concordance rate between RAS mutations identified with the RASKET KIT and two reference assays (DS with MMD and TheraScreen® K-RAS Mutation Kit). As the secondary endpoints, we evaluated the concordance rate between DS and the RASKET KIT for RAS mutations in the wild-type KRAS exon 2 population and the genotyping performance of the RASKET KIT compared with DS. Findings Among 307 analyzable specimens, the reference assays detected 140 (45.6%, 140/307) RAS mutations: 111 KRAS exon 2 and 29 other (minor) RAS mutations. The RASKET KIT detected 143 (46.6%, 143/307) mutations: 114 KRAS exon 2 and 29 minor RAS mutations. The between-method concordance rate was 96.7% (297/307) (95% CI: 94.1–98.4%). Minor RAS mutations were detected in 15.7% (30/191) of the wild-type KRAS exon 2 population (n = 191); the concordance rate was 98.4% (188/191) (95% CI: 95.5–99.7%). The concordance rate of RAS genotyping was 100% (139/139) (95% CI: 97–100%). Interpretation The RASKET KIT provides rapid and precise detections of RAS mutations and consequently, quicker and more effective anti-EGFR therapy for CRC (Study ID: UMIN

  4. PAQR10 and PAQR11 mediate Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ting; Ding, Qiurong; Huang, Heng; Xu, Daqian; Jiang, Yuhui; Zhou, Ben; Li, Zhenghu; Jiang, Xiaomeng; He, Jing; Liu, Weizhong; Zhang, Yixuan; Pan, Yi; Wang, Zhenzhen; Thomas, Walter G; Chen, Yan

    2012-04-01

    Ras plays a pivotal role in many cellular activities, and its subcellular compartmentalization provides spatial and temporal selectivity. Here we report a mode of spatial regulation of Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus by two highly homologous proteins PAQR10 and PAQR11 of the progestin and AdipoQ receptors family. PAQR10 and PAQR11 are exclusively localized in the Golgi apparatus. Overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 stimulates basal and EGF-induced ERK phosphorylation and increases the expression of ERK target genes in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 markedly elevates Golgi localization of HRas, NRas and KRas4A, but not KRas4B. PAQR10 and PAQR11 can also interact with HRas, NRas and KRas4A, but not KRas4B. The increased Ras protein at the Golgi apparatus by overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11 is in an active state. Consistently, knockdown of PAQR10 and PAQR11 reduces EGF-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and Ras activation at the Golgi apparatus. Intriguingly, PAQR10 and PAQR11 are able to interact with RasGRP1, a guanine nucleotide exchange protein of Ras, and increase Golgi localization of RasGRP1. The C1 domain of RasGRP1 is both necessary and sufficient for the interaction of RasGRP1 with PAQR10/PAQR11. The simulation of ERK phosphorylation by overexpressed PAQR10/PAQR11 is abrogated by downregulation of RasGRP1. Furthermore, differentiation of PC12 cells is significantly enhanced by overexpression of PAQR10/PAQR11. Collectively, this study uncovers a new paradigm of spatial regulation of Ras signaling in the Golgi apparatus by PAQR10 and PAQR11.

  5. Evidence implicating the Ras pathway in multiple CD28 costimulatory functions in CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit V Janardhan

    Full Text Available CD28 costimulation is a critical event in the full activation of CD4(+ T cells that augments cytokine gene transcription, promotes cytokine mRNA stability, prevents induction of anergy, increases cellular metabolism, and increases cell survival. However, despite extensive biochemical analysis of the signaling events downstream of CD28, molecular pathways sufficient to functionally replace the diverse aspects of CD28-mediated costimulation in normal T cells have not been identified. Ras/MAPK signaling is a critical pathway downstream of T cell receptor stimulation, but its role in CD28-mediated costimulation has been controversial. We observed that physiologic CD28 costimulation caused a relocalization of the RasGEF RasGRP to the T cell-APC interface by confocal microscopy. In whole cell biochemical analysis, CD28 cross-linking with either anti-CD28 antibody or B7.1-Ig augmented TCR-induced Ras activation. To determine whether Ras signaling was sufficient to functionally mimic CD28 costimulation, we utilized an adenoviral vector encoding constitutively active H-Ras (61L to transduce normal, Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR transgenic CD4(+ T cells. Like costimulation via CD28, active Ras induced AKT, JNK and ERK phosphorylation. In addition, constitutive Ras signaling mimicked the ability of CD28 to costimulate IL-2 protein secretion, prevent anergy induction, increase glucose uptake, and promote cell survival. Importantly, we also found that active Ras mimicked the mechanism by which CD28 costimulates IL-2 production: by increasing IL-2 gene transcription, and promoting IL-2 mRNA stability. Finally, active Ras was able to induce IL-2 production when combined with ionomycin stimulation in a MEK-1-dependent fashion. Our results are consistent with a central role for Ras signaling in CD28-mediated costimulation.

  6. ROS, autophagy, mitochondria and cancer: Ras, the hidden master?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Gregory L; Liu, Dan; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances have highlighted the complex web of biological mechanisms and pathways involved in oncogenic transformation and maintenance of the cancer phenotype. To that end, a number of key factors have been identified and thoroughly investigated over the past couple of decades, such as redox regulation of cell fate decisions, cellular metabolism and bioenergetics, autophagy induction as a survival signal, and how these pathways interplay with oncogene-induced transformation. This has been particularly well documented for oncoprotein Ras-induced carcinogenesis, and recent reports provide ample evidence to indicate a well-coordinated crosstalk between these diverse cellular pathways in the process of cancer initiation and progression. Here we provide a brief summary of the recent advances in the field to illustrate the dual role of autophagy as a tumor suppressor and as a survival mechanism required for cancer maintenance as well as its implication in the complex relationship between Ras-mediated carcinogenesis, mitochondrial metabolism, cellular redox status and bioenergetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Signal transduction by Ras-like GTPases: a potential target for anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, M.; Bischoff, J. R.; McCormick, F.

    1995-01-01

    Members of the ras family of GTPases are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and transformation. The ras oncogene is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. In addition, other oncogene and tumor suppressor gene

  8. Coexistence of K-ras mutations and HPV infection in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tezol Ayda

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the ras genes or association with human papillomavirus infection have been extensively studied in colorectal cancer. However, the correlation between K-ras mutations and HPV in colorectal cancer has not been investigated yet. In this study we aimed to investigate the presence of K-ras mutations and their correlation with HPV infection in colon cancer. Methods K-ras mutations were analyzed by a mutagenic PCR assay and digestion with specific restriction enzymes to distinguish the wild-type and mutant codons. HPV infection was analyzed by PCR amplification and hybridization with specific probes by Southern blotting. Stattistical analyses were performed by the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests Results HPV gene fragments were detected in 43 tumors and 17 normal tissue samples. HPV 18 was the prevalent type in the tumor tissue. A mutation at codon 12 of the K-ras gene was present in 31 patients. 56% of the HPV-positive tumors also harbored a K-ras mutation. Codon 13 mutations were not observed. These data indicate that infection with high risk HPV types and mutational activation of the K-ras gene are frequent events in colorectal carcinogenesis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that mutational activation of the K-ras gene is a common event in colon carcinogenesis and that HPV infection may represent an important factor in the development of the premalignant lesions leading to the neoplastic phenotype.

  9. Mutated N-ras does not induce p19 in CO25 cell line

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kamel

    2012-06-28

    Jun 28, 2012 ... Key words: Oncogene, N-ras, p19, myoblast, CO25 cells, differentiation, MDM2. INTRODUCTION. The ras oncogene has been shown to affect differentiation in various cell types in different ways, by inducing the resistance retinoic acid, which is a potent effectors of epithelial cell growth, differentiation (Olson ...

  10. The Ras mutant D119N is both dominant negative and activated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cool, RH; Schmidt, G; Lenzen, CU; Prinz, H; Vogt, D; Wittinghofer, A

    The introduction of mutation D119N (or its homolog) in the NKxD nucleotide binding motif of various Ras-like proteins produces constitutively activated or dominant-negative effects, depending on the system and assay. Here we show that Ras(D119N) has an inhibitory effect at a cell-specific

  11. Preoperative RAS Mutational Analysis Is of Great Value in Predicting Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sook Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC, particularly the encapsulated subtype, often causes a diagnostic dilemma. We reconfirmed the molecular profiles in a large number of FVPTCs and investigated the efficacy of the preoperative mutational analysis in indeterminate thyroid nodules. BRAF V600E/K601E and RAS mutational analysis was performed on 187 FVPTCs. Of these, 132 (70.6% had a point mutation in one of the BRAF V600E (n=57, BRAF K601E (n=11, or RAS (n=64 genes. All mutations were mutually exclusive. The most common RAS mutations were at NRAS codon 61. FNA aspirates from 564 indeterminate nodules were prospectively tested for BRAF and RAS mutation and the surgical outcome was correlated with the mutational status. Fifty-seven and 47 cases were positive for BRAF and RAS mutation, respectively. Twenty-seven RAS-positive patients underwent surgery and all except one patient had FVPTC. The PPV and accuracy of RAS mutational analysis for predicting FVPTC were 96% and 84%, respectively. BRAF or RAS mutations were present in more than two-thirds of FVPTCs and these were mutually exclusive. BRAF mutational analysis followed by N, H, and KRAS codon 61 mutational analysis in indeterminate thyroid nodules would streamline the management of patients with malignancies, mostly FVPTC.

  12. Literature review : performance of RAP/RAS mixes and new direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    In the last several years reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) have been : widely used in asphalt mixes in Texas. The use of RAP/RAS can significantly reduce the initial cost of : asphalt mixtures, conserve energy, and...

  13. Thermodynamics between RAP/RAS and virgin aggregates during asphalt concrete production : a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In hot-mix asphalt (HMA) plants, virgin aggregates are heated and dried separately before being mixed with : RAP/RAS and virgin asphalt binder. RAP/RAS materials are not heated or dried directly by a burner to avoid : burning of aged binder coating o...

  14. Ras signalling linked to the cell-cycle machinery by the retinoblastoma protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeper, D.S.; Upton, T.M.; Ladha, M.H.; Neuman, E.; Zalvide, J.; Bernards, R.A.; DeCaprio, J.A.; Ewen, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Ras proto-oncogene is a central component of mitogenic signal-transduction pathways, and is essential for cells both to leave a quiescent state (GO) and to pass through the GI/S transition of the cell cycle. The mechanism by which Ras signalling regulates cell-cycle progression is unclear,

  15. N-ras mutations in human cutaneous melanoma from sun-exposed body sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Veer, L. J.; Burgering, B. M.; Versteeg, R.; Boot, A. J.; Ruiter, D. J.; Osanto, S.; Schrier, P. I.; Bos, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    In 7 of 37 patients with cutaneous melanoma, mutations in the N-ras gene were found. The primary tumors of these seven patients were exclusively localized on body sites continuously exposed to sunlight. Moreover, the ras mutations were all at or near dipyrimidine sites known to be targets of UV

  16. Epidermal-growth-factor receptors generate Ras.GTP more efficiently than insulin receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osterop, A.P.R.M.; Medema, R.H.; Zon, G.C.M. van der; Bos, J.L.; Möller, W.; Maassen, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Activation of the Ras proto-oncogene contributes in general to mitogenic activation of cells. We show here that epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates Ras.GTP formation very efficiently in a variety of cell lines expressing endogenous EGF receptors only. Maximal activation of the receptor converts

  17. Targeted expression of oncogenic K-ras in intestinal epithelium causes spontaneous tumorigenesis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, KP; El Marjou, F; Pinto, D; Sastre, X; Rouillard, D; Fouquet, C; Soussi, T; Louvard, D; Robine, S

    Background & Aims: Ras oncoproteins are mutated in about 50% of human colorectal cancers, but their precise role in tumor initiation or progression is still unclear. Methods: This study presents transgenic mice that express K-ras(V12G), the most frequent oncogenic mutation in human tumors, under

  18. K-ras gene mutation as an early prognostic marker of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpon, Łukasz; Stal, Aleksander; Zawadzki, Marcin; Lis-Nawara, Anna; Kielan, Wojciech; Grzebieniak, Zygmunt

    2016-01-01

    Due to increased colorectal cancer incidence there is a necessity of seeking new both prognostic and prediction factors that will allow to evolve new diagnostic tests. K-ras gene seems to be such a factor and its mutations are considered to be an early marker of progression of colorectal cancer. The aim of the study was to find a correlation between K-ras gene mutation in patients with diagnosed colorectal cancer and selected clinical parameters. A total of 104 patients (41 women and 63 men) with diagnosed colorectal cancer were included in this study. The average age of male group was 68.3 and in female group - 65.9. Samples were taken from paraffine blocks with tissue from diagnosed patients and K-ras gene mutation were identified. Afterwards the statistical analysis was made seeking the correlation between K-ras gene mutation incidence and clinical TNM staging system, tumour localisation, histological type, sex, age. K-ras gene mutations were detected in 20.1% of all colorectal cancers. Significantly higher rate of K-ras gene mutations were diagnosed among patients classified at stage I (40%), stage IIC (50%) and stage IV (50%) according to the TNM classification. The results of our study are compatible with other studies and indicate the correlation between K-ras gene mutation and colorectal cancer incidence. Identification of K-ras gene mutation may complement other diagnostic methods at early stage of colorectal cancer.

  19. The p21 ras C-terminus is required for transformation and membrane association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Christensen, A; Hubbert, N L

    1984-01-01

    The Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MuSV) transforming gene, v-rasH, encodes a 21,000 molecular weight protein (p21) that is closely related to the p21 proteins encoded by the cellular transforming genes of the ras gene family. The primary translation product (prop21), which is found in the cytosol...

  20. Escape from premature senescence is not sufficient for oncogenic transformation by Ras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeper, D.S.; Dannenberg, J.-H.; Douma, S.; Riele, H. te; Bernards, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Resistance of primary cells to transformation by oncogenic Ras has been attributed to the induction of replicative growth arrest1, 2, 3. This irreversible 'fail-safe mechanism' resembles senescence and requires induction by Ras of p19ARF and p53 (refs 3−5). Mutation of either p19ARF or p53

  1. Transcriptional Profile of Ki-Ras-Induced Transformation of Thyroid Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visconti, Roberta; Federico, Antonella; Coppola, Valeria

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In the last years, an increasing number of experiments has provided compelling evidence for a casual role of Ras protein mutations, resulting in their constitutive activation, in thyroid carcinogenesis. However, despite the clear involvement of Ras proteins in thyroid carcinogenesis, the...

  2. BRAF inhibitors induce metastasis in RAS mutant or inhibitor-resistant melanoma cells by reactivating MEK and ERK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Laorden, Berta; Viros, Amaya; Girotti, Maria Romina; Pedersen, Malin; Saturno, Grazia; Zambon, Alfonso; Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Turajlic, Samra; Hayes, Andrew; Gore, Martin; Larkin, James; Lorigan, Paul; Cook, Martin; Springer, Caroline; Marais, Richard

    2014-03-25

    Melanoma is a highly metastatic and lethal form of skin cancer. The protein kinase BRAF is mutated in about 40% of melanomas, and BRAF inhibitors improve progression-free and overall survival in these patients. However, after a relatively short period of disease control, most patients develop resistance because of reactivation of the RAF-ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, mediated in many cases by mutations in RAS. We found that BRAF inhibition induces invasion and metastasis in RAS mutant melanoma cells through a mechanism mediated by the reactivation of the MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase)-ERK pathway, increased expression and secretion of interleukin 8, and induction of protease-dependent invasion. These events were accompanied by a cell morphology switch from predominantly rounded to predominantly elongated cells. We also observed similar responses in BRAF inhibitor-resistant melanoma cells. These data show that BRAF inhibitors can induce melanoma cell invasion and metastasis in tumors that develop resistance to these drugs.

  3. A study case of Baranca drainage basin flash-floods using the hydrological model of Hec-Ras

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aritina HALIUC; Alexandru FRANTIUC

    2012-01-01

    .... The Baranca brook which drains a considerable part of Zamostea village (Romania) was used as a pilot drainage basin for the flash-flood simulation using the Hec-Ras program and the Arcgis extension, HecGeo-Ras...

  4. Isolation of a novel ras gene from Trichomonas vaginalis: a possible evolutionary ancestor of the Ras and Rap genes of higher eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Yan; Liu, Ju-Li; Zhang, Ren-Li; Fu, Yu-cai

    2007-04-01

    The Ras subfamily proteins are small, monomeric GTP-binding proteins with vital roles in regulating eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. Gene duplication and divergence have been postulated as the mechanism by which such family members have evolved their specific functions. A cDNA clone of TvRsp was isolated and sequenced from a cDNA expression library of the primitive eukaryote Trichomonas vaginalis. The genomic DNA corresponding to the cDNA sequence was amplified by PCR and sequenced. Sequence analysis suggested that TvRsp was an intronless gene. This gene encoded a protein of 181 amino acids and contained the 5 conserved G domains that designated it as a Ras or Rap subfamily member. However, the deduced amino acid sequence shared only 34%-37% overall identity with other Ras subfamily members of different species, and the presence of motifs characteristic of both the Ras and Rap families of GTPase confused the familial classification of this gene. Phylogenetic analysis showed its origins at the divergence point of the Ras/Rap families and suggested that TvRsp was a possible evolutionary ancestral gene of the ras/rap genes of higher eukaryotes. This information was of importance not only from the perspective of understanding the evolution and diversity of eukaryotic signal transduction pathways but also in providing a framework by which to understand protein processing in the growth and differentiation of single-celled microorganisms.

  5. An improved Ras sensor for highly sensitive and quantitative FRET-FLIM imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana F Oliveira

    Full Text Available Ras is a signaling protein involved in a variety of cellular processes. Hence, studying Ras signaling with high spatiotemporal resolution is crucial to understanding the roles of Ras in many important cellular functions. Previously, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM of fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET-based Ras activity sensors, FRas and FRas-F, have been demonstrated to be useful for measuring the spatiotemporal dynamics of Ras signaling in subcellular micro-compartments. However the predominantly nuclear localization of the sensors' acceptor has limited its sensitivity. Here, we have overcome this limitation and developed two variants of the existing FRas sensor with different affinities: FRas2-F (K(d∼1.7 µM and FRas2-M (K(d∼0.5 µM. We demonstrate that, under 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, FRas2 sensors provide higher sensitivity compared to previous sensors in 293T cells and neurons.

  6. cpRAS: a novel circularly permuted RAS-like GTPase domain with a highly scattered phylogenetic distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novotny Marian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent systematic survey suggested that the YRG (or YawG/YlqF family with the G4-G5-G1-G2-G3 order of the conserved GTPase motifs represents the only possible circularly permuted variation of the canonical GTPase structure. Here we show that a different circularly permuted GTPase domain actually does exist, conforming to the pattern G3-G4-G5-G1-G2. The domain, dubbed cpRAS, is a variant of RAS family GTPases and occurs in two types of larger proteins, either inserted into a region homologous to a bacterial group of proteins classified as COG2373 and potentially related to the alpha-2-macroglobulin family (so far a single protein in Dictyostelium or in combination with a von Willebrand factor type A (VWA domain. For the latter protein type, which was found in a few metazoans and several distantly related protists, existence in the common ancestor of opisthokonts, Amoebozoa and excavates followed by at least eight independent losses may be inferred. Our findings thus bring further evidence for the importance of parallel reduction of ancestral complexity in the eukaryotic evolution. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Lakshminarayan Iyer and Fyodor Kondrashov. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  7. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  8. R-Ras regulates migration through an interaction with filamin A in melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Gawecka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in cell adhesion and migration in the tumor microenvironment are key in the initiation and progression of metastasis. R-Ras is one of several small GTPases that regulate cell adhesion and migration on the extracellular matrix, however the mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach we sought to identify novel R-Ras binding proteins that might mediate its effects on integrins.We identified Filamin A (FLNa as a candidate interacting protein. FLNa is an actin-binding scaffold protein that also binds to integrin beta1, beta2 and beta7 tails and is associated with diverse cell processes including cell migration. Indeed, M2 melanoma cells require FLNa for motility. We further show that R-Ras and FLNa interact in co-immunoprecipitations and pull-down assays. Deletion of FLNa repeat 3 (FLNaDelta3 abrogated this interaction. In M2 melanoma cells active R-Ras co-localized with FLNa but did not co-localize with FLNa lacking repeat 3. Thus, activated R-Ras binds repeat 3 of FLNa. The functional consequence of this interaction was that active R-Ras and FLNa coordinately increased cell migration. In contrast, co-expression of R-Ras and FLNaDelta3 had a significantly reduced effect on migration. While there was enhancement of integrin activation and fibronectin matrix assembly, cell adhesion was not altered. Finally, siRNA knockdown of endogenous R-Ras impaired FLNa-dependent fibronectin matrix assembly.These data support a model in which R-Ras functionally associates with FLNa and thereby regulates integrin-dependent migration. Thus in melanoma cells R-Ras and FLNa may cooperatively promote metastasis by enhancing cell migration.

  9. Mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor and K-ras in Chinese patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueke Zhou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations of EGFR and K-ras are biomarkers for predicting the efficacy of targeting agents in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and colorectal cancer (CRC. Data on the gene mutation status of EGFR and K-ras in Chinese patients with CRC are limited. Methods EGFR mutations in exon 18-21 and K-ras mutations in exon 1 and 2 were detected in tumor samples from 101 Chinese patients with CRC by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism. The relationship between patients' characteristics and survival time and gene mutation status were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Results Only two samples (2.0% had EGFR mutations in exon 18 or 21, and 33 of 101 samples (32.7% had K-ras mutations in codon 12, 13, 45, 69, or 80. Univariate analysis suggested that differentiation might be correlated with K-ras mutations (p = 0.05, which was confirmed by a logistic regression model (p = 0.04. The median overall survival (OS and median survival after metastasis were 44.0 and 18.0 months, respectively, in the mutant K-ras group, and 53.3 and 19.0 months, respectively, in the wild K-ras group. K-ras mutation was not an independent prognostic factor for OS or survival after metastasis (p = 0.79 and 0.78, respectively. Conclusions In Chinese patients with CRC, EGFR mutations were rare, and K-ras mutations were similar to those of Europeans. New mutations in codons 45, 69, and 80 were found in the Chinese population. Poor differentiation was an independent factor related to K-ras mutations.

  10. Hyperglycemia promotes K-Ras-induced lung tumorigenesis through BASCs amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Micucci

    Full Text Available Oncogenic K-Ras represents the most common molecular change in human lung adenocarcinomas, the major histologic subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The presence of K-Ras mutation is associated with a poor prognosis, but no effective treatment strategies are available for K-Ras -mutant NSCLC. Epidemiological studies report higher lung cancer mortality rates in patients with type 2 diabetes. Here, we use a mouse model of K-Ras-mediated lung cancer on a background of chronic hyperglycemia to determine whether elevated circulating glycemic levels could influence oncogenic K-Ras-mediated tumor development. Inducible oncogenic K-Ras mouse model was treated with subtoxic doses of streptozotocin (STZ to induce chronic hyperglycemia. We observed increased tumor mass and higher grade of malignancy in STZ treated diabetic mice analyzed at 4, 12 and 24 weeks, suggesting that oncogenic K-Ras increased lung tumorigenesis in hyperglycemic condition. This promoting effect is achieved by expansion of tumor-initiating lung bronchio-alveolar stem cells (BASCs in bronchio-alveolar duct junction, indicating a role of hyperglycemia in the activity of K-Ras-transformed putative lung stem cells. Notably, after oncogene K-Ras activation, BASCs show upregulation of the glucose transporter (Glut1/Slc2a1, considered as an important player of the active control of tumor cell metabolism by oncogenic K-Ras. Our novel findings suggest that anti-hyperglycemic drugs, such as metformin, may act as therapeutic agent to restrict lung neoplasia promotion and progression.

  11. Interactions between wild-type and mutant Ras genes in lung and skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, M D; Rosario, R D; Westcott, P M K; Banta, K L; Balmain, A

    2013-08-22

    Ras oncogenes (Hras, Kras and Nras) are important drivers of carcinogenesis. However, tumors with Ras mutations often show loss of the corresponding wild-type (WT) allele, suggesting that proto-oncogenic forms of Ras can function as a suppressor of carcinogenesis. In vitro studies also suggest that WT Ras proteins can suppress the tumorigenic properties of alternate mutant Ras family members, but in vivo evidence for these heterologous interactions is lacking. We have investigated the genetic interactions between different combinations of mutant and WT Ras alleles in vivo using carcinogen-induced lung and skin carcinogenesis in mice with targeted deletion of different Ras family members. The major suppressor effect of WT Kras is observed only in mutant Kras-driven lung carcinogenesis, where loss of one Kras allele led to increased tumor number and size. Deletion of one Hras allele dramatically reduced the number of skin papillomas with Hras mutations, consistent with Hras as the major target of mutation in these tumors. However, skin carcinoma numbers were very similar, suggesting that WT Hras functions as a suppressor of progression from papillomas to invasive squamous carcinomas. In the skin, the Kras proto-oncogene functions cooperatively with mutant Hras to promote papilloma development, although the effect is relatively small. In contrast, the Hras proto-oncogene attenuated the activity of mutant Kras in lung carcinogenesis. Interestingly, loss of Nras increased the number of mutant Kras-induced lung tumors, but decreased the number of mutant Hras-induced skin papillomas. These results show that the strongest suppressor effects of WT Ras are only seen in the context of mutation of the cognate Ras protein, and only relatively weak effects are detected on tumor development induced by mutations in alternative family members. The data also underscore the complex and context-dependent nature of interactions between proto-oncogenic and oncogenic forms of different

  12. Identification of Differentially Expressed K-Ras Transcript Variants in Patients With Leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, Nooshin; Shahbazi, Shirin; Torfeh, Mahnaz; Khorasani, Maryam; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Mahdian, Reza

    2017-10-01

    Molecular studies have demonstrated a wide range of gene expression variations in uterine leiomyoma. The rat sarcoma virus/rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (RAS/RAF/MAPK) is the crucial cellular pathway in transmitting external signals into nucleus. Deregulation of this pathway contributes to excessive cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. The present study aims to investigate the expression profile of the K-Ras transcripts in tissue samples from patients with leiomyoma. The patients were leiomyoma cases who had no mutation in mediator complex subunit 12 ( MED12) gene. A quantitative approach has been applied to determine the difference in the expression of the 2 main K-Ras messenger RNA (mRNA) variants. The comparison between gene expression levels in leiomyoma and normal myometrium group was performed using relative expression software tool. The expression of K-Ras4B gene was upregulated in leiomyoma group ( P = .016), suggesting the involvement of K-Ras4B in the disease pathogenesis. Pairwise comparison of the K-Ras4B expression between each leiomyoma tissue and its matched adjacent normal myometrium revealed gene upregulation in 68% of the cases. The expression of K-Ras4A mRNA was relatively upregulated in leiomyoma group ( P = .030). In addition, the mean expression of K-Ras4A gene in leiomyoma tissues relative to normal samples was 4.475 (95% confidence interval: 0.10-20.42; standard error: 0.53-12.67). In total, 58% of the cases showed more than 2-fold increase in K-Ras4A gene expression. Our results demonstrated increased expression of both K-Ras mRNA splicing variants in leiomyoma tissue. However, the ultimate result of KRAS expression on leiomyoma development depends on the overall KRAS isoform balance and, consequently, on activated signaling pathways.

