WorldWideScience

Sample records for neurobiology animation titles

  1. Freeze for action: neurobiological mechanisms in animal and human freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Karin

    2017-04-19

    Upon increasing levels of threat, animals activate qualitatively different defensive modes, including freezing and active fight-or-flight reactions. Whereas freezing is a form of behavioural inhibition accompanied by parasympathetically dominated heart rate deceleration, fight-or-flight reactions are associated with sympathetically driven heart rate acceleration. Despite the potential relevance of freezing for human stress-coping, its phenomenology and neurobiological underpinnings remain largely unexplored in humans. Studies in rodents have shown that freezing depends on amygdala projections to the brainstem (periaqueductal grey). Recent neuroimaging studies in humans have indicated that similar brain regions may be involved in human freezing. In addition, flexibly shifting between freezing and active defensive modes is critical for adequate stress-coping and relies on fronto-amygdala connections. This review paper presents a model detailing these neural mechanisms involved in freezing and the shift to fight-or-flight action. Freezing is not a passive state but rather a parasympathetic brake on the motor system, relevant to perception and action preparation. Study of these defensive responses in humans may advance insights into human stress-related psychopathologies characterized by rigidity in behavioural stress reactions. The paper therefore concludes with a research agenda to stimulate translational animal-human research in this emerging field of human defensive stress responses.This article is part of the themed issue 'Movement suppression: brain mechanisms for stopping and stillness'. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Freeze for action: neurobiological mechanisms in animal and human freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Upon increasing levels of threat, animals activate qualitatively different defensive modes, including freezing and active fight-or-flight reactions. Whereas freezing is a form of behavioural inhibition accompanied by parasympathetically dominated heart rate deceleration, fight-or-flight reactions are associated with sympathetically driven heart rate acceleration. Despite the potential relevance of freezing for human stress-coping, its phenomenology and neurobiological underpinnings remain largely unexplored in humans. Studies in rodents have shown that freezing depends on amygdala projections to the brainstem (periaqueductal grey). Recent neuroimaging studies in humans have indicated that similar brain regions may be involved in human freezing. In addition, flexibly shifting between freezing and active defensive modes is critical for adequate stress-coping and relies on fronto-amygdala connections. This review paper presents a model detailing these neural mechanisms involved in freezing and the shift to fight-or-flight action. Freezing is not a passive state but rather a parasympathetic brake on the motor system, relevant to perception and action preparation. Study of these defensive responses in humans may advance insights into human stress-related psychopathologies characterized by rigidity in behavioural stress reactions. The paper therefore concludes with a research agenda to stimulate translational animal–human research in this emerging field of human defensive stress responses. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Movement suppression: brain mechanisms for stopping and stillness’. PMID:28242739

  3. Realistic Avatar Eye and Head Animation Using a Neurobiological Model of Visual Attention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Itti, L; Dhavale, N; Pighin, F

    2003-01-01

    We describe a neurobiological model of visual attention and eye/head movements in primates, and its application to the automatic animation of a realistic virtual human head watching an unconstrained...

  4. Freeze for action: Neurobiological mechanisms in animal and human freezing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, K.

    2017-01-01

    Upon increasing levels of threat, animals activate qualitatively different defensive modes, including freezing and active fight-or-flight reactions. Whereas freezing is a form of behavioural inhibition accompanied by parasympathetically dominated heart rate deceleration, fight-or-flight reactions

  5. The effect of music on cognitive performance: insight from neurobiological and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Nikki S; Toukhsati, Samia R; Field, Simone E

    2005-12-01

    The past 50 years have seen numerous claims that music exposure enhances human cognitive performance. Critical evaluation of studies across a variety of contexts, however, reveals important methodological weaknesses. The current article argues that an interdisciplinary approach is required to advance this research. A case is made for the use of appropriate animal models to avoid many confounds associated with human music research. Although such research has validity limitations for humans, reductionist methodology enables a more controlled exploration of music's elementary effects. This article also explores candidate mechanisms for this putative effect. A review of neurobiological evidence from human and comparative animal studies confirms that musical stimuli modify autonomic and neurochemical arousal indices, and may also modify synaptic plasticity. It is proposed that understanding how music affects animals provides a valuable conjunct to human research and may be vital in uncovering how music might be used to enhance cognitive performance.

  6. Fundamentals of neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greg Hall, D

    2011-01-01

    Session 1 of the 2010 STP/IFSTP Joint Symposium on Toxicologic Neuropathology, titled "Fundamentals of Neurobiology," was organized to provide a foundation for subsequent sessions by presenting essential elements of neuroanatomy and nervous system function. A brief introduction to the session titled "Introduction to Correlative Neurobiology" was provided by Dr. Greg Hall (Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN). Correlative neurobiology refers to considerations of the relationships between the highly organized and compartmentalized structure of nervous tissues and the functioning within this system.

  7. Animal Models of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Recent Neurobiological Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Annie M.; Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Edwards, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex psychiatric disorder characterized by the intrusive re-experiencing of past trauma, avoidant behavior, enhanced fear, and hyperarousal following a traumatic event in vulnerable populations. Preclinical animal models do not replicate the human condition in its entirety, but seek to mimic symptoms or endophenotypes associated with PTSD. Although many models of traumatic stress exist, few adequately capture the complex nature of the disorder and the observed individual variability in susceptibility of humans to develop PTSD. In addition, various types of stressors may produce different molecular neuroadaptations that likely contribute to the various behavioral disruptions produced by each model, although certain consistent neurobiological themes related to PTSD have emerged. For example, animal models report traumatic stress- and trauma reminder-induced alterations in neuronal activity in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, in agreement with the human PTSD literature. Models have also provided a conceptual framework for the often observed combination of PTSD and co-morbid conditions such as alcohol use disorder (AUD). Future studies will continue to refine preclinical PTSD models in hopes of capitalizing on their potential to deliver new and more efficacious treatments for PTSD and associated psychiatric disorders. PMID:25083568

  8. Clinical and Neurobiological Relevance of Current Animal Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck; Lázaro, María T; Choi, Chang Soon; Bahn, Geon Ho; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social and communication impairments, as well as repetitive and restrictive behaviors. The phenotypic heterogeneity of ASD has made it overwhelmingly difficult to determine the exact etiology and pathophysiology underlying the core symptoms, which are often accompanied by comorbidities such as hyperactivity, seizures, and sensorimotor abnormalities. To our benefit, the advent of animal models has allowed us to assess and test diverse risk factors of ASD, both genetic and environmental, and measure their contribution to the manifestation of autistic symptoms. At a broader scale, rodent models have helped consolidate molecular pathways and unify the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying each one of the various etiologies. This approach will potentially enable the stratification of ASD into clinical, molecular, and neurophenotypic subgroups, further proving their translational utility. It is henceforth paramount to establish a common ground of mechanistic theories from complementing results in preclinical research. In this review, we cluster the ASD animal models into lesion and genetic models and further classify them based on the corresponding environmental, epigenetic and genetic factors. Finally, we summarize the symptoms and neuropathological highlights for each model and make critical comparisons that elucidate their clinical and neurobiological relevance.

  9. The use of animal models to decipher physiological and neurobiological alterations of Anorexia Nervosa patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu eMéquinion

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies were performed to decipher the mechanisms regulating feeding due to the worldwide obesity pandemy and its complications. The data obtained might be adapted to another disorder related to alteration of food intake, the restrictive anorexia nervosa. This multifactorial disease with a complex and unknown etiology is considered as an awful eating disorder since the chronic refusal to eat leads to severe and sometimes irreversible complications for the whole organism, until death. There is an urgent need to better understand the different aspects of the disease to develop novel approaches complementary to the usual psychological therapies. For this purpose, the use of pertinent animal models becomes a necessity. We present here the various rodent models described in the literature that might be used to dissect central and peripheral mechanisms involved in the adaptation to deficient energy supplies and/or the maintenance of physiological alterations on the long term. Data obtained from the spontaneous or engineered genetic models permit to better apprehend the implication of one signaling system (hormone, neuropeptides, neurotransmitter in the development of several symptoms observed in anorexia nervosa. As example, mutations in the ghrelin, serotonin, dopamine pathways lead to alterations that mimic the phenotype, but compensatory mechanisms often occur rendering necessary the used of more selective gene strategies. Until now, environmental animal models based on one or several inducing factors like diet restriction, stress or physical activity mimicked more extensively central and peripheral alterations decribed in anorexia nervosa. They bring significant data on feeding behavior, energy expenditure and central circuit alterations. Animal models are described and criticized on the basis of the criteria of validity for anorexia nervosa.

  10. The Use of Animal Models to Decipher Physiological and Neurobiological Alterations of Anorexia Nervosa Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies were performed to decipher the mechanisms regulating feeding due to the worldwide obesity pandemy and its complications. The data obtained might be adapted to another disorder related to alteration of food intake, the restrictive anorexia nervosa. This multifactorial disease with a complex and unknown etiology is considered as an awful eating disorder since the chronic refusal to eat leads to severe, and sometimes, irreversible complications for the whole organism, until death. There is an urgent need to better understand the different aspects of the disease to develop novel approaches complementary to the usual psychological therapies. For this purpose, the use of pertinent animal models becomes a necessity. We present here the various rodent models described in the literature that might be used to dissect central and peripheral mechanisms involved in the adaptation to deficient energy supplies and/or the maintenance of physiological alterations on the long term. Data obtained from the spontaneous or engineered genetic models permit to better apprehend the implication of one signaling system (hormone, neuropeptide, neurotransmitter) in the development of several symptoms observed in anorexia nervosa. As example, mutations in the ghrelin, serotonin, dopamine pathways lead to alterations that mimic the phenotype, but compensatory mechanisms often occur rendering necessary the use of more selective gene strategies. Until now, environmental animal models based on one or several inducing factors like diet restriction, stress, or physical activity mimicked more extensively central and peripheral alterations decribed in anorexia nervosa. They bring significant data on feeding behavior, energy expenditure, and central circuit alterations. Animal models are described and criticized on the basis of the criteria of validity for anorexia nervosa. PMID:26042085

  11. Characterizing ingestive behavior through licking microstructure: Underlying neurobiology and its use in the study of obesity in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alexander W

    2017-07-03

    Ingestive behavior is controlled by multiple distinct peripheral and central physiological mechanisms that ultimately determine whether a particular food should be accepted or avoided. As rodents consume a fluid they display stereotyped rhythmic tongue movements, and by analyzing the temporal distribution of pauses of licking, it is possible through analyses of licking microstructure to uncover dissociable evaluative and motivational variables that contribute to ingestive behavior. The mean number of licks occurring within each burst of licking (burst and cluster size) reflects the palatability of the consumed solution, whereas the frequency of initiating novel bouts of licking behavior (burst and cluster number) is dependent upon the degree of gastrointestinal inhibition that accrues through continued fluid ingestion. This review describes the analysis of these measures within a context of the behavioral variables that come to influence the acceptance or avoidance of a fluid, and the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie alterations in the temporal distribution of pauses of licks. The application of these studies to models of obesity in animals is also described. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Significance of Human-Animal Relationships as Modulators of Trauma Effects in Children: A Developmental Neurobiological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Emotional stress and trauma impacts the neurobiology of children. They are especially vulnerable given the developmental plasticity of the brain. The neural synaptic circular processes between the anterior cingulated cortex, prefrontal cortex, amygdala and the hypothalamus are altered. Trauma results in the release of the peptide glucocortisoid,…

  13. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Marc N Potenza

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may pro...

  14. Putting the ?Biology? Back into ?Neurobiology?: The Strength of Diversity in Animal Model Systems for Neuroscience Research

    OpenAIRE

    Keifer, Joyce; Summers, Cliff H.

    2016-01-01

    Current trends in neuroscience research have moved toward a reliance on rodent animal models to study most aspects of brain function. Such laboratory-reared animals are highly inbred, have been disengaged from their natural environments for generations and appear to be of limited predictive value for successful clinical outcomes. In this Perspective article, we argue that research on a rich diversity of animal model systems is fundamental to new discoveries in evolutionarily conserved core ph...

  15. [Neurobiology of Tourette Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Dilek; Akdemir, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Although it is a common disorder in childhood, the etiology of Tourette Syndrome has not been fully elucidated yet. Studies, -conducted so far- have revealed differences in neurobiological structures of individuals who suffer from Tourette Syndrome. The objective of this review is to assess etiological and pathophysiological studies in the Tourette Syndrome literature. An electronical search was conducted in PubMed database using the keywords tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome, neurobiology, genetics, neuroimaging and animal models. Research and review studies published between 1985 and 2015, with a selection preference towards recent publications, were reviewed. According to the studies, genetic predisposition hypothesis is considered as a priority. However, a precise genetic disorder associated with Tourette Syndrome has not been found. The evidence from postmortem and neuroimaging studies in heterogenous patient groups and animal studies supports the pathological involvement of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits in Tourette Syndrome. Consequently, the most emphasized hypothesis in the pathophysiology is the dopaminergic dysfunction in these circuits. Furthermore, these findings of the animal, postmortem and neuroimaging studies have confirmed the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of Tourette Syndrome. In conclusion, more studies are needed to understand the etiology of the disorder. The data obtained from neurobiological studies of the disorder will not only shed light on the way of Tourette Syndrome, but also guide studies on its treatment options.

  16. Putting the "Biology" Back into "Neurobiology": The Strength of Diversity in Animal Model Systems for Neuroscience Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce; Summers, Cliff H

    2016-01-01

    Current trends in neuroscience research have moved toward a reliance on rodent animal models to study most aspects of brain function. Such laboratory-reared animals are highly inbred, have been disengaged from their natural environments for generations and appear to be of limited predictive value for successful clinical outcomes. In this Perspective article, we argue that research on a rich diversity of animal model systems is fundamental to new discoveries in evolutionarily conserved core physiological and molecular mechanisms that are the foundation of human brain function. Analysis of neural circuits across phyla will reveal general computational solutions that form the basis for adaptive behavioral responses. Further, we stress that development of ethoexperimental approaches to improve our understanding of behavioral nuance will help to realign our research strategies with therapeutic goals and improve the translational validity of specific animal models. Finally, we suggest that neuroscience has a role in environmental conservation of habitat and fauna that will preserve and protect the ecological settings that drive species-specific behavioral adaptations. A rich biodiversity will enhance our understanding of human brain function and lead in unpredicted directions for development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders.

  17. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  18. Neurobiological studies of fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is a symptom associated with many disorders, is especially common in women and in older adults, and can have a huge negative influence on quality of life. Although most past research on fatigue uses human subjects instead of animal models, the use of appropriate animal models has recently begun to advance our understanding of the neurobiology of fatigue. In this review, results from animal models using immunological, developmental, or physical approaches to study fatigue are described and compared. Common across these animal models is that fatigue arises when a stimulus induces activation of microglia and/or increased cytokines and chemokines in the brain. Neurobiological studies implicate structures in the ascending arousal system, sleep executive control areas, and areas important in reward. In addition, the suprachiasmatic nucleus clearly plays an important role in homeostatic regulation of the neural network mediating fatigue. This nucleus responds to cytokines, shows decreased amplitude firing rate output in models of fatigue, and responds to exercise, one of our few treatments for fatigue. This is a young field but very important as the symptom of fatigue is common across many disorders and we do not have effective treatments. PMID:22841649

  19. Animal models for medications development targeting alcohol abuse using selectively bred rat lines: Neurobiological and pharmacological validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard L.; Sable, Helen J.K.; Colombo, Giancarlo; Hyytia, Petri; Rodd, Zachary A.; Lumeng, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper is to present evidence that rat animal models of alcoholism provide an ideal platform for developing and screening medications that target alcohol abuse and dependence. The focus is on the 5 oldest international rat lines that have been selectively bred for a high alcohol-consumption phenotype. The behavioral and neurochemical phenotypes of these rat lines are reviewed and placed in the context of the clinical literature. The paper presents behavioral models for assessing the efficacy of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of alcohol abuse and dependence in rodents, with particular emphasis on rats. Drugs that have been tested for their effectiveness in reducing alcohol/ethanol consumption and/or self-administration by these rat lines and their putative site of action are summarized. The paper also presents some current and future directions for developing pharmacological treatments targeting alcohol abuse and dependence. PMID:22841890

  20. The neurobiology of individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bivort, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Individuals often display conspicuously different patterns of behavior, even when they are very closely related genetically. These differences give rise to our sense of individuality, but what is their molecular and neurobiological basis? Individuals that are nominally genetically identical differ at various molecular and neurobiological levels: cell-to-cell variation in somatic genomes, cell-to-cell variation in expression patterns, individual-to-individual variation in neuronal morphology and physiology, and individual-to-individual variation in patterns of brain activity. It is unknown which of these levels is fundamentally causal of behavioral differences. To investigate this problem, we use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whose genetic toolkit allows the manipulation of each of these mechanistic levels, and whose rapid lifecycle and small size allows for high-throughput automation of behavioral assays. This latter point is crucial; identifying inter-individual behavioral differences requires high sample sizes both within and across individual animals. Automated behavioral characterization is at the heart of our research strategy. In every behavior examined, individual flies have individual behavioral preferences, and we have begun to identify both neural genes and circuits that control the degree of behavioral variability between individuals.

  1. Molecular neurobiology in neurology and psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 selections. Some of the titles are: An Introduction to Ion Channels; Molecular Neurobiology of the Myelinated Nerve Fiber: Ion-Channel Distributions and Their Implications for Demyelinating Diseases; A Molecular Genetic Approach to Huntington's Disease; and Molecular Features of Cell Adhesion Molecules Involved in Neural Development.

  2. The neurobiology of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Sean

    2018-02-01

    Directional climate change (global warming) is causing rapid alterations in animals' environments. Because the nervous system is at the forefront of animals' interactions with the environment, the neurobiological implications of climate change are central to understanding how individuals, and ultimately populations, will respond to global warming. Evidence is accumulating for individual level, mechanistic effects of climate change on nervous system development and performance. Climate change can also alter sensory stimuli, changing the effectiveness of sensory and cognitive systems for achieving biological fitness. At the population level, natural selection forces stemming from directional climate change may drive rapid evolutionary change in nervous system structure and function.

  3. [What brings neurobiology to addictions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Magalie; Noble, Florence

    2016-12-01

    Addictions are multifactorial, and there are no experimental models replicating all aspects of this pathology. The development of animal models reproducing the clinical symptoms of addictions allows significant advances in the knowledge of the neurobiological processes involved in addiction. Preclinical data highlight different neuroadaptations according to the routes of administration, speeds of injection and frequencies of exposure to drugs of abuse. The neuroadaptations induced by an exposure to drugs of abuse follow dynamic processes in time. Despite significant progresses in the knowledge of neurobiology of addictions allowing to propose new therapeutic targets, the passage of new drugs in clinical is often disappointing. The lack of treatment efficacy reported in clinical trials is probably due to a very important heterogeneity of patients with distinct biological and genetic factors, but also with different patterns of consumption that can lead to different neuroadaptations, as clearly observed in preclinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Title and title page.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peh, W C G; Ng, K H

    2008-08-01

    The title gives the first impression of a scientific article, and should accurately convey to a reader what the whole article is about. A good title is short, informative and attractive. The title page provides information about the authors, their affiliations and the corresponding author's contact details.

  5. Plant neurobiology and green plant intelligence : science, metaphors and nonsense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struik, P.C.; Yin, X.; Meinke, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the recent debates on the emerging science of plant neurobiology, which claims that the individual green plant should be considered as an intelligent organism. Plant neurobiology tries to use elements from animal physiology as elegant metaphors to trigger the imagination in

  6. Neurobiology of song learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Birdsong is a culturally transmitted behavior that depends on a juvenile songbird’s ability to imitate the song of an adult tutor. Neurobiological studies of birdsong can reveal how a complex form of imitative learning, which bears strong parallels to human speech learning, can be understood at the level of underlying circuit, cellular, and synaptic mechanisms. This review focuses on recent studies that illuminate the neurobiological mechanisms for singing and song learning. PMID:19892546

  7. [Recent progress in neurobiological mechanisms of depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Bo; Li, Liang-Ping; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2012-08-25

    Revealing the neurobiological mechanism of depression has always been a big challenge in the field of neuroscience. Not only are depressive syndromes heterogeneous and their aetiologies diverse, but also some symptoms are impossible to reproduce in animal models. Nevertheless, great progress has been made on the understanding and treatment of depression in recent years. In this review, we focus on key leading hypotheses in the neurobiological mechanism of depression, examine their strengths and weaknesses critically, and also highlight new insights that promise to extend the understanding of depression and its treatment.

  8. Neurobiology of Gambling Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    For many, gambling is a recreational activity that is performed periodically without ill effects, but for some, gambling may interfere with life functioning. A diagnostic entity, pathological gambling, is currently used to define a condition marked by excessive and problematic gambling. In this review, the current status of understanding of the neurobiologies of gambling and pathological gambling is described. Multiple neurotransmitter systems (norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, opioid and glutamate) and brain regions (ventral striatum, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, insula, among others) have been implicated in gambling and pathological gambling. Considerations for future directions in gambling research, with a view towards translating neurobiological advances into more effective prevention and treatment strategies, are discussed. PMID:23541597

  9. [Recent neurobiological data on cannabis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Jean

    2002-01-01

    The alarming increase in cannabis abuse has triggered a renewed interest in the neurobiological mechanisms which underlie its effects, particularly as regards its addictive properties either intrinsic or when crossed with other narcotics as well as its subsequent damage. We here report an evaluation of experimental data which reveal in animals a psychological dependence, common to all addictive drugs; a physical dependence, which is considered up to now as the characteristic of "hard addictive drugs"; the incentive effect that cannabis should exert on the inclination to abuse other addictive drugs, especially heroin; and finally the close relationships which seem to exist between cannabis and schizophrenia. Most of these recent data are far from reassuring as regards cannabis psychotoxicity. Furthermore they underline its potential danger and prompt increased caution.

  10. Marijuana Neurobiology and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Elkashef, Ahmed; Vocci, Frank; Huestis, Marilyn; Haney, Margaret; Budney, Alan; Gruber, Amanda; el-Guebaly, Nady

    2008-01-01

    Marijuana is the number one illicit drug of abuse worldwide and a major public health problem, especially in the younger population. The objective of this article is to update and review the state of the science and treatments available for marijuana dependence based on a pre-meeting workshop that was presented at ISAM 2006. At the workshop, several papers were presented addressing the neurobiology and pharmacology of marijuana and treatment approaches, both psychotherapy and medications, for...

  11. Neurobiology of Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Elizabeth S.; Beach, Sara D.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disabilities, yet its brain basis and core causes are not yet fully understood. Neuroimaging methods, including structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and electrophysiology, have significantly contributed to knowledge about the neurobiology of dyslexia. Recent studies have discovered brain differences prior to formal instruction that likely encourage or discourage learning to read effectively, distinguished between brain differences that likely reflect the etiology of dyslexia versus brain differences that are the consequences of variation in reading experience, and identified distinct neural networks associated with specific psychological factors that are associated with dyslexia. PMID:25290881

  12. Neurobiology of dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Elizabeth S; Beach, Sara D; Gabrieli, John D E

    2015-02-01

    Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disabilities, yet its brain basis and core causes are not yet fully understood. Neuroimaging methods, including structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and electrophysiology, have significantly contributed to knowledge about the neurobiology of dyslexia. Recent studies have discovered brain differences before formal instruction that likely encourage or discourage learning to read effectively, distinguished between brain differences that likely reflect the etiology of dyslexia versus brain differences that are the consequences of variation in reading experience, and identified distinct neural networks associated with specific psychological factors that are associated with dyslexia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress: Neurobiology, consequences and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress, both physical and psychological, is attracting increasing attention among neuroresearchers. In the last 20 decades, there has been a surge of interest in the research of stress-induced manifestations and this approach has resulted in the development of more appropriate animal models for stress-associated pathologies and its therapeutic management. These stress models are an easy and convenient method for inducing both psychological and physical stress. To understand the behavioral changes underlying major depression, molecular and cellular studies are required. Dysregulation of the stress system may lead to disturbances in growth and development, and may this may further lead to the development of various other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the different types of stress and their neurobiology, including the different neurotransmitters affected. There are various complications associated with stress and their management through various pharmacological and non-pharmacological techniques. The use of herbs in the treatment of stress-related problems is practiced in both Indian and Western societies, and it has a vast market in terms of anti-stress medications and treatments. Non-pharmacological techniques such as meditation and yoga are nowadays becoming very popular as a stress-relieving therapy because of their greater effectiveness and no associated side effects. Therefore, this review highlights the changes under stress and stressor and their impact on different animal models in understanding the mechanisms of stress along with their effective and safe management.

  14. Stalking: a neurobiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Donatella; Falaschi, Valentina; Lombardi, Amedeo; Mungai, Francesco; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays stalking is becoming a real social emergency, as it may often fuel severe aggressive behaviours. No exhaustive aetiological hypothesis is still available regarding this complex phenomenon. However, the detailed descriptions of some of its peculiar features allow to draw with cautions some general suggestions. Probably stalking may arise from the derangement of those neural networks subserving the so-called social brain and the pair bonding formation, in particular the processes of attachment/separation, attraction/romantic love/reward. In addition, it seems to be modulated by excessive functioning of the dopamine system coupled with decreased serotonin tone. It is believed that the investigation and deepening of its possible neurobiological substrates may be helpful in the prevention of the severe consequences of stalking.

  15. Neurobiological consequences of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeroff, Charles B

    2004-01-01

    There is considerable evidence to suggest that adverse early-life experiences have a profound effect on the developing brain. Neurobiological changes that occur in response to untoward early-life stress can lead to lifelong psychiatric sequelae. Children who are exposed to sexual or physical abuse or the death of a parent are at higher risk for development of depressive and anxiety disorders later in life. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that repeated early-life stress leads to alterations in central neurobiological systems, particularly in the corticotropin-releasing factor system, leading to increased responsiveness to stress. Clearly, exposure to early-life stressors leads to neurobiological changes that increase the risk of psychopathology in both children and adults. Identification of the neurobiological substrates that are affected by adverse experiences in early life should lead to the development of more effective treatments for these disorders. The preclinical and clinical studies evaluating the consequences of early-life stress are reviewed.

  16. The neurobiology of successful abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavan, H; Brennan, K L; Hester, R; Whelan, R

    2013-08-01

    This review focuses on the neurobiological processes involved in achieving successful abstinence from drugs of abuse. While there is clinical and public health value in knowing if the deficits associated with drug use correct with abstinence, studying the neurobiology that underlies successful abstinence can also illuminate the processes that enable drug-dependent individuals to successfully quit. Here, we review studies on human addicts that assess the neurobiological changes that arise with abstinence and the neurobiological predictors of successfully avoiding relapse. The literature, while modest in size, suggests that abstinence is associated with improvement in prefrontal structure and function, which may underscore the importance of prefrontally mediated cognitive control processes in avoiding relapse. Given the implication that the prefrontal cortex may be an important target for therapeutic interventions, we also review evidence indicating the efficacy of cognitive control training for abstinence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gravitational Neurobiology of Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmann, H.; Anken, R. H.

    In vertebrates (including man), altered gravitational environments such as weightlessness can induce malfunctions of the inner ears, based on irregular movements of the semicircular cristae or on dislocations of the inner ear otoliths from the corresponding sensory epithelia. This will lead to illusionary tilts, since the vestibular inputs are not confirmed by the other sensory organs, which results in an intersensory conflict. Vertebrates in orbit therefore face severe orientation problems. In humans, the intersensory conflict may additionally lead to a malaise, commonly referred to as space motion sickness (SMS), a kinetosis. During the first days at weightlessness, the orientation problems (and SMS) disappear, since the brain develops a new compensatory interpretation of the available sensory data. The present review reports on the neurobiological responses - particularly of fish - observed at altered gravitational states, concerning behaviour and neuroplastic reactivities. Recent investigations employing microgravity (spaceflight, parabolic aircraft flights, clinostat) and hyper-gravity (laboratory centrifuges as ground based research tools) yielded clues and insights into the understanding of the respective basic phenomena

  18. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  1. Neurodynamics: nonlinear dynamics and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarbanel, H D; Rabinovich, M I

    2001-08-01

    The use of methods from contemporary nonlinear dynamics in studying neurobiology has been rather limited.Yet, nonlinear dynamics has become a practical tool for analyzing data and verifying models. This has led to productive coupling of nonlinear dynamics with experiments in neurobiology in which the neural circuits are forced with constant stimuli, with slowly varying stimuli, with periodic stimuli, and with more complex information-bearing stimuli. Analysis of these more complex stimuli of neural circuits goes to the heart of how one is to understand the encoding and transmission of information by nervous systems.

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 1006 ... Issue, Title. Vol 56, No 2 (2014), Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence studies on humans and animals in Africa, Abstract PDF. K Hammond-Aryee, M Esser, PD Van Helden. Vol 51, No 1 (2009), A Bibliometric Analysis of Research Publications Funded Partially by the Cancer Association of South Africa ...

  3. The neurobiology of circadian rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, Eddy A.; Boersma, Gretha J.; Hut, Roelof A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review There is growing awareness of the importance of circadian rhythmicity in various research fields. Exciting developments are ongoing in the field of circadian neurobiology linked to sleep, food intake, and memory. With the current knowledge of critical clock genes' (genes found to

  4. Neurobiological Substrates of Tourette's Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.; Smith, Megan E.; Larabi, Daouia; Hampson, Michelle

    Objective: This article reviews the available scientific literature concerning the neurobiological substrates of Tourette's disorder (TD). Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies using relevant search terms. Results:

  5. Mental health: More than neurobiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, E.; Tuerlinckx, F.; Borsboom, D.

    2014-01-01

    The decision by the US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to fund only research into the neurobiological roots of mental disorders (Nature 507, 288; 2014) presumes that these all result from brain abnormalities. But this is not the case for many people with mental-health issues and we fear

  6. Neurobiology of wisdom: a literature overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Thomas W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2009-04-01

    Wisdom is a unique psychological trait noted since antiquity, long discussed in humanities disciplines, recently operationalized by psychology and sociology researchers, but largely unexamined in psychiatry or biology. To discuss recent neurobiological studies related to subcomponents of wisdom identified from several published definitions/descriptions of wisdom by clinical investigators in the field, ie, prosocial attitudes/behaviors, social decision making/pragmatic knowledge of life, emotional homeostasis, reflection/self-understanding, value relativism/tolerance, and acknowledgment of and dealing effectively with uncertainty. Literature focusing primarily on neuroimaging/brain localization and secondarily on neurotransmitters, including their genetic determinants. Studies involving functional neuroimaging or neurotransmitter functioning, examining human (rather than animal) subjects, and identified via a PubMed search using keywords from any of the 6 proposed subcomponents of wisdom were included. Studies were reviewed by both of us, and data considered to be potentially relevant to the neurobiology of wisdom were extracted. Functional neuroimaging permits exploration of neural correlates of complex psychological attributes such as those proposed to comprise wisdom. The prefrontal cortex figures prominently in several wisdom subcomponents (eg, emotional regulation, decision making, value relativism), primarily via top-down regulation of limbic and striatal regions. The lateral prefrontal cortex facilitates calculated, reason-based decision making, whereas the medial prefrontal cortex is implicated in emotional valence and prosocial attitudes/behaviors. Reward neurocircuitry (ventral striatum, nucleus accumbens) also appears important for promoting prosocial attitudes/behaviors. Monoaminergic activity (especially dopaminergic and serotonergic), influenced by several genetic polymorphisms, is critical to certain subcomponents of wisdom such as emotional

  7. Neurobiological basis of frustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justel, Nadia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main feature shared by the phenomena involving unexpected changes of reinforcement is that there is a discrepancy between expected and received reward. Consequently, the behavior is modified according to this difference; the animals have an emotional response to the surprising reward change, called frustration. Some of the paradigms that are commonly used to study these problems are: consummatory Successive Negative Contrast and consummatory Extinction. This review describes the major works that investigate the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological mechanisms involved in these studies, and the main tasks related with the administration of drugs that modulate the memory of the surprising reward changes.

  8. The neurobiology of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, J M

    1999-05-08

    Understanding the plasticity of pain and analgesia exhibited in different pain states may improve therapies for the two major types of pain, neuropathic and inflammatory pain, in which nerve and tissue damage leads to alterations at both peripheral and central levels. At the level of the peripheral nerve, drugs that act on particular sodium channels may target only pain-related activity. Agents that act on some of the peripheral mediators of pain may control peripheral nerve activity. A new generation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitors, that lack gastric actions are becoming available. In the spinal cord, the release of peptides and glutamate causes activation of multiple receptors, particularly, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor for glutamate, which, in concert with other spinal systems, generates spinal hypersensitivity. Blocking the generation of excitability is one approach, but increasing inhibitions may also provide analgesia. Opioid actions are via presynaptic and post-synaptic inhibitory effects on central and peripheral C fibre terminals, spinal neurones, and supraspinal mechanisms. Our knowledge of brain mechanisms of pain is still, however, limited. Other new targets have been revealed by molecular biology and animal models of clinical pain, but the possibility of a "magic bullet" is doubtful. Thus, another approach could be single molecules with dual drug actions, that encompass targets where additive or synergistic effects of different mechanisms may enable pain relief without major adverse effects.

  9. The neurobiology of social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, N L; Book, S; Davidson, J R

    1996-06-01

    Studies in the neurobiology of social phobia have used neuroendocrine, naturalistic and chemical challenges, pharmacological probes, neurotransmitter system measures, peripheral receptor binding and magnetic resonance measures. Studies of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axes have been largely unrevealing; adrenaline, carbon dioxide, caffeine and yohimbine tests have provided mixed results; probe studies using L-dopa, clonidine and fenfluramine have provided some evidence of post-synaptic serotonergic abnormality; studies on platelet and lymphocyte binding have failed to distinguish social phobia from other groups; magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggest possible differences between patients with social phobia and healthy controls in respect of dopamine, serotonin and second-messenger function. In aggregate, these studies have provided some neurobiological basis for separating social phobia from panic disorder and non-psychiatric healthy controls.

  10. The Neurobiology of Anesthetic Emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnal, Vijay; Vlisides, Phillip E; Mashour, George A

    2016-07-01

    Achieving a smooth and rapid emergence from general anesthesia is of particular importance for neurosurgical patients and is a clinical goal for neuroanesthesiologists. Recent data suggest that the process of emergence is not simply the mirror image of induction, but rather controlled by distinct neural circuits. In this narrative review, we discuss (1) hysteresis, (2) the concept of neural inertia, (3) the asymmetry between the neurobiology of induction and emergence, and (4) recent attempts at actively inducing emergence.

  11. Controlling legs for locomotion-insights from robotics and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Thomas; Ewald, Alexander; von Twickel, Arndt; Büschges, Ansgar

    2015-06-29

    Walking is the most common terrestrial form of locomotion in animals. Its great versatility and flexibility has led to many attempts at building walking machines with similar capabilities. The control of walking is an active research area both in neurobiology and robotics, with a large and growing body of work. This paper gives an overview of the current knowledge on the control of legged locomotion in animals and machines and attempts to give walking control researchers from biology and robotics an overview of the current knowledge in both fields. We try to summarize the knowledge on the neurobiological basis of walking control in animals, emphasizing common principles seen in different species. In a section on walking robots, we review common approaches to walking controller design with a slight emphasis on biped walking control. We show where parallels between robotic and neurobiological walking controllers exist and how robotics and biology may benefit from each other. Finally, we discuss where research in the two fields diverges and suggest ways to bridge these gaps.

  12. Neurobiology of aggression and violence

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega-Escobar, Joaquín; Alcázar-Córcoles, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    La neurobiología de la agresión y la violencia es de interés para la psicología jurídica porque buenaparte de la conducta delictiva tiene componentes violentos. En esta revisión se definen en primer lugarambos conceptos, para diferenciar a continuación los tipos de agresión (impulsiva vs. instrumental) queaparecen en la literatura científica y finalmente analizar las estructuras nerviosas que según los estudiossobre lesiones cerebrales o de neuroimagen están asociadas con la agresión. Esta re...

  13. An embodied view of octopus neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochner, Binyamin

    2012-10-23

    Octopuses have a unique flexible body and unusual morphology, but nevertheless they are undoubtedly a great evolutionary success. They compete successfully with vertebrates in their ecological niche using a rich behavioral repertoire more typical of an intelligent predator which includes extremely effective defensive behavior--fast escape swimming and an astonishing ability to adapt their shape and color to their environment. The most obvious characteristic feature of an octopus is its eight long and flexible arms, but these pose a great challenge for achieving the level of motor and sensory information processing necessary for their behaviors. First, coordinating motion is a formidable task because of the infinite degrees of freedom that have to be controlled; and second, it is hard to use body coordinates in this flexible animal to represent sensory information in a central control system. Here I will review experimental results suggesting that these difficulties, arising from the animal's morphology, have imposed the evolution of unique brain/body/behavior relationships best explained as intelligent behavior which emerges from the octopus's embodied organization. The term 'intelligent embodiment' comes from robotics and refers to an approach to designing autonomous robots in which the behavior emerges from the dynamic physical and sensory interactions of the agent's materials, morphology and environment. Consideration of the unusual neurobiology of the octopus in the light of its unique morphology suggests that similar embodied principles are instrumental for understanding the emergence of intelligent behavior in all biological systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurobiology of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Clauw, Daniel J

    2016-12-03

    Fibromyalgia is the current term for chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain for which no alternative cause can be identified. The underlying mechanisms, in both human and animal studies, for the continued pain in individuals with fibromyalgia will be explored in this review. There is a substantial amount of support for alterations of central nervous system nociceptive processing in people with fibromyalgia, and that psychological factors such as stress can enhance the pain experience. Emerging evidence has begun exploring other potential mechanisms including a peripheral nervous system component to the generation of pain and the role of systemic inflammation. We will explore the data and neurobiology related to the role of the CNS in nociceptive processing, followed by a short review of studies examining potential peripheral nervous system changes and cytokine involvement. We will not only explore the data from human subjects with fibromyalgia but will relate this to findings from animal models of fibromyalgia. We conclude that fibromyalgia and related disorders are heterogenous conditions with a complicated pathobiology with patients falling along a continuum with one end a purely peripherally driven painful condition and the other end of the continuum is when pain is purely centrally driven. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The neurobiology of addictive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Stephen; Peselow, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Addiction is increasingly understood as a neurobiological illness where repetitive substance abuse corrupts the normal circuitry of rewarding and adaptive behaviors causing drug-induced neuroplastic changes. The addictive process can be examined by looking at the biological basis of substance initiation to the progression of substance abuse to dependence to the enduring risk of relapse. Critical neurotransmitters and neurocircuits underlie the pathological changes at each of these stages. Enhanced dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens is part of the common pathway for the positively rewarding aspects of drugs of abuse and for initiation of the addictive process. F-Aminobutyric acid,opioid peptides, serotonin, acetylcholine, the endocannabinoids, and glutamate systems also play a role in the initial addictive process. Dopamine also plays a key role in conditioned responses to drugs of abuse, and addiction is now recognized as a disease of pathological learning and memory. In the path from substance abuse to addiction, the neurochemistry shifts from a dopamine-based behavioral system to a predominantly glutamate-based one marked by dysregulated glutamate transmission from the prefrontal cortex to the nucleus accumbens in relation to drug versus biologically oriented stimuli. This is a core part of the executive dysfunction now understood as one of the hallmark features of addiction that also includes impaired decision making and impulse dysregulation.Understanding the neurobiology of the addictive process allows for a theoretical psychopharmacological approach to treating addictive disorders,one that takes into account biological interventions aimed at particular stages of the illness.

  16. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enteric Neurobiology: Discoveries and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jackie D

    Discovery and documentation of noncholinergic-nonadrenergic neurotransmission in the enteric nervous system started a revolution in mechanisms of neural control of the digestive tract that continues into a twenty-first century era of translational gastroenterology, which is now firmly embedded in the term, neurogastroenterology. This chapter, on Enteric Neurobiology: Discoveries and Directions, tracks the step-by-step advances in enteric neuronal electrophysiology and synaptic behavior and progresses to the higher order functions of central pattern generators, hard wired synaptic circuits and libraries of neural programs in the brain-in-the-gut that underlie the several different patterns of motility and secretory behaviors that occur in the specialized, serially-connected compartments extending from the esophagus to the anus.

  18. [Neurobiological basis of depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, C; Bielau, H; Bogerts, B; Northoff, G

    2006-12-01

    Depressive disorders belong to the most frequent diseases worldwide showing a lifetime prevalence of up to 20%. Moreover they are one of the leading causes for the amount of years lived with disability. Increasing knowledge about the pathological mechanisms underlying depressive syndromes is obtained by using modern neurobiological research-techniques. Thereby some older theories that have been the basis of emotion-research for decades--like the monoamine hypothesis--have been strengthened. In addition new aspects of the pathological processes underlying depressive disturbances have been unraveled. In this review established models and recent findings will be discussed, to bridge various research-fields, ranging from genetics, epigenetics and morphological changes to the functional consequences of depression. Finally therapeutic implications that could be derived from these results will be presented, showing up putative possibilities for diagnosis and treatment of depressive syndromes.

  19. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert J R

    2016-02-01

    This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action.

  20. Neurobiological linkage between stress and sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Larry D.; Wellman, Laurie L.

