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Sample records for neurexin superfamily member

  1. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Worah, Kuntal; van der Schaaf, Alie; Buschow, Sonja I; van Spriel, Annemiek B

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the complete tetraspanin superfamily in primary murine (CD4+, CD8+, pDC) and human DC subsets (CD1c+, CD141+, pDC) at the transcriptome and proteome level. Different RNA and protein expression profiles for the tetraspanin genes across human and murine DC subsets were identified. Although RNA expression levels of CD37 and CD82 were not significantly different between human DC subsets, CD9 RNA was highly expressed in pDCs, while CD9 protein expression was lower. This indicates that relative RNA and protein expression levels are not always in agreement. Both murine CD8α+ DCs and its regarded human counterpart, CD141+ DCs, displayed relatively high protein levels of CD81. CD53 protein was highly expressed on human pDCs in contrast to the relatively low protein expression of most other tetraspanins. This study demonstrates that tetraspanins are differentially expressed by human and murine DC subsets which provides a valuable resource that will aid the understanding of tetraspanin function in DC biology.

  2. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malou Zuidscherwoude

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs, which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the complete tetraspanin superfamily in primary murine (CD4+, CD8+, pDC and human DC subsets (CD1c+, CD141+, pDC at the transcriptome and proteome level. Different RNA and protein expression profiles for the tetraspanin genes across human and murine DC subsets were identified. Although RNA expression levels of CD37 and CD82 were not significantly different between human DC subsets, CD9 RNA was highly expressed in pDCs, while CD9 protein expression was lower. This indicates that relative RNA and protein expression levels are not always in agreement. Both murine CD8α+ DCs and its regarded human counterpart, CD141+ DCs, displayed relatively high protein levels of CD81. CD53 protein was highly expressed on human pDCs in contrast to the relatively low protein expression of most other tetraspanins. This study demonstrates that tetraspanins are differentially expressed by human and murine DC subsets which provides a valuable resource that will aid the understanding of tetraspanin function in DC biology.

  3. Spatial and temporal expression of immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, Sjoerd D.; Meijer, Onno C.; Heinen, Charlotte A.; Mol, Isabel M.; Laghmani, El Houari; Sengers, Rozemarijn M. A.; Carreno, Gabriela; van Trotsenburg, A. S. Paul; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Wit, Jan M.; Oostdijk, Wilma; van Pelt, Ans M. M.; Hamer, Geert; Wagenaar, Gerry T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 (IGSF1) gene cause an X-linked syndrome of central hypothyroidism, macroorchidism, variable prolactin and GH deficiency, delayed pubertal testosterone rise, and obesity. To understand the pathophysiology of this syndrome,

  4. Plant MTs-long neglected members of the metallothionein superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freisinger, Eva

    2008-12-21

    Occurrence of metallothioneins (MTs) was initially thought to be restricted to the animal kingdom, and the corresponding functions such as detoxification of heavy metal ions were assumed to be taken over in plants by the enzymatically synthesized phytochelatins. This perception was revised in the past years, and the existence of plant metallothioneins is generally accepted. Compared to the vertebrate forms, members of the plant MT family display a significantly larger sequence diversity, however, surprisingly little information is available concerning their possible functions, properties, and structures. Gene expression studies, and thus studies on the mRNA level, are the major source of data aiming at elucidating the function of plant MTs. However, so far it is not possible to unambiguously assign a specific function to a given metallothionein as proposed functions overlap, are complementary to each other, or even contradictory results are obtained. With respect to the structures and properties of plant metallothioneins even less scientific contributions are available illustrating the early stages, in which this research area resides. Existing data covers the metal ion content of the different plant metallothionein species and the pH stabilities of the resulting metal-thiolate clusters. Further, for a limited selection of proteins the number of clusters formed has been proposed and predictions towards the secondary structure of the protein backbone made. A recently determined three-dimensional structure of the larger domain of the wheat metallothionein E(c)-1 describes a metal ion coordination mode unprecedented for any metallothionein so far.

  5. TNF and TNF Receptor Superfamily Members in HIV infection: New Cellular Targets for Therapy?

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    Amit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF and TNF receptors (TNFR superfamily members are engaged in diverse cellular phenomena such as cellular proliferation, morphogenesis, apoptosis, inflammation, and immune regulation. Their role in regulating viral infections has been well documented. Viruses have evolved with numerous strategies to interfere with TNF-mediated signaling indicating the importance of TNF and TNFR superfamily in viral pathogenesis. Recent research reports suggest that TNF and TNFRs play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV. TNFR signaling modulates HIV replication and HIV proteins interfere with TNF/TNFR pathways. Since immune activation and inflammation are the hallmark of HIV infection, the use of TNF inhibitors can have significant impact on HIV disease progression. In this review, we will describe how HIV infection is modulated by signaling mediated through members of TNF and TNFR superfamily and in turn how these latter could be targeted by HIV proteins. Finally, we will discuss the emerging therapeutics options based on modulation of TNF activity that could ultimately lead to the cure of HIV-infected patients.

  6. TNF superfamily member TL1A elicits type 2 innate lymphoid cells at mucosal barriers.

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    Yu, X; Pappu, R; Ramirez-Carrozzi, V; Ota, N; Caplazi, P; Zhang, J; Yan, D; Xu, M; Lee, W P; Grogan, J L

    2014-05-01

    Immune responses at mucosal barriers are regulated by innate type 2 lymphoid cells (ILC2s) that elaborate effector cytokines interleukins 5 and 13 (IL5 and IL13). IL25 and IL33 are key cytokines that support ILC2s; however, mice deficient in these pathways retain some functional ILC2s. Analysis of human and murine cells revealed that ILC2s highly express tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor superfamily member DR3 (TNFRSF25). Engagement of DR3 with cognate ligand TL1A promoted ILC2 expansion, survival, and function. Exogenous protein or genetic overexpression of TL1A activated ILC2s independent of IL25 or IL33. Dr3(-/-) mice failed to control gut helminthic infections, and failed to mount ILC2 responses in the lung after nasal challenge with papain. Our data demonstrate a key role for TL1A in promoting ILC2s at mucosal barriers.

  7. CIPP, a novel multivalent PDZ domain protein, selectively interacts with Kir4.0 family members, NMDA receptor subunits, neurexins, and neuroligins.

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    Kurschner, C; Mermelstein, P G; Holden, W T; Surmeier, D J

    1998-06-01

    We report a novel multivalent PDZ domain protein, CIPP (for channel-interacting PDZ domain protein), which is expressed exclusively in brain and kidney. Within the brain, the highest CIPP mRNA levels were found in neurons of the cerebellum, inferior colliculus, vestibular nucleus, facial nucleus, and thalamus. Furthermore, we identified the inward rectifier K+ (Kir) channel, Kir4.1 (also called "Kir1.2"), as a cellular CIPP ligand. Among several other Kir channels tested, only the closely related Kir4.2 (or "Kir1.3") also interacted with CIPP. In addition, specific PDZ domains within CIPP associated selectively with the C-termini of N-methyl-D-aspartate subtypes of glutamate receptors, as well as neurexins and neuroligins, cell surface molecules enriched in synaptic membranes. Thus, CIPP may serve as a scaffold that brings structurally diverse but functionally connected proteins into close proximity at the synapse. The functional consequences of CIPP expression on Kir4.1 channels were studied using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques in Kir4.1 transfected COS-7 cells. On average, Kir4.1 current densities were doubled by cotransfection with CIPP. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  8. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

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    Nils Widderich

    Full Text Available Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa, we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (SaEctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of

  9. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widderich, Nils; Kobus, Stefanie; Höppner, Astrid; Riclea, Ramona; Seubert, Andreas; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Heider, Johann; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC) catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa), we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (Sa)EctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of enzyme activity

  10. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höppner, Astrid; Riclea, Ramona; Seubert, Andreas; Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Heider, Johann; Smits, Sander H. J.; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC) catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa), we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (Sa)EctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of enzyme activity

  11. Cofilin-1 and Other ADF/Cofilin Superfamily Members in Human Malignant Cells.

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    Shishkin, Sergey; Eremina, Lidia; Pashintseva, Natalya; Kovalev, Leonid; Kovaleva, Marina

    2016-12-22

    Identification of actin-depolymerizing factor homology (ADF-H) domains in the structures of several related proteins led first to the formation of the ADF/cofilin family, which then expanded to the ADF/cofilin superfamily. This superfamily includes the well-studied cofilin-1 (Cfl-1) and about a dozen different human proteins that interact directly or indirectly with the actin cytoskeleton, provide its remodeling, and alter cell motility. According to some data, Cfl-1 is contained in various human malignant cells (HMCs) and is involved in the formation of malignant properties, including invasiveness, metastatic potential, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. The presence of other ADF/cofilin superfamily proteins in HMCs and their involvement in the regulation of cell motility were discovered with the use of various OMICS technologies. In our review, we discuss the results of the study of Cfl-1 and other ADF/cofilin superfamily proteins, which may be of interest for solving different problems of molecular oncology, as well as for the prospects of further investigations of these proteins in HMCs.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Sfh3, a member of the Sec14 protein superfamily