  13. A cross-sectional study examining the expression of splice variants K-RAS4A and K-RAS4B in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Veronica; Masson Domingues, Pedro; Carvalho de Macedo, Fabiane; Moreira de Sousa, Carlos Augusto; Caldas Montella, Tatiane; de Souza Accioly, Maria Theresa; Ferreira, Carlos Gil

    2018-02-01

    Mammalian cells differently express 4 RAS isoforms: H-RAS, N-RAS, K-RAS4A and K-RAS4B, which are important in promoting oncogenic processes when mutated. In lung cancer, the K-RAS isoform is the most frequently altered RAS protein, being also a difficult therapeutic target. Interestingly, there are two K-RAS splice variants (K-RAS4A and K-RAS4B) and little is known about the role of K-RAS4A. Most studies targeting K-RAS, or analysing it as a prognostic factor, have not taken into account the two isoforms. Consequently, the in-depth investigation of them is needed. The present study analysed 98 specimens from advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) adenocarcinoma patients originated from Brazil. The alterations present in K-RAS at the DNA level (Sanger sequencing) as well as the expression of the splicing isoforms at the RNA (qRT-PCR) and protein levels (immunohistochemistry analysis), were evaluated. Possible associations between clinicopathological features and the molecular findings were also investigated. Our results showed that in the non-smoking population, the cancer incidence was higher among women. In contrast, in smokers and former smokers, the incidence was higher among men. Regarding sequencing results, 10.5% of valid samples presented mutations in exon 2, being all wild-type for exon 3, and the most frequently occurring base change was the transversion G → T. Our qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis showed that both, K-RAS4A and K-RAS4B, were differently expressed in NSCLC tumour samples. For example, tumour specimens showed higher K-RAS4A mRNA expression in relation to commercial normal lung control than did K-RAS4B. In addition, K-RAS4B protein expression was frequently stronger than K-RAS4A in the patients analysed. Our results highlight the differential expression of K-RAS4A and K-RAS4B in advanced adenocarcinoma NSCLC patients and underline the need to further clarify the enigma behind their biological significance in various cancer

  14. Variational data assimilation system "INM RAS - Black Sea"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmuzin, Eugene; Agoshkov, Valery; Assovskiy, Maksim; Giniatulin, Sergey; Zakharova, Natalia; Kuimov, Grigory; Fomin, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Development of Informational-Computational Systems (ICS) for Data Assimilation Procedures is one of multidisciplinary problems. To study and solve these problems one needs to apply modern results from different disciplines and recent developments in: mathematical modeling; theory of adjoint equations and optimal control; inverse problems; numerical methods theory; numerical algebra and scientific computing. The problems discussed above are studied in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Science (INM RAS) in ICS for Personal Computers (PC). Special problems and questions arise while effective ICS versions for PC are being developed. These problems and questions can be solved with applying modern methods of numerical mathematics and by solving "parallelism problem" using OpenMP technology and special linear algebra packages. In this work the results on the ICS development for PC-ICS "INM RAS - Black Sea" are presented. In the work the following problems and questions are discussed: practical problems that can be studied by ICS; parallelism problems and their solutions with applying of OpenMP technology and the linear algebra packages used in ICS "INM - Black Sea"; Interface of ICS. The results of ICS "INM RAS - Black Sea" testing are presented. Efficiency of technologies and methods applied are discussed. The work was supported by RFBR, grants No. 13-01-00753, 13-05-00715 and by The Ministry of education and science of Russian Federation, project 8291, project 11.519.11.1005 References: [1] V.I. Agoshkov, M.V. Assovskii, S.A. Lebedev, Numerical simulation of Black Sea hydrothermodynamics taking into account tide-forming forces. Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math. Modelling (2012) 27, No.1, 5-31 [2] E.I. Parmuzin, V.I. Agoshkov, Numerical solution of the variational assimilation problem for sea surface temperature in the model of the Black Sea dynamics. Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math. Modelling (2012) 27, No.1, 69-94 [3] V.B. Zalesny, N.A. Diansky, V

  15. Modulation of presynaptic plasticity and learning by the H-ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/synapsin I signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Steven A; Elgersma, Ype; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Jaarsma, Dick; van Woerden, Geeske M; Hojjati, Mohammad Reza; Cui, Yijun; LeBoutillier, Janelle C; Marrone, Diano F; Choi, Esther S; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Petit, Ted L; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Silva, Alcino J

    2005-10-19

    Molecular and cellular studies of the mechanisms underlying mammalian learning and memory have focused almost exclusively on postsynaptic function. We now reveal an experience-dependent presynaptic mechanism that modulates learning and synaptic plasticity in mice. Consistent with a presynaptic function for endogenous H-ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, we observed that, under normal physiologic conditions in wild-type mice, hippocampus-dependent learning stimulated the ERK-dependent phosphorylation of synapsin I, and MEK (MAP kinase kinase)/ERK inhibition selectively decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs. By generating transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of H-ras (H-rasG12V), which is abundantly localized in axon terminals, we were able to increase the ERK-dependent phosphorylation of synapsin I. This resulted in several presynaptic changes, including a higher density of docked neurotransmitter vesicles in glutamatergic terminals, an increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, and increased paired-pulse facilitation. In addition, we observed facilitated neurotransmitter release selectively during high-frequency activity with consequent increases in long-term potentiation. Moreover, these mice showed dramatic enhancements in hippocampus-dependent learning. Importantly, deletion of synapsin I, an exclusively presynaptic protein, blocked the enhancements of learning, presynaptic plasticity, and long-term potentiation. Together with previous invertebrate studies, these results demonstrate that presynaptic plasticity represents an important evolutionarily conserved mechanism for modulating learning and memory.

  16. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen, E-mail: nesnow.stephen@epa.gov

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  17. The bovine papillomavirus E5 oncogene can cooperate with ras: identification of p21 amino acids critical for transformation by c-rasH but not v-rasH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Vass, W C; Velu, T J

    1991-01-01

    activity of c-rasH is low, we have used cotransfection with the bovine papillomavirus (BPV) genome to develop a more sensitive transformation assay for c-rasH mutants. The increased sensitivity of the assay, which is seen both in focal transformation and in anchorage-independent growth, is mediated......We have previously used a series of insertion-deletion mutants of the mutationally activated v-rasH gene to identify several regions of the encoded protein that are dispensable for cellular transformation (B. M. Willumsen, A. G. Papageorge, H.-F. Kung, E. Bekesi, T. Robins, M. Johnsen, W. C. Vass......, and D. R. Lowy, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:2646-2654, 1986). To determine if some of these amino acids are more important for the biological activity of c-rasH, we have now tested many of the same insertion-deletion mutants in the c-rasH form for their ability to transform NIH 3T3 cells. Since the transforming...

  18. Alternatif Pengendalian Banjir Kali Juana Berbasis Model HEC-RAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Marhendi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kejadian banjir di Kali Juana terjadi setiap musim hujan berlangsung. Beberapa kecamatan seperti Kecamatan Kaliwungu, Undaan dan Mejobo (Kab. Kudus serta Pati, Margorejo dan Juwana (Kab. Pati selalu menjadi daerah genangan banjir. Beberapa upaya pengendalian banjir sudah dilakukan seperti upaya normalisasi dan perbaikan tanggul. Namun mengingat kompleksnya sistem aliran banir di Kali Juana, upaya tesebut belum memberikan hasil yang memadai. Kajian ini dimaksudkan untuk menganalisis alternatif pengendalian banjir di Kali Juana menggunakan analisis model HEC-RAS. Analisis dilakukan dengan melakukan simulasi terhadap beberapa bentuk upaya pengendalian, guna mengurangi besaran banjir. Hasil analisis menunjukkan bahwa terdapat 6 model alternatif yang muncul dalam pengendalian banjir Kali Juana. Dari beberapa model tersebut, terpilih model simulasi yang meliputi Normalisasi, Tanggul, Waduk logung, 8 kolam Retensi dan Floodway.

  19. Investigation of medieval ceramics from Ras by physicochemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zindović Nataša D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although early medieval Serbian ceramic is well described by the archeologists and historians, knowledge of the Balkan ceramic production is still limited. Archaeometric study of ceramics provenance, technology of preparation and used pigments as well as influence of neighboring countries and specific characteristics of different workshops has never been performed so far. The detailed knowledge of the micro-chemical and micro-structural nature of an archaeological artifact is critical in finding solutions to problems of restoration, conservation, dating and authentication in the art world. In this work we present results of systematic investigation of pottery shards from archeological site Ras. The term Ras, which signifies both the fortress and the region encompassing the upper course of Raška River, used to be the center of the medieval Serbian state. Both the ceramic body and the polychromatic glaze of the artifacts were studied by a multianalitical approach combining optical microscopy (OM, FT-IR spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF. Mineralogical composition of pottery shards has been determined combining results obtained by FT-IR spectroscopy, after deconvolution of the spectra, and XRPD analysis. Firing temperature has been estimated based on the mineralogical composition and positions of Si-O stretching (-1000 cm-1 and banding (-460 cm-1 vibrations. Investigated samples have been classified into two groups based on the mineralogical composition, cross sections and firing temperature. Larger group consists of samples of fine-grained, homogeneous ceramics with firing temperatures bellow 800 °C which indicates imported products. Second, smaller group consists of inhomogeneous ceramics with firing temperatures between 850 and 900 °C produced in the domestic workshops. The obtained results will be used to build up a national database for the compositions of bodies, glazes and pigments.

  20. Statins improve NASH via inhibition of RhoA and Ras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierwagen, Robert; Maybüchen, Lara; Hittatiya, Kanishka

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), especially as part of the metabolic syndrome (MS), is an increasing burden in Western countries. Statins are already used in MS and seem to be beneficial in liver diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying pleiotropi...

  1. H-ras inhibits the hippo pathway by promoting Mst1/Mst2 heterodimerization

    OpenAIRE

    Rawat, Sonali J.; Araiza-Olivera, Daniela; Arias-Romero, Luis E; Villamar-Cruz, Olga; Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Roder, Heinrich; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases Mst1 and Mst2 have tumor suppressor activity, but their mode of regulation is not well established. Mst1 and Mst2 are broadly expressed and may have certain overlapping functions in mammals, as deletions of both Mst1 and Mst2 together are required for tumorigenesis in mouse models [1���3]. These kinases act via a three-component signaling cascade comprising Mst1/2, the protein kinase Lats1/2, and the transcriptional coactivators Yap and Taz [4���6]. Mst1/2 contain C-termin...

  2. Fgfr-Ras-MAPK signaling is required for apical constriction via apical positioning of Rho-associated kinase during mechanosensory organ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Molly J; Nechiporuk, Alex V

    2012-09-01

    Many morphogenetic movements during development require the formation of transient intermediates called rosettes. Within rosettes, cells are polarized with apical ends constricted towards the rosette center and nuclei basally displaced. Whereas the polarity and cytoskeletal machinery establishing these structures has been extensively studied, the extracellular cues and intracellular signaling cascades that promote their formation are not well understood. We examined how extracellular Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signals regulate rosette formation in the zebrafish posterior lateral line primordium (pLLp), a group of ∼100 cells that migrates along the trunk during embryonic development to form the lateral line mechanosensory system. During migration, the pLLp deposits rosettes from the trailing edge, while cells are polarized and incorporated into nascent rosettes in the leading region. Fgf signaling was previously shown to be crucial for rosette formation in the pLLp. We demonstrate that activation of Fgf receptor (Fgfr) induces intracellular Ras-MAPK, which is required for apical constriction and rosette formation in the pLLp. Inhibiting Fgfr-Ras-MAPK leads to loss of apically localized Rho-associated kinase (Rock) 2a, which results in failed actomyosin cytoskeleton activation. Using mosaic analyses, we show that a cell-autonomous Ras-MAPK signal is required for apical constriction and Rock2a localization. We propose a model whereby activated Fgfr signals through Ras-MAPK to induce apical localization of Rock2a in a cell-autonomous manner, activating the actomyosin network to promote apical constriction and rosette formation in the pLLp. This mechanism presents a novel cellular strategy for driving cell shape changes.

  3. Regulation of Hxt3 and Hxt7 turnover converges on the Vid30 complex and requires inactivation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Snowdon

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells adjust their intracellular protein complement as a mechanism to adapt to changing environmental signals. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the hexose transporters Hxt3 and Hxt7 are expressed and function on the plasma membrane in high and low glucose abundance, respectively. By contrast, Hxt3 is endocytosed and degraded in the vacuole when cells are starved of glucose and Hxt7 in response to rapamycin treatment or when nitrogen is limiting. Yeast uses several signaling pathways, including the TORC1 and Ras/cAMP/Protein Kinase A (PKA pathways, to adapt to nutrient changes in the environment. The multi-protein Vid30 complex (Vid30c, an E3 ubiquitin ligase required for the degradation of FBPase, assists in this adaptation process in a mechanism that is poorly understood. Here we show the endocytosis and the subsequent degradation of both Hxt3 and Hxt7, in response to different nutrient signals, is dependent on components of the Vid30c. Additionally, we define the signaling events required for the turnover of Hxt3 and Hxt7 by showing that Hxt3 turnover requires Ras2 and PKA inactivation, whereas Hxt7 turnover requires TORC1 and Ras2 inactivation. Further investigation led us to identify Rim15, a kinase that is inhibited by both the TORC1 and Ras/cAMP/PKA pathways, as a key downstream effector in signaling both turnover events. Finally, we show that the turnover of both Hxt3 and Hxt7 is dependent on the essential E3 ubiquitin ligase, Rsp5, indicating that the role of the Vid30c might be indirect of Hxt ubiquitylation.

  4. Ras oncogene-independent activation of RALB signaling is a targetable mechanism of escape from NRAS(V12) oncogene addiction in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, E J; Lee, L A; Lee, R D W; Schirm, D K; Temiz, N A; Ma, J; Gruber, T A; Diaz-Flores, E; Moriarity, B S; Downing, J R; Shannon, K M; Largaespada, D A; Eckfeldt, C E

    2017-06-08

    Somatic mutations that lead to constitutive activation of NRAS and KRAS proto-oncogenes are among the most common in human cancer and frequently occur in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). An inducible NRAS(V12)-driven AML mouse model has established a critical role for continued NRAS(V12) expression in leukemia maintenance. In this model genetic suppression of NRAS(V12) expression results in rapid leukemia remission, but some mice undergo spontaneous relapse with NRAS(V12)-independent (NRI) AMLs providing an opportunity to identify mechanisms that bypass the requirement for Ras oncogene activity and drive leukemia relapse. We found that relapsed NRI AMLs are devoid of NRAS(V12) expression and signaling through the major oncogenic Ras effector pathways, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase, but express higher levels of an alternate Ras effector, Ralb, and exhibit NRI phosphorylation of the RALB effector TBK1, implicating RALB signaling in AML relapse. Functional studies confirmed that inhibiting CDK5-mediated RALB activation with a clinically relevant experimental drug, dinaciclib, led to potent RALB-dependent antileukemic effects in human AML cell lines, induced apoptosis in patient-derived AML samples in vitro and led to a 2-log reduction in the leukemic burden in patient-derived xenograft mice. Furthermore, dinaciclib potently suppressed the clonogenic potential of relapsed NRI AMLs in vitro and prevented the development of relapsed AML in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that Ras oncogene-independent activation of RALB signaling is a therapeutically targetable mechanism of escape from NRAS oncogene addiction in AML.

  5. THE MOLECULAR ANALYSIS ON THE EXPRESSION OF ORAL MUCOSA PROTEIN ANOMALY IN RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS (RAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Savitri Ernawati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to disclose one of the etiopathogenesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS at molecular level by analyzing the expression of protein anomaly in oral mucosa. This was a cross-sectional explorative and analytical observational study. Samples, who met inclusion and exclusion criteria, were taken from total population. Samples of protein swab were obtained from oral mucosa, serums were taken from 15 patients with major RAS, 20 patients with minor RAS and 15 were control. The characterization of protein anomaly expressed on the surface of oral mucosa epithelium was carried out using SDS-PAGE 12% and Westernblot methods. The result of oral mucosa protein anomaly expression analysis in patients with major RAS using SDS-PAGE 12% revealed five protein bands with molecular weights of 87, 65, 30, 25, and 20 kDa. In minor RAS cases with protein anomaly expression there were four patients with molecular weights of 87, 65, 25, and 20 kDa. The band disappearances by using Westernblot cases, of 30 kDa of major cases, 87 and 20 kDa of minor cases and 20 and 25 kDa of remission cases, indicated that those patients were not reacted with polyclonal antibodies of rabbit serum; therefore they had no role in the induction of RAS. In conclusion, the antigenic protein expressed in oral mucosa of major, minor, and remission RAS was predominantly 65 kDa molecular weight.

  6. High Intra- and Inter-Tumoral Heterogeneity of RAS Mutations in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Jeantet

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of patients with wild type RAS metastatic colorectal cancer are non-responders to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies (anti-EGFR mAbs, possibly due to undetected tumoral subclones harboring RAS mutations. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of RAS mutations in different areas of the primary tumor, metastatic lymph nodes and distant metastasis. A retrospective cohort of 18 patients with a colorectal cancer (CRC was included in the study. Multiregion analysis was performed in 60 spatially separated tumor areas according to the pathological tumor node metastasis (pTNM staging and KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutations were tested using pyrosequencing. In primary tumors, intra-tumoral heterogeneity for RAS mutation was found in 33% of cases. Inter-tumoral heterogeneity for RAS mutation between primary tumors and metastatic lymph nodes or distant metastasis was found in 36% of cases. Moreover, 28% of tumors had multiple RAS mutated subclones in the same tumor. A high proportion of CRCs presented intra- and/or inter-tumoral heterogeneity, which has relevant clinical implications for anti-EGFR mAbs prescription. These results suggest the need for multiple RAS testing in different parts of the same tumor and/or more sensitive techniques.

  7. Oncogenic RAS Regulates Long Noncoding RNA Orilnc1 in Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongmei; Zhang, Gao; Hu, Xiaowen; Wu, Lawrence; Feng, Yi; He, Sidan; Zhang, Youyou; Hu, Zhongyi; Yang, Lu; Tian, Tian; Xu, Weiting; Wei, Zhi; Lu, Yiling; Flaherty, Keith T; Zhong, Xiaomin; Mills, Gordon B; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Xu, Xiaowei; Herlyn, Meenhard; Zhang, Lin

    2017-07-15

    RAS and its downstream cascades transmit cellular signals, resulting in increased transcription of genes involved in cell growth and division. Protein-coding gene targets of RAS signaling have been characterized extensively, but long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) regulated by these processes have not. Using a custom-designed lncRNA microarray, we identified the lncRNA Orilnc1 as a genetic target of RAS that is critical for RAS oncogenicity. Orilnc1 expression was regulated by RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling via the transcription factor AP1. Orilnc1 was highly expressed in BRAF-mutant cancers, such as melanoma. Silencing of Orilnc1 blocked tumor cell proliferation and growth in vitro and in vivo In addition, Orilnc1 blockade reduced expression of cyclin E1 and induced G1-S cell-cycle arrest in tumor cells. Taken together, our results identify Orilnc1 as a novel, nonprotein mediator of RAS/RAF activation that may serve as a therapeutic target in RAS/RAF-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3745-57. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate couples glycolytic flux to activation of Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Ken; Van Leemputte, Frederik; Fischer, Baptiste; Bonini, Beatriz M; Quezada, Hector; Tsytlonok, Maksym; Haesen, Dorien; Vanthienen, Ward; Bernardes, Nuno; Gonzalez-Blas, Carmen Bravo; Janssens, Veerle; Tompa, Peter; Versées, Wim; Thevelein, Johan M

    2017-10-13

    Yeast and cancer cells share the unusual characteristic of favoring fermentation of sugar over respiration. We now reveal an evolutionary conserved mechanism linking fermentation to activation of Ras, a major regulator of cell proliferation in yeast and mammalian cells, and prime proto-oncogene product. A yeast mutant (tps1∆) with overactive influx of glucose into glycolysis and hyperaccumulation of Fru1,6bisP, shows hyperactivation of Ras, which causes its glucose growth defect by triggering apoptosis. Fru1,6bisP is a potent activator of Ras in permeabilized yeast cells, likely acting through Cdc25. As in yeast, glucose triggers activation of Ras and its downstream targets MEK and ERK in mammalian cells. Biolayer interferometry measurements show that physiological concentrations of Fru1,6bisP stimulate dissociation of the pure Sos1/H-Ras complex. Thermal shift assay confirms direct binding to Sos1, the mammalian ortholog of Cdc25. Our results suggest that the Warburg effect creates a vicious cycle through Fru1,6bisP activation of Ras, by which enhanced fermentation stimulates oncogenic potency.Yeast and cancer cells both favor sugar fermentation in aerobic conditions. Here the authors describe a conserved mechanism from yeast to mammals where the glycolysis intermediate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate binds Cdc25/Sos1 and couples increased glycolytic flux to increased Ras proto-oncoprotein activity.

  9. The Mechanism by which Neurofibromin Suppresses Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    NF1) syndrome . MPNSTs are highly aggressive,therapeutically resistant, and typically fatal. Using comparative transcriptome analysis, we identified...transiently promotes self-renewal but not tumorigenesis by neural crest stem cells. Cancer Cell 13, 129-140. Kijima, T., Maulik, G., Ma, P.C., Tibaldi, E.V

  10. [Clinical relevance of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer: experience in a Mexican population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Mendoza, F; Gainza-Lagunes, S; Castañeda-Andrade, I; Castro-Zárate, A

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is frequent in the developed countries, with a cancer-specific mortality rate of 33%. Different biomarkers are associated with overall survival and the prediction of monoclonal treatment effectiveness. The presence of mutations in the K-ras oncogene alters the response to target therapy with cetuximab and could be an independent prognostic factor. To analyze the difference in survival between patients with mutated K-ras and those with K-ras wild-type status. Thirty-one clinical records were retrospectively analyzed of patients presenting with colorectal cancer that underwent K-ras sequencing through real-time polymerase chain reaction within the time frame of 2009 to 2012 at the Hospital de Alta Especialidad de Veracruz of the Instituto para la Salud y Seguridad Social de los Trabajadores del Estado (HAEV-ISSSTE). Survival analysis for patients with and without K-ras mutation was performed using the Kaplan Meier method. Contrast of covariates was performed using logarithmic transformations. No statistically significant difference was found in relation to survival in the patients with mutated K-ras vs. those with K-ras wild-type (P=.416), nor were significant differences found when analyzing the covariants and survival in the patients with mutated K-ras: ECOG scale (P=.221); age (less than, equal to or greater than 65years, P=.441); clinical stage according to the AJCC (P=.057), and primary lesion site (P=.614). No relation was found between the K-ras oncogene mutation and reduced survival, in contrast to what has been established in the international medical literature. Further studies that include both a larger number of patients and those receiving monoclonal treatment, need to be conducted. There were only 5 patients in the present study that received cetuximab, resulting in a misleading analysis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Incidental Abnormalities in Oral Mucosal Carcinogenesis of v-H-ras Transgenic Mice OF v-H-ras TRANSGENIC MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Agustina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of individual oncogene on diverse cell types could be studied by using transgenic mice. The expression of transgene is mainly determined by the regulatory sequences chosen. Fifty four v-H-ras transgenic FVB/N mice and 54 parental FVB/N mice were used as the experimental and the control groups respectively. Each group was divided into nine subgroups with three different treatments i.e. 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO-treated, phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (PDD-treated and propane-1,2-diol (PD-treated palatal of mice for 6, 16 or 24 weeks. Other four mice of parental mice were used as the untreated group. Two weeks after the last painting, all animals were sacrificed and the intra- or extra-oral tissues were removed and fixed in 4% m/v paraformaldehyde for 24 hours. Hard tissue were then decalcified after the fixation was completed. Subsequently, standard procedure for H&E staining was performed. The results of this study showed that 47 out of 54 transgenic mice produced spontaneous odontogenic, epidermal or mesenchymal neoplasms. After 24 weeks of painting with 4NQO there was minimal evidence of palatal epithelial dysplasia in both transgenic and parental strain groups and neither the PDD nor PD groups showed evidence of dysplasia. From these results it was apparent that the effect of 4NQO and PDD was slower than reported for other strain of mice and that activated v-H-ras did not increase the rate of palatal mucosal carcinogenesis in the model used. On the other hand, incidental abnormalities were much detected especially in the experimental group.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i1.11

  12. Targeting Fyn in Ras-transformed cells induces F-actin to promote adherens junction-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Sarah E; Hutchens, Kelli A; Denning, Mitchell F

    2015-10-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases (SFK), is an oncogene in murine epidermis and is associated with cell-cell adhesion turnover and induction of cell migration. Additionally, Fyn upregulation has been reported in multiple tumor types, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Introduction of active H-Ras(G12V) into the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line resulted in upregulation of Fyn mRNA (200-fold) and protein, while expression of other SFKs remained unaltered. Transduction of active Ras or Fyn was sufficient to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HaCaT cells. Inhibition of Fyn activity, using siRNA or the clinical SFK inhibitor Dasatinib, increased cell-cell adhesion and rapidly (5-60 min) increased levels of cortical F-actin. Fyn inhibition with siRNA or Dasatinib also induced F-actin in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have elevated Fyn. F-actin co-localized with adherens junction proteins, and Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion could be blocked by Cytochalasin D, indicating that F-actin polymerization was a key initiator of cell-cell adhesion through the adherens junction. Conversely, inhibiting cell-cell adhesion with low Ca(2+) media did not block Dasatinib-induced F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of the Rho effector kinase ROCK blocked Dasatinib-induced F-actin and cell-cell adhesion, implicating relief of Rho GTPase inhibition as a mechanism of Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion. Finally, topical Dasatinib treatment significantly reduced total tumor burden in the SKH1 mouse model of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Together these results identify the promotion of actin-based cell-cell adhesion as a newly described mechanism of action for Dasatinib and suggest that Fyn inhibition may be an effective therapeutic approach in treating cSCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Study of the mechanism of Ras-dva small GTPase intracellular localization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshina, M B; Belousov, V V; Zaraĭskiĭ, A G

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of amino acid sequences of small GTPases of the Ras-dva family allowed us to determine the C-terminal prenylation motif, which could be responsible for the membrane localization of these proteins. We demonstrated using in vivo EGFP tracing that the Ras-dva small GTPases from Xenopus laevis embryo cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts are localized on both plasma membranes and endomembranes (the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus, and vesicles). At the same time, the replacement of the Cys residue, the SH group of which must be theoretically farnesylated, in the C-terminal prenylation motif of the Ras-dva small GTPase by the Ser residue prevented the membrane localization of the protein. These results indicate that the C-terminal prenylation site is critical for the membrane localization of small Ras-dva GTPases.

  14. Minimal FLAG sequence useful in the functional epitope tagging of H-Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristy Y; Liu, Liya; Vincent, Timothy S

    2002-06-01

    Epitope tagging can interfere with normal protein function, indicating the need for an unobtrusive epitope tag. The FLAG epitope (DYKDDDDK) was examined for a minimal epitope useful in the tagging of H-Ras. The heptapeptide tag, F7 (MDYKDDD), was found to retain reactivity with M2 and M5 monoclonal antibodies in immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy. The F7 tag did not interfere with Ras stability, EGF stimulation of Ras activation, and downstream phosphorylation of MAPK Erk1/2. Unlike the full FLAG sequence, the F7 tag had minimal effect on the growth properties of H-Ras in a colony-forming assay. The F7 tag may be useful when minimizing the effect of tagging on protein function is an important criterion in the selection of an N-terminal epitope tag.

  15. The prognostic value of simultaneous tumor and serum RAS/RAF mutations in localized colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner Thomsen, Caroline Emilie; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2017-01-01

    The impact of RAS/RAF mutations in localized colon cancer needs clarification. Based on analysis of tumor-specific DNA, this study aimed at elucidating the prognostic influence of mutational status in tumor and serum using an extended panel of mutations. The study retrospectively included 294...... analysis taking known prognostic factors into account. Mutational status in tumor did not on its own have significant prognostic impact (P = 0.22). Patients with a RAS mutation simultaneously in tumor and serum had a significantly worse prognosis, overall survival (OS) (HR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.27-4.15, P = 0.......0008). In conclusion, RAS mutations in serum, and BRAF mutation in serum combined with pMMR in tumor were strong independent prognostic factors in patients with RAS/RAF mutated tumors....

  16. Balanced RAP/RAS mix design and performance evaluation system for project-specific service conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The use of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) can significantly reduce the increasing cost of hot-mix asphalt paving, conserve energy, and protect the environment. However, the premature cracking problem has been a s...

  17. G4 DNA in ras genes and its potential in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoi, Susanna; Xodo, Luigi E

    2016-04-01

    It is now well established that in the human genome the canonical double helix coexists with folded G-quadruplex structures that are known to have important biological functions. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on quadruplex formation in the promoters of the ras genes that are mutated in about 30% of all human cancers. We describe the nuclear proteins that recognize these unusual DNA structures and discuss their function in transcription. We also examine the formation of G-quadruplexes in the 5'-untranslated region of the ras transcripts and conclude this review by reporting strategies that use either ras G-quadruplexes or proteins recognizing the ras G-quadruplexes as targets of anticancer small molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Determination of K-ras gene mutation in colorectal cancer tissue by capillary electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongqin; Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; Tian, Wei; Jia, Zhengping; Guo, Jiankui

    2013-06-01

    The codons 12/13 of K-ras genomic DNA from 76 colorectal cancer tissues and normal tissues were amplified by PCR. The amplified 152 samples were purified, denatured, and then detected using capillary electrophoresis (CE)-laser induced fluorescence (LIF) with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). The abnormal samples were further confirmed by direct-sequencing. The 30 patients of the 76 colorectal cancer patients were found gene mutation, of which the results of base G --> A point mutation were confirmed by the gene sequence. To detect K-ras gene mutation that has important role in clinical forecast, diagnosis, therapy and prognosis, the CE-LIF with SSCP was applied for detecting K-ras gene. It becomes a promising tool to analyse K-ras gene mutation in the clinical diagnosis and therapy of colorectal cancer tissue.

  19. Hepatocarcinogenesis in mice with beta-catenin and Ha-ras gene mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harada, Naomoto; Oshima, Hiroko; Katoh, Masahiro; Tamai, Yositaka; Oshima, Masanobu; Taketo, Makoto M

    2004-01-01

    .... Here we report that hepatocellular carcinoma develops at the 100% incidence in mice with simultaneous mutations in the beta-catenin and H-ras genes that are introduced by adenovirus-mediated Cre expression...

  20. Parallel imaging of Drosophila embryos for quantitative analysis of genetic perturbations of the Ras pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Goyal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ras pathway patterns the poles of the Drosophila embryo by downregulating the levels and activity of a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor Capicua (Cic. We demonstrate that the spatiotemporal pattern of Cic during this signaling event can be harnessed for functional studies of mutations in the Ras pathway in human diseases. Our approach relies on a new microfluidic device that enables parallel imaging of Cic dynamics in dozens of live embryos. We found that although the pattern of Cic in early embryos is complex, it can be accurately approximated by a product of one spatial profile and one time-dependent amplitude. Analysis of these functions of space and time alone reveals the differential effects of mutations within the Ras pathway. Given the highly conserved nature of Ras-dependent control of Cic, our approach provides new opportunities for functional analysis of multiple sequence variants from developmental abnormalities and cancers.