    2012-10-01

    Stress can have a significant negative impact on health and stress-induced alterations in sleep are implicated in both human sleep disorders and in psychiatric disorders in which sleep is affected. We have demonstrated that the amygdala, a region critical for regulating emotion, is a key modulator of sleep. Our current research is focused on understanding how the amygdala and stressful emotion affect sleep and on the role sleep plays in recovery from stress. We have implemented animal models to examine the how stress and stress-related memories impact sleep. Experiencing uncontrollable stress and reminders of uncontrollable stress can produce significant reductions in sleep, in particular rapid eye movement sleep. We are using these models to explore the neurobiology linking stress-related emotion and sleep. This research is relevant for sleep disorders such as insomnia and into mental disorders in which sleep is affected such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which is typically characterized by a prominent sleep disturbance in the aftermath of exposure to a psychologically traumatic event.

  1. Toward a Neurobiology of Delusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, P.R.; Taylor, J.R.; Wang, X.-J.; Fletcher, P.C.; Krystal, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Delusions are the false and often incorrigible beliefs that can cause severe suffering in mental illness. We cannot yet explain them in terms of underlying neurobiological abnormalities. However, by drawing on recent advances in the biological, computational and psychological processes of reinforcement learning, memory, and perception it may be feasible to account for delusions in terms of cognition and brain function. The account focuses on a particular parameter, prediction error – the mismatch between expectation and experience – that provides a computational mechanism common to cortical hierarchies, frontostriatal circuits and the amygdala as well as parietal cortices. We suggest that delusions result from aberrations in how brain circuits specify hierarchical predictions, and how they compute and respond to prediction errors. Defects in these fundamental brain mechanisms can vitiate perception, memory, bodily agency and social learning such that individuals with delusions experience an internal and external world that healthy individuals would find difficult to comprehend. The present model attempts to provide a framework through which we can build a mechanistic and translational understanding of these puzzling symptoms. PMID:20558235

  2. Aggression and anxiety: social context and neurobiological links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga D Neumann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Psychopathologies such as anxiety- and depression-related disorders are often characterized by impaired social behaviours including excessive aggression and violence. Excessive aggression and violence likely develop as a consequence of generally disturbed emotional regulation, such as abnormally high or low levels of anxiety. This suggests an overlap between brain circuitries and neurochemical systems regulating aggression and anxiety. In this review, we will discuss different forms of male aggression, rodent models of excessive aggression, and neurobiological mechanisms underlying male aggression in the context of anxiety. We will summarize our attempts to establish an animal model of high and abnormal aggression using rats selected for high (HAB versus low (LAB anxiety-related behaviour. Briefly, male LAB rats and, to a lesser extent, male HAB rats show high and abnormal forms of aggression compared with non-selected (NAB rats, making them a suitable animal model for studying excessive aggression in the context of extremes in innate anxiety. In addition, we will discuss differences in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, brain arginine vasopressin, and the serotonin systems, among others, which contribute to the distinct behavioural phenotypes related to aggression and anxiety. Further investigation of the neurobiological systems in animals with distinct anxiety phenotypes might provide valuable information about the link between excessive aggression and disturbed emotional regulation, which is essential for understanding the social and emotional deficits that are characteristic of many human psychiatric disorders.

  3. Integrated neurobiology of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir eMaletic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available From a neurobiological perspective there is no such thing as bipolar disorder. Rather, it is almost certainly the case that many somewhat similar, but subtly different, pathological conditions produce a disease state that we currently diagnose as bipolarity. This heterogeneity—reflected in the lack of synergy between our current diagnostic schema and our rapidly advancing scientific understanding of the condition—limits attempts to articulate an integrated perspective on bipolar disorder. However, despite these challenges, scientific findings in recent years are beginning to offer a provisional unified field theory of the disease. This theory sees bipolar disorder as a suite of related neurodevelopmental conditions with interconnected functional abnormalities that often appear early in life and worsen over time. In addition to accelerated loss of volume in brain areas known to be essential for mood regulation and cognitive function, consistent findings have emerged at a cellular level, providing evidence that bipolar disorder is reliably associated with dysregulation of glial-neuronal interactions. Among these glial elements are microglia—the brain’s primary immune elements, which appear to be overactive in the context of bipolarity. Multiple studies now indicate that inflammation is also increased in the periphery of the body in both the depressive and manic phases of the illness, with at least some return to normality in the euthymic state. These findings are consistent with changes in the HPA axis, which are known to drive inflammatory activation. In summary, the very fact that no single gene, pathway or brain abnormality is likely to ever account for the condition is itself an extremely important first step in better articulating an integrated perspective on both its ontological status and pathogenesis. Whether this perspective will translate into the discovery of innumerable more homogeneous forms of bipolarity is one of the great

  4. Ethology, Interpersonal Neurobiology, and Play: Insights into the Evolutionary Origin of the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    The author considers the biological basis of the arts in human evolution, which she holds to be grounded in ethology and interpersonal neurobiology. In the arts, she argues, ordinary reality becomes extraordinary by attention-getting, emotionally salient devices that also appear in ritualized animal behaviors, many kinds of play, and the playful…

  5. Neurobiology of Escalated Aggression and Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miczek, Klaus A.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Kravitz, Edward A.; Rissman, Emilie F.; de Boer, Sietse F.; Raine, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Psychopathological violence in criminals and intense aggression in fruit flies and rodents are studied with novel behavioral, neurobiological, and genetic approaches that characterize the escalation from adaptive aggression to violence. One goal is to delineate the type of aggressive behavior and its escalation with greater precision; second, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and brainstem structures emerge as pivotal nodes in the limbic circuitry mediating escalated aggressive behavior. The neurochemical and molecular work focuses on the genes that enable invertebrate aggression in males and females and genes that are expressed or suppressed as a result of aggressive experiences in mammals. The fruitless gene, immediate early genes in discrete serotonin neurons, or sex chromosome genes identify sexually differentiated mechanisms for escalated aggression. Male, but not female, fruit flies establish hierarchical relationships in fights and learn from previous fighting experiences. By manipulating either the fruitless or transformer genes in the brains of male or female flies, patterns of aggression can be switched with males using female patterns and vice versa. Work with Sts or Sry genes suggests so far that other genes on the X chromosomes may have a more critical role in female mouse aggression. New data from feral rats point to the regulatory influences on mesocortical serotonin circuits in highly aggressive animals via feedback to autoreceptors and via GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs. Imaging data lead to the hypothesis that antisocial, violent, and psychopathic behavior may in part be attributable to impairments in some of the brain structures (dorsal and ventral PFC, amygdala, and angular gyrus) subserving moral cognition and emotion. PMID:17978016

  6. Integrated Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletic, Vladimir; Raison, Charles

    2014-01-01

    From a neurobiological perspective there is no such thing as bipolar disorder. Rather, it is almost certainly the case that many somewhat similar, but subtly different, pathological conditions produce a disease state that we currently diagnose as bipolarity. This heterogeneity – reflected in the lack of synergy between our current diagnostic schema and our rapidly advancing scientific understanding of the condition – limits attempts to articulate an integrated perspective on bipolar disorder. However, despite these challenges, scientific findings in recent years are beginning to offer a provisional “unified field theory” of the disease. This theory sees bipolar disorder as a suite of related neurodevelopmental conditions with interconnected functional abnormalities that often appear early in life and worsen over time. In addition to accelerated loss of volume in brain areas known to be essential for mood regulation and cognitive function, consistent findings have emerged at a cellular level, providing evidence that bipolar disorder is reliably associated with dysregulation of glial–neuronal interactions. Among these glial elements are microglia – the brain’s primary immune elements, which appear to be overactive in the context of bipolarity. Multiple studies now indicate that inflammation is also increased in the periphery of the body in both the depressive and manic phases of the illness, with at least some return to normality in the euthymic state. These findings are consistent with changes in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which are known to drive inflammatory activation. In summary, the very fact that no single gene, pathway, or brain abnormality is likely to ever account for the condition is itself an extremely important first step in better articulating an integrated perspective on both its ontological status and pathogenesis. Whether this perspective will translate into the discovery of innumerable more homogeneous forms of

  7. Integrating ecology, psychology and neurobiology within a food-hoarding paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravosudov, Vladimir V; Smulders, Tom V

    2010-03-27

    Many animals regularly hoard food for future use, which appears to be an important adaptation to a seasonally and/or unpredictably changing environment. This food-hoarding paradigm is an excellent example of a natural system that has broadly influenced both theoretical and empirical work in the field of biology. The food-hoarding paradigm has played a major role in the conceptual framework of numerous fields from ecology (e.g. plant-animal interactions) and evolution (e.g. the coevolution of caching, spatial memory and the hippocampus) to psychology (e.g. memory and cognition) and neurobiology (e.g. neurogenesis and the neurobiology of learning and memory). Many food-hoarding animals retrieve caches by using spatial memory. This memory-based behavioural system has the inherent advantage of being tractable for study in both the field and laboratory and has been shaped by natural selection, which produces variation with strong fitness consequences in a variety of taxa. Thus, food hoarding is an excellent model for a highly integrative approach to understanding numerous questions across a variety of disciplines. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the complexity of animal cognition such as future planning and episodic-like-memory as well as in the relationship between memory, the environment and the brain. In addition, new breakthroughs in neurobiology have enhanced our ability to address the mechanisms underlying these behaviours. Consequently, the field is necessarily becoming more integrative by assessing behavioural questions in the context of natural ecological systems and by addressing mechanisms through neurobiology and psychology, but, importantly, within an evolutionary and ecological framework. In this issue, we aim to bring together a series of papers providing a modern synthesis of ecology, psychology, physiology and neurobiology and identifying new directions and developments in the use of food-hoarding animals as a model system.

  8. Untangling the neurobiology of escalated aggression in animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sietse F.

    Canines’ capacity for uncontrolled aggressiveness and violent-like behavior is a serious veterinary medicine concern and inflicts an awful burden on their owners. Unfortunately, the current intervention strategies and treatment options for curbing these problematic behavioral expressions are largely

  9. Neurobiology of Consciousness: Current Research and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płonka Beata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific, objective approach to consciousness has allowed to obtain some experimental data concerning brain activity, ignoring, however, the longstanding philosophical tradition. Spectacular development of neuroscience which has been observed recently made this dissonance particularly noticeable. The paper addresses the main problems of discrepancy between neurobiological research and philosophical perspective. Current opinions concerning neural correlates and models of consciousness are discussed, as well as the problems of working memory, attention, self, and disorders of consciousness. A new neurobiological approach to describe brain function in terms of brain connectivity (so-called connectome is also presented. Finally, the need to introduce at least some aspects of philosophical approach directly into neurobiological research of consciousness is postulated.

  10. Using a Comparative Species Approach to Investigate the Neurobiology of Paternal Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Franssen, Catherine L.; Bardi, Massimo; Lambert, Kelly G.

    2011-01-01

    A goal of behavioral neuroscience is to identify underlying neurobiological factors that regulate specific behaviors. Using animal models to accomplish this goal, many methodological strategies require invasive techniques to manipulate the intensity of the behavior of interest (e.g., lesion methods, pharmacological manipulations, microdialysis techniques, genetically-engineered animal models). The utilization of a comparative species approach allows researchers to take advantage of naturally ...

  11. The clinical neurobiology of drug craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajita

    2013-08-01

    Drug craving has re-emerged as a relevant and important construct in the pathophysiology of addiction with its inclusion in DSM-V as a key clinical symptom of addictive disorders. This renewed focus has been due in part to the recent neurobiological evidence on craving-related neural activation and clinical evidence supporting its association with drug use, relapse, and recovery processes. This review covers the neurobiology of drug craving and relapse risk with a primary focus on cocaine addiction and a secondary emphasis on alcohol addiction. A conceptualization of drug craving on the continuum of healthy desire and compulsive seeking, and the associated neurobiological adaptations associated with the development of an increased craving/wanting state is presented. Altered dopamine neurochemistry as well as disrupted prefrontal control and hyperactive striatal-limbic responses in experiencing drug cues, stress, drug intake and in basal relaxed states are identified as neurobiological signatures that predict drug craving and drug use. Thus, the clinical and neurobiological features of the craving/wanting state are presented with specific attention to alterations in these cortico-limbic-striatal and prefrontal self-control circuits that predict drug craving and relapse risk. The methodological challenges that need to be addressed to further develop the evolving conceptual approach to the neuroscience of drug craving is presented, with a focus on identification and validation of biomarkers associated with the craving state and treatment approaches that may be of benefit in reversing the neurobiological adaptations associated with drug craving to improve treatment outcomes in addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sleep neurobiology and critical care illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouot, Xavier; Quentin, Solene

    2015-07-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) environment is not propitious for restoring sleep and many studies have reported that critically ill patients have severe sleep disruptions. However, sleep alterations in critically ill patients are specific and differ significantly from those in ambulatory patients. Polysomnographic patterns of normal sleep are frequently lacking in critically ill patients and the neurobiology of sleep is important to consider regarding alternative methods to quantify sleep in the ICU. This article discusses elements of sleep neurobiology affecting the specificity of sleep patterns and sleep alterations in patients admitted to the ICU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The neurobiology of decision: consensus and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Joseph W; Glimcher, Paul W

    2009-09-24

    We review and synthesize recent neurophysiological studies of decision making in humans and nonhuman primates. From these studies, the basic outline of the neurobiological mechanism for primate choice is beginning to emerge. The identified mechanism is now known to include a multicomponent valuation stage, implemented in ventromedial prefrontal cortex and associated parts of striatum, and a choice stage, implemented in lateral prefrontal and parietal areas. Neurobiological studies of decision making are beginning to enhance our understanding of economic and social behavior as well as our understanding of significant health disorders where people's behavior plays a key role.

  14. 32 CFR 644.68 - Title Clearance-Certificate of Title and Title Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Title Clearance-Certificate of Title and Title... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Acquisition Procurement of Title Evidence, Title Clearance, and Closings § 644.68 Title Clearance—Certificate of Title and Title Insurance. (a) Curative action...

  15. Neurobiological Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us to gain insight into the mechanism of sleep at levels not possible to study in human subjects. Many useful approaches have been utilized to evaluate the effect of sleep loss on cognitive function, each with relative advantages and disadvantages. In this review we discuss sleep and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation mostly in experimental animals. The negative effects of sleep deprivation on various aspects of brain function including learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and the state of cognition-related signaling molecules are discussed. PMID:24179461

  16. Neurobiological consequences of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-05-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us to gain insight into the mechanism of sleep at levels not possible to study in human subjects. Many useful approaches have been utilized to evaluate the effect of sleep loss on cognitive function, each with relative advantages and disadvantages. In this review we discuss sleep and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation mostly in experimental animals. The negative effects of sleep deprivation on various aspects of brain function including learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and the state of cognition-related signaling molecules are discussed.

  17. Neurobiological Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Alkadhi, Karim; Zagaar, Munder; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    Although the physiological function of sleep is not completely understood, it is well documented that it contributes significantly to the process of learning and memory. Ample evidence suggests that adequate sleep is essential for fostering connections among neuronal networks for memory consolidation in the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation studies are extremely valuable in understanding why we sleep and what are the consequences of sleep loss. Experimental sleep deprivation in animals allows us...

  18. Neurobiology of Anxious Depression: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Dawn F; Niciu, Mark J; Mathews, Daniel C; Richards, Erica M; Zarate, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Anxious depression is a common, distinct clinical subtype of major depressive disorder (MDD). This review summarizes current neurobiological knowledge regarding anxious depression. Peer-reviewed articles published January 1970 through September 2012 were identified via PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, using the following key words: anxious depression electroencephalography (EEG), anxious depression functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), anxious depression genetics, anxious depress...

  19. Neurobiology of escalated aggression and violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miczek, Klaus A.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Kravitz, Edward A.; Rissman, Emilie F.; de Boer, Sietse F.; Raine, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Psychopathological violence in criminals and intense aggression in fruit flies and rodents are studied with novel behavioral, neurobiological, and genetic approaches that characterize the escalation from adaptive aggression to violence. One goal is to delineate the type of aggressive behavior and

  20. The Neurobiology of Trust and Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Derek

    2018-01-01

    Are there neurobiological reasons why we are willing to trust other people and why "trust" and moral values such as "care" play a quite pivotal role in our social lives and the judgements we make, including our social interactions and judgements made in the context of schooling? In pursuing this question, this paper largely…

  1. The neurobiology of syntax: beyond string sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Karl Magnus; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The human capacity to acquire language is an outstanding scientific challenge to understand. Somehow our language capacities arise from the way the human brain processes, develops and learns in interaction with its environment. To set the stage, we begin with a summary of what is known about the neural organization of language and what our artificial grammar learning (AGL) studies have revealed. We then review the Chomsky hierarchy in the context of the theory of computation and formal learning theory. Finally, we outline a neurobiological model of language acquisition and processing based on an adaptive, recurrent, spiking network architecture. This architecture implements an asynchronous, event-driven, parallel system for recursive processing. We conclude that the brain represents grammars (or more precisely, the parser/generator) in its connectivity, and its ability for syntax is based on neurobiological infrastructure for structured sequence processing. The acquisition of this ability is accounted for in an adaptive dynamical systems framework. Artificial language learning (ALL) paradigms might be used to study the acquisition process within such a framework, as well as the processing properties of the underlying neurobiological infrastructure. However, it is necessary to combine and constrain the interpretation of ALL results by theoretical models and empirical studies on natural language processing. Given that the faculty of language is captured by classical computational models to a significant extent, and that these can be embedded in dynamic network architectures, there is hope that significant progress can be made in understanding the neurobiology of the language faculty. PMID:22688633

  2. The neurobiology of syntax: beyond string sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Karl Magnus; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-07-19

    The human capacity to acquire language is an outstanding scientific challenge to understand. Somehow our language capacities arise from the way the human brain processes, develops and learns in interaction with its environment. To set the stage, we begin with a summary of what is known about the neural organization of language and what our artificial grammar learning (AGL) studies have revealed. We then review the Chomsky hierarchy in the context of the theory of computation and formal learning theory. Finally, we outline a neurobiological model of language acquisition and processing based on an adaptive, recurrent, spiking network architecture. This architecture implements an asynchronous, event-driven, parallel system for recursive processing. We conclude that the brain represents grammars (or more precisely, the parser/generator) in its connectivity, and its ability for syntax is based on neurobiological infrastructure for structured sequence processing. The acquisition of this ability is accounted for in an adaptive dynamical systems framework. Artificial language learning (ALL) paradigms might be used to study the acquisition process within such a framework, as well as the processing properties of the underlying neurobiological infrastructure. However, it is necessary to combine and constrain the interpretation of ALL results by theoretical models and empirical studies on natural language processing. Given that the faculty of language is captured by classical computational models to a significant extent, and that these can be embedded in dynamic network architectures, there is hope that significant progress can be made in understanding the neurobiology of the language faculty.

  3. Neurobiology of functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark J; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Pareés, Isabel

    2013-08-01

    This review explores recent developments in understanding the neurobiological mechanism of functional (psychogenic) movement disorders (FMDs). This is particularly relevant given the resurgence of academic and clinical interest in patients with functional neurological symptoms and the clear shift in diagnostic and treatment approaches away from a pure psychological model of functional symptoms. Recent research findings implicate three key processes in the neurobiology of FMD (and by extension other functional neurological symptoms): abnormal attentional focus, abnormal beliefs and expectations, and abnormalities in sense of agency. These three processes have been combined in recent neurobiological models of FMD in which abnormal predictions related to movement are triggered by self-focused attention, and the resulting movement is generated without the normal sense of agency that accompanies voluntary movement. New understanding of the neurobiology of FMD forms an important part of reappraising the way that patients with FMD (and other functional disorders) are characterized and treated. It also provides a testable framework for further exploring the pathophysiology of these common causes of ill health.

  4. [Pleasure: Neurobiological conception and Freudian conception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenu, A; Tassin, J-P

    2014-04-01

    Despite many controversies the debate between psychoanalysis and neuroscience remains intense, all the more since the Freudian theory stands as a reference for a number of medical practitioners and faculty psychiatrists, at least in France. Instead of going on arguing we think that it may be more constructive to favour dialogue through the analysis of a precise concept developed in each discipline. The Freudian theory of pleasure, because it is based on biological principles, appears an appropriate topic to perform this task. In this paper, we aim at comparing Freud's propositions to those issued from recent findings in Neuroscience. Like all emotions, pleasure is acknowledged as a motivating factor in contemporary models. Pleasure can indeed be either rewarding when it follows satisfaction, or incentive when it reinforces behaviours. The Freudian concept of pleasure is more univocal. In Freud's theory, pleasure is assumed to be the result of the discharge of the accumulated excitation which will thus reduce the tension. This quantitative approach corresponds to the classical scheme that associates satisfaction and pleasure. Satisfaction of a need would induce both a decrease in tension and the development of pleasure. However, clinical contradictions to this model, such as the occasional co-existence between pleasure and excitation, drove Freud to suggest different theoretical reversals. Freud's 1905 publication, which describes how preliminary sexual pleasures contribute to an increased excitation and a sexual satisfaction, is the only analysis which provides an adapted answer to the apparent paradox of pleasure and excitation co-existence. Studies on the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for the development of pleasure may help to fill this gap in the Freudian theory. Activity of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is strongly associated with the reward system. Experimental studies performed in animals have shown that increased dopaminergic activity in the

  5. What can medical education learn from the neurobiology of learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Michael J; Andrews, Linda; Armstrong, Elizabeth G; Aschenbrenner, Carol; Kass, Joseph S; Ogden, Paul; Schwartzstein, Richard; Viggiano, Thomas R

    2011-04-01

    The last several decades have seen a large increase in knowledge of the underlying biological mechanisms that serve learning and memory. The insights gleaned from neurobiological and cognitive neuroscientific experimentation in humans and in animal models have identified many of the processes at the molecular, cellular, and systems levels that occur during learning and the formation, storage, and recall of memories. Moreover, with the advent of noninvasive technologies to monitor patterns of neural activity during various forms of human cognition, the efficacy of different strategies for effective teaching can be compared. Considerable insight has also been developed as to how to most effectively engage these processes to facilitate learning, retention, recall, and effective use and application of the learned information. However, this knowledge has not systematically found its way into the medical education process. Thus, there are considerable opportunities for the integration of current knowledge about the biology of learning with educational strategies and curricular design. By teaching medical students in ways that use this knowledge, there is an opportunity to make medical education easier and more effective. The authors present 10 key aspects of learning that they believe can be incorporated into effective teaching paradigms in multiple ways. They also present recommendations for applying the current knowledge of the neurobiology of learning throughout the medical education continuum. © by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  6. [The neurobiology of sleep and its influence on memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertuğrul, Aygün; Rezaki, Murat

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in neuroscience have increased our knowledge of the physiology of sleep and dreaming, and thus the number of studies about the influence of sleep on learning and memory have increased rapidly. In this review the objective is to assess the relationship between sleep and memory considering the evidence regarding the neurobiology of sleep and dreaming. This is a retrospective literature review and the relevant studies from the last 10 years are included. For this purpose the PubMed search engine and the key words "sleep, neurobiology, synaptic plasticity, memory" were used. Sleep-wake and NREM-REM cycles are accompanied by neuromodulatory influences on forebrain structures that affect behavior, consciousness and cognition. Animal and human studies in which learning paradigms are used to assess the influence of sleep deprivation on memory show the influence of sleep on memory consolidation. Different sleep stages have different effects on memory processes. Some investigators claim that NREM improves declarative memory while REM improves procedural and implicit memory. Other investigators suggest that NREM and REM affect memory in a complementary and sequential way. Molecular and electrophysiological evidence suggests that the influence of sleep on memory is through synaptic plasticity. Studies about the physiology of sleep and dreaming will help us to understand consciousness and memory better. The reverse is also true: understanding the contribution of sleep stages to memory will help us to determine the advantages of sleep and dreaming in an evolutionary perspective.

  7. Historical Overview on Plant Neurobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Stahlberg, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The review tracks the history of electrical long-distance signals from the first recordings of action potentials (APs) in sensitive Dionea and Mimosa plants at the end of the 19th century to their re-discovery in common plants in the 1950's, from the first intracellular recordings of APs in giant algal cells to the identification of the ionic mechanisms by voltage-clamp experiments. An important aspect is the comparison of plant and animal signals and the resulting theoretical implications th...

  8. Atypical Neurotransmitters and the Neurobiology of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joca, Samia Regiane; Moreira, Fabricio Araujo; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report that the mechanism of action of antidepressants involves the facilitation of monoaminergic neurotransmission in the brain in the 1960s, the leading hypothesis about the neurobiology of depression has been the so called "monoaminergic hypothesis". However, a growing body of evidence from the last two decades also supports important involvement of non-monoaminergic mechanisms in the neurobiology of depression and antidepressant action. The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) and endocannabinoid signaling in the brain during the 1990s challenged the wellestablished criteria of classical neurotransmission. These transmitters are synthesized and released on demand by the postsynaptic neurons, and may act as a retrograde messenger on the presynaptic terminal, modulating neurotransmitter release. These unconventional signaling mechanisms and the important role as neural messengers have classified NO and endocannabinoids as atypical neurotransmitters. They are able to modulate neural signaling mediated by the main conventional neurotransmitters systems in the brain, including the monoaminergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling systems. This review aims at discussing the fundamental aspects of NO- and endocannabinoid-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to the neurobiology of depression. Both preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of these atypical neurotransmitters in the neurobiology of depression, and in the antidepressant effects are presented here. The evidence is discussed on basis of their ability to modulate different neurotransmitter systems in the brain, including monoaminergic and glutamatergic ones. A better comprehension of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms in the neurobiology depression could provide new avenues for the development of novel non-monoamine based antidepressants.

  9. Title IX Resource Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities in federally funded schools at all levels. If any part of a school district or college receives any Federal funds for any purpose, all of the operations of the district or college are covered by Title IX. The essence…

  10. Neurobiology and treatment of compulsive hoarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sanjaya

    2008-09-01

    Compulsive hoarding is a common and often disabling neuropsychiatric disorder. This article reviews the phenomenology, etiology, neurobiology, and treatment of compulsive hoarding. Compulsive hoarding is part of a discrete clinical syndrome that includes difficulty discarding, urges to save, clutter, excessive acquisition, indecisiveness, perfectionism, procrastination, disorganization, and avoidance. Epidemiological and taxometric studies indicate that compulsive hoarding is a separate but related obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder that is frequently comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Compulsive hoarding is a genetically discrete, strongly heritable phenotype. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies indicate that compulsive hoarding is neurobiologically distinct from OCD and implicate dysfunction of the anterior cingulate cortex and other ventral and medial prefrontal cortical areas that mediate decision-making, attention, and emotional regulation. Effective treatments for compulsive hoarding include pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy. More research will be required to determine the etiology and pathophysiology of compulsive hoarding, and to develop better treatments for this disorder.

  11. The neurobiology of the human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietta, Pierluigi; Fietta, Pieranna

    2011-01-01

    Memory can be defined as the ability to acquire, process, store, and retrieve information. Memory is indispensable for learning, adaptation, and survival of every living organism. In humans, the remembering process has acquired great flexibility and complexity, reaching close links with other mental functions, such as thinking and emotions. Changes in synaptic connectivity and interactions among multiple neural networks provide the neurobiological substrates for memory encoding, retention, and consolidation. Memory may be categorized as short-term and long-term memory (according to the storage temporal duration), as implicit and explicit memory (with respect to the consciousness of remembering), as declarative (knowing that [fact]) and procedural (knowing how [skill]) memory, or as sensory (echoic, iconic and haptil), semantic, and episodic memory (according to the various remembering domains). Significant advances have been obtained in understanding memory neurobiology, but much remains to be learned in its cognitive, psychological, and phenomenological aspects.

  12. Successful and unsuccessful psychopaths: a neurobiological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing interest in psychopathy research, surprisingly little is known about the etiology of non-incarcerated, successful psychopaths. This review provides an analysis of current knowledge on the similarities and differences between successful and unsuccessful psychopaths derived from five population sources: community samples, individuals from employment agencies, college students, industrial psychopaths, and serial killers. An initial neurobiological model of successful and unsuccessful psychopathy is outlined. It is hypothesized that successful psychopaths have intact or enhanced neurobiological functioning that underlies their normal or even superior cognitive functioning, which in turn helps them to achieve their goals using more covert and nonviolent methods. In contrast, in unsuccessful, caught psychopaths, brain structural and functional impairments together with autonomic nervous system dysfunction are hypothesized to underlie cognitive and emotional deficits and more overt violent offending.

  13. Neurobiology of depression: A neurodevelopmental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Ojeda, Juan M; Rupprecht, Rainer; Baghai, Thomas C

    2017-03-03

    The main aims of this paper are to review and evaluate the neurobiology of the depressive syndrome from a neurodevelopmental perspective. An English language literature search was performed using PubMed. Depression is a complex syndrome that involves anatomical and functional changes that have an early origin in brain development. In subjects with genetic risk for depression, early stress factors are able to mediate not only the genetic risk but also gene expression. There is evidence that endocrine and immune interactions have an important impact on monoamine function and that the altered monoamine signalling observed in the depressive syndrome has a neuro-endocrino-immunological origin early in the development. Neurodevelopment is a key aspect to understand the whole neurobiology of depression.

  14. Downward Causation and the Neurobiology of Free Will

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Nancey; O’Connor, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    How is free will possible in the light of the physical and chemical underpinnings of brain activity and recent neurobiological experiments? How can the emergence of complexity in hierarchical systems such as the brain, based at the lower levels in physical interactions, lead to something like genuine free will? The nature of our understanding of free will in the light of present-day neuroscience is becoming increasingly important because of remarkable discoveries on the topic being made by neuroscientists at the present time, on the one hand, and its crucial importance for the way we view ourselves as human beings, on the other. A key tool in understanding how free will may arise in this context is the idea of downward causation in complex systems, happening coterminously with bottom up causation, to form an integral whole. Top-down causation is usually neglected, and is therefore emphasized in the other part of the book’s title. The concept is explored in depth, as are the ethical and legal implications of...

  15. The neurobiological causes and effects of alloparenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkel, William M; Perkeybile, Allison M; Carter, C Sue

    2017-02-01

    Alloparenting, defined as care provided by individuals other than parents, is a universal behavior among humans that has shaped our evolutionary history and remains important in contemporary society. Dysfunctions in alloparenting can have serious and sometimes fatal consequences for vulnerable infants and children. In spite of the importance of alloparenting, they still have much to learn regarding the underlying neurobiological systems governing its expression. Here, they review how a lack of alloparental behavior among traditional laboratory species has led to a blind spot in our understanding of this critical facet of human social behavior and the relevant neurobiology. Based on what is known, they draw from model systems ranging from voles to meerkats to primates to describe a conserved set of neuroendocrine mechanisms supporting the expression of alloparental care. In this review we describe the neurobiological and behavioral prerequisites, ontogeny, and consequences of alloparental care. Lastly, they identified several outstanding topics in the area of alloparental care that deserve further research efforts to better advance human health and wellbeing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 214-232, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Neurobiological findings related to Internet use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeongsu; Han, Doug Hyun; Roh, Sungwon

    2017-07-01

    In the last 10 years, numerous neurobiological studies have been conducted on Internet addiction or Internet use disorder. Various neurobiological research methods - such as magnetic resonance imaging; nuclear imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography; molecular genetics; and neurophysiologic methods - have made it possible to discover structural or functional impairments in the brains of individuals with Internet use disorder. Specifically, Internet use disorder is associated with structural or functional impairment in the orbitofrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex. These regions are associated with the processing of reward, motivation, memory, and cognitive control. Early neurobiological research results in this area indicated that Internet use disorder shares many similarities with substance use disorders, including, to a certain extent, a shared pathophysiology. However, recent studies suggest that differences in biological and psychological markers exist between Internet use disorder and substance use disorders. Further research is required for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of Internet use disorder. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  17. Neurobiological and psychosocial processes associated with depressive and substance-related disorders in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Uma; Chen, Li-Ann

    2008-01-01

    Adolescents are at heightened risk for the development of both depressive and substance-related disorders. These two disorders frequently co-occur in adolescents and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Given the substantial economic and psychosocial burden associated with the comorbid condition, the identification of causal mechanisms associated with their co-occurrence is of great public health importance. Although there is significant understanding of the environmental and neurobiological factors involved in depression and addictive disorders considered separately, the mechanisms underlying the comorbid illness have not been investigated carefully. The purpose of this review is to summarize the extant literature on genetic, environmental and neurobiological processes involved in the etiology of depressive and substance-related disorders in adolescents and adults. It is important to note that the data on common neurobiological systems that link addictive and depressive disorders are primarily from research with adult animals and humans. Given the ongoing maturation of these systems throughout adolescence and early adult life, it is not clear how these neurobiological processes influence the development and progression of both disorders. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to the onset and course of these disorders during adolescence will be helpful in developing more effective preventive and treatment strategies not only for this population but also for adult patients with early-onset illness.

  18. Neurobiology of addiction versus drug use driven by lack of choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Serge H; Lenoir, Magalie; Guillem, Karine

    2013-08-01

    Research on the neurobiology of addiction often involves nonhuman animals that are given ready access to drugs for self-administration but without other choices. Here we argue using cocaine as an example that this standard setting may no longer be sufficient and can even lead to the formulation of unrealistic views about the neurobiology of addiction. Addiction as a psychiatric disorder is defined as resulting from brain dysfunctions that affect normal choice-making, not as an expectable response to lack of alternative choices. We encourage neurobiologists involved in addiction research to increase animals' choice during drug access, preferably by supplying alternative rewarding pursuits. Only animals that continue to take and prefer drugs despite and at the expense of other available choices may be considered as having developed an addiction-like behavior in comparison to those that remain able to stop drug use for other pursuits, even after extended drug use. The systematic comparison of these two individual behaviors should reveal new insights about the neurobiology of drug choice and addiction. More generally, this research should also shed a unique light on how the brain 'chooses' among qualitatively different kinds of pursuits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The brain decade in debate: III. Neurobiology of emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Blanchard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is a transcription of an electronic symposium in which active researchers were invited by the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC to discuss the advances of the last decade in the neurobiology of emotion. Four basic questions were debated: 1 What are the most critical issues/questions in the neurobiology of emotion? 2 What do we know for certain about brain processes involved in emotion and what is controversial? 3 What kinds of research are needed to resolve these controversial issues? 4 What is the relationship between learning, memory and emotion? The focus was on the existence of different neural systems for different emotions and the nature of the neural coding for the emotional states. Is emotion the result of the interaction of different brain regions such as the amygdala, the nucleus accumbens, or the periaqueductal gray matter or is it an emergent property of the whole brain neural network? The relationship between unlearned and learned emotions was also discussed. Are the circuits of the former the underpinnings of the latter? It was pointed out that much of what we know about emotions refers to aversively motivated behaviors, like fear and anxiety. Appetitive emotions should attract much interest in the future. The learning and memory relationship with emotions was also discussed in terms of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, innate and learned fear, contextual cues inducing emotional states, implicit memory and the property of using this term for animal memories. In a general way it could be said that learning modifies the neural circuits through which emotional responses are expressed.

  20. The neurobiology of relapse in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Gary; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Fervaha, Gagan; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Hahn, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Dopamine's proposed role in psychosis proved a starting point in our understanding of the neurobiology of relapse, fitting given the central role positive symptoms play. This link is reflected in early work examining neurotransmitter metabolite and drug (e.g. amphetamine, methylphenidate) challenge studies as a means of better understanding relapse and predictors. Since, lines of investigation have expanded (e.g. electrophysiological, immunological, hormonal, stress), an important step forward if relapse per se is the question. Arguably, perturbations in dopamine represent the final common pathway in psychosis but it is evident that, like schizophrenia, relapse is heterogeneous and multidimensional. In understanding the neurobiology of relapse, greater gains are likely to be made if these distinctions are acknowledged; for example, efforts to identify trait markers might better be served by distinguishing primary (i.e. idiopathic) and secondary (e.g. substance abuse, medication nonadherence) forms of relapse. Similarly, it has been suggested that relapse is 'neurotoxic', yet individuals do very well on clozapine after multiple relapses and the designation of treatment resistance. An alternative explanation holds that schizophrenia is characterized by different trajectories, at least to some extent biologically and/or structurally distinguishable from the outset, with differential patterns of response and relapse. Just as with schizophrenia, it seems naïve to conceptualize the neurobiology of relapse as a singular process. We propose that it is shaped by the form of illness and in place from the outset, modified by constitutional factors like resilience, as well as treatment, and confounded by secondary forms of relapse. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Energy intake, meal frequency, and health: a neurobiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Mark P

    2005-01-01

    The size and frequency of meals are fundamental aspects of nutrition that can have profound effects on the health and longevity of laboratory animals. In humans, excessive energy intake is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers and is a major cause of disability and death in industrialized countries. On the other hand, the influence of meal frequency on human health and longevity is unclear. Both caloric (energy) restriction (CR) and reduced meal frequency/intermittent fasting can suppress the development of various diseases and can increase life span in rodents by mechanisms involving reduced oxidative damage and increased stress resistance. Many of the beneficial effects of CR and fasting appear to be mediated by the nervous system. For example, intermittent fasting results in increased production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which increases the resistance of neurons in the brain to dysfunction and degeneration in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders; BDNF signaling may also mediate beneficial effects of intermittent fasting on glucose regulation and cardiovascular function. A better understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms by which meal size and frequency affect human health may lead to novel approaches for disease prevention and treatment.

  2. Nonlinear dynamical patterns as personality theory for neurobiology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, A J; Selz, K A

    1995-11-01

    ADVANCES in the theory of nonlinear differential equations and their statistical representations have yielded a powerful, qualitatively descriptive yet quantitative language that captures characteristic patterns of behavior (what the psychoanalyst Roy Schafer calls "continuity, coherence, and consistency of action") that has begun to influence studies of complex systems in motion as diverse in specifics as signatory patterns of discharge of neurochemically defined single neurons and the dynamical structures characteristic of a particular composer's music. What might be called personality theories of neurobiological dynamics have arisen to replace neurobiological theories of personality. It is in this way that rigorously proven and powerful general mathematical insights have changed the face of determinism in research in brain and behavior. Two examples: (1) Very complicated looking behavior of neurobiological forced-dissipative (expanding and contracting) systems over time take place on low dimensional abstract surfaces on which only a few underlying abstract parameters control the action. (2) Independent of specific details (chemical, electrical, and/or behavioral), there exist a relatively few fundamental categories of behavior in time and transitions, among them a property called universality. Results from this new theoretical, in contrast with experimental, reductionism yield analogies with and new approaches to historically important dynamic ideas about personality and character patterns that are equally relevant to micro and macrocomplex systems such as neural membrane receptor proteins and individual personality styles. Research findings achieved over the past decade and a half in our laboratory and others in neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and animal and human behavior, as well as the results of a new demonstration experiment involving the prediction of dynamical category membership from abstract expressive motion in humans, are used to exemplify this use

  3. Adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta A. Schriber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment encountered (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth. Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts – be they positive or negative – such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. Ultimately, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes.

  4. PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Gent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-04-01

    Addresses a variety of aspects of neurotransmission in the brain. Details the latest results in probe development. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT of Neurobiological Systems combines the expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the development of novel probes and techniques for the investigation of neurobiological systems has achieved international recognition. Various aspects of neurotransmission in the brain are discussed, such as visualization and quantification of (more than 20 different) neuroreceptors, neuroinflammatory markers, transporters, and enzymes as well as neurotransmitter synthesis, ?-amyloid deposition, cerebral blood flow, and the metabolic rate of glucose. The latest results in probe development are also detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by radiochemists and nuclear medicine specialists to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to anyone in the field of clinical or preclinical neuroscience, from the radiochemist and radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested neurobiologist and general practitioner. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences. Other volumes focus on PET and SPECT in psychiatry and PET and SPECT in neurology''.

  5. Applications of carbon nanotubes in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarkey, Erik B; Parpura, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials for the electronics, computer and aerospace industries. There are numerous properties of carbon nanotubes that make them attractive for applications in neurobiology: small size, flexibility, strength, inertness, electrical conductivity and ease of modification with biological compounds. Here, we discuss the current applications of carbon nanotubes in neuroscience. Carbon nanotubes and their derivatives can be used as substrates/scaffolds for neural cell growth. The chemical properties of carbon nanotubes can be systematically varied by attaching different functional groups; manipulation of the charge carried by functionalized carbon nanotubes can be used to control the outgrowth and branching pattern of neuronal processes. The ease with which carbon nanotubes can be patterned makes them attractive for studying the organization of neural networks and the electrical conductivity of nanotubes can provide a mechanism to monitor or stimulate neurons through the substrate itself. However, it is important to recognize that carbon nanotubes themselves can affect neuronal function, most likely by interaction with ion channels. The use of carbon nanotubes in neurobiology is a promising application that has the potential to develop new methods and techniques to advance the study of neuroscience.

  6. Apolipoprotein E: from lipid transport to neurobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul S.; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Ryan, Robert O.