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    Ren, Jihui; Schaaf, Gabriel; Bankaitis, Vytas A.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Pathak, Manish C. (Emory-MED); (UNC)

    2012-03-26

    Sec14 is the major phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is the founding member of the Sec14 protein superfamily. Recent functional data suggest that Sec14 functions as a nanoreactor for PtdCho-regulated presentation of PtdIns to PtdIns kinase to affect membrane trafficking. Extrapolation of this concept to other members of the Sec14 superfamily suggests a mechanism by which a comprehensive cohort of Sec14-like nanoreactors sense correspondingly diverse pools of lipid metabolites. In turn, metabolic information is translated to signaling circuits driven by phosphoinositide metabolism. Sfh3, one of five Sec14 homologs in yeast, exhibits several interesting functional features, including its unique localization to lipid particles and microsomes. This localization forecasts novel regulatory interfaces between neutral lipid metabolism and phosphoinositide signaling. To launch a detailed structural and functional characterization of Sfh3, the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity, diffraction-quality crystals were produced and a native X-ray data set was collected to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. To aid in phasing, SAD X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.93 {angstrom} resolution from an SeMet-labeled crystal at the Southeast Regional Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source. Here, the cloning and purification of Sfh3 and the preliminary diffraction of Sfh3 crystals are reported, enabling structural analyses that are expected to reveal novel principles governing ligand binding and functional specificity for Sec14-superfamily proteins.

  13. The CDI toxin of Yersinia kristensenii is a novel bacterial member of the RNase A superfamily

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    Batot, Gaëlle; Michalska, Karolina; Ekberg, Greg; Irimpan, Ervin M.; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Hayes, Christopher S.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Goulding, Celia W.

    2017-04-10

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is an important mechanism of inter-bacterial competition found in many Gram-negative pathogens. CDI+ cells express cell-surface CdiA proteins that bind neighboring bacteria and deliver C-terminal toxin domains (CdiA-CT) to inhibit target-cell growth. CDI+ bacteria also produce CdiI immunity proteins, which specifically neutralize cognate CdiA-CT toxins to prevent self-inhibition. Here, we present the crystal structure of the CdiA-CT/CdiI(Ykris) complex from Yersinia kris-tensenii ATCC 33638. CdiA-CTYkris adopts the same fold as angiogenin and other RNase A paralogs, but the toxin does not share sequence similarity with these nucleases and lacks the characteristic disulfide bonds of the superfamily. Consistent with the structural homology, CdiA-CTYkris has potent RNase activity in vitro and in vivo. Structure-guided mutagenesis reveals that His175, Arg186, Thr276 and Tyr278 contribute to CdiA-CTYkris activity, suggesting that these residues participate in substrate binding and/or catalysis. CdiI(Ykris) binds directly over the putative active site and likely neutralizes toxicity by blocking access to RNA substrates. Significantly, CdiA-CTYkris is the first non-vertebrate protein found to possess the RNase A superfamily fold, and homologs of this toxin are associated with secretion systems in many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These observations suggest that RNase Alike toxins are commonly deployed in inter-bacterial competition.

  14. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

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    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying, E-mail: zhouying@moon.ibp.ac.cn

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated.

  15. CD177: A member of the Ly-6 gene superfamily involved with neutrophil proliferation and polycythemia vera

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    Bettinotti Maria

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genes in the Leukocyte Antigen 6 (Ly-6 superfamily encode glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored glycoproteins (gp with conserved domains of 70 to 100 amino acids and 8 to 10 cysteine residues. Murine Ly-6 genes encode important lymphocyte and hematopoietic stem cell antigens. Recently, a new member of the human Ly-6 gene superfamily has been described, CD177. CD177 is polymorphic and has at least two alleles, PRV-1 and NB1. CD177 was first described as PRV-1, a gene that is overexpressed in neutrophils from approximately 95% of patients with polycythemia vera and from about half of patients with essential thrombocythemia. CD177 encodes NB1 gp, a 58–64 kD GPI gp that is expressed by neutrophils and neutrophil precursors. NB1 gp carries Human Neutrophil Antigen (HNA-2a. Investigators working to identify the gene encoding NB1 gp called the CD177 allele they described NB1. NB1 gp is unusual in that neutrophils from some healthy people lack the NB1 gp completely and in most people NB1 gp is expressed by a subpopulation of neutrophils. The function of NB1 gp and the role of CD177 in the pathogenesis and clinical course of polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are not yet known. However, measuring neutrophil CD177 mRNA levels has become an important marker for diagnosing the myeloproliferative disorders polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor Superfamily Member 1b on CD8+ T Cells and TNF Receptor Superfamily Member 1a on Non-CD8+ T Cells Contribute Significantly to Upper Genital Tract Pathology Following Chlamydial Infection.

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    Manam, Srikanth; Thomas, Joshua D; Li, Weidang; Maladore, Allison; Schripsema, Justin H; Ramsey, Kyle H; Murthy, Ashlesh K

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrated previously that tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)-producing Chlamydia-specific CD8(+) T cells cause oviduct pathological sequelae. In the current study, we used wild-type C57BL/6J (WT) mice with a deficiency in genes encoding TNF receptor superfamily member 1a (TNFR1; TNFR1 knockout [KO] mice), TNF receptor superfamily member 1b (TNFR2; TNFR2 KO mice), and both TNFR1 and TNFR2 (TNFR1/2 double KO [DKO] mice) and mix-match adoptive transfers of CD8(+) T cells to study chlamydial pathogenesis. TNFR1 KO, TNFR2 KO, and TNFR1/2 DKO mice displayed comparable clearance of primary or secondary genital Chlamydia muridarum infection but significantly reduced oviduct pathology, compared with WT animals. The Chlamydia-specific total cellular cytokine response in splenic and draining lymph nodes and the antibody response in serum were comparable between the WT and KO animals. However, CD8(+) T cells from TNFR2 KO mice displayed significantly reduced activation (CD11a expression and cytokine production), compared with TNFR1 KO or WT animals. Repletion of TNFR2 KO mice with WT CD8(+) T cells but not with TNFR2 KO CD8(+) T cells and repletion of TNFR1 KO mice with either WT or TNFR1 KO CD8(+) T cells restored oviduct pathology to WT levels in both KO groups. Collectively, these results demonstrate that TNFR2-bearing CD8(+) T cells and TNFR1-bearing non-CD8(+) T cells contribute significantly to oviduct pathology following genital chlamydial infection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Role of TNF-α and TNF Superfamily Members in the Pathogenesis of Calcific Aortic Valvular Disease

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    Antonella Galeone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD represents a slowly progressive pathologic process associated with major morbidity and mortality. The process is characterized by multiple steps: inflammation, fibrosis, and calcification. Numerous studies focalized on its physiopathology highlighting different “actors” for the multiple “acts.” This paper focuses on the role of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF members in the pathogenesis of CAVD. In particular, we discuss the clinical and experimental studies providing evidence of the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB ligand (RANKL, its membrane receptor RANK and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL in valvular calcification.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor superfamily member (TNFSF) 13 (APRIL) and TNFSF13B (BAFF) downregulate homeostatic immunoglobulin production in the intestines.

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    Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Kanno, Yumiko; Kojima, Hidefumi; Kobata, Tetsuji

    2017-10-27

    Intestinal immunoglobulins (Igs) protect against microbes. However, the regulation of intestinal Ig production is poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the roles of APRIL (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member [TNFSF] 13) and BAFF (TNFSF13B) in intestinal Ig induction. Peyer's patches (PPs) are, at least in part, an inductive site for Igs, including IgA. Introducing APRIL and BAFF in vivo lowered the frequency of IgG1(+) or IgG2b(+) B cells in PPs. Administration of TACI-Fc upregulated the frequency of IgG1(+), IgG2b(+), and IgA(+) B cells in PPs, suggesting that APRIL and BAFF attenuate Ig production in these regions. TACI-Fc also upregulated intestinal IgA levels and expanded germinal center B cells in PPs. These results indicate that APRIL and BAFF paradoxically downregulate homeostatic Ig production in the intestines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hsp31, a member of the DJ-1 superfamily, is a multitasking stress responder with chaperone activity.