  1. FIFA määras Pohlaku ausa mängu komiteesse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Vt. ka Linnaleht : Tartu 6. veebr., lk. 6. Maailma jalgpalliliite ühendav ja maailma jalgpallielu juhtiv FIFA määras Eesti Jalgpalli Liidu presidendi Aivar Pohlaku ausa mängu ja sotsiaalse vastutuse komitee liikmeks

  2. Combined Inactivation of MYC and K-Ras oncogenes reverses tumorigenesis in lung adenocarcinomas and lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc T Tran

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Conditional transgenic models have established that tumors require sustained oncogene activation for tumor maintenance, exhibiting the phenomenon known as "oncogene-addiction." However, most cancers are caused by multiple genetic events making it difficult to determine which oncogenes or combination of oncogenes will be the most effective targets for their treatment.To examine how the MYC and K-ras(G12D oncogenes cooperate for the initiation and maintenance of tumorigenesis, we generated double conditional transgenic tumor models of lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. The ability of MYC and K-ras(G12D to cooperate for tumorigenesis and the ability of the inactivation of these oncogenes to result in tumor regression depended upon the specific tissue context. MYC-, K-ras(G12D- or MYC/K-ras(G12D-induced lymphomas exhibited sustained regression upon the inactivation of either or both oncogenes. However, in marked contrast, MYC-induced lung tumors failed to regress completely upon oncogene inactivation; whereas K-ras(G12D-induced lung tumors regressed completely. Importantly, the combined inactivation of both MYC and K-ras(G12D resulted more frequently in complete lung tumor regression. To account for the different roles of MYC and K-ras(G12D in maintenance of lung tumors, we found that the down-stream mediators of K-ras(G12D signaling, Stat3 and Stat5, are dephosphorylated following conditional K-ras(G12D but not MYC inactivation. In contrast, Stat3 becomes dephosphorylated in lymphoma cells upon inactivation of MYC and/or K-ras(G12D. Interestingly, MYC-induced lung tumors that failed to regress upon MYC inactivation were found to have persistent Stat3 and Stat5 phosphorylation.Taken together, our findings point to the importance of the K-Ras and associated down-stream Stat effector pathways in the initiation and maintenance of lymphomas and lung tumors. We suggest that combined targeting of oncogenic pathways is more likely to be effective in the

  3. RASOnD - A comprehensive resource and search tool for RAS superfamily oncogenes from various species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Tej P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras superfamily plays an important role in the control of cell signalling and division. Mutations in the Ras genes convert them into active oncogenes. The Ras oncogenes form a major thrust of global cancer research as they are involved in the development and progression of tumors. This has resulted in the exponential growth of data on Ras superfamily across different public databases and in literature. However, no dedicated public resource is currently available for data mining and analysis on this family. The present database was developed to facilitate straightforward accession, retrieval and analysis of information available on Ras oncogenes from one particular site. Description We have developed the RAS Oncogene Database (RASOnD as a comprehensive knowledgebase that provides integrated and curated information on a single platform for oncogenes of Ras superfamily. RASOnD encompasses exhaustive genomics and proteomics data existing across diverse publicly accessible databases. This resource presently includes overall 199,046 entries from 101 different species. It provides a search tool to generate information about their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, chromosome positions, orthologies, motifs, structures, related pathways and associated diseases. We have implemented a number of user-friendly search interfaces and sequence analysis tools. At present the user can (i browse the data (ii search any field through a simple or advance search interface and (iii perform a BLAST search and subsequently CLUSTALW multiple sequence alignment by selecting sequences of Ras oncogenes. The Generic gene browser, GBrowse, JMOL for structural visualization and TREEVIEW for phylograms have been integrated for clear perception of retrieved data. External links to related databases have been included in RASOnD. Conclusions This database is a resource and search tool dedicated to Ras oncogenes. It has

  4. Activated Ras alters lens and corneal development through induction of distinct downstream targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneker Lixing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian Ras genes regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation and differentiation and are frequently mutated in human cancers. Tumor development in response to Ras activation varies between different tissues and the molecular basis for these variations are poorly understood. The murine lens and cornea have a common embryonic origin and arise from adjacent regions of the surface ectoderm. Activation of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling pathway induces the corneal epithelial cells to proliferate and the lens epithelial cells to exit the cell cycle. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the differential responses of these two related tissues have not been defined. We have generated transgenic mice that express a constitutively active version of human H-Ras in their lenses and corneas. Results Ras transgenic lenses and corneal epithelial cells showed increased proliferation with concomitant increases in cyclin D1 and D2 expression. This initial increase in proliferation is sustained in the cornea but not in the lens epithelial cells. Coincidentally, cdk inhibitors p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were upregulated in the Ras transgenic lenses but not in the corneas. Phospho-Erk1 and Erk2 levels were elevated in the lens but not in the cornea and Spry 1 and Spry 2, negative regulators of Ras-Raf-Erk signaling, were upregulated more in the corneal than in the lens epithelial cells. Both lens and corneal differentiation programs were sensitive to Ras activation. Ras transgenic embryos showed a distinctive alteration in the architecture of the lens pit. Ras activation, though sufficient for upregulation of Prox1, a transcription factor critical for cell cycle exit and initiation of fiber differentiation, is not sufficient for induction of terminal fiber differentiation. Expression of Keratin 12, a marker of corneal epithelial differentiation, was reduced in the Ras transgenic corneas. Conclusions Collectively, these

  5. Transient inhibition of the ERK pathway prevents cerebellar developmental defects and improves long-term motor functions in murine models of neurofibromatosis type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Edward; Wang, Yuan; Kim, Sun-Jung; Bornhorst, Miriam; Jecrois, Emmanuelle S; Anthony, Todd E.; Wang, Chenran; Li, Yi E; Guan, Jun-Lin; Murphy, Geoffrey G.; Zhu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a condition characterized by the growth of tumors along the nerves of the body. It is caused by mutations in a gene called NF1, which codes for a protein that normally works to inhibit the activity of another protein called Ras. In healthy cells, Ras is needed to stimulate the cells to grow and divide. However, if the Ras protein is not turned off at the right time or if it is activated at the wrong time, it can force cells to keep growing and dividing...

  6. Immune system deregulation in hypertensive patients chronically RAS suppressed developing albuminuria

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; Martinez, Paula J.; Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Segura, Juli?n; Vazquez, Jes?s; Vivanco, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G.; Ruilope, Luis M.; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Albuminuria development in hypertensive patients is an indicator of higher cardiovascular (CV) risk and renal damage. Chronic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) suppression facilitates blood pressure control but it does not prevent from albuminuria development. We pursued the identification of protein indicators in urine behind albuminuria development in hypertensive patients under RAS suppression. Urine was collected from 100 patients classified in three groups according to albuminuria developme...

  7. A central role for Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in K-Ras-driven lung tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney A Granville

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: K-Ras mutations are characteristic of human lung adenocarcinomas and occur almost exclusively in smokers. In preclinical models, K-Ras mutations are necessary for tobacco carcinogen-driven lung tumorigenesis and are sufficient to cause lung adenocarcinomas in transgenic mice. Because these mutations confer resistance to commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted agents, effective therapies that target K-Ras are needed. Inhibitors of mTOR such as rapamycin can prevent K-Ras-driven lung tumorigenesis and alter the proportion of cytotoxic and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, suggesting that lung-associated T cells might be important for tumorigenesis. METHODS: Lung tumorigenesis was studied in three murine models that depend on mutant K-Ras; a tobacco carcinogen-driven model, a syngeneic inoculation model, and a transgenic model. Splenic and lung-associated T cells were studied using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Foxp3+ cells were depleted using rapamycin, an antibody, or genetic ablation. RESULTS: Exposure of A/J mice to a tobacco carcinogen tripled lung-associated Foxp3+ cells prior to tumor development. At clinically relevant concentrations, rapamycin prevented this induction and reduced lung tumors by 90%. In A/J mice inoculated with lung adenocarcinoma cells resistant to rapamycin, antibody-mediated depletion of Foxp3+ cells reduced lung tumorigenesis by 80%. Likewise, mutant K-Ras transgenic mice lacking Foxp3+ cells developed 75% fewer lung tumors than littermates with Foxp3+ cells. CONCLUSIONS: Foxp3+ regulatory T cells are required for K-Ras-mediated lung tumorigenesis in mice. These studies support clinical testing of rapamycin or other agents that target Treg in K-Ras driven human lung cancer.

  8. Membrane curvature enables N-Ras lipid anchor sorting to liquid-ordered membrane phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik Bruun; Jensen, Martin Borch; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller

    2015-01-01

    Trafficking and sorting of membrane-anchored Ras GTPases are regulated by partitioning between distinct membrane domains. Here, in vitro experiments and microscopic molecular theory reveal membrane curvature as a new modulator of N-Ras lipid anchor and palmitoyl chain partitioning. Membrane...... curvature was essential for enrichment in raft-like liquid-ordered phases; enrichment was driven by relief of lateral pressure upon anchor insertion and most likely affects the localization of lipidated proteins in general....

  9. RAS mutations affect pattern of metastatic spread and increase propensity for brain metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaeger, Rona; Cowell, Elizabeth; Chou, Joanne F; Gewirtz, Alexandra N; Borsu, Laetitia; Vakiani, Efsevia; Solit, David B; Rosen, Neal; Capanu, Marinela; Ladanyi, Marc; Kemeny, Nancy

    2015-04-15

    RAS and PIK3CA mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have been associated with worse survival. We sought to evaluate the impact of RAS and PIK3CA mutations on cumulative incidence of metastasis to potentially curable sites of liver and lung and other sites such as bone and brain. We performed a computerized search of the electronic medical record of our institution for mCRC cases genotyped for RAS or PIK3CA mutations from 2008 to 2012. Cases were reviewed for patient characteristics, survival, and site-specific metastasis. Among the 918 patients identified, 477 cases were RAS wild type, and 441 cases had a RAS mutation (394 at KRAS exon 2, 29 at KRAS exon 3 or 4, and 18 in NRAS). RAS mutation was significantly associated with shorter median overall survival (OS) and on multivariate analysis independently predicted worse OS (HR, 1.6; P brain metastasis and on multivariate analysis was an independent predictor of involvement of these sites (HR, 1.5, 1.6, and 3.7, respectively). PIK3CA mutations occurred in 10% of the 786 cases genotyped, did not predict for worse survival, and did not exhibit a site-specific pattern of metastatic spread. The metastatic potential of CRC varies with the presence of RAS mutation. RAS mutation is associated with worse OS and increased incidence of lung, bone, and brain metastasis. An understanding of this site-specific pattern of spread may help to inform physicians' assessment of symptoms in patients with mCRC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  10. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate couples glycolytic flux to activation of Ras

    OpenAIRE

    Peeters, Ken; Van Leemputte, Frederik; Fischer, Baptiste; Bonini, Beatriz M.; Quezada, Hector; Tsytlonok, Maksym; Haesen, Dorien; Vanthienen, Ward; Bernardes, Nuno; Gonzalez-Blas, Carmen Bravo; Janssens, Veerle; Tompa, Peter; Versées, Wim; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2017-01-01

    Yeast and cancer cells share the unusual characteristic of favoring fermentation of sugar over respiration. We now reveal an evolutionary conserved mechanism linking fermentation to activation of Ras, a major regulator of cell proliferation in yeast and mammalian cells, and prime proto-oncogene product. A yeast mutant (tps1∆) with overactive influx of glucose into glycolysis and hyperaccumulation of Fru1,6bisP, shows hyperactivation of Ras, which causes its glucose growth defect by triggering...

  11. Beta1 integrin promotes but is not essential for metastasis of ras-myc transformed fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brakebusch, C; Wennerberg, K; Krell, H W

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the role of beta1 integrin during tumor metastasis, we established a ras-myc transformed fibroblastoid cell line with a disrupted beta1 integrin gene on both alleles (GERM 11). Stable transfection of this cell line with an expression vector encoding beta1A integrin resulted in beta1A......, and collagen type I. Beta1 integrin, therefore, increases but is not essential for metastasis of ras-myc transformed fibroblasts....

  12. Collagen type I-mediated activation of ERK/MAP Kinase is dependent on Ras, Raf-1 and protein phosphatase 2A in Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetoui, Nizar; Gendron, Steve; Chamoux, Estelle; Aoudjit, Fawzi

    2006-04-01

    Growing evidence indicates that interactions of T cells with extracellular matrix through beta1 integrins are important for the regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses and diseases. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated that collagen I (Coll I) through alpha2beta1 integrin inhibited Fas-induced apoptosis of T cells by activating a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent ERK/MAP Kinase pathway. As survival of T cells is critical for their functions, we further investigated the mechanisms underlying the activation of this pathway. Inhibition studies demonstrated that Coll I activates the ERK/MAP Kinase pathway in Jurkat T cells through the activation of Ras and Raf-1. Activation of PP2A was not necessary for the binding of Coll I to Jurkat T cells, but is required for the activation of Raf-1. In accordance, activation of Ras, Raf-1 and PP2A were also required for the ability of Coll I to protect Jurkat T cells from Fas-induced apoptosis. In contrast and despite its capacity to activate Ras, fibronectin (Fbn) failed to activate PP2A and Raf-1. These results might explain, at least in part, the weak ability of Fbn to activate ERK in T cells, supporting thus the differential signaling of beta1 integrin members in these cells. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms by which beta1 integrins activate the ERK/MAP Kinase pathway in T cells, and is the first report to provide a role for PP2A in integrin-mediated ERK/MAP Kinase activation.

  13. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone assignments of GDP-bound human H-Ras mutant G12V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nader; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Coyle, Joe; Nietlispach, Daniel; Williams, Glyn

    2016-04-01

    Harvey Ras (H-Ras) is a membrane-associated GTPase with critical functions in cell proliferation and differentiation. The G12V mutant of H-Ras is one of the most commonly encountered oncoproteins in human cancer. This mutation disrupts the GTPase activity of H-Ras, leading to constitutive activation and aberrant downstream signalling. Here we report the backbone resonance assignments of human H-Ras mutant G12V lacking the C-terminal membrane attachment domain.

  14. Aliskiren inhibits the renin-angiotensin system in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Sónia; Santos, Daniela F; Silva, Gabriela A

    2016-09-20

    Observations of increased angiotensin II levels and activation of the (pro)renin receptor in retinopathies support the role of ocular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the development of retinal diseases. While targeting RAS presents significant therapeutic potential, current RAS-based therapies are ineffective halting the progression of these diseases. A new class of drugs, the direct renin inhibitors such as aliskiren, is a potential therapeutic alternative. However, it is unclear how aliskiren acts in the retina, in particular in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the structure responsible for the maintenance of retinal homeostasis whose role is deeply compromised in retinal diseases. We firstly analyzed the expression and activity of the main RAS components in RPE cells. Time- and concentration-dependent treatments with aliskiren were performed to modulate different pathways of the RAS in RPE cells. Our data demonstrate that RPE cells express the main RAS constituents. Exposure of RPE cells to aliskiren inhibited the activity of renin and consequently decreased the levels of angiotensin II. Additionally, aliskiren reduced the translocation of the (pro)renin receptor to the cellular membrane of RPE cells preventing the activation of ERK1/2. Our findings of the RPE well-defined RAS, together with the demonstration that aliskiren effectively blocks this system at different steps of the cascade, suggest that aliskiren might be an alternative and successful drug in preventing the deleterious effects derived from the overactivation of the RAS, known to contribute to the pathogenesis of different retinal diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Properties of ras-amplified recombinant BHK-21 cells in protein-free culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Y; Kawamoto, S; Shoji, M; Hashizume, S; Teruya, K; Katakura, Y; Shirahata, S

    2000-07-01

    We compared serum and protein-free cultures ofa ras-amplified recombinant BHK-21 cell line(ras-rBHK-IgG), which hyperproduces a lungcancer specific recombinant human monoclonal antibody. Ras-rBHK-IgG cells were shown to grow well, evenin protein-free medium and to be morphologicallysimilar to cells cultured in serum containing medium. However, the growth rate of ras-rBHK-IgG cellswas considerably slower in protein-free medium, whichresults in a longer maintenance period compared with cells cultured in serum containing medium. In addition, it was found that antibody production in protein-free culture had a ten times higher maximum than cells cultured in serum containing medium. On theother hand, in high density culture, using the hollowfiber bioreactor system, ras-rBHK-IgG cellscould be maintained for a month in protein-freeculture in contrast with serum culture, which onlylasted for half a month. However, the markedincrease of antibody production was not observed. A total amount of about 15 mg of the recombinantantibody, obtained in protein-free culture, was abouttwo times of that obtained in serum culture, and wasshown to be reactive to lung cancer cells in tissue. From these properties in protein-free medium, it isconcluded that protein-free culture of ras-rBHK-IgG cells is suitable for middle scaleproduction of recombinant human monoclonal antibody.

  16. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Guadagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient’s sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala of exon 1. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 729–733

  17. Distinct roles of the RasGAP family proteins in C. elegans associative learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurkó, M Dávid; Csermely, Péter; Sőti, Csaba; Steták, Attila

    2015-10-15

    The Ras GTPase activating proteins (RasGAPs) are regulators of the conserved Ras/MAPK pathway. Various roles of some of the RasGAPs in learning and memory have been reported in different model systems, yet, there is no comprehensive study to characterize all gap genes in any organism. Here, using reverse genetics and neurobehavioural tests, we studied the role of all known genes of the rasgap family in C. elegans in associative learning and memory. We demonstrated that their proteins are implicated in different parts of the learning and memory processes. We show that gap-1 contribute redundantly with gap-3 to the chemosensation of volatile compounds, gap-1 plays a major role in associative learning, while gap-2 and gap-3 are predominantly required for short- and long-term associative memory. Our results also suggest that the C. elegans Ras orthologue let-60 is involved in multiple processes during learning and memory. Thus, we show that the different classes of RasGAP proteins are all involved in cognitive function and their complex interplay ensures the proper formation and storage of novel information in C. elegans.

  18. Expanding the Scope of Electrophiles Capable of Targeting K-Ras Oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Lynn M; Jenkins, Meredith L; Kerwin, Caitlin; Burke, John E; Shokat, Kevan M

    2017-06-27

    There is growing interest in reversible and irreversible covalent inhibitors that target noncatalytic amino acids in target proteins. With a goal of targeting oncogenic K-Ras variants (e.g., G12D) by expanding the types of amino acids that can be targeted by covalent inhibitors, we survey a set of electrophiles for their ability to label carboxylates. We functionalized an optimized ligand for the K-Ras switch II pocket with a set of electrophiles previously reported to react with carboxylates and characterized the ability of these compounds to react with model nucleophiles and oncogenic K-Ras proteins. Here, we report that aziridines and stabilized diazo groups preferentially react with free carboxylates over thiols. Although we did not identify a warhead that potently labels K-Ras G12D, we were able to study the interactions of many electrophiles with K-Ras, as most of the electrophiles rapidly label K-Ras G12C. We characterized the resulting complexes by crystallography, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and differential scanning fluorimetry. Our results both demonstrate the ability of a noncatalytic cysteine to react with a diverse set of electrophiles and emphasize the importance of proper spatial arrangements between a covalent inhibitor and its intended nucleophile. We hope that these results can expand the range of electrophiles and nucleophiles of use in covalent protein modulation.

  19. Ras Oncogene-Mediated Progressive Silencing of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cammarota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 is a secreted enzyme that uses superoxide anion as a substrate in a dismutase reaction that results in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Both of these reactive oxygen species affect growth signaling in cells. Although SOD3 has growth-supporting characteristics, the expression of SOD3 is downregulated in epithelial cancer cells. In the current work, we studied the mechanisms regulating SOD3 expression in vitro using thyroid cell models representing different stages of thyroid cancer. We demonstrate that a low level of RAS activation increases SOD3 mRNA synthesis that then gradually decreases with increasing levels of RAS activation and the decreasing degree of differentiation of the cancer cells. Our data indicate that SOD3 regulation can be divided into two classes. The first class involves RAS–driven reversible regulation of SOD3 expression that can be mediated by the following mechanisms: RAS GTPase regulatory genes that are responsible for SOD3 self-regulation; RAS-stimulated p38 MAPK activation; and RAS-activated increased expression of the mir21 microRNA, which inversely correlates with sod3 mRNA expression. The second class involves permanent silencing of SOD3 mediated by epigenetic DNA methylation in cells that represent more advanced cancers. Therefore, the work suggests that SOD3 belongs to the group of ras oncogene-silenced genes.

  20. Geminin functions downstream of p53 in K-ras-induced gene amplification of dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ling; Nishioka, Takashi; Guo, Jinjin; Chen, Changyan

    2012-12-01

    DNA strand breakage and perturbation of cell-cycle progression contribute to gene amplification events that can drive cancer. In cells lacking p53, DNA damage does not trigger an effective cell-cycle arrest and in this setting promotes gene amplification. This is also increased in cells harboring oncogenic Ras, in which cell-cycle arrest is perturbed and ROS levels that cause DNA single strand breaks are elevated. This study focused on the effects of v-K-ras and p53 on Methotrexate (MTX)-mediated DHFR amplification. Rat lung epithelial cells expressing v-K-ras or murine lung cancer LKR cells harboring active K-ras continued cell-cycle progression when treated with MTX. However, upon loss of p53, amplification of DHFR and formation of MTX-resistant colonies occurred. Expression levels of cyclin A, Geminin, and Cdt1 were increased in v-K-ras transfectants. Geminin was sufficient to prevent the occurrence of multiple replications via interaction with Cdt1 after MTX treatment, and DHFR amplification proceeded in v-K-ras transfectants that possess a functional p53 in the absence of geminin. Taken together, our findings indicate that p53 not only regulates cell-cycle progression, but also functions through geminin to prevent DHFR amplification and protect genomic integrity.

  1. Atomic layer sensitive in-situ plasma etch depth control with reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Christoph; Kleinschmidt, Ann-Kathrin; Barzen, Lars; Strassner, Johannes; Fouckhardt, Henning

    2017-06-01

    Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) allows for in-situ monitoring of reactive ion etching (RIE) of monocrystalline III-V semiconductor surfaces. Upon use of RAS the sample to be etched is illuminated with broad-band linearly polarized light under nearly normal incidence. Commonly the spectral range is between 1.5 and 5.5 eV. Typically the spectrally resolved difference in reflectivity for light of two orthogonal linear polarizations of light is measured with respect to time - for example for cubic lattices (like the zinc blende structures of most III-V semiconductors) polarizations along the [110] and the [-110] direction. Local anisotropies on the etch front cause elliptical polarization of the reflected light resulting in the RAS signal. The time and photon energy resolved spectra of RAS include reflectometric as well as interferometric information. Light with wavelengths well above 100 nm (even inside the material) can be successfully used to monitor surface abrasion with a resolution of some tens of nanometers. The layers being thinned out act as optical interferometers resulting in Fabry-Perot oscillations of the RAS-signal. Here we report on RAS measurements assessing the surface deconstruction during dry etching. For low etch rates our experimental data show even better resolution than that of the (slow) Fabry-Perot oscillations. For certain photon energies we detect monolayer-etch-related oscillations in the mean reflectivity, which give the best possible resolution in etch depth monitoring and control, i.e. the atomic scale.

  2. New GNSS processing software for EOP service of IAA RAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorkin, Vladimir; Kurdubov, Sergey; Gayazov, Iskander

    2014-05-01

    GNSS Earth Orientation Parameters Service of Institute of Applied Astronomy RAS runs from year 2000 and provides daily estimates of Xp, Yp, Xp_rate, Yp_rate and LOD to IERS. The previous software which processes triple-difference GPS-measurements is replaced by newly developed software. This software processes daily observation series of globally distributed 50-70 fixed GNSS stations within IGS network. We process zero-difference ionosphere-free combinations of phase and code measurements and use physical models and calculating strategies in accordance to IERS Conventions 2010 and IGS recommendations to Analysis Centers. We use segmented least-squares algorithms for adjustment and highly optimized implementation for fast computing performance. The products of daily processing are not only EOP estimates but also satellites and receiver clock biases, orbital parameters and parameters of troposphere. The software can be used also outside EOP service to process regional and global GNSS-networks and estimating additional parameters of measurement models.

  3. Loss of RASSF1A Expression in Colorectal Cancer and Its Association with K-ras Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The RAS-association domain family 1 A (RASSF1A is a classical member of RAS effectors regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Loss of RASSF1A expression may shift the balance towards a growth-promoting effect without the necessity of activating K-ras mutations. Its potential association with K-ras mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC is unclear. Methods. RASSF1A expression was examined in normal mucosa, adenoma, and tumor tissues of colon and rectum, respectively. We examined the association of RASSF1A expression, mutations of K-ras, and EGFR status in 76 primary CRCs. The relationship between clinicopathological characteristics and RASSF1A expression was also analyzed. Results. RASSF1A expression level decreased progressively in normal mucosa, adenoma and, tumor tissues, and the loss of RASSF1A expression occurred more frequently in tumor tissues. Of 76 primary CRCs, loss of RASSF1A expression and/or K-ras mutations were detected in 77% cases. Loss of RASSF1A expression was more frequent in K-ras wild-type than in mutation cases (63% versus 32%, . Conclusions. Our study indicates that loss of RASSF1A may be involved in pathogenesis of CRC, its expression was found predominantly in K-ras wild-type CRCs, suggesting that it may be another way of affecting RAS signaling, in addition to K-ras mutations.

  4. Imaging of Ras/Raf activity induced by low energy laser irradiation in living cell using FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Xing, Da

    2005-01-01

    Ras/Raf signaling pathway is an important signaling pathway that governs cell proliferation, differential and apoptosis. Low-energy laser irradiation (LELI) was found to modulate various processes. Generally, cell proliferation is induced by low doses LELI and apoptosis is induced by high doses LELI. Mechanism of biological effect of LELI has not been clear. Recently, activation of MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase), which are downstream protein kinases of Ras/Raf, are observed during LELI-induced cell proliferation by immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis. RaichuRas reporter consisting of fusions of H-ras, the Ras-binding domain of Raf (RafRBD), a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Therefore, intramolecular binding of GTP-Ras to RafRBD brings CFP close to YFP and increases FRET between CFP and YFP. Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (ASTC-a-1) was transfected with the plasmid (pRaichuRas) and then treated with LELI at dose of 60J/cm2. Effect of LELI on Ras/Raf in physiological condition of living cells was observed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique during lung adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis induced by high dose (60J/cm2) LELI. Experimental results showed that after high dose LELI treatment, the binding of Ras and Raf decreases obviously, Ras/Raf signaling pathway deregulates and cell apoptosis occurs.

  5. Functional significance of the novel H-RAS gene mutation M72I in a patient with medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barollo, S; Pezzani, R; Cristiani, A; Bertazza, L; Rubin, B; Bulfone, A; Pelizzo, M R; Torresan, F; Mantero, F; Pennelli, G; Moro, S; Mian, C

    2013-10-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts for around 5-10% of all thyroid cancers. Though usually sporadic, 1 in 4 cases are of genetic origin, with germinal mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in familial forms and somatic mutations both in RET and in the RAS family genes in sporadic ones.This study aimed to characterize a rare H-RAS sequence variant -M72I- in a patient with sporadic MTC, focusing on its functional significance.Mutation analysis was performed for the RET, N-RAS, K-RAS and H-RAS genes by direct sequencing. Western blot analysis was done on 4 thyroid tissues from 1 patient carrying the M72I mutation in H-RAS, 1 with the Q61R mutation in H-RAS, 1 with no RET, H-RAS, K-RAS or N-RAS gene mutations, and 1 normal thyroid, using different antibodies against Erk1/2, phospho-Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), Akt and phospho-Akt (Ser473). Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were completed for H-RAS wt and H-RAS M72I.Western blot analysis demonstrated that both MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways were activated in the MTC patient carrying the M72I variant. In silico results showed conformational changes in H-RAS that could influence its activation by Sos and phosphate binding. Results of molecular dynamics were consistent with Western blot experiments.The M72I mutation may contribute effectively to proliferation and survival signaling throughout the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. This work underscores the importance of studying genetic alterations that may lead to carcinogenesis. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Chemoinhibitory effect of mulberry anthocyanins on melanoma metastasis involved in the Ras/PI3K pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Pei; Shih, Yuan-Wei; Chang, Yun-Ching; Hung, Chi-Nan; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2008-10-08

    Anthocyanins richly exist in mulberry plants and have been well characterized to have various bioactive properties. However, the antimetastasis properties of mulberry anthocyanins (MACs) remain unclear. The objectives of this study were to investigate the inhibitory effects of MACs on the metastasis of B16-F1 cells under noncytotoxic concentrations. Further investigation revealed that the antimetastatic effect of MACs was also evident in a C57BL/6 mice model. First, MACs exhibited an inhibitory effect on the migration ability by wound healing assay and Boyden chamber assay. In the cancer cell metastasis process, matrix degrading proteinases are required. B16-F1 cells treated with MACs at various concentrations showed reduced extracellular matrix (ECM) proteinases including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) by gelatin zymography assay. The results of the Western blotting assay demonstrated that the expression levels of Ras, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-Akt, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) in the MACs-treated B16-F1 cells were reduced. Therefore, it was suggested that MACs could mediate B16-F1 cell metastasis by reduction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities involving the suppression of the Ras/PI3K signaling pathway. Besides, B16-F1 melanoma cells were also injected into the right groin of the C57BL/6 mice, and the mice were fed with MACs at the same time. The hematoxylin-eosin stain (H&E stain) and immunohistochemistry stain showed that the MACs inhibited the mtastasis of B16-F1 cells in vivo. Taken together, the findings proved the inhibitory effect of MACs on the growth and metastasis of B16-F1 cells. These results indicated that MACs might be offered for future application as an antimetastatic agent.