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E has a storied history as a lipid transport protein. The integral association between cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein clearance from circulation are intimately related to apoE's function as a ligand for cell surface receptors of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. The receptor binding properties of apoE are strongly influenced by isoform specific amino acid differences as well as the lipidation state of the protein. As understanding of apoE as a structural component of circulating plasma lipoproteins has evolved, exciting developments in neurobiology have revitalized interest in apoE. The strong and enduring correlation between the apoE4 isoform and age of onset and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease has catapulted apoE to the forefront of neurobiology. Using genetic tools generated for study of apoE lipoprotein metabolism, transgenic “knock-in” and gene-disrupted mice are now favored models for study of its role in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Key structural knowledge of apoE and isoform specific differences is driving research activity designed to elucidate how a single amino acid change can manifest such profoundly significant pathological consequences. This review describes apoE through a lens of structure-based knowledge that leads to hypotheses that attempt to explain the functions of apoE and isoform specific effects relating to disease mechanism. PMID:20854843

  7. The neurobiology of aggression and violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Daniel R; Siever, Larry J

    2015-06-01

    Aggression and violence represent a significant public health concern and a clinical challenge for the mental healthcare provider. A great deal has been revealed regarding the neurobiology of violence and aggression, and an integration of this body of knowledge will ultimately serve to advance clinical diagnostics and therapeutic interventions. We will review here the latest findings regarding the neurobiology of aggression and violence. First, we will introduce the construct of aggression, with a focus on issues related to its heterogeneity, as well as the importance of refining the aggression phenotype in order to reduce pathophysiologic variability. Next we will examine the neuroanatomy of aggression and violence, focusing on regional volumes, functional studies, and interregional connectivity. Significant emphasis will be on the amygdala, as well as amygdala-frontal circuitry. Then we will turn our attention to the neurochemistry and molecular genetics of aggression and violence, examining the extensive findings on the serotonergic system, as well as the growing literature on the dopaminergic and vasopressinergic systems. We will also address the contribution of steroid hormones, namely, cortisol and testosterone. Finally, we will summarize these findings with a focus on reconciling inconsistencies and potential clinical implications; and, then we will suggest areas of focus for future directions in the field.

  8. Adolescent Neurobiological Susceptibility to Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriber, Roberta A.; Guyer, Amanda E.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment they encounter (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth). Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped in part by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts – be they positive or negative – such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. As such, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes. PMID:26773514

  9. A Neurobiological Basis for SLA and First Language Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bode, Stella

    The two-part paper examines the neurobiological processes of synapse overproduction, synapse elimination, and issues of language acquisition and attrition. The first part consists of diagrams and notes explaining some basic terms and concepts of neurobiology: cortex; white matter; neuron; synapse; synaptogenesis; and development and organization…

  10. Neurobiology Research Findings: How the Brain Works during Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweldju, Siusana

    2015-01-01

    In the past, neurobiology for reading was identical with neuropathology. Today, however, the advancement of modern neuroimaging techniques has contributed to the understanding of the reading processes of normal individuals. Neurobiology findings today have uncovered and illuminated the fundamental neural mechanism of reading. The findings have…

  11. Neurobiological signatures of alcohol dependence revealed by protein profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Gorini

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse causes dramatic neuroadaptations in the brain, which contribute to tolerance, dependence, and behavioral modifications. Previous proteomic studies in human alcoholics and animal models have identified candidate alcoholism-related proteins. However, recent evidences suggest that alcohol dependence is caused by changes in co-regulation that are invisible to single protein-based analysis. Here, we analyze global proteomics data to integrate differential expression, co-expression networks, and gene annotations to unveil key neurobiological rearrangements associated with the transition to alcohol dependence modeled by a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol (CIE, two-bottle choice (2BC paradigm. We analyzed cerebral cortices (CTX and midbrains (MB from male C57BL/6J mice subjected to a CIE, 2BC paradigm, which induces heavy drinking and represents one of the best available animal models for alcohol dependence and relapse drinking. CIE induced significant changes in protein levels in dependent mice compared with their non-dependent controls. Multiple protein isoforms showed region-specific differential regulation as a result of post-translational modifications. Our integrative analysis identified modules of co-expressed proteins that were highly correlated with CIE treatment. We found that modules most related to the effects of CIE treatment coordinate molecular imbalances in endocytic- and energy-related pathways, with specific proteins involved, such as dynamin-1. The qRT-PCR experiments validated both differential and co-expression analyses, and the correspondence among our data and previous genomic and proteomic studies in humans and rodents substantiates our findings. The changes identified above may play a key role in the escalation of ethanol consumption associated with dependence. Our approach to alcohol addiction will advance knowledge of brain remodeling mechanisms and adaptive changes in response to drug abuse, contribute to

  12. Title V Operating Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site will provide basic information on clean air permitting under the title V operating permits program, provide access to state and regional permitting programs, and maintain access to proposed and final regulatory requirements.

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 5, No 1 (2006), Zidovudine-cyclodextrin inclusion complex and its permeability across rat stomach and intestinal compartments, Abstract. JO Onah, EO Adagazu. 101 - 101 of 101 Items, << < 1 2 3 ...

  14. Title IX Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargyas, Ellen J.

    1989-01-01

    Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 is the principal federal law which prohibits sex discrimination in education. The law's requirements with regard to physical education classes and competitive, intramural, and club athletics are discussed. (IAH)

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 5051 - 5100 of 11090 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index .... Vol 10, No 84 (2011), Fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1) promoter as a candidate for genetic engineering of fatty acids to .... V Jalasutram, A Jetty, GR Anupoju.

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 490 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... to the extraction and purification of pectin from inferior shaddock using .... Vol 4, No 4 (2008), Assessment of heavy metals concentrations in water from borehole at ...

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 34 of 34 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 17 (2007), Application of wastewater treatment by algae in irrigation of some economic ... and physiological behavior of drinking water-borne pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 444 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 60 (2007), Determination of Phenols in Water Samples using a ... Silver on Nano-ZnO for the Environmental Purification of Dye Pollutants, Abstract PDF.

  19. Parenting in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Karen L

    2017-06-01

    The study of parenting in animals has allowed us to come to a better understanding of the neural and physiological mechanisms that underlie mammalian parental behavior. The long-term effects of parenting (and parental abuse or neglect) on offspring, and the neurobiological changes that underlie those changes, have also been best studied in animal models. Our greater experimental control and ability to directly manipulate neural and hormonal systems, as well as the environment of the subjects, will ensure that animal models remain important in the study of parenting; while in the future, the great variety of parental caregiving systems displayed by animals should be more thoroughly explored. Most importantly, cross-talk between animal and human subjects research should be promoted.

  20. Mathematical methods in biology and neurobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Jost, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models can be used to meet many of the challenges and opportunities offered by modern biology. The description of biological phenomena requires a range of mathematical theories. This is the case particularly for the emerging field of systems biology. Mathematical Methods in Biology and Neurobiology introduces and develops these mathematical structures and methods in a systematic manner. It studies:   • discrete structures and graph theory • stochastic processes • dynamical systems and partial differential equations • optimization and the calculus of variations.   The biological applications range from molecular to evolutionary and ecological levels, for example:   • cellular reaction kinetics and gene regulation • biological pattern formation and chemotaxis • the biophysics and dynamics of neurons • the coding of information in neuronal systems • phylogenetic tree reconstruction • branching processes and population genetics • optimal resource allocation • sexual recombi...

  1. Towards a new neurobiology of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppel, David; Emmorey, Karen; Hickok, Gregory; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2012-10-10

    Theoretical advances in language research and the availability of increasingly high-resolution experimental techniques in the cognitive neurosciences are profoundly changing how we investigate and conceive of the neural basis of speech and language processing. Recent work closely aligns language research with issues at the core of systems neuroscience, ranging from neurophysiological and neuroanatomic characterizations to questions about neural coding. Here we highlight, across different aspects of language processing (perception, production, sign language, meaning construction), new insights and approaches to the neurobiology of language, aiming to describe promising new areas of investigation in which the neurosciences intersect with linguistic research more closely than before. This paper summarizes in brief some of the issues that constitute the background for talks presented in a symposium at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. It is not a comprehensive review of any of the issues that are discussed in the symposium.

  2. Neurobiology of the circadian system: meeting metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza, Jorge

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic principles of physiology postulated the necessity of the constancy of the internal environment to maintain a physiological equilibrium and do not front serious consequences in health. Now we know that physiology is rhythmic and that a break of this rhythmicity can generate serious consequences in health which even could be lethal. Circadian clocks, headed by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the central nervous system, are the responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms. These clocks are affected by external signals as light (day-night cycles and feeding. This review examines the basic principles of the circadian system and the current knowledge in the neurobiology of biological clocks, making emphasis in the relationship between the circadian system, feeding behaviour, nutrition and metabolism, and the consequences that occur when these systems are not coordinated each other, as the development of metabolic and circadian pathologies.

  3. Phytochemicals: Potential in Management of Climacteric Neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Kanwaljit; Bansal, Seema; Sachdeva, Anand Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Menopause jeopardizes the integrity of brain and makes it vulnerable to various diseases, both of psychiatric and degenerative nature. Exogenous estrogen supplementation confers neuroprotection but the results of Women's Health Initiative (WHI), Million Women Study (MWS) and incidence of endometrial cancer, breast cancer and venous thromboembolism reported with estrogen use have engendered doubts over its clinical translation for postmenopausal neurological disorders. Scientific community and general public have started recognizing the protective potential of phytochemicals in climacteric medicine. These phytochemicals are plant-derived, non-steroidal bioactive estrogenic compounds. Emerging preclinical studies have suggested that these phytochemicals display potential benefits in mitigating postmenopausal depression, anxiety, cerebral ischemia and cognitive dysfunction. Thus, the aim of present review is: a) to give an overview of neuroprotective action of estrogen, b) to address the chemical and pharmacological features of various classes of phytoestrogens, and c) to present preclinical and clinical evidence of effect of phytoestrogens on climacteric neurobiology with their possible mechanisms of action.

  4. Neurobiological mechanisms of state-dependent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovic, Jelena; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Meyer, Mariah Aa

    2017-08-01

    State-dependent learning (SDL) is a phenomenon relating to information storage and retrieval restricted to discrete states. While extensively studied using psychopharmacological approaches, SDL has not been subjected to rigorous neuroscientific study. Here we present an overview of approaches historically used to induce SDL, and highlight some of the known neurobiological mechanisms, in particular those related to inhibitory neurotransmission and its regulation by microRNAs (miR). We also propose novel cellular and circuit mechanisms as contributing factors. Lastly, we discuss the implications of advancing our knowledge on SDL, both for most fundamental processes of learning and memory as well as for development and maintenance of psychopathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurobiology of the incubation of drug craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Charles L; Airavaara, Mikko; Theberge, Florence; Fanous, Sanya; Hope, Bruce T; Shaham, Yavin

    2011-08-01

    It was suggested in 1986 that cue-induced drug craving in cocaine addicts progressively increases over the first several weeks of abstinence and remains high for extended periods. During the past decade, investigators have identified an analogous incubation phenomenon in rodents, in which time-dependent increases in cue-induced drug seeking are observed after withdrawal from intravenous cocaine self-administration. Such an incubation of drug craving is not specific to cocaine, as similar findings have been observed after self-administration of heroin, nicotine, methamphetamine and alcohol in rats. In this review, we discuss recent results that have identified important brain regions involved in the incubation of drug craving, as well as evidence for the underlying cellular mechanisms. Understanding the neurobiology of the incubation of drug craving in rodents is likely to have significant implications for furthering understanding of brain mechanisms and circuits that underlie craving and relapse in human addicts. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Towards a new neurobiology of language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppel, David; Emmorey, Karen; Hickok, Gregory; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical advances in language research and the availability of increasingly high-resolution experimental techniques in the cognitive neurosciences are profoundly changing how we investigate and conceive of the neural basis of speech and language processing. Recent work closely aligns language research with issues at the core of systems neuroscience, ranging from neurophysiological and neuroanatomic characterizations to questions about neural coding. Here we highlight, across different aspects of language processing (perception, production, sign language, meaning construction), new insights and approaches to the neurobiology of language, aiming to describe promising new areas of investigation in which the neurosciences intersect with linguistic research more closely than before. This paper summarizes in brief some of the issues that constitute the background for talks presented in a symposium at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. It is not a comprehensive review of any of the issues that are discussed in the symposium. PMID:23055482

  7. Neurobiology of inflammation-associated anorexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gautron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Compelling data demonstrate that inflammation-associated anorexia directly results from the action of pro-inflammatory factors, primarily cytokines and prostaglandins E2, on the nervous system. For instance, the aforementioned pro-inflammatory factors can stimulate the activity of peripheral sensory neurons, and induce their own de novo synthesis and release into the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid. Ultimately, it results in the mobilization of a specific neural circuit that shuts down appetite. The present article describes the different cell groups and neurotransmitters involved in inflammation-associated anorexia and examines how they interact with neural systems regulating feeding such as the melanocortin system. A better understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying inflammation-associated anorexia will help to develop appetite stimulants for cancer and AIDS patients.

  8. Autism spectrum disorders: from genes to neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsey, A Jeremy; State, Matthew W

    2015-02-01

    Advances in genome-wide technology, coupled with the availability of large cohorts, are finally yielding a steady stream of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes carrying mutations of large effect. These findings represent important molecular clues, but at the same time present notable challenges to traditional strategies for moving from genes to neurobiology. A remarkable degree of genetic heterogeneity, the biological pleiotropy of ASD genes, and the tremendous complexity of the human brain are prompting the development of new strategies for translating genetic discoveries into therapeutic targets. Recent developments in systems biology approaches that 'contextualize' these genetic findings along spatial, temporal, and cellular axes of human brain development are beginning to bridge the gap between high-throughput gene discovery and testable pathophysiological hypotheses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological sex affects the neurobiology of autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Michael V.; Suckling, John; Ruigrok, Amber N. V.; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Ecker, Christine; Deoni, Sean C. L.; Craig, Michael C.; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In autism, heterogeneity is the rule rather than the exception. One obvious source of heterogeneity is biological sex. Since autism was first recognized, males with autism have disproportionately skewed research. Females with autism have thus been relatively overlooked, and have generally been assumed to have the same underlying neurobiology as males with autism. Growing evidence, however, suggests that this is an oversimplification that risks obscuring the biological base of autism. This study seeks to answer two questions about how autism is modulated by biological sex at the level of the brain: (i) is the neuroanatomy of autism different in males and females? and (ii) does the neuroanatomy of autism fit predictions from the ‘extreme male brain’ theory of autism, in males and/or in females? Neuroanatomical features derived from voxel-based morphometry were compared in a sample of equal-sized high-functioning male and female adults with and without autism (n = 120, n = 30/group). The first question was investigated using a 2 × 2 factorial design, and by spatial overlap analyses of the neuroanatomy of autism in males and females. The second question was tested through spatial overlap analyses of specific patterns predicted by the extreme male brain theory. We found that the neuroanatomy of autism differed between adult males and females, evidenced by minimal spatial overlap (not different from that occurred under random condition) in both grey and white matter, and substantially large white matter regions showing significant sex × diagnosis interactions in the 2 × 2 factorial design. These suggest that autism manifests differently by biological sex. Furthermore, atypical brain areas in females with autism substantially and non-randomly (P females with autism remains to be understood. Future research should stratify by biological sex to reduce heterogeneity and to provide greater insight into the neurobiology of autism. PMID:23935125

  10. Contactins in the neurobiology of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuko, Amila; Kleijer, Kristel T E; Oguro-Ando, Asami; Kas, Martien J H; van Daalen, Emma; van der Zwaag, Bert; Burbach, J Peter H

    2013-11-05

    Autism is a disease of brain plasticity. Inspiring work of Willem Hendrik Gispen on neuronal plasticity has stimulated us to investigate gene defects in autism and the consequences for brain development. The central process in the pathogenesis of autism is local dendritic mRNA translation which is dependent on axodendritic communication. Hence, most autism-related gene products (i) are part of the protein synthesis machinery itself, (ii) are components of the mTOR signal transduction pathway, or (iii) shape synaptic activity and plasticity. Accordingly, prototype drugs have been recognized that interfere with these pathways. The contactin (CNTN) family of Ig cell adhesion molecules (IgCAMs) harbours at least three members that have genetically been implicated in autism: CNTN4, CNTN5, and CNTN6. In this chapter we review the genetic and neurobiological data underpinning their role in normal and abnormal development of brain systems, and the consequences for behavior. Although data on each of these CNTNs are far from complete, we tentatively conclude that these three contactins play roles in brain development in a critical phase of establishing brain systems and their plasticity. They modulate neuronal activities, such as neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, survival, guidance of projections and terminal branching of axons in forming neural circuits. Current research on these CNTNs concentrate on the neurobiological mechanism of their developmental functions. A future task will be to establish if proposed pharmacological strategies to counteract ASD-related symptomes can also be applied to reversal of phenotypes caused by genetic defects in these CNTN genes. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biological sex affects the neurobiology of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Meng-Chuan; Lombardo, Michael V; Suckling, John; Ruigrok, Amber N V; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Ecker, Christine; Deoni, Sean C L; Craig, Michael C; Murphy, Declan G M; Bullmore, Edward T; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2013-09-01

    In autism, heterogeneity is the rule rather than the exception. One obvious source of heterogeneity is biological sex. Since autism was first recognized, males with autism have disproportionately skewed research. Females with autism have thus been relatively overlooked, and have generally been assumed to have the same underlying neurobiology as males with autism. Growing evidence, however, suggests that this is an oversimplification that risks obscuring the biological base of autism. This study seeks to answer two questions about how autism is modulated by biological sex at the level of the brain: (i) is the neuroanatomy of autism different in males and females? and (ii) does the neuroanatomy of autism fit predictions from the 'extreme male brain' theory of autism, in males and/or in females? Neuroanatomical features derived from voxel-based morphometry were compared in a sample of equal-sized high-functioning male and female adults with and without autism (n = 120, n = 30/group). The first question was investigated using a 2 × 2 factorial design, and by spatial overlap analyses of the neuroanatomy of autism in males and females. The second question was tested through spatial overlap analyses of specific patterns predicted by the extreme male brain theory. We found that the neuroanatomy of autism differed between adult males and females, evidenced by minimal spatial overlap (not different from that occurred under random condition) in both grey and white matter, and substantially large white matter regions showing significant sex × diagnosis interactions in the 2 × 2 factorial design. These suggest that autism manifests differently by biological sex. Furthermore, atypical brain areas in females with autism substantially and non-randomly (P neurobiology of autism.

  12. Neurobiological mechanisms supporting experience-dependent resistance to social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M A; Clinard, C T; Morrison, K E

    2015-04-16

    Humans and other animals show a remarkable capacity for resilience following traumatic, stressful events. Resilience is thought to be an active process related to coping with stress, although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that support active coping and stress resistance remain poorly understood. In this review, we focus on the neurobiological mechanisms by which environmental and social experiences promote stress resistance. In male Syrian hamsters, exposure to a brief social defeat stressor leads to increased avoidance of novel opponents, which we call conditioned defeat. Also, hamsters that have achieved dominant social status show reduced conditioned defeat as well as cellular and molecular changes in the neural circuits controlling the conditioned defeat response. We propose that experience-dependent neural plasticity occurs in the prelimbic (PL) cortex, infralimbic (IL) cortex, and ventral medial amygdala (vMeA) during the maintenance of dominance relationships, and that adaptations in these neural circuits support stress resistance in dominant individuals. Overall, behavioral treatments that promote success in competitive interactions may represent valuable interventions for instilling resilience. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Addicted to palatable foods: comparing the neurobiology of Bulimia Nervosa to that of drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Natalie A; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2014-05-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is highly comorbid with substance abuse and shares common phenotypic and genetic predispositions with drug addiction. Although treatments for the two disorders are similar, controversy remains about whether BN should be classified as addiction. Here, we review the animal and human literature with the goal of assessing whether BN and drug addiction share a common neurobiology. Similar neurobiological features are present following administration of drugs and bingeing on palatable food, especially sugar. Specifically, both disorders involve increases in extracellular dopamine (DA), D1 binding, D3 messenger RNA (mRNA), and ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Animal models of BN reveal increases in ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA and enzymes involved in DA synthesis that resemble changes observed after exposure to addictive drugs. Additionally, alterations in the expression of glutamate receptors and prefrontal cortex activity present in human BN or following sugar bingeing in animals are comparable to the effects of addictive drugs. The two disorders differ in regards to alterations in NAc D2 binding, VTA DAT mRNA expression, and the efficacy of drugs targeting glutamate to treat these disorders. Although additional empirical studies are necessary, the synthesis of the two bodies of research presented here suggests that BN shares many neurobiological features with drug addiction. While few Food and Drug Administration-approved options currently exist for the treatment of drug addiction, pharmacotherapies developed in the future, which target the glutamate, DA, and opioid systems, may be beneficial for the treatment of both BN and drug addiction.

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 423 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 2 (2012), 28th Africa Cup of Nations (Gabon/Equatorial Guinea - 2012): Lessons for Nigeria Football, Abstract PDF. E J Jeroh. Vol 1, No 3 (2012), Adult Functional Literacy Curriculum: Effective Strategy for Human Resource Development in Nigeria, Abstract PDF. VE Okafor, C Ejezie.

  15. Browse Title Index

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    Items 151 - 200 of 246 ... Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 2 (2011), Hypoglycaemic effect of Allium sativum (aqueous extract) on normal and alloxan-induced hyperglycaemic Wistar rats, Abstract. D Atsukwei, SO Odeh, UG Egesie, SA Seriki, TP Yakubu. Vol 2, No 2 (2005), Hypotensive effect of Baissea axillaris (Apocynaceae) leaves in ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 15 (2011), Assessment of genetic diversity among accessions of two traditional leafy vegetables (Acmella uliginosa (L.) and Justicia tenella (Nees) T.) consumed in Benin using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, Abstract PDF. K Adéoti, A Rival, A Dansi, BS Ahohuendo, ...

  17. Browse Title Index

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    Issue, Title. Vol 70 (2007), UKIMWISHAJI wa Utanzu wa Fashihi: Mifano kutoka Methali za Tanzania, Abstract. Aldin K. Mutembei. Vol 70 (2007), A minimalist approach to Kiswahili Syntax, Abstract. Alice Mwihaki. Vol 80, No 1 (2017), A Morphological Classification of Kiswahili, Abstract. Susan C. Choge. Vol 74, No 1 (2011) ...

  18. Browse Title Index

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    Items 951 - 1000 of 1932 ... Issue, Title. Vol 15, No 1 (2016), Evaluation of Immunomodulatory Effect of Immunace on Adjuvanticity of 1,2-Dioleoyl-3- trimethylammoniumpropane-based Liposomes, Abstract PDF. Ebele Onuigbo, Austin Ngene, Vincent Okore, Anthony Attama. Vol 14, No 3 (2015), Evaluation of Information ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 63 ... Issue, Title. Vol 7, No 2 (2002), AAPS, African Political Science and Globalisation: Which Way Forward? Abstract. L. Adele Jinadu. Vol 6, No 1 (2001), African Crisis Response Initiative and the New African Security (Dis)order, Abstract. Emmanuel K. Aning. Vol 5, No 1 (2000), African Renaissance in the New ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 28, No 1 (2015), La cucina nella Grammatica castigliana e Toscana Di lorenzo Franciosini, Abstract. G Sotis. Vol 9, No 2 (1996), La diversità del femminile: Neera femminista ed antifemminista, Abstract. Ermenegilda Pierobon. Vol 28, No 1 (2015), La funzione etica e catartica della rappresentazione della ...

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    Items 851 - 900 of 1605 ... Issue, Title. Vol 16, No 3 (2013), Lettres to Editor: Transabdominal ultrasonographic assessment of prostate size and volume in Nigerians with clinical diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia, Abstract PDF. SM Ma'aji, B Adamu. Vol 17, No 3 (2014), Leukemoid reaction associated with transitional ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 165 ... Issue, Title. Vol 36 (2008), A Case Study about Open Source Internet Software in the eThekwini Municipality and a discussion of the relevance of open source software in libraries, Abstract. A Spencer. Vol 42 (2011), A crack in the 'dam(ned)' wall?: cooperation and collaboration among higher education ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 241 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 1 (2010), Ye Shakoch Chilot (the court of the sheikhs): A traditional institution of conflict resolution in Oromiya zone of Amhara regional state, Ethiopia, Abstract PDF. M Zeleke. Vol 15, No 3 (2015), A comparative analysis of the Post- Arab Spring National Dialogues in Tunisia and ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 44 (2010), Test and gonad characteristics in different genders of cultivated sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus intermedius, Agassiz): First insight into sexual identification, Abstract PDF. Chong Zhao, Weijie Zhang, Yaqing Chang, Pingjin Liu. Vol 8, No 6 (2009), Testicular development and relationship ...

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    Items 251 - 300 of 513 ... Issue, Title. Vol 37, No 2 (2016), Microbial analysis of meat and meat products sold in fast food restaurants in Aba, Abia State, Nigeria, Abstract .... of community ownership and sustainability of community directed treatment with ivermectin for onchocerciasis control in Cross River State, Nigeria, Abstract.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 669 ... Issue, Title. Vol 45, No 1 (2015), An Assessment of the Impact of Innovation, Succession Planning and Management Skills on the Performance of Small to Medium Sized Family-Owned Businesses in the Zimbabwe Retail Sector, Abstract. Maxwell Sandada, Lorraine Mangwandi. Vol 38, No 3 (2008): ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 13, No 2 (2013), Using Mindfulness as a Teaching Aid for Phenomenology, Abstract PDF. IR Owen. Vol 8, No 1 (2008), Were Nietzsche's Cardinal Ideas – Delusions? Abstract PDF. Eva M Cybulska. Vol 12, No 1 (2012), What did you learn in school today? Abstract PDF. Carina Henriksson. Vol 5, No 1 (2005) ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 208 ... Issue, Title. Vol 11 (2009), Comparative study on the antimicrobial activities of three Indian medicinal plants, Abstract PDF. S Hemaiswarya, M Poonkothai, R Raja, C Anbazhagan. Vol 14 (2012), Composition, functional properties and antioxidative activity of hydrolysates prepared from the frame meat of ...

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    Items 401 - 450 of 911 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 1 (2005), Heterotopic pregnancy with spontaneous vaginal delivery at 36 weeks and laparotomy at term a case report, Abstract. Chisara C Umezurike, Paul A Feyi-Waboso. Vol 4, No 2 (2000), High Knowledge and High Risk Behaviour: A Profile of Hotel-Based Sex Workers in ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 237 ... Issue, Title. Vol 64 (2017), Book Review: What Fanon Said: Philosophical Introduction to His Life and Thought, Abstract. S'busisiwe Mnguni. Vol 57 (2015), Book Review: Winelands, wealth and work: Transformations in the Dwars River Valley, Stellenbosch, Abstract. H Smith. Vol 36 (2009), Book ...

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    Items 1 - 49 of 49 ... Issue, Title. Vol 14, No 1 (2016), A socio-musical analysis of Ayo Bankole's choral music: Fun Mi N'ibeji, Abstract. Mary Taiwo Omotosho. Vol 7 (2006), A study of therapeutic songs used in Yoruba Christian Healing Homes: The Cherubim and Seraphim church, Osogbo, as a case study, Abstract.

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    Items 201 - 250 of 931 ... Issue, Title. Vol 36, No 2 (2017), Comparative study of Moore and Mealy machine models adaptation in black soap production, Abstract PDF. S. A. Akinboro, A. Omotosho, J. A. Adeyiga, E. Effiom. Vol 29, No 1 (2010), Comparative Study of Vlasov and Euler Instabilities of Axially Compressed ...

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    Items 451 - 500 of 1932 ... Issue, Title. Vol 7, No 3 (2008), Characterization of Biotic and Abiotic Profiles of Greenhouse Evaporative Cooling System Fouling, Abstract PDF. AA Nuhu, S Ahmad. Vol 13, No 12 (2014), Characterization of Carbamazepine-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Prepared by Rapid Expansion of ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 87, No 7 (2010), Perceptions of Interns Performance: A Comparison between a Problem Based and a Conventional Curriculum, Abstract PDF. C Owino. Vol 82, No 1 (2005):, Perceptions Of Primary Health Care With Regard To Corresponding Knowledge, Attitude And Practices Amongst The Kenyan Maasai ...

  15. Browse Title Index

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    Items 351 - 400 of 452 ... Issue, Title. Vol 17, No 3 (2016), Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in India: An updated meta-analysis, Abstract PDF. Pradeep Kumar, Upendra Yadav, Vandana Rai. Vol 14, No 1 (2013), Prevalence of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and A1298C ...

  16. Browse Title Index

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    Items 101 - 150 of 350 ... Issue, Title. Vol 43 (2014), Die waarde en uitdagings van diensleer vir tolkopleiding: die ervaring van die tolkopleidingsprogram aan die Universiteit Stellenbosch, Abstract PDF. HM Lesch. Vol 45 (2014), Die waarde van tolking vir tersiêre onderrig en leer. 'n Ondersoek na die persepsies van ...

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    Items 101 - 107 of 107 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 2 (2007), User Experiences And Perceptions Of Online Information Resources In Libraries: A Case Of Sokoine National Agricultural Library (Snal), Tanzania, Abstract. A Malekani. Vol 6, No 2 (2004), User fees in public libraries: perspectives, opportunities and challenges in ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 414 ... Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 1 (2011), Comparative Study on Three Major Internet Search Engines, Abstract. UA Usman, JK Alhassan. Vol 13, No 2 (2016), Competencies and materials for repositioning cataloguers for information management in an electronic era in University Libraries in South East, Nigeria ...

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    Items 501 - 550 of 741 ... Issue, Title. Vol 16, No 1 (2008), Psychosocial Factors Influencing Attitudes Towards Internet Piracy among Nigerian University Students, Abstract. F M Ilevbare. Vol 20, No 1 (2012), Psychosocial factors predisposing university undergraduates to mentoring relationship, Abstract. R Opayemi. Vol 20, No ...

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    Items 201 - 250 of 312 ... Issue, Title. Vol 23, No 1-2 (2008), Mechanism of the delayed puberty onset in offspring of rats that consumed aqueous extract of hibiscus sabdariffa during pregnancy, Abstract PDF. E.E Iyare, O.A Adegoke. Vol 24, No 2 (2009), Medicinal properties of fractionated acetone/water neem (Azadirachta ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 292 ... Issue, Title. Vol 19, No 1 (2012), Cancer Patterns In Ilorin: An Analysis Of Ilorin Cancer Registry Statistics, Abstract. EAO Afolayan, OOK Ibrahim, GT Ayilara. Vol 17, No 1 (2010), Cardiovascular health benefits of some locally adoptable exercise techniques, Abstract. A.F Adeniyi, U.A Ahmed. Vol 19, No 2 ...

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    Items 151 - 200 of 247 ... Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 4 (2008), New gaussian points for the solution of first order ordinary differential equations, Abstract PDF. J.P Chollom, S.E Madugu. Vol 10, No 1 (2015), Nuclear and Atomic Methods Applied in the Determination of Some Heavy Polluting Elements in Some Soil Samples around ...

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    Items 151 - 200 of 1247 ... Issue, Title. Vol 11, No 2 (2007), Assessment of Possible Impacts of Climate Change in Water Reservoir of Bhopal with Special Reference to Heavy Metals, Central Region - India, Abstract PDF. C Parashar, S Dixit, R Shrivastava. Vol 18, No 1 (2014), Assessment of Potential Abatement provided by ...

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    Items 501 - 521 of 521 ... Issue, Title. Vol 22, No 3 (2004), Urinary tract infection in adults, Abstract PDF. E Coetzer. Vol 29, No 7 (2011), Using communication skills for difficult conversations in palliative care: 'Suffering is not a question which demands an answer, It is not a problem which demands a solution, It is a mystery ...

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    Items 401 - 450 of 493 ... Issue, Title. Vol 34, No 2 (2014), Stress and coping mechanisms of nursing students during clinical practice in Ghana, Abstract PDF. VB Bam, GA Oppong, MB Ibitoye. Vol 36, No 2 (2016), STUDENTS' AWARENESS OF AND ADHERENCE TO ENERGY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SELECTED ...

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    Items 101 - 125 of 125 ... Issue, Title. Vol 4, No 2 (2014): Special Issue: Part 1, The chemist's triangle and a general systemic approach to teaching, learning and research in chemistry education, Abstract PDF. JD Bradley. Vol 4, No 2 (2014): Special Issue: Part 1, The development of a new chemistry curriculum in the ...

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    Items 551 - 600 of 611 ... Issue, Title. Vol 2, No 1 (1999), The effect of aqeous seed extract of Trigonella foenum graecum (Fenugreek) on haematological parameters in albino rats, Abstract PDF. K.D. Efraim, H.A. Salami, P.A. Nwafor. Vol 10, No 2 (2007), The effect of chronic cement dust exposure on lung function of cement ...

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    Items 751 - 800 of 1463 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 2 (2009): Special Issue, In-vitro antibacterial activity of selected medicinal plants from Longisa region of Bomet district, Kenya, Abstract PDF. KR Cheruiyot, D Olila, J Kateregga. Vol 7, No 4 (2007), In-vitro antimicrobial activity of selected honeys on clinical isolates of Helicobacter ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 1 (2009), Relationship Between Socioeconomic Status and Body Mass Index Among Adult Nigerians, Abstract PDF. CE Mbada, RA Adedoyin, AS Odejide. Vol 2, No 1 (2010), Relationship Between the 6-minute Walk Test and Correlates of Type 2 Diabetes: Indication for caution in exercise prescription ...

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    Items 251 - 300 of 699 ... Issue, Title. Vol 33, No 3 (2008), Effects of oil pollution on aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages in Gabon wetlands, Abstract. MR Vinson, EC Dinger, J Kotynek, M Dethier. Vol 29, No 1 (2004), Effects of the 2000 southern Mozambique floods on a marginal coral community: the case at Xai-Xai ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 11090 ... Issue, Title. Vol 12, No 7 (2013), In vitro clonal propagation of Fuchsia magellanica Lam. Abstract. Anjum Parveen, Sadia Rasheed. Vol 7, No 8 (2008), In vitro clonal propagation of Mucuna pruriens var. utilis and its evaluation of genetic stability through RAPD markers, Abstract PDF.

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    Issue, Title. Vol 11, No 3 (2017), Synthesis of novel thiazolobenzimidazoles, Abstract PDF. Siomenan Coulbali, Roger Simplice Pépin Zoakouma, Sagne Jacques Akpa, Venance Martial Say, Fanté Bamba, Drissa Sissouma, Ané Adjou. Vol 3, No 4 (2009), Synthesis of peptide derivatives of aspirin and their antibiogram ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 210 ... Issue, Title. Vol 30, No 2 (2006), Comparative Brine Shrimp Toxicity of Withenia somnifera and Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium Extracts and In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of W. Somnifera, Abstract. J M Mbaria, G W Gakuya, S N Yunus, H F Kaburia, A N Njuguna. Vol 27 (2004): Special Issue 2004 ...

  14. Browse Title Index

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    Items 7651 - 7700 of 11090 ... Issue, Title. Vol 11, No 6 (2012), Novel expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR) markers characterized by new bioinformatic criteria reveal high genetic similarity in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeding lines, Abstract PDF. K Ukoskit, P Thipmongkolcharoen, ...

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    Items 1 - 41 of 41 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 1 (1997), Aeration of anaerobically digested sewage sludges to enhance phosphorus precipitation, Abstract. Z. Phiri, H. Harada. Vol 1, No 1 (1997), Amenability assessment for recovery of gold from Nigerian Ilesha gold ore by cyanidation, Abstract. J. A. Ajayi, S. Simukanga. Vol 1, No 2 ...

  16. Browse Title Index

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    Items 51 - 100 of 189 ... Issue, Title. Vol 5, No 2 (2004), Dimensioning of dog bone specimens and numerical analysis of the effects of different fillet radii, clamp area and pinhole loading on the stresses in such specimens, Abstract. Maina Maringa. Vol 12, No 1 (2012), Diversity of the chironomidae (diptera) of river Niger related ...

  17. Browse Title Index

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    Items 1 - 50 of 164 ... Issue, Title. Vol 22, No 1 (2010), Bona, Barometer of the Decades, Abstract. T Khuzwayo. Vol 17, No 2 (2005), En fuite, on Foot, in Thought: Making the Metropolis Elusive, Abstract. S-A Murray. Vol 15, No 1 (2003), A Brazilian theatre model meets Zulu performance conventions Westville prison – the case ...

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    Items 101 - 120 of 120 ... Issue, Title. Vol 11, No 2 (2017), Serological survey of toxoplasmosis, neosporosis and brucellosis among cattle herds in Oyo state, south-western Nigeria, Abstract PDF. Adekunle Ayinmode, Victor Akinseye, Gereon Schares, Simeon Cadmus. Vol 9, No 2 (2015), Seronegative conversion of an HIV ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 226 ... Issue, Title. Vol 17 (2000), Comparative analysis of Scandinavian and Ethiopian approaches to housing with special emphasis on housing tenure and housing finance, Abstract PDF. W Berhanu. Vol 18 (2001), Comparison Of Seismic Provisions Of EBCS 8 And Current Major Builduing Codes Pertinent ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 3 (2009), Kinetics of the reaction of compound III of horseradish peroxidase with hydrogen peroxide and NADPH, Abstract PDF. SA Adeniyi, CL Orjiekwe, SJ Josiah. Vol 4, No 5 (2010), Knowledge of Nigerian laboratory technologists and mortuary attendants on various methods of embalming ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 139 ... Issue, Title. Vol 7, No 1 (2015), Engineering-geological properties of carbonates and shale: their implications for dam construction in Mekelle, Northern ... Vol 2, No 1 (2010), Evaluation of Orange Peel Citrus Sinensis (L) As a Source of Repellent, Toxicant and Protectant against Zabrotes Subfasciatus ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 2 (2016), Usefulness of problem tree, objective tree and logical framework matrix to fix chal-lenges of unemployment and underemployment of higher education graduates in Rwanda, Kenya and Ghana, Abstract PDF. Irénée Ndayambaje, Philothère Ntawiha, Susan Ngigi, Samuel Yaw Ampofo.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 620 ... Issue, Title. Vol 19, No 2 (2007), A qualitative study of medical student socialization in Malawi\\'s College of Medicine: Preclinical training and identity, Abstract PDF. C Wendland, C Bandawe. Vol 27, No 3 (2015), A review of patients with advanced cervical cancer presenting to palliative care services at ...

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    Items 251 - 300 of 399 ... Issue, Title. Vol 11, No 2 (2012), Pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kano, Nigeria, Abstract PDF. A Lawan, TB Mohammed. Vol 6, No 4 (2007), Pattern of Eclampsia in a Tertiary Health Facility Situated in a Semi-Rural Town in Northern Nigeria, Abstract PDF. J Tukur, BA Umar, A Rabi'u. Vol 7, No 3 (2008) ...

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    Items 351 - 400 of 465 ... Issue, Title. Vol 13, No 2 (2008), Recognition of Odontogenic Cyst-Fluid Cholesterol Concentration as a Measure of Serum Cholesterol Value of the Patient. Abstract. U Mgbeokwere, BC Ezeanolue, OC Ekwueme, AE Obiechina, C Oji. Vol 14, No 2 (2009), Recurrent angio-oedema involving the upper ...

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    Items 251 - 300 of 1932 ... Issue, Title. Vol 16, No 10 (2017), Anti-hyperlipidemic effects of Caralluma edulis (Asclepiadaceae) and Verbena officinalis (Verbenaceae) whole plants against high-fat diet-induced .... Vol 8, No 4 (2009), Antimicrobial Activity of the Leaves of Endemic Stachys pseudopinardii in Turkey, Abstract PDF.

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    Items 151 - 200 of 387 ... Issue, Title. Vol 15, No 2 (2015), Introduction to Christian philosophy, Abstract. Charles Ogundu Nnaji. Vol 8, No 2 (2006), Is Quantum Mechanics a Complete Theory?: A Philosophical Defense of Einstein's Position, Abstract. U O Egbai. Vol 10, No 1 (2007), Jesus in Africa, Abstract. FF Edet. Vol 10, No ...

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    Items 401 - 450 of 814 ... Issue, Title. Vol 20, No 1 (2015), Major limb amputations at a teaching hospital in the sub-Saharan Africa: Any change in trend? Abstract PDF. OJ Ogundele, AI Ifesanya, OA Oyewole, OO Adegbehingbe. Vol 14, No 1 (2009), Major limb trauma in Eastern Ethiopia, Abstract PDF. MD Munyazewal Dessie.

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    Items 101 - 150 of 168 ... Issue, Title. Vol 59 (2017), On the record: Interview with Lieutenant General Gary Kruser, Deputy National Commissioner, South African Police Service, Abstract PDF. Johan Burger. Vol 60 (2017), On the record: Interview with Major General Johan Jooste (Retired), South African National Parks, Head of ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 338 ... Issue, Title. Vol 14, No 4 (2010), Digital teaching files – a useful teaching tool for the modern radiologist, Abstract PDF. AT du Plessis. Vol 8, No 2 (2004), Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses absorbed by health care workers? Abstract PDF. R Raubenheimer, B ...