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    Aslam, Kiran; Hazbun, Tony R

    2016-03-03

    Among different types of protein aggregation, amyloids are a biochemically well characterized state of protein aggregation that are associated with a large number of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an insightful model to understand the underlying mechanism of protein aggregation. Many yeast molecular chaperones can modulate aggregation and misfolding of proteins including α-Syn and the Sup35 prion. Hsp31 is a homodimeric protein structurally similar to human DJ-1, a Parkinson's disease-linked protein, and both are members of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily. An emerging view is that Hsp31 and its associated superfamily members each have divergent multitasking functions that have the common theme of responding and managing various types of cellular stress. Hsp31 has several biochemical activities including chaperone and detoxifying enzyme activities that modulate at various points of a stress pathway such as toxicity associated with protein misfolding. However, we have shown the protective role of Hsp31's chaperone activity can operate independent of detoxifying enzyme activities in preventing the early stages of protein aggregate formation and associated cellular toxicities. We provide additional data that collectively supports the multiple functional roles that can be accomplished independent of each other. We present data indicating Hsp31 purified from yeast is more active compared to expression and purification from E. coli suggesting that posttranslational modifications could be important for Hsp31 to be fully active. We also compare the similarities and differences in activities among paralogs of Hsp31 supporting a model in which this protein family has overlapping but diverging roles in responding to various sources of cellular stresses.

  20. Analysis of the Active-Site Mechanism of Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase I: A Member of the Phospholipase D Superfamily

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    Gajewski, Stefan; Comeaux, Evan Q.; Jafari, Nauzanene; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W.; van Waardenburg, Robert C.A.M. (UAB); (SJCH)

    2012-03-15

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) is a member of the phospholipase D superfamily that hydrolyzes 3'-phospho-DNA adducts via two conserved catalytic histidines - one acting as the lead nucleophile and the second acting as a general acid/base. Substitution of the second histidine specifically to arginine contributes to the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy (SCAN1). We investigated the catalytic role of this histidine in the yeast protein (His432) using a combination of X-ray crystallography, biochemistry, yeast genetics, and theoretical chemistry. The structures of wild-type Tdp1 and His432Arg both show a phosphorylated form of the nucleophilic histidine that is not observed in the structure of His432Asn. The phosphohistidine is stabilized in the His432Arg structure by the guanidinium group that also restricts the access of nucleophilic water molecule to the Tdp1-DNA intermediate. Biochemical analyses confirm that His432Arg forms an observable and unique Tdp1-DNA adduct during catalysis. Substitution of His432 by Lys does not affect catalytic activity or yeast phenotype, but substitutions with Asn, Gln, Leu, Ala, Ser, and Thr all result in severely compromised enzymes and DNA topoisomerase I-camptothecin dependent lethality. Surprisingly, His432Asn did not show a stable covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate that suggests another catalytic defect. Theoretical calculations revealed that the defect resides in the nucleophilic histidine and that the pK{sub a} of this histidine is crucially dependent on the second histidine and on the incoming phosphate of the substrate. This represents a unique example of substrate-activated catalysis that applies to the entire phospholipase D superfamily.

  1. Human microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics: well-known and promising members of the SDR superfamily.

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    Skarydová, Lucie; Wsól, Vladimír

    2012-05-01

    The best known, most widely studied enzyme system in phase I biotransformation is cytochrome P450 (CYP), which participates in the metabolism of roughly 9 of 10 drugs in use today. The main biotransformation isoforms of CYP are associated with the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). Other enzymes that are also active in phase I biotransformation are carbonyl reducing enzymes. Much is known about the role of cytosolic forms of carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics, but their microsomal forms have been mostly poorly studied. The only well-known microsomal carbonyl reducing enzyme taking part in the biotransformation of xenobiotics is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Physiological roles of microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes are better known than their participation in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This review is a summary of the fragmentary information known about the roles of the microsomal forms. Besides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, it has been reported, so far, that retinol dehydrogenase 12 participates only in the detoxification of unsaturated aldehydes formed upon oxidative stress. Another promising group of microsomal biotransformation carbonyl reducing enzymes are some members of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Generally, it is clear that this area is, overall, quite unexplored, but carbonyl reducing enzymes located in the ER have proven very interesting. The study of these enzymes could shed new light on the metabolism of several clinically used drugs or they could become an important target in connection with some diseases.

  2. BAFF and associated TNF superfamily members in renal transplantation: an end to BLySful ignorance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Manu; Conlon, Thomas M; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh; Pettigrew, Gavin J

    2013-11-27

    : The emergence of B-cell-activating factor and its related family members as critical mediators for B-cell development and survival has led to the development of a number of new agents aimed at controlling complicated chronic pathologies with an underlying humoral component. Currently being trialed in autoimmunity, these agents also hold much promise for preventing the insidious humoral responses that are increasingly associated with early failure of kidney transplants. This review discusses some of the pertinent aspects of B-cell-activating factor biology and considers how recent advances in our understanding of this signaling axis could be exploited to improve clinical outcomes in renal transplantation.

  3. TNF superfamily member APRIL enhances midbrain dopaminergic axon growth and contributes to the nigrostriatal projection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Thomas G; Howard, Laura; Wyatt, Sean; Davies, Alun M

    2017-12-01

    We have studied the role of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily member APRIL in the development of embryonic mouse midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. In culture, soluble APRIL enhanced axon growth during a window of development between E12 and E14 when nigrostriatal axons are growing to their targets in the striatum in vivo. April transcripts were detected in both the striatum and midbrain during this period and at later stages. The axon growth-enhancing effect of APRIL was similar to that of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), but in contrast to GDNF, APRIL did not promote the survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The effect of APRIL on axon growth was prevented by function-blocking antibodies to one of its receptors, BCMA (TNFRSF13A), but not by function-blocking antibodies to the other APRIL receptor, TACI (TNFRSF13B), suggesting that the effects of APRIL on axon growth are mediated by BCMA. In vivo, there was a significant reduction in the density of midbrain dopaminergic projections to the striatum in April-/- embryos compared with wild type littermates at E14. These findings demonstrate that APRIL is a physiologically relevant factor for the nigrostriatal projection. Given the importance of the degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal connections in the pathogenesis and progression of Parkinson's disease, our findings contribute to our understanding of the factors that establish nigrostriatal integrity. Copyright © 2017 Cardiff University. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene codes for a novel member of the non-heme dioxygenase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Navarro Miguel A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variants in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene have been associated with an increased risk of obesity. However, the function of its protein product has not been experimentally studied and previously reported sequence similarity analyses suggested the absence of homologs in existing protein databases. Here, we present the first detailed computational analysis of the sequence and predicted structure of the protein encoded by FTO. Results We performed a sequence similarity search using the human FTO protein as query and then generated a profile using the multiple sequence alignment of the homologous sequences. Profile-to-sequence and profile-to-profile based comparisons identified remote homologs of the non-heme dioxygenase family. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that human FTO is a member of the non-heme dioxygenase (Fe(II- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases superfamily. Amino acid conservation patterns support this hypothesis and indicate that both 2-oxoglutarate and iron should be important for FTO function. This computational prediction of the function of FTO should suggest further steps for its experimental characterization and help to formulate hypothesis about the mechanisms by which it relates to obesity in humans.

  5. Junctional Adhesion Molecule, a Novel Member of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily That Distributes at Intercellular Junctions and Modulates Monocyte Transmigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martìn-Padura, Inés; Lostaglio, Susan; Schneemann, Markus; Williams, Lisa; Romano, Maria; Fruscella, Paolo; Panzeri, Carla; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Ruco, Luigi; Villa, Antonello; Simmons, David; Dejana, Elisabetta

    1998-01-01

    Tight junctions are the most apical components of endothelial and epithelial intercellular cleft. In the endothelium these structures play an important role in the control of paracellular permeability to circulating cells and solutes. The only known integral membrane protein localized at sites of membrane–membrane interaction of tight junctions is occludin, which is linked inside the cells to a complex network of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. We report here the identification of a novel protein (junctional adhesion molecule [JAM]) that is selectively concentrated at intercellular junctions of endothelial and epithelial cells of different origins. Confocal and immunoelectron microscopy shows that JAM codistributes with tight junction components at the apical region of the intercellular cleft. A cDNA clone encoding JAM defines a novel immunoglobulin gene superfamily member that consists of two V-type Ig domains. An mAb directed to JAM (BV11) was found to inhibit spontaneous and chemokine-induced monocyte transmigration through an endothelial cell monolayer in vitro. Systemic treatment of mice with BV11 mAb blocked monocyte infiltration upon chemokine administration in subcutaneous air pouches. Thus, JAM is a new component of endothelial and epithelial junctions that play a role in regulating monocyte transmigration. PMID:9660867