  7. Utilization of salt whey from Egyptian Ras (cephalotyre) cheese in microbial milk clotting enzymes production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tanboly, El-Sayed; El-Hofi, Mahmoud; Youssef, Youssef Bahr; El-Desoki, Wahed; Ismail, Azza

    2013-01-01

    Microbial milk-clotting enzymes are valued as calf rennet substitutes in the cheese industry. The worldwide increase of cheese production coupled with a reduced supply of calf rennet has prompted a search for calf rennet substitutes, including microbial and plant rennets. However, most plant rennets have proved unsuitable because they impart a bitter taste to the cheese. Microbial rennet appears to be more promising because its production is cheaper, biochemical diversity is greater, and genetic modification is easier. Most cheese manufacturing facilities in Egypt perform land spreading of salt whey. However, this practice increases the chloride levels of soil, and elevates the risk of crop damage. One possible application for salt whey is to use it as a whole medium for growth and production of milk clotting enzyme from fungi. Mucor pusillus QM 436 was identified to produce the highest milk-clotting activity during screening of 19 fungal strains. Salted whey results from Ras (Cephalotyre) cheese manufacture as a whole medium for growth of Mucor pusillus QM 436 and production of the enzyme. The milk-clotting enzyme from Mucor pusillus QM 436 was purified to 7.14-fold with 54.4% recovery by precipitation in ammonium sulfate, ethanol and fractionated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme was active in the pH range 5.5-7.5 and was inactivated completely by heating 5 min at 70°C and 30 min at 65°C. The highest level of enzyme activity was obtained at 60°C, pH 5.5. A positive and proportional relationship occurred in the presence of CaCl2 in milk, with inhibition which occurred in the presence of NaCl. The high level of milk-clotting activity coupled with a low level of thermal stability suggested that the milk-clotting enzyme from Mucor pusillus QM 436 should be considered as a potential substitute for calf rennet.

  8. Antisense gene therapy using anti-k-ras and antitelomerase oligonucleotides in colorectal cancer Eficacia de la terapia génica antisentido utilizando oligonucleótidos anti K-ras y antitelomerasa en cáncer colorrectal

    OpenAIRE

    S. Lledó; Alfonso, R; S. F. Aliño

    2005-01-01

    Aim: to test the efficacy of anti-k-ras and antitelomerase oligonucleotides for disabling colorectal cancer cell growth. Material and methods: an established human colorectal cancer cell line (SW 480, ATTC®) was used. Oligodeoxiribonucleotides (ODNs) have a phosphorotioate modification to ensure intracellular intake. We used an antitelomerase ODN (Telp5) and two anti-k-ras ODNs (AS-KRAS and ISIS). AS-KRAS is designed to join the k-ras oncogene's exon 1. ISIS links to the terminal transcriptio...

  9. RAS testing practices and RAS mutation prevalence among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: results from a Europe-wide survey of pathology centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boleij, A.; Tack, V.; Taylor, A.; Kafatos, G.; Jenkins-Anderson, S.; Tembuyser, L.; Dequeker, E.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) include anti-epithelial growth factor therapies, which, in Europe, are indicated in patients with RAS wild-type tumours only and require prior mutation testing of "hot-spot" codons in exons 2, 3 and 4 of KRAS and

  10. Analysis of mutations in B-RAF, N-RAS, and H-RAS genes in the differential diagnosis of Spitz nevus and spitzoid melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.C.R.F. van; Bernsen, M.R.; Ruiter, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    A definite diagnosis cannot be established based on histologic features alone in a large number of Spitz nevi and spitzoid melanomas. In a vast majority of common benign and malignant melanocytic lesions, B-RAF and N-RAS mutations were described, but these were not detected in Spitz nevi. In

  11. The prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients treated with high-dose cytarabine

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    Ahmad EI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebtesam I Ahmad, Heba H Gawish, Nashwa MA Al Azizi, Ashraf M ElhefniClinical Pathology Department, Hematology and Oncology Unit of Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Sharkia, EgyptBackground: Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, little is known about its clinical relevance in the treatment outcome for this leukemia.Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C used in postinduction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients.Patients and methods: The study comprised of 71 de novo AML patients with male/female ratio 1.4:1; their ages ranged from 21–59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G-banding (Giemsa staining, and K-RAS mutation detection using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patients were randomized into two groups according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, the high the dose ara-C (HDAC group receiving 400 mg ara-C and-low-dose ara-C (LDAC group receiving 100 mg ara-C; they were followed over a period of five years.Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS were detected in 23 patients (32% with the remaining 48 patients (68% having wild-type RAS (wtRAS. The percent of blast cells was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P ≤ 0.001 while M4 subtype of AML and Inv(16 frequencies were significantly higher in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P = 0.015 and (P = 0.003, respectively. The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11–57 months. There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS between mutRAS and wtRAS (P = 0.326. Within the mutRAS

  12. Gene expression profile associated with oncogenic ras-induced senescence, cell death, and transforming properties in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumtzi, Sophy S; Roberts, Michael L; Joyce, Tobias; Evangelidou, Maria; Probert, Lesley; Frillingos, Stathis; Fotsis, Theodore; Pintzas, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    We developed inducible and constitutive expression systems of Ha-RasV12 in HEK 293 cells to examine early oncogenic RasV12 signaling. Inducible expression of oncogenic Ras-triggered growth arrest, early senescence, and later apoptosis. Gene expression profile analysis revealed early Ras proliferation and cell cycle genes like c-fos, cyclin E, cdk2, cell-cell contact, and signaling like integrin a6, MEK5, and free radical signaling genes, like proline oxidase. Therefore, Ras-mediated signaling is a fine regulated process both positively and negatively influencing cell cycle, senescence, and apoptosis pathways. Novel early RAS-target genes could be potentially exploited in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

  13. Regulation of SREBPs by Sphingomyelin in Adipocytes via a Caveolin and Ras-ERK-MAPK-CREB Signaling Pathway.

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    Nehman Makdissy

    Full Text Available Sterol response element binding protein (SREBP is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We previously demonstrated that elevated levels of membrane sphingomyelin (SM were related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ, which is a known target gene of SREBP-1 in adipocytes. However, the role of SM in SREBP expression in adipocytes remains unknown. In human abdominal adipose tissue from obese women with various concentrations of fasting plasma insulin, SREBP-1 proteins decreased in parallel with increases in membrane SM levels. An inverse correlation was found between the membrane SM content and the levels of SREBP-1c/ERK/Ras/PPARγ/CREB proteins. For the first time, we demonstrate the effects of SM and its signaling pathway in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. These cells were enriched or unenriched with SM in a range of concentrations similar to those observed in obese subjects by adding exogenous natural SMs (having different acyl chain lengths or by inhibiting neutral sphingomyelinase. SM accumulated in caveolae of the plasma membrane within 24 h and then in the intracellular space. SM enrichment decreased SREBP-1 through the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK but not JNK or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK. Ras/Raf-1/MEK1/2 and KSR proteins, which are upstream mediators of ERK, were down-regulated, whereas SREBP-2/caveolin and cholesterol were up-regulated. In SM-unmodulated adipocytes treated with DL-1-Phenyl-2-Palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP, where the ceramide level increased, the expression levels of SREBPs and ERK were modulated in an opposite direction relative to the SM-enriched cells. SM inhibited the insulin-induced expression of SREBP-1. Rosiglitazone, which is an anti-diabetic agent and potent activator of PPARγ, reversed the effects of SM on SREBP-1, PPARγ and CREB. Taken together, these findings provide novel insights indicating that excess

  14. Tobacco Smoke and Ras Mutations Among Latino and Non-Latino Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maneet; de Smith, Adam J; Selvin, Steve; Zhang, Luoping; Cunningham, Marc; Kang, Michelle W; Hansen, Helen M; Cooper, Robert M; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Wiemels, Joseph L; Metayer, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a biologically heterogeneous disease, and mutations in the KRAS and NRAS oncogenes are present at diagnosis in about one-fifth of cases. Ras mutations were previously associated with environmental exposures in leukemias as well as in many other cancer types. This study examined whether Ras mutation could define a unique etiologic group of childhood ALL associated with tobacco smoke, a well-established mutagen and carcinogen. We included 670 children with ALL enrolled in a case-control study in California (1995-2013), including 50.6% Latinos. Parental and child exposure to tobacco smoke was obtained from interviews. Sanger sequencing was used to detect the common KRAS and NRAS hotspot mutations in diagnostic bone marrow DNA. ALL cases were also characterized for common chromosome abnormalities. In case-case analyses, logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios to describe the association between tobacco smoke exposure and childhood ALL with Ras mutations. KRAS or NRAS mutations were detected in ∼18% of children diagnosed with ALL. Ras mutations were more common among Latino cases compared with non-Latino whites and in high-hyperdiploid ALL. No associations were observed between parental smoking or child's passive exposure to smoke and Ras positive ALL. The apparent lack of association between tobacco smoke and Ras mutation in childhood ALL suggests that Ras mutations do not specifically define a tobacco-related etiologic pathway. Reasons for racial and ethnic differences in ALL are not well understood and could reflect differences in etiology that warrant further examination. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Association between H-ras and L-myc gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qin; Zhang, Yong-jing; Zhang, Shan-chun; Jin, Ming-juan; Ma, Xin-yuan; Yao, Kai-yan; Li, Qi-long; Chen, Kun

    2012-01-01

    To explore the association between the polymorphisms of oncogenes H-ras and L-myc and colorectal cancer risk, and the interaction of those genes. The genotypes of H-ras and L-myc genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Stratified analysis and logistic model were used to detect the gene-gene interaction. The gene-gene interaction was validated by multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis. The single SNP model showed that the polymorphisms of H-ras and L-myc genes were not significantly related with colorectal cancer risk (P > 0.05). Stratified analysis revealed that among the L-myc LS + SS genotype carriers, those with H-ras TC + CC genotype showed significantly increased risk of rectal cancer than those with TT genotype (OR = 1.81, P = 0.005). The positive interaction between L-myc and H-ras was detected by logistic regression model. The OR of the interaction effect was 2.74 (P = 0.024). This result was confirmed in the MDR model, with 54.83% testing balanced accuracy and 10/10 cross-validation consistency, and the model was still significant after the 1000 times permutation test (P = 0.001). Our findings suggest that the polymorphism of H-ras and L-myc genes is not related to colorectal cancer risk, but there is a synergy between H-ras and L-myc polymorphisms in the development of rectal cancer.

  16. Mitogenic effect of oxidized low-density lipoprotein on vascular smooth muscle cells mediated by activation of Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C M; Chien, C S; Hsiao, L D; Pan, S L; Wang, C C; Chiu, C T; Lin, C C

    2001-04-01

    1. It has been demonstrated that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OX-LDL) is a risk factor in atherosclerosis by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. However, the mechanisms of OX-LDL-induced cell proliferation are not completely understood. Therefore, we investigated the effect of OX-LDL on cell proliferation associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in rat cultured VSMCs. 2. Both native-LDL (N-LDL) and OX-LDL induced a time- and concentration-dependent incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine in VSMCs. 3. OX-LDL induced time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of p42/p44 MAPK. Pretreatment of these cells with pertussis toxin or U73122 attenuated the OX-LDL-induced responses. 4. Pretreatment with PMA for 24 h, preincubation with a PKC inhibitor staurosporine or the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genistein and herbimycin A for 1 h, substantially reduced [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation induced by OX-LDL. 5. Removal of Ca(2+) by BAPTA/AM or depletion of the internal Ca(2+) pool by thapsigargin significantly inhibited OX-LDL-induced [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. 6. OX-LDL-induced [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation was inhibited by PD98059 (an inhibitor of MEK1/2) and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK) in a concentration-dependent manner. 7. Overexpression of dominant negative mutants of Ras (H-Ras-15A) and Raf (Raf-N4) significantly suppressed MEK1/2 and p42/p44 MAPK activation induced by OX-LDL and PDGF-BB, indicating that Ras and Raf may be required for activation of these kinases. 8. These results suggest that the mitogenic effect of OX-LDL is mediated through a PTX-sensitive G protein-coupled receptor that involves the activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway similar to that of PDGF-BB in rat cultured VSMCs.

  17. Aurora-A overexpression enhances cell-aggregation of Ha-ras transformants through the MEK/ERK signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chi-Ying F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ras (RasV12 together has been detected in human bladder cancer tissue. However, it is not clear whether this phenomenon is a general event or not. Although crosstalk between Aurora-A and Ras signaling pathways has been reported, the role of these two genes acting together in tumorigenesis remains unclear. Methods Real-time PCR and sequence analysis were utilized to identify Ha- and Ki-ras mutation (Gly -> Val. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to measure the level of Aurora-A expression in bladder and colon cancer specimens. To reveal the effect of overexpression of the above two genes on cellular responses, mouse NIH3T3 fibroblast derived cell lines over-expressing either RasV12and wild-type Aurora-A (designated WT or RasV12 and kinase-inactivated Aurora-A (KD were established. MTT and focus formation assays were conducted to measure proliferation rate and focus formation capability of the cells. Small interfering RNA, pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative genes were used to dissect the signaling pathways involved. Results Overexpression of wild-type Aurora-A and mutation of RasV12 were detected in human bladder and colon cancer tissues. Wild-type Aurora-A induces focus formation and aggregation of the RasV12 transformants. Aurora-A activates Ral A and the phosphorylation of AKT as well as enhances the phosphorylation of MEK, ERK of WT cells. Finally, the Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway is responsible for Aurora-A induced aggregation of the RasV12 transformants. Conclusion Wild-type-Aurora-A enhances focus formation and aggregation of the RasV12 transformants and the latter occurs through modulating the Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

  18. ANALISIS PENDAPATAN USAHA PETERNAKAN AYAM RAS PETELUR PADA FASE PEMELIHARAAN STARTER GROWER DAN LAYER DI KECAMATAN MATTIROBULU KABUPATEN PINRANG

    OpenAIRE

    MAHYUDDIN

    2013-01-01

    2013 Mahyuddin (I 311 09 268). Analisis Pendapatan Usaha Peternakan Ayam Ras Petelur Pada Fase Pemeliharaan Starter Grower dan Layer di Kecamatan Mattirobulu Kabupaten Pinrang. Dibawah Bimbingan Dr. Ir. Hj. St. Rohani, M.Si sebagai Pembimbing Utama dan Ir. Veronica Sri Lestari, M.Ec sebagai Pembimbing Anggota. Telah dilakukan penelitian tentang pendapatan ayam ras petelur dengan tujuan mengetahui pendapatan usaha peternakan ayam ras petelur pada fase pemeliharaan start...

  19. Activating K-Ras mutations outwith ‘hotspot' codons in sporadic colorectal tumours – implications for personalised cancer medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G; Bounds, R; Wolf, H; Steele, R J C; Carey, F A; Wolf, C R

    2010-01-01

    Background: Response to EGFR-targeted therapies in colorectal cancer patients has been convincingly associated with Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) mutation status. Current mandatory mutation testing for patient selection is limited to the K-Ras ‘hotspot' codons 12 and 13. Methods: Colorectal tumours (n=106) were screened for additional K-Ras mutations, phenotypes compared in transformation and Ras GTPase activating assays and gene and pathway changes induced by individual K-Ras mutants identified by microarray analysis. Taqman-based gene copy number and FISH analyses were used to investigate K-Ras gene amplification. Results: Four additional K-Ras mutations (Leu19Phe (1 out of 106 tumours), Lys117Asn (1 out of 106), Ala146Thr (7 out of 106) and Arg164Gln (1 out of 106)) were identified. Lys117Asn and Ala146Thr had phenotypes similar to the hotspot mutations, whereas Leu19Phe had an attenuated phenotype and the Arg164Gln mutation was phenotypically equivalent to wt K-Ras. We additionally identified a new K-Ras gene amplification event, present in approximately 2% of tumours. Conclusions: The identification of mutations outwith previously described hotspot codons increases the K-Ras mutation burden in colorectal tumours by one-third. Future mutation screening to facilitate optimal patient selection for treatment with EGFR-targeted therapies should therefore be extended to codon 146, and in addition should consider the unique molecular signatures associated with individual K-Ras mutations. PMID:20147967

  20. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced acute lung inflammation by regulation of PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Hou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative pathogen–induced nosocomial infections and resistance are a most serious menace to global public health. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan (QF, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM formula, has been used clinically in China for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections, acute or chronic bronchitis and pulmonary infection. In this study, the effects of QF on Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced acute pneumonia in mice were evaluated. The mechanisms by which four typical anti-inflammatory ingredients from QF, arctigenin (ATG, cholic acid (CLA, chlorogenic acid (CGA and sinapic acid (SPA, regulate anti-inflammatory signaling pathways and related targets were investigated using molecular biology and molecular docking techniques. The results showed that pretreatment with QF significantly inhibits the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6 and chemokines (IL-8 and RANTES, reduces leukocytes recruitment into inflamed tissues and ameliorates pulmonary edema and necrosis. In addition, ATG was identified as the primary anti-inflammatory agent with action on the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways. CLA and CGA enhanced the actions of ATG and exhibited synergistic NF-κB inactivation effects possibly via the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, CLA is speculated to target FGFR and MEK firstly. Overall, QF regulated the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways to inhibit pathogenic bacterial infections effectively.

  1. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced acute lung inflammation by regulation of PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuanyuan; Nie, Yan; Cheng, Binfeng; Tao, Jin; Ma, Xiaoyao; Jiang, Min; Gao, Jie; Bai, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative pathogen–induced nosocomial infections and resistance are a most serious menace to global public health. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan (QF), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula, has been used clinically in China for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections, acute or chronic bronchitis and pulmonary infection. In this study, the effects of QF on Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced acute pneumonia in mice were evaluated. The mechanisms by which four typical anti-inflammatory ingredients from QF, arctigenin (ATG), cholic acid (CLA), chlorogenic acid (CGA) and sinapic acid (SPA), regulate anti-inflammatory signaling pathways and related targets were investigated using molecular biology and molecular docking techniques. The results showed that pretreatment with QF significantly inhibits the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and chemokines (IL-8 and RANTES), reduces leukocytes recruitment into inflamed tissues and ameliorates pulmonary edema and necrosis. In addition, ATG was identified as the primary anti-inflammatory agent with action on the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways. CLA and CGA enhanced the actions of ATG and exhibited synergistic NF-κB inactivation effects possibly via the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, CLA is speculated to target FGFR and MEK firstly. Overall, QF regulated the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways to inhibit pathogenic bacterial infections effectively. PMID:27175332

  2. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced acute lung inflammation by regulation of PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuanyuan; Nie, Yan; Cheng, Binfeng; Tao, Jin; Ma, Xiaoyao; Jiang, Min; Gao, Jie; Bai, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative pathogen-induced nosocomial infections and resistance are a most serious menace to global public health. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan (QF), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula, has been used clinically in China for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections, acute or chronic bronchitis and pulmonary infection. In this study, the effects of QF on Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced acute pneumonia in mice were evaluated. The mechanisms by which four typical anti-inflammatory ingredients from QF, arctigenin (ATG), cholic acid (CLA), chlorogenic acid (CGA) and sinapic acid (SPA), regulate anti-inflammatory signaling pathways and related targets were investigated using molecular biology and molecular docking techniques. The results showed that pretreatment with QF significantly inhibits the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and chemokines (IL-8 and RANTES), reduces leukocytes recruitment into inflamed tissues and ameliorates pulmonary edema and necrosis. In addition, ATG was identified as the primary anti-inflammatory agent with action on the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways. CLA and CGA enhanced the actions of ATG and exhibited synergistic NF-κB inactivation effects possibly via the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, CLA is speculated to target FGFR and MEK firstly. Overall, QF regulated the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways to inhibit pathogenic bacterial infections effectively.

  3. The cornerstone K-RAS mutation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: From cell signaling network, target genes, biological processes to therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vasseur, Romain; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2017-03-01

    RAS belongs to the super family of small G proteins and plays crucial roles in signal transduction from membrane receptors in the cell. Mutations of K-RAS oncogene lead to an accumulation of GTP-bound proteins that maintains an active conformation. In the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, mutations of the K-RAS oncogene are nearly systematic (>90%). Moreover, K-RAS mutation is the earliest genetic alteration occurring during pancreatic carcinogenetic sequence. In this review, we discuss the central role of K-RAS mutations and their tremendous diversity of biological properties by the interconnected regulation of signaling pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, PI3K, Ral…). In pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, transcriptome analysis and preclinical animal models showed that K-RAS mutation alters biological behavior of PDAC cells (promoting proliferation, migration and invasion, evading growth suppressors, regulating mucin pattern, and miRNA expression). K-RAS also impacts tumor microenvironment and PDAC metabolism reprogramming. Finally we discuss therapeutic targeting strategies of K-RAS that have been developed without significant clinical success so far. As K-RAS is considered as the undruggable target, targeting its multiple effectors and target genes should be considered as potential alternatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Bisphenol A analogue Bisphenol S binds to K-Ras4B--implications for 'BPA-free' plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpel, Miriam; Herrmann, Christian; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2016-02-01

    K-Ras4B is a small GTPase that belongs to the Ras superfamily of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. GTPases function as molecular switches in cells and are key players in intracellular signalling. Ras has been identified as an oncogene and is mutated in more than 20% of human cancers. Here, we report that Bisphenol S binds into a binding pocket of K-Ras4B previously identified for various low molecular weight compounds. Our results advocate for more comprehensive safety studies on the toxicity of Bisphenol S, as it is frequently used for Bisphenol A-free food containers. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Interferon-induced revertants of ras-transformed cells: resistance to transformation by specific oncogenes and retransformation by 5-azacytidine.

    OpenAIRE

    Samid, D; Flessate, D M; Friedman, R M

    1987-01-01

    Prolonged alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) treatment of NIH 3T3 cells transformed by a long terminal repeat-activated Ha-ras proto-oncogene resulted in revertants that maintained a nontransformed phenotype long after IFN treatment had been discontinued. Cloned persistent revertants (PRs) produced large amounts of the ras-encoded p21 and were refractile to transformation by EJras DNA and by transforming retroviruses which carried the v-Ha-ras, v-Ki-ras, v-abl, or v-fes oncogene. Transien...

  6. RAS2/PKA pathway activity is involved in the nitrogen regulation of L-leucine uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz, D A; Chianelli, M S; Stella, C A; Mattoon, J R; Ramos, E H

    1997-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the participation of RAS2/PKA signal pathway in the nitrogen regulation of L-leucine transport in yeast cells. The study was performed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae isogenic strains with the normal RAS2 gene, the RAS2val19 mutant and the disrupted ras2::LEU2. These strains bring about different activities of the RAS2/PKA signal pathway, L-(14C)-Amino acid uptake measurements were determined in cells grown in a rich YPD medium with a mixed nitrogen source or in minimal media containing NH4+ or L-proline as the sole nitrogen source. We report herein that in all strains used, even in those grown in a minimal proline medium, the activity of the general amino acid permease (GAP1) was not detected. L-Leucine uptake in these strains is mediated by two kinetically characterized transport systems. Their KT values are of the same order as those of S1 and S2 L-leucine permeases. Mutation in the RAS2 gene alters initial velocities and Jmax values in both high and low affinity L-leucine transport systems. Activation of the RAS2/PKA signalling pathway by the RAS2val19 mutation, blocks the response to a poor nitrogen source whereas inactivation of RAS2 by gene disruption, results in an increase of the same response.

  7. Blocking of p53-Snail Binding, Promoted by Oncogenic K-Ras, Recovers p53 Expression and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hye Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentially from other kinds of Ras, oncogenic K-Ras, which is mutated approximately 30% of human cancer, does not induce apoptosis and senescence. Here, we provide the evidence that oncogenic K-Ras abrogates p53 function and expression through induction of Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related mediated Snail stabilization. Snail directly binds to DNA binding domain of p53 and diminishes the tumor-suppressive function of p53. Thus, elimination of Snail through si-RNA can induce p53 in K-Ras-mutated cells, whereas Snail and mutant K-Ras can suppress p53 in regardless of K-Ras status. Chemicals, isolated from inhibitor screening of p53-Snail binding, can block the Snail-mediated p53 suppression and enhance the expression of p53 as well as the transcriptional activity of p53 in an oncogenic K-Ras-dependent manner. Among the chemicals, two are very similar in structure. These results can answer why K-Ras can coexist with wild type p53 and propose the Snail-p53 binding as the new therapeutic target for K-Ras-mutated cancers including pancreatic, lung, and colon cancers.

  8. A non-cell-autonomous role for Ras signaling in C. elegans neuroblast delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Jean M; Sundaram, Meera V

    2014-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling through Ras influences many aspects of normal cell behavior, including epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and aberrant signaling promotes both tumorigenesis and metastasis. Although many such effects are cell-autonomous, here we show a non-cell-autonomous role for RTK-Ras signaling in the delamination of a neuroblast from an epithelial organ. The C. elegans renal-like excretory organ is initially composed of three unicellular epithelial tubes, namely the canal, duct and G1 pore cells; however, the G1 cell later delaminates from the excretory system to become a neuroblast and is replaced by the G2 cell. G1 delamination and G2 intercalation involve cytoskeletal remodeling, interconversion of autocellular and intercellular junctions and migration over a luminal extracellular matrix, followed by G1 junction loss. LET-23/EGFR and SOS-1, an exchange factor for Ras, are required for G1 junction loss but not for initial cytoskeletal or junction remodeling. Surprisingly, expression of activated LET-60/Ras in the neighboring duct cell, but not in the G1 or G2 cells, is sufficient to rescue sos-1 delamination defects, revealing that Ras acts non-cell-autonomously to permit G1 delamination. We suggest that, similarly, oncogenic mutations in cells within a tumor might help create a microenvironment that is permissive for other cells to detach and ultimately metastasize. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Genotyping of K-ras codons 12 and 13 mutations in colorectal cancer by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ling; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2009-06-26

    Point mutations of the K-ras gene located in codons 12 and 13 cause poor responses to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapy of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Besides, mutations of K-ras gene have also been proven to play an important role in human tumor progression. We established a simple and effective capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for simultaneous point mutation detection in codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene. We combined one universal fluorescence-based nonhuman-sequence primer and two fragment-oriented primers in one tube, and performed this two-in-one polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR fragments included wild type and seven point mutations at codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene. The amplicons were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP)-CE method. The CE analysis was performed by using a 1x Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffer containing 1.5% (w/v) hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) (MW 250,000) under reverse polarity with 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Ninety colorectal cancer patients were blindly genotyped using this developed method. The results showed good agreement with those of DNA sequencing method. The SSCP-CE was feasible for mutation screening of K-ras gene in populations.

  10. Ras/MAPK Modifier Loci Revealed by eQTL in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark G. Sterken

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The oncogenic Ras/MAPK pathway is evolutionarily conserved across metazoans. Yet, almost all our knowledge on this pathway comes from studies using single genetic backgrounds, whereas mutational effects can be highly background dependent. Therefore, we lack insight in the interplay between genetic backgrounds and the Ras/MAPK-signaling pathway. Here, we used a Caenorhabditis elegans RIL population containing a gain-of-function mutation in the Ras/MAPK-pathway gene let-60 and measured how gene expression regulation is affected by this mutation. We mapped eQTL and found that the majority (∼73% of the 1516 detected cis-eQTL were not specific for the let-60 mutation, whereas most (∼76% of the 898 detected trans-eQTL were associated with the let-60 mutation. We detected six eQTL trans-bands specific for the interaction between the genetic background and the mutation, one of which colocalized with the polymorphic Ras/MAPK modifier amx-2. Comparison between transgenic lines expressing allelic variants of amx-2 showed the involvement of amx-2 in 79% of the trans-eQTL for genes mapping to this trans-band. Together, our results have revealed hidden loci affecting Ras/MAPK signaling using sensitized backgrounds in C. elegans. These loci harbor putative polymorphic modifier genes that would not have been detected using mutant screens in single genetic backgrounds.

  11. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide is a downstream target for ras and src activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Drucker, D J

    1994-03-04

    Neoplastic transformation may be associated with the development of paraneoplastic syndromes that complicate the management of patients with malignant disease. One of these syndromes, humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy, has been shown to be attributable to increased secretion of a parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP). The gene encoding PTHrP is expressed at low levels in a growth factor-dependent manner in normal tissues, and the mechanisms underlying selective tumor-associated induction of PTHrP gene expression remain unclear. Here we show that cellular transformation by the EJ-Ha-ras and v-src oncogenes is associated with a marked increase in PTHrP gene expression. Ha-ras- and v-src-transfected NRK 49F cells and ras-transfected RCB 2.2 cell lines secreted increased amounts of immunoreactive PTHrP. Northern blot analysis also demonstrated increased levels of PTHrP mRNA transcripts in oncogene-transfected stable cell lines. No significant change in the half-life of PTHrP mRNA transcripts was detected in Ha-ras- and v-src-transformed cells. In contrast, nuclear run-on assays demonstrated an increased rate of PTHrP gene transcription in oncogene-transformed cells. These observations demonstrate that the gene encoding PTHrP is a downstream target for ras and src, potentially providing a molecular basis for understanding the activation of PTHrP gene expression in malignancy-associated hypercalcemia.

  12. Active Erk Regulates Microtubule Stability in H-ras-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene E. Harrison

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that activated erk regulates cell functions, at least in part, by mechanisms that do not require gene transcription. Here we show that the map kinase, erk, decorates microtubules (MTs and mitotic spindles in both parental and mutant active rastransfected 10T1 /2 fibroblasts and MCF10A breast epithelial cells. Approximately 20% of total cellular erk decorated MTs in both cell lines. A greater proportion of activated erk was associated with MTs in the presence of mutant active H-ras than in parental cells. Activation of erk by the ras pathway coincided with a decrease in the stability of MT, as detected by a stability marker. The MKK1 inhibitor, PD98059 and transfection of a dominant negative MKK1 blocked ras-induced instability of MTs but did not modify the association of erk with MTs or affect MT stability of the parental cells. These results indicate that the subset of active erk kinase that associates with MTs contributes to their instability in the presence of a mutant active ras. The MT-associated subset of active erk likely contributes to the enhanced invasive and proliferative abilities of cells containing mutant active H-ras.