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    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 1 (2008), Assessment Of Ophthalmic Patients' Satisfaction In Owo, Abstract. CO Omolase, CO Fadamiro, BO Omolase, AS Aina, EO Omolade. Vol 3, No 1 (2010), Case Report: Strongyloides stercoralis coinfection in a Nigerian with HIV. Abstract. A.A Oyekunle, R.A.A Bolarinwa, O.A ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 900 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 6 (2010), β-carotene, iron and zinc content in Papua New Guinea and East African highland bananas. Abstract PDF. R Fungo, J.K Kikafunda, M Pillay. Vol 11, No 6 (2011), Allium hookeri, Thw. Enum. A lesser known terrestrial perennial herb used as food and its ethnobotanical ...

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    Items 51 - 100 of 112 ... Issue, Title. Vol 24, No 1 (2008), Improving the quality of care of the critically ill patient. Implementing the central venous line care bundle in the ICU, Abstract PDF. R Gillespie. Vol 23, No 2 (2007), Improving the quality of care of the critically ill patients: Implementing the care bundle approach in the ICU ...

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    Issue, Title. Vol 50, No 1 (2013), Memory, verbal onslaught and persuasive eloquence in Armah's Two Thousand Seasons and The Healers, Abstract PDF. AM Fubara. Vol 36, No 1-2 (2002), Metacognitive reading skills in academic support: A transactionist perspective of the relationship between reading and learning ...

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    Items 251 - 300 of 333 ... Issue, Title. Vol 22, No 1 (1999), Self-incompatibility system in the Ethiopian populations of Guizotia abyssinica ( L.F) Cass. (niger). Details PDF. Sileshi Nemomissa, Endashaw Bekele, Kifle Dagne. Vol 28, No 1 (2005), Sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the Chilga basin sediments, Northwest ...

  16. Browse Title Index

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    Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 15 (2011), The effect of polyacrylamide (PAM) applications on infiltration, runoff and soil losses under simulated rainfall conditions, Abstract PDF. Z Tümsavas, A Kara. Vol 11, No 49 (2012), The effect of polythene colour container and three spawn rates on production of Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom ...

  17. Browse Title Index

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    Issue, Title. Vol 6, No 22 (2007), Antimicrobial activity of a decoction used by Southwestern Nigeria traditional healers on selected dermatophytes, Abstract PDF. AM Kilani, O Oyelade, OE Adeleke. Vol 7, No 16 (2008), Antimicrobial activity of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria isolated from Algerian traditional fermented milk ...

  18. Browse Title Index

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    Items 6401 - 6450 of 11090 ... Issue, Title. Vol 2, No 10 (2003), Influence of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium application on the yield of maize in the savanna zone of Nigeria, Abstract PDF. JOS Kogbe, JA Adediran. Vol 10, No 56 (2011), Influence of nitrogen source and sucrose concentration on inulinase production by ...

  19. Browse Title Index

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    Items 1 - 50 of 346 ... Issue, Title. Vol 27, No 3 (2014), A desire for weight loss in season increases disordered eating behaviour risk and energy deficiency in athletes, Abstract PDF. HH Wright, R Ford, CR Botha. Vol 29, No 3 (2016), A review of infant and young child feeding practice in hospital and the home in KwaZulu-Natal ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 188 ... Issue, Title. Vol 16 (2002), Le Chichewa essai de description dans une perspective didactique, Details PDF. Allan Lipenga. Vol 3, No 1 (1989), Leibniz and Ralph Cudworth on freedom, necessity and fatalism, Abstract PDF. Didier Njirayamanda Kaphagawani. Vol 24 (2016), Les dynamiques de ...

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    Items 1 - 50 of 457 ... Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 6 (2011), 2D study of wind forces around multiple cooling towers using computational fluid dynamics, Abstract PDF. H Irtaza, S Ahmad, T Pandey. Vol 2, No 6 (2010), 3D finite element analysis on crack-tip plastic zone, Abstract PDF. Shashidhar K Kudari, Krishnaraja G Kodancha.

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    Items 51 - 100 of 242 ... Issue, Title. Vol 7, No 2 (2008), Day Case Orthopaedic Surgery in a West African Teaching Hospital, Abstract. OA Adewole, SO Giwa, MO Kayode, MO Shoga. Vol 11, No 2 (2012), Diagnostic Accuracy of Lachman Test in the Evaluation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries, Abstract. CA Nkanta, JVS ...

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    Items 101 - 136 of 136 ... Issue, Title. Vol 13, No 1 (2004), Taxation Of Financial Assets: Implications For Capital Market Development In Tanzania, Abstract. Emma C Isinika, Hamisi H Mwinyimvua. Vol 14, No 1 (2005), The application of management accounting techniques in decision-making in a developing country, Abstract.

  4. Browse Title Index

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    Items 51 - 100 of 333 ... Issue, Title. Vol 36, No 2 (2013), Characterization of fungal extracts from Trichoderma isolates: their effects against coffee wilt pathogen (Gibberella xylarioides), Abstract PDF. Afrasa Mulatu, Negussie Megersa, Tesfaye Alemu. Vol 35, No 2 (2012), CHROMOSOME STUDY OF SOME GRASSHOPPER ...

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    Items 101 - 150 of 814 ... Issue, Title. Vol 17, No 1 (2012), Attitude of Nurses in Mulago Hospital Burns Unit to HIV/AIDS Burns Patients, Abstract PDF. R Alenyo, R Ssentongo, E Kalanzi, C Namatovu. Vol 8, No 1 (2003), Autotransfusion in penetrating chest war trauma with haemothorax: The Keysaney Hospital experience ...

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    Items 201 - 250 of 473 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 2 (1999), Enhancement of protein in Cassava (in vitro), Abstract. D Eruvbetine, EB Oguntona, LO Adegbenro. Vol 5, No 1 (2002), Estimating growth, instability indices and levels of associations in number and value of loans guaranteed under agricultural credit guaranteed scheme ...

  7. Browse Title Index

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    Items 7051 - 7100 of 11090 ... Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 20 (2009), Mapping of QTLs for frost tolerance and heading time using SSR markers in bread wheat, Abstract PDF. O Sofalian, SA Mohammadi, S Aharizad, M Moghaddam, MR Shakiba. Vol 9, No 50 (2010), Mapping of QTLs for leaf area and the association with winter ...

  8. Browse Title Index

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    Items 201 - 250 of 458 ... Issue, Title. Vol 32, No 2 (2011), Grid Keratotomy for Treatment of Atypical Presenting Indolent Corneal Ulceration in a Boxer, Abstract PDF. Sarbani Hazra, Himangshu Palui. Vol 36, No 4 (2015), Gross and morphometric anatomical changes of the thyroid gland in the West African Dwarf Goat (Capra ...

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 282 ... Issue, Title. Vol 17, No 1 (2016), Comparison and suitability of genotype by environment analysis methods for yield-related traits of pearl millet, Abstract PDF. G Lubadde, J Ebiyau, B Akello, M.A. Ugen. Vol 16, No 1 (2015), Comparison of in vitro digestibility using slaughtered and fistulated cattle as ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 350 ... Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 2 (2007), Socio-economic characteristics of cattle farmers and their perceptions of climatic effects on cattle production in Kwara State, Nigeria, Abstract ... Vol 6, No 3 (2010), Survey of Hard Ticks (Ixodidae) Infesting Camels (Camelus Dromedarius) in Kano State, Nigeria, Abstract.

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 635 ... Issue, Title. Vol 7, No 2 (2014): Supplement, Farmers' Perception and Adaptation to Climate Change: Heckman's Two Stage Sample Selection Model, Abstract PDF. U Tilahun, A Bedemo. Vol 4, No 1 (2011), Farmers' Perception and Reponses to Soil erosion in Zing Local Government Area of Taraba ...

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 399 ... Issue, Title. Vol 49, No 2 (2015), Determinants of physicians' intention to collect data exhaustively in registries: an exploratory study in Bamako's community health centres, Abstract PDF. BA Ly, MP Gagnon, F Legare, M Rousseau, D Simonyan. Vol 45, No 2 (2011), Diabetic foot care: Self reported ...

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 113 of 113 ... Issue, Title. Vol 6, No 1 (2014), The e-waste conundrum: Balancing evidence from the North and on-the-ground developing countries' realities for improved management, Abstract PDF. M Martin Oteng-Ababio, E F Amankwaa. Vol 2, No 2 (2011), The Impact of Corporate Board Meetings on Corporate ...

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 149 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 2 (2003), A study of annexin-V labeled-lymphocytes apoptosis in pediatric-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in comparison to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, Abstract PDF. Ashraf A Salama, Hoda Y Tomoum, Afaf A Mostafa, Emad M Mourad. Vol 10, No 2 (2012), Allergen-specific ...

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 107 ... Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 1 (2005), Job satisfaction of journalism graduates in Pakistan, Abstract. S Riaz. Vol 9, No 2 (2013): Special Issue, Land Tenure Induced Deforestation and Environmental Degradation in Ethiopia: The Case of Arbagugu State Forest Development and Protection Project (A Historical ...

  16. Browse Title Index

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    Items 101 - 137 of 137 ... Issue, Title. Vol 4, No 1 (2010), The Director as a Theatre Critic: The Case of Dapo Adelugba, Abstract PDF. N Nnenyelike. Vol 3, No 1 (2009), The drama in cross-cultural marriages and stereotypes in central Nigeria: The tiv-igede paradigm in the global age, Abstract PDF. GA Doki. Vol 10, No 2 (2016) ...

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 901 - 950 of 1427 ... Issue, Title. Vol 17, No 3 (2017), Onset and duration of cycloplegic action of 1% cyclopentolate – 1% tropicamide combination, Abstract PDF. Samuel Kyei, Alfred Asiem Nketsiah, Kofi Asiedu, Agnes Awuah, Andrew Owusu-Ansah. Vol 16, No 4 (2016), Opiate withdrawal syndrome in buprenorphine ...

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 82 ... Issue, Title. Vol 7, No 2 (2010), A Markov deterioration model for predicting recurrent maintenance of a network of roads: a case study of Niger state, Nigeria. Abstract PDF. YA Jimoh, AY Adama. Vol 10, No 1 (2013), A Method for Solving the Voltage and Torque Equations of the Split-Phase Induction ...

  19. Browse Title Index

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    Items 1 - 50 of 921 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 1 (2005), "Abortion? That's for women!" Narratives and experiences of commercial motorbike riders in South-Western Uganda, Abstract. Stella Nyanzi, Barbara Nyanzi, Kalina Bessie. Vol 3, No 2 (1999), Editorial: Safe Abortion in Africa: Ending the Silence and Starting a Movement ...

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 392 ... Issue, Title .... Vol 44, No 2 (2006), Adult tonsillectomy - are long waiting lists putting patients at risk? ... G Watermeyer, MEC van Wyk, PA Goldberg ... CR de Jager, RJ Moont, NE Pearce ... testosterone and adverse prognostic factors in men diagnosed with prostate cancer in KwaZulu-Natal, Abstract PDF.

  1. Browse Title Index

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    Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 2 (2010), Utilization of community-based outpatient addiction treatment programmes in Kenya, Abstract PDF. CS Deveau, L Tengia, C Mutua, S Njoroge, L Dajoh, B Singer. Vol 7, No 1 (2008), Volume of alcohol consumption, patterns of drinking and burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa, 2002 ...

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 8251 - 8300 of 11090 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 2 (2002), Physiological and molecular insights into drought tolerance, Abstract PDF. Sagadevan G Mundree, Bienyameen Baker, Shaheen Mowla, Shaun Peters, Saberi Marais, Clare Vander Willigen, Kershini Govender, Alice Maredza, Samson Muyanga, Jill M Farrant, ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 210 ... Issue, Title. Vol 13, No 2 (2016), Social determinants of self-care subsequent to major medical surgery at the Central Regional Teaching Hospital in Ghana, Abstract PDF. William Boateng. Vol 7, No 1 (2010), Socio-Economic and Cultural Determinants of Girl-Child Education in Gushegu/Karaga ...

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 30, No 3 (2012), Corpus-based language teaching: An African language perspective, Abstract ... Vol 33, No 1 (2015), Development and Validation of an EFL Self-Regulated Learning Questionnaire, Abstract ... Vol 32, No 1 (2014), Domains of H tone spreading and the noun class prefix in Xitsonga, Abstract.

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 127 of 127 ... Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 1 (2011), Role of the African Council for Distance Education in Fostering Quality Assurance in Open and Distance Learning in Africa, Abstract. O Rotimi, J Sanusi. Vol 4, No 2 (2013), Sampling in Qualitative Research: Improving the Quality of Research Outcomes in Higher ...

  6. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 74 ... Issue, Title. Vol 4, No 1-2 (2013), 'From the classroom to stage': developing an African popular music pedagogy, Abstract PDF. AM Emielu. Vol 4, No 1-2 (2013), A review of literature: rape and communication media strategies in Nigeria, Abstract PDF. OT Akinwole, OS Omoera. Vol 2, No 1-2 (2008), A Study ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 351 - 400 of 650 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 1 (2017), Inhibitory effect of isolated Lupeol from stem bark of Diospyros mespiliformis Horsch (Ebenaceae) against some microbial pathogens, Abstract PDF. A Anas, A Ahmed, S Umar, U.M. Jajere, E.H. Mshelia, O Natasha. Vol 3, No 1 (2010), Interventional studies of ...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 846 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 3 (2017), Assessment of nutrient contamination in surface water, case study of Ain Zada Dam (North-East of Algeria), Abstract PDF. A Mebarkia, A Haouchine, A Boudoukha, R Nedjai. Vol 5, No 2 (2013), Assessment of water quality index for groundwater of Valsad district of south ...

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 38, No 1 (2004), Book Review: Unexpected Voices – Theory, Practice and Identity in the Writing Classroom. Abstract. Charly Dyers. Vol 38, No 1 (2004), Book Review: Shelley Angelil-Carter: Stolen Language? Plagiarism in Writing. Abstract. Elizabeth de Kadt. Vol 37, No 1 (2003), Book Review: The Green ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 401 - 450 of 522 ... Issue, Title. Vol 12, No 1 (2006), Spectral entropy and haemodynamic response to surgery during sevoflurane anaesthesia, Abstract PDF. FJ Smith, E Dannhauser. Vol 19, No 3 (2013), Spinal anaesthesia for brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: a comparison of two dose regimens of hyperbaric ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 231 ... Issue, Title. Vol 16, No 2 (2004), A Comparative Analysis of Students\\' Characteristics and the Impact these have on Student Unrest: The Case of Three Universities in Harare, Abstract. Muchadei Alex Nyota. Vol 24, No 3 (2012), A Comparative Analysis of the Causes of Primary School Dropout in an Urban ...

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 633 ... Issue, Title. Vol 19, No 1 (2009), Delays in Tuberculosis Treatment and Associated Factors in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia, Abstract PDF. Ayalew Tegegn, Meseret Yazachew. Vol 26, No 1 (2016), Delivery Site Preferences and Associated Factors among Married Women of Child Bearing Age in ...

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 168 of 168 ... Issue, Title. Vol 41 (2012), Understanding 'Poinry face': What is criminology for? Abstract PDF. B Dixon. Vol 48 (2014), Unsustainable and unjust: Criminal justice policy and remand detention since 1994, Abstract PDF. J Redpath. Vol 32 (2010), Using data to make a difference: Understanding crime ...

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 1427 ... Issue, Title. Vol 10, No 3 (2010), Ameliorative effects of Cnidoscolus aconitifolius on alloxan toxicity in Wistar rats, Abstract PDF. O.I Azeez, A.A Oyagbemi, M.O Oyeyemi, A.A Odetola. Vol 12, No 4 (2012), Amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia in chronic renal failure: a case report, Abstract PDF.

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 1 (2007), An Action Five Strategy For Bridging The Gender Gap In Academic Research Activities In African Universities. The Case of Nigeria, Abstract PDF. DN Okorie, OG Agabi, CM Uche. Vol 1, No 1 (2007), Book Review: Confronting sexual harassment in Ghanaian Universities ...

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 451 - 500 of 518 ... Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 3 (2016): Special Issue, The effects of (ethanolic, methanolic, and aqueous) extracts of Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Thymus vulgaris with clotrimazol ointment in preventing the growth of Candidad albicans fungus, Abstract PDF. E Saffarieh, R Pazoki, S Aghaamoo, E Jahan.

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 172 ... Issue, Title. Vol 35, No 3 (2006): Politics and the Imagination, 'To Think Representatively': Arendt on Judgment and the Imagination, Abstract. Maurizio Passerin d Entreves. Vol 36, No 1 (2007):, A Non-Modal Conception of Secondary Properties, Abstract. Manuel García-Carpintero. Vol 30, No 3 (2001): ...

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 551 - 600 of 911 ... Issue, Title. Vol 16, No 1 (2012), Nigerian Lawyers and Reproductive Health Rights: A Survey of Knowledge, Practices and Opinions on Law Reforms among the Bar and Bench in North Eastern Nigeria, Abstract PDF. Abdulkarim Garba Mairiga, Ado Dan'azumi Geidam, Babagana Bako, Abdullahi ...

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 247 ... Issue, Title. Vol 9, No 1 (2014), Biochemical response of normal albino rats to the addition of aqueous leaves extract of Hibiscus cannabinus and Murraya koenigii in rats drinking water, Abstract PDF. SA James, MJ Ladan, R Auta, J Audu, A Garba. Vol 4, No 1 (2009), Bioconversion of cassava starch to ...

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 425 ... Issue, Title. Vol 36 (2005), Nutrient status of some soils supporting rubber (Hevea brasil iensis Arg. Muell) in Midwestern Nigeria, Abstract. IK Ugwa, Jr Orimoloye, TU Esekhade. Vol 35 (2004), Nutritional physcio-chemical properties of snake gourd Trichosanthes cucumerina pulp compared to tomatoe ...

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 641 ... Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 4 (2013), Fetal Macrosomia: Risk Factors, Maternal, and Perinatal Outcome, Abstract PDF. A Mohammadbeigi, F Farhadifar, N Soufi Zadeh, N Mohammadsalehi, M Rezaiee, M Aghaei. Vol 3, No 3 (2013), Fever of Unknown Origin: A Case of Post Obstructive Pneumonia ...

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 391 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 3 (1999):, Selection and in-vitro propagation of five cassava (Manihot esculenta, Crantz) cultivars, Abstract. K. E. Danso, E. Acheampong, H. M. Amoatey. Vol 12, No 1 (2010), Selection of New Standard Crosses for the Oil Palm (Elaeis Guineensis J.) Third Cycle of Selection ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 425 ... Issue, Title. Vol 34 (2003), A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF CAPTURE FISHERIES ON THE WESTERN AND EASTERN SHORES OF KAINJI LAKE BASIN, NIGERIA, Abstract. M.A.Y RAHJI. Vol 40, No 1-2 (2009), A comparative study of gender roles in indigenous processing and marketing of yam and ...

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 260 of 260 ... Issue, Title. Vol 46 (2006), The use of two biological formulations of Bacillus Thuringiensis and Bacillus Sphaericus in the control of mosquito vectors of malaria in drains and rice fields, Abstract. M H Ocran, F Akpabey. Vol 47 (2007), The Wildlife Trade In Ghana: A Threat To Biodiversity Conservation ...

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 452 ... Issue, Title. Vol 16, No 1 (2015), Association of β-fibrinogen promoter gene polymorphism (148C/T), hyperfibrinogenemia and ischemic stroke in young adult patients, Abstract PDF. I Imran, R Lamsudin, P Idjradinata, TH Achmad, A Maskoen, S Wibowo, H Harapan. Vol 17, No 1 (2016), Association of ...

  6. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 23, No 1 (2016), La teneur en iode du sel de cuisine consommé à Lubumbashi et le statut iode des personnes vulnérables: cas de femmes enceintes de milieux défavorisés, Abstract. Bienvenue Ilunga Banza, Jean Baptiste Simbi Lumbu, Philippe Donnen, Eugène Kabange Twite, Daniel Mikobi Kwete, ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 37 of 37 ... Issue, Title. Vol 12, No 1 (2006), A critical analysis of paradigms and rights in disability dicources, Abstract. L Nyirinkindi. Vol 12, No 2 (2006), A Critique Of The Rights Of Refugees Under The OAU Convention Governing The Specific Aspects Of Refugee Problems In Africa, Abstract. OS Oyelade. Vol 14, No ...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 247 ... Issue, Title. Vol 6, No 2 (2011), In vitro Aantimalarial Activity of the Extracts of Vernonia amygdalina Commonly Used In Traditional Medicine In Nigeria, Abstract PDF. KK Sha'a, S Oguche, IM Watila, TF Ikpa. Vol 12, No 1 (2017), In vitro antioxidant activity of n-butanol extract of Curcuma longa and its ...

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 432 ... Issue, Title. Vol 21, No 1 (2016), Selection criteria for a radiography programme in South Africa: Predictors for academic success in the first year of study, Abstract PDF. Carol Anne Kridiotis, Johan Bezuidenhout, Jacques Raubenheimer. Vol 10, No 4 (2005), Service-learning in nursing: Integrating ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 85 ... Issue, Title. Vol 4, No 1 (2012), Helicobacter Pylori: Serological Testing and Treatment in Uninvestigated Dyspepsia: Randomized Control Study in Northern Nigeria, Abstract. OA Solomon, TD Thacher, AO Ajayi. Vol 8, No 2 (2016), Helicobacter pylori and upper digestive diseases - diagnosis through real ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 33, No 3 (2011), Transit station or destination? Attendance patterns, movements and abundance estimate of humpback whales off west South Africa from photographic and genotypic matching, Abstract. J Barendse, PB Best, M Thornton, SH Elwen, HC Rosenbaum, I Carvalho, C Pomilla, TJQ Collins, MA ...

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 113 ... Issue, Title. Vol 8, No 2 (2016), 2010 FIFA World Cup stadium investment: Does the post-event usage justify the expenditure? Abstract. Luke Humphrey, Gavin Fraser. Vol 6, No 1 (2014), 7Implication of mergers and acquisitions on stock returns before and during the 2007–2009 credit crunch: An event ...

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 351 - 400 of 1199 ... Issue, Title. Vol 5, No 1 (2011), Effective Classroom Management Techniques for Secondary Schools, Abstract PDF. RI Asiyai. Vol 9, No 2 (2015), Effective Management of Human Resources for Business and Church Growth, Abstract PDF. SA Jaja, LO Arugu. Vol 6, No 3 (2012), Effective Management ...

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 227 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 7, No 1 (2015): Supplement 1, Impact of a quality improvement project to strengthen infection prevention and control training at rural healthcare facilities ... Vol 2, No 1 (2010), Is temperament a key to the success of teaching innovation?

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 97 of 97 ... Issue, Title. Vol 4, No 3 (2015), Malaria and intestinal parasites in pregnant and non-pregnant women: a comparative study at the University Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana, Abstract PDF. E. Agboli, S.C.K. Tay, C. Obirikorang, E.Y. Aidoo. Vol 1, No 4 (2012), Management of complex ankle fracture: A Ghanaian ...

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 74 (2014), Isolation, characterization and primary screening of soil actinomycetes from Kenyatta University arboretum grounds for antibacterial activities, Abstract PDF. OY Khasabuli, AN Kibera. Vol 114 (2017), Isolement par partition bio guidé du principe actif myostimulant de l'extrait aqueux de Mareya ...

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 244 ... Issue, Title. Vol 22, No 1-4 (2010), Ocular features seen in children with hydrocephalus at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu: a case series, Abstract. FC Maduka-Okafor, UF Ezepue. Vol 25, No 3-4 (2013), Ocular manifestations and outcome of treatment of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: ...

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 21, No 1 (2015), Lingual botryomycoma in the aftermath of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, Abstract PDF. Houyam Moundib, Fouzia Hali. Vol 17, No 1 (2014), Lipid profile frequency and the prevalence of dyslipidaemia from biochemical tests at Saint Louis University Hospital in Senegal, Abstract PDF.

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 3, No 1 (2014), Utilisation and diagnostic yield of large bowel endoscopy at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Abstract PDF. JCB Dakubo, B Seshie, LNA Ankrah. Vol 2, No 2 (2013), Visual Impairment and Ocular Findings among Deaf and Hearing Impaired School Children in Central Region, Ghana, Abstract PDF.

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 1117 ... Issue, Title. Vol 21, No 2 (2015), A cross-over from Sport Psychology to the Psychology of Music: An intervention study on undergraduate music students, Abstract. BJM Steyn, MH Steyn, DJF Maree, C Panebianco-Warrens. Vol 16, No 2 (2010), A descriptive and factor analytical study of salient ...

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 116 ... Issue, Title. Vol 25 (2005), 'Stop this filth': The censorship of Roger Lucey's music in apartheid South Africa, Abstract. M Drewett ... Vol 26 (2007), 'This Is Our Sport!' Christmas Band ... Vol 34-35, No 1 (2015), Book Review: Sounding the Cape: Music, Identity and Politics in South Africa, Abstract. Francesca ...

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 493 ... Issue, Title. Vol 30, No 1 (2010), Determinants of Under-Five Mortality in Builsa District, Upper East Region, Ghana, Abstract PDF. K Osei-Kwakye, E Otupiri, E Owusu Dabo, ENL Browne, M Adjuik. Vol 29, No 2 (2009), Determination Of Segmented Angular Shapes For Circular Areas Of Thermal ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 521 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 22, No 8 (2004), A medical approach to language delay, Abstract PDF ... Vol 29, No 3 (2011), Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: MRI is now the ...

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 432 ... Issue, Title. Vol 21, No 1 (2016), Knowledge, perceptions and practices of pharmacovigilance amongst community and hospital pharmacists in a selected district of North West Province, South Africa, Abstract PDF. M.C. Joubert, Panjasaram Naidoo. Vol 9, No 2 (2004), Leadership in Health Services ...

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 990 ... Issue, Title. Vol 11, No 1 (1997), (+)-Floribundone 3 from the pods of Senna septemtrionalis, Details PDF. Gizachew Alemayehu, Bekuretsion Woldeyesus, Berhanu M Abegaz. Vol 14, No 1 (2000), 11α-Hydroxy muzigadiolide, a novel drimane sesquiterpene from the stem bark of warburgia ugandensis ...

  6. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 11 of 11 ... Issue, Title. Vol 2, No 1-2 (2009), Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns Of Salmonella Species In Contemporary Medical Practice: Challenges And Prospects In Treatment Of Enteric Fevers, Abstract. GTA Jombo, MNO Enenebeaku, SJ Utsalo. Vol 2, No 1-2 (2009), Beliefs And Practice Concerning Pregnancy ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 38, No 1 (2016), Changes in insulin resistance and adipokines in obese women following a 12-week programme of combined exercise training, Abstract. Dong-Il Seo, Wi-Young So, Dong Jun Sung. Vol 36, No 2 (2014), Changing relationships with significant others: Reflections of National and International ...

  8. Neurobiological Correlates in Forensic Assessment : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gronde, Toon; Kempes, Maaike; van El, Carla; Rinne, Thomas; Pieters, Toine

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the increased knowledge of biological risk factors, interest in including this information in forensic assessments is growing. Currently, forensic assessments are predominantly focused on psychosocial factors. A better understanding of the neurobiology of violent criminal behaviour

  9. Quantum and Multidimensional Explanations in a Neurobiological Context of Mind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, Jakob

    This article examines the possible relevance of physical-mathematical multidimensional or quantum concepts aiming at understanding the (human) mind in a neurobiological context. Some typical features of the quantum and multidimensional concepts are briefly introduced, including entanglement,

  10. Social Context Effects on Decision-Making: A Neurobiological Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Stallen (Mirre)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis explores how social context influences the neurobiological processes underlying decision-making. To this end, this research takes an interdisciplinary approach, combining methods and insights from Psychology, Marketing, Economics, and Neuroscience. In particular, behavioural

  11. The neurobiology of neuropsychiatric syndromes in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Thomas W; Ropacki, Susan A; Jeste, Dilip V

    2006-11-01

    Neuropsychiatric disturbances in dementia are prevalent, and research is uncovering their neurobiological correlates. Late-onset depression appears to be associated with Alzheimer's disease pathology at autopsy, and lifetime depression episodes may worsen Alzheimer's disease pathology in the hippocampus. Vascular disease and elevated homocysteine increase risk for both late-onset depression and Alzheimer's disease and may partly mediate their relationship. Monoamine changes are robust finding in Alzheimer's disease and may account for many observed depression symptoms. Risk of psychosis of Alzheimer's disease appears to be increased by several genes also implicated in schizophrenia (e.g., catechol-O-methyltransferase, neuregulin-1). Psychosis in dementia with Lewy bodies appears to be related to cholinergic deficits. Alzheimer's disease is associated with changes in the circadian sleep-wake cycles, including decreased night-time melatonin. Sleep apnea may be related to apolipoprotein E genotype and impact cognition in Alzheimer's disease. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is intricately related to synucleinopathies, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, but synuclein changes may not totally explain this relationship. Neuropsychiatric disturbances are a core feature of dementia and worsen many clinical outcomes. Among the most validated syndromes are depression, psychosis, and sleep disturbance of Alzheimer's disease. Neuropathology, neuroimaging, and genetic studies increasingly provide insight into the origins of these psychiatric symptoms in dementia.

  12. Etiopathogenesis and Neurobiology of Narcolepsy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swarup; Sagili, Haritha

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic lifelong sleep disorder and it often leaves a debilitating effect on the quality of life of the sufferer. This disorder is characterized by a tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (brief loss of muscle tone following strong emotion), hypnogogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. There are two distinct subgroups of Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy with cataplexy and Narcolepsy without cataplexy. For over 100 years, clinicians have recognised narcolepsy, but only in the last few decades have scientists been able to shed light on the true cause and pathogenesis of narcolepsy. Recent studies have shown that a loss of the hypothalamic neuropeptide Hypocretin/Orexincauses Narcolepsy with cataplexy and that an autoimmune mechanism may be responsible for this loss. Our understanding of the neurophysiologic aspect of narcolepsy has also significantly improved. The basic neural mechanisms behind sleepiness and cataplexy, the two defining symptoms of narcolepsy have started to become clearer. In this review, we have provided a detailed account of the key aspects of etiopathogenesis and neurobiology of narcolepsy, along with a critical appraisal of the more recent and interesting causal associations.We have also looked at the contributions of neuroimaging to the etiopathogenesis of Narcolepsy. PMID:24701532

  13. [Collective violence: neurobiological, psychosocial and sociological condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller-Leimkühler, A M; Bogerts, B

    2013-11-01

    Collective violence, despite its often disastrous consequences has widely been disregarded by psychiatry, as was the case for individual violence. Physical violence is not only an individual, mostly male phenomenon but manifests mainly as collective violence among men in multiple forms. Due to the plentitude of theories and findings on collective violence the present article is limited to a few relevant sociological and neurobiological aspects of collective violence as a group and intergroup phenomenon. A special focus is given to the association of the phylogenetic disposition to group violence and constructions of masculinity, to the potential relevance of mirror neurons for social contagion and to the influence of sociostructural factors for male adolescents joining violence-prone groups. In this context group dynamics such as in-group overevaluation and out-group devaluation are of central importance by stabilizing the male sense of self-worth and legitimizing, normalizing and internalizing violent behavior. Instead of mythologizing, biologizing or banalizing violence, transdisciplinary approaches are necessary to improve violence prevention on different ecological levels being obligated to a culture of nonviolent conflict management.

  14. Towards a neurobiological understanding of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren S; Krauss, Theresa; Demir, Ihsan Ekin

    2017-01-01

    a chronic pain syndrome. Objectives: We aimed to characterize the neurobiological signature of pain associated with CP and to discuss its implications for treatment strategies. Methods: Relevant basic and clinical articles were selected for review following an extensive search of the literature. Results...... processing of pain at the peripheral and central level of the pain system. This neurobiological understanding of pain has important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of pain chronification....

  15. The Neurobiology of Moral Behavior: Review and Neuropsychiatric Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mendez, Mario F.

    2009-01-01

    Morality may be innate to the human brain. This review examines the neurobiological evidence from research involving functional magnetic resonance imaging of normal subjects, developmental sociopathy, acquired sociopathy from brain lesions, and frontotemporal dementia. These studies indicate a “neuromoral” network for responding to moral dilemmas centered in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and its connections, particularly on the right. The neurobiological evidence indicates the existence ...

  16. Neurobiology of dyslexia : A reinterpretation of the data

    OpenAIRE

    Ramus, Franck

    2004-01-01

    Theories of developmental dyslexia differ on how to best interpret the great variety of symptoms (linguistic, sensory, motor) observed in dyslexic individuals. One approach views dyslexia as a specific phonological deficit, which sometimes co-occurs with a more general sensorimotor syndrome. The present review of the neurobiology of dyslexia shows that neurobiological data are indeed consistent with this view, explaining both how a specific phonological deficit might arise, and why a sensorim...

  17. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-10-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive - running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals' wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity.

  18. Neurobiology of aggression and violence in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, Michael

    2011-09-01

    There is much evidence that schizophrenia patients have an increased risk for aggression and violent behavior, including homicide. The neurobiological basis and correlates of this risk have not been much studied. While genome-wide association studies are lacking, a number of candidate genes have been investigated. By far, the most intensively studied is the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene on chromosome 22. COMT is involved in the metabolism of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Several studies suggest that the Val158Met polymorphism of this gene affects COMT activity. Methionine (Met)/Met homozygote schizophrenia patients show 4- to 5-fold lower COMT activity than valine (Val)/Val homozygotes, and some but not all studies have found an association with aggression and violence. Recently, a new functional single-nucleotide polymorphism in the COMT gene, Ala72Ser, was found to be associated with homicidal behavior in schizophrenia, but this finding warrants further replication. Studies published so far indicate that an association with the monoamine oxidase A, B, or tryptophan hydroxylase 1 genes is unlikely. Data for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene are conflicting and limited. Data from the limited number of neuroimaging studies performed to date are interesting. Frontal and temporal lobe abnormalities are found consistently in aggressive schizophrenia patients. Positron emission tomography and single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) data indicate deficits also in the orbitofrontal and temporal cortex. Some functional magnetic resonance imaging studies found a negative association of violent behavior with frontal and right-sided inferior parietal activity. Neuroimaging studies may well help further elucidate the interrelationship between neurocognitive functioning, personality traits, and antisocial and violent behavior.

  19. Translation from neurobiological data to music parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciacchi, Diego

    2003-11-01

    Composers have explored different ways to use biological information for the realization of music. Throughout the decades, biological findings have been repeatedly indicated as a source of inspiration or a reservoir of extramusical material for musical composition. More radical and fertile are attempts to produce music systematically using biological data in processes called data sonification or biofeedback techniques. Presented here is a novel strategy of translation where populations of neurobiological data are converted into relational structures from which sound objects are generated by flexible and homogeneous control of the sound parameters. All brain data originate from experiments performed with standard anatomical and physiological techniques, and results of studies based on these experimental materials have already been published. During the translation processes, the information for every sound parameter (such as pitch, duration, envelope, and dynamics) is never derived from fixed transcriptions of data properties. Rather, the space and/or the time interrelations of data populations are used to obtain indexes for sound construction. In this way, equivalent sets of information are exploited to model, or sculpt, the different parameters of sound objects. Three examples from the last decade's personal productions are given. The first refers to the microformal aspects of sound aggregation and is based on data from a microstimulation experiment in the motor cortex. The second describes the earliest translation process developed for live performance with conventional instruments and is based on experiments using a conventional tract tracing technique to compare selected spinal-projecting cell populations in two differently organized brains. The third outlines a recent music production for three pianos based on data from experiments using the multiple fluorescent tract-tracing technique to simultaneously label different populations of thalamocortical neurons

  20. Neurobiological Correlates of Coping through Emotional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Sarah L.; Amodio, David M.; Stanton, Annette L.; Yee, Cindy M.; Hilmert, Clayton J.; Taylor, Shelley E.

    2008-01-01

    This investigation considered possible health-related neurobiological processes associated with “emotional approach coping” (EAC), or intentional efforts to identify, process, and express emotions surrounding stressors. It was hypothesized that higher dispositional use of EAC strategies would be related to neural activity indicative of greater trait approach motivational orientation and to lower proinflammatory cytokine and cortisol responses to stress. To assess these relationships, 46 healthy participants completed a questionnaire assessing the two components of EAC (i.e., emotional processing and emotional expression), and their resting frontal cortical asymmetry was measured using electroencephalography (EEG). A subset (N = 22) of these participants’ levels of the soluble receptor for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (sTNFαRII), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and cortisol (all obtained from oral fluids) were also assessed before and after exposure to an acute laboratory stressor. Consistent with predictions, higher reported levels of emotional expression were significantly associated with greater relative left-sided frontal EEG asymmetry, indicative of greater trait approach motivation. Additionally, people who scored higher on EAC, particularly the emotional processing component, tended to show a less-pronounced TNF-α stress response. EAC was unrelated to levels of IL-6 and cortisol. Greater left-sided frontal EEG asymmetry was significantly related to lower baseline levels of IL-6 and to lower stress-related levels of sTNFαRII, and was marginally related to lower stress-related levels of IL-6. The findings suggest that the salubrious effects of EAC strategies for managing stress may be linked to an approach-oriented neurocognitive profile and to well-regulated proinflammatory cytokine responses to stress. PMID:18558470

  1. Neurobiology and clinical implications of lucid dreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A; Araujo, John F

    2013-11-01

    Several lines of evidence converge to the idea that rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is a good model to foster our understanding of psychosis. Both REMS and psychosis course with internally generated perceptions and lack of rational judgment, which is attributed to a hyperlimbic activity along with hypofrontality. Interestingly, some individuals can become aware of dreaming during REMS, a particular experience known as lucid dreaming (LD), whose neurobiological basis is still controversial. Since the frontal lobe plays a role in self-consciousness, working memory and attention, here we hypothesize that LD is associated with increased frontal activity during REMS. A possible way to test this hypothesis is to check whether transcranial magnetic or electric stimulation of the frontal region during REMS triggers LD. We further suggest that psychosis and LD are opposite phenomena: LD as a physiological awakening while dreaming due to frontal activity, and psychosis as a pathological intrusion of dream features during wake state due to hypofrontality. We further suggest that LD research may have three main clinical implications. First, LD could be important to the study of consciousness, including its pathologies and other altered states. Second, LD could be used as a therapy for recurrent nightmares, a common symptom of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Finally, LD may allow for motor imagery during dreaming with possible improvement of physical rehabilitation. In all, we believe that LD research may clarify multiple aspects of brain functioning in its physiological, altered and pathological states. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol and Suicide: Neurobiological and Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Sher

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol, primarily in the form of ethyl alcohol (ethanol, has occupied an important place in the history of humankind for at least 8,000 years. In most Western societies, at least 90% of people consume alcohol at some time during their lives, and 30% or more of drinkers develop alcohol-related problems. Severe alcohol-related life impairment, alcohol dependence (alcoholism, is observed at some time during their lives in about 10% of men and 3—5% of women. An additional 5—10% of each sex develops persistent, but less intense, problems that are diagnosed as alcohol abuse. It this review, neurobiological aspects of suicidal behavior in alcoholism is discussed. In individuals with comorbid depression and alcoholism, greater serotonergic impairment may be associated with higher risk of completed suicide. Dopaminergic dysfunction may play an important role in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior in alcoholism. Brain damage and neurobehavioral deficits are associated with alcohol use disorders and may contribute to suicidal behavior in persons with alcohol dependence or abuse. Aggression/impulsivity and alcoholism severity affect risk for suicide among individuals with alcoholism. Major depressive episodes and stressful life events particularly, partner-relationship disruptions, may precipitate suicidal behavior in individuals with alcohol use disorders. Alcohol misuse and psychosocial adversity can combine to increase stress on the person, and, thereby, potentially, increase the risk for suicidal behavior. The management of suicidal patients with alcohol use disorders is also discussed. It is to be hoped that the efforts of clinicians will reduce morbidity and mortality associated with alcohol misuse.

  3. Animals and ICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hemmen, J Leo; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    experimental and mathematical foundation, it is known that there is a low-frequency regime where the internal time difference (iTD) as perceived by the animal may well be 2-5 times higher than the external ITD, the interaural time difference, and that there is a frequency plateau over which the fraction i......TD/ITD is constant. There is also a high-frequency regime where the internal level (amplitude) difference iLD as perceived by the animal is much higher than the interaural level difference ILD measured externally between the two ears. The fundamental tympanic frequency segregates the two regimes. The present special...... issue devoted to "internally coupled ears" provides an overview of many aspects of ICE, be they acoustic, anatomical, auditory, mathematical, or neurobiological. A focus is on the hotly debated topic of what aspects of ICE animals actually exploit neuronally to localize a sound source....

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issue, Title. Vol 5, No 3 (2011), Caractérisation de souches d'Aspergillus spp isolées des graines d'arachides cultivées au Burkina Faso, Afrique de l'Ouest, Abstract PDF .... Vol 1, No 2 (2007), Caractérisation et étude de la germination des diaspores de Tetracarpidium conophorum (Müll. Arg.) Hutch. et Dalz. Abstract PDF.

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 513 ... Issue, Title. Vol 38, No 2 (2017), -308G>A (rs1800629)and -244G>A(rs673) polymorphisms at the promoter region of the TNF-α gene in severe malaria patients in north-central Nigeria, Abstract. S.I. Oyedeji, H.O. Awobode, P.U. Bassi, F.K. Jürgen. Vol 36, No 1 (2015), Albicans candidiasis amongs women ...