  6. Annotating Enzymes of Uncertain Function: The Deacylation of d-Amino Acids by Members of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, J.; Fedorov, A; Xu, C; Brown, S; Fedorov, E; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic activities of three members of the amidohydrolase superfamily were discovered using amino acid substrate libraries. Bb3285 from Bordetella bronchiseptica, Gox1177 from Gluconobacter oxidans, and Sco4986 from Streptomyces coelicolor are currently annotated as d-aminoacylases or N-acetyl-d-glutamate deacetylases. These three enzymes are 22-34% identical to one another in amino acid sequence. Substrate libraries containing nearly all combinations of N-formyl-d-Xaa, N-acetyl-d-Xaa, N-succinyl-d-Xaa, and l-Xaa-d-Xaa were used to establish the substrate profiles for these enzymes. It was demonstrated that Bb3285 is restricted to the hydrolysis of N-acyl-substituted derivatives of d-glutamate. The best substrates for this enzyme are N-formyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.8 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), N-acetyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.2 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), and l-methionine-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.4 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Gox1177 and Sco4986 preferentially hydrolyze N-acyl-substituted derivatives of hydrophobic d-amino acids. The best substrates for Gox1177 are N-acetyl-d-leucine (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.2 x 104 M{sup -1} s-1), N-acetyl-d-tryptophan (kcat/Km = 4.1 x 104 M-1 s-1), and l-tyrosine-d-leucine (kcat/Km = 1.5 x 104 M-1 s-1). A fourth protein, Bb2785 from B. bronchiseptica, did not have d-aminoacylase activity. The best substrates for Sco4986 are N-acetyl-d-phenylalanine and N-acetyl-d-tryptophan. The three-dimensional structures of Bb3285 in the presence of the product acetate or a potent mimic of the tetrahedral intermediate were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The side chain of the d-glutamate moiety of the inhibitor is ion-paired to Arg-295, while the {alpha}-carboxylate is ion-paired with Lys-250 and Arg-376. These results have revealed the chemical and structural determinants for substrate specificity in this protein. Bioinformatic analyses of an additional {approx}250

  7. Down-regulation of microRNA-155 promotes selenium deficiency-induced apoptosis by tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B in the broiler spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ci; Sun, Zhepeng; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tianqi; Pan, Tingru; Li, Shu

    2017-08-29

    The aim of this work was to explore the microRNA profile and the effect of microRNA-155 on apoptosis in the spleen of selenium-deficient broilers. We replicated the splenic-apoptotic model in selenium-deficient broilers. In vitro , microRNA-155 oligonucleotides were transfected into lymphocytes and subsequently treated with H 2 O 2 . We observed that selenium deficiency altered the microRNA profile and decreased the expression of microRNA-155 in the broiler spleens. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B was verified as a target of microRNA-155 in the splenocytes. Morphological changes, increased levels of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, Bak, Bax, Cyt-c, caspase9 and caspase3 and decreased levels of Bcl-2 demonstrated that selenium deficiency induced apoptosis in the spleen tissues. In vitro , microRNA-155 m inhibited the levels of ROS and reduced apoptosis compared with microRNA-155i in the lymphocytes. These results suggested that the reduced levels of microRNA-155 due to selenium deficiency could promote oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by increased tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B in splenic cells.

  8. Structural mutations of C-domains in members of the Ig superfamily. Consequences for the interactions between the T cell antigen receptor and the zeta 2 homodimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Rubin, B; Caspar-Bauguil, S

    1992-01-01

    -alpha-deficient Jurkat variant. Computer model analysis showed that the Ti-alpha phenylalanine195 directly contributed to the beta-sheet facing away from the Ti-beta chain, indicating that it could be directly involved in the interactions between one or more of the CD3 chains or the zeta 2 dimer. Site...... assembly of the Ti-alpha and -beta mutations were due to any direct effects on the interaction between zeta and the Ti alpha beta dimer or to indirect effects are discussed.......Several molecules belonging to the Ig superfamily are expressed together with noncovalently associated subunits. This applies for membrane-bound IgM and IgD, some of the FcR, and the Ti dimers of the TCR. The interactions between members of the Ig superfamily and their associated subunits are still...

  9. Unusual N-prenylation in diazepinomicin biosynthesis: the farnesylation of a benzodiazepine substrate is catalyzed by a new member of the ABBA prenyltransferase superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bonitz

    Full Text Available The bacterium Micromonospora sp. RV115, isolated from a marine sponge, produces the unusual metabolite diazepinomicin, a prenylated benzodiazepine derivative. We have cloned the prenyltransferase gene dzmP from this organism, expressed it in Escherichia coli, and the resulting His8-tagged protein was purified and investigated biochemically. It was found to catalyze the farnesylation of the amide nitrogen of dibenzodiazepinone. DzmP belongs to the ABBA prenyltransferases and is the first member of this superfamily which utilizes farnesyl diphosphate as genuine substrate. All previously discovered members utilize either dimethylallyl diphosphate (C5 or geranyl diphosphate (C10. Another putative diazepinomicin biosynthetic gene cluster was identified in the genome of Streptomyces griseoflavus Tü4000, suggesting that the formation of diazepinomicin is not restricted to the genus Micromonospora. The gene cluster contains a gene ssrg_00986 with 61.4% identity (amino acid level to dzmP. The gene was expressed in E. coli, and the purified protein showed similar catalytic properties as DzmP. Both enzymes also accepted other phenolic or phenazine substrates. ABBA prenyltransferases are useful tools for chemoenzymatic synthesis, due to their nature as soluble, stable biocatalysts. The discovery of DzmP and Ssrg_00986 extends the isoprenoid substrate range of this superfamily. The observed prenylation of an amide nitrogen is an unusual biochemical reaction.

  10. Type II restriction endonuclease R.Eco29kI is a member of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feder Marcin

    2007-07-01

    prediction that R.Eco29kI belongs to the GIY-YIG superfamily of nucleases. Our study provides the first experimental evidence for a Type IIP REase that does not belong to the PD-(D/EXK or HNH superfamilies of nucleases, and is instead a member of the unrelated GIY-YIG superfamily.

  11. The PD-(D/EXK superfamily revisited: identification of new members among proteins involved in DNA metabolism and functional predictions for domains of (hitherto unknown function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujnicki Janusz M

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PD-(D/EXK nuclease superfamily, initially identified in type II restriction endonucleases and later in many enzymes involved in DNA recombination and repair, is one of the most challenging targets for protein sequence analysis and structure prediction. Typically, the sequence similarity between these proteins is so low, that most of the relationships between known members of the PD-(D/EXK superfamily were identified only after the corresponding structures were determined experimentally. Thus, it is tempting to speculate that among the uncharacterized protein families, there are potential nucleases that remain to be discovered, but their identification requires more sensitive tools than traditional PSI-BLAST searches. Results The low degree of amino acid conservation hampers the possibility of identification of new members of the PD-(D/EXK superfamily based solely on sequence comparisons to known members. Therefore, we used a recently developed method HHsearch for sensitive detection of remote similarities between protein families represented as profile Hidden Markov Models enhanced by secondary structure. We carried out a comparison of known families of PD-(D/EXK nucleases to the database comprising the COG and PFAM profiles corresponding to both functionally characterized as well as uncharacterized protein families to detect significant similarities. The initial candidates for new nucleases were subsequently verified by sequence-structure threading, comparative modeling, and identification of potential active site residues. Conclusion In this article, we report identification of the PD-(D/EXK nuclease domain in numerous proteins implicated in interactions with DNA but with unknown structure and mechanism of action (such as putative recombinase RmuC, DNA competence factor CoiA, a DNA-binding protein SfsA, a large human protein predicted to be a DNA repair enzyme, predicted archaeal transcription regulators, and the head

  12. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran

    2002-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin is encoded by DMBT1 and identical to gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 is known for its Streptococcus mutans agglutinating properties. This 300-400 kDa glycoprotein is composed of conserved peptide motifs: 14...... SRCR domains that are separated by SRCR-interspersed domains (SIDs), 2 CUB (C1r/C1s Uegf Bmp1) domains, and a zona pellucida domain. We have searched for the peptide domains of agglutinin/DMBT1 responsible for bacteria binding. Digestion with endoproteinase Lys-C resulted in a protein fragment....... Strikingly, this peptide was also able to induce agglutination of S. mutans and a number of other bacteria. The repeated presence of this peptide in the native molecule endows agglutinin/DMBT1 with a general bacterial binding feature with a multivalent character. Moreover, our studies demonstrate...

  13. Cupincin: A Unique Protease Purified from Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Bran Is a New Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedhar, Roopesh; Kaul Tiku, Purnima

    2016-01-01

    Cupin superfamily is one of the most diverse super families. This study reports the purification and characterization of a novel cupin domain containing protease from rice bran for the first time. Hypothetical protein OsI_13867 was identified and named as cupincin. Cupincin was purified to 4.4 folds with a recovery of 4.9%. Cupincin had an optimum pH and temperature of pH 4.0 and 60 °C respectively. Cupincin was found to be a homotrimer, consisting of three distinct subunits with apparent molecular masses of 33.45 kDa, 22.35 kDa and 16.67 kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF, whereas it eluted as a single unit with an apparent molecular mass of 135.33 ± 3.52 kDa in analytical gel filtration and migrated as a single band in native page, suggesting its homogeneity. Sequence identity of cupincin was deduced by determining the amino-terminal sequence of the polypeptide chains and by and de novo sequencing. For understanding the hydrolysing mechanism of cupincin, its three-dimensional model was developed. Structural analysis indicated that cupincin contains His313, His326 and Glu318 with zinc ion as the putative active site residues, inhibition of enzyme activity by 1,10-phenanthroline and atomic absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of zinc ion. The cleavage specificity of cupincin towards oxidized B-chain of insulin was highly specific; cleaving at the Leu15-Tyr16 position, the specificity was also determined using neurotensin as a substrate, where it cleaved only at the Glu1-Tyr2 position. Limited proteolysis of the protease suggests a specific function for cupincin. These results demonstrated cupincin as a completely new protease.