  13. miR-11 regulates pupal size of Drosophila melanogaster via directly targeting Ras85D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Li, Shengjie; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs play diverse roles in various physiological processes during Drosophila development. In the present study, we reported that miR-11 regulates pupal size during Drosophila metamorphosis via targeting Ras85D with the following evidences: pupal size was increased in the miR-11 deletion mutant; restoration of miR-11 in the miR-11 deletion mutant rescued the increased pupal size phenotype observed in the miR-11 deletion mutant; ectopic expression of miR-11 in brain insulin-producing cells (IPCs) and whole body shows consistent alteration of pupal size; Dilps and Ras85D expressions were negatively regulated by miR-11 in vivo; miR-11 targets Ras85D through directly binding to Ras85D 3'-untranslated region in vitro; removal of one copy of Ras85D in the miR-11 deletion mutant rescued the increased pupal size phenotype observed in the miR-11 deletion mutant. Thus, our current work provides a novel mechanism of pupal size determination by microRNAs during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Prognostic and Predictive Value of RAS Gene Mutations in Colorectal Cancer: Moving Beyond KRAS Exon 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckx, Nele; Peeters, Marc; Van Camp, Guy; Pauwels, Patrick; Op de Beeck, Ken; Deschoolmeester, Vanessa

    2015-10-01

    The advent of anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) therapy resulted in significant progress in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. However, many patients do not respond to this therapy or develop acquired resistance within a few months after the start of treatment. Since 2008, anti-EGFR therapy is restricted to KRAS wild-type patients as it has been shown that KRAS exon 2-mutated patients do not respond to this therapy. Still, up to 60 % of KRAS exon 2 wild-type patients show primary resistance to this treatment. Recently, several studies investigating the predictive and prognostic role of RAS mutations other than in KRAS exon 2 demonstrated that patients with these mutations are not responding to therapy. However, the role of these mutations has long been questioned as The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines in Oncology and the European Medicines Agency indications had already been changed in order to restrict anti-EGFR therapy to all RAS wild-type colorectal cancer patients, while the Food and Drug Administration guidelines remained unchanged. Recently, the Food and Drug Administration guidelines have also been changed, which implies the importance of RAS mutations beyond KRAS exon 2 in colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the most important studies regarding the predictive and prognostic role of RAS mutations other than in KRAS exon 2 in order to demonstrate the importance of these RAS mutations in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with anti-EGFR therapy.

  15. A recombinantly tailored β-defensin that displays intensive macropinocytosis-mediated uptake exerting potent efficacy against K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yue; Shang, Bo-Yang; Sheng, Wei-Jin; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Li, Yi; Miao, Qing-Fang; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2016-09-06

    K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer cells display intensive macropinocytosis, indicating that this process may be exploited in the design of anticancer targeted therapies. In this study, we constructed a macropinocytosis-oriented recombinantly tailored defensin (DF-HSA) which consists of human β-defensin-2 (DF) and human serum albumin (HSA). The macropinocytosis intensity and cytotoxicity of DF-HSA were investigated in K-Ras mutant MIA PaCa-2 cells and wild-type BxPC-3 cells. As found, the DF-HSA uptake in MIA PaCa-2 cells was much higher than that in wild-type BxPC-3 cells. Correspondingly, the cytotoxicity of DF-HSA to MIA PaCa-2 cells was more potent than that to BxPC-3 cells. In addition, the cytotoxicity of DF-HSA was much stronger than that of β-defensin HBD2. DF-HSA suppressed cancer cell proliferation and induced mitochondrial pathway apoptosis. Notably, DF-HSA significantly inhibited the growth of human pancreatic carcinoma MIA PaCa-2 xenograft in athymic mice at well tolerated dose. By in vivo imaging, DF-HSA displayed a prominent accumulation in the tumor. The study indicates that the recombinantly tailored β-defensin can intensively enter into the K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer cells through macropinocytosis-mediated process and exert potent therapeutic efficacy against the pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. The novel format of β-defensin may play an active role in macropinocytosis-mediated targeting therapy.

  16. The bisphosphonate zoledronic acid effectively targets lung cancer cells by inhibition of protein prenylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Fan [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jingzhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China); Li, Pengcheng [Department of Oncology, Wuhan Union Hospital Affiliated to Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Gong, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiahong [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jingzhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China); Ma, Jingping, E-mail: mjpjzhospital@hotmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jingzhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China)

    2015-11-27

    Aberrant activation of oncoproteins such as members of the Ras family is common in human lung cancers. The proper function of Ras largely depends on a post-translational modification termed prenylation. Bisphosphonates have been shown to inhibit prenylation in cancer cells. In this study, we show that zoledronic acid, a third generation bisphosphonate, is effective in targeting lung cancer cells. This is achieved by the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, through suppressing the activation of downstream Ras and EGFR signalling by zoledronic acid. The combination of zoledronic acid and paclitaxel or cisplatin (commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs for lung cancer) augmented the activity of either drug alone in in vitro lung cancer cellular system and in vivo lung xenograft mouse model. Importantly, zoledronic acid inhibits protein prenylation as shown by the increased levels of unprenylated Ras and Rap1A. In addition, the effects of zoledronic acid were reversed in the presence of geranylgeraniol and farnesol, further confirming that mechanism of zoledroinc acid's action in lung cancer cells is through prenylation inhibition. Since zoledronic acid is already available for clinic use, these results suggest that it may be an effective addition to the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Zoledronic acid (ZA) is effectively against lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. • ZA acts on lung cancer cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. • ZA suppresses global downstream phosphorylation of Ras signalling. • ZA enhances the effects of chemotherapeutic drugs in lung cancer cells.

  17. Subcellular Distribution of S-Nitrosylated H-Ras in Differentiated and Undifferentiated PC12 Cells during Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbakadze, Tamar; Goloshvili, Galina; Narmania, Nana; Zhuravliova, Elene; Mikeladze, David

    2017-10-01

    Hypoxia or exposure to excessive reactive oxygen or nitrogen species could induce S-nitrosylation of various target proteins, including GTPases of the Ras-superfamily. Under hypoxic conditions, the Ras-protein is translocated to the cytosol and interacts with the Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria. The mobility/translocation of Ras depend on the cells oxidative status. However, the importance of relocated Snitrosylated- H-Ras (NO-H-Ras) in proliferation/differentiation processes is not completely understood. We have determined the content of soluble- and membrane-bound-NO-HRas in differentiated (D) and undifferentiated (ND) rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In our experimental study, we analyzed NO-H-Ras levels under hypoxic/normoxic conditions in membrane and soluble fractions of ND and D PC12 cells with/without nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) treatment. Cells were analyzed by the S-nitrosylated kit, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot. We assessed the action of NO-H-Ras on oxidative metabolism of isolated mitochondria by determining mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide generation via the scopoletin oxidation method and ATPproduction as estimated by the luminometric method. Hypoxia did not influence nitrosylation of soluble H-Ras in ND PC12 cells. Under hypoxic conditions, the nitrosylation of soluble-H-Ras greatly decreased in D PC12 cells. SNP didn't change the levels of nitrosylation of soluble-H-Ras, in either hypoxic or normoxic conditions. On the other hand, hypoxia, per se, did not affect the nitrosylation of membrane-bound-H-Ras in D and ND PC12 cells. SNP-dependent nitrosylation of membrane-bound-H-Ras greatly increased in D PC12 cells. Both unmodified normal and mutated H-Ras enhanced the mitochondrial synthesis of ATP, whereas the stimulatory effects on ATP synthesis were eliminated after S-nitrosylation of H-Ras. According to the results, it may be proposed that hypoxia can decrease S

  18. Ras induces experimental lung metastasis through up-regulation of RbAp46 to suppress RECK promoter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsuan-Heng; Tseng, Yu-Fen; Hsu, Yu-Chiao; Lan, Sheng-Hui; Wu, Shan-Ying; Raghavaraju, Giri; Cheng, Da-En; Lee, Ying-Ray; Chang, Tsuey-Yu; Chow, Nan-Haw; Hung, Wen-Chun; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2015-03-25

    Mutant Ras plays multiple functions in tumorigenesis including tumor formation and metastasis. Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK), a metastasis inhibitor gene, suppresses matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in the metastatic cascade. Clarifying the relationship between Ras and RECK and understanding the underlying molecular mechanism may lead to the development of better treatment for Ras-related tumors. Suppression subtractive hybridization PCR (SSH PCR) was conducted to identify Ha-ras (val12) up-regulated genes in bladder cancer cells. Stable cell lines of human breast cancer (MCF-7-ras) and mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts (7-4) harboring the inducible Ha-ras (val12) oncogene, which could be induced by isopropylthio-β-D-galactoside (IPTG), were used to clarify the relationship between Ras and the up-regulated genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, DNA affinity precipitation assay (DAPA) and RECK reporter gene assay were utilized to confirm the complex formation and binding with promoters. Retinoblastoma binding protein-7 (RbAp46) was identified and confirmed as a Ha-ras (val12) up-regulated gene. RbAp46 could bind with histone deacetylase (HDAC1) and Sp1, followed by binding to RECK promoter at the Sp1 site resulting in repression of RECK expression. High expression of Ras protein accompanied with high RbAp46 and low RECK expression were detected in 75% (3/4) of the clinical bladder cancer tumor tissues compared to the adjacent normal parts. Ras induced RbAp46 expression increases invasion of the bladder cancer T24 cells and MMP-9 activity was increased, which was confirmed by specific lentiviral shRNAs inhibitors against Ras and RbAp46. Similarly, knockdown of RbAp46 expression in the stable NIH3T3 cells "7-4" by shRNA decreased Ras-related lung metastasis using a xenograft nude mice model. We confirmed that RbAp46 is a Ha-ras (val12) up-regulated gene and binds with HDAC1 and Sp1. Furthermore, RbAp46 binds to the RECK

  19. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumov, Inna [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Kazanov, Dina [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lisiansky, Victoria [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Starr, Alex [Lung and Allergy Institute, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Arber, Nadir, E-mail: narber@post.tau.ac.il [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  20. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our "gene therapy" approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce ~50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by ~35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ets Factors Regulate Neural Stem Cell Depletion and Gliogenesis in Ras Pathway Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Breunig

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As the list of putative driver mutations in glioma grows, we are just beginning to elucidate the effects of dysregulated developmental signaling pathways on the transformation of neural cells. We have employed a postnatal, mosaic, autochthonous glioma model that captures the first hours and days of gliomagenesis in more resolution than conventional genetically engineered mouse models of cancer. We provide evidence that disruption of the Nf1-Ras pathway in the ventricular zone at multiple signaling nodes uniformly results in rapid neural stem cell depletion, progenitor hyperproliferation, and gliogenic lineage restriction. Abolishing Ets subfamily activity, which is upregulated downstream of Ras, rescues these phenotypes and blocks glioma initiation. Thus, the Nf1-Ras-Ets axis might be one of the select molecular pathways that are perturbed for initiation and maintenance in glioma.

  2. K-ras mutations in sinonasal cancers in relation to wood dust exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornholdt, Jette; Hansen, Johnni; Steiniche, Torben

    2008-01-01

    as the most common and often related to wood dust exposure. CONCLUSION: Patients exposed to wood dust seemed more likely to develop adenocarcinoma compared to squamous cell carcinomas. K-ras mutations were detected in 13% of adenocarcinomas. In this study and previously published studies of sinonasal cancer...... to be explanatory for the G-->A mutations, but combination of exposure to tobacco, wood dust, and possibly other occupational agents may be a more likely explanation. Overall, the study suggests a limited role for K-ras mutations in development of sinonasal cancer.......BACKGROUND: Cancer in the sinonasal tract is rare, but persons who have been occupationally exposed to wood dust have a substantially increased risk. It has been estimated that approximately 3.6 million workers are exposed to inhalable wood dust in EU. In previous small studies of this cancer, ras...

  3. RAS-pathway mutation patterns define epigenetic subclasses in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Daniel B; Witte, Tania; Toth, Reka; Yang, Jing; Wiesenfarth, Manuel; Nöllke, Peter; Fischer, Alexandra; Brocks, David; Gu, Zuguang; Park, Jeongbin; Strahm, Brigitte; Wlodarski, Marcin; Yoshimi, Ayami; Claus, Rainer; Lübbert, Michael; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hartmann, Mark; Schönung, Maximilian; Kilik, Umut; Langstein, Jens; Wierzbinska, Justyna A; Pabst, Caroline; Garg, Swati; Catalá, Albert; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Hasle, Henrik; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; Schmugge, Markus; Smith, Owen; Stary, Jan; Ussowicz, Marek; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Assenov, Yassen; Schlesner, Matthias; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Flotho, Christian; Plass, Christoph

    2017-12-19

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive myeloproliferative disorder of early childhood characterized by mutations activating RAS signaling. Established clinical and genetic markers fail to fully recapitulate the clinical and biological heterogeneity of this disease. Here we report DNA methylome analysis and mutation profiling of 167 JMML samples. We identify three JMML subgroups with unique molecular and clinical characteristics. The high methylation group (HM) is characterized by somatic PTPN11 mutations and poor clinical outcome. The low methylation group is enriched for somatic NRAS and CBL mutations, as well as for Noonan patients, and has a good prognosis. The intermediate methylation group (IM) shows enrichment for monosomy 7 and somatic KRAS mutations. Hypermethylation is associated with repressed chromatin, genes regulated by RAS signaling, frequent co-occurrence of RAS pathway mutations and upregulation of DNMT1 and DNMT3B, suggesting a link between activation of the DNA methylation machinery and mutational patterns in JMML.

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity Induces Ras Signaling in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirapa Chetsawang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that overproduction of reactive oxygen species occurs after brain injury and mediates neuronal cells degeneration. In the present study, we examined the role of Ras signaling on hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cells degeneration in dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. An inhibitor of the enzyme that catalyzes the farnesylation of Ras proteins, FTI-277, and a competitive inhibitor of GTP-binding proteins, GDP-beta-S significantly decreased hydrogen peroxide-induced reduction in cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. The results of this study might indicate that a Ras-dependent signaling pathway plays a role in hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in neuronal cells.

  5. Membrane Curvature and Lipid Composition Synergize To Regulate N-Ras Anchor Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik B.; Kennard, Celeste; Pedersen, Søren L.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins anchored to membranes through covalently linked fatty acids and/or isoprenoid groups play crucial roles in all forms of life. Sorting and trafficking of lipidated proteins has traditionally been discussed in the context of partitioning to membrane domains of different lipid composition. We...... recently showed that membrane shape/curvature can in itself mediate the recruitment of lipidated proteins. However, exactly how membrane curvature and composition synergize remains largely unexplored. Here we investigated how three critical structural parameters of lipids, namely acyl chain saturation......, headgroup size, and acyl chain length, modulate the capacity of membrane curvature to recruit lipidated proteins. As a model system we used the lipidated minimal membrane anchor of the GTPase, N-Ras (tN-Ras). Our data revealed complex synergistic effects, whereby tN-Ras binding was higher on planar DOPC...

  6. Bioinformatics of non small cell lung cancer and the ras proto-oncogene

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, Amita; Babu M, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is initiated by activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutations in the K-ras proto-oncogene are responsible for 10–30% of adenocarcinomas. Clinical Findings point to a wide variety of other cancers contributing to lung cancer incidence. Such a scenario makes identification of lung cancer difficult and thus identifying its mechanisms can contribute to the society. Identifying unique conserved patterns common to contributing proto-oncogenes may further be a boon to Pharmacogenomics and pharmacoinformatics. This calls for ab initio/de novo drug discovery that in turn will require a comprehensive in silico approach of Sequence, Domain, Phylogenetic and Structural analysis of the receptors, ligand screening and optimization and detailed Docking studies. This brief involves extensive role of the RAS subfamily that includes a set of proteins, which cause an over expression of cancer-causing genes like M-ras and initiate tumour formation in lungs. SNP Studies and Structure based ...

  7. Ras Signaling Regulates Stem Cells and Amelogenesis in the Mouse Incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X; Goodwin, A F; Tian, H; Jheon, A H; Klein, O D

    2017-11-01

    The role of Ras signaling during tooth development is poorly understood. Ras proteins-which are activated by many upstream pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinase cascades-signal through multiple effectors, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K pathways. Here, we utilized the mouse incisor as a model to study how the MAPK and PI3K pathways regulate dental epithelial stem cells and amelogenesis. The rodent incisor-which grows continuously throughout the life of the animal due to the presence of epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells-provides a model for the study of ectodermal organ renewal and regeneration. Utilizing models of Ras dysregulation as well as inhibitors of the MAPK and PI3K pathways, we found that MAPK and PI3K regulate dental epithelial stem cell activity, transit-amplifying cell proliferation, and enamel formation in the mouse incisor.

  8. RAS blockade in experimental renal transplantation. Benefits and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit-van Oosten, Annemieke; Stegeman, C.A.; Goor, van Harry

    2003-01-01

    In renal transplantation, chronic renal transplant failure (CRTF) is the principal cause of late graft loss. Both immunological and non-immunological factors play a role in the pathogenesis of CRTF. However, CRTF is unresponsive to immunosuppressive therapy. In several kidney diseases, inhibition of

  9. A thirty-year quest for a role of R-Ras in cancer: from an oncogene to a multitasking GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wai Nam; Yan, Mingfei; Chan, Andrew M

    2017-09-10

    Since the identification of R-Ras, which is the first Ras-related GTPase isolated based on sequence similarity to the classical RAS oncogene, more than 160 members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases have been identified and classified into the Ras, Rho, Rap, Rab, Ran, Arf, Rheb, RGK, Rad, Rit, and Miro subfamilies. R-Ras belongs to the Ras subfamily of small G-proteins, which are frequently implicated in cell growth and differentiation. Although the roles of R-Ras in cellular transformation and integrin-mediated cell adhesion have been extensively studied, the physiological function of this enigmatic G-protein was only revealed when a mouse strain deficient in R-Ras was generated. In parallel, a plethora of research findings also linked R-Ras with processes including tumor angiogenesis, axon guidance, and immune cell trafficking. Several upstream factors that modulate R-Ras GTP-binding were identified including Notch, semaphorin, and chemokine C-C motif ligand 21. A review of our evolving understanding of the role of R-Ras in oncogenesis is timely, as this year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication describing the cloning of R-Ras. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Recombinant expression of different mutant K-ras gene in pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cells and its effects on chemotherapy sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, TengFei; Zheng, YuanTing; Zhao, Bei; Li, Tao; Cheng, KeGuang; Cai, WeiMin

    2014-10-01

    K-ras is a member of ras gene family which is involved in cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. When a mutation occurs in ras gene, the activation of Ras proteins may be prolonged to induce oncogenesis. However, the relationship between K-ras mutation and clinical outcomes in pancreatic cancer patients treated with chemotherapy agents is still under debate. In this study, we constructed five pAcGFP1-C3 plasmids for different types of K-ras gene (WT, G12V, G12R, G12D, and G13D) and stably transfected human pancreatic cancer Bxpc-3 cells with these genes. The wild type and mutant clones showed a comparable growth and expression of K-Ras-GFP fusion protein. The expression of some K-ras mutations resulted in a reduced sensitivity to gefitinib, 5-FU, docetaxel and gemcitabine, while showed no effects on erlotinib or cisplatin. Moreover, compared with the wild type clone, K-Ras downstream signals (phospho-Akt and/or phospho-Erk) were increased in K-ras mutant clones. Interestingly, different types of K-ras mutation had non-identical K-Ras downstream signal activities and drug responses. Our results are the first to reveal the relationship between different K-ras mutation and drug sensitivities of these anti-cancer drugs in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

  11. The absence of an association between Interleukin 1β gene polymorphisms and recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ślebioda, Zuzanna; Kowalska, Anna; Rozmiarek, Marta; Krawiecka, Ewa; Szponar, Elżbieta; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2017-09-19

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a chronic, ulcerative disease with a probable polygenic mode of inheritance and complex etiology with a strong immunological background. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the IL-1β gene: IL-1β-511 T>C (rs16944) and IL-1β+3954C>T (rs1143634) and RAS susceptibility in a moderately large group of patients. One hundred and four patients with minor, major and herpetiform RAS and 75 healthy volunteers were genotyped at IL-1β-511 T>C (rs16944) and IL-1β+3954C>T (rs1143634) using the PCR-RFLP approach. The results were statistically analysed with chi-square test and test of difference between two rates of structure, with p<0.05 assumed to be a statistically significance level (Statistica 10, StatSoft(®), Kraków, Poland). There were no statistically significant differences in the genotype distribution for the IL-1β C[+3954]T polymorphism between the RAS and control groups. The frequency of IL-1β*T[-511]/*T[-511] homozygotes among the patients was significantly higher when compared to our study control (p<0.0347). The results after stratification into carriers and non-carriers of C and T alleles did not clearly indicate which SNP may be considered a risk factor for RAS. The genetic association between the studied SNPs of the IL-1β gene and RAS remains controversial and requires further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilizing ras signaling pathway to direct selective replication of herpes simplex virus-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Pan

    Full Text Available Re-engineering the tropism of viruses is an attractive translational strategy for targeting cancer cells. The Ras signal transduction pathway is a central hub for a variety of pro-oncogenic events with a fundamental role in normal and neoplastic physiology. In this work we were interested in linking Ras activation to HSV-1 replication in a direct manner in order to generate a novel oncolytic herpes virus which can target cancer cells. To establish such link, we developed a mutant HSV-1 in which the expression of ICP4 (infected cell protein-4, a viral protein necessary for replication is controlled by activation of ELK, a transcription factor down-stream of the Ras pathway and mainly activated by ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an important Ras effector pathway. This mutant HSV-1 was named as Signal-Smart 1 (SS1. A series of prostate cells were infected with the SS1 virus. Cells with elevated levels of ELK activation were preferentially infected by the SS1 virus, as demonstrated by increased levels of viral progeny, herpetic glycoprotein C and overall SS1 viral protein production. Upon exposure to SS1, the proliferation, invasiveness and colony formation capabilities of prostate cancer cells with increased ELK activation were significantly decreased (p<0.05, while the rate of apoptosis/necrosis in these cells was increased. Additionally, high Ras signaling cells infected with SS1 showed a prominent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle as compared to cells exposed to parental HSV-1. The results of this study reveal the potential for re-modeling the host-herpes interaction to specifically interfere with the life of cancer cells with increased Ras signaling. SS1 also serves as a "prototype" for development of a family of signal-smart viruses which can target cancer cells on the basis of their signaling portfolio.

  13. Ras conformational switching: simulating nucleotide-dependent conformational transitions with accelerated molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ras mediates signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation and development by cycling between GTP- and GDP-bound active and inactive conformational states. Understanding the complete reaction path of this conformational change and its intermediary structures is critical to understanding Ras signaling. We characterize nucleotide-dependent conformational transition using multiple-barrier-crossing accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations. These transitions, achieved for the first time for wild-type Ras, are impossible to observe with classical molecular dynamics (cMD simulations due to the large energetic barrier between end states. Mapping the reaction path onto a conformer plot describing the distribution of the crystallographic structures enabled identification of highly populated intermediate structures. These structures have unique switch orientations (residues 25-40 and 57-75 intermediate between GTP and GDP states, or distinct loop3 (46-49, loop7 (105-110, and alpha5 C-terminus (159-166 conformations distal from the nucleotide-binding site. In addition, these barrier-crossing trajectories predict novel nucleotide-dependent correlated motions, including correlations of alpha2 (residues 66-74 with alpha3-loop7 (93-110, loop2 (26-37 with loop10 (145-151, and loop3 (46-49 with alpha5 (152-167. The interconversion between newly identified Ras conformations revealed by this study advances our mechanistic understanding of Ras function. In addition, the pattern of correlated motions provides new evidence for a dynamic linkage between the nucleotide-binding site and the membrane interacting C-terminus critical for the signaling function of Ras. Furthermore, normal mode analysis indicates that the dominant collective motion that occurs during nucleotide-dependent conformational exchange, and captured in aMD (but absent in cMD simulations, is a low-frequency motion intrinsic to the structure.

  14. Prognostic significance of K-Ras mutation rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Cremolini, Chiara; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Russo, Antonio; Mannavola, Francesco; Perrone, Giuseppe; Pantano, Francesco; Loupakis, Fotios; Rossini, Daniele; Ongaro, Elena; Bonazzina, Erica; Dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Imperatori, Marco; Zoccoli, Alice; Bronte, Giuseppe; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fontanini, Gabriella; Natoli, Clara; Falcone, Alfredo; Santini, Daniele; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore; Tonini, Giuseppe; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-10-13

    Activating mutations of K-Ras gene have a well-established role as predictors of resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Their prognostic value is controversial, and no data regarding the prognostic value of mutation rate, defined as the percentage of mutated alleles/tumor sample, are available. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of K-Rasmutation rate in a homogenous cohort of mCRC patients receiving first-line doublet plus bevacizumab. This retrospective study enrolled 397 K-Ras mutant mCRC patients from 6 Italian centers, and 263 patients were fully evaluable for our analysis. K-Ras mutation rate was assessed by pyrosequencing. Patients with less than 60% of cancer cells in tumor tissue were excluded. No patients received anti-EGFR containing anticancer therapy, at any time. Median mutation rate was 40% and was adopted as cut-off. The primary and secondary endpoints were PFS and OS respectively. At univariate analysis, K-Ras mutation rate higher than 40% was significantly associated with lower PFS (7.3 vs 9.1 months; P < 0.0001) and OS (21 vs 31 months; P = 0.004). A multivariate model adjusted for age at diagnosis, site of origin of tumor tissue (primary vs metastases), referral center, number of metastatic sites, and first-line chemotherapy backbone, showed that K-Ras mutation rate remained a significant predictor of PFS and OS in the whole population. Our data demonstrate an association between K-Ras mutation rate and prognosis in mCRC patients treated with bevacizumab-containing first-line therapy. These data deserve to be verified in an independent validation set.

  15. Copy number variants including RAS pathway genes-How much RASopathy is in the phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissewski, Christina; Kant, Sarina G; Stark, Zornitza; Schanze, Ina; Zenker, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The RASopathies comprise a group of clinically overlapping developmental syndromes the common pathogenetic basis of which is dysregulated signal flow through the RAS-MAPK pathway. Mutations in several components or modifiers of the pathway have been identified in Noonan syndrome and related disorders. Over the past years copy number variants (CNVs) encompassing RAS pathway genes (PTPN11, RAF1, MEK2, or SHOC2) have been reported in children with developmental syndromes. These observations raised speculations that the associated phenotypes represent RASopathies, implying that the increased or reduced expression of the respective RAS pathway component and a consecutive dysregulation of RAS pathway signalling is responsible for the clinical picture. Herein, we present two individuals and three of their relatives harboring duplications of either 3p25.2 including the RAF1 locus or 19p13.3 including the MEK2 locus. Duplication carriers exhibited variable clinical phenotypes including non-specific facial dysmorphism, short stature, and learning difficulties. A careful review of the literature supported the impression that phenotypes associated with CNVs including RAS pathway genes commonly share non-specific symptoms with RASopathies, while the characteristic "gestalt" is lacking. Considering the known molecular pathogenesis of RASopathies, it is questionable that a modest increase in the expression of a functionally normal signaling component can mimic the effects of a qualitatively abnormal (hyperactive) mutant protein. We thus argue that current empirical and biological evidence is still insufficient to allow the conclusion that an altered copy number of a RAS pathway component is indeed the mechanism that is critical for the phenotype associated with CNVs including RASopathy genes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Consequences of RAS and MAPK activation in the ovary: the good, the bad and the ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Liu, Zhilin; Mullany, Lisa K.; Richards, JoAnne S.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes studies providing evidence 1) that endogenous RAS activation regulates important physiological events during ovulation and luteinization 2) that expression of the mutant, active KRASG12D in granulosa cells in vivo causes abnormal follicle growth arrest leading to premature ovarian failure and 3) that KRASG12D expression in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells renders them susceptible to the pathological outcome of transformation and tumor formation. These diverse effects of RAS highlight how critical its activation is linked to cell- and stage-specific events in the ovary that control normal processes and that can also lead to altered granulosa cell and OSE cell fates. PMID:22197887

  17. Muzeja IT infrastruktūras modernizēšana

    OpenAIRE

    Liparts, Arnis

    2014-01-01

    Kvalifikācijas darba nosaukums ir „Muzeja IT infrastruktūras modernizācija”. Darbā tiek aprakstīts kā tika modernizēts jau esošs un salīdzinoši sarežģīts datoru tīkls. Darbā lielā mērā tika izmantoti Mikrotik maršrutētāji IT infrastruktūras modernizācijai. Atslēgas vārdi : Karstvieta, automatizēšana, Mikrotik, IT

  18. Conformational SERS Classification of K-Ras Point Mutations for Cancer Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Masetti, Matteo; Garcia-Rico, Eduardo; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Guerrini, Luca

    2017-02-20

    Point mutations in Ras oncogenes are routinely screened for diagnostics and treatment of tumors (especially in colorectal cancer). Here, we develop an optical approach based on direct SERS coupled with chemometrics for the study of the specific conformations that single-point mutations impose on a relatively large fragment of the K-Ras gene (141 nucleobases). Results obtained offer the unambiguous classification of different mutations providing a potentially useful insight for diagnostics and treatment of cancer in a sensitive, fast, direct and inexpensive manner. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A Corpus-Based Lexical Study on Frequency and Distribution of Coxhead's Awl Word Families in Medical Research Articles (RAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Guang-Chun, Ge

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a lexical study on the word frequency and the text coverage of the 570 word families from Coxhead's Academic Word List (AWL) in medical research articles (RAs) based on a corpus of 50 medical RAs written in English with 190425 running words. By computer analysis, we found that the text coverage of the AWL words accounted for around…

  20. GTPase-activating protein SH2-SH3 domains induce gene expression in a Ras-dependent fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, R.H.; Laat, W.L. de; Martin, G.A.; Mccormick, F.; Bos, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The p21ras GTPase-activating protein (GAP) is thought to function as both a negative regulator and a downstream target of p21ras. Here, we have investigated the role of GAP by using a transient expression assay with a fos luciferase reporter plasmid. We used GAP deletion mutants that lack the domain

  1. Product (P1) from project 0-6738 : performance studies and future directions for mixes containing RAP and RAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In recent years both reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) have been widely used in asphalt mixes by the asphalt paving industry in Texas. The use of RAP and RAS can save tax payers money, and it is also good for the...