  6. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 683 ... Issue, Title. Vol 86, No 3 (2015), Current conservation status of the Blue Swallow Hirundo atrocaerulea Sundevall 1850 in Africa, Abstract. S.W. Evans, A Monadjem, L Roxburgh, A.E. McKechnie, E.M. Baker, R.B. Kizungu, I.T. Little, F Matsvimbo, R.K. Mulwa, D Mwizabi, D Nalwanga, K Ndang'ang'a, ...

  7. The neurobiology of retinoic acid in affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, J Douglas; McCaffery, Peter

    2008-02-15

    Current models of affective disorders implicate alterations in norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, and CRF/cortisol; however treatments targeted at these neurotransmitters or hormones have led to imperfect resolution of symptoms, suggesting that the neurobiology of affective disorders is incompletely understood. Until now retinoids have not been considered as possible contributors to affective disorders. Retinoids represent a family of compounds derived from vitamin A that perform a large number of functions, many via the vitamin A product, retinoic acid. This signaling molecule binds to specific retinoic acid receptors in the brain which, like the glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors, are part of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulate gene transcription. Research in the field of retinoic acid in the CNS has focused on the developing brain, in part stimulated by the observation that isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid), an isomer of retinoic acid used in the treatment of acne, is highly teratogenic for the CNS. More recent work has suggested that retinoic acid may influence the adult brain; animal studies indicated that the administration of isotretinoin is associated with alterations in behavior as well as inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Clinical evidence for an association between retinoids and depression includes case reports in the literature, studies of health care databases, and other sources. A preliminary PET study in human subjects showed that isotretinoin was associated with a decrease in orbitofrontal metabolism. Several studies have shown that the molecular components required for retinoic acid signaling are expressed in the adult brain; the overlap of brain areas implicated in retinoic acid function and stress and depression suggest that retinoids could play a role in affective disorders. This report reviews the evidence in this area and describes several systems that may be targets of retinoic acid and which contribute to

  8. Poor title--poor manuscript?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjersvik, Petter; Gulbrandsen, Pål; Aasheim, Erlend T; Nylenna, Magne

    2013-12-10

    The title of a scientific article is important for several reasons. Does the title of a manuscript submitted for publication in a medical journal reflect the quality of the manuscript itself? We prepared criteria for poor, fair and good titles and tested them in pilot studies. All manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association during the period 1 September 2009-31 August 2011 as original articles (n = 211) or review articles (n = 110) were recorded. The quality of the titles was scored by two former editors. Primary outcome measures were rejection rates and odds ratio for rejection of manuscripts with a poor title compared to those with a good title. For original articles, the rejection rate for manuscripts with a poor, fair or good title amounted to 88%, 73% and 61% (p = 0.002) respectively, and for review articles 83%, 56% and 38% (p title compared to those with a good title was 4.6 (95% CI: 1.7-12.3) for original articles and 8.2 (95% CI: 2.6-26.4) for review articles. In a logistic regression model, the quality of the title explained 14% and 27% of the variance in outcome for original articles and review articles respectively. In this study, a poor manuscript title was significantly associated with manuscript rejection. This indicates that the quality of the title often reflects the quality of the manuscript itself.

  9. Using a comparative species approach to investigate the neurobiology of paternal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Catherine L; Bardi, Massimo; Lambert, Kelly G

    2011-09-19

    A goal of behavioral neuroscience is to identify underlying neurobiological factors that regulate specific behaviors. Using animal models to accomplish this goal, many methodological strategies require invasive techniques to manipulate the intensity of the behavior of interest (e.g., lesion methods, pharmacological manipulations, microdialysis techniques, genetically-engineered animal models). The utilization of a comparative species approach allows researchers to take advantage of naturally occurring differences in response strategies existing in closely related species. In our lab, we use two species of the Peromyscus genus that differ in paternal responses. The male California deer mouse (Peromyscus californicus) exhibits the same parental responses as the female whereas its cousin, the common deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) exhibits virtually no nurturing/parental responses in the presence of pups. Of specific interest in this article is an exploration of the neurobiological factors associated with the affiliative social responses exhibited by the paternal California deer mouse. Because the behavioral neuroscience approach is multifaceted, the following key components of the study will be briefly addressed: the identification of appropriate species for this type of research; data collection for behavioral analysis; preparation and sectioning of the brains; basic steps involved in immunocytochemistry for the quantification of vasopressin-immunoreactivity; the use of neuroimaging software to quantify the brain tissue; the use of a microsequencing video analysis to score behavior and, finally, the appropriate statistical analyses to provide the most informed interpretations of the research findings.

  10. Towards a neurobiological understanding of alexithymia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Meza-Concha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Si bien la literatura especializada sobre la etiología de la alexitimia es controvertida, la investigación neurobiológica sobre el fenómeno ha demostrado importantes avances. El objetivo de esta revisión es analizar la evidencia disponible en relación a las bases neurofisiológicas de la alexitimia. Se realizó una revisión exhaustiva de artículos disponibles en MEDLINE/PubMed, EBSCO y SciELO. Inicialmente, se vinculó a la alexitimia con una conexión cerebral interhemisférica reducida. Desde la perspectiva traumática infantil, la corteza prefrontal derecha y la red neuronal por defecto experimentarían alteraciones, primero hipermetabólicas (desregulación dopaminérgica y glutamatérgica y luego hipometabólicas-disociativas (desregulación serotoninérgica y opioide, resultando en una consciencia interoceptiva y emocional distorsionada. Las neuronas espejo son el sustrato neurobiológico fundamental de la teoría de la mente y la cognición social, intrínsecamente vinculadas con la alexitimia, involucrando cortezas como la parietal, la temporal, la premotora, la cingulada y el giro frontal inferior. Otras estructuras involucradas son amígdala (expresión facial y reactividad emocional, ínsula (interocepción, integración emocional y empatía y cerebelo (cerebelo límbico y consciencia somatosensorial. La genética molecular ha detectado polimorfismos en el gen del transportador de serotonina, en los genes de las enzimas del metabolismo dopaminérgico y del factor neurotrófico derivado del cerebro, mientras que el rol de la oxitocina es controvertido. En conclusión, numerosos estudios demuestran contundentemente la existencia de una neurobiología subyacente a la alexitimia. Sin embargo, la investigación es aún poco concluyente y debe considerar los factores ambientales, traumáticos, sociales y psicológicos que contribuyen al origen del fenómeno.

  11. The neurobiology of uncertainty: implications for statistical learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Uri

    2017-01-05

    The capacity for assessing the degree of uncertainty in the environment relies on estimating statistics of temporally unfolding inputs. This, in turn, allows calibration of predictive and bottom-up processing, and signalling changes in temporally unfolding environmental features. In the last decade, several studies have examined how the brain codes for and responds to input uncertainty. Initial neurobiological experiments implicated frontoparietal and hippocampal systems, based largely on paradigms that manipulated distributional features of visual stimuli. However, later work in the auditory domain pointed to different systems, whose activation profiles have interesting implications for computational and neurobiological models of statistical learning (SL). This review begins by briefly recapping the historical development of ideas pertaining to the sensitivity to uncertainty in temporally unfolding inputs. It then discusses several issues at the interface of studies of uncertainty and SL. Following, it presents several current treatments of the neurobiology of uncertainty and reviews recent findings that point to principles that serve as important constraints on future neurobiological theories of uncertainty, and relatedly, SL. This review suggests it may be useful to establish closer links between neurobiological research on uncertainty and SL, considering particularly mechanisms sensitive to local and global structure in inputs, the degree of input uncertainty, the complexity of the system generating the input, learning mechanisms that operate on different temporal scales and the use of learnt information for online prediction.This article is part of the themed issue 'New frontiers for statistical learning in the cognitive sciences'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. [Neurobiological consequences of child sexual abuse: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, Noemí; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2011-01-01

    The results of several studies suggest that there is a critical timeframe during development in which experiences of maltreatment and sexual abuse may lead to permanent or long-lasting neurobiological changes that particularly affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis response. The aim of the present study was to provide an updated review on the main neurobiological consequences of child sexual abuse. We selected articles published between January 1999 and January 2010 in English or Spanish that focused on the neurobiological consequences of child sexual abuse available through Medline, Scopus and Web of Science. We also examined the references in published articles on the consequences of sexual victimization in childhood. In this review we included 34 studies on neurobiological consequences, indicating different kinds of effects, namely: neuroendocrine, structural, functional and neuropsychological consequences, which affect a large number of victims. The existing body of work on the neurobiological consequences of maltreatment shows the need to consider maltreatment and child sexual abuse as health problems that affect different areas of victims' lives, which would in turn favor the development of intervention and treatment programs that take these multiple effects into account. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional chronic pain syndromes and naturopathic treatments: neurobiological foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, Frauke; Michalsen, Andreas; Dobos, Gustav

    2008-04-01

    There is increasing clinical evidence that reflex therapies such as massage, Gua Sha, cupping, wet packs, acupuncture etc. are helpful in reducing symptoms of chronic pain. However, the neurobiological basis of these effects has rarely been investigated even though the increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of chronic pain syndromes allows for specific hypotheses. Reflex therapies are likely able to influence chronic pain at the level of the nociceptor and the spinal cord. Moreover, it can be speculated that these therapies have a strong impact on relaxation and maybe understood as a social, comforting interaction. Since it is well accepted that the positive effect of grooming has a neurobiological basis in non-human primates, its biosocial impact on wellbeing and pain processing in humans may be underestimated. A synopsis of the neurobiological foundations of pain perception, from the nociceptor up the spinal cord to brain mechanisms provides the basis for the investigation of the 'way of action' of reflex therapies. Specific hypotheses on their neurobiological bases and methods suitable for their investigation are outlined. Further clarification of the mechanisms of action of reflex therapies will support their clinical evidence and add to our understanding of the neurobiology of complementary medicine. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Neurobiology of dysregulated motivational systems in drug addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2010-01-01

    The progression from recreational drug use to drug addiction impacts multiple neurobiological processes and can be conceptualized as a transition from positive to negative reinforcement mechanisms driving both drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors. Neurobiological mechanisms for negative reinforcement, defined as drug taking that alleviates a negative emotional state, involve changes in the brain reward system and recruitment of brain stress (or antireward) systems within forebrain structures, including the extended amygdala. These systems are hypothesized to be dysregulated by excessive drug intake and to contribute to allostatic changes in reinforcement mechanisms associated with addiction. Points of intersection between positive and negative motivational circuitry may further drive the compulsivity of drug addiction but also provide a rich neurobiological substrate for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20563312

  15. Neurobiological determinism: human freedom of choice and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniok, Frank; Laubacher, Arja; Hardegger, Judith; Rossegger, Astrid; Endrass, Jérôme; Moskvitin, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    Several authors have argued that criminal behavior is generally caused by neurobiological deficits. This assumption not only questions the concept of free will and a person's responsibility for his or her own actions but also the principle of guilt in criminal law. When critically examining the current state of research, it becomes apparent that the results are not sufficient to support the existence of a universally valid neurobiological causality of criminal behavior. Moreover, the assumption of total neurobiological determination of human behavior and the impossibility of individual responsibility are characterized by both faulty empiricism and methodical misconceptions. The principle of relative determinism and the analysis of the offender's behavior at the time of the offense thus remain the central and cogent approach to the assessment of criminal responsibility.

  16. “Love” Phenomenon and Neurobiology of Love Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Evren Tufan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology; especially the neurobiological features of the “love” phenomenon has recently started to attract attention. Love relations and attachment, which is closely related with them, are known to be important in health and disease. Love and love relations are found to be complex neurobiological phenomena based on activation of the limbic system of the brain. Those processes involve oxytocin, vasopressin, dopamine and serotonergic functions. Additionally, endorphine and endogenous opiate systems as well as nitrous oxide play role in those processes. The stages of love and love relations may demonstrate different neurochemical and neurophysiological features and may partially overlap with m aternal, romantic and sexual love and attachments. The aim of this article is to evaluate the common neurobiological pathways underlying the “love” phenomenon as well as their importance in medicine and health.

  17. Titles are "serious stuff": a historical study of academic titles

    OpenAIRE

    Salager-Meyer, Françoise; Alcaraz Ariza, María Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we carried out a diachronic analysis (1840-2009) of a corpus of 180 medical case report titles drawn from the British Medical Journal. We analyzed a series of quantitative variables (number of authors and their institutional affiliation, title length, and punctuation/grammatical data) and qualitative variables (authors’ collaboration and types of titles). The results of our research show various shifts over the period studied that could be attributed to the following factors: 1)...

  18. Neurobiology of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Walter

    2008-04-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders of unknown etiology that most commonly begin during adolescence in women. AN and BN have unique and puzzling symptoms, such as restricted eating or binge-purge behaviors, body image distortions, denial of emaciation, and resistance to treatment. These are often chronic and relapsing disorders, and AN has the highest death rate of any psychiatric disorder. The lack of understanding of the pathogenesis of this illness has hindered the development of effective interventions, particularly for AN. Individuals with AN and BN are consistently characterized by perfectionism, obsessive-compulsiveness, and dysphoric mood. Individuals with AN tend to have high constraint, constriction of affect and emotional expressiveness, ahendonia and asceticism, whereas individuals with BN tend to be more impulsive and sensation seeking. Such symptoms often begin in childhood, before the onset of an eating disorder, and persist after recovery, suggesting they are traits that create a vulnerability for developing an ED. There is growing acknowledgement that neurobiological vulnerabilities make a substantial contribution to the pathogenesis of AN and BN. Considerable evidence suggests that altered brain serotonin (5-HT) function contributes to dysregulation of appetite, mood, and impulse control in AN and BN. Brain imaging studies, using 5-HT specific ligands, show that disturbances of 5-HT function occur when people are ill, and persist after recovery from AN and BN. It is possible that a trait-related disturbance of 5-HT neuronal modulation predates the onset of AN and contributes to premorbid symptoms of anxiety, obsessionality, and inhibition. This dysphoric temperament may involve an inherent dysregulation of emotional and reward pathways which also mediate the hedonic aspects of feeding, thus making these individuals vulnerable to disturbed appetitive behaviors. Restricting food intake may become powerfully

  19. Avances en neurobiología de la conducta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Raggi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available La experiencia diaria nos enseña que el cerebro tiene una notable capacidad de adaptarse a cambios ambientales,de almacenar memoria y determinar la conducta. Pero hasta que punto esta adaptación del cerebroadulto, depende de reordcnamicntos en las conexiones entre las células nerviosas, sigue siendo uno de losmayores desafios de la neurobiología moderna. Los mecanismos sioápticos de la plasticidad en la cortezaadulta, dependiente de la experiencia, aún se desconocen. En esta breve revisión se comunican algunos delos avances en la neurobiología de la plasticidad neuronal.

  20. Neurobiology of dyslexia: a reinterpretation of the data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Franck

    2004-12-01

    Theories of developmental dyslexia differ on how to best interpret the great variety of symptoms (linguistic, sensory and motor) observed in dyslexic individuals. One approach views dyslexia as a specific phonological deficit, which sometimes co-occurs with a more general sensorimotor syndrome. This article on the neurobiology of dyslexia shows that neurobiological data are indeed consistent with this view, explaining both how a specific phonological deficit might arise, and why a sensorimotor syndrome should be significantly associated with it. This new conceptualisation of the aetiology of dyslexia could generalize to other neurodevelopmental disorders, and might further explain heterogeneity within each disorder and comorbidity between disorders.

  1. Adolescent brain maturation, the endogenous cannabinoid system and the neurobiology of cannabis-induced schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Niesink, Raymond J M

    2010-11-01

    Cannabis use during adolescence increases the risk of developing psychotic disorders later in life. However, the neurobiological processes underlying this relationship are unknown. This review reports the results of a literature search comprising various neurobiological disciplines, ultimately converging into a model that might explain the neurobiology of cannabis-induced schizophrenia. The article briefly reviews current insights into brain development during adolescence. In particular, the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in experience-dependent maturation of specific cortical circuitries is examined. The review also covers recent hypotheses regarding disturbances in strengthening and pruning of synaptic connections in the prefrontal cortex, and the link with latent psychotic disorders. In the present model, cannabis-induced schizophrenia is considered to be a distortion of normal late postnatal brain maturation. Distortion of glutamatergic transmission during critical periods may disturb prefrontal neurocircuitry in specific brain areas. Our model postulates that adolescent exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive substance in cannabis, transiently disturbs physiological control of the endogenous cannabinoid system over glutamate and GABA release. As a result, THC may adversely affect adolescent experience-dependent maturation of neural circuitries within prefrontal cortical areas. Depending on dose, exact time window and duration of exposure, this may ultimately lead to the development of psychosis or schizophrenia. The proposed model provides testable hypotheses which can be addressed in future studies, including animal experiments, reanalysis of existing epidemiological data, and prospective epidemiological studies in which the role of the dose-time-effect relationship should be central. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Neurobiological Mechanisms of Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate Dependence and Withdrawal and Their Clinical Relevance: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Rama M; van Noorden, Martijn S; Franzek, Ernst; Dijkstra, Boukje A G; Loonen, Anton J M; De Jong, Cornelius A J

    2016-01-01

    x03B3;-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has gained popularity as a drug of abuse. In the Netherlands the number of patients in treatment for GHB dependence has increased sharply. Clinical presentation of GHB withdrawal can be life threatening. We aim, through this overview, to explore the neurobiological pathways causing GHB dependency and withdrawal, and their implications for treatment choices. In this work we review the literature discussing the findings from animal models to clinical studies focused on the neurobiological pathways of endogenous but mainly exogenous GHB. Chronic abuse of GHB exerts multifarious neurotransmitter and neuromodulator effects on x03B3;-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine and cholinergic systems. Moreover, important effects on neurosteroidogenesis and oxytocin release are wielded. GHB acts mainly via a bidirectional effect on GABAB receptors (GABABR; subunits GABAB1 and GABAB2), depending on the subunit of the GIRK (G-protein-dependent ion inwardly rectifying potassium) channel involved, and an indirect effect of the cortical and limbic inputs outside the nucleus accumbens. GHB also activates a specific GHB receptor and β1-subunits of α4-GABAAR. Reversing this complex interaction of neurobiological mechanisms by the abrupt cessation of GHB use results in a withdrawal syndrome with a diversity of symptoms of different intensity, depending on the pattern of GHB abuse. The GHB withdrawal symptoms cannot be related to a single mechanism or neurological pathway, which implies that different medication combinations are needed for treatment. A single drug class, such as benzodiazepines, gabapentin or antipsychotics, is unlikely to be sufficient to avoid life-threatening complications. Detoxification by means of titration and tapering of pharmaceutical GHB can be considered as a promising treatment that could make polypharmacy redundant. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. What makes a good title?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Maria J

    2013-12-01

    The chances are the first thing you when you set out to write an article is the title. But what factors transform a mediocre title into a good title? Firstly, it should be both informative and specific, using words or phrases likely to be used when searching for information, for example 'nurse education' rather than simply 'nurse'. Secondly, it should be concise yet convey the main ideas clearly; articles with short titles reporting study findings have been found to attract higher numbers of viewing and citations. Thirdly, provide details of the study design to assist the reader in making an informed choice about the type of project your article is reporting. In taking these small steps when developing your title, your title can present a more concise, retrievable and clear articulation of your article. © 2013 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  4. Neurobiological changes after intervention in individuals with anti-social behaviour: A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornet, L.J.M.; de Kogel, C.H.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Raine, A.; van der Laan, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A neurobiological perspective has become accepted as a valuable approach for understanding anti-social behaviour. There is literature to suggest that, in non-offending populations, psychological treatments affect both neurobiological measures and clinical presentation. A theoretical

  5. Neurobiological changes after intervention in individuals with anti-social behaviour: A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornet, L.J.M.; Kogel, C.H. de; Nijman, H.L.I.; Raine, A.; Laan, P.H. van der

    2015-01-01

    Background A neurobiological perspective has become accepted as a valuable approach for understanding anti-social behaviour. There is literature to suggest that, in non-offending populations, psychological treatments affect both neurobiological measures and clinical presentation. A theoretical

  6. Neurobiological mechanisms of treatment resistant depression: Functional, structural and molecular imaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kwaasteniet, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigated the neurobiological mechanisms of TRD using functional, structural and molecular imaging studies. First the neurobiological mechanisms of MDD were investigated and revealed decreased functional connectivity between the ventral and dorsal network. Thereafter, structural

  7. Animals and How They Live.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of 14 Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing teachers and students with informational reading on animals. The bulletin titles are as follows: Birds: Their Adaptations to Ways of Life; Our Friends the Hawks; Mysteries of Bird Migration; Bird Nests; Camouflage in the Animal World; Snakes; Turtles; Frogs and Toads;…

  8. The neurobiology and pharmacology of depression: A comparative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A serendipitous approach to drug discovery has therefore been replaced by the development of drugs acting on predetermined neurobiological targets recognised to be involved in the pathology of depressive illness. The first of these 'designer drugs'. were the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRls), followed ...

  9. What artificial grammar learning reveals about the neurobiology of syntax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersson, K.M.; Vasiliki, F.; Hagoort, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine the neurobiological correlates of syntax, the processing of structured sequences, by comparing FMRI results on artificial and natural language syntax. We discuss these and similar findings in the context of formal language and computability theory. We used a simple

  10. What artificial grammar learning reveals about the neurobiology of syntax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersson, K.M.; Folia, V.; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    : In this paper we examine the neurobiological correlates of syntax, the processing of structured sequences, by comparing FMRI results on artificial and natural language syntax. We discuss these and similar findings in the context of formal language and computability theory. We used a simple

  11. What Artificial Grammar Learning Reveals about the Neurobiology of Syntax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Karl-Magnus; Folia, Vasiliki; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine the neurobiological correlates of syntax, the processing of structured sequences, by comparing FMRI results on artificial and natural language syntax. We discuss these and similar findings in the context of formal language and computability theory. We used a simple right-linear unification grammar in an implicit artificial…

  12. Early Adverse Experiences and the Neurobiology of Facial Emotion Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulson, Margaret C.; Fox, Nathan A.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    To examine the neurobiological consequences of early institutionalization, the authors recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from 3 groups of Romanian children--currently institutionalized, previously institutionalized but randomly assigned to foster care, and family-reared children--in response to pictures of happy, angry, fearful, and sad…

  13. Feather pecking and monoamines - a behavioral and neurobiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (SFP) remains one of the major welfare issues in laying hens. SFP is the pecking at and pulling out of feathers, inflicting damage to the plumage and skin of the recipient. The neurobiological profile determining the vulnerability of individual hens to develop into a severe

  14. Neglected but Exciting Concepts in Developmental and Neurobiological Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Evan M.; Thomas, David G.

    2017-01-01

    This review provides an evaluative overview of five concepts specific to developmental and neurobiological psychology that are found to be largely overlooked in current textbooks. A sample of 19 introductory psychology texts was surveyed to develop a list, including glial cell signaling, grandmother cells, memory reconsolidation, brain plasticity,…

  15. Dynamics of multi-articular coordination in neurobiological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jia Yi; Davids, Keith; Button, Chris; Rein, Robert; Hristovski, Robert; Koh, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although previous work in nonlinear dynamics on neurobiological coordination and control has provided valuable insights from studies of single joint movements in humans, researchers have shown increasing interest in coordination of multi-articular actions. Multi-articular movement models have provided valuable insights on neurobiological systems conceptualised as degenerate, adaptive complex systems satisfying the constraints of dynamic environments. In this paper, we overview empirical evidence illustrating the dynamics of adaptive movement behavior in a range of multi-articular actions including kicking, throwing, hitting and balancing. We model the emergence of creativity and the diversity of neurobiological action in the meta-stable region of self organising criticality. We examine the influence on multi-articular actions of decaying and emerging constraints in the context of skill acquisition. We demonstrate how, in this context, transitions between preferred movement patterns exemplify the search for and adaptation of attractor states within the perceptual motor workspace as a function of practice. We conclude by showing how empirical analyses of neurobiological coordination and control have been used to establish a nonlinear pedagogical framework for enhancing acquisition of multi-articular actions.

  16. Sex Influences on the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreano, Joseph M.; Cahill, Larry

    2009-01-01

    In essentially every domain of neuroscience, the generally implicit assumption that few, if any, meaningful differences exist between male and female brain function is being challenged. Here we address how this development is influencing studies of the neurobiology of learning and memory. While it has been commonly held that males show an…

  17. Matching the Neurobiology of Learning to Teaching Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Nelle; Fleisher, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe principles of good teaching drawn from meta-analyses of research on teaching effectiveness. Recent developments in neurobiology are presented and aligned to provide biological support for these principles. To make it easier for college faculty to try out sample instructional strategies, the authors map principles of good…

  18. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Neurobiology and Current Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ryan A.; Robins, Diana L.; Decker, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    This study reviews recent research related to the neurobiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) an provides an empirical analysis of current assessment practices. Data were collected through a survey of 117 school psychologists. The Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Gilliam Autism Rating Scale (GARS), and Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale…

  19. [Neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of social phobia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouizerate, B; Martin-Guehl, C; Tignol, J

    2004-01-01

    Social phobia (also known as social anxiety disorder) is still not clearly understood. It was not established as an authentic psychiatric entity until the diagnostic nomenclature of the American Psychiatric Association DSM III in 1980. In recent years, increasing attention among researchers has contributed to provide important information about the genetic, familial and temperamental bases of social phobia and its neurochemical, neuroendocrinological and neuroanatomical substrates, which remain to be further investigated. Up to date, there have been several findings about the possible influence of variables, including particularly genetic, socio-familial and early temperamental (eg behavioral inhibition) factors that represent risk for the later development of social phobia. Clinical neurobiological studies, based on the use of exogenous compounds such as lactate, CO2, caffeine, epinephrine, flumazenil or cholecystokinin/pentagastrin to reproduce naturally occurring phobic anxiety, have shown that patients with social phobia appear to exhibit an intermediate sensitivity between patients with panic disorder and control subjects. No difference in the rate of panic attacks in response to lactate, low concentrations of CO2 (5%), epinephrine or flumazenil was observed between patients with social phobia and normal healthy subjects, both being less reactive compared to patients with panic disorder. However, patients with social phobia had similar anxiety reactions to high concentrations of CO2 (35%), caffeine or cholecystokinin/pentagastrin than those seen in patients with panic disorder, both being more intensive than in controls. Several lines of evidence suggest specific neurotransmitter system alterations in social phobia, especially with regard to the serotoninergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems. Although no abnormality in platelet serotonin transporter density has been found, patients with social phobia appear to show an enhanced sensitivity of both post

  20. Ecology and neurobiology of toxin avoidance and the paradox of drug reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, E H; Sullivan, R J; Schmidt, R; Morris, G; Kempter, R; Hammerstein, P

    2009-04-21

    Current neurobiological theory of drug use is based on the observation that all addictive drugs induce changes in activity of dopaminergic circuitry, interfering with reward processing, and thus enhancing drug seeking and consumption behaviors. Current theory of drug origins, in contrast, views almost all major drugs of abuse, including nicotine, cocaine and opiates, as plant neurotoxins that evolved to punish and deter herbivores. According to this latter view, plants should not have evolved compounds that reward or reinforce plant consumption. Mammals, in turn, should not have evolved reinforcement mechanisms easily triggered by toxic substances. Situated in an ecological context, therefore, drug reward is a paradox. In an attempt to resolve the paradox, we review the neurobiology of aversive learning and toxin avoidance and their relationships to appetitive learning. We seek to answer the question: why does aversive learning not prevent the repeated use of plant drugs? We conclude by proposing alternative models of drug seeking and use. Specifically, we suggest that humans, like other animals, might have evolved to counter-exploit plant neurotoxins.

  1. Linking brains and brawn: exercise and the evolution of human neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichlen, David A; Polk, John D

    2013-01-07

    The hunting and gathering lifestyle adopted by human ancestors around 2 Ma required a large increase in aerobic activity. High levels of physical activity altered the shape of the human body, enabling access to new food resources (e.g. animal protein) in a changing environment. Recent experimental work provides strong evidence that both acute bouts of exercise and long-term exercise training increase the size of brain components and improve cognitive performance in humans and other taxa. However, to date, researchers have not explored the possibility that the increases in aerobic capacity and physical activity that occurred during human evolution directly influenced the human brain. Here, we hypothesize that proximate mechanisms linking physical activity and neurobiology in living species may help to explain changes in brain size and cognitive function during human evolution. We review evidence that selection acting on endurance increased baseline neurotrophin and growth factor signalling (compounds responsible for both brain growth and for metabolic regulation during exercise) in some mammals, which in turn led to increased overall brain growth and development. This hypothesis suggests that a significant portion of human neurobiology evolved due to selection acting on features unrelated to cognitive performance.

  2. Linking brains and brawn: exercise and the evolution of human neurobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichlen, David A.; Polk, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The hunting and gathering lifestyle adopted by human ancestors around 2 Ma required a large increase in aerobic activity. High levels of physical activity altered the shape of the human body, enabling access to new food resources (e.g. animal protein) in a changing environment. Recent experimental work provides strong evidence that both acute bouts of exercise and long-term exercise training increase the size of brain components and improve cognitive performance in humans and other taxa. However, to date, researchers have not explored the possibility that the increases in aerobic capacity and physical activity that occurred during human evolution directly influenced the human brain. Here, we hypothesize that proximate mechanisms linking physical activity and neurobiology in living species may help to explain changes in brain size and cognitive function during human evolution. We review evidence that selection acting on endurance increased baseline neurotrophin and growth factor signalling (compounds responsible for both brain growth and for metabolic regulation during exercise) in some mammals, which in turn led to increased overall brain growth and development. This hypothesis suggests that a significant portion of human neurobiology evolved due to selection acting on features unrelated to cognitive performance. PMID:23173208

  3. THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF PAIR BONDING: INSIGHTS FROM A SOCIALLY MONOGAMOUS RODENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kimberly A.; Gobrogge, Kyle L.; Liu, Yan; Wang, Zuoxin

    2010-01-01

    The formation of enduring relationships between adult mates (i.e., pair bonds) is an integral aspect of human social behavior and has been implicated in both physical and psychological health. However, due to the inherent complexity of these bonds and the relative rarity with which they are formed in other mammalian species, we know surprisingly little about their underlying neurobiology. Over the past few decades, the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) has emerged as an animal model of pair bonding. Research in this socially monogamous rodent has provided valuable insights into the neurobiological mechanisms that regulate pair bonding behaviors. Here, we review these studies and discuss the neural regulation of three behaviors inherent to pair bonding: the formation of partner preferences, the subsequent development of selective aggression toward unfamiliar conspecifics, and the bi-parental care of young. We focus on the role of vasopressin, oxytocin, and dopamine in the regulation of these behaviors, but also discuss the involvement of other neuropeptides, neurotransmitters, and hormones. These studies may not only contribute to the understanding of pair bonding in our own species, but may also offer insight into the underlying causes of social deficits noted in several mental health disorders. PMID:20688099

  4. Parental buffering of fear and stress neurobiology: Reviewing parallels across rodent, monkey, and human models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnar, Megan R; Hostinar, Camelia E; Sanchez, Mar M; Tottenham, Nim; Sullivan, Regina M

    2015-01-01

    It has been long recognized that parents exert profound influences on child development. Dating back to at least the seventeenth-century Enlightenment, the ability for parents to shape child behavior in an enduring way has been noted. Twentieth-century scholars developed theories to explain how parenting histories influence psychological development, and since that time, the number of scientific publications on parenting influences in both human and nonhuman animal fields has grown at an exponential rate, reaching numbers in the thousands by 2015. This special issue describes a symposium delivered by Megan Gunnar, Regina Sullivan, Mar Sanchez, and Nim Tottenham in the Fall of 2014 at the Society for Social Neuroscience. The goal of the symposium was to describe the emerging knowledge on neurobiological mechanisms that mediate parent-offspring interactions across three different species: rodent, monkey, and human. The talks were aimed at designing testable models of parenting effects on the development of emotional and stress regulation. Specifically, the symposium aimed at characterizing the special modulatory (buffering) effects of parental cues on fear- and stress-relevant neurobiology and behaviors of the offspring and to discuss examples of impaired buffering when the parent-infant relationship is disrupted.

  5. Clinical and Neurobiological Aspects of Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy and/or other dissociated manifestations of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis). Narcolepsy is currently treated with amphetamine-like central nervous system (CNS) stimulants (for EDS) and antidepressants (for cataplexy). Some other classes of compounds such as modafinil (a non-amphetamine wake-promoting compound for EDS) and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB, a short-acting sedative for EDS/fragmented nighttime sleep and cataplexy) given at night are also employed. The major pathophysiology of human narcolepsy has been recently elucidated based on the discovery of narcolepsy genes in animals. Using forward (i.e., positional cloning in canine narcolepsy) and reverse (i.e., mouse gene knockout) genetics, the genes involved in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy (hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor) in animals have been identified. Hypocretins/orexins are novel hypothalamic neuropeptides also involved in various hypothalamic functions such as energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine functions. Mutations in hypocretin-related genes are rare in humans, but hypocretin-ligand deficiency is found in many narcolepsy-cataplexy cases. In this review, the clinical, pathophysiological and pharmacological aspects of narcolepsy are discussed. PMID:17470414

  6. Food, mood and health: a neurobiologic outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Prasad

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Hippocrates was the first to suggest the healing power of food; however, it was not until the medieval ages that food was considered a tool to modify temperament and mood, although scientific methods as we know them today were not in use at the time. Modern scientific methods in neuroscience began to emerge much later, leading investigators to examine the role of diet in health, including mental well-being, with greater precision. This review shows how short- and long-term forced dietary interventions bring about changes in brain structure, chemistry, and physiology, leading to altered animal behavior. Examples will be presented to show how diets alter brain chemistry, behavior, and the action of neuroactive drugs. Most humans and most animal species examined in a controlled setting exhibit a fairly reproducible pattern of what and how they eat. Recent data suggest that these patterns may be under the neurochemical and hormonal control of the organisms themselves. Other data show that in many instances food may be used unconsciously to regulate mood by seemingly normal subjects as well as those undergoing drug withdrawal or experiencing seasonal affective disorders and obesity-related social withdrawal. We will discuss specific examples that illustrate that manipulation of dietary preference is actually an attempt to correct neurochemical make-up.

  7. Neurobiology of Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Charles E

    2017-12-06

    Sexual identity and sexual orientation are independent components of a person's sexual identity. These dimensions are most often in harmony with each other and with an individual's genital sex, but not always. This review discusses the relationship of sexual identity and sexual orientation to prenatal factors that act to shape the development of the brain and the expression of sexual behaviors in animals and humans. One major influence discussed relates to organizational effects that the early hormone environment exerts on both gender identity and sexual orientation. Evidence that gender identity and sexual orientation are masculinized by prenatal exposure to testosterone and feminized in it absence is drawn from basic research in animals, correlations of biometric indices of androgen exposure and studies of clinical conditions associated with disorders in sexual development. There are, however, important exceptions to this theory that have yet to be resolved. Family and twin studies indicate that genes play a role, but no specific candidate genes have been identified. Evidence that relates to the number of older brothers implicates maternal immune responses as a contributing factor for male sexual orientation. It remains speculative how these influences might relate to each other and interact with postnatal socialization. Nonetheless, despite the many challenges to research in this area, existing empirical evidence makes it clear that there is a significant biological contribution to the development of an individual's sexual identity and sexual orientation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Title III/Title IV Authorities Necessary for Full and Interim Title V Program Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 350 ... Vol 6, No 3 (2010), Environmental Impact and Hazards Analysis Critical Control Point (Haccp) Concept in the Production of Tsire at Zaria, Nigeria, Abstract. IO Abdullahi, VJ Umoh, JB Ameh, M Galadima. Vol 4, No 2 (2008), Environmental impacts of improper animal wastes management at three major ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 448 ... Tropical Journal of Animal Science. ... Vol 3, No 1 (2000), Influence of housing conditions and type of finishing feeds on the oxidative stability of broiler-chicken muscles, Abstract. GE Onibi, EAO Laseinde, S Akinyandenu. Vol 18, No 2 (2016), Influence of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin on the Fertility ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 501 - 550 of 870 ... Vol 12, No 1 (2012), Microcredit–nutrition education link: A case study analysis of ghanaian women's experiences in income generation and family care ... Microenterprise development coupled with nutrition education can help increase caregivers' incomes and household accessibility to animal source ...

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 263 ... Vol 4, No 2 (2005), Cold chain facility status and the potency of animal rabies vaccine used in Nigeria, Abstract. Adesina Adeiga, T Harry. Vol 8, No 1 (2009), Collection and Transfusion of Blood in Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria, 2000 – 2005, Abstract. OJ Egesie, DE Joseph, UG Egesie, ...

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 7251 - 7300 of 11090 ... Vol 9, No 53 (2010), Modeling herbivorous animal digestive system as 3- continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and 1-plug flow reactor (PFR) in .... Escherichia coli (STEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) from piglets and infants associated with diarrhoea in Mizoram, India, Abstract PDF.

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 458 ... Vol 28, No 1 (2007), Review Of Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumour (TVT) In Dogs, Abstract PDF. C A Eze, H C Anyanwu, RO Kene. Vol 34, No 2 (2013), Review Paper Heart Failure in Small Animals - Advances in Clinical Case Management, Abstract PDF. JO Omamegbe, RIO Nwoha. Vol 33, No ...

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 451 - 500 of 2157 ... Vol 45, No 1 (2015), Dietary effect of silage type and combination with camelina seed on milk fatty acid profile and antioxidant capacity of sheep milk .... Vol 43, No 3 (2013): Special Issue: A balanced perspective on animal production, from environment to human health, Direct methane and nitrous ...

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 1, No 2 (2001), Rapid detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from cattle and zoo animals by Nested PCR, Abstract PDF. Joseph Erume, Joachim Spergser, Renate Rosengarten. Vol 9, No 3 (2009), Rapid screening for co-infection of HIV and HCV in pregnant women in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria ...

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 745 ... Perry(Myrtaceae) in animal models, Abstract. EO Agbaje. Vol 24, No 2 (2014), Gender differences in the metabolic syndrome: implications for women's cadiovascular health, Abstract. IC Udenze. Vol 10, No 3 (2000), Genetic health care service and medical genetics of common orofacial anomalies in ...

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 319 ... Vol 11, No 2 (2011), Selected Drying Characteristics of Plantation Grown Gmelina Arborea under an Experimental Solar Drying Kiln, Abstract PDF. OY Ogunsanwo, ON Amao-Onidundu. Vol 8, No 2 (2008), Small-Scale Family Poultry Production As A Substantial Source Of Animal Protein In Selected ...

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 141 ... Vol 4, No 3 (2015), Evaluating an animated and static time series map of District Six: A visual and cognitive approach, Abstract PDF. N Dawood, S Motala. Vol 6, No 2 (2017): Special Edition, Evaluating public ambulance service levels by applying a GIS based accessibility analysis approach, Abstract PDF.

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 2157 ... Vol 24, No 3 (1994), An investigation into genetic evaluation using an animal model when paternity is uncertain, Abstract PDF. FWC Neser, KV Konstantinov, GJ Erasmus. Vol 28, No 3 (1998), An investigation into possible genotype x environment interactions for weaning weight in South African ...

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 401 - 450 of 2005 ... Vol 92, No 11 (2015), Comparative performance of Anigen © FMD NSP Ab ELISA (Korea), NSP Priocheck® kit, liquid phase blocking ELISA kits and virus neutralisation tests in the detection of foot and mouth disease virus antibodies in animals sera from Kilifi county, Kenya, Abstract. NK Ruuri, AWT ...

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 452 ... Vol 9, No 1 (2008), Indicators of Apoptosis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients, Abstract PDF. E Abdel-Salam, L Mansour, I Abdel-Meguid, S Korraa. Vol 17, No 2 (2016), Inducible protective processes in animal systems XIV: Cytogenetic adaptive response induced by EMS or MMS in bone ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 458 ... Vol 34, No 2 (2013), Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Pasteurella Multocida Isolated from Dead Poultry in Jos, Plateau State, Abstract PDF. JKP Kwage, SO Ekundayo, A Chuku, AF Yusuf, ES Mwankon, SS Boss, M Muhammad. Vol 33, No 2 (2012), Pheromone and Animal Reproducton: ...

  4. Recent applications of superresolution microscopy in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willig, Katrin I; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2014-06-01

    Chemical synapses in brain are structural differentiations where excitatory or inhibitory signals are vectorially transmitted between two neurons. Excitatory synapses occur mostly on dendritic spines, submicron sized protrusions of the neuronal dendritic arborizations. Axons establish contacts with these tiny specializations purported to be the smallest functional processing units in the central nervous system. The minute size of synapses and their macromolecular constituents creates an inherent difficulty for imaging but makes them an ideal object for superresolution microscopy. Here we discuss some representative examples of nanoscopy studies, ranging from quantification of receptors and scaffolding proteins in postsynaptic densities and their dynamic behavior, to imaging of synaptic vesicle proteins and dendritic spines in living neurons or even live animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Aspects of psychodynamic neuropsychiatry III: magic spells, the placebo effect, and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Through a case study, the importance of supporting the positive transference is stressed-from both a psychological and neurobiological perspective. The article argues that the neurobiology of expectation underlies transference. This neurobiology has been investigated particularly over the past several decades in work concerning the placebo effect. By understanding the neurobiology of expectation, one gains a better understanding of the neurobiology of the transference. This enables clinical predictions-and decisions-that are informed not just by the teachings of psychology but also by the science of biology.