  14. Cupincin: A Unique Protease Purified from Rice (Oryza sativa L. Bran Is a New Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopesh Sreedhar

    Full Text Available Cupin superfamily is one of the most diverse super families. This study reports the purification and characterization of a novel cupin domain containing protease from rice bran for the first time. Hypothetical protein OsI_13867 was identified and named as cupincin. Cupincin was purified to 4.4 folds with a recovery of 4.9%. Cupincin had an optimum pH and temperature of pH 4.0 and 60 °C respectively. Cupincin was found to be a homotrimer, consisting of three distinct subunits with apparent molecular masses of 33.45 kDa, 22.35 kDa and 16.67 kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF, whereas it eluted as a single unit with an apparent molecular mass of 135.33 ± 3.52 kDa in analytical gel filtration and migrated as a single band in native page, suggesting its homogeneity. Sequence identity of cupincin was deduced by determining the amino-terminal sequence of the polypeptide chains and by and de novo sequencing. For understanding the hydrolysing mechanism of cupincin, its three-dimensional model was developed. Structural analysis indicated that cupincin contains His313, His326 and Glu318 with zinc ion as the putative active site residues, inhibition of enzyme activity by 1,10-phenanthroline and atomic absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of zinc ion. The cleavage specificity of cupincin towards oxidized B-chain of insulin was highly specific; cleaving at the Leu15-Tyr16 position, the specificity was also determined using neurotensin as a substrate, where it cleaved only at the Glu1-Tyr2 position. Limited proteolysis of the protease suggests a specific function for cupincin. These results demonstrated cupincin as a completely new protease.

  15. Solution structure and phylogenetics of Prod1, a member of the three-finger protein superfamily implicated in salamander limb regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acely Garza-Garcia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following the amputation of a limb, newts and salamanders have the capability to regenerate the lost tissues via a complex process that takes place at the site of injury. Initially these cells undergo dedifferentiation to a state competent to regenerate the missing limb structures. Crucially, dedifferentiated cells have memory of their level of origin along the proximodistal (PD axis of the limb, a property known as positional identity. Notophthalmus viridescens Prod1 is a cell-surface molecule of the three-finger protein (TFP superfamily involved in the specification of newt limb PD identity. The TFP superfamily is a highly diverse group of metazoan proteins that includes snake venom toxins, mammalian transmembrane receptors and miscellaneous signaling molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the aim of identifying potential orthologs of Prod1, we have solved its 3D structure and compared it to other known TFPs using phylogenetic techniques. The analysis shows that TFP 3D structures group in different categories according to function. Prod1 clusters with other cell surface protein TFP domains including the complement regulator CD59 and the C-terminal domain of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. To infer orthology, a structure-based multiple sequence alignment of representative TFP family members was built and analyzed by phylogenetic methods. Prod1 has been proposed to be the salamander CD59 but our analysis fails to support this association. Prod1 is not a good match for any of the TFP families present in mammals and this result was further supported by the identification of the putative orthologs of both CD59 and N. viridescens Prod1 in sequence data for the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The available data suggest that Prod1, and thereby its role in encoding PD identity, is restricted to salamanders. The lack of comparable limb-regenerative capability in other adult vertebrates could be

  16. Protogenin, a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is implicated in the development of the mouse lower first molar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Protogenin (Prtg) has been identified as a gene which is highly expressed in the mouse mandible at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) by a cDNA subtraction method between mandibles at E10.5 and E12.0. Prtg is a new member of the deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC) family, which is composed of DCC, Neogenin, Punc and Nope. Although these members play an important role in the development of the embryonic central nervous system, recent research has also shed on the non-neuronal organization. However, very little is known regarding the fetal requirement of the non-neuronal organization for Prtg and how this may be associated with the tooth germ development. This study examined the functional implications of Prtg in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. Results Ptrg is preferentially expressed in the early stage of organogenesis. Prtg mRNA and protein were widely expressed in the mesenchymal cells in the mandible at E10.5. The oral epithelial cells were also positive for Prtg. The expression intensity of Prtg after E12.0 was markedly reduced in the mesenchymal cells of the mandible, and was restricted to the area where the tooth bud was likely to be formed. Signals were also observed in the epithelial cells of the tooth germ. Weak signals were observed in the inner enamel epithelial cells at E16.0 and E18.0. An inhibition assay using a hemagglutinating virus of Japan-liposome containing Prtg antisense-phosphorothioated-oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-S-ODN) in cultured mandibles at E10.5 showed a significant growth inhibition in the tooth germ. The relationship between Prtg and the odontogenesis-related genes was examined in mouse E10.5 mandible, and we verified that the Bmp-4 expression had significantly been decreased in the mouse E10.5 mandible 24 hr after treatment with Prtg AS-S-ODN. Conclusion These results indicated that the Prtg might be related to the initial morphogenesis of the tooth germ leading to the differentiation of the inner enamel

  17. Protogenin, a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is implicated in the development of the mouse lower first molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Hiroko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protogenin (Prtg has been identified as a gene which is highly expressed in the mouse mandible at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5 by a cDNA subtraction method between mandibles at E10.5 and E12.0. Prtg is a new member of the deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC family, which is composed of DCC, Neogenin, Punc and Nope. Although these members play an important role in the development of the embryonic central nervous system, recent research has also shed on the non-neuronal organization. However, very little is known regarding the fetal requirement of the non-neuronal organization for Prtg and how this may be associated with the tooth germ development. This study examined the functional implications of Prtg in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. Results Ptrg is preferentially expressed in the early stage of organogenesis. Prtg mRNA and protein were widely expressed in the mesenchymal cells in the mandible at E10.5. The oral epithelial cells were also positive for Prtg. The expression intensity of Prtg after E12.0 was markedly reduced in the mesenchymal cells of the mandible, and was restricted to the area where the tooth bud was likely to be formed. Signals were also observed in the epithelial cells of the tooth germ. Weak signals were observed in the inner enamel epithelial cells at E16.0 and E18.0. An inhibition assay using a hemagglutinating virus of Japan-liposome containing Prtg antisense-phosphorothioated-oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-S-ODN in cultured mandibles at E10.5 showed a significant growth inhibition in the tooth germ. The relationship between Prtg and the odontogenesis-related genes was examined in mouse E10.5 mandible, and we verified that the Bmp-4 expression had significantly been decreased in the mouse E10.5 mandible 24 hr after treatment with Prtg AS-S-ODN. Conclusion These results indicated that the Prtg might be related to the initial morphogenesis of the tooth germ leading to the

  18. SEMP1, a senescence-associated cDNA isolated from human mammary epithelial cells, is a member of an epithelial membrane protein superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisshelm, K; Machl, A; Planitzer, S; Robertson, R; Kubbies, M; Hosier, S

    1999-01-21

    We have cloned a human cDNA, SEMP1 (senescence-associated epithelial membrane protein 1), using differential display (DD) of mRNA. We compared mRNA expression profiles between cultured normal senescent human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) and proliferating, early passage HMECs. From the amino acid sequence of the open reading frame (ORF) of the cDNA, we infer that the protein belongs to a family of membrane-associated, epithelial cell-specific proteins. The translation product has 91% identity to a mouse protein, claudin-1, a tight junction (TJ)-associated protein. SEMP1 mRNA is expressed in human tissues, including adult and fetal liver, pancreas, placenta, adrenals, prostate and ovary but at low or undetectable levels in a number of human breast cancer cell lines. SEMP1 is a member of a superfamily of epithelial membrane proteins (EMPs), which may have multiple potential functions, including maintenance and regulation of cell polarity and permeability, perhaps through mechanisms involving tight junctions.

  19. Overexpression, on-column refolding and isotopic labeling of Hahellin from Hahella chejuensis, a putative member of the betagamma-crystallin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul K; Sharma, Yogendra; Chary, Kandala V R

    2008-04-01

    A gene which encodes a hypothetical protein of 40 kDa has been identified in the genome of a marine bacterium Hahella chejuensis, as a putative member of betagamma-crystallin superfamily. This hypothetical protein contains a putative betagamma-crystallin-like domain, along with other domains for carbohydrate binding regions. It is named as Hahellin. A PCR amplified stretch of 92-amino acid residue long protein was cloned into pET21a vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3)pLysS cells. The recombinant Hahellin, produced as inclusion bodies, was estimated to be around 50% of the total cellular protein content which was solubilized in 8 M urea. The protein was purified and refolded using an anion exchange column. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry revealed the purity and monomeric nature of the protein. Further, a method to prepare isotopically (15N/13C) labeled protein with high yield for NMR studies is reported. The uniformly 15N-labeled Hahellin thus produced has been characterized by recording a sensitivity enhanced 2D [15N]-[1H] HSQC spectrum. The well, dispersed peaks in the spectrum confirm that the protein is indeed well folded and suitable for further studies by NMR.