  2. Heterotrophic bacterial production on solid fish waste: TAN and nitrate as nitrogen source under practical RAS conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, O.; Sereti, V.; Eding, E.H.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The drumfilter effluent from a recirculation aquaculture system (RAS) can be used as substrate for heterotrophic bacteria production. This biomass can be re-used as aquatic feed. RAS effluents are rich in nitrate and low in total ammonia nitrogen (TAN). This might result in 20% lower bacteria

  3. HIV-1/cocaine induced oxidative stress disrupts tight junction protein-1 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells: role of Ras/ERK1/2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjali Dalvi

    Full Text Available Intravenous drug use (IVDU is the major risk factor in the development of HIV-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (HRPAH; however, the pathogenesis of HRPAH in association with IVDU has yet to be characterized. Endothelial injury is considered to be an initiating factor for pulmonary vascular remodeling in animal models of PAH. Our previous study shows that simultaneous exposure to HIV-Trans-activator of transcription (Tat and cocaine exacerbates both disruption of tight junction proteins and permeability of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells compared with either treatment alone. We here now demonstrate that this HIV-Tat and cocaine mediated endothelial dysfunction accompanies with increase in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals generation and involves redox sensitive signaling pathway. Pretreatment with antioxidant cocktail attenuated the cocaine and Tat mediated disassembly of Zonula Occludens (ZO-1 and enhancement of endothelial monolayer permeability. Furthermore, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin or siRNA-mediated knockdown of gp-91(phox abolished the Tat/cocaine-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, suggesting the NADPH oxidase mediated generation of oxidative radicals. In addition, ROS dependent activation of Ras and ERK1/2 Kinase was observed to be mediating the TJP-1 disassembly, and endothelial dysfunction in response to cocaine and Tat exposure. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Tat/cocaine -mediated production of ROS activate Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 pathway that contributes to disruption of tight junction protein leading to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction associated with pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  4. CREBBP knockdown enhances RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling in Ras pathway mutated acute lymphoblastic leukemia but does not modulate chemotherapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Zach A; Nicholson, Lindsay; Zeppetzauer, Martin; Matheson, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Paul; Harrison, Christine J; Irving, Julie A E

    2017-04-01

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in young people and new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve outcome. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous inactivating mutations in the histone acetyl transferase, CREBBP , are particularly frequent in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and associated with a hyperdiploid karyotype and KRAS mutations. To study the functional impact of CREBBP haploinsufficiency in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, RNA interference was used to knock down expression of CREBBP in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines and various primagraft acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We demonstrate that attenuation of CREBBP results in reduced acetylation of histone 3 lysine 18, but has no significant impact on cAMP-dependent target gene expression. Impaired induction of glucocorticoid receptor targets was only seen in 1 of 4 CREBBP knockdown models, and there was no significant difference in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, sensitivity to other acute lymphoblastic leukemia chemotherapeutics or histone deacetylase inhibitors. Importantly, we show that CREBBP directly acetylates KRAS and that CREBBP knockdown enhances signaling of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in Ras pathway mutated acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, which are still sensitive to MEK inhibitors. Thus, CREBBP mutations might assist in enhancing oncogenic RAS signaling in acute lymphoblastic leukemia but do not alter response to MEK inhibitors. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  5. A mouse homologue of the Drosophila tumor suppressor l(2)tid gene defines a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP)-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentin, G A; Yin, X; Tahir, S; Lhotak, S; Farhang-Fallah, J; Li, Y; Rozakis-Adcock, M

    2001-04-20

    p120 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) down-regulates Ras by stimulating GTP hydrolysis of active Ras. In addition to its association with Ras, GAP has been shown to bind to several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in cells stimulated by growth factors or expressing transforming tyrosine kinase variants. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a novel GAP-binding protein, mTid-1, a DnaJ chaperone protein that represents the murine homolog of the Drosophila tumor suppressor l(2)tid gene. Three alternatively spliced variants of mTid-1 were isolated, two of which correspond to the recently identified hTid-1(L) and hTid-1(S) forms of the human TID1 gene that exhibit opposing effects on apoptosis. We demonstrate that both cytoplasmic precursor and mitochondrial mature forms of mTid-1 associate with GAP in vivo. Interestingly, although mTid-1 is found tyrosine-phosphorylated in v-src-transformed fibroblast cells, GAP selectively binds to the unphosphorylated form of mTid-1. In immunofluorescence experiments, GAP and Tid-1 were shown to colocalize at perinuclear mitochondrial membranes in response to epidermal growth factor stimulation. These findings raise the possibility that Tid chaperone proteins may play a role in governing the conformation, activity, and/or subcellular distribution of GAP, thereby influencing its biochemical and biological activity within cells.

  6. Deregulation of the Egfr/Ras Signaling Pathway Induces Age-related Brain Degeneration in the Drosophila Mutant vap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, José A.; Kretzschmar, Doris; Kiermayer, Claudia; Feldmann, Pascale; Hughes, David A.; Schneuwly, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    Ras signaling has been shown to play an important role in promoting cell survival in many different tissues. Here we show that upregulation of Ras activity in adult Drosophila neurons induces neuronal cell death, as evident from the phenotype of vacuolar peduncle (vap) mutants defective in the Drosophila RasGAP gene, which encodes a Ras GTPase-activating protein. These mutants show age-related brain degeneration that is dependent on activation of the EGF receptor signaling pathway in adult neurons, leading to autophagic cell death (cell death type 2). These results provide the first evidence for a requirement of Egf receptor activity in differentiated adult Drosophila neurons and show that a delicate balance of Ras activity is essential for the survival of adult neurons. PMID:12529440

  7. Applying 1D Sediment Models to Reservoir Flushing Studies: Measuring, Monitoring, and Modeling the Spencer Dam Sediment Flush with HEC-RAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    originator. Applying 1D Sediment Models to Reservoir Flushing Studies: Measuring, Monitoring, and Modeling the Spencer Dam Sediment Flush with HEC - RAS ... HEC - RAS ), and (2) to determine the model’s applicability for flushing applications. HEC - RAS is a one- dimensional (1D) numerical hydraulics and...sediment model. Reservoir flushing events generally have no historic precedent, so they cannot be calibrated. If HEC - RAS performs well on a carefully

  8. Loss of Apc allows phenotypic manifestation of the transforming properties of an endogenous K-ras oncogene in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, Owen J; Meniel, Valerie; Wilkins, Julie A; Cole, Alicia M; Oien, Karin A; Marsh, Victoria; Jamieson, Thomas J; Guerra, Carmen; Ashton, Gabrielle H; Barbacid, Mariano; Clarke, Alan R

    2006-09-19

    Oncogenic mutations in the K-ras gene occur in approximately 50% of human colorectal cancers. However, the precise role that K-ras oncogenes play in tumor formation is still unclear. To address this issue, we have conditionally expressed an oncogenic K-ras(V12) allele in the small intestine of adult mice either alone or in the context of Apc deficiency. We found that expression of K-ras(V12) does not affect normal intestinal homeostasis or the immediate phenotypes associated with Apc deficiency. Mechanistically we failed to find activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, which may be a consequence of the up-regulation of a number of negative feedback loops. However, K-ras(V12) expression accelerates intestinal tumorigenesis and confers invasive properties after Apc loss over the long term. In renal epithelium, expression of the oncogenic K-ras(V12) allele in the absence of Apc induces the rapid development of renal carcinoma. These tumors, unlike those of intestinal origin, display activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK and Akt signaling pathways. Taken together, these data indicate that normal intestinal and kidney epithelium are resistant to malignant transformation by an endogenous K-ras oncogene. However, activation of K-ras(V12) after Apc loss results in increased tumorigenesis with distinct kinetics. Whereas the effect of K-ras oncogenes in the intestine can been observed only after long latencies, they result in rapid carcinogenesis in the kidney epithelium. These data imply a window of opportunity for anti-K-ras therapies after tumor initiation in preventing tumor growth and invasion.

  9. Low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide or nitrite induced of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cell proliferation in a Ras-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Eliza Coronel Janu Haniu

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, should be able to adapt to dramatic environmental changes inside the infected host after inhalation of air-borne conidia and transition to pathogenic yeasts. Proteins with antioxidant functions may protect fungal cells against reactive oxygen (ROS and nitrogen (RNS species generated by phagocytic cells, thus acting as potential virulence factors. Ras GTPases are involved in stress responses, cell morphology, and differentiation in a range of organisms. Ras, in its activated form, interacts with effector proteins and can initiate a kinase cascade. In lower eukaryotes, Byr2 kinase represents a Ras target. The present study investigated the role of Ras in P. brasiliensis after in vitro stimulus with ROS or RNS. We have demonstrated that low concentrations of H2O2 (0.1 mM or NO2 (0.1-0.25 µM stimulated P. brasiliensis yeast cell proliferation and that was not observed when yeast cells were pre-incubated with farnesyltransferase inhibitor. We constructed an expression plasmid containing the Byr2 Ras-binding domain (RBD fused with GST (RBD-Byr2-GST to detect the Ras active form. After stimulation with low concentrations of H2O2 or NO2, the Ras active form was observed in fungal extracts. Besides, NO2 induced a rapid increase in S-nitrosylated Ras levels. This alternative posttranslational modification of Ras, probably in residue Cys123, would lead to an exchange of GDP for GTP and consequent GTPase activation in P. brasiliensis. In conclusion, low concentrations of H2O2 or NO2 stimulated P. brasiliensis proliferation through Ras activation.

  10. Interaction between the p21ras GTPase activating protein and the insulin receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, G.J.; Medema, R.H.; Burgering, B.M.T.; Clark, R.; McCormick, F.; Bos, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of the p21ras-GTPase activating protein (GAP) in insulin-induced signal transduction. In cells overexpressing the insulin receptor, we did not observe association between GAP and the insulin receptor after insulin treatment nor the phosphorylation of GAP on tyrosine

  11. The effectiveness of vitamin B12 in preventing minor Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis(RAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izzatul Syafiqah Bt Abd Samad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Minor type of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS is the most common oral lesion among the populations especially in second decade. There are a lot of predisposing factors which may caused Minor type of RAS and one of them is nutritional deficiency include vitamin B12 deficiency. The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of vitamin B12 in preventing Minor type of RAS. Randomised sampling; double blind, parallel design experimental of 30 students from faculty of dentistry in Padjadjaran university. All samples were divided into two groups and each group was given 100 mcg and 50 mcg of vitamin B12, they consumed one tablet for 1 month. Mann Whitney test was used to analyze the data. Result showed there were difference numbers of sample who still have ulcer between two groups after a month. As statistically, there was no significance difference in group of 50 mcg (p-value=0.073, but there was significant differences significant in group of 100 mcg (p-value=0.000 and there was no different significance in data between 50 mcg and 100 mcg vitamin B12 (p-value =0.367 for ulcer and different significance (p-value=0.011 for non ulcer. Conclusion: vitamin B12 is effective in preventing minor type of RAS in dosages 100 mcg and 50 mcg, but statistically 100 mcg of tablet vitamin B12 is more effective than 50 mcg.

  12. Demonstration of pb-PSHA with Ras-Elhekma earthquake, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergany, Elsayed; Hutchings, Lawrence

    2017-06-01

    The main goal of this work is to: (1) argue for the importance of a physically-based probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (pb-PSHA) methodology and show examples to support the argument from recent events, (2) demonstrate the methodology with the ground motion simulations of May 28, 1998, Mw = 5.5 Ras-Elhekma earthquake, north Egypt. The boundaries for the possible rupture parameters that may have been identified prior to the 1998 Ras-Elhekma earthquake were estimated. A range of simulated ground-motions for the Ras-Elhekma earthquake was ;predicted; for frequency 0.5-25 Hz at three sites, where the large earthquake was recorded, with average epicentral distances of 220 km. The best rupture model of the 1998 Ras-Elhekma earthquake was identified by calculated the goodness of fit between observed and synthesized records at sites FYM, HAG, and KOT. We used the best rupture scenario of the 1998 earthquake to synthesize the ground motions at interested sites where the main shock was not recorded. Based on the good fit of simulated and observed seismograms, we concluded that this methodology can provide realistic ground motion of an earthquake and highly recommended for engineering purposes in advance or foregoing large earthquakes at non record sites. We propose that there is a need for this methodology for good-representing the true hazard with reducing uncertainties.

  13. ATF1 and RAS in exosomes are potential clinical diagnostic markers for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanhua; Wang, Wei; Yang, Baozhi; Tian, Hongge

    2017-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. It is highly lethal yet can be treated when found in early stage. Thus, early detection is of significant important for early diagnosis of cervical cancer. Exosomes have been used as biomarkers in clinical diagnosis. It is unknown that whether blood exosomes associated with cervical cancer can be detected and if these exosomes can accurately represent the developmental stage of cervical cancer. Mouse models were made out of a relapsed cervical cancer patient's tumour sample for original and recurrent cervical cancer, and gene analysis in both tumours and exosomes in these mouse models were performed. We found that activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) and RAS genes were significantly up-regulated in tumours of both primary and recurrent cervical cancer mouse model, and they can also be detected in the blood exosomes of the mouse model. Our results indicated that ATF1 and RAS could be potential candidate biomarkers for cervical cancer in early diagnosis. ATF1 and RAS genes were found significantly elevated in tumours of primary and recurrent cervical cancer mouse model, and they were also detected in the blood exosomes. Therefore, ATF1 and RAS could be used as a diagnostic marker for cervical cancer in the future. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Report Task 2.3: Particulate waste and turbidity in (marine) RAS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kals, J.; Schram, E.; Brummelhuis, E.B.M.; Bakel, van B.

    2006-01-01

    Particulate waste management and removal is one of the most problematic parts of recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS). Particulate waste and thereby turbidity originates from three major sources: fish (faeces), feed and biofilm (heterotrophic bacteria and fungi). Based on size and density there

  15. Animal products and K-ras codon 12 and 13 mutations in colon carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.; Voskuil, D.W.; Kraats, van A.A.; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Goldbohm, R.S.; Veer, van 't P.

    2000-01-01

    K-ras gene mutations (codons 12 and 13) were determined by PCR-based mutant allele-specific amplification (MASA) in tumour tissue of 185 colon cancer patients: 36␑arboured mutations, of which 82 ere located in codon 12. High intakes of animal protein, calcium and poultry were differently associated

  16. Targeting mutant RAS in patient-derived colorectal cancer organoids by combinatorial drug screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verissimo, Carla S; Overmeer, René M; Ponsioen, Bas; Drost, Jarno; Mertens, Sander; Verlaan-Klink, Ingrid; Gerwen, Bastiaan van; van der Ven, Marieke; Wetering, Marc van de; Egan, David A; Bernards, René; Clevers, Hans; Bos, Johannes L; Snippert, Hugo J

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) organoids can be derived from almost all CRC patients and therefore capture the genetic diversity of this disease. We assembled a panel of CRC organoids carrying either wild-type or mutant RAS, as well as normal organoids and tumor organoids with a CRISPR-introduced oncogenic

  17. Impact of temperature on ammonium and nitrite removal rates in RAS moving bed biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinyage, John Peter Hewa; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2016-01-01

    by using moving bed bio-elements from a freshwater RAS in steady state operated at 18 °C. The impact of temperature on ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates was evaluated by transferring the colonized bio elements to six liter batch reactors (triplicated setup). Each reactor was acclimatized for 24 h...

  18. study and analysis of asa river hypothetical dam break using hec-ras

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A hypothetical dam break on Asa Dam located in Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria was analyzed using United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Hydrologic Engineering Center's River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) computer model. Unsteady flow simulation was performed using geometric data obtained from Digital ...

  19. RAS Corner at the ATRF Library Keeps You Up-to-Date on the Research | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Robin Meckley, Contributing Writer The new RAS initiative recently undertaken at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research has prompted the Scientific Library to provide support in a creative way to the laboratories at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), where the research is centered.

  20. Murine fibroblasts lacking p21 undergo senescence and are resistant to transformation by oncogenic Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, C; Serrano, M

    1999-09-02

    The cell-cycle inhibitor p21 is upregulated during senescence and upon induction of senescence-like arrest by oncogenic Ras. We have used primary fibroblasts derived from p21-null mice to evaluate the role of p21 in these processes. We find that primary p21-/- cells enter senescence and have a lifespan similar to wild-type cells. Upon immortalization, most wild-type and p21-/- cultures acquire alterations in either p53 or p16INK4a, further indicating that p21-deficiency is not sufficient by itself to allow immortalization. Primary p21-/- cells, like wild-type cells, respond to oncogenic Ras by accumulating p53 and p16INK4a, and by decreasing their proliferation rate. In agreement with this, p21-/- cells are refractory to neoplasic transformation by oncogenic Ras when compared to p53-/- cells. We conclude that, in murine fibroblasts, p21 is not essential neither for senescence nor for preventing neoplasic transformation by oncogenic Ras.

  1. K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Pachen, M.M.M.; Smits, K.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Activation of K-ras oncogene has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, being mutated in 30-60% of the adenocarcinomas. In this study, 737 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, originating from 120 852 men and women (55-69 years at baseline) participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study

  2. Fat and K-ras mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Schouten, L.J.; Koedijk, F.D.H.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Associations between dietary intake of various fats and specific K-ras mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC) were investigated within the framework of The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (NLCS). After 7.3 years of follow-up and with exclusion of the first 2.3 years, 448 colon and 160

  3. Ras/MAPK Modifier Loci Revealed by eQTL in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterken, Mark G.; Bemmelen-van der Plaat, van Linda; Riksen, Joost A.; Rodriguez, Miriam; Schmid, Tobias; Hajnal, Alex; Kammenga, Jan E.; Snoek, Basten L.

    2017-01-01

    The oncogenic Ras/MAPK pathway is evolutionarily conserved across metazoans. Yet, almost all our knowledge on this pathway comes from studies using single genetic backgrounds, whereas mutational effects can be highly background dependent. Therefore, we lack insight in the interplay between genetic

  4. Mutated N-ras does not induce p19 in CO25 cell line

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kamel

    2012-06-28

    Jun 28, 2012 ... The mouse cell line (CO25) used in this study was transfected with a glucocorticoid inducible mutated human N-ras oncogene under transcriptional control of the steroid-sensitive promoter of the mouse mammary tumors virus long terminal repeat MMTV-LTR. This study was aimed to investigate the.

  5. Demonstration of pb-PSHA with Ras-Elhekma earthquake, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed Fergany

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is to: (1 argue for the importance of a physically-based probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (pb-PSHA methodology and show examples to support the argument from recent events, (2 demonstrate the methodology with the ground motion simulations of May 28, 1998, Mw = 5.5 Ras-Elhekma earthquake, north Egypt. The boundaries for the possible rupture parameters that may have been identified prior to the 1998 Ras-Elhekma earthquake were estimated. A range of simulated ground-motions for the Ras-Elhekma earthquake was “predicted” for frequency 0.5–25 Hz at three sites, where the large earthquake was recorded, with average epicentral distances of 220 km. The best rupture model of the 1998 Ras-Elhekma earthquake was identified by calculated the goodness of fit between observed and synthesized records at sites FYM, HAG, and KOT. We used the best rupture scenario of the 1998 earthquake to synthesize the ground motions at interested sites where the main shock was not recorded. Based on the good fit of simulated and observed seismograms, we concluded that this methodology can provide realistic ground motion of an earthquake and highly recommended for engineering purposes in advance or foregoing large earthquakes at non record sites. We propose that there is a need for this methodology for good-representing the true hazard with reducing uncertainties.

  6. RAS1, a quantitative trait locus for salt tolerance and ABA sensitivity in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Zhonghai

    2010-03-08

    Soil salinity limits agricultural production and is a major obstacle for feeding the growing world population. We used natural genetic variation in salt tolerance among different Arabidopsis accessions to map a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for salt tolerance and abscisic acid (ABA) sensitivity during seed germination and early seedling growth. A recombinant inbred population derived from Landsberg erecta (Ler; salt and ABA sensitive) x Shakdara (Sha; salt and ABA resistant) was used for QTL mapping. High-resolution mapping and cloning of this QTL, Response to ABA and Salt 1 (RAS1), revealed that it is an ABA- and salt stress-inducible gene and encodes a previously undescribed plant-specific protein. A premature stop codon results in a truncated RAS1 protein in Sha. Reducing the expression of RAS1 by transfer-DNA insertion in Col or RNA interference in Ler leads to decreased salt and ABA sensitivity, whereas overexpression of the Ler allele but not the Sha allele causes increased salt and ABA sensitivity. Our results suggest that RAS1 functions as a negative regulator of salt tolerance during seed germination and early seedling growth by enhancing ABA sensitivity and that its loss of function contributes to the increased salt tolerance of Sha.

  7. Dictyostelium chemotaxis : essential Ras activation and accessory signalling pathways for amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortholt, Arjan; Kataria, Rama; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Van Egmond, Wouter N.; Khanna, Ankita; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Central to chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which cells exhibit directed movement in shallow gradients of a chemoattractant. We used Dictyostelium mutants to investigate the minimal requirements for chemotaxis, and identified a basal signalling module providing activation of Ras at the

  8. RAS Ookeani pankrot läks riigile maksma ligi veerand miljardit / Marika Roomere

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roomere, Marika

    2007-01-01

    Valitsus eraldas reservist ligi 243 miljonit krooni pankrotis RAS Ookeaniga seotud välispankade kahjunõude katteks, täites sellega Rahvusvahelise Investeeringuvaidluste Lahendamise Keskuse (ICSID) vahekohtu 19. nov. otsuse. Kommenteerivad rahandusminister Ivari Padar, justiitsminister Rein Lang ja pankrotihaldur Arno Mägi

  9. Parasexual genetics of Dictyostelium gene disruptions: identification of a ras pathway using diploids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insall Robert H

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relative ease of targeted gene disruption in the social amoeba Dictyostelium has stimulated its widespread use as an experimental organism for cell and developmental biology. However, the field has been hamstrung by the lack of techniques to recombine disrupted genes. Results We describe new techniques for parasexual fusion of strains in liquid medium, selection and maintenance of the resulting stable diploid strains, and segregation to make recombined haploids. We have used these techniques to isolate rasS/gefB double nulls. The phenotypes of these mutants are no more severe than either parent, with movement, phagocytosis and fluid-phase endocytosis affected to the same degree as in rasS or gefB single nulls. In addition, we have produced diploids from one AX2- and one AX3-derived parent, providing an axenic strain with fewer secondary phenotypes than has been previously available. Conclusions The phenotype of the rasS/gefB double mutant suggests that the RasS and GefB proteins lie on the same linear pathway. In addition, axenic diploids and the techniques to generate, maintain and segregate them will be productive tools for future work on Dictyostelium. They will particularly facilitate generation of multiple mutants and manuipulation of essential genes.

  10. Resequencing analysis of the candidate tyrosine kinase and RAS pathway gene families in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucthagowder, Vishwanathan; Meyer, Rekha; Mullins, Chelsea; Nagarajan, Rakesh; DiPersio, John F; Vij, Ravi; Tomasson, Michael H; Kulkarni, Shashikant

    2012-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable, B-cell malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation and accumulation of malignant plasma cells in bone marrow. Despite recent advances in the understanding of genomic aberrations, a comprehensive catalogue of clinically actionable mutations in MM is just beginning to emerge. The tyrosine kinase (TK) and RAS oncogenes, which encode important regulators of various signaling pathways, are among the most frequently altered gene families in cancer. To clarify the role of TK and RAS genes in the pathogenesis of MM, we performed a systematic, targeted screening of mutations on prioritized RAS and TK genes, in CD138-sorted bone marrow specimens from 42 untreated patients. We identified a total of 24 mutations in the KRAS, PIK3CA, INSR, LTK, and MERTK genes. In particular, seven novel mutations in addition to known KRAS mutations were observed. Prediction analysis tools PolyPhen and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) were used to assess the functional significance of these novel mutations. Our analysis predicted that these mutations may have a deleterious effect, resulting in the functional alteration of proteins involved in the pathogenesis of myeloma. While further investigation is needed to determine the functional consequences of these proteins, mutational testing of the RAS and TK genes in larger myeloma cohorts might also be useful to establish the recurrent nature of these mutations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Copy number variants of Ras/MAPK pathway genes in patients with isolated cryptorchidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, F; Vallejos, C; Giraudo, F; Unanue, N; Hernández, M I; Godoy, P; Célis, S; Martín-Arenas, R; Palomares-Bralo, M; Heath, K E; López, M T; Cassorla, F

    2017-09-01

    Cryptorchidism is the most common congenital disorder in boys, but the cause for most cases remains unknown. Patients with Noonan Syndrome are characterized by a typical face, growth retardation, congenital heart defects, learning disabilities and cryptorchidism. Copy number variations of Ras/MAPK pathway genes are unusual in patients with several clinical features of Noonan Syndrome; however, they have not been studied in patients with only one feature of this condition, such as cryptorchidism. Our aim was to determine whether patients with isolated cryptorchidism exhibit Ras/MAPK pathway gene copy number variations (CNVs). Fifty-nine patients with isolated cryptorchidism and negative for mutations in genes associated with Noonan Syndrome were recruited. Determination of Ras/MAPK pathway gene CNVs was performed by Comparative Genome Hybridization array. A CNV was identified in two individuals, a ~175 kb microduplication at 3p25.2, partially including RAF1. A similar RAF1 microduplication has been observed in a patient with testicular aplasia. This suggests that some patients with isolated cryptorchidism may harbor Ras/MAPK pathway gene CNVs. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  12. Mutated N-ras does not induce p19 arf in CO25 cell line | Saleh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mouse cell line (CO25) used in this study was transfected with a glucocorticoid inducible mutated human N-ras oncogene under transcriptional control of the steroid-sensitive promoter of the mouse mammary tumors virus long terminal repeat MMTV-LTR. This study was aimed to investigate the expression of p19arf and ...

  13. Clinical relevance of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer: Experience in a Mexican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cabrera-Mendoza

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: No relation was found between the K-ras oncogene mutation and reduced survival, in contrast to what has been established in the international medical literature. Further studies that include both a larger number of patients and those receiving monoclonal treatment, need to be conducted. There were only 5 patients in the present study that received cetuximab, resulting in a misleading analysis.

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-RAS status in two cohorts of squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Laethem Jean-Luc

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the availability of effective anti-EGFR therapies for various solid malignancies, such as non-cell small lung cancer, colorectal cancer and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, the knowledge of EGFR and K-RAS status becomes clinically important. The aim of this study was to analyse EGFR expression, EGFR gene copy number and EGFR and K-RAS mutations in two cohorts of squamous cell carcinomas, specifically anal canal and tonsil carcinomas. Methods Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from anal and tonsil carcinoma were used. EGFR protein expression and EGFR gene copy number were analysed by means of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The somatic status of the EGFR gene was investigated by PCR using primers specific for exons 18 through 21. For the K-RAS gene, PCR was performed using exon 2 specific primers. Results EGFR immunoreactivity was present in 36/43 (83.7% of anal canal and in 20/24 (83.3% of tonsil squamous cell carcinomas. EGFR amplification was absent in anal canal tumours (0/23, but could be identified in 4 of 24 tonsil tumours. From 38 anal canal specimens, 26 specimens were successfully analysed for exon 18, 30 for exon 19, 34 for exon 20 and 30 for exon 21. No EGFR mutations were found in the investigated samples. Thirty samples were sequenced for K-RAS exon 2 and no mutation was identified. From 24 tonsil specimens, 22 were successfully analysed for exon 18 and all 24 specimens for exon 19, 20 and 21. No EGFR mutations were found. Twenty-two samples were sequenced for K-RAS exon 2 and one mutation c.53C > A was identified. Conclusion EGFR mutations were absent from squamous cell carcinoma of the anus and tonsils, but EGFR protein expression was detected in the majority of the cases. EGFR amplification was seen in tonsil but not in anal canal carcinomas. In our investigated panel, only one mutation in the K-RAS gene of a tonsil squamous cell carcinoma was identified

  15. Cytogenetic characterization and H-ras associated transformation of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larivee Siobhan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Immortalization is a key step in malignant transformation, but immortalization alone is insufficient for transformation. Human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC transformation is a complex process that requires additional genetic changes beyond immortalization and can be accomplished in vitro by accumulation of genetic changes and expression of H-ras. Methods HMEC were immortalized by serial passaging and transduction with the catalytic subunit of the human telomerase gene (hTERT. The immortalized cells were passaged in vitro and studied by a combination of G- banding and Spectral Karyotyping (SKY. H-ras transduced, hTERT immortalized cells were cloned in soft agar and injected into nude mice. Extensive analysis was performed on the tumors that developed in nude mice, including immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Results Immortal HMEC alone were not tumorigenic in γ-irradiated nude mice and could not grow in soft agar. Late passage hTERT immortalized HMEC from a donor transduced with a retroviral vector containing the mutant, autoactive, human H-ras61L gene acquired anchorage independent growth properties and the capacity for tumorigenic growth in vivo. The tumors that developed in the nude mice were poorly differentiated epithelial carcinomas that continued to overexpress ras. These cells were resistant to doxorubicin mediated G1/S phase arrest but were sensitive to treatment with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Conclusion Some of the cytogenetic changes are similar to what is observed in premalignant and malignant breast lesions. Despite these changes, late passage immortal HMEC are not tumorigenic and could only be transformed with overexpression of a mutant H-ras oncogene.