  6. 24 CFR 266.405 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Title. 266.405 Section 266.405... Requirements; HUD Endorsement § 266.405 Title. (a) Eligibility of title. Marketable title to the mortgaged property must be vested in the mortgagor on the date the mortgage is filed for record. (b) Title evidence...

  7. 24 CFR 202.12 - Title II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Title II. 202.12 Section 202.12... INSTITUTIONS AND MORTGAGEES Title I and Title II Specific Requirements § 202.12 Title II. (a) Tiered pricing—(1... mortgagee approved for participation in Title II programs is notified by the Secretary that it had a rate of...

  8. 24 CFR 202.11 - Title I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Title I. 202.11 Section 202.11... INSTITUTIONS AND MORTGAGEES Title I and Title II Specific Requirements § 202.11 Title I. (a) Administrative... may be imposed under the Title I program. The administrative actions that may be applied are set forth...

  9. Plant neurobiology as a paradigm shift not only in the plant sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, Frantisek; Mancuso, Stefano

    2007-07-01

    Plants are complex living beings, extremely sensitive to environmental factors, continuously adapting to the ever changing environment. Emerging research document that plants sense, memorize, and process experiences and use this information for their adaptive behavior and evolution. As any other living and evolving systems, plants act as knowledge accumulating systems. Neuronal informational systems are behind this concept of organisms as knowledge accumulating systems because they allow the most rapid and efficient adaptive responses to changes in environment. Therefore, it should not be surprising that neuronal computation is not limited to animal brains but is used also by bacteria and plants. The journal, Plant Signaling & Behavior, was launched as a platform for exchanging information and fostering research on plant neurobiology in order to allow our understanding of plants in their whole integrated, communicative, and behavioral complexity.I always go by official statistics because they are very carefully compounded and, even if they are false, we have no others ... approximately Jaroslav Hasek, 1911.

  10. Anxiety: a systematic review of neurobiology, traditional pharmaceuticals and novel alternatives from medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfuso, Érica Aparecida; Rosa, Daiane Santos; Fachin, Ana Lúcia; Mortari, Márcia Renata; Cunha, Alexandra Olimpio Siqueira; Beleboni, Rene Oliveira

    2014-02-01

    Pathologic anxiety is a disproportional reaction of individuals to anticipation or misinterpretation of a potential danger, which affects individual social and personal life. Despite the advances already accomplished, further studies are still necessary in order to understand the mechanisms involved in anxiety. These may provide more effective and safer treatments to aid in the control of anxiety and improve patient quality of life. In this work, we review the current issue about anxiety disorders, covering general aspects such as basic epidemiology and classification, an overview of the pharmacological treatments employed and the current search for natural anxiolytics. Also, a compilation of data investigating the neurobiology that underlies anxiety disorders and a brief discussion evolving the most usual animal experimental models to study anxiety is presented.

  11. Neurobiology of the myofascial trigger point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, R D

    1994-11-01

    The clinical phenomenon of the MTrP is accessible to any clinician who takes the time to learn to palpate skeletal muscle gently and carefully, and who is willing to learn the functional anatomy necessary to understand the regional spread of MTrPs through functional muscle units (Travell and Simons, 1992). Yet despite the years of clinical study of MPS, the pathophysiology of the central feature, the trigger point, has remained elusive. Many investigators have contributed to the general understanding of the mechanisms of pain perception, but we owe a particular debt of gratitude to Dr Seigfried Mense of Heidelberg for his pursuit of the study of pain originating in muscle lesions. However, Dr Mense would be the first to caution us against the direct transference of the results obtained with an inflammatory lesion produced in the experimental animal to the pain of MTrPs in the clinic patient. Notwithstanding that, researchers in the field of pain have given us an understanding of the basis for the hyperalgesia, allodynia and the previously difficult-to-understand finding of referred pain zones that we see daily in our patients. Finally, the interesting initial observations of Hubbard and Berkoff (1993), suggesting that the muscle spindle may be associated with the trigger point, open yet another door in our understanding of the nature of MPS.

  12. Introduction to the neurobiology of interval timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; de Lafuente, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Time is a fundamental variable that organisms must quantify in order to survive. In humans, for example, the gradual development of the sense of duration and rhythm is an essential skill in many facets of social behavior such as speaking, dancing to-, listening to- or playing music, performing a wide variety of sports, and driving a car (Merchant H, Harrington DL, Meck WH. Annu Rev Neurosci. 36:313-36, 2013). During the last 10 years there has been a rapid growth of research on the neural underpinnings of timing in the subsecond and suprasecond scales, using a variety of methodological approaches in the human being, as well as in varied animal and theoretical models. In this introductory chapter we attempt to give a conceptual framework that defines time processing as a family of different phenomena. The brain circuits and neural underpinnings of temporal quantification seem to largely depend on its time scale and the sensorimotor nature of specific behaviors. Therefore, we describe the main time scales and their associated behaviors and show how the perception and execution of timing events in the subsecond and second scales may depend on similar or different neural mechanisms.

  13. Animating Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title ‘Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience’. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of ‘soul catching’, the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain’s electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  14. Validating Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Atanasova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I respond to the challenge raised against contemporary experimental neurobiology according to which the field is in a state of crisis because of the multiple experimental protocols employed in different laboratories and strengthening their reliability that presumably preclude the validity of neurobiological knowledge. I provide an alternative account of experimentation in neurobiology which makes sense of its experimental practices. I argue that maintaining a multiplicity of experimental protocols and strengthening their reliability are well justified and they foster rather than preclude the validity of neurobiological knowledge. Thus, their presence indicates thriving rather than crisis of experimental neurobiology.

  15. The neurobiology and evolution of cannabinoid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, M R; Egertová, M

    2001-03-29

    The plant Cannabis sativa has been used by humans for thousands of years because of its psychoactivity. The major psychoactive ingredient of cannabis is Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which exerts effects in the brain by binding to a G-protein-coupled receptor known as the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. The discovery of this receptor indicated that endogenous cannabinoids may occur in the brain, which act as physiological ligands for CB1. Two putative endocannabinoid ligands, arachidonylethanolamide ('anandamide') and 2-arachidonylglycerol, have been identified, giving rise to the concept of a cannabinoid signalling system. Little is known about how or where these compounds are synthesized in the brain and how this relates to CB1 expression. However, detailed neuroanatomical and electrophysiological analysis of mammalian nervous systems has revealed that the CB1 receptor is targeted to the presynaptic terminals of neurons where it acts to inhibit release of 'classical' neurotransmitters. Moreover, an enzyme that inactivates endocannabinoids, fatty acid amide hydrolase, appears to be preferentially targeted to the somatodendritic compartment of neurons that are postsynaptic to CB1-expressing axon terminals. Based on these findings, we present here a model of cannabinoid signalling in which anandamide is synthesized by postsynaptic cells and acts as a retrograde messenger molecule to modulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Using this model as a framework, we discuss the role of cannabinoid signalling in different regions of the nervous system in relation to the characteristic physiological actions of cannabinoids in mammals, which include effects on movement, memory, pain and smooth muscle contractility. The discovery of the cannabinoid signalling system in mammals has prompted investigation of the occurrence of this pathway in non-mammalian animals. Here we review the evidence for the existence of cannabinoid receptors in non-mammalian vertebrates

  16. Molecular Neurobiology and Promising New Treatment in Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Jeon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The limited effects of currently available antidepressants are becoming an urgent issue in depression research. It takes a long time to determine treatment effects, and the overall remission rate is low. Although we expect the development of non-monoamine antidepressants in the near future, efforts in this regard over the past several decades have not yet been compensated. Thus, researchers and clinicians should clarify the neurobiological mechanisms of integrated modulators that regulate changes in genes, cells, the brain, and behaviors associated with depression. In this study, we review molecular neurobiological theories and new treatments for depression. Beyond neuroanatomy and monoamine theory, we discuss cells and molecules, neural plasticity, neurotrophisms, endocrine mechanisms, immunological mechanisms, genetics, circadian rhythms, and metabolic regulation in depression. In addition, we introduce the possibility of new antidepressant drug development using protein translation signaling (mTOR pathways.

  17. The neurobiology of empathy in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Luis H; Snyder, Rebekah; Steele, Howard; Siever, Larry J

    2013-03-01

    We present a neurobiological model of empathic dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD) to guide future empirical research. Empathy is a necessary component of interpersonal functioning, involving two distinct, parallel neural networks. One form of empathic processing relies on shared representations (SR) of others' mental states, while the other is associated with explicit mental state attribution (MSA). SR processing is visceral and automatic, contributing to attunement, but also emotional contagion. MSA processing contributes to deliberate, perspectival forms of empathic understanding. Empathic dysfunction in BPD may involve hyper-reactivity of SR networks and impairment of MSA networks. Nevertheless, this empathic dysfunction is subtle, but contributes to interpersonal difficulties. Interaction between genetic factors and traumatic attachment stressors may contribute to development of BPD, with painful attachment insecurity and disorganization affecting SR and MSA network functioning. Future avenues for BPD research will include developmental assessment of attachment and neurobiological functioning under varying conditions.

  18. Evolutionary themes in the neurobiology of social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitekamp, Chelsea A; Hofmann, Hans A

    2014-10-01

    Remarkable examples of social cognition have been described across a diverse range of species, yet surprisingly little is known about the neurobiological underpinnings of these behaviors. Recent studies suggest that the molecular pathways and neural networks that mediate social behavior have been relatively conserved across vertebrate evolution, suggesting that shared mechanisms may drive adaptive behavioral responses to social stimuli. Here, we review recent advances in the neurobiology of flexible and context-dependent social behaviors across vertebrate taxa, focusing on female mate choice, pair-bonding, and aggressive behavior. Furthermore, we highlight the outstanding opportunities for uncovering the mechanisms mediating cooperative behavior, an exemplar of social cognition. We suggest a framework for investigating context-dependent neural organization and the evoked neural response to social stimuli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Insomnia: psychological and neurobiological aspects and non-pharmacological treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Fleury Molen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia involves difficulty in falling asleep, maintaining sleep or having refreshing sleep. This review gathers the existing informations seeking to explain insomnia, including those that focus on psychological aspects and those considered neurobiological. Insomnia has been defined in psychological (cognitive components, such as worries and rumination, and behavioral aspects, such as classic conditioning and physiological terms (increased metabolic rate, with increased muscle tone, heart rate and temperature. From the neurobiological point of view, there are two perspectives: one which proposes that insomnia occurs in association with a failure to inhibit wakefulness and another that considers hyperarousal as having an important role in the physiology of sleep. The non-pharmacological interventions developed to face different aspects of insomnia are presented.

  20. [Neurobiological and psychosocial causes of individual male violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogerts, B; Möller-Leimkühler, A M

    2013-11-01

    Individual and collective acts of violence are mainly a male phenomenon caused by complex interactions of neurobiological and psychosocial factors. Amazingly this topic has not yet played a major role in the clinical psychiatric literature although the disastrous consequences are clearly visible everywhere and although aggression also belongs to the archaic human emotions, such as anxiety, depression and euphoria.The article gives an integrative overview on epidemiological, neurobiological, genetic, neuropathological, neurochemical/hormonal, developmental and psychosocial theories on aggression and violence, including sociocognitive models, hedonistic aspects of violence, effects of violence in the media and processes of childhood socialization.Better knowledge of the broad spectrum of these intensively interacting biological and psychosocial components resulting in violence not only improves our understanding of this calamitous psychosyndrome but can also lead to more effective preventive measures.

  1. The neurobiological consequences of early stress and childhood maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teicher, Martin H; Andersen, Susan L; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Navalta, Carryl P; Kim, Dennis M

    2003-01-01

    Early severe stress and maltreatment produces a cascade of neurobiological events that have the potential to cause enduring changes in brain development. These changes occur on multiple levels, from neurohumoral (especially the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA] axis) to structural and functional. The major structural consequences of early stress include reduced size of the mid-portions of the corpus callosum and attenuated development of the left neocortex, hippocampus, and amygdala. Major functional consequences include increased electrical irritability in limbic structures and reduced functional activity of the cerebellar vermis. There are also gender differences in vulnerability and functional consequences. The neurobiological sequelae of early stress and maltreatment may play a significant role in the emergence of psychiatric disorders during development.

  2. Neurobiological Correlates of the Attitude Toward Human Empathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Gentili

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, integrated philosophical and neuroscientific studies of empathy have been steadily growing, because of the pivotal role that empathy plays in social cognition and ethics, as well as in the understanding of human behavior both under physiological conditions and in the presence of mental disorders. The umbrella concept of empathy embraces multi-faceted characteristics, including affective and cognitive processes, such as so-called emotional contagion and concern and perspective-taking. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art of knowledge about the neurobiology of empathy. Specifically, we examine studies regarding empathy for pain, emotional imitation and expression and their alterations in psychopathological conditions. We also consider studies on the theory of mind (ToM and the mirror neuron system (MNS. Finally, we propose measures of brain resting state activity as a potential neurobiological marker of proneness to be empathic.

  3. Why not look at animals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Pick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revisiting John Berger’s seminal essay ‘Why Look at Animals?’ (1980, this essay inverts Berger’s title in order to explore instances where the visibility of animals is at stake and where seeing is linked to forms of surveillance and control. In the context of advanced optical and tracking technologies that render animals permanently visible, the possibility of not-seeing emerges as a progressive modality of relation to animals that takes seriously the notion of animal privacy and the exposed animal’s resistance to the human gaze.

  4. Why not look at animals?

    OpenAIRE

    Anat Pick

    2015-01-01

    Revisiting John Berger’s seminal essay ‘Why Look at Animals?’ (1980), this essay inverts Berger’s title in order to explore instances where the visibility of animals is at stake and where seeing is linked to forms of surveillance and control. In the context of advanced optical and tracking technologies that render animals permanently visible, the possibility of not-seeing emerges as a progressive modality of relation to animals that takes seriously the notion of animal privacy and the exposed...

  5. Neurobiological correlates of internet gaming disorder: Similarities to pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth-Bühler, M; Mann, K

    2017-01-01

    The number of massively multiplayer online games (MMOs) is on the rise worldwide along with the fascination that they inspire. Problems occur when the use of MMOs becomes excessive at the expense of other life domains. Although not yet formally included as disorder in common diagnostic systems, internet gaming disorder (IGD) is considered a "condition for further study" in section III of the DSM-5. The current review aims to provide an overview of cognitive and neurobiological data currently available on IGD, with a particular focus on impulsivity, compulsivity, and sensitivity to reward and punishment. Additionally, we also compare these findings on IGD with data from studies on pathological gambling (PG)-so far the only condition officially classified as a behavioral addiction in the DSM-5. Multiple similarities have been observed in the neurobiology of IGD and PG, as measured by alterations in brain function and behavior. Both patients with IGD and those with PG exhibited decreased loss sensitivity; enhanced reactivity to gaming and gambling cues, respectively; enhanced impulsive choice behavior; aberrant reward-based learning; and no changes in cognitive flexibility. In conclusion, the evidence base on the neurobiology of gaming and gambling disorders is beginning to illuminate the similarities between the two. However, as only a few studies have addressed the neurobiological basis of IGD, and some of these studies suffer from significant limitations, more research is required before IGD's inclusion as a second behavioral addiction in the next versions of the ICD and DSM can be justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An Emerging Technology Framework for the Neurobiology of Appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternson, Scott M; Atasoy, Deniz; Betley, J Nicholas; Henry, Fredrick E; Xu, Shengjin

    2016-02-09

    Advances in neuro-technology for mapping, manipulating, and monitoring molecularly defined cell types are rapidly advancing insight into neural circuits that regulate appetite. Here, we review these important tools and their applications in circuits that control food seeking and consumption. Technical capabilities provided by these tools establish a rigorous experimental framework for research into the neurobiology of hunger. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Neurobiology of Retinoic Acid in Affective Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bremner, J. Douglas; McCaffery, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Current models of affective disorders implicate alterations in norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, and CRF/cortisol; however treatments targeted at these neurotransmitters or hormones have led to imperfect resolution of symptoms, suggesting that the neurobiology of affective disorders is incompletely understood. Until now retinoids have not been considered as possible contributors to affective disorders. Retinoids represent a family of compounds derived from Vitamin A that perform a large nu...

  8. Alcohol-related aggression-social and neurobiological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Alcohol-related aggression and violence are a widespread cause of personal suffering with high socioeconomic costs. In 2011, nearly one in three violent acts in Germany was committed under the influence of alcohol (31.8%). The link between alcohol consumption and aggression is promoted by various interacting factors. In this review, based on a selective search for pertinent literature in PubMed, we analyze and summarize information from original articles, reviews, and book chapters about alcohol and aggression and discuss the neurobiological basis of aggressive behavior. Aggression is promoted both by the cognitive deficits arising in connection with acute or chronic alcohol use and by prior experience of violence in particular situations where alcohol was drunk. Only a minority of persons who drink alcohol become aggressive. On the other hand, alcohol abuse and dependence together constitute the second most commonly diagnosed cause of suicide (15-43%). Current research indicates that the individual tendency toward alcohol-induced aggression depends not just on neurobiological factors, but also on personal expectations of the effects of alcohol, on prior experience of violent conflicts, and on the environmental conditions of early childhood, especially social exclusion and discrimination. Gene-environment interactions affecting the serotonergic and other neurotransmitter systems play an important role. Potential (but not yet adequately validated) therapeutic approaches involve reinforcing cognitive processes or pharmacologically modulating serotonergic neurotransmission (and other target processes). Alcohol-related aggression has manifold social and neurobiological causes. Specific treatments must be tested in controlled trials.

  9. Neurobiological effects of physical exercise in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Probst, Michel; De Hert, Marc; Soundy, Andrew; Stubbs, Brendon; Stroobants, Marc; De Herdt, Amber

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to provide a summary of neurobiological effects of physical exercise for people with schizophrenia. A systematic review was conducted in accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. Searches were conducted up to April 2013 across three databases: Medline, PsycINFO, and Embase. A methodological quality assessment using the Downs and Black Quality Index was carried out with all of the included studies. Of the 654 initial data search results, two studies reported in 3 articles including 48 patients (six women) with schizophrenia, met the eligibility criteria. The methodological quality of each study was high. Data on hippocampal volume changes following physical exercise were conflicting while physical exercise-induced changes in other brain areas were absent. Increases in hippocampal volume following physical exercise were correlated with improvements in aerobic fitness and short-term memory. Future research is needed to investigate whether brain health in people with schizophrenia is activity-dependent. Additionally, research that considers the neurobiological mechanisms and associated functional outcomes of physical exercise in individuals with schizophrenia is required. Understanding the neurobiological effects of physical exercise in patients with schizophrenia may contribute to the development of new rehabilitation strategies. There is currently insufficient evidence to determine if physical exercise has a beneficial influence on the brain health of people with schizophrenia.

  10. Neurobiologically-based treatments in Rett syndrome: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Walter E.; Stallworth, Jennifer L.; Everman, David B.; Skinner, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects females, typically resulting in a period of developmental regression in early childhood followed by stabilization and severe chronic cognitive, behavioral, and physical disability. No known treatment exists beyond symptomatic management, and while insights into the genetic cause, pathophysiology, neurobiology, and natural history of RTT have been gained, many challenges remain. Areas covered: Based on a comprehensive survey of the primary literature on RTT, this article describes and comments upon the general and unique features of the disorder, genetic and neurobiological bases of drug development, and the history of clinical trials in RTT, with an emphasis on drug trial design, outcome measures, and implementation. Expert opinion: Neurobiologically based drug trials are the ultimate goal in RTT, and due to the complexity and global nature of the disorder, drugs targeting both general mechanisms (e.g., growth factors) and specific systems (e.g., glutamate modulators) could be effective. Trial design should optimize data on safety and efficacy, but selection of outcome measures with adequate measurement properties, as well as innovative strategies, such as those enhancing synaptic plasticity and use of biomarkers, are essential for progress in RTT and other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:28163986

  11. Bridging the divide between neuroprosthetic design, tissue engineering and neurobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Leach

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthetic devices have made a major impact in the treatment of a variety of disorders such as paralysis and stroke. However, a major impediment in the advancement of this technology is the challenge of maintaining device performance during chronic implantation (months to years due to complex intrinsic host responses such as gliosis or glial scarring. The objective of this review is to bring together research communities in neurobiology, tissue engineering, and neuroprosthetics to address the major obstacles encountered in the translation of neuroprosthetics technology into long-term clinical use. This article draws connections between specific challenges faced by current neuroprosthetics technology and recent advances in the areas of nerve tissue engineering and neurobiology. Within the context of the device-nervous system interface and central nervous system (CNS implants, areas of synergistic opportunity are discussed, including platforms to present cells with multiple cues, controlled delivery of bioactive factors, three-dimensional constructs and in vitro models of gliosis and brain injury, nerve regeneration strategies, and neural stem/progenitor cell (NPC biology. Finally, recent insights gained from the fields of developmental neurobiology and cancer biology are discussed as examples of exciting new biological knowledge that may provide fresh inspiration towards novel technologies to address the complexities associated with long-term neuroprosthetic device performance.

  12. Bridging the Divide between Neuroprosthetic Design, Tissue Engineering and Neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Jennie B; Achyuta, Anil Kumar H; Murthy, Shashi K

    2010-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic devices have made a major impact in the treatment of a variety of disorders such as paralysis and stroke. However, a major impediment in the advancement of this technology is the challenge of maintaining device performance during chronic implantation (months to years) due to complex intrinsic host responses such as gliosis or glial scarring. The objective of this review is to bring together research communities in neurobiology, tissue engineering, and neuroprosthetics to address the major obstacles encountered in the translation of neuroprosthetics technology into long-term clinical use. This article draws connections between specific challenges faced by current neuroprosthetics technology and recent advances in the areas of nerve tissue engineering and neurobiology. Within the context of the device-nervous system interface and central nervous system implants, areas of synergistic opportunity are discussed, including platforms to present cells with multiple cues, controlled delivery of bioactive factors, three-dimensional constructs and in vitro models of gliosis and brain injury, nerve regeneration strategies, and neural stem/progenitor cell biology. Finally, recent insights gained from the fields of developmental neurobiology and cancer biology are discussed as examples of exciting new biological knowledge that may provide fresh inspiration toward novel technologies to address the complexities associated with long-term neuroprosthetic device performance.

  13. Title V Permitting Statistics Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Title V Permitting Statistics Inventory contains measured and estimated nationwide statistical data, consisting of counts of permitted sources, types of permits...

  14. Region 7 Title V facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web map shows the Region 7 Title V facilities (Clean Air Act major sources), any Class I areas within 300 km of R7 States, and any Tribal areas within 50 miles...

  15. Animal Migraine Models for Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    for headache has almost come to a standstill partly because of a lack of valid animal models. Here we review previous models with emphasis on optimal characteristics of a future model. In addition to selection of animal species, the method of induction of migraine-like changes and the method of recording...... responses are likely to be behavioral, allowing multiple experiments in each individual animal. Distinction is made between acute and prophylactic models and how to validate each of them. Modern insight into neurobiological mechanisms of migraine is so good that it is only a question of resources...

  16. Comparative eicosanoid physiology in invertebrate animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley-Samuelson, D W

    1991-05-01

    A comparative survey of eicosanoid physiology in invertebrate animals is presented. Topics include host skin penetration behavior in blood flukes, oocyte maturation in starfishes, prevention of polyspermic fertilizations in sea urchins, ion regulation in bivalves, egg production in snails, egg release in scallops, neurobiology of Aplysia, hatching in barnacles, and release of egg-laying behavior in some insects. Some eicosanoid actions, such as ion regulation, may be common to most vertebrate and invertebrate animals, whereas other actions, such as mediation of whole organism behavior, are not shared. Comparative physiology is revealing that the biological significance of eicosanoids extends far beyond vertebrate animals.

  17. The novel object recognition memory: neurobiology, test procedure, and its modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, M; Biala, G

    2012-05-01

    Animal models of memory have been considered as the subject of many scientific publications at least since the beginning of the twentieth century. In humans, memory is often accessed through spoken or written language, while in animals, cognitive functions must be accessed through different kind of behaviors in many specific, experimental models of memory and learning. Among them, the novel object recognition test can be evaluated by the differences in the exploration time of novel and familiar objects. Its application is not limited to a field of research and enables that various issues can be studied, such as the memory and learning, the preference for novelty, the influence of different brain regions in the process of recognition, and even the study of different drugs and their effects. This paper describes the novel object recognition paradigms in animals, as a valuable measure of cognition. The purpose of this work was to review the neurobiology and methodological modifications of the test commonly used in behavioral pharmacology.

  18. Quantum neurophysics: From non-living matter to quantum neurobiology and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlacı, Sultan; Pregnolato, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The concepts of quantum brain, quantum mind and quantum consciousness have been increasingly gaining currency in recent years, both in scientific papers and in the popular press. In fact, the concept of the quantum brain is a general framework. Included in it are basically four main sub-headings. These are often incorrectly used interchangeably. The first of these and the one which started the quantum mind/consciousness debate was the place of consciousness in the problem of measurement in quantum mechanics. Debate on the problem of quantum measurement and about the place of the conscious observer has lasted almost a century. One solution to this problem is that the participation of a conscious observer in the experiment will radically change our understanding of the universe and our relationship with the outside world. The second topic is that of quantum biology. This topic has become a popular field of research, especially in the last decade. It concerns whether or not the rules of quantum physics operate in biological structures. It has been shown in the latest research on photosynthesis, the sense of smell and magnetic direction finding in animals that the laws of quantum physics may operate in warm-wet-noisy biological structures. The third sub-heading is quantum neurobiology. This topic has not yet gained wide acceptance and is still in its early stages. Its primary purpose is directed to understand whether the laws of quantum physics are effective in the biology of the nervous system or not. A further step in brain neurobiology, toward the understanding of consciousness formation, is the research of quantum laws effects upon neural network functions. The fourth and final topic is quantum psychopathology. This topic takes its basis and its support from quantum neurobiology. It comes from the idea that if quantum physics is involved in the normal working of the brain, diseased conditions of the brain such as depression, anxiety, dementia, schizophrenia and

  19. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchese, Joseph J.; Berry, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3–7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain–computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  20. 48 CFR 252.217-7006 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Title. 252.217-7006... Clauses 252.217-7006 Title. As prescribed in 217.7104(a), use the following clause: Title (DEC 1991) (a) Unless otherwise provided, title to all materials and equipment to be incorporated in a vessel in the...

  1. 48 CFR 245.7309-5 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Title. 245.7309-5 Section... Title. (a) Unless otherwise specified in the Invitation, title to property sold under this Invitation... Contractor, title shall not vest until payment and loading are completed. (b) A Standard Form 97, Certificate...

  2. 7 CFR 3200.7 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Title. 3200.7 Section 3200.7 Agriculture Regulations... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 3200.7 Title. Title to excess personal property obtained under Part 3200 will... will give preference to the Federal agency that will retain title in the Government. ...

  3. 13 CFR 314.7 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Title. 314.7 Section 314.7... Property § 314.7 Title. (a) General. The Recipient must hold title to the Real Property required for a... and must maintain title at all times during the Estimated Useful Life of the Project, except in those...

  4. 12 CFR 5.42 - Corporate title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate title. 5.42 Section 5.42 Banks and... CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Other Changes in Activities and Operations § 5.42 Corporate title. (a) Authority. 12 U... change its corporate title. (c) Standards. A national bank may change its corporate title provided that...

  5. 48 CFR 1352.271-80 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Title. 1352.271-80 Section... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.271-80 Title. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.111, insert the following clause: Title (APR 2010) (a) Title to all materials and...

  6. 48 CFR 51.106 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Title. 51.106 Section 51... GOVERNMENT SOURCES BY CONTRACTORS Contractor Use of Government Supply Sources 51.106 Title. (a) Title to all... educational institutions and the Government Property clause at 52.245-1, Alternate II, is used, title to...

  7. 24 CFR 200.61 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Title. 200.61 Section 200.61... Requirements for Existing Projects General Requirements § 200.61 Title. (a) Marketable title to the project must be vested in the mortgagor as of the date the mortgage is filed for record. (b) Title evidence for...

  8. Neurobiological, Psychosocial and Environmental Causes of Violence and Aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozhan Yalcin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In psychiatric practice psychotic disorders, mania, substance and alcohol related disorders, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, delirium, stereotypical movement disorders, trichotillomania, eating disorders and other obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, major depressive disorder, mixt episodes are closely related with agression towards surrounding and other people and towards self. Although as in suicide agression and violence are not always related to prominent psychopatology, violence and agression are closely associated with crime. In some societies, especially ritualistic agressive behaviours towards self are perceived as culturally normative. Sex, temperamental and cognitive patterns, medical factors also neurobiological and neuropsychiatric causes like neurotransmitters and hormonal factors and their metabolism, glucocorticoid and cholesterol metabolism, genetic factors and also ecological, toxical, nutritional factors, psychosocial and psychodynamic factors can be related with development and severity of agression and violence towards surrounding, other people and towards self. Although it is accepted that there isn’t single explanation of the individual differences about the tendency to violence, there are contradicting points of view among researchers about the most significant risc factor. Probably development or alleveation of violent behavior is influenced by the reciprocal interaction between psychosocial, psychodynamic, temperamental, neuropsychiatric, enviromental, genetic factors, parenting styles, quality of nurturition and education and school mental health interventions. Positive psychosocial, familial, educational factors, psychiatric interventions, protective mental health quality and positive government political attitudes can restorate negative genetic

  9. Diagnosis, treatment, and neurobiology of autism in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainhart, J E; Piven, J

    1995-08-01

    Autism is a developmental neuropsychiatric disorder defined by the presence of social and communicative deficits, restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests, and a characteristic course. Research suggests that hereditary factors play a principal role in the etiology of most cases. A phenotype broader than autism, including milder social and language-based cognitive deficits, appears to be inherited. Although the pathogenesis is unknown, neurobiologic mechanisms clearly underlie the disorder. Neuropathologic studies have demonstrated abnormalities in limbic structures, the cerebellum, and the cortex. New advances in behavioral therapies and pharmacologic treatment are important components of successful multidisciplinary treatment of this disorder.

  10. Avances en neurobiología de la conducta

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Alberto Raggi; Ingrid Rojas

    2013-01-01

    La experiencia diaria nos enseña que el cerebro tiene una notable capacidad de adaptarse a cambios ambientales,de almacenar memoria y determinar la conducta. Pero hasta que punto esta adaptación del cerebroadulto, depende de reordcnamicntos en las conexiones entre las células nerviosas, sigue siendo uno de losmayores desafios de la neurobiología moderna. Los mecanismos sioápticos de la plasticidad en la cortezaadulta, dependiente de la experiencia, aún se desconocen. En esta breve revisión se...

  11. A NEUROBIOLOGICAL MODEL OF PERCEPTION Considerations for Transference

    OpenAIRE

    Pincus, David; Freeman, Walter J III; Modell, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Transference is a key concept in psychoanalysis, distinguishing the analytic treatment from other forms of psychotherapy. In this essay, the authors place transference into the context of a general psychology of human functioning and link it to the neurobiology of perception. The authors briefly review the literature within and outside of psychoanalysis, define transference through the lens of perception, and propose that it is ubiquitous in humans. When not impaired, transference is an adaptiv...

  12. Placebo effects: from the neurobiological paradigm to translational implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2014-11-05

    Today we are witnessing a new science of placebo, a complex discipline that encompasses several experimental approaches and translational implications. Modern neurobiological tools have been used to answer important questions in placebo research, such as the top-down modulation of sensory and motor systems as well as the influence of cognition, emotions, and learning on symptoms, diseases, and responses to treatments. What we have learned is that there is not one single placebo effect, but many. This review highlights the translational implications of this new knowledge, ranging from clinical trial design to medical practice to social and ethical issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Current understandings about cognition and the neurobiological correlates in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder. Cognitive deficits are one of the core features of schizophrenia. Multiple domains of cognition (executive function, attention/vigilance, working memory, verbal fluency, visuospatial skills, processing speed, and social cognition are affected in patients with schizophrenia. Deficits in cognition led to impairment in the real world functioning. Identifying the cognitive deficits and early intervention is required for better functional outcome. This review focuses on conceptual understanding of cognition with its neurobiological correlates in schizophrenia and its different clinical implications.

  14. Neurobiology of bipolar disorder - lessons from migraine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Janathon; Agius, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Treatment for Bipolar Affective Disorder is at present largely empirical, in the lack of a definitive understanding of the biological basis of the condition. Many theories have been proposed regarding the underlying neurobiology. These have included aetiologies relating to altered neurotrophic factor expression, mitochondrial endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction with related calcium changes, and loss of inhibitory interneurons. Here an attempt is made to integrate such current understanding, in part by considering the changes observed in migraine - a condition which has a number of similarities with bipolar disorder.

  15. The Emerging Neurobiology of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: The Key Role of the Prefrontal Association Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnsten, Amy F.T.

    2009-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, and locomotor hyperactivity. Recent advances in neurobiology, imaging, and genetics have led to a greater understanding of the etiology and treatment of ADHD. Studies have found that ADHD is associated with weaker function and structure of prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuits, especially in the right hemisphere. The prefrontal association cortex plays a crucial role in regulating attention, behavior, and emotion, with the right hemisphere specialized for behavioral inhibition. The PFC is highly dependent on the correct neurochemical environment for proper function: noradrenergic stimulation of postsynaptic alpha-2A adrenoceptors and dopaminergic stimulation of D1 receptors is necessary for optimal prefrontal function. ADHD is associated with genetic changes that weaken catecholamine signaling and, in some patients, with slowed PFC maturation. Effective pharmacologic treatments for ADHD all enhance catecholamine signaling in the PFC and strengthen its regulation of attention and behavior. Recent animal studies show that therapeutic doses of stimulant medications preferentially increase norepinephrine and, to a lesser extent, dopamine, in the PFC. These doses reduce locomotor activity and improve PFC regulation of attention and behavior through enhanced catecholamine stimulation of alpha-2A and D1 receptors. These findings in animals are consistent with improved PFC function in normal human subjects and, more prominently, in patients with ADHD. Thus, a highly cohesive story is emerging regarding the etiology and treatment of ADHD. PMID:20596295

  16. Economic, neurobiological, and behavioral perspectives on building America's future workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Eric I; Heckman, James J; Cameron, Judy L; Shonkoff, Jack P

    2006-07-05

    A growing proportion of the U.S. workforce will have been raised in disadvantaged environments that are associated with relatively high proportions of individuals with diminished cognitive and social skills. A cross-disciplinary examination of research in economics, developmental psychology, and neurobiology reveals a striking convergence on a set of common principles that account for the potent effects of early environment on the capacity for human skill development. Central to these principles are the findings that early experiences have a uniquely powerful influence on the development of cognitive and social skills and on brain architecture and neurochemistry, that both skill development and brain maturation are hierarchical processes in which higher level functions depend on, and build on, lower level functions, and that the capacity for change in the foundations of human skill development and neural circuitry is highest earlier in life and decreases over time. These findings lead to the conclusion that the most efficient strategy for strengthening the future workforce, both economically and neurobiologically, and improving its quality of life is to invest in the environments of disadvantaged children during the early childhood years.

  17. The Neurobiological Impact of Ghrelin Suppression after Oesophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor F. Murphy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin, discovered in 1999, is a 28-amino-acid hormone, best recognized as a stimulator of growth hormone secretion, but with pleiotropic functions in the area of energy homeostasis, such as appetite stimulation and energy expenditure regulation. As the intrinsic ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R, ghrelin appears to have a broad array of effects, but its primary role is still an area of debate. Produced mainly from oxyntic glands in the stomach, but with a multitude of extra-metabolic roles, ghrelin is implicated in complex neurobiological processes. Comprehensive studies within the areas of obesity and metabolic surgery have clarified the mechanism of these operations. As a stimulator of growth hormone (GH, and an apparent inducer of positive energy balance, other areas of interest include its impact on carcinogenesis and tumour proliferation and its role in the cancer cachexia syndrome. This has led several authors to study the hormone in the cancer setting. Ghrelin levels are acutely reduced following an oesophagectomy, a primary treatment modality for oesophageal cancer. We sought to investigate the nature of this postoperative ghrelin suppression, and its neurobiological implications.

  18. Attachment, neurobiology, and mentalizing along the psychosis continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Debbané

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, we outline the evidence linking attachment adversity to the psychosis, from the premorbid stages of the disorder to its clinical forms. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms through which insecure attachment may contribute to psychosis, we identify at least five neurobiological pathways linking attachment to risk for developing psychosis. Besides its well documented influence on the hypothalamic-pituary-adrenal (HPA axis, insecure attachment may also contribute to neurodevelopmental risk through the dopaminergic and oxytonergic systems, as well as bear influence on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress responses. We further consider the neuroscientific and behavioural studies that underpin mentalization as a suite of processes potentially moderating the risk to transition to psychotic disorders. In particular, mentalization may help the individual compensate for endophenotypical impairments in the integration of sensory and metacognitive information. We propose a model where embodied mentalization would lie at the core of a protective, resilience response mitigating the adverse and potentially pathological influence of the neurodevelopmental cascade of risk for psychosis.

  19. The neurobiology of the emotional adolescent: From the inside out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Amanda E; Silk, Jennifer S; Nelson, Eric E

    2016-11-01

    Adolescents are commonly portrayed as highly emotional, with their behaviors often hijacked by their emotions. Research on the neural substrates of adolescent affective behavior is beginning to paint a more nuanced picture of how neurodevelopmental changes in brain function influence affective behavior, and how these influences are modulated by external factors in the environment. Recent neurodevelopmental models suggest that the brain is designed to promote emotion regulation, learning, and affiliation across development, and that affective behavior reciprocally interacts with age-specific social demands and different social contexts. In this review, we discuss current findings on neurobiological mechanisms of adolescents' affective behavior and highlight individual differences in and social-contextual influences on adolescents' emotionality. Neurobiological mechanisms of affective processes related to anxiety and depression are also discussed as examples. As the field progresses, it will be critical to test new hypotheses generated from the foundational empirical and conceptual work and to focus on identifying more precisely how and when neural networks change in ways that promote or thwart adaptive affective behavior during adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurobiological phenotypes associated with a family history of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cservenka, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with a family history of alcoholism are at much greater risk for developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD) than youth or adults without such history. A large body of research suggests that there are premorbid differences in brain structure and function in family history positive (FHP) individuals relative to their family history negative (FHN) peers. This review summarizes the existing literature on neurobiological phenotypes present in FHP youth and adults by describing findings across neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies. Neuroimaging studies have shown FHP individuals differ from their FHN peers in amygdalar, hippocampal, basal ganglia, and cerebellar volume. Both increased and decreased white matter integrity has been reported in FHP individuals compared with FHN controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have found altered inhibitory control and working memory-related brain response in FHP youth and adults, suggesting neural markers of executive functioning may be related to increased vulnerability for developing AUDs in this population. Additionally, brain activity differences in regions involved in bottom-up reward and emotional processing, such as the nucleus accumbens and amygdala, have been shown in FHP individuals relative to their FHN peers. It is critical to understand premorbid neural characteristics that could be associated with cognitive, reward-related, or emotional risk factors that increase risk for AUDs in FHP individuals. This information may lead to the development of neurobiologically informed prevention and intervention studies focused on reducing the incidence of AUDs in high-risk youth and adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Stress and depression: clinical, neurobiological and genetical perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, S J

    2009-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (mdd) can be elicited by various kinds of stress, such as negative life events, chronic stress and experiences of abuse early in life. These stressors interact with personality traits and with a genetic predisposition to depression, thereby bringing about mdd. Therefore, the neurobiology of depression cannot be separated from the neurobiology of stress system. A substantial number of publications have in fact demonstrated that mdd patients show abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (hpa) axis, which is a key element of the stress response. Such disturbances are exacerbated by chronic stress, early experiences of abuse and even prenatal exposure to stress. On the other hand, genetic variations can play a role in the hpa axis dysfunction and in vulnerability to depression. Evidence is emerging that certain genes are directly involved in the functioning of the hpa axis. Other genetic factors, not directly related to the hpa axis, are probably relevant as well, the best known example being the serotonin transporter gene.

  2. Stress, depression, and cardiovascular dysregulation: A review of neurobiological mechanisms and the integration of research from preclinical disease models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, Angela J.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional association between mood disorders such as depression, and cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure, has been described; however, the precise neurobiological mechanisms that underlie these associations have not been fully elucidated. This review is focused on the neurobiological processes and mediators that are common to both mood and cardiovascular disorders, with an emphasis on the role of exogenous stressors in addition to: (a) neuroendocrine and neurohumoral changes involving dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, (b) immune alterations including activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, (c) autonomic and cardiovascular dysregulation including increased sympathetic drive, withdrawal of parasympathetic tone, cardiac rate and rhythm disturbances, and altered baroreceptor reflex function, (d) central neurotransmitter system dysfunction including dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, and (e) behavioral changes including fatigue and physical inactivity. We also focus specifically on experimental investigations with preclinical disease models, conducted to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the link between mood disorders and cardiovascular disease. These include: (a) the chronic mild stress model of depression, (b) a model of congestive heart failure, a model of cardiovascular deconditioning, (d) pharmacological manipulations of body fluid and sodium balance, and (e) pharmacological manipulations of the central serotonergic system. In combination with the extensive literature describing findings from human research, the investigation of mechanisms underlying mood and cardiovascular regulation using animal models will enhance our understanding of the association of depression and cardiovascular disease, and can promote the development of better treatments and interventions for individuals with these co

  3. Animal models of alcohol and drug dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2013-01-01

    Drug addiction has serious health and social consequences. In the last 50 years, a wide range of techniques have been developed to model specific aspects of drug-taking behaviors and have greatly contributed to the understanding of the neurobiological basis of drug abuse and addiction. In the last two decades, new models have been proposed in an attempt to capture the more genuine aspects of addiction-like behaviors in laboratory animals. The goal of the present review is to provide an overview of the preclinical procedures used to study drug abuse and dependence and describe recent progress that has been made in studying more specific aspects of addictive behavior in animals.