  20. First haplosporidan parasite reported infecting a member of the Superfamily Pinnoidea (Pinna nobilis) during a mortality event in Alicante (Spain, Western Mediterranean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darriba, Susana

    2017-09-01

    Several stages of a haplosporidan parasite, including spores, were detected infecting three out of four specimens of the Pen Shell Pinna nobilis from the coast of Alicante (Western Mediterranean). A mortality event initiated few weeks before the sampling. The infection was systemic in the connective tissue, with free uni-nucleate stages and early plasmodia, whereas sporulation process took place in the digestive tubules disrupting them. Morphological details, by light and transmission electron microscopy, and PCR amplification confirmed that the parasite belongs to the haplosporidan group. Spores were pleomorphic, usually elongated ovoid, with round to elongated haplosporosomes-like in the sporoplasma. The operculum was situated in the apical zone of the wall, with an external lid, and the nucleus tended to be eccentric in the basal zone. Spore ornamentation was not observed. The single uninfected specimen appeared to be healthy. This is the first report of a haplosporidan parasite infecting a member of the Superfamily Pinnoidea and this is the first histopathological study of a mortality event in the endangered and protected P. nobilis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Three members of the human cystatin gene superfamily, AHSG, HRG, and KNG, map within one megabase of genomic DNA at 3q27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzu, P; Baldini, A

    1995-01-01

    While constructing a contig in the human chromosome region 3q27, we identified two YAC clones that were positive for the polymorphic marker D3S1602. One of these clones was also positive for a sequence-tagged site derived from the kininogen (KNG) gene. Because of the known evolutionary and structural relationship of KNG to other members of the cystatin gene superfamily, we tested the physical linkage of the genes encoding alpha-2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG), KNG, and histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), all of which were previously mapped to the long arm of chromosome 3. Our results show the colocalization of the three genes in two independent, partially overlapping YAC clones. The genomic inserts of the two clones were 1 Mb and 1.3 Mb in size, indicating that the three genes map within 1 Mb of DNA. The largest YAC was also positive for the polymorphic marker D3S1262, substantiating previously reported data of genetic linkage between this marker and HRG. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the two YAC clones to chromosome band 3q27.

  2. Disruption of the neurexin 1 gene is associated with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rujescu, Dan; Ingason, Andres; Cichon, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Deletions within the neurexin 1 gene (NRXN1; 2p16.3) are associated with autism and have also been reported in two families with schizophrenia. We examined NRXN1, and the closely related NRXN2 and NRXN3 genes, for copy number variants (CNVs) in 2977 schizophrenia patients and 33 746 controls from...

  3. Tumour necrosis factor superfamily member 15 (Tnfsf15) facilitates lymphangiogenesis via up-regulation of Vegfr3 gene expression in lymphatic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ting-Ting; Xu, Guo-Ce; Qi, Jian-Wei; Yang, Gui-Li; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Hai-Lin; Xu, Li-Xia; Xiang, Rong; Xiao, Guozhi; Cao, Huiling; Wei, Yuquan; Zhang, Qiang-Zhe; Li, Lu-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Lymphangiogenesis is essential in embryonic development but is rare in adults. It occurs, however, in many disease conditions including cancers. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C/D (VEGF-C/D) and VEGF receptor-3 (Vegfr3) play a critical role in the regulation of lymphangiogenesis. We investigated how the VEGF-C/Vegfr3 signalling system is regulated by tumour necrosis factor superfamily member 15 (Tnfsf15), an endothelium-derived cytokine. We report here that Tnfsf15, which is known to induce apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells, can promote lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) growth and migration, stimulate lymphangiogenesis, and facilitate lymphatic circulation. Treatment of mouse LECs with Tnfsf15 results in up-regulation of Vegfr3 expression; this can be inhibited by gene silencing of death domain-containing receptor-3 (DR3; Tnfrsf25), a cell surface receptor for Tnfsf15, with siRNA, or by blocking Tnfsf15-DR3 interaction with a Tnfsf15 neutralizing antibody, 4-3H. Additionally, Tnfsf15/DR3 signalling pathways in LECs include activation of NF-κB. Tnfsf15-overexpressing transgenic mice exhibit a marked enhancement of lymph drainage; this is confirmed by treatment of wild-type mice with intraperitoneal injection of recombinant Tnfsf15. Moreover, systemic treatment of pregnant Tnfsf15 transgenic mice with 4-3H leads to inhibition of embryonic lymphangiogenesis. Our data indicate that Tnfsf15, a cytokine produced largely by endothelial cells, facilitates lymphangiogenesis by up-regulating Vegfr3 gene expression in LECs, contributing to the maintenance of the homeostasis of the circulatory system. This finding also suggests that Tnfsf15 may be of potential value as a therapeutic tool for the treatment of lymphoedema. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Structural Determinants of Substrate Recognition in the HAD Superfamily Member D-glycero-D-manno-Heptose-1,7-bisphosphate Phosphatase (GmhB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, H.; Wang, L; Huang, H; Peisach, E; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K

    2010-01-01

    The haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase (HAD) enzyme superfamily is the largest family of phosphohydrolases. In HAD members, the structural elements that provide the binding interactions that support substrate specificity are separated from those that orchestrate catalysis. For most HAD phosphatases, a cap domain functions in substrate recognition. However, for the HAD phosphatases that lack a cap domain, an alternate strategy for substrate selection must be operative. One such HAD phosphatase, GmhB of the HisB subfamily, was selected for structure-function analysis. Herein, the X-ray crystallographic structures of Escherichia coli GmhB in the apo form (1.6 {angstrom} resolution), in a complex with Mg{sup 2+} and orthophosphate (1.8 {angstrom} resolution), and in a complex with Mg{sup 2+} and D-glycero-D-manno-heptose 1{beta},7-bisphosphate (2.2 {angstrom} resolution) were determined, in addition to the structure of Bordetella bronchiseptica GmhB bound to Mg{sup 2+} and orthophosphate (1.7 {angstrom} resolution). The structures show that in place of a cap domain, the GmhB catalytic site is elaborated by three peptide inserts or loops that pack to form a concave, semicircular surface around the substrate leaving group. Structure-guided kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants was conducted in parallel with a bioinformatics study of sequence diversification within the HisB subfamily to identify loop residues that serve as substrate recognition elements and that distinguish GmhB from its subfamily counterpart, the histidinol-phosphate phosphatase domain of HisB. We show that GmhB and the histidinol-phosphate phosphatase domain use the same design of three substrate recognition loops inserted into the cap domain yet, through selective residue usage on the loops, have achieved unique substrate specificity and thus novel biochemical function.

  5. The HER2- and Heregulin β1 (HRG)-inducible TNFR Superfamily Member Fn14 Promotes HRG-driven Cell Migration, Invasion and MMP9 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrani, Kaushal; Keri, Ruth A.; Galisteo, Rebeca; Brown, Sharron A. N.; Morgan, Sarah J.; Ghosh, Arundhati; Tran, Nhan L.; Winkles, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2 overexpression occurs in 15–20% of all breast cancers and is associated with increased metastatic potential and poor patient survival. Abnormal HER2 activation, either through HER2 overexpression or heregulin (HRG):HER3 binding, elicits the formation of potent HER2-HER3 heterodimers and drives breast cancer cell growth and metastasis. In a previous study, we found that fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), a member of the TNF receptor superfamily, was frequently overexpressed in human HER2+ breast tumors. We report here that HER2 and Fn14 are also co-expressed in mammary tumors that develop in two different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. In consideration of these findings, we investigated whether HER2 activation in breast cancer cells could directly induce Fn14 gene expression. We found that transient or stable transfection of MCF7 cells with a HER2 expression plasmid increased Fn14 protein levels. Also, HRG1-β1 treatment of MCF7 cells transiently induced Fn14 mRNA and protein expression. Both the HER2- and HRG1-β1-induced increase in Fn14 expression in MCF7 cells as well as basal Fn14 expression in HER2 gene-amplified AU565 cells could be reduced by HER2 kinase inhibition with lapatinib or combined HER2 and HER3 depletion using siRNA. We also report that Fn14-depleted, HER2-overexpressing MCF7 cells have reduced basal cell migration capacity and reduced HRG1-β1-stimulated cell migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression. Together, these results indicate that Fn14 may be an important downstream regulator of HER2/HER3-driven breast cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:23378579

  6. A matter of balance: role of neurexin and neuroligin at the synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Marie Louise; Owczarek, Sylwia

    2013-06-01

    Neurexins and neuroligins are synaptic cell adhesion molecules. Neurexins are primary located on the presynaptic membrane, whereas neuroligins are strictly postsynaptic proteins. Since their discovery, the knowledge of neurexins and neuroligins has expanded, implicating them in various neuronal processes, including the differentiation, maturation, stabilization, and plasticity of both inhibitory and excitatory synapses. Here, we review the most recent results regarding the structure and function of these cell adhesion molecules.