  16. Ras GTPase-activating protein regulation of actin cytoskeleton and hyphal polarity in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harispe, Laura; Portela, Cecilia; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Peñalva, Miguel A; Gorfinkiel, Lisette

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans gapA1, a mutation leading to compact, fluffy colonies and delayed polarity establishment, maps to a gene encoding a Ras GTPase-activating protein. Domain organization and phylogenetic analyses strongly indicate that GapA regulates one or more "true" Ras proteins. A gapADelta strain is viable. gapA colonies are more compact than gapA1 colonies and show reduced conidiation. gapADelta strains have abnormal conidiophores, characterized by the absence of one of the two layers of sterigmata seen in the wild type. gapA transcript levels are very low in conidia but increase during germination and reach their maximum at a time coincident with germ tube emergence. Elevated levels persist in hyphae. In germinating conidiospores, gapADelta disrupts the normal coupling of isotropic growth, polarity establishment, and mitosis, resulting in a highly heterogeneous cell population, including malformed germlings and a class of giant cells with no germ tubes and a multitude of nuclei. Unlike wild-type conidia, gapADelta conidia germinate without a carbon source. Giant multinucleated spores and carbon source-independent germination have been reported in strains carrying a rasA dominant active allele, indicating that GapA downregulates RasA. gapADelta cells show a polarity maintenance defect characterized by apical swelling and subapical branching. The strongly polarized wild-type F-actin distribution is lost in gapADelta cells. As GapA-green fluorescent protein shows cortical localization with strong predominance at the hyphal tips, we propose that GapA-mediated downregulation of Ras signaling at the plasma membrane of these tips is involved in the polarization of the actin cytoskeleton that is required for hyphal growth and, possibly, for asexual morphogenesis.

  17. Ras GTPase-Activating Protein Regulation of Actin Cytoskeleton and Hyphal Polarity in Aspergillus nidulans▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harispe, Laura; Portela, Cecilia; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Gorfinkiel, Lisette

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans gapA1, a mutation leading to compact, fluffy colonies and delayed polarity establishment, maps to a gene encoding a Ras GTPase-activating protein. Domain organization and phylogenetic analyses strongly indicate that GapA regulates one or more “true” Ras proteins. A gapAΔ strain is viable. gapA colonies are more compact than gapA1 colonies and show reduced conidiation. gapAΔ strains have abnormal conidiophores, characterized by the absence of one of the two layers of sterigmata seen in the wild type. gapA transcript levels are very low in conidia but increase during germination and reach their maximum at a time coincident with germ tube emergence. Elevated levels persist in hyphae. In germinating conidiospores, gapAΔ disrupts the normal coupling of isotropic growth, polarity establishment, and mitosis, resulting in a highly heterogeneous cell population, including malformed germlings and a class of giant cells with no germ tubes and a multitude of nuclei. Unlike wild-type conidia, gapAΔ conidia germinate without a carbon source. Giant multinucleated spores and carbon source-independent germination have been reported in strains carrying a rasA dominant active allele, indicating that GapA downregulates RasA. gapAΔ cells show a polarity maintenance defect characterized by apical swelling and subapical branching. The strongly polarized wild-type F-actin distribution is lost in gapAΔ cells. As GapA-green fluorescent protein shows cortical localization with strong predominance at the hyphal tips, we propose that GapA-mediated downregulation of Ras signaling at the plasma membrane of these tips is involved in the polarization of the actin cytoskeleton that is required for hyphal growth and, possibly, for asexual morphogenesis. PMID:18039943

  18. K-ras Mutation in Colorectal Cancer, A Report from Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Omidifar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are very few studies about K-ras mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC from developing countries such as Iran. It is therefore essential to conduct studies to learn about the molecular signature of such tumors, allowing the determination of an appropriate management plan. In the present study, we aimed to determine the frequency and types of K-ras mutations among patients with CRC in Iran. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of 100 cases of CRC were collected from hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (June 2011 to June 2013. All of the H&E slides were examined and proper slide with a minimum of necrosis and maximum of well-preserved tumor cells (at least 70% tumor in each slide were selected. Recurrent, metastatic, and post chemotherapy cases were excluded from the study. Mutation of codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene by PCR was performed, followed by direct sequencing by Sanger method. From 100 eligible cases (55 male and 45 females with mean age of 59 years, 32% had mutant K-ras gene; the most common substitution was 12G>C followed by 12G>A and 13G>A, respectively. It is found that K-ras mutation rate, among the selected population of the southern province of Iran, was as high as 32% (codon 12: 71.8% and in codon 13: 25% and one in both codons: 3.1%.

  19. Mutation Screening of Her-2, N-ras and Nf1 Genes in Brain Tumor Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapijakis, Christos; Adamopoulou, Maria; Tasiouka, Konstantina; Voumvourakis, Costas; Stranjalis, George

    2016-09-01

    A deeper understanding of the complex molecular pathology of brain malignancies is needed in order to develop more effective and targeted therapies of these highly lethal disorders. In an effort to further enlighten the molecular pathology of brain oncogenesis involving the her-2 (erbB-2/neu/ngl)/N-ras/nf1 pathway, we screened the genotypes of specimens from various types of brain tumors. The studied specimens included 35 biopsies of four general categories: 13 neuroglial tumors (4 astrocytomas, 2 oligodendrogliomas, 7 glioblastomas multiforme), 14 meningiomas, 3 other nervous system tumors (2 schwannomas, 1 craniopharyngioma) and 5 metastatic tumors (such as lung carcinomas and chronic myelocytic leukemia). Screening for most common mutations in oncogenes her-2, N-ras and tumor suppressor gene nf1 was conducted with molecular hybridization techniques (Southern blotting, dot blot and single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, respectively), and was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Gene amplification of her-2 was observed in only two cases (6%), namely in one glioblastoma and in one meningioma. Screening of 3 hot spot codons of the N-ras gene (12, 13 and 61) and subsequent DNA sequencing revealed mutations in 19 biopsies encompassing all categories (54%). Screening for mutations in exons of the nf1 gene by SSCP analysis detected a novel nonsense mutation in exon 31 in a unique case of a glioblastoma biopsy (3%) taken from a patient without neurofibromatosis type I. Activated N-ras appears to be a major oncogene in brain oncogenesis, exhibiting the most important role in the her-2/N-ras/nf1 pathway. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. MRL proteins cooperate with activated Ras in glia to drive distinct oncogenic outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E; Alqadri, N; Dodgson, L; Mason, D; Lyulcheva, E; Messina, G; Bennett, D

    2017-01-01

    The Mig10/RIAM/Lpd (MRL) adapter protein Lpd regulates actin dynamics through interactions with Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP proteins to promote the formation of cellular protrusions and to stimulate invasive migration. However, the ability of MRL proteins to interact with multiple actin regulators and to promote serum response factor (SRF) signalling has raised the question of whether MRL proteins employ alternative downstream mechanisms to drive oncogenic processes in a context-dependent manner. Here, using a Drosophila model, we show that overexpression of either human Lpd or its Drosophila orthologue Pico can promote growth and invasion of RasV12-induced cell tumours in the brain. Notably, effects were restricted to two populations of Repo-positive glial cells: an invasive population, characterized by JNK-dependent elevation of Mmp1 expression, and a hyperproliferative population lacking elevated JNK signalling. JNK activation was not triggered by reactive immune cell signalling, implicating the involvement of an intrinsic stress response. The ability to promote dissemination of RasV12-induced tumours was shared by a subset of actin regulators, including, most prominently, Chicadee/Profilin, which directly interacts with Pico, and, Mal, a cofactor for serum response factor that responds to changes in G:F actin dynamics. Suppression of Mal activity partially abrogated the ability of pico to promote invasion of RasV12 tumours. Furthermore, we found that larval glia are enriched for serum response factor expression, explaining the apparent sensitivity of glial cells to Pico/RasV12 overexpression. Taken together, our findings indicate that MRL proteins cooperate with oncogenic Ras to promote formation of glial tumours, and that, in this context, Mal/serum response factor activation is rate-limiting for tumour dissemination. PMID:28346426

  1. Study on Point Mutations of K-ras Gene in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in Guangxi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixiang ZHONG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Recent studies indicated that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with mutant K-ras were resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between the mutation of K-ras gene and NSCLC in Guangxi by detecting the point mutations in codon 12, 13 and 61 of K-ras gene in NSCLC. Methods The point mutations in codon 12, 13 and 61 of K-ras gene were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR products and DNA sequencing analysis in 105 cases of NSCLC tissues and 30 cases of adjacent normal tissues. Results No point mutation in codon 12, 13 and 61 of K-ras gene was found in 105 cases of NSCLC tissues and 30 cases of adjacent normal tissues. In this study, the mutation frequency of K-ras gene in NSCLC was 0 (0/105. Conclusion The high proportion of K-ras gene in wild-type indicates that patients with NSCLC in Guangxi could take more benefits from the therapy with EGFR-TKIs.

  2. Evaluation of K-ras and p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma using the cancer genome atlas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Lu

    Full Text Available Genetic alterations in K-ras and p53 are thought to be critical in pancreatic cancer development and progression. However, K-ras and p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma have not been systematically examined in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA Data Portal. Information regarding K-ras and p53 alterations, mRNA expression data, and protein/protein phosphorylation abundance was retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA databases, and analyses were performed by the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics. The mutual exclusivity analysis showed that events in K-ras and p53 were likely to co-occur in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Log odds ratio = 1.599, P = 0.006. The graphical summary of the mutations showed that there were hotspots for protein activation. In the network analysis, no solid association between K-ras and p53 was observed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In the survival analysis, neither K-ras nor p53 were associated with both survival events. As in the data mining study in the TCGA databases, our study provides a new perspective to understand the genetic features of K-ras and p53 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  3. Ki-ras gene mutations are invariably present in low-grade mucinous tumors of the vermiform appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauber, Peter; Berman, Errol; Marotta, Stephen; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene; Bishop, Timothy

    2011-07-01

    Low-grade mucinous tumors of the appendix appear to have a simple histological structure. Paradoxically, reports have suggested a greater frequency of Ki-ras gene mutation in these lesions than in more complex lesions such as benign colonic adenomas and carcinomas. We assessed several molecular genetic changes, including Ki-ras gene mutations, in a large series of low-grade mucinous tumors of the appendix. We retrospectively ascertained low-grade mucinous tumors of the appendix from computerized pathology records. Extracted DNA was analyzed for APC and DCC gene loss of heterozygosity, microsatellite instability and for the presence of Ki-ras gene mutation using standard molecular techniques. Controls consisted of normal appendices, other appendiceal neoplasms, and ovarian mucinous cystadenomas. A total of 31 low-grade appendiceal mucinous tumors were identified. All were microsatellite stable and none demonstrated loss of heterozygosity for the APC or DCC genes. By contrast, all 31 lesions contained a Ki-ras gene mutation. The presence of a Ki-ras gene mutation in all lesions, with no other molecular changes identified, strongly suggests a possible etiological role of the Ki-ras mutation in the development of this particular lesion of the appendix. Based on other work regarding intestinal bacteria, we hypothesize a relationship between chronic inflammation of the appendix from bacterial overgrowth and Ki-ras gene mutation.

  4. Promotion of invasion by mutant RAS is dependent on activation of the WASF3 metastasis promoter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yong; Ngoka, Lambert; Cowell, John K

    2017-06-01

    Metastasis represents an end stage in the evolution of cancer progression and has been related to specific genetic pathways. Overexpression of mutant RAS in particular appears to promote invasion and metastasis, although exactly how this occurs has not been well characterized. It was previously showed that activation of the WASF3 protein regulates actin cytoskeleton dynamics that promote invasion. In this report, how WASF3 overexpression interacts with mutant RAS to increase invasion and metastasis was investigated. The ability of RAS to promote invasion and metastasis was shown to be dependent on WASF3 activation in a PI3K and AKT dependent manner. Proteomics analysis demonstrates the presence of AKT in the WASF3 immunocomplex which is enhanced by overexpression of mutant RAS. During these processes activation of ERK1/2 is not affected by loss of WASF3 expression. Analysis of the relative involvement of p85 and p110 in the WASF3 complex demonstrates that mutant RAS promotes dissociation of p85 promoting activation of p110. These studies provide a deeper understanding of the critical role for WASF3 in facilitating increased invasion potential in cancer cells expressing mutant RAS and supports the idea that targeting WASF3 in metastatic cells overexpressing RAS may be used to suppress invasion and metastasis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Various p53 mutant proteins differently regulate the Ras circuit to induce a cancer-related gene signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Hilla; Buganim, Yosef; Kogan-Sakin, Ira; Pomeraniec, Leslie; Assia, Yael; Madar, Shalom; Goldstein, Ido; Brosh, Ran; Kalo, Eyal; Beatus, Tsevi; Goldfinger, Naomi; Rotter, Varda

    2012-07-01

    Concomitant expression of mutant p53 and oncogenic Ras, leading to cellular transformation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms by which the various mutant p53 categories cooperate with Ras remain largely obscure. From this study we suggest that different mutant p53 categories cooperate with H-Ras in different ways to induce a unique expression pattern of a cancer-related gene signature (CGS). The DNA-contact p53 mutants (p53(R248Q) and p53(R273H)) exhibited the highest level of CGS expression by cooperating with NFκB. Furthermore, the Zn(+2) region conformational p53 mutants (p53(R175H) and p53(H179R)) induced the CGS by elevating H-Ras activity. This elevation in H-Ras activity stemmed from a perturbed function of the p53 transcription target gene, BTG2. By contrast, the L3 loop region conformational mutant (p53(G245S)) did not affect CGS expression. Our findings were further corroborated in human tumor-derived cell lines expressing Ras and the aforementioned mutated p53 proteins. These data might assist in future tailor-made therapy targeting the mutant p53-Ras axis in cancer.

  6. Ras gene mutation is not related to tumour invasion during rat tongue carcinogenesis induced by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracalossi, Ana C C; Comparini, Larissa; Funabashi, Karina; Godoy, Carla; Iwamura, Edna S M; Nascimento, Fábio D; Nader, Helena B; Oshima, Celina T F; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether mutations in the genes H-ras and K-ras were related to the mechanism of invasion as a result of the immunoexpression of H-Ras, Ki-67, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) during 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO)-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis. Male Wistar rats were distributed into three groups of 10 animals each and treated with 50 ppm 4NQO solution through their drinking water for 4, 12 and 20 weeks. Ten animals were used as negative control. Although no histopathological abnormalities were induced in the epithelium after 4 weeks of carcinogen exposure, Ki-67 was overexpresssed in the 'normal' oral epithelium. In pre-neoplastic lesions at 12 weeks following carcinogen exposure, the levels of Ki-67 were increased (P 0.05) were found in H-ras protein expression for all experimental periods evaluated that corresponded to normal oral mucosa, hyperplasia, dysplasia and squamous cell carcinomas. In the same way, no mutations in H-ras or K-ras genes were found. Our results support the idea that expression of Ki-67 plays a crucial role during malignant transformation being closely related to neoplastic conversion of the oral mucosa cells. However, it seems that mutations in the ras genes are not involved to experimental tongue carcinogenesis induced by 4NQO. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. [Study on point mutations of K-ras gene in non-small cell lung cancer in Guangxi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weixiang; Chen, Mingwu; Xian, Lei; Li, Manhong

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies indicated that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with mutant K-ras were resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between the mutation of K-ras gene and NSCLC in Guangxi by detecting the point mutations in codon 12, 13 and 61 of K-ras gene in NSCLC. The point mutations in codon 12, 13 and 61 of K-ras gene were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products and DNA sequencing analysis in 105 cases of NSCLC tissues and 30 cases of adjacent normal tissues. No point mutation in codon 12, 13 and 61 of K-ras gene was found in 105 cases of NSCLC tissues and 30 cases of adjacent normal tissues. In this study, the mutation frequency of K-ras gene in NSCLC was 0 (0/105). The high proportion of K-ras gene in wild-type indicates that patients with NSCLC in Guangxi could take more benefits from the therapy with EGFR-TKIs.

  8. Structural insight into the rearrangement of the switch I region in GTP-bound G12A K-Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenyuan; Long, Brian N; Boris, Gabriel H; Chen, Anqi; Ni, Shuisong; Kennedy, Michael A

    2017-12-01

    K-Ras, a molecular switch that regulates cell growth, apoptosis and metabolism, is activated when it undergoes a conformation change upon binding GTP and is deactivated following the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. Hydrolysis of GTP in water is accelerated by coordination to K-Ras, where GTP adopts a high-energy conformation approaching the transition state. The G12A mutation reduces intrinsic K-Ras GTP hydrolysis by an unexplained mechanism. Here, crystal structures of G12A K-Ras in complex with GDP, GTP, GTPγS and GppNHp, and of Q61A K-Ras in complex with GDP, are reported. In the G12A K-Ras-GTP complex, the switch I region undergoes a significant reorganization such that the Tyr32 side chain points towards the GTP-binding pocket and forms a hydrogen bond to the GTP γ-phosphate, effectively stabilizing GTP in its precatalytic state, increasing the activation energy required to reach the transition state and contributing to the reduced intrinsic GTPase activity of G12A K-Ras mutants.

  9. Regulation of hnRNPA1 by microRNAs controls the miR-18a–K-RAS axis in chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Monroig, Paloma del C; Redis, Roxana S; Bayraktar, Emine; Almeida, Maria I; Ivan, Cristina; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Rashed, Mohammed H; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Ozpolat, Bulent; Mitra, Rahul; Sood, Anil K; Calin, George A; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, function and degradation involves a range of mechanisms, including interactions with RNA-binding proteins. The potential contribution of regulatory miRNAs to the expression of these RNA interactor proteins that could control other miRNAs expression is still unclear. Here we demonstrate a regulatory circuit involving oncogenic and tumor-suppressor miRNAs and an RNA-binding protein in a chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer model. We identified and characterized miR-15a-5p and miR-25-3p as negative regulators of hnRNPA1 expression, which is required for the processing of miR-18a-3p, an inhibitor of the K-RAS oncogene. The inhibition of miR-25-3p and miR-15a-5p decreased the proliferation, motility, invasiveness and angiogenic potential and increased apoptosis when combined with docetaxel. Alteration of this regulatory circuit causes poor overall survival outcome in ovarian cancer patients. These results highlight miR-15a-5p and miR-25-3p as key regulators of miR-18a-3p expression and its downstream target K-RAS, through direct modulation of hnRNPA1 expression. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting miR-25-3p and miR-15a-5p and the use of miR-18a-3p/KRAS ratio as a prominent outcome prognostic factor. PMID:28904816

  10. Regulation of hnRNPA1 by microRNAs controls the miR-18a-K-RAS axis in chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Monroig, Paloma Del C; Redis, Roxana S; Bayraktar, Emine; Almeida, Maria I; Ivan, Cristina; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Rashed, Mohammed H; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Ozpolat, Bulent; Mitra, Rahul; Sood, Anil K; Calin, George A; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, function and degradation involves a range of mechanisms, including interactions with RNA-binding proteins. The potential contribution of regulatory miRNAs to the expression of these RNA interactor proteins that could control other miRNAs expression is still unclear. Here we demonstrate a regulatory circuit involving oncogenic and tumor-suppressor miRNAs and an RNA-binding protein in a chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer model. We identified and characterized miR-15a-5p and miR-25-3p as negative regulators of hnRNPA1 expression, which is required for the processing of miR-18a-3p, an inhibitor of the K-RAS oncogene. The inhibition of miR-25-3p and miR-15a-5p decreased the proliferation, motility, invasiveness and angiogenic potential and increased apoptosis when combined with docetaxel. Alteration of this regulatory circuit causes poor overall survival outcome in ovarian cancer patients. These results highlight miR-15a-5p and miR-25-3p as key regulators of miR-18a-3p expression and its downstream target K-RAS, through direct modulation of hnRNPA1 expression. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting miR-25-3p and miR-15a-5p and the use of miR-18a-3p/KRAS ratio as a prominent outcome prognostic factor.

  11. Clinical impacts of inhibition of renin-angiotensin system in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction who underwent successful late percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyukjin; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Jeong, Myung Ho; Cho, Jae Yeong; Lee, Ki Hong; Sim, Doo Sun; Yoon, Nam Sik; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jim

    2017-01-01

    Successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the occluded infarct-related artery (IRA) in latecomers may improve long-term survival mainly by reducing left ventricular remodeling. It is not clear whether inhibition of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) brings additional better clinical outcomes in this specific population subset. Between January 2008 and June 2013, 669 latecomer patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (66.2±12.1 years, 71.0% males) in Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) who underwent a successful PCI were enrolled. The study population underwent a successful PCI for a totally occluded IRA. They were divided into two groups according to whether they were prescribed RAS inhibitors at the time of discharge: group I (RAS inhibition, n=556), and group II (no RAS inhibition, n=113). During the one-year follow-up, major adverse cardiac events (MACE), which consist of cardiac death and myocardial infarction, occurred in 71 patients (10.6%). There were significantly reduced incidences of MACE in the group I (hazard ratio=0.34, 95% confidence interval 0.199-0.588, p=0.001). In subgroup analyses, RAS inhibition was beneficial in patients with male gender, history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus, and even in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥40%. In the baseline and follow-up echocardiographic data, benefit in changes of LVEF and left ventricular end-systolic volume was noted in group I. In latecomers with STEMI, RAS inhibition improved long-term clinical outcomes after a successful PCI, even in patients with low risk who had relatively preserved LVEF. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Glomus tumors in neurofibromatosis type 1: genetic, functional, and clinical evidence of a novel association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brems, Hilde; Park, Caroline; Maertens, Ophélia; Pemov, Alexander; Messiaen, Ludwine; Messia, Ludwine; Upadhyaya, Meena; Claes, Kathleen; Beert, Eline; Peeters, Kristel; Mautner, Victor; Sloan, Jennifer L; Yao, Lawrence; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Sciot, Raf; De Smet, Luc; Legius, Eric; Stewart, Douglas R

    2009-09-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common disorder that arises secondary to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene NF1. Glomus tumors are small, benign but painful tumors that originate from the glomus body, a thermoregulatory shunt concentrated in the fingers and toes. We report 11 individuals with NF1 who harbored 20 glomus tumors of the fingers and 1 in the toe; 5 individuals had multiple glomus tumors. We hypothesized that biallelic inactivation of NF1 underlies the pathogenesis of these tumors. In 12 NF1-associated glomus tumors, we used cell culture and laser capture microdissection to isolate DNA. We also analyzed two sporadic (not NF1-associated) glomus tumors. Genetic analysis showed germ line and somatic NF1 mutations in seven tumors. RAS mitogen-activated protein kinase hyperactivation was observed in cultured NF1(-/-) glomus cells, reflecting a lack of inhibition of the pathway by functional neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1. No abnormalities in NF1 or RAS mitogen-activated protein kinase activation were found in sporadic glomus tumors. By comparative genomic hybridization, we observed amplification of the 3'-end of CRTAC1 and a deletion of the 5'-end of WASF1 in two NF1-associated glomus tumors. For the first time, we show that loss of neurofibromin function is crucial in the pathogenesis of glomus tumors in NF1. Glomus tumors of the fingers or toes should be considered as part of the tumor spectrum of NF1.

  13. Ras-dva is a novel Pit-1- and glucocorticoid-regulated gene in the embryonic anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellestad, Laura E; Porter, Tom E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a role in functional differentiation of pituitary somatotrophs and lactotrophs during embryogenesis. Ras-dva was identified as a gene regulated by anterior neural fold protein-1/homeobox expressed in embryonic stem cells-1, a transcription factor known to be critical in pituitary development, and has an expression profile in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland that is consistent with in vivo regulation by glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was to characterize expression and regulation of ras-dva mRNA in the developing chicken anterior pituitary. Pituitary ras-dva mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on embryonic day (e) 18 and then decreased and remained low or undetectable after hatch. Ras-dva expression was highly enriched in the pituitary gland on e18 relative to other tissues examined. Glucocorticoid treatment of pituitary cells from mid- and late-stage embryos rapidly increased ras-dva mRNA, suggesting it may be a direct transcriptional target of glucocorticoids. A reporter construct driven by 4 kb of the chicken ras-dva 5'-flanking region, containing six putative pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) binding sites and two potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites, was highly activated in embryonic pituitary cells and up-regulated by corticosterone. Mutagenesis of the most proximal Pit-1 site decreased promoter activity in chicken e11 pituitary cells, indicating regulation of ras-dva by Pit-1. However, mutating putative GR binding sites did not substantially reduce induction of ras-dva promoter activity by corticosterone, suggesting additional DNA elements within the 5'-flanking region are responsible for glucocorticoid regulation. We have identified ras-dva as a glucocorticoid-regulated gene that is likely expressed in cells of the Pit-1 lineage within the developing anterior pituitary gland.

  14. Clasificación de presas y evaluación del riesgo con programa HEC-RAS

    OpenAIRE

    Marín Rubís, Àlex

    2006-01-01

    Desde el año 2003 el modelo HEC-RAS, desarrollado por el Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) del United States Army Corps of Engineers, incorpora entre sus capacidades un módulo que permite la simulación de rotura de presas. El objeto de este trabajo ha sido asegurar la capacidad de HEC-RAS para llevar a cabo este tipo de simulaciones y crear una guía para su uso en entorno GIS (Arcview) mediante la aplicación HEC-GeoRAS.

  15. Blocking of p53-Snail Binding, Promoted by Oncogenic K-Ras, Recovers p53 Expression and function

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Hye; Lee, Su-Jin; Jung, Yeon Sang; Xu, Yongbin; Kang, Ho Sung; Ha, Nam-Chul; Park, Bum-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Differentially from other kinds of Ras, oncogenic K-Ras, which is mutated approximately 30% of human cancer, does not induce apoptosis and senescence. Here, we provide the evidence that oncogenic K-Ras abrogates p53 function and expression through induction of Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related mediated Snail stabilization. Snail directly binds to DNA binding domain of p53 and diminishes the tumor-suppressive function of p53. Thus, elimination of Snail through si-RNA can induce p5...

  16. Modelling salinity inhibition effects during biodegradation of perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C; Marchand, E A

    2006-07-01

    To determine the mathematical kinetic rates and mechanisms of acclimated perchlorate (ClO)-reducing microbial cultures by incorporating a term to relate the inhibitory effect of high salinity during biological reduction of concentrated perchlorate solutions. Salt toxicity associated with the biodegradation of concentrated perchlorate (200, 500, 1100, 1700 and 2400 mg l(-1) as ClO) was investigated using two microbial cultures isolated from a domestic wastewater treatment plant [return activated sludge (RAS) and anaerobic digester sludge (ADS)]. Experiments were performed in wastewaters containing various sodium chloride concentrations, ranging from 0% to 4.0% (w/v) NaCl (ionic strength: 0.14-0.82 mol l(-1), total dissolved solids: 5.3-42.6 g l(-1)) at near-neutral values of pH (6.7-7.8). Perchlorate biodegradation was stimulated through stepwise acclimation to high salinity. The ADS culture was capable of reducing perchlorate at salinities up to 4% NaCl, while the RAS culture exhibited complete inhibition of perchlorate degradation at 4% NaCl, probably resulting from either a toxic effect or enzyme inactivation of the perchlorate-reducing microbes. Further, a kinetic growth model was developed based on experimental data in order to express an inhibition function to relate specific growth rate and salinity. Biological reduction of concentrated perchlorate wastewaters using either acclimated RAS or ADS cultures is feasible up to 3% or 4% NaCl, respectively. In addition, the kinetic model including a salinity inhibition term should be effective in many practical applications such as improving reactor design and management, furthering the understanding of high salinity inhibition, and enhancing bioremediation under high salinity loading conditions. Applications of these findings in water treatment practice where ion exchange or membrane technologies are used to remove perchlorate from water can have the potential to increase the overall attractiveness of these

  17. Comparison of EGFR and K-RAS gene status between primary tumours and corresponding metastases in NSCLC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalikaki, A; Koutsopoulos, A; Trypaki, M; Souglakos, J; Stathopoulos, E; Georgoulias, V; Mavroudis, D; Voutsina, A

    2008-01-01

    .... However, the EGFR and K-RAS mutation status in metastases is not well studied. We compared the mutation status of these genes between the primary tumours and the corresponding metastases of 25 patients...

  18. Novel determinants of H-Ras plasma membrane localization and transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Cox, A D; Solski, P A

    1996-01-01

    cysteine did not abolish palmitoylation. However, despite continued lipid modification the mutant proteins failed to bind to plasma membranes and instead accumulated on internal membranes and, importantly, were not transforming. Addition of an N-terminal myristoylation signal to these defective mutants......, or to proteins entirely lacking the C-terminal 25 residues restored both plasma membrane association and transforming activity. Thus, H-Ras does not absolutely require prenylation or palmitoylation nor indeed its hypervariable domain in order to interact with effectors that ultimately cause transformation....... However, in this native state, the C-terminus appears to provide a combination of lipids and a previously unrecognized signal for specific plasma membrane targeting that are essential for the correct localization and biological function of H-Ras....