  4. Epidemiology, neurobiology and pharmacological interventions related to suicide deaths and suicide attempts in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffer, Ayal; Isometsä, Erkki T; Tondo, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Bipolar disorder is associated with elevated risk of suicide attempts and deaths. Key aims of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide included examining the extant literature on epidemiology, neurobiology and pharmacotherapy related to suicide attempts...... the neurobiology and specific treatment of suicide risk in bipolar disorder....

  5. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...... are faring. From the utilitarian perspective, the use of sentient animals in research that may harm them is an ethical issue, but harm done to animals can be balanced by benefit generated for humans and other animals. The animal rights view, when thoroughgoing, is abolitionist as regards the use of animals...

  6. TITLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha K. M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The new millennium is seen as an epoch of entrepreneurship with entrepreneurs perceiving novel opportunities, organizing resources, undertaking risks to pursue their goals in establishing innovative ventures for scaling new horizons. Women entrepreneurs have the potency to confront numerous challenges, such as creating equity, equilibrium, ensuring sustainable and inclusive socio economic development in divergent economies, by seizing tremendous business opportunities in the contemporary commercial world. Kerala, the southern State of India, is experiencing an economic renovation through technological transformation and, in particular, through the growth of women oriented Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs. The study aims to; identify the growth trends of women’s entrepreneurship in the micro enterprises of Kerala; examine whether women’s entrepreneurial activities significantly vary across the form of women owned enterprises, type of organization and nature of activity; and also explore the prospects and challenges faced by women entrepreneurs through micro entrepreneurial activities. Research methodology involves the application of descriptive quantitative analysis on the secondary data primarily collected from the database of Directorate of Industries and District Industries Centre for a period of 7 years extending from 2007-08 to 2013-14. Findings reveal that MSMEs spawn better income distribution, by operating in heterogeneous areas of the economy with limited capital and creating more employment opportunities, thereby reducing poverty and inequalities. The trend analysis reflects an escalation in the number of enterprises, investments, profits and employment opportunities generated especially through micro enterprises of women. They play a crucial role in the economy in terms of creating self employment and generating employment opportunities for others. A paradigm shift is seen in the role of women’s entrepreneurship in terms of innovation, attitudes, leadership qualities, competitiveness, entrepreneurial skill and absorbing new entrants to the job market, empowering marginalized women.

  7. American animation VS. Japanese Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Stian; Johnsen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is a comparative study between American animation and Japanese animation. We take a look into differences, taking into account the culture, history, production- and the animation techniques employed. The main theoretical questions that are answered in this study are: - How has each side of animation influenced the culture surrounding it, and vice versa? -Why can Japanese animation studios presumably produce more than twice the amount that an American animation studio p...

  8. Avoiding Title V permitting pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laswell, D.L.

    1993-04-01

    Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments requires states to implement new air operating permit programs. States have a great deal of flexibility in developing their permit programs. Industry should work now to ensure that state programs contain the favorable aspects of the federal regulations and do not contain more stringent requirements that are not required under the Clean Air Act. This article outlines areas of the permit program that have the potential to handicap industry`s ability to expand.

  9. Cognitive interventions for addiction medicine: Understanding the underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilverstand, Anna; Parvaz, Muhammad A; Moeller, Scott J; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging provides a tool for investigating the neurobiological mechanisms of cognitive interventions in addiction. The aim of this review was to describe the brain circuits that are recruited during cognitive interventions, examining differences between various treatment modalities while highlighting core mechanisms, in drug addicted individuals. Based on a systematic Medline search we reviewed neuroimaging studies on cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive inhibition of craving, motivational interventions, emotion regulation, mindfulness, and neurofeedback training in addiction. Across intervention modalities, common results included the normalization of aberrant activity in the brain's reward circuitry, and the recruitment and strengthening of the brain's inhibitory control network. Results suggest that different cognitive interventions act, at least partly, through recruitment of a common inhibitory control network as a core mechanism. This implies potential transfer effects between training modalities. Overall, results confirm that chronically hypoactive prefrontal regions implicated in cognitive control in addiction can be normalized through cognitive means. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The chronobiology and neurobiology of winter seasonal affective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes research on the chronobiology and neurobiology of winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a recurrent subtype of depression characterized by a predictable onset in the fall/winter months and spontaneous remission in the spring/summer period. Chronobiological mechanisms related to circadian rhythms, melatonin, and photoperiodism play a significant role in many cases of SAD, and treatment of SAD can be optimized by considering individual differences in key chronobiological markers. Converging evidence also points to a role for the major monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in one or more aspects of SAD. Ultimately, as with other psychiatric illnesses, SAD is best considered as a complex disorder resulting from the interaction of several vulnerability factors acting at different levels, the various genetic mechanisms that underlie them, and the physical environment. Models of SAD that emphasize its potential role in human evolution will also be discussed. PMID:17969868

  11. Effect of Altered Gravity on the Neurobiology of Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    In vertebrates (including humans) altered gravitational environments such as weightlessness can induce malfunction of the inner ears due to a mismatch between canal and statolith afferents. This leads to an illusionary tilt because the inputs from the inner ear are not confirmed by the other sensory organs, which then results in intersensory conflict. Vertebrates in orbit therefore face severe orientation problems. In humans the intersensory conflict may additionally lead to a malaise commonly referred to as space motion sickness (SMS). After the initial days of weightlessness the orientation problems (and SMS) disappear as the brain develops a new interpretation of the available sensory data. The present contribution reviews the neurobiological responses, particularly those of fish, observed under altered gravitational states concerning behavior and neuroplastic reactivities. Investigations employing microgravity (spaceflight, parabolic aircraft flights, clinostat) and hypergravity (laboratory centrifuges as ground-based research tools) provide insights for understanding the basic phenomena, many of which remain only incompletely explained

  12. Neurobiological responses of fish to altered gravity conditions: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf H.; Rahmann, Hinrich

    In vertebrates (including man), altered gravitational environments such as weightlessness can induce malfunctions of the inner ears, based on an irregular dislocation of the inner ear otoliths from the corresponding sensory epithelia. This dislocation leads to an illusionary tilt, since the otolithic inputs are not confirmed by the other sensory organs, which results in an intersensory conflict. Vertebrates in the orbit therefore face severe orientation problems. In humans, the intersensory conflict may additionally lead to a malaise, commonly referred to as space motion sickness (SMS). During the first days at weightlessness, the orientation problems (and SMS) disappear, since the brain develops a new compensatory interpretation of the available sensory data. The present review reports on the neurobiological responses — particularly of fish — observed at altered gravitational states, concerning behaviour and neuroplastic reactivities.

  13. Current understanding of the neurobiology of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriţă, Anca Livia; Gheorman, Victor; Bondari, Dan; Rogoveanu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent worldwide and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Approximately 340 million people worldwide suffer from depression at any given time. Based on estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is responsible for the greatest proportion of burden associated with non-fatal health outcomes and accounts for approximately 12% total years lived with disability. Probably no single risk factor can be completely isolated in major depressive disorder (MDD), as interactions between many sources of vulnerability are the most likely explanation. Buttressing the identification of grief, demoralization, hopelessness and styles of psychological coping of the depressed patient are vital, ongoing scientific developments that flow from an increased understanding of this interplay amongst the immune system, endocrine system and brain. The rapidly accumulating body of neurobiological knowledge has catalyzed fundamental changes in how we conceptualize depressive symptoms and has important implications regarding the treatment and even prevention of depressive symptoms in patients.

  14. Reasoning about Frailty in Neurology: Neurobiological Correlates and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevelli, M; Troili, F; Bruno, G

    2014-01-01

    To date, the frailty syndrome has surprisingly attracted limited attention in the field of neurology and neuroscience. Nevertheless, several concepts closely related to frailty, such as vulnerability, susceptibility, and homeostatic reserves, have been increasingly investigated and documented at level of neuronal cells, brain networks, and functions. Similarly, several aspects commonly assessed in the neurological practice, including cognitive functioning and emotional/affective status, clearly appear to be major determinants of the individual's vulnerability and resiliency to stressors. Therefore, they should be carefully considered in the clinical approach to frail subjects. Moreover, dysfunctions of these domains, if timely detected, may be suitable to be targeted by interventions providing beneficial effects to the overall health status of the individual. In the present article, we discuss the neurobiological processes potentially contributing to frailty. Moreover, we reason about the clinical manifestations allowing the prompt and easy recognition of frail persons in the neurological practice.

  15. Unraveling the Neurobiology of Sleep and Sleep Disorders Using Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, L; Moscato, E H; Kayser, M S

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disorders in humans are increasingly appreciated to be not only widespread but also detrimental to multiple facets of physical and mental health. Recent work has begun to shed light on the mechanistic basis of sleep disorders like insomnia, restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy, and a host of others, but a more detailed genetic and molecular understanding of how sleep goes awry is lacking. Over the past 15 years, studies in Drosophila have yielded new insights into basic questions regarding sleep function and regulation. More recently, powerful genetic approaches in the fly have been applied toward studying primary human sleep disorders and other disease states associated with dysregulated sleep. In this review, we discuss the contribution of Drosophila to the landscape of sleep biology, examining not only fundamental advances in sleep neurobiology but also how flies have begun to inform pathological sleep states in humans. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Opiate addiction and cocaine addiction: underlying molecular neurobiology and genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Levran, Orna; Reed, Brian; Schlussman, Stefan D.; Zhou, Yan; Butelman, Eduardo R.

    2012-01-01

    Addictive diseases, including addiction to heroin, prescription opioids, or cocaine, pose massive personal and public health costs. Addictions are chronic relapsing diseases of the brain caused by drug-induced direct effects and persisting neuroadaptations at the epigenetic, mRNA, neuropeptide, neurotransmitter, or protein levels. These neuroadaptations, which can be specific to drug type, and their resultant behaviors are modified by various internal and external environmental factors, including stress responsivity, addict mindset, and social setting. Specific gene variants, including variants encoding pharmacological target proteins or genes mediating neuroadaptations, also modify vulnerability at particular stages of addiction. Greater understanding of these interacting factors through laboratory-based and translational studies have the potential to optimize early interventions for the therapy of chronic addictive diseases and to reduce the burden of relapse. Here, we review the molecular neurobiology and genetics of opiate addiction, including heroin and prescription opioids, and cocaine addiction. PMID:23023708

  17. [Neurological diseases and suicide: from neurobiology to hopelessness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, A; Baertschi, M; Weber, K; Canuto, A

    2015-02-11

    Neurologic diseases expose at a high risk of suicidal behaviors and they constitute a privileged domain for exploring the heterogeneity of underlying mechanisms. They are in fact characterized by strictly biological injuries that may be involved in cerebral systems considered at the basis of neurobiological vulnerability for suicide. At the same time, they oblige a numberof existential topics to emerge, as the hopelessness in respect of several particularly severe conditions without an etiologic treatment. A clinical approach reserving an unconditional listening can prevent a suicidal attempt. Furthermore, it can illustrate the role of the liaison's psychiatrist, who tries to transform a hopelessness situation into a patient's personal questioning and try to be present when therapeutic action is not longer possible.

  18. Neurobiology of Schemas and Schema-Mediated Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Asaf; Marlatte, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    Schemas are superordinate knowledge structures that reflect abstracted commonalities across multiple experiences, exerting powerful influences over how events are perceived, interpreted, and remembered. Activated schema templates modulate early perceptual processing, as they get populated with specific informational instances (schema instantiation). Instantiated schemas, in turn, can enhance or distort mnemonic processing from the outset (at encoding), impact offline memory transformation and accelerate neocortical integration. Recent studies demonstrate distinctive neurobiological processes underlying schema-related learning. Interactions between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), hippocampus, angular gyrus (AG), and unimodal associative cortices support context-relevant schema instantiation and schema mnemonic effects. The vmPFC and hippocampus may compete (as suggested by some models) or synchronize (as suggested by others) to optimize schema-related learning depending on the specific operationalization of schema memory. This highlights the need for more precise definitions of memory schemas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Consciousness, Neurobiology and Quantum Mechanics: The Case for a Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameroff, Stuart

    Consciousness is generally considered to emerge from synaptic computation among brain neurons, but this approach cannot account for its critical features. The Penrose-Hameroff "Orch OR" model suggests that consciousness is a sequence of quantum computations in microtubules within brain neurons, shielded from decoherence to reach threshold for objective reduction (OR), the Penrose quantum gravity solution to the measurement problem. The quantum computations are "orchestrated" by neuronal/synaptic inputs (hence "Orch OR"), and extend throughout cortex by tunneling through gap junctions. Each Orch OR is proposed as a conscious event, akin to Whitehead's philosophical "occasion of experience", occurring in concert with brain electrophysiology. This chapter discusses the need for such an approach and its neurobiological requirements.

  20. Integrating neuroimmune systems in the neurobiology of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohleb, Eric S; Franklin, Tina; Iwata, Masaaki; Duman, Ronald S

    2016-08-01

    Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that immune dysregulation, specifically of inflammatory processes, is associated with symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD). In particular, increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and concomitant activation of brain-resident microglia can lead to depressive behavioural symptoms. Repeated exposure to psychological stress has a profound impact on peripheral immune responses and perturbs the function of brain microglia, which may contribute to neurobiological changes underlying MDD. Here, we review these findings and discuss ongoing studies examining neuroimmune mechanisms that influence neuronal activity as well as synaptic plasticity. Interventions targeting immune-related cellular and molecular pathways may benefit subsets of MDD patients with immune dysregulation.

  1. Advances in the neurobiological bases for food 'liking' versus 'wanting'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, D C; Berridge, K C

    2014-09-01

    The neural basis of food sensory pleasure has become an increasingly studied topic in neuroscience and psychology. Progress has been aided by the discovery of localized brain subregions called hedonic hotspots in the early 2000s, which are able to causally amplify positive affective reactions to palatable tastes ('liking') in response to particular neurochemical or neurobiological stimulations. Those hedonic mechanisms are at least partly distinct from larger mesocorticolimbic circuitry that generates the incentive motivation to eat ('wanting'). In this review, we aim to describe findings on these brain hedonic hotspots, especially in the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum, and discuss their role in generating food pleasure and appetite. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Speech perception at the interface of neurobiology and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppel, David; Idsardi, William J; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2008-03-12

    Speech perception consists of a set of computations that take continuously varying acoustic waveforms as input and generate discrete representations that make contact with the lexical representations stored in long-term memory as output. Because the perceptual objects that are recognized by the speech perception enter into subsequent linguistic computation, the format that is used for lexical representation and processing fundamentally constrains the speech perceptual processes. Consequently, theories of speech perception must, at some level, be tightly linked to theories of lexical representation. Minimally, speech perception must yield representations that smoothly and rapidly interface with stored lexical items. Adopting the perspective of Marr, we argue and provide neurobiological and psychophysical evidence for the following research programme. First, at the implementational level, speech perception is a multi-time resolution process, with perceptual analyses occurring concurrently on at least two time scales (approx. 20-80 ms, approx. 150-300 ms), commensurate with (sub)segmental and syllabic analyses, respectively. Second, at the algorithmic level, we suggest that perception proceeds on the basis of internal forward models, or uses an 'analysis-by-synthesis' approach. Third, at the computational level (in the sense of Marr), the theory of lexical representation that we adopt is principally informed by phonological research and assumes that words are represented in the mental lexicon in terms of sequences of discrete segments composed of distinctive features. One important goal of the research programme is to develop linking hypotheses between putative neurobiological primitives (e.g. temporal primitives) and those primitives derived from linguistic inquiry, to arrive ultimately at a biologically sensible and theoretically satisfying model of representation and computation in speech.

  3. [The social brain: neurobiological bases of clinical interest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-González, Luis C

    2015-11-16

    Human social capacities are developmentally late and unique. They allow for a specialisation that enhances the availability of resources and facilitates reproduction. Our social complexity rests on specific circuits and mechanisms, which are analysed here. The following are put into operation for those purposes: knowledge of the other by means of empathy, specific mechanisms that endow us with the capacity to detect defrauders, genetic and biochemical factors, and the autonomic nervous system. Empathy is the basic mechanism in sociability. It has different levels of complexity (emotional, cognitive, attribution), with specific anatomical differentiation. Social matters are linked to emotional ones, and this in turn to the homeostatic aspects. Hence, physical and social pain share an anatomical matrix and therapies. We are social beings of a selfish biological nature, which we adjust thanks to a special capacity to detect defrauders, which is dominant over those involving planning or abstraction. Oxytocin is the essential prosocial neurochemical mediator. Serotonin and the enzyme MAO are considered as having an antisocial capacity, which is dependent on the interaction with adverse environments. Finally, the vagal system, which is more recent phylogenetically speaking and myelinated, that of the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve, is a requirement for warm and leisurely social interaction. The neurobiology of social matters makes it possible to recognise disorders affecting this behaviour in structural injuries (vascular, of the white matter, dementias, etc.), neurodevelopmental disorders (autism), psychiatric illnesses (schizophrenia) or personality disorders. There are a number of promising therapeutic interventions (transcranial magnetic stimulation, drugs). The addition of cultural and environmental factors to the neurobiological ones introduces a greater amount of ecological complexity, but without lessening the validity of what it outlined.

  4. Neurobiology of Everyday Communication: What Have We Learned From Music?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Nina; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2016-06-09

    Sound is an invisible but powerful force that is central to everyday life. Studies in the neurobiology of everyday communication seek to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying sound processing, their stability, their plasticity, and their links to language abilities and disabilities. This sound processing lies at the nexus of cognitive, sensorimotor, and reward networks. Music provides a powerful experimental model to understand these biological foundations of communication, especially with regard to auditory learning. We review studies of music training that employ a biological approach to reveal the integrity of sound processing in the brain, the bearing these mechanisms have on everyday communication, and how these processes are shaped by experience. Together, these experiments illustrate that music works in synergistic partnerships with language skills and the ability to make sense of speech in complex, everyday listening environments. The active, repeated engagement with sound demanded by music making augments the neural processing of speech, eventually cascading to listening and language. This generalization from music to everyday communications illustrates both that these auditory brain mechanisms have a profound potential for plasticity and that sound processing is biologically intertwined with listening and language skills. A new wave of studies has pushed neuroscience beyond the traditional laboratory by revealing the effects of community music training in underserved populations. These community-based studies reinforce laboratory work highlight how the auditory system achieves a remarkable balance between stability and flexibility in processing speech. Moreover, these community studies have the potential to inform health care, education, and social policy by lending a neurobiological perspective to their efficacy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Characteristic neurobiological patterns differentiate paternal responsiveness in two Peromyscus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Kelly G; Franssen, Catherine L; Bardi, Massimo; Hampton, Joseph E; Hainley, Leslie; Karsner, Stephanie; Tu, Eddie B; Hyer, Molly M; Crockett, Ashly; Baranova, Anya; Ferguson, Tajh; Ferguson, Tenaj; Kinsley, Craig H

    2011-01-01

    Rodent paternal models provide unique opportunities to investigate the emergence of affiliative social behavior in mammals. Using biparental and uniparental Peromyscus species (californicus and maniculatus, respectively) we assessed paternal responsiveness by exposing males to biological offspring, unrelated conspecific pups, or familiar brothers following a 24-hour separation. The putative paternal circuit we investigated included brain areas involved in fear/anxiety [cingulate cortex (Cg), medial amygdala (MeA), paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), and lateral septum (LS)], parental motivation [medial preoptic area (MPOA)], learning/behavioral plasticity (hippocampus), olfaction [pyriform cortex (PC)], and social rewards (nucleus accumbens). Paternal experience in californicus males reduced fos immunoreactivity (ir) in several fear/anxiety areas; additionally, all californicus groups exhibited decreased fos-ir in the PC. Enhanced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT)-ir cell bodies and fibers, as well as increased neuronal restructuring in the hippocampus, were also observed in californicus mice. Multidimensional scaling analyses revealed distinct brain activation profiles differentiating californicus biological fathers, pup-exposed virgins, and pup-naïve virgins. Specifically, associations among MPOA fos, CA1 fos, dentate gyrus GFAP, CA2 nestin-, and PVN OT-ir characterized biological fathers; LS fos-, Cg fos-, and AVP-ir characterized pup-exposed virgins, and PC-, PVN-, and MeA fos-ir characterized pup-naïve virgins. Thus, whereas fear/anxiety areas characterized pup-naïve males, neurobiological factors involved in more diverse functions such as learning, motivation, and nurturing responses characterized fatherhood in biparental californicus mice. Less distinct paternal-dependent activation patterns were observed in uniparental maniculatus mice. These data suggest that dual neurobiological circuits, leading to the inhibition of social

  6. Imaging the neurobiological substrate of atypical depression by SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Salmaso, Dario [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Nardo, Davide [University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Psychology, Rome (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine; Larsson, Stig A. [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jacobsson, Hans [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gardner, Ann [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    Neurobiological abnormalities underlying atypical depression have previously been suggested. The purpose of this study was to explore differences at functional brain imaging between depressed patients with and without atypical features and healthy controls. Twenty-three out-patients with chronic depressive disorder recruited from a service for patients with audiological symptoms were investigated. Eleven fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression (mood reactivity and at least two of the following: weight gain, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis and interpersonal rejection sensitivity). Twenty-three healthy subjects served as controls. Voxel-based analysis was applied to explore differences in {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO uptake between groups. Patients in the atypical group had a higher prevalence of bilateral hearing impairment and higher depression and somatic distress ratings at the time of SPECT. Significantly higher tracer uptake was found bilaterally in the atypical group as compared with the non-atypicals in the sensorimotor (Brodmann areas, BA1-3) and premotor cortex in the superior frontal gyri (BA6), in the middle frontal cortex (BA8), in the parietal associative cortex (BA5, BA7) and in the inferior parietal lobule (BA40). Significantly lower tracer distribution was found in the right hemisphere in the non-atypicals compared with the controls in BA6, BA8, BA44, BA45 and BA46 in the frontal cortex, in the orbito-frontal cortex (BA11, BA47), in the postcentral parietal cortex (BA2) and in the multimodal association parietal cortex (BA40). The differences found between atypical and non-atypical depressed patients suggest different neurobiological substrates in these patient groups. The putative links with the clinical features of atypical depression are discussed. These findings encourage the use of functional neuroimaging in psychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  7. Neurobiological correlates of EMDR monitoring - an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Monaco, Leonardo; Lauretti, Giada; Russo, Rita; Niolu, Cinzia; Ammaniti, Massimo; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0) and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1). Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS) of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful EMDR therapy, thus supporting the evidence of distinct

  8. Neurobiological correlates of EMDR monitoring - an EEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pagani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. METHODS: Electroencephalography (EEG was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0 and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1. Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. RESULTS: During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. CONCLUSIONS: The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful

  9. Neurobiological Correlates of EMDR Monitoring – An EEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Monaco, Leonardo; Lauretti, Giada; Russo, Rita; Niolu, Cinzia; Ammaniti, Massimo; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. Methods Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0) and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1). Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. Results During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS) of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. Conclusions The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful EMDR therapy, thus

  10. Adolescent Alcohol Exposure Persistently Impacts Adult Neurobiology and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetreno, Ryan P.; Broadwater, Margaret A.; Robinson, Donita L.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period when physical and cognitive abilities are optimized, when social skills are consolidated, and when sexuality, adolescent behaviors, and frontal cortical functions mature to adult levels. Adolescents also have unique responses to alcohol compared with adults, being less sensitive to ethanol sedative–motor responses that most likely contribute to binge drinking and blackouts. Population studies find that an early age of drinking onset correlates with increased lifetime risks for the development of alcohol dependence, violence, and injuries. Brain synapses, myelination, and neural circuits mature in adolescence to adult levels in parallel with increased reflection on the consequence of actions and reduced impulsivity and thrill seeking. Alcohol binge drinking could alter human development, but variations in genetics, peer groups, family structure, early life experiences, and the emergence of psychopathology in humans confound studies. As adolescence is common to mammalian species, preclinical models of binge drinking provide insight into the direct impact of alcohol on adolescent development. This review relates human findings to basic science studies, particularly the preclinical studies of the Neurobiology of Adolescent Drinking in Adulthood (NADIA) Consortium. These studies focus on persistent adult changes in neurobiology and behavior following adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE), a model of underage drinking. NADIA studies and others find that AIE results in the following: increases in adult alcohol drinking, disinhibition, and social anxiety; altered adult synapses, cognition, and sleep; reduced adult neurogenesis, cholinergic, and serotonergic neurons; and increased neuroimmune gene expression and epigenetic modifiers of gene expression. Many of these effects are specific to adolescents and not found in parallel adult studies. AIE can cause a persistence of adolescent-like synaptic physiology, behavior, and sensitivity

  11. Neuromorphic implementations of neurobiological learning algorithms for spiking neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Florian; Röhrbein, Florian; Knoll, Alois

    2015-12-01

    The application of biologically inspired methods in design and control has a long tradition in robotics. Unlike previous approaches in this direction, the emerging field of neurorobotics not only mimics biological mechanisms at a relatively high level of abstraction but employs highly realistic simulations of actual biological nervous systems. Even today, carrying out these simulations efficiently at appropriate timescales is challenging. Neuromorphic chip designs specially tailored to this task therefore offer an interesting perspective for neurorobotics. Unlike Von Neumann CPUs, these chips cannot be simply programmed with a standard programming language. Like real brains, their functionality is determined by the structure of neural connectivity and synaptic efficacies. Enabling higher cognitive functions for neurorobotics consequently requires the application of neurobiological learning algorithms to adjust synaptic weights in a biologically plausible way. In this paper, we therefore investigate how to program neuromorphic chips by means of learning. First, we provide an overview over selected neuromorphic chip designs and analyze them in terms of neural computation, communication systems and software infrastructure. On the theoretical side, we review neurobiological learning techniques. Based on this overview, we then examine on-die implementations of these learning algorithms on the considered neuromorphic chips. A final discussion puts the findings of this work into context and highlights how neuromorphic hardware can potentially advance the field of autonomous robot systems. The paper thus gives an in-depth overview of neuromorphic implementations of basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity which are required to realize advanced cognitive capabilities with spiking neural networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phenomenology and neurobiology of self disorder in schizophrenia: Primary factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Juan P; Sass, Louis A

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous syndrome, varying between persons and over course of illness. In this and a companion article, we argue that comprehension of this condition or set of conditions may require combining a phenomenological perspective emphasizing disorders of basic-self experience ("ipseity disturbance") with a multidimensional appreciation of possible neurobiological correlates--both primary and secondary. Previous attempts to link phenomenology and neurobiology generally focus on a single neurocognitive factor. We consider diverse aspects of schizophrenia in light of a diverse, albeit interacting, set of neurocognitive abnormalities, examining both synchronic (structural) interdependence and diachronic (temporal) succession. In this article we focus on the primary or foundational role of early perceptual and motoric disturbances that affect perceptual organization and especially intermodal or multisensory perceptual integration (“perceptual dys-integration”). These disturbances are discussed in terms of their implications for three interconnected aspects of selfhood in schizophrenia, primary forms of: disrupted "hold" or "grip" on the world, hyperreflexivity, diminished self-presence (self-affection). Disturbances of organization or integration imply forms of perceptual incoherence or diminished cognitive coordination. The effect is to disrupt one's ability to apprehend the world in holistic, vital, or contextually grounded fashion, or to fully identify with or experience the unity of one's own body or thinking--thereby generating an early and profound (albeit often subtle) disruption or diminishment of basic or core self and of the sense of existing in a coherent world. We discuss interrelationships or possible complementarities between these three aspects, and consider their relevance for a neurodevelopmental account of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 48 CFR 1832.1009 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Title. 1832.1009 Section... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Performance-Based Payments 1832.1009 Title. In accordance with 42 U.S.C. 2465d, NASA shall not take title to launch vehicles under contracts for launch services...

  14. 12 CFR 543.1 - Corporate title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate title. 543.1 Section 543.1 Banks and...-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION § 543.1 Corporate title. (a) General. A Federal savings association shall not adopt a title that misrepresents the nature of the institution or the services it offers. (b...

  15. 48 CFR 1371.111 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Title. 1371.111 Section... REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.111 Title. Insert clause 1352.271-80, Title, in all solicitations and contracts for ship repair. ...

  16. 48 CFR 1252.217-77 - Title.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Title. 1252.217-77 Section... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1252.217-77 Title. As prescribed at (TAR) 48 CFR 1217.7001(b) and (c), insert the following clause: Title (OCT 1994) (a) Unless otherwise...

  17. 48 CFR 32.1009 - Title.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Title. 32.1009 Section 32... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Performance-Based Payments 32.1009 Title. (a) Since the clause at 52.232-32, Performance-Based Payments, gives the Government title to the property described in paragraph (f) of the...

  18. 7 CFR 2812.6 - Title.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Title. 2812.6 Section 2812.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF OPERATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...) § 2812.6 Title. Title to excess personal property/equipment donated under this Part will automatically...

  19. 45 CFR 1309.20 - Title.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Title. 1309.20 Section 1309.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... FACILITIES PURCHASE, MAJOR RENOVATION AND CONSTRUCTION Protection of Federal Interest § 1309.20 Title. Title...

  20. Animal models of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, CA; Watson, DJG; Fone, KCF

    2011-01-01

    Developing reliable, predictive animal models for complex psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, is essential to increase our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for the development of novel drugs with improved therapeutic efficacy. All available animal models of schizophrenia fit into four different induction categories: developmental, drug-induced, lesion or genetic manipulation, and the best characterized examples of each type are reviewed herein. Most rodent models have behavioural phenotype changes that resemble ‘positive-like’ symptoms of schizophrenia, probably reflecting altered mesolimbic dopamine function, but fewer models also show altered social interaction, and learning and memory impairment, analogous to negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia respectively. The negative and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia are resistant to treatment with current antipsychotics, even after remission of the psychosis, which limits their therapeutic efficacy. The MATRICS initiative developed a consensus on the core cognitive deficits of schizophrenic patients, and recommended a standardized test battery to evaluate them. More recently, work has begun to identify specific rodent behavioural tasks with translational relevance to specific cognitive domains affected in schizophrenia, and where available this review focuses on reporting the effect of current and potential antipsychotics on these tasks. The review also highlights the need to develop more comprehensive animal models that more adequately replicate deficits in negative and cognitive symptoms. Increasing information on the neurochemical and structural CNS changes accompanying each model will also help assess treatments that prevent the development of schizophrenia rather than treating the symptoms, another pivotal change required to enable new more effective therapeutic strategies to be developed. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on

  1. 42 CFR 476.86 - Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions. 476.86 Section 476.86 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...) Qio Review Functions § 476.86 Correlation of Title XI functions with Title XVIII functions. (a...

  2. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingshou; Xia, Yang; Kendrick, Keith; Liu, Xiuxiu; Wang, Maosen; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenal finding that listening to Mozart K.448 enhances performance on spatial tasks has motivated a continuous surge in promoting music education over the past two decades. But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects. We show that while the Mozart K.448 has positive cognitive effects, the retrograde version has a negative effect on rats’ performance in the Morris water maze test and on human subjects’ performance in the paper folding and cutting test and the pencil-and-paper maze test. Such findings are further confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemical analyses in rats on the neurogenesis and protein levels of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB. Furthermore, when the rhythm and pitch of the normal and retrograde Mozart music are manipulated independently, the learning performance of the rats in the Morris water maze test indicated that rhythm is a crucial element in producing the behavioural effects. These findings suggest that the nature of Mozart effect is the Mozart rhythm effect, and indicate that different music may have quite different to opposite effects. Further study on rhythm effect may provide clues to understand the common basis over animals from rats to humans. PMID:26795072

  3. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingshou; Xia, Yang; Kendrick, Keith; Liu, Xiuxiu; Wang, Maosen; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-21

    The phenomenal finding that listening to Mozart K.448 enhances performance on spatial tasks has motivated a continuous surge in promoting music education over the past two decades. But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects. We show that while the Mozart K.448 has positive cognitive effects, the retrograde version has a negative effect on rats' performance in the Morris water maze test and on human subjects' performance in the paper folding and cutting test and the pencil-and-paper maze test. Such findings are further confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemical analyses in rats on the neurogenesis and protein levels of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB. Furthermore, when the rhythm and pitch of the normal and retrograde Mozart music are manipulated independently, the learning performance of the rats in the Morris water maze test indicated that rhythm is a crucial element in producing the behavioural effects. These findings suggest that the nature of Mozart effect is the Mozart rhythm effect, and indicate that different music may have quite different to opposite effects. Further study on rhythm effect may provide clues to understand the common basis over animals from rats to humans.

  4. Acid-base physiology, neurobiology and behaviour in relation to CO2-induced ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Hamilton, Trevor J

    2017-06-15

    Experimental exposure to ocean and freshwater acidification affects the behaviour of multiple aquatic organisms in laboratory tests. One proposed cause involves an imbalance in plasma chloride and bicarbonate ion concentrations as a result of acid-base regulation, causing the reversal of ionic fluxes through GABA A receptors, which leads to altered neuronal function. This model is exclusively based on differential effects of the GABA A receptor antagonist gabazine on control animals and those exposed to elevated CO 2 However, direct measurements of actual chloride and bicarbonate concentrations in neurons and their extracellular fluids and of GABA A receptor properties in aquatic organisms are largely lacking. Similarly, very little is known about potential compensatory mechanisms, and about alternative mechanisms that might lead to ocean acidification-induced behavioural changes. This article reviews the current knowledge on acid-base physiology, neurobiology, pharmacology and behaviour in relation to marine CO 2 -induced acidification, and identifies important topics for future research that will help us to understand the potential effects of predicted levels of aquatic acidification on organisms. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. The reinstatement model of drug relapse: recent neurobiological findings, emerging research topics, and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, Jennifer M; Marchant, Nathan J; Calu, Donna J; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-10-01

    Results from many clinical studies suggest that drug relapse and craving are often provoked by acute exposure to the self-administered drug or related drugs, drug-associated cues or contexts, or certain stressors. During the last two decades, this clinical scenario has been studied in laboratory animals by using the reinstatement model. In this model, reinstatement of drug seeking by drug priming, drug cues or contexts, or certain stressors is assessed following drug self-administration training and subsequent extinction of the drug-reinforced responding. In this review, we first summarize recent (2009-present) neurobiological findings from studies using the reinstatement model. We then discuss emerging research topics, including the impact of interfering with putative reconsolidation processes on cue- and context-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, and similarities and differences in mechanisms of reinstatement across drug classes. We conclude by discussing results from recent human studies that were inspired by results from rat studies using the reinstatement model. Main conclusions from the studies reviewed highlight: (1) the ventral subiculum and lateral hypothalamus as emerging brain areas important for reinstatement of drug seeking, (2) the existence of differences in brain mechanisms controlling reinstatement of drug seeking across drug classes, (3) the utility of the reinstatement model for assessing the effect of reconsolidation-related manipulations on cue-induced drug seeking, and (4) the encouraging pharmacological concordance between results from rat studies using the reinstatement model and human laboratory studies on cue- and stress-induced drug craving.

  6. Defeating the fear: new insights into the neurobiology of stress susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vaishnav

    2014-11-01

    The psychopathological impact of emotional stress on a specific individual varies markedly: while most escape the development of post-traumatic stress disorder and/or major depression, a select group of individuals demonstrate a vulnerability to succumb to these conditions. The past decade has witnessed an explosion in animal research into the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that govern both vulnerability and resilience to such stressors. In the May 2014 issue, Chou and colleagues employ the mouse social defeat model of chronic stress to demonstrate that defeated susceptible mice display an exaggerated conditioned fear response associated with more pronounced autonomic changes. These physiological alterations were found to be mediated via local increases in the levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) within the basolateral amygdala and could be inhibited by the systemic administration of a beta adrenergic antagonist. This mini-review critically examines this manuscript's new mechanistic insights in light of previous results employing similar approaches. The strengths and limitations of the social defeat model, as well as the relevance of these findings to neurologic illness are discussed briefly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurobiology of panic and pH chemosensation in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmie, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Panic disorder is a common and disabling illness for which treatments are too frequently ineffective. Greater knowledge of the underlying biology could aid the discovery of better therapies. Although panic attacks occur unpredictably, the ability to provoke them in the laboratory with challenge protocols provides an opportunity for crucial insight into the neurobiology of panic. Two of the most well-studied panic provocation challenges are CO2 inhalation and lactate infusion. Although it remains unclear how these challenges provoke panic animal models of CO2 and lactate action are beginning to emerge, and offer unprecedented opportunities to probe the molecules and circuits underlying panic attacks. Both CO2 and lactate alter pH balance and may generate acidosis that can influence neuron function through a growing list of pH-sensitive receptors. These observations suggest that a key to better understanding of panic disorder may lie in more knowledge of brain pH regulation and pH-sensitive receptors. PMID:22275852

  8. The byzantine title of Constantine Bodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatina Predrag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the use of the title exousiastes on the newly discovered seal of Constantine Bodin. It analyses the meaning and use of this title in the sources of a diplomatic character of the 10th century, as well as its use in the 11th century sources. The question is posed why this title was used on Bodin’s seal instead of the title archon, which had been used for former Serbian rulers, as well as whether this phenomenon had any connection to the fact that Serbian rulers, beginning at the end of the rule of Bodin’s father Michael, used the title of king.

  9. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  10. Farm Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Kit Connect With Us New & Noteworthy Farm Animals Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overview Diseases ... Tips for staying healthy at petting zoos and animal exhibits Do not eat food or drink beverages ...

  11. Neurobiologia das emoções Neurobiology of the emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderson Esperidião-Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A "natureza" das emoções é um dos temas arcaicos do pensamento ocidental, sendo tematizada em diferentes manifestações da cultura como a arte, a religião, a filosofia e a ciência, desde tempos imemoriais. Nos últimos anos, o avanço das neurociências possibilitou a construção de hipóteses para a explicação das emoções, especialmente a partir dos estudos envolvendo o sistema límbico. OBJETIVOS: Apresentar uma discussão atualizada acerca da neurobiologia dos processos relativos às emoções, demarcando suas conexões com o controle neurovegetativo. MÉTODOS: Revisão da literatura e reflexão crítica dos textos obtidos. RESULTADOS: Apresentação das principais estruturas neurais relativas às emoções, suas vias e circuitos de maior relevância, os neurotransmissores implicados, seguindo-se uma discussão sobre as principais emoções. CONCLUSÕES: Espera-se que o presente manuscrito possa contribuir à difusão de idéias sobre o sistema das emoções, as quais poderão motivar futuros estudos capazes de elucidar pontos ainda em aberto.BACKGROUND: The "nature" of emotions is one of the archaic subjects of the western thought, being the theme choice in diverse manifestations of culture - as in art, religion, philosophy and science - from time immemorial. In recent years the advances in Neurosciences have made it possible to build hypotheses to explain emotions, a possibility derived particularly from the studies involving the limbic system. OBJECTIVES: To present an updated discussion about the neurobiology of the processes relating to emotions and their connections with neurovegetative control. METHODS: Review of the literature on the subject. RESULTS: An updated account of the main neural structures related with emotions, the pathways and circuits of greater relevance as well as the regarding neurotransmitters. The neurobiological aspects of emotions are also discussed. DISCUSSION: It is expected that the present

  12. The neurobiology of offensive aggression: Revealing a modular view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, S F; Olivier, B; Veening, J; Koolhaas, J M

    2015-07-01

    Experimental studies aimed at understanding the neurobiology of aggression started in the early 20th century, and by employing increasingly sophisticated tools of functional neuroanatomy (i.e., from electric/chemical lesion and stimulation techniques to neurochemical mapping and manipulations) have provided the important framework for the functional brain circuit organization of aggressive behaviors. Recently, newly emerging technologies for mapping,measuring and manipulating neural circuitry at the level of molecular and genetically defined neuronal subtypes promise to further delineate the precise neural microcircuits mediating the initiation and termination of aggressive behavior, and characterize its dynamic neuromolecular functioning. This paper will review some of the behavioral, neuroanatomical and neurochemical evidence in support of a modular view of the neurobiology of offensive aggressive behavior. Although aggressive behavior likely arises from a specific concerted activity within a distributed neural network across multiple brain regions, emerging opto- and pharmacogenetic neuronal manipulation studies make it clear that manipulation of molecularly-defined neurons within a single node of this global interconnected network seems to be both necessary and sufficient to evoke aggressive attacks. However, the evidence so far also indicates that in addition to behavior-specific neurons there are neuronal systems that should be considered as more general behavioral control modules. The answer to the question of behavioral specificity of brain structures at the level of individual neurons requires a change of the traditional experimental setup. Studies using c-fos expression mapping usually compare the activation patterns induced by for example aggression with a home cage control. However, to reveal the behavioral specificity of this neuronal activation pattern, a comparison with other social and non-social related behaviors such as mating, defensive burying

  13. Animal Deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, C.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written on environmental politics on the one hand, and animal ethics and welfare on the other, animal politics, as the interface of the two, is underexamined. There are key political implications in the increase of animal protection laws, the rights of nature, and political

  14. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...... pathology, to biomarkers in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation, to drug testing and targeted medicine....