  7. Disruption of M-T5, a novel myxoma virus gene member of poxvirus host range superfamily, results in dramatic attenuation of myxomatosis in infected European rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossman, K; Lee, S F; Barry, M; Boshkov, L; McFadden, G

    1996-07-01

    Myxoma virus is a pathogenic poxvirus that induces a lethal myxomatosis disease profile in European rabbits, which is characterized by fulminating lesions at the primary site of inoculation, rapid dissemination to secondary internal organs and peripheral external sites, and supervening gram-negative bacterial infection. Here we describe the role of a novel myxoma virus protein encoded by the M-T5 open reading frame during pathogenesis. The myxoma virus M-T5 protein possesses no significant sequence homology to nonviral proteins but is a member of a larger poxviral superfamily designated host range proteins. An M-T5- mutant virus was constructed by disruption of both copies of the M-T5 gene followed by insertion of the selectable marker p7.5Ecogpt. Although the M-T5- deletion mutant replicated with wild-type kinetics in rabbit fibroblasts, infection of a rabbit CD4+ T-cell line (RL5) with the myxoma virus M-T5- mutant virus resulted in the rapid and complete cessation of both host and viral protein synthesis, accompanied by the manifestation of all the classical features of programmed cell death. Infection of primary rabbit peripheral mononuclear cells with the myxoma virus M-T5-mutant virus resulted in the apoptotic death of nonadherent lymphocytes but not adherent monocytes. Within the European rabbit, disruption of the M-T5 open reading frame caused a dramatic attenuation of the rapidly lethal myxomatosis infection, and none of the infected rabbits displayed any of the characteristic features of myxomatosis. The two most significant histological observations in rabbits infected with the M-T5-mutant virus were (i) the lack of progression of the infection past the primary site of inoculation, coupled with the establishment of a rapid and effective inflammatory reaction, and (ii) the inability of the virus to initiate a cellular reaction within secondary immune organs. We conclude that M-T5 functions as a critical virulence factor by allowing productive infection of

  8. Structural and Biochemical Investigation of PglF from Campylobacter jejuni Reveals a New Mechanism for a Member of the Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegert, Alexander S. [Department; Thoden, James B. [Department; Schoenhofen, Ian C. [National; Watson, David C. [National; Young, N. Martin [National; Tipton, Peter A. [Department; Holden, Hazel M. [Department

    2017-11-03

    Within recent years it has become apparent that protein glycosylation is not limited to eukaryotes. Indeed, in Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative bacterium, more than 60 of its proteins are known to be glycosylated. One of the sugars found in such glycosylated proteins is 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-α-d-glucopyranose, hereafter referred to as QuiNAc4NAc. The pathway for its biosynthesis, initiating with UDP-GlcNAc, requires three enzymes referred to as PglF, PglE, and PlgD. The focus of this investigation is on PglF, an NAD+-dependent sugar 4,6-dehydratase known to belong to the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Specifically, PglF catalyzes the first step in the pathway, namely, the dehydration of UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-α-d-xylo-hexos-4-ulose. Most members of the SDR superfamily contain a characteristic signature sequence of YXXXK where the conserved tyrosine functions as a catalytic acid or a base. Strikingly, in PglF, this residue is a methionine. Here we describe a detailed structural and functional investigation of PglF from C. jejuni. For this investigation five X-ray structures were determined to resolutions of 2.0 Å or better. In addition, kinetic analyses of the wild-type and site-directed variants were performed. On the basis of the data reported herein, a new catalytic mechanism for a SDR superfamily member is proposed that does not require the typically conserved tyrosine residue.

  9. DMBT1, a new member of the SRCR superfamily, on chromosome 10q25.3-26.1 is deleted in malignant brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, J; Wiemann, S; Scheurlen, W

    1997-01-01

    Loss of sequences from human chromosome 10q has been associated with the progression of human cancer. Medulloblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme are the most common malignant brain tumours in children and adults, respectively. In glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive form, 80% of the tumo......Loss of sequences from human chromosome 10q has been associated with the progression of human cancer. Medulloblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme are the most common malignant brain tumours in children and adults, respectively. In glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive form, 80......% of the tumours show loss of 10q. We have used representational difference analysis to identify a homozygous deletion at 10q25.3-26.1 in a medulloblastoma cell line and have cloned a novel gene, DMBT1, spanning this deletion. DMBT1 shows homology to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily...

  10. Sequence specific 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of Hahellin from Hahella chejuensis, a putative member of the betagamma-crystallin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul K; Sharma, Yogendra; Chary, K V R

    2008-12-01

    The sequence specific (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of Hahellin, a putative member of betagamma-crystallin family, from Hahella Chejuensis, have been accomplished by NMR spectroscopy. The resonance assignments reveal that the protein adopts predominantly a beta-sheet conformation as in the case of betagamma-crystallin folds.

  11. LRRTM3 Regulates Excitatory Synapse Development through Alternative Splicing and Neurexin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won Um

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The four members of the LRRTM family (LRRTM1-4 are postsynaptic adhesion molecules essential for excitatory synapse development. They have also been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we focus on LRRTM3, showing that two distinct LRRTM3 variants generated by alternative splicing regulate LRRTM3 interaction with PSD-95, but not its excitatory synapse-promoting activity. Overexpression of either LRRTM3 variant increased excitatory synapse density in dentate gyrus (DG granule neurons, whereas LRRTM3 knockdown decreased it. LRRTM3 also controlled activity-regulated AMPA receptor surface expression in an alternative splicing-dependent manner. Furthermore, Lrrtm3-knockout mice displayed specific alterations in excitatory synapse density, excitatory synaptic transmission and excitability in DG granule neurons but not in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Lastly, LRRTM3 required only specific splice variants of presynaptic neurexins for their synaptogenic activity. Collectively, our data highlight alternative splicing and differential presynaptic ligand utilization in the regulation of LRRTMs, revealing key regulatory mechanisms for excitatory synapse development.

  12. The Structure of Neurexin 1[alpha] Reveals Features Promoting a Role as Synaptic Organizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fang; Venugopal, Vandavasi; Murray, Beverly; Rudenko, Gabby (Michigan)

    2014-10-02

    {alpha}-Neurexins are essential synaptic adhesion molecules implicated in autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The {alpha}-neurexin extracellular domain consists of six LNS domains interspersed by three EGF-like repeats and interacts with many different proteins in the synaptic cleft. To understand how {alpha}-neurexins might function as synaptic organizers, we solved the structure of the neurexin 1{alpha} extracellular domain (n1{alpha}) to 2.65 {angstrom}. The L-shaped molecule can be divided into a flexible repeat I (LNS1-EGF-A-LNS2), a rigid horseshoe-shaped repeat II (LNS3-EGF-B-LNS4) with structural similarity to so-called reelin repeats, and an extended repeat III (LNS5-EGF-B-LNS6) with controlled flexibility. A 2.95 {angstrom} structure of n1{alpha} carrying splice insert SS3 in LNS4 reveals that SS3 protrudes as a loop and does not alter the rigid arrangement of repeat II. The global architecture imposed by conserved structural features enables {alpha}-neurexins to recruit and organize proteins in distinct and variable ways, influenced by splicing, thereby promoting synaptic function.

  13. Regulation of Neurexin 1[beta] Tertiary Structure and Ligand Binding through Alternative Splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Kaiser C.; Kuczynska, Dorota A.; Wu, Irene J.; Murray, Beverly H.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Rudenko, Gabby (Michigan)

    2008-08-04

    Neurexins and neuroligins play an essential role in synapse function, and their alterations are linked to autistic spectrum disorder. Interactions between neurexins and neuroligins regulate inhibitory and excitatory synaptogenesis in vitro through a splice-insert signaling code. In particular, neurexin 1{beta} carrying an alternative splice insert at site SS{number_sign}4 interacts with neuroligin 2 (found predominantly at inhibitory synapses) but much less so with other neuroligins (those carrying an insert at site B and prevalent at excitatory synapses). The structure of neurexin 1{beta}+SS{number_sign}4 reveals dramatic rearrangements to the 'hypervariable surface', the binding site for neuroligins. The splice insert protrudes as a long helix into space, triggers conversion of loop {beta}10-{beta}11 into a helix rearranging the binding site for neuroligins, and rearranges the Ca{sup 2+}-binding site required for ligand binding, increasing its affinity. Our structures reveal the mechanism by which neurexin 1{beta} isoforms acquire neuroligin splice isoform selectivity.