  19. Carcinogenicity evaluation for the application of carbon nanotubes as biomaterials in rasH2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Seiji; Hara, Kazuo; Aoki, Kaoru; Usui, Yuki; Shimizu, Masayuki; Haniu, Hisao; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Ishigaki, Norio; Nakamura, Koichi; Okamoto, Masanori; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sano, Kenji; Nishimura, Naoyuki; Tsutsumi, Hideki; Machida, Kazuhiko; Saito, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    The application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as biomaterials is of wide interest, and studies examining their application in medicine have had considerable significance. Biological safety is the most important factor when considering the clinical application of CNTs as biomaterials, and various toxicity evaluations are required. Among these evaluations, carcinogenicity should be examined with the highest priority; however, no report using transgenic mice to evaluate the carcinogenicity of CNTs has been published to date. Here, we performed a carcinogenicity test by implanting multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) into the subcutaneous tissue of rasH2 mice, using the carbon black present in black tattoo ink as a reference material for safety. The rasH2 mice did not develop neoplasms after being injected with MWCNTs; instead, MWCNTs showed lower carcinogenicity than carbon black. Such evaluations should facilitate the clinical application and development of CNTs for use in important medical fields.

  20. Detection of K-ras gene mutations in feces by magnetic nanoprobe in patients with pancreatic cancer: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jingshuai; Chen, Fei; Zhong, Zhengxiang; Qi, Lifeng

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of detecting K-ras mutation by using magnetic nanoparticles in fecal samples of patients with pancreatic cancer at different stages. The novel methodology of K-ras mutation detection was compared to the existing methodology of cancer antigen (CA)19-9 examination. Patients with pancreatic cancer (n=88), pancreatic benign diseases who displayed chronic pancreatitis (n=35), pancreatic mucinous cyst neoplasms (n=10) and pancreatic serous cyst (n=9) admitted to the Department of Surgery, Jiaxing Second Hospital were enrolled in the present study. Fecal samples were collected from all patients, DNA was extracted and magnetic nanoprobe was then used to detect K-ras mutation. The results obtained using the novel magnetic nanoprobe detection technique showed a K-ras mutation rate of 81.8% (72/88) in the patients with pancreatic cancer and 18.5% (10/54) in patients with pancreatic benign diseases. In patients with pancreatic cancer, the K-ras mutation rate was comparable in stages I + IIA and IIB + III + IV (78.9 vs. 84.0%; P>0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of K-ras mutation for detection of pancreatic cancer was 81.8 and 81.5%, respectively. Sixty-eight pancreatic cancer patients had >37 U/ml CA99 with a sensitivity and specificity for pancreatic cancer detection of 77.3 and 77.8%, which was not significantly lower than detection by the fecal K-ras mutations (P>0.05). Combinational detection of fecal K-ras mutations and serum CA19-9 significantly increased the sensitivity regarding pancreatic cancer detection to 97.7% (P0.05) compared with fecal K-ras mutations or CA19-9 alone. The findings showed that the magnetic nanoprobe is able to detect fecal K-ras mutations in different stages of pancreatic cancer, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to CA19-9 examination for differentiating pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, combined detection of CA19-9 and K-ras mutations has enhanced sensitivity

  1. Activating the expression of human K-rasG12D stimulates oncogenic transformation in transgenic goat fetal fibroblast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Gong

    Full Text Available Humane use of preclinical large animal cancer models plays a critical role in understanding cancer biology and developing therapeutic treatments. Among the large animal candidates, goats have great potentials as sustainable sources for large animal cancer model development. Goats are easier to handle and cheaper to raise. The genome of the goats has been sequenced recently. It has been known that goats develop skin, adrenal cortex, breast and other types of cancers. Technically, goats are subject to somatic cell nuclear transfer more efficiently and exhibit better viability through the cloning process. Towards the development of a goat cancer model, we created a transgenic goat fetal fibroblast (GFF cell as the donor cell for SCNT. Human mutated K-ras (hK-rasG12D was chosen as the transgene, as it is present in 20% of cancers. Both hK-rasG12D and a herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk reporter genes, flanked by a pair of LoxP sites, were knocked in the GFF endogenous K-ras locus through homologous recombination. Following Cre-mediated activation (with a 95% activation efficiency, hK-rasG12D and HSV1-tk were expressed in the transgenic GFF cells, evidently through the presence of corresponding mRNAs, and confirmed by HSV1-tk protein function assay. The hK-rasG12D expressing GFF cells exhibited enhanced proliferation rates and an anchorage-independent growth behavior. They were able to initiate tumor growth in athymic nude mice. In conclusion, after activating hK-rasG12D gene expression, hK-rasG12D transgenic GFF cells were transformed into tumorgenesis cells. Transgenic goats via SCNT using the above-motioned cells as the donor cells have been established.

  2. Is K-ras gene mutation a prognostic factor for colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, JiaoJiao; Li, GuangXiao; Ge, Jie; Li, Xia; Zhao, YaShuang

    2012-08-01

    : The K-ras gene is one of the commonly mutated oncogenes associated with colorectal cancer. However, its prognostic significance for patients with colorectal cancer remains inconclusive. : To derive a more precise estimation of the prognostic significance of K-ras gene mutations, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. : We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane databases from January 1992 to November 2011. : The prognostic value of K-ras gene mutations was examined in patients with colorectal cancer who did not receive preoperative chemotherapy or radiation. : The effect of K-ras gene mutations on the overall survival was measured by the HR and 95% CIs. : The pooled HR for the association between K-ras gene mutations and overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.99-1.10, p = 0.11). Subgroup analysis showed significant reductions in the overall survival associated with mutations at K-ras codon 12, the articles that reported HR directly, and the studies published before and after 2005, although publication bias was present. All the associations disappeared after adjustment with the trim-and-fill method. The pooled HR of 3 studies examining mutations at K-ras codon 13 was 1.47 (95% CI: 1.09-1.97, p = 0.02), and no publication bias was observed. No significant association was observed in different study regions. : The heterogeneity in the study populations is a potential problem, the use of different staging systems or small groups of different stages may contribute to heterogeneity, and residual confounding may have influenced the results in those studies that did not completely adjust for other factors. : Overall K-ras gene mutations seem not to correlate with the prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. The association remains to be confirmed with a more precise analysis of a large sample.

  3. PIK3CB and K-ras in oral squamous Cell carcinoma. A possible cross-talk!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natheer H Al-Rawi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: PIK3 and K-ras are signal transducing proteins involved and mediating many responses related to cell cycle growth regulation. Until date, there has been only limited evidence about the expression of K-ras and PKI3CB in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. AIMS : This study aimed to examine both proteins in OSCC and their relation to clinic- pathological findings. Setting and Design: A total of 31 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of OSCC were selected in this study. PIK3CB and K-ras expressions were detected using standard immunohistochemical techniques. Materials and Methods: PIK3CB and k-ras immune reactivity was semi-quantitatively evaluated in at least five representative fields at 400X magnification and recorded as percentage of PIK3CB and k-ras positive tumor cells over the total number of cells examined in the same area. Results and Conclusion: All examined specimens of OSCC were positive for monoclonal antibodies directed against PIK3CB and K-ras proteins especially at advanced stage of the disease. No significant relation was observed between the tested proteins and the clinic-pathological findings of OSCC; however a highly significant direct relationship was observed between K-ras and PIK3CB. This lead to conclusion that both K-ras and PIK3CB signaling pathway were activated in the advanced stage of OSCC, and possibly a cross-talk between them. This could make these mutant proteins a potential target for an effective molecular therapy.

  4. Genome profiling of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: frequent alterations of RAS and RUNX1 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olschwang Sylviane

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML is a hematological disease close to, but separate from both myeloproliferative disorders (MPD and myelodysplastic syndromes and may show either myeloproliferative (MP-CMML or myelodysplastic (MD-CMML features. Not much is known about the molecular biology of this disease. Methods We studied a series of 30 CMML samples (13 MP- and 11 MD-CMMLs, and 6 acutely transformed cases from 29 patients by using Agilent high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and sequencing of 12 candidate genes. Results Two-thirds of samples did not show any obvious alteration of aCGH profiles. In one-third we observed chromosome abnormalities (e.g. trisomy 8, del20q and gain or loss of genes (e.g. NF1, RB1 and CDK6. RAS mutations were detected in 4 cases (including an uncommon codon 146 mutation in KRAS and PTPN11 mutations in 3 cases. We detected 11 RUNX1 alterations (9 mutations and 2 rearrangements. The rearrangements were a new, cryptic inversion of chromosomal region 21q21-22 leading to break and fusion of RUNX1 to USP16. RAS and RUNX1 alterations were not mutually exclusive. RAS pathway mutations occurred in MP-CMMLs (~46% but not in MD-CMMLs. RUNX1 alterations (mutations and cryptic rearrangement occurred in both MP and MD classes (~38%. Conclusion We detected RAS pathway mutations and RUNX1 alterations. The latter included a new cryptic USP16-RUNX1 fusion. In some samples, two alterations coexisted already at this early chronic stage.

  5. Comparison of HEC-RAS with FLDWAV and DAMBRK models for dam break analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, R.D.; Judge, D.G.; Donnelly, C.R. [Acres International Ltd., Niagara Falls, ON (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    Dam break analysis is conducted as a routine dam safety assessment in determining the incremental hazard potential (IHP) that would occur in the event of a dam failure. Dam safety analysis also provides the information needed to make flood inundation maps and emergency preparedness plans (EPP) for dams that present a risk to human safety. For several years, the standard programs that have been used by the national weather service (NWS) for dam break flood simulation were the FLDWAV and DAMBRK models. However, another popular hydraulic model has been introduced. The HEC-RAS is an upgraded version of the former HEC-2 model used for the assessment of river floodplain inundation. A dam break analysis module has been added to HEC-2 and renamed the HEC-RAS which offers similar modeling capabilities to the DAMBRK and FLDWAV models for simulating flood hydrographs and flood wave propagation in river channels located downstream of a breached dam. The use of the alternative HEC-RAS could save time and resources. As such, it has the potential to replace the FLDWAV and DAMBRK. This paper compares the HEC-RAS dam break module with the FLDWAV and DAMBRK to determine if the new module accurately represents the dam break flood process. The comparison focuses on the theoretical background of the models, numerical solution techniques, ease of use of the module, modeling accuracy, practical aspects in performing dam break simulations, and capability for coupling the models with GIS for inundation mapping. The advantages and disadvantages of each model were summarized. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway activation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and its therapeutic targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKnight

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway is a common event in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is caused by point mutation, gene deletion and chromosomal translocation of a vast array of gene types, highlighting its importance in leukemia biology. Pathway activation can be therapeutically exploited and may guide new therapies needed for relapsed ALL and other high risk subgroups.

  7. Identification of the In Vivo Phosphorylation Sites of the Ras Suppressor Rsu-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-11

    1991 ; Zhang, 1990). The neurofibromatosis protein NF-I contains a GAP- related domain which has RasGAP activity (Ballester, 1990; DeClue, 1991...intact), Rsu- l phosphorylation is less efficient but still possible. Interestingly, serine- 163 is located in the fifth segment of the LRR region...2825. DeClue, J ., Cohen, B., and Lowy. D.R. (1991). Identification and characterization of the Neurofibromatosis type 1 protein product. Proc. Natl

  8. Geranylgeranylated, but not farnesylated, RhoB suppresses Ras transformation of NIH-3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazières, Julien; Tillement, Vanessa; Allal, Cuider; Clanet, Carine; Bobin, Lisbeth; Chen, Zhi; Sebti, Said M; Favre, Gilles; Pradines, Anne

    2005-04-01

    RhoB is a low molecular weight GTPase that is both farnesylated (RhoB-F) and geranylgeranylated (RhoB-GG) in cells. Based on data from rodent cell models, it has been suggested that RhoB displays differential effects on cell transformation, according to the nature of its prenylation. To test directly this hypothesis, we generated GTPase-deficient RhoB mutants that are exclusively either farnesylated or geranylgeranylated. We show that in Ras-transformed murine NIH-3T3 cells, RhoB-F enhances, whereas RhoB-GG and RhoB (F/GG) suppresses anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth as well as tumor growth in nude mice. We then demonstrate that Ras constitutive activation of the tumor survival pathways Akt and NF-kappa B are blocked by RhoB-GG, but not by RhoB-F, providing further support for the opposing role of RhoB-F and RhoB-GG in Ras malignant transformation in NIH-3T3 cells. In addition, both RhoB (F/GG) and RhoB-GG induce apoptosis in Ras-transformed NIH-3T3 cells whereas RhoB-F has no effect. Our data demonstrate that RhoB-F and RhoB-GG which differ only by a 5-carbon isoprene behave differently in rodent cells highlighting the important role of prenyl groups in protein function and emphasize the potency of RhoB to regulate negatively the oncogenic signal.

  9. Novel Molecular Targets for kRAS Downregulation: Promoter G-Quadruplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    specifically targeted small molecule to be used in the treatment of pancreatic , ovarian, lung, and colon cancers. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights...stabilizers of the unique mid-G4 has great potential as anti-cancer therapeutics to advance the care of pancreatic , lung, and colon cancer patients.G4mid... pancreatic cancer patients clearly indicates that new and more efficacious treatments are needed and targeted kRAS dowregulation holds a great deal of promise

  10. An assessment of travel time for spills management - using HEC-RAS water quality analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disley, Tom; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Perdikaris, John [University of Guelph, Guelph, (Canada); Singh, Amanjot; Dougherty, Jennifer [Credit Valley Conservation Authority, Mississauga, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    In order to mitigate the detrimental effects that contaminants such as petrochemical and chemical spills may have on the environment it is critical to understand their transport. This paper presented an assessment of travel time for spills management using HEC-RAS water quality analysis on the Credit River Watershed. It is a 1000 km2 area of urban and rural landscapes drained by 90 km of the main Credit River. The study focused on the mixing characteristics of 5 stream reaches in the Credit River watershed. Dye tracing was done under three different flow conditions to obtain a longitudinal dispersion coefficient, which is a necessary parameter for predicting and modelling time concentration curves downstream of a spill. The longitudinal dispersion coefficient was input into the US Army Corp of Engineers, Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC RAS) to predict time concentration curves. The HEC RAS model produced average travel time close to those measured in the field after final calibration was completed.

  11. Development of a HEC-RAS temperature model for the North Santiam River, northwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonewall, Adam J.; Buccola, Norman L.

    2015-01-01

    A one-dimensional, unsteady streamflow and temperature model (HEC-RAS) of the North Santiam and Santiam Rivers was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to be used in conjunction with previously developed two-dimensional hydrodynamic water-quality models (CE-QUAL-W2) of Detroit and Big Cliff Lakes upstream of the study area. In conjunction with the output from the previously developed models, the HEC-RAS model can simulate streamflows and temperatures within acceptable limits (mean error [bias] near zero; typical streamflow errors less than 5 percent; typical water temperature errors less than 1.0 °C) for the length of the North Santiam River downstream of Big Cliff Dam under a series of potential future conditions in which dam structures and/or dam operations are modified to improve temperature conditions for threatened and endangered fish. Although a two-dimensional (longitudinal, vertical) CE-QUAL-W2 model for the North Santiam and Santiam Rivers downstream of Big Cliff Dam exists, that model proved unstable under highly variable flow conditions. The one-dimensional HEC-RAS model documented in this report can better simulate cross-sectional-averaged stream temperatures under a wide range of flow conditions.

  12. SHANK proteins limit integrin activation by directly interacting with Rap1 and R-Ras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, Maria; Jacquemet, Guillaume; De Franceschi, Nicola; Peuhu, Emilia; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Pouwels, Jeroen; Martens, Victoria; Nia, Fatemeh Hassani; Beifuss, Malte; Boeckers, Tobias; Kreienkamp, Hans-Juergen; Barsukov, Igor L; Ivaska, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    SHANK3, a synaptic scaffold protein and actin regulator, is widely expressed outside of the central nervous system with predominantly unknown function. Solving the structure of the SHANK3 N-terminal region revealed that the SPN-domain is an unexpected Ras-association domain with high affinity for GTP-bound Ras and Rap G-proteins. The role of Rap1 in integrin activation is well established but the mechanisms to antagonize it remain largely unknown. Here, we show that SHANK1 and SHANK3 act as integrin activation inhibitors by sequestering active Rap1 and R-Ras via the SPN-domain and thus limiting their bioavailability at the plasma membrane. Consistently, SHANK3 silencing triggers increased plasma membrane Rap1 activity, cell spreading, migration and invasion. Autism-related mutations within the SHANK3 SPN-domain (R12C and L68P) disrupt G-protein interaction and fail to counteract integrin activation along the Rap1/RIAM/talin axis in cancer cells and neurons. Altogether, we establish SHANKs as critical regulators of G-protein signalling and integrin-dependent processes. PMID:28263956

  13. SHANK proteins limit integrin activation by directly interacting with Rap1 and R-Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Johanna; Zacharchenko, Thomas; Georgiadou, Maria; Jacquemet, Guillaume; De Franceschi, Nicola; Peuhu, Emilia; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Pouwels, Jeroen; Martens, Victoria; Nia, Fatemeh Hassani; Beifuss, Malte; Boeckers, Tobias; Kreienkamp, Hans-Juergen; Barsukov, Igor L; Ivaska, Johanna

    2017-04-01

    SHANK3, a synaptic scaffold protein and actin regulator, is widely expressed outside of the central nervous system with predominantly unknown function. Solving the structure of the SHANK3 N-terminal region revealed that the SPN domain is an unexpected Ras-association domain with high affinity for GTP-bound Ras and Rap G-proteins. The role of Rap1 in integrin activation is well established but the mechanisms to antagonize it remain largely unknown. Here, we show that SHANK1 and SHANK3 act as integrin activation inhibitors by sequestering active Rap1 and R-Ras via the SPN domain and thus limiting their bioavailability at the plasma membrane. Consistently, SHANK3 silencing triggers increased plasma membrane Rap1 activity, cell spreading, migration and invasion. Autism-related mutations within the SHANK3 SPN domain (R12C and L68P) disrupt G-protein interaction and fail to counteract integrin activation along the Rap1-RIAM-talin axis in cancer cells and neurons. Altogether, we establish SHANKs as critical regulators of G-protein signalling and integrin-dependent processes.

  14. EMT-induced stemness and tumorigenicity are fueled by the EGFR/Ras pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Chih-Cheng Voon

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that differentiated epithelial cells would acquire stem cell-like and tumorigenic properties following an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. However, the signaling pathways that participate in this novel mechanism of tumorigenesis have not been fully characterized. In Runx3 (-/- p53 (-/- murine gastric epithelial (GIF-14 cells, EMT-induced plasticity is reflected in the expression of the embryonal proto-oncogene Hmga2 and Lgr5, an exclusive gastrointestinal stem cell marker. Here, we report the concurrent activation of an EGFR/Ras gene expression signature during TGF-β1-induced EMT in GIF-14 cells. Amongst the altered genes was the induction of Egfr, which corresponded with a delayed sensitization to EGF treatment in GIF-14. Co-treatment with TGF-β1 and EGF or the expression of exogenous KRas led to increased Hmga2 or Lgr5 expression, sphere initiation and colony formation in soft agar assay. Interestingly, the gain in cellular plasticity/tumorigenicity was not accompanied by increased EMT. This uncoupling of EMT and the induction of plasticity reveals an involvement of distinct signaling cues, whereby the EGFR/Ras pathway specifically promotes stemness and tumorigenicity in EMT-altered GIF-14 cells. These data show that the EGFR/Ras pathway requisite for the sustenance of gastric stem cells in vivo and in vitro is involved in the genesis and promotion of EMT-induced tumor-initiating cells.

  15. Kirsten Ras* oncogene: significance of its discovery in human cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Nobuo; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Grieco, Michele

    2016-07-19

    The KRAS/ K-RAS oncogene is crucially involved in human cancer. The term "oncogene" -- i.e., a gene able to transform a normal cell into a tumor cell - was introduced in 1969, but the word was not used in the human carcinogenesis literature until much later. Transforming Kras and Hras oncogenes from the Kirsten and Harvey sarcoma viruses were not identified until the early 1980s due to the complicated structures of the viral genomes. Orthologs of these viral oncogenes were then found in transforming DNA fragments in human cancers in the form of mutated versions of the HRAS and KRAS proto-oncogenes. Thus, RAS genes were the first human oncogenes to be identified. Subsequent studies showed that mutated KRAS acted as an in vivo oncogenic driver, as indicated by studies of anti-EGFR therapy for metastatic colorectal cancers. This review addresses the historical background and experimental studies that led to the discovery of Kirsten Ras as an oncogene, the role of mutated KRAS in human carcinogenesis, and recent therapeutic studies of cancer cells with KRAS mutations.

  16. Intercellular transfer of oncogenic H-Ras at the immunological synapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded Rechavi

    Full Text Available Immune cells establish dynamic adhesive cell-cell interactions at a specific contact region, termed the immunological synapse (IS. Intriguing features of the IS are the formation of regions of plasma membrane fusion and the intercellular exchange of membrane fragments between the conjugated cells. It is not known whether upon IS formation, intact intracellular proteins can transfer from target cells to lymphocytes to allow the transmission of signals across cell boundaries. Here we show by both FACS and confocal microscopy that human lymphocytes acquire from the cells they scan the inner-membrane protein H-Ras, a G-protein vital for common lymphocyte functions and a prominent participant in human cancer. The transfer was cell contact-dependent and occurred in the context of cell-conjugate formation. Moreover, the acquisition of oncogenic H-RasG12V by natural killer (NK and T lymphocytes had important biological functions in the adopting lymphocytes: the transferred H-RasG12V induced ERK phosphorylation, increased interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion, enhanced lymphocyte proliferation, and augmented NK-mediated target cell killing. Our findings reveal a novel mode of cell-to-cell communication-allowing lymphocytes to extend the confines of their own proteome-which may moreover play an important role in natural tumor immunity.

  17. A Diaphanous-related formin links Ras signaling directly to actin assembly in macropinocytosis and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junemann, Alexander; Filić, Vedrana; Winterhoff, Moritz; Nordholz, Benjamin; Litschko, Christof; Schwellenbach, Helena; Stephan, Till; Weber, Igor; Faix, Jan

    2016-11-22

    Phagocytosis and macropinocytosis are Ras-regulated and actin-driven processes that depend on the dynamic rearrangements of the plasma membrane that protrudes and internalizes extracellular material by cup-shaped structures. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying actin assembly in large-scale endocytosis remain elusive. Here, we show that the Diaphanous-related formin G (ForG) from the professional phagocyte Dictyostelium discoideum localizes to endocytic cups. Biochemical analyses revealed that ForG is a rather weak nucleator but efficiently elongates actin filaments in the presence of profilin. Notably, genetic inactivation of ForG is associated with a strongly impaired endocytosis and a markedly diminished F-actin content at the base of the cups. By contrast, ablation of the Arp2/3 (actin-related protein-2/3) complex activator SCAR (suppressor of cAMP receptor) diminishes F-actin mainly at the cup rim, being consistent with its known localization. These data therefore suggest that ForG acts as an actin polymerase of Arp2/3-nucleated filaments to allow for efficient membrane expansion and engulfment of extracellular material. Finally, we show that ForG is directly regulated in large-scale endocytosis by RasB and RasG, which are highly related to the human proto-oncogene KRas.

  18. Gene Essentiality Profiling Reveals Gene Networks and Synthetic Lethal Interactions with Oncogenic Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tim; Yu, Haiyan; Hughes, Nicholas W; Liu, Bingxu; Kendirli, Arek; Klein, Klara; Chen, Walter W; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2017-02-23

    The genetic dependencies of human cancers widely vary. Here, we catalog this heterogeneity and use it to identify functional gene interactions and genotype-dependent liabilities in cancer. By using genome-wide CRISPR-based screens, we generate a gene essentiality dataset across 14 human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. Sets of genes with correlated patterns of essentiality across the lines reveal new gene relationships, the essential substrates of enzymes, and the molecular functions of uncharacterized proteins. Comparisons of differentially essential genes between Ras-dependent and -independent lines uncover synthetic lethal partners of oncogenic Ras. Screens in both human AML and engineered mouse pro-B cells converge on a surprisingly small number of genes in the Ras processing and MAPK pathways and pinpoint PREX1 as an AML-specific activator of MAPK signaling. Our findings suggest general strategies for defining mammalian gene networks and synthetic lethal interactions by exploiting the natural genetic and epigenetic diversity of human cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Click-Chemistry Based High Throughput Screening Platform for Modulators of Ras Palmitoylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Lakshmi; Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Levental, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Palmitoylation is a widespread, reversible lipid modification that has been implicated in regulating a variety of cellular processes. Approximately one thousand proteins are annotated as being palmitoylated, and for some of these, including several oncogenes of the Ras and Src families, palmitoylation is indispensable for protein function. Despite this wealth of disease-relevant targets, there are currently few effective pharmacological tools to interfere with protein palmitoylation. One reason for this lack of development is the dearth of assays to efficiently screen for small molecular inhibitors of palmitoylation. To address this shortcoming, we have developed a robust, high-throughput compatible, click chemistry-based approach to identify small molecules that interfere with the palmitoylation of Ras, a high value therapeutic target that is mutated in up to a third of human cancers. This assay design shows excellent performance in 384-well format and is sensitive to known, non-specific palmitoylation inhibitors. Further, we demonstrate an ideal counter-screening strategy, which relies on a target peptide from an unrelated protein, the Src-family kinase Fyn. The screening approach described here provides an integrated platform to identify specific modulators of palmitoylated proteins, demonstrated here for Ras and Fyn, but potentially applicable to pharmaceutical targets involved in a variety of human diseases. PMID:28112226

  20. Structural insight into the rearrangement of the switch I region in GTP-bound G12A K-Ras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shenyuan; Long, Brian N.; Boris, Gabriel H.; Chen, Anqi; Ni, Shuisong; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2017-11-10

    K-Ras, a molecular switch that regulates cell growth, apoptosis and metabolism, is activated when it undergoes a conformation change upon binding GTP and is deactivated following the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. Hydrolysis of GTP in water is accelerated by coordination to K-Ras, where GTP adopts a high-energy conformation approaching the transition state. The G12A mutation reduces intrinsic K-Ras GTP hydrolysis by an unexplained mechanism. Here, crystal structures of G12A K-Ras in complex with GDP, GTP, GTPγS and GppNHp, and of Q61A K-Ras in complex with GDP, are reported. In the G12A K-Ras–GTP complex, the switch I region undergoes a significant reorganization such that the Tyr32 side chain points towards the GTP-binding pocket and forms a hydrogen bond to the GTP γ-phosphate, effectively stabilizing GTP in its precatalytic state, increasing the activation energy required to reach the transition state and contributing to the reduced intrinsic GTPase activity of G12A K-Ras mutants.

  1. A novel prenyl-polybasic domain code determines lipid-binding specificity of the K-Ras membrane anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Hancock, John F

    2018-01-15

    Ras proteins must localize to the plasma membrane (PM) for biological function. The membrane anchor of the K-Ras4B isoform comprises a farnesylated and methylated C-terminal cysteine together with an adjacent hexa-lysine polybasic domain (PBD). Traditionally, polybasic sequences have been thought to interact electrostatically with negatively charged membranes showing no specificity for anionic lipid head groups. By contrast we recently showed that the K-Ras membrane anchor actually exhibits a very high degree of specificity for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). The selectivity for PtdSer is determined by a combinatorial code comprising the PBD sequence plus the prenyl anchor. Lipid binding specificity is therefore altered by PBD point mutations that in turn modulate signaling output. For example, mutating Lys177 or Lys178 to glutamine switches K-Ras4B lipid affinity from PtdSer to phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Changing the lipid anchor from farnesyl to geranylgeranyl or the PBD lysines to arginines also changes lipid binding specificity. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the structural basis for these K-Ras anchor lipid-binding preferences. Here we examine the PM interactions of a series of geranylgeranylated PBD mutants and provide further evidence that the precise PBD sequence and prenyl lipid determines lipid sorting specificity of the K-Ras anchor and hence biological function.

  2. 1H NMR studies distinguish the water soluble metabolomic profiles of untransformed and RAS-transformed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Marks

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic profiling is an increasingly important method for identifying potential biomarkers in cancer cells with a view towards improved diagnosis and treatment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR provides a potentially noninvasive means to accurately characterize differences in the metabolomic profiles of cells. In this work, we use 1H NMR to measure the metabolomic profiles of water soluble metabolites extracted from isogenic control and oncogenic HRAS-, KRAS-, and NRAS-transduced BEAS2B lung epithelial cells to determine the robustness of NMR metabolomic profiling in detecting differences between the transformed cells and their untransformed counterparts as well as differences among the RAS-transformed cells. Unique metabolomic signatures between control and RAS-transformed cell lines as well as among the three RAS isoform-transformed lines were found by applying principal component analysis to the NMR data. This study provides a proof of principle demonstration that NMR-based metabolomic profiling can robustly distinguish untransformed and RAS-transformed cells as well as cells transformed with different RAS oncogenic isoforms. Thus, our data may potentially provide new diagnostic signatures for RAS-transformed cells.

  3. Analysis of KRAS and NRAS Gene Mutations in Arab Asian Children With Acute Leukemia: High Frequency of RAS Mutations in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kzayer, Lika'a Fasih Y; Sakashita, Kazuo; Al-Jadiry, Mazin Faisal; Al-Hadad, Salma Abbas; Ghali, Hasanein Habeeb; Uyen, Le T N; Liu, Tingting; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Abdulkadhim, Jaafar M H; Al-Shujairi, Tariq Abadi; Matti, Zead Ismael I K; Sughayer, Maher A; Rihani, Rawad; Madanat, Faris F; Inoshita, Toshi; Kamata, Minoru; Koike, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    KRAS and NRAS gene mutations are frequently observed in childhood leukemia. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of RAS mutations and the association between RAS mutations and other genetic aberrations in Arab Asian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Diagnostic samples of 485 patients (RAS mutations were detected in 86/318 (27%) of ALL cases and 35/167 (21%) of AML cases. The frequency of NRAS mutation was similar to that of KRAS mutation in ALL. Two RAS mutations