  15. Spatial learning impairment induced by chronic stress is related to individual differences in novelty reactivity: search for neurobiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touyarot, K; Venero, C; Sandi, C

    2004-02-01

    Although chronic stress has been reported to induce deleterious effects on hippocampal structure and function, the possible existence of individual differences in the vulnerability to develop stress-induced cognitive alterations was hypothesized. This study was designed to evaluate (i) whether individual variability in behavioural reactivity to novelty could be related to a differential vulnerability to show spatial learning deficits after chronic stress in young adult rats, and (ii) to what extent, could individual differences in stress-induced cognitive alterations be related to alterations in specific neurobiological substrates. Four month-old Wistar male rats were classified according to their locomotor reactivity to a novel environment, as either low (LR) or highly (HR) reactive, and then either submitted to psychosocial stress for 21-days (consisting of the daily cohabitation of each young adult rat with a new middle-aged rat) or left undisturbed. The results showed that psychosocial stress induced a marked deficit in spatial learning in the water maze in HR, but not in LR, rats. Then, a second experiment investigated the possible differential expression of corticosteroid receptors (MR and GR) and cell adhesion molecules (NCAM and L1) in the hippocampus of HR and LR rats, both under basal conditions and after exposure to chronic social stress. Although chronic stress induced a reduction on the hippocampal expression of MRs and the NCAM-140 isoform, the levels of these molecules did not differ between stressed rats with and without spatial learning impairments; i.e., between HR- and LR-stressed rats, respectively. Nevertheless, it should be noted that the reduction of the hippocampal expression of NCAM-140 induced by psychosocial stress was particularly marked in HR stressed rats. However, the expression of GRs, NCAM-120 and NCAM-180 isoforms, and L1, was not affected by stress, regardless of the reactivity of the animals. Therefore, although we failed to find

  16. 77 FR 14272 - New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds CFR Correction In Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 500 to 599, revised as of April 1, 2011, on...

  17. 75 FR 15610 - New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds CFR Correction In Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 500 to 599, revised as of April 1, 2009, in...

  18. The neurobiology of social deficits in female patients with borderline personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomann, Anne Cathrine; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Bo, Sune

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Social deficits and emotional dysregulation have been suggested as explanations for the relational difficulties experienced by patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) is a possible neurobiological underpinning of these adversities...

  19. Love is more than just a kiss : A neurobiological perspective on love and affection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A.; van Buel, E. M.; ter Horst, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Love, attachment, and truth of human monogamy have become important research themes in neuroscience. After the introduction of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET), neuroscientists have demonstrated increased interest in the neurobiology and

  20. Mozart, Mozart Rhythm and Retrograde Mozart Effects: Evidences from Behaviours and Neurobiology Bases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Yingshou; Xia, Yang; Kendrick, Keith; Liu, Xiuxiu; Wang, Maosen; Wu, Dan; Yang, Hua; Jing, Wei; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-01-01

    .... But there have been inconsistent reports in previous studies of the Mozart effect. Here conducted was a systematic study, with Mozart and retrograde Mozart music, Mozart music rhythm and pitch, behaviours and neurobiology tests, rats and humans subjects...

  1. Forensic practitioners’ expectations and moral views regarding neurobiological interventions in offenders with mental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Specker (Jona); F. Focquaert (Farah); S. Sterckx (Sigrid); M.H.N. Schermer (Maartje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractNeurobiological and behavioural genetic research gives rise to speculations about potential biomedical interventions to prevent, contain, or treat violent and antisocial behaviour. These developments have stirred considerable ethical debate on the prospects, threats, and limitations of

  2. Neuroimaging assessment of early and late neurobiological sequelae of traumatic brain injury: implications for CTE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sundman, Mark; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Morey, Rajendra A

    2015-01-01

    .... Recent evidence indicates that the resultant chronic neurobiological sequelae following head trauma may, at least in part, contribute to a pathologically distinct disease known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE...

  3. Rational approaches to the neurobiologic study of youth at risk for bipolar disorder and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublette, M Elizabeth; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, J John

    2006-10-01

    The aims of this paper are to provide an overview of neuroimaging findings specific to bipolar disorder and suicide, and to consider rational approaches to the design of future in vivo studies in youth at risk. Neuroimaging and related neurobiological literature pertaining to bipolar disorder and suicide in adult and pediatric samples was reviewed in a non-quantitative manner. Specific structural and functional brain findings in bipolar disorder are described, where possible in the context of relevant current neurobiological theories of etiology. Diagnostic and prognostic implications are discussed. The simultaneous use of complementary neurobiological approaches may be a powerful way of identifying and validating factors reliably associated with bipolar disorder and suicide. A profile of neurobiological markers with which to screen for bipolar disorder and suicide risk may provide for earlier and more accurate diagnosis, perhaps even in the pre- or subsyndromal stages in high-risk youth.

  4. Neurobiology of value integration: when value impacts valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyoung Q; Kahnt, Thorsten; Rieskamp, Jörg; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2011-06-22

    Everyday choice options have advantages (positive values) and disadvantages (negative values) that need to be integrated into an overall subjective value. For decades, economic models have assumed that when a person evaluates a choice option, different values contribute independently to the overall subjective value of the option. However, human choice behavior often violates this assumption, suggesting interactions between values. To investigate how qualitatively different advantages and disadvantages are integrated into an overall subjective value, we measured the brain activity of human subjects using fMRI while they were accepting or rejecting choice options that were combinations of monetary reward and physical pain. We compared different subjective value models on behavioral and neural data. These models all made similar predictions of choice behavior, suggesting that behavioral data alone are not sufficient to uncover the underlying integration mechanism. Strikingly, a direct model comparison on brain data decisively demonstrated that interactive value integration (where values interact and affect overall valuation) predicts neural activity in value-sensitive brain regions significantly better than the independent mechanism. Furthermore, effective connectivity analyses revealed that value-dependent changes in valuation are associated with modulations in subgenual anterior cingulate cortex-amygdala coupling. These results provide novel insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of human decision making involving the integration of different values.

  5. The cognitive and neurobiological effects of daily stress in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Ahrareh; Galván, Adriana

    2014-05-15

    Increased stress reactivity during adolescence coincides with maturation of cognitive abilities and development of the prefrontal cortex. Although the effects of early-life, chronic, and pervasive stress on cognition have been extensively explored across development, very little is known about the effects of naturalistic, daily stress on adolescent cognition. In this study, our goal was to use a naturalistic approach to determine whether participants' own stressful experiences from daily life impacted cognitive performance and associated neural correlates. Adolescent and adult participants provided daily ratings of stress and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) twice: once under a self-reported "high-stress" state and once under a self-reported "low-stress" state. While in the scanner, participants performed a response inhibition task. Behaviorally, all participants exhibited worse response inhibition under high, versus low, stress states, an effect that was significantly stronger in adolescents. At the neural level, there was a significant age by stress interaction, such that adolescents exhibited less recruitment of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during inhibition under high-stress versus low-stress; adults evinced the opposite activation pattern in DLPFC. These data suggest that the developing brain may be a more vulnerable target to the cognitive and neurobiological effects of daily stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Internet Addiction in adolescence: Neurobiological, psychosocial and clinical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerniglia, L; Zoratto, F; Cimino, S; Laviola, G; Ammaniti, M; Adriani, W

    2017-05-01

    Despite it has not been formally included in DSM-5 as a disorder, 'Internet addiction (IA)' has become a worldwide issue. It can be broadly defined as a non-chemical, behavioral addiction, which involves human-machine interaction. We pinpoint it as an "instrumental" form of social interaction (i.e. mediated by machines), a notion that appears useful for the sake of possible preclinical modeling. The features of Internet use reveals as addictive when this comes at the expense of genuine real-life sociability, with an overlap towards the hikikomori phenomenon (i.e., extreme retreat to one's own room). Due to the specific neuro-developmental plasticity in adolescence, IA poses risks to youths' mental health, and may likely produce negative consequences in everyday life. The thwarted development of adolescents' identity, self-image and adaptive social relationships is discussed: the IA adolescents often suffer loss of control, feelings of anger, symptoms of distress, social withdrawal, and familial conflicts. Further, more severe clinical conditions are also associated to IA, such as dysthymic, bipolar, affective, social-anxiety disorders, as well as major depression. This paper overviews the literature on IA, from neuro-biological, psycho-social and clinical standpoints, taking into account recent debates on diagnostic criteria, nosographic label and assessment tools. Neuroimaging data and neurochemical regulations are illustrated with links to pathogenetic hypotheses, which are amenable to validation through innovative preclinical modeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurobiological problems in long-term deep space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M. E.

    Future missions in space may involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, subjecting astronauts to radiation hazards posed by solar flares and galactic cosmic rays, altered gravitation fields and physiological stress. Thus, it is critical to determine if there will be any reversible or irreversible, detrimental neurological effects from this prolonged exposure to space. A question of particular importance focuses on the long-term effects of the space environment on the central nervous system (CNS) neuroplasticity, with the potential acute and/or delayed effects that such perturbations might entail. Although the short-term effects of microgravity on neural control were studied on previous low earth orbit missions, the late consequences of stress in space, microgravity and space radiation have not been addressed sufficiently at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. The possibility that space flight factors can interact influencing the neuroplastic response in the CNS looms critical issue not only to understand the ontogeny of the CNS and its functional integrity, but also, ultimately the performance of astronauts in extended space forays. The purpose of this paper is to review the neurobiological modifications that occur in the CNS exposed to the space environment, and its potential consequences for extended deep space flight.

  8. The placebo response: neurobiological and clinical issues of neurological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Antonella; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    The recent upsurge in placebo research has demonstrated the sound neurobiological substrate of a phenomenon once believed to be only patient mystification, or at best a variable to control in clinical trials, bringing about a new awareness of its potential exploitation to the patient's benefit and framing it as a positive context effect, with the power to influence the therapy outcome. Placebo effects have been described both in the experimental setting and in different clinical conditions, many of which are of neurological interest. Multiple mechanisms have been described, namely conditioning and cognitive factors like expectation, desire, and reward. A body of evidence from neurochemical, pharmacological, and neuroimaging studies points to the involvement of neural pathways specific to single conditions, such as the activation of the endogenous antinociceptive system during placebo analgesia or the release of dopamine in the striatum of parkinsonian patients experiencing placebo reduction of motor impairment. The possible clinical applications of placebo studies range from the design of clinical trials incorporating specific recommendations and minimizing the use of placebo arms to the optimization of the context surrounding the patient, in order to maximize the placebo component present in any treatment.

  9. The neurobiology of speech perception decline in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau-Mercure, Mylène; Lortie, Catherine L; Sato, Marc; Guitton, Matthieu J; Tremblay, Pascale

    2015-03-01

    Speech perception difficulties are common among elderlies; yet the underlying neural mechanisms are still poorly understood. New empirical evidence suggesting that brain senescence may be an important contributor to these difficulties has challenged the traditional view that peripheral hearing loss was the main factor in the etiology of these difficulties. Here, we investigated the relationship between structural and functional brain senescence and speech perception skills in aging. Following audiometric evaluations, participants underwent MRI while performing a speech perception task at different intelligibility levels. As expected, with age speech perception declined, even after controlling for hearing sensitivity using an audiological measure (pure tone averages), and a bioacoustical measure (DPOAEs recordings). Our results reveal that the core speech network, centered on the supratemporal cortex and ventral motor areas bilaterally, decreased in spatial extent in older adults. Importantly, our results also show that speech skills in aging are affected by changes in cortical thickness and in brain functioning. Age-independent intelligibility effects were found in several motor and premotor areas, including the left ventral premotor cortex and the right supplementary motor area (SMA). Age-dependent intelligibility effects were also found, mainly in sensorimotor cortical areas, and in the left dorsal anterior insula. In this region, changes in BOLD signal modulated the relationship between age and speech perception skills suggesting a role for this region in maintaining speech perception in older ages. These results provide important new insights into the neurobiology of speech perception in aging.

  10. The Neurobiological Grounding of Persistent Stuttering: from Structure to Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Nicole E; Anwander, Alfred; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation provide insights into the neuronal mechanisms underlying speech disfluencies in chronic persistent stuttering. In the present paper, the goal is not to provide an exhaustive review of existing literature, but rather to highlight robust findings. We, therefore, conducted a meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies which have recently implicated disrupted white matter connectivity in stuttering. A reduction of fractional anisotropy in persistent stuttering has been reported at several different loci. Our meta-analysis revealed consistent deficits in the left dorsal stream and in the interhemispheric connections between the sensorimotor cortices. In addition, recent fMRI meta-analyses link stuttering to reduced left fronto-parieto-temporal activation while greater fluency is associated with boosted co-activations of right fronto-parieto-temporal areas. However, the physiological foundation of these irregularities is not accessible with MRI. Complementary, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) reveals local excitatory and inhibitory regulation of cortical dynamics. Applied to a speech motor area, TMS revealed reduced speech-planning-related neuronal dynamics at the level of the primary motor cortex in stuttering. Together, this review provides a focused view of the neurobiology of stuttering to date and may guide the rational design of future research. This future needs to account for the perpetual dynamic interactions between auditory, somatosensory, and speech motor circuits that shape fluent speech.

  11. The Neurobiology of Orofacial Pain and Sleep and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, G J; Sessle, B J

    2016-09-01

    This article provides an overview of the neurobiology of orofacial pain as well as the neural processes underlying sleep, with a particular focus on the mechanisms that underlie pain and sleep interactions including sleep disorders. Acute pain is part of a hypervigilance system that alerts the individual to injury or potential injury of tissues. It can also disturb sleep. Disrupted sleep is often associated with chronic pain states, including those that occur in the orofacial region. The article presents many insights that have been gained in the last few decades into the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in orofacial pain and its modulation, as well as the circuits and processes in the central nervous system that underlie sleep. Although it has become clear that sleep is essential to preserve and maintain health, it has also been found that pain, particularly chronic pain, is commonly associated with disturbed sleep. In the presence of chronic pain, a circular relationship may prevail, with mutual deleterious influences causing an increase in pain and a disruption of sleep. This article also reviews findings that indicate that reducing orofacial pain and improving sleep need to be targeted together in the management of acute to chronic orofacial pain states in order to improve an orofacial pain patient's quality of life, to prevent mood alterations or exacerbation of sleep disorder (e.g., insomnia, sleep-disordered breathing) that can negatively affect their pain, and to promote healing and optimize their health. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  12. The Neurobiology and Psychology of Pedophilia: Recent Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilian eTenbergen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A pedophilic disorder is recognized for its impairment to the individual and for the harm it may cause others. Pedophilia is often considered a side issue and research into the nature of pedophilia is delayed in comparison to research into other psychiatric disorders. However, with the increasing use of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional and structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI, fMRI together with neuropsychological studies we are increasing our knowledge of predisposing and accompanying factors contributing to pedophilia development. At the same time we are faced with methodological challenges such as group differences between studies including age, intelligence, and comorbidities together with a lack of careful assessment and control of child sexual abuse. Having this in mind this review highlights the most important studies investigating pedophilia, with a strong emphasis on (neuro- biological studies, combined with a brief explanation of research into normal human sexuality. We focus on some of the recent theories on the etiology of pedophilia such as the concept of a general neurodevelopmental disorder and/or alterations of structure and function in frontal, temporal and limbic brain areas. With this approach we aim to not only provide an update and overview but also a framework for future research and to address one of the most significant questions of how pedophilia may be explained by neurobiological and developmental alterations.

  13. Unraveling the neurobiology of nicotine dependence using genetically engineered mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Astrid K; Markou, Athina

    2013-08-01

    This review article provides an overview of recent studies of nicotine dependence and withdrawal that used genetically engineered mice. Major progress has been made in recent years with mutant mice that have knockout and gain-of-function of specific neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit genes. Nicotine exerts its actions by binding to neuronal nAChRs that consist of five subunits. The different nAChR subunits that combine to compose a receptor determine the distinct pharmacological and kinetic properties of the specific nAChR. Recent findings in genetically engineered mice have indicated that while α4-containing and β2-containing nAChRs are involved in the acquisition of nicotine self-administration and initial stages of nicotine dependence, α7 homomeric nAChRs appear to be involved in the later stages of nicotine dependence. In the medial habenula, α5-containing, α3-containing, and β4-containing nAChRs were shown to be crucially important in the regulation of the aversive aspects of nicotine. Studies of the involvement of α6 nAChR subunits in nicotine dependence have only recently emerged. The use of genetically engineered mice continues to vastly improve our understanding of the neurobiology of nicotine dependence and withdrawal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurobiological considerations in understanding behavioral treatments for pathological gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Marc N.; Balodis, Iris M.; Franco, Christine A.; Bullock, Scott; Xu, Jiansong; Chung, Tammy; Grant, Jon E.

    2013-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), a disorder currently categorized as an impulse-control disorder but being considered as a non-substance addiction in DSM-5 discussions, represents a significant public health concern. Over the past decade, considerable advances have been made with respect to understanding the biological underpinnings of PG. Research has also demonstrated the efficacies of multiple treatments, particularly behavioral therapies, for treating PG. Despite these advances, relatively little is known regarding how biological measures, particularly those assessing brain function, relate to treatments for PG. In this article, we present a conceptual review focusing on the neurobiology of behavioral therapies for PG. To illustrate issues related to study design, we present proof-of-concept preliminary data that link Stroop-related brain activations prior to treatment onset to treatment outcome in individuals with PG receiving a cognitive behavioral treatment incorporating aspects of imaginal desensitization and motivational interviewing. We conclude with recommendations about current and future directions regarding how to incorporate and translate biological findings into improved therapies for individuals with non-substance and substance addictions. PMID:23586456

  15. The Influence of Prebiotics on Neurobiology and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, A C C; Harty, S; Burnet, P W J

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the intestinal microbiota for the benefit of the brain is a concept that has become widely acknowledged. Prebiotics are nondigestible nutrients (i.e., fibers, carbohydrates, or various saccharides) that proliferate intrinsic, beneficial gut bacteria, and so provide an alternative strategy for effectively altering the enteric ecosystem, and thence brain function. Rodent studies demonstrating neurobiological changes following prebiotic intake are slowly emerging, and have thus far revealed significant benefits in disease models, including antiinflammatory and neuroprotective actions. There are also compelling data showing the robust and favorable effects of prebiotics on several behavioral paradigms including, anxiety, learning, and memory. At present, studies in humans are limited, though there is strong evidence for prebiotics modulating emotional processes and the neuroendocrine stress response that may underlie the pathophysiology of anxiety. While the mechanistic details linking the enteric microbiota to the central nervous system remain to be elucidated, there are a number of considerations that can guide future studies. These include the modulation of intestinal endocrine systems and inflammatory cascades, as well as direct interaction with the enteric nervous system and gut mucosa. Our knowledge of gut microbiome-brain communication is steadily progressing, and thorough investigations validating the use of prebiotics in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders would be highly valued and are encouraged. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The neurobiology of MMN and implications for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Patricia T; Malmierca, Manuel S; Harms, Lauren; Todd, Juanita

    2016-04-01

    Although the scientific community appears to know a lot about MMN, about its neural generators and the computational processes that underlie its generation, do we have sufficient knowledge to understand what causes the reduction of MMN amplitude in schizophrenia? Here we attempt to integrate the evidence presented in this series of papers for the special issue on MMN in schizophrenia together with evidence from other new relevant research and ask--what have we learnt? While MMN research was the purview for decades of psychophysiologists interested in event-related potentials derived from scalp recorded EEG, it is now part of mainstream neuroscience research attracting the interest of basic auditory neuroscientists, neurobiologists and computational modellers. The confluence of these developments together with increasing clinical research has certainly advanced our understanding of the causes of reduced MMN in schizophrenia as this integrative review attempts to demonstrate--but much remains to be learnt. Future advances will rely on the application of multiple methodologies and approaches in order to arrive at better understanding of the neurobiology of MMN and implications for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Neurobiology and Psychology of Pedophilia: Recent Advances and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbergen, Gilian; Wittfoth, Matthias; Frieling, Helge; Ponseti, Jorge; Walter, Martin; Walter, Henrik; Beier, Klaus M; Schiffer, Boris; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2015-01-01

    A pedophilic disorder is recognized for its impairment to the individual and for the harm it may cause to others. Pedophilia is often considered a side issue and research into the nature of pedophilia is delayed in comparison to research into other psychiatric disorders. However, with the increasing use of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI, fMRI), together with neuropsychological studies, we are increasing our knowledge of predisposing and accompanying factors contributing to pedophilia development. At the same time, we are faced with methodological challenges, such as group differences between studies, including age, intelligence, and comorbidities, together with a lack of careful assessment and control of child sexual abuse. Having this in mind, this review highlights the most important studies investigating pedophilia, with a strong emphasis on (neuro-) biological studies, combined with a brief explanation of research into normal human sexuality. We focus on some of the recent theories on the etiology of pedophilia such as the concept of a general neurodevelopmental disorder and/or alterations of structure and function in frontal, temporal, and limbic brain areas. With this approach, we aim to not only provide an update and overview but also a framework for future research and to address one of the most significant questions of how pedophilia may be explained by neurobiological and developmental alterations.

  18. The Neurobiology and Psychology of Pedophilia: Recent Advances and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbergen, Gilian; Wittfoth, Matthias; Frieling, Helge; Ponseti, Jorge; Walter, Martin; Walter, Henrik; Beier, Klaus M.; Schiffer, Boris; Kruger, Tillmann H. C.

    2015-01-01

    A pedophilic disorder is recognized for its impairment to the individual and for the harm it may cause to others. Pedophilia is often considered a side issue and research into the nature of pedophilia is delayed in comparison to research into other psychiatric disorders. However, with the increasing use of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI, fMRI), together with neuropsychological studies, we are increasing our knowledge of predisposing and accompanying factors contributing to pedophilia development. At the same time, we are faced with methodological challenges, such as group differences between studies, including age, intelligence, and comorbidities, together with a lack of careful assessment and control of child sexual abuse. Having this in mind, this review highlights the most important studies investigating pedophilia, with a strong emphasis on (neuro-) biological studies, combined with a brief explanation of research into normal human sexuality. We focus on some of the recent theories on the etiology of pedophilia such as the concept of a general neurodevelopmental disorder and/or alterations of structure and function in frontal, temporal, and limbic brain areas. With this approach, we aim to not only provide an update and overview but also a framework for future research and to address one of the most significant questions of how pedophilia may be explained by neurobiological and developmental alterations. PMID:26157372

  19. Study of mouse behavioural response in microgravity: ethogram and neurobiological related

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Daniela; Francia, Nadia; Schwartz, Silvia; Biticchi, Roberta; Liu, Yi; Cancedda, Ranieri; Aloe, Luigi

    The conquest of space, which started with the dog Laika in 1966 to be followed few years later by Yuri Gagarin, has witnessed an increasing numbers of both vertebrates (tadpoles, frogs, rats mice etc.) and invertebrates (flies, scorpions, protozoa) species exposed to zero gravity levels. Animals are sent into orbit to proactively foresee possible health problems in humans. The issue of animal exposure to un-physiological gravity is of primary importance to i) understand behavioural and physiological adaptations in such environment as well as ii) develop coun-termeasures to improve 0-g life conditions and reduce possible animal suffering. The Mouse Drawer System (MDS), an Italian facility, has been transferred to the International Space Sta-tion with a first experiment investigating mechanisms underlying bone mass loss in microgravity in mice. Preliminary and ground-based control experiments have been conducted with six mice housed individually inside the MDS facility for 20 and 100 days. The behavioural repertoire of wild-type and transgenic mice housed in the MDS has been videorecorded with the observation subsystem, which allows to monitor animal's behavior through the use of 6 video cameras. The behavioural patterns characterizing mice in the MDS system have been finely analysed at several time points during the the experiment. Moreover, neurobiological parameters, known to be involved in the response to stress, have been evaluated. In particular, NGF and BDNF levels have been measured in the central nervous system (hippocampus, striatum, and cortex), adrenal gland and limbs. Preliminary data from ground based experiment revealed Several dif-ferences in behavioural profile between wt and tg mice, with transgenic ones apparently more active than wild type controls. Moreover a clear difference in time spent in different areas of the MDS cage was observed. Finally changes in neurotrophins levels were observed in relation to both genotype and environmental

  20. Land Titles and Rice Production in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Broeck, Katleen; Newman, Carol; Tarp, Finn

    In most of the empirical literature on land titling, the household is regarded as unitary, and land rights are found to have ambiguous effects on land allocation, investment and productivity. Using data from 12 provinces in Vietnam, we diversify land titles, and show in a household fixed effects...... analysis of plot level rice yields that land titles are indeed important. Only exclusively held titles have the expected positive effects, and the positive effect on yields is found in male headed households. Furthermore, a household level rice yield function reveals that exclusive user rights...... are inefficiency decreasing, while jointly held user rights have no efficiency effects. Finally, once the gender of the head of household is controlled for, exclusively held female titles have a greater positive effect on the efficiency of the household than that of male held titles....

  1. MEDLARS Abbreviations for Medical Journal Titles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charen, Thelma; Gillespie, Constantine J.

    1971-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine announces its adoption of the Anglo-American standard for the formulation of journal title abbreviations according to the American National Standard for the Abbreviation of Titles of Periodicals (1969), with individual words abbreviated, in turn, according to the International List of Periodical Title Word Abbreviations (1970). The history of the activity of the specific Z39 Committee of USASI (now ANSI) concerned with journal title abbreviations is reviewed, covering the period from 1962 to the present. A history of the National Clearinghouse for Periodical Title Word Abbreviations and of the International List is also given. Former NLM usage is compared with the forms of the present International List and examples show the major changes in NLM abbreviations. The NLM Rules for Abbreviation of Periodical Titles as derived from the new standard are appended. PMID:5146764

  2. Ships Docked at Title V Permitted Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. [Transgenic animals and animal welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Under the pressure of a public vote in Switzerland (7 June 1998) on an initiative to ban the production, use and patenting of transgenic animals, their value for biomedical research and development is intensely debated. In addition, the Swiss legislation has adopted (1992) a constitutional obligation to "take into account the dignity of creatures". The term "dignity of creatures", however, can be interpreted in anthropocentric or biocentric ways. The government has now formulated the legal implications of this term for transgenic animals and plants in various laws including the animal and environmental protection laws. This paper gives arguments for a fair evaluation of trangenic animals from an animal welfare point of view where not only the costs of animal suffering must be considered but also the probability of potential benefit for man. A self-confident research community should allow such an evaluation procedure even in view of an outcome which could ban many uses of transgenic animals

  4. Animal models of addiction: fat and sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Drake; Sizemore, Glen M

    2011-01-01

    The concept of "food addiction" is gaining acceptance among the scientific community, and much is known about the influence of various components of food (e.g. high-fat, sugar, carbohydrate, salt) on behavior and physiology. Most of the studies to date have studied these consequences following relatively long-term diet manipulations and/or relatively free access to the food of interest. It is suggested that these types of studies are primarily tapping into the energy regulation and homeostatic processes that govern food intake and consumption. More recently, the overlap between the neurobiology of "reward-related" or hedonic effects of food ingestion and other reinforcers such as drugs of abuse has been highlighted, contributing to the notion that "food addiction" exists and that various components of food may be the substance of abuse. Based on preclinical animal models of drug addiction, a new direction for this field is using self-administration procedures and identifying an addiction-like behavioral phenotype in animals following various environmental, genetic, pharmacological, and neurobiological manipulations. Here we provide examples from this research area, with a focus on fat and sugar self-administration, and how the sophisticated animal models of drug addiction can be used to study the determinants and consequences of food addiction.

  5. Animal ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    the nature of our duties to animals. They are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, the animal rights view, contextual views, and a respect for nature view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possible to combine elements from the presented views, and how to make up one’s mind.......This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about...

  6. Comparing the characteristics of highly cited titles and highly alted titles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didegah, F.; Bowman, T.D.; Bowman, S.; Hartley, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines differences in the types of titles for articles that show high altmetric activity (highly alted articles) versus highly cited articles. This work expands on previous research on document titles in combination with a grounded theory approach to develop a codebook in which articles were manually coded based on 11 characteristics. The results show that there are differences and similarities in titles across many of the examined characteristics; highly cited titles and highly mentioned titles on Wikipedia have some similar characteristics such as they have the the highest percentage of substantive words; in addition, there are no or very few titles referencing outside or with humor/lightness on both platforms. Twitter and Facebook also showed some similarities having the highest percentage of humorous/light titles and lowest percentage of substantive words in their titles. (Author)

  7. Neurobiological Evidence for the Primacy of Mania Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Rapinesi, Chiara; Savoja, Valeria; Cuomo, Ilaria; Simonetti, Alessio; Ambrosi, Elisa; Panaccione, Isabella; Gubbini, Silvia; De Rossi, Pietro; De Chiara, Lavinia; Janiri, Delfina; Sani, Gabriele; Koukopoulos, Alexia E; Manfredi, Giovanni; Napoletano, Flavia; Caloro, Matteo; Pancheri, Lucia; Puzella, Antonella; Callovini, Gemma; Angeletti, Gloria; Del Casale, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Athanasios Koukopoulos proposed the primacy of mania hypothesis (PoM) in a 2006 book chapter and later, in two peer-reviewed papers with Nassir Ghaemi and other collaborators. This hypothesis supports that in bipolar disorder, mania leads to depression, while depression does not lead to mania. To identify evidence in literature that supports or falsifies this hypothesis. We searched the medical literature (PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library) for peer-reviewed papers on the primacy of mania, the default mode function of the brain in normal people and in bipolar disorder patients, and on illusion superiority until 6 June, 2016. Papers resulting from searches were considered for appropriateness to our objective. We adopted the PRISMA method for our review. The search for consistency with PoM was filtered through the neurobiological results of superiority illusion studies. Out of a grand total of 139 records, 59 were included in our analysis. Of these, 36 were of uncertain value as to the primacy of mania hypothesis, 22 favoured it, and 1 was contrary, but the latter pooled patients in their manic and depressive phases, so to invalidate possible conclusions about its consistency with regard to PoM. All considered studies were not focused on PoM or superiority illusion, hence most of their results were, as expected, unrelated to the circuitry involved in superiority illusion. A considerable amount of evidence is consistent with the hypothesis, although indirectly so. Only few studies compared manic with depressive phases, with the majority including patients in euthymia. It is possible that humans have a natural tendency for elation/optimism and positive self-consideration, that are more akin to mania; the depressive state could be a consequence of frustrated or unsustainable mania. This would be consistent with PoM.

  8. Stress and Memory: Behavioral Effects and Neurobiological Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandi, Carmen; Pinelo-Nava, M. Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Stress is a potent modulator of learning and memory processes. Although there have been a few attempts in the literature to explain the diversity of effects (including facilitating, impairing, and lack of effects) described for the impact of stress on memory function according to single classification criterion, they have proved insufficient to explain the whole complexity of effects. Here, we review the literature in the field of stress and memory interactions according to five selected classifying factors (source of stress, stressor duration, stressor intensity, stressor timing with regard to memory phase, and learning type) in an attempt to develop an integrative model to understand how stress affects memory function. Summarizing on those conditions in which there was enough information, we conclude that high stress levels, whether intrinsic (triggered by the cognitive challenge) or extrinsic (induced by conditions completely unrelated to the cognitive task), tend to facilitate Pavlovian conditioning (in a linear-asymptotic manner), while being deleterious for spatial/explicit information processing (which with regard to intrinsic stress levels follows an inverted U-shape effect). Moreover, after reviewing the literature, we conclude that all selected factors are essential to develop an integrative model that defines the outcome of stress effects in memory processes. In parallel, we provide a brief review of the main neurobiological mechanisms proposed to account for the different effects of stress in memory function. Glucocorticoids were found as a common mediating mechanism for both the facilitating and impairing actions of stress in different memory processes and phases. Among the brain regions implicated, the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex were highlighted as critical for the mediation of stress effects. PMID:18060012

  9. [Neurobiological hypothesis relating to connections between psychopathy and childhood maltreatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquis, N

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to closely link maltreatment subjected in childhood with the psychopathy, which is characterised by 2 factors: factor one: callousness, lack of guilt, emotional shallowness; factor two: antisocial behaviour, violence and impulsivity. If the parental education system seems to have an effect on the development of "factor two", "factor one" is for the authors of unknown aetiology. I will try to theorize that harsh and chronic maltreatment could be responsible for this emotional impairment which characterizes psychopathic individuals. There's a wealth of literature on the consequences of maltreatment on the brain's development in childhood, which are considered from a stress point of view, some individuals developing a syndrome called "post-traumatic stress disorder": PTSD (Perry, Shore, Van der Kolk, Teicher, Bremner, Carrion, De Bellis, Lanius, Nutt...). With prolonged chronic stress, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is hyper-activated, with the resulting release in adrenocorticotropin and cortisol, which involves structural changes, cell atrophy and neuronal loss. According to the authors, there are 2 responses to harsh or chronic stress: dissociation (numbing) which involves the parasympathetic system, and hyperarousal which involves the sympathetic system. One of the worst neurobiological effects of repeated stress is amygdala kindling. Many laboratory studies on physiological alterations of amygdala in rats show that kindling interferes with the acquisition of fear conditioning. Now, fear conditioning is the model on which the abusive education system is based. If this cannot develop, the child lives in the present, reacting to the unconditioned stimulus (US) like blows (with autonomic reactions), but the emotional association between this and the conditioned stimulus (CS) -- like hostile glances or shouting -- could not be registered in the orbital frontal cortex and the conditioned stimulus would not provoke autonomic responses

  10. Nicotine aversion: Neurobiological mechanisms and relevance to tobacco dependence vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Christie D.; Kenny, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine stimulates brain reward circuitries, most prominently the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, and this action is considered critical in establishing and maintaining the tobacco smoking habit. Compounds that attenuate nicotine reward are considered promising therapeutic candidates for tobacco dependence, but many of these agents have other actions that limit their potential utility. Nicotine is also highly noxious, particularly at higher doses, and aversive reactions to nicotine after initial exposure can decrease the likelihood of developing a tobacco habit in many first time smokers. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the mechanisms of nicotine aversion. The purpose of this review is to present recent new insights into the neurobiological mechanisms that regulate avoidance of nicotine. First, the role of the mesocorticolimbic system, so often associated with nicotine reward, in regulating nicotine aversion is highlighted. Second, genetic variation that modifies noxious responses to nicotine and thereby influences vulnerability to tobacco dependence, in particular variation in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit gene cluster, will be discussed. Third, the role of the habenular complex in nicotine aversion, primarily medial habenular projections to the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) but also lateral habenular projections to rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) are reviewed. Forth, brain circuits that are enriched in nAChRs, but whose role in nicotine avoidance has not yet been assessed, will be proposed. Finally, the feasibility of developing novel therapeutic agents for tobacco dependence that act not by blocking nicotine reward but by enhancing nicotine avoidance will be considered. PMID:24055497

  11. Stress and Memory: Behavioral Effects and Neurobiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a potent modulator of learning and memory processes. Although there have been a few attempts in the literature to explain the diversity of effects (including facilitating, impairing, and lack of effects described for the impact of stress on memory function according to single classification criterion, they have proved insufficient to explain the whole complexity of effects. Here, we review the literature in the field of stress and memory interactions according to five selected classifying factors (source of stress, stressor duration, stressor intensity, stressor timing with regard to memory phase, and learning type in an attempt to develop an integrative model to understand how stress affects memory function. Summarizing on those conditions in which there was enough information, we conclude that high stress levels, whether intrinsic (triggered by the cognitive challenge or extrinsic (induced by conditions completely unrelated to the cognitive task, tend to facilitate Pavlovian conditioning (in a linear-asymptotic manner, while being deleterious for spatial/explicit information processing (which with regard to intrinsic stress levels follows an inverted U-shape effect. Moreover, after reviewing the literature, we conclude that all selected factors are essential to develop an integrative model that defines the outcome of stress effects in memory processes. In parallel, we provide a brief review of the main neurobiological mechanisms proposed to account for the different effects of stress in memory function. Glucocorticoids were found as a common mediating mechanism for both the facilitating and impairing actions of stress in different memory processes and phases. Among the brain regions implicated, the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex were highlighted as critical for the mediation of stress effects.

  12. Animal magic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Writing a popular-science book about animal biophysics is hard work. Authors must read through hundreds of research papers as the subject is so multidisciplinary. On both counts of research and writing, Matin Durrani and Liz Kalaugher have done a good to excellent job with their book Furry Logic: the Physics of Animal Life

  13. Animal Detectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Bridget; Warnock, Carly

    2015-01-01

    During a two-week inquiry-based 5E learning cycle unit, children made observations and inferences to guide their explorations of animal traits and habitats (Bybee 2014). The children became "animal detectives" by studying a live-feed webcam and digital images of wolves in their natural habitat, reading books and online sources about…

  14. Neurobiology of apathy in Alzheimer's disease Neurobiologia da apatia na doença de Alzheimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Cerqueira Guimarães

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Apathy is considered the most frequent neuropsychiatric disturbance in dementia and its outcome is generally deleterious. Apathy can be related to a dysfunction of the anatomical-system that supports the generation of voluntary actions, namely the prefrontal cortex and/or the prefrontal-subcortical circuits. In Alzheimer's disease, pathological and neuroimaging data indicate that apathy is likely due to a dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex. Accordingly, in this review article, we propose a pathophysiological model to explain apathetic behavior in Alzheimer's disease, combining data from neuroimaging, neuropathology and experimental research on the role of orbito-frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, basal ganglia and dopamine in decision-making neurobiology.Apatia é considerada a alteração neuropsiquiátrica mais freqüente nas demências e suas conseqüências são habitualmente deletérias. Apatia pode ser relacionada à disfunção do sistema anatômico responsável pela geração de ações voluntárias, conhecido com córtex pré-frontal e/ou circuitos pré-frontais-subcorticais. Na doença de Alzheimer, evidências neuropatológicas e de neuroimagem funcional indicam que a apatia é provavelmente decorrente da disfunção do córtex pré-frontal medial. Assim, neste artigo de revisão, apresentamos uma proposta de um modelo fisiopatológico para explicar o comportamento apático na doença de Alzheimer, combinando dados de neuropatologia, neuroimagem e experimentação animal sobre o papel do córtex órbito-frontal, cíngulo anterior, núcleos da base e dopamina na neurobiologia da tomada de decisão.

  15. K+ CHANNELEPSY: progress in the neurobiology of potassium channels and epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina D'Adamo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available K+ channels are important determinants of seizure susceptibility. These membrane proteins, encoded by more than 70 genes, make the largest group of ion channels that fine-tune the electrical activity of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the brain. Their ubiquity and extremely high genetic and functional diversity, unmatched by any other ion channel type, place K+ channels as primary targets of genetic variations or perturbations in K+-dependent homeostasis, even in the absence of a primary channel defect. It is therefore not surprising that numerous inherited or acquired K+ channels dysfunctions have been associated with several neurologic syndromes, including epilepsy, which often generate confusion in the classification of the associated diseases. Therefore, we propose to name the K+ channels defects underlying distinct epilepsies as K+ channelepsies, and introduce a new nomenclature (e.g. Kx.y-channelepsy, following the widely used K+ channel classification, which could be also adopted to easily identify other channelopathies involving Na+ (e.g. Navx.y-phenotype, Ca2+ (e.g. Cavx.y-phenotype, and Cl- channels. Furthermore, we discuss novel genetic defects in K+ channels and associated proteins that underlie distinct epileptic phenotypes in humans, and analyze critically the recent progress in the neurobiology of this disease that has also been provided by investigations on valuable animal models of epilepsy. The abundant and varied lines of evidence discussed here strongly foster assessments for variations in genes encoding for K+ channels and associated proteins in patients with idiopathic epilepsy, provide new avenues for future investigations, and highlight these proteins as critical pharmacological targets.

  16. How property title impacts urban consolidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Easthope, Hazel; Warnken, Jan; Sherry, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Continuing urbanisation is triggering an increase in multi-titled housing internationally. This trend has given rise to a substantial research interest in the social consequences of higher density living. Little enquiry, however, has been directed to examining how property title subdivisions gene...

  17. 24 CFR 3500.16 - Title companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Title companies. 3500.16 Section 3500.16 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT § 3500.16 Title companies. No seller of property that will...

  18. 31 CFR 505.01 - Short title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short title. 505.01 Section 505.01 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN... CERTAIN MERCHANDISE BETWEEN FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 505.01 Short title. The regulations in this part may be...

  19. 18 CFR 415.1 - Short title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Short title. 415.1 Section 415.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Generally § 415.1 Short title. This part shall be known...

  20. 40 CFR 105.3 - Title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Title. 105.3 Section 105.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS RECOGNITION AWARDS UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT General § 105.3 Title. The awards are known as the National Clean Water Act...