  14. Calsyntenins Function as Synaptogenic Adhesion Molecules in Concert with Neurexins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won Um

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple synaptic adhesion molecules govern synapse formation. Here, we propose calsyntenin-3/alcadein-β as a synapse organizer that specifically induces presynaptic differentiation in heterologous synapse-formation assays. Calsyntenin-3 (CST-3 is highly expressed during various postnatal periods of mouse brain development. The simultaneous knockdown of all three CSTs, but not CST-3 alone, decreases inhibitory, but not excitatory, synapse densities in cultured hippocampal neurons. Moreover, the knockdown of CSTs specifically reduces inhibitory synaptic transmission in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, the loss of CSTs induces a concomitant decrease in neuron soma size in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Furthermore, α-neurexins (α-Nrxs are components of a CST-3 complex involved in CST-3-mediated presynaptic differentiation. However, CST-3 does not directly bind to Nrxs. Viewed together, these data suggest that the three CSTs redundantly regulate inhibitory synapse formation, inhibitory synapse function, and neuron development in concert with Nrxs.

  15. Sea urchin ovoperoxidase: oocyte-specific member of a heme-dependent peroxidase superfamily that functions in the block to polyspermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, G J; Horiuchi, Y; Wessel, G M

    1998-01-01

    Ovoperoxidase is one of several oocyte-specific proteins that are stored within sea urchin cortical granules, released during the cortical reaction, and incorporated into the newly formed fertilization envelope. Ovoperoxidase plays a particularly important role in this process, crosslinking the envelope into a hardened matrix that is insensitive to biochemical and mechanical challenges and thus providing a permanent block to polyspermy. Here we present the primary structures of two ovoperoxidases as predicted from cDNAs cloned from the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (AF035380) and Lytechinus variegatus (AF035381). We also present a proposed scheme for the post-translational processing of ovoperoxidase based upon comparisons between the cDNA and protein structures and taking into account previously published reports. The sea urchin ovoperoxidase sequences conform to a profile shared by members of a heme-dependent animal peroxidase family, including the mammalian myelo-, lacto-, eosinophil, and thyroid peroxidases. Using in situ RNA hybridizations, we showed that the mRNA of S. purpuratus ovoperoxidase (4 kb) is present exclusively in oocytes, and is turned over rapidly following germinal vesicle breakdown. Taking into account our immunoblot and N-terminal sequencing data along with reports from similar peroxidases, we propose that ovoperoxidases are synthesized in a pre-pro form and proteolytically processed to result in the 70 and 50 kDa forms that are found in the fertilization envelope. The sequence and structural data presented here will facilitate our continuing studies of the biogenesis of cortical granules and the fertilization envelope. Additionally, since ovoperoxidase activities have been reported in a wide range of animals, these cDNAs will be useful in uncovering similar peroxidases used in the fertilization reactions of other metazoan eggs.

  16. Isolation and molecular characterisation of the benzoate-para-hydroxylase gene (bphA) of Aspergillus niger: a member of a new gene family of the cytochrome P450 superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gorcom, R F; Boschloo, J G; Kuijvenhoven, A; Lange, J; van Vark, A J; Bos, C J; van Balken, J A; Pouwels, P H; van den Hondel, C A

    1990-09-01

    The gene coding for benzoate-para-hydroxylase (bphA) of Aspergillus niger was cloned using differential hybridisation techniques and complementation of mutants deficient in this enzyme activity. The nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined, the presence of two introns was shown and the transcription start and termination sites were determined. The structure of the mRNA upstream from the long open reading frame (ORF) is unusual. It contains two small, overlapping ORFs whose function is unknown. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the protein with the sequences present in the databanks, indicated a significant similarity of BPH to the superfamily of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Further analysis revealed that this protein is a member of a new P450 gene family designated P450LIII. The gene is designated CYP53. To increase the BPH activity of A. niger, multiple copies of the bphA gene were introduced into the genome of a recipient strain by transformation. Although increased intracellular levels of the BPH protein could be detected, the BPH enzyme activity was decreased, suggesting titration of another essential component.

  17. The ribonuclease A superfamily : general discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, JJ; Kleineidam, RG

    Enzymic properties of members of the ribonuclease A superfamily, like the activity on RNA, the preference for either cytosine or uracil in the primary binding site B-1, the preference for the other side of the cleaved phosphodiester bond, the B-2 site, and features of the two noncatalytic

  18. Cartography of neurexin alternative splicing mapped by single-molecule long-read mRNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treutlein, Barbara; Gokce, Ozgun; Quake, Stephen R; Südhof, Thomas C

    2014-04-01

    Neurexins are evolutionarily conserved presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that are essential for normal synapse formation and synaptic transmission. Indirect evidence has indicated that extensive alternative splicing of neurexin mRNAs may produce hundreds if not thousands of neurexin isoforms, but no direct evidence for such diversity has been available. Here we use unbiased long-read sequencing of full-length neurexin (Nrxn)1α, Nrxn1β, Nrxn2β, Nrxn3α, and Nrxn3β mRNAs to systematically assess how many sites of alternative splicing are used in neurexins with a significant frequency, and whether alternative splicing events at these sites are independent of each other. In sequencing more than 25,000 full-length mRNAs, we identified a novel, abundantly used alternatively spliced exon of Nrxn1α and Nrxn3α (referred to as alternatively spliced sequence 6) that encodes a 9-residue insertion in the flexible hinge region between the fifth LNS (laminin-α, neurexin, sex hormone-binding globulin) domain and the third EGF-like sequence. In addition, we observed several larger-scale events of alternative splicing that deleted multiple domains and were much less frequent than the canonical six sites of alternative splicing in neurexins. All of the six canonical events of alternative splicing appear to be independent of each other, suggesting that neurexins may exhibit an even larger isoform diversity than previously envisioned and comprise thousands of variants. Our data are consistent with the notion that α-neurexins represent extracellular protein-interaction scaffolds in which different LNS and EGF domains mediate distinct interactions that affect diverse functions and are independently regulated by independent events of alternative splicing.

  19. Effect of Wenhua Juanbi Recipe () on expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand, osteoprotegerin, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14 in rats with collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi-de; Wang, Yun-Qing; Cai, Long; Ye, Li-Hong; Wang, Fang; Feng, Ying-Ying

    2017-03-01

    To study the effect of Wenhua Juanbi Recipe (, WJR) on expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14 (TNFRSF14, also known as LIGHT) in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of bovine collagen type-II at the tail base. Sixty CIA rats were randomly assigned (10 animals/group) to: model, methotrexate (MTX)-treated (0.78 mg/kg body weight), and WJR-treated (22.9 g/kg) groups. Healthy normal rats (n=10) were used as the normal control. Treatments or saline were administered once daily by oral gavage. Rats were sacrifificed at day 28 post-treatment and knee synovium and peripheral blood serum were collected. Toe swelling degree and expression of RANKL, OPG, and LIGHT were determined by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Compared with the normal group, toe swelling degree was signifificantly increased in the model group (P<0.01). After treatment, toe swelling degree decreased signifificantly in the WJR and MTX groups compared with the model group (P<0.01). Compared with the normal group, expression of RANKL and LIGHT were signifificantly increased and OPG signifificantly decreased in peripheral blood and synovium of the model group (P<0.01). Conversely, RANKL and LIGHT expression were signifificantly reduced and OPG increased in the WJR and MTX groups compared with the model group (P<0.01). No statistically significant difference existed between WJR and MTX groups. WJR likely acts by reducing RANKL expression and increasing OPG expression, thus inhibiting RANKL/RANK interaction and reducing LIGHT expression, thereby inhibiting osteoclast formation/activation to block bone erosion.

  20. beta-Neurexin is a ligand for the Staphylococcus aureus MSCRAMM SdrC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Magda Barbu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gram-positive bacteria contain a family of surface proteins that are covalently anchored to the cell wall of the organism. These cell-wall anchored (CWA proteins appear to play key roles in the interactions between pathogenic organisms and the host. A subfamily of the CWA has a common structural organization with multiple domains adopting characteristic IgG-like folds. The identified microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs belong to this subfamily, as does SdrC from S. aureus. However, an interactive host ligand for the putative MSCRAMM SdrC was not previously identified. We have screened a phage display peptide library and identified a peptide sequence found in beta-neurexin that binds SdrC. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the identified sequence as well as a recombinant form of the beta-neurexin 1 exodomain binds SdrC with high affinity and specificity. Furthermore, expression of SdrC on bacteria greatly enhances microbial adherence to cultured mammalian cells expressing beta-neurexin on their surface. Taken together, our experimental results demonstrate that beta-neurexin is a ligand for SdrC. This interaction involves a specific sequence located in the N-terminal region of the mammalian protein and the N(2N(3 domain of the MSCRAMM. The fact that these two proteins interact when expressed on the appropriate cells demonstrates the functionality of the interaction. Possible implications of this interaction are discussed.

  1. Identification of the Mg2+-binding site in the P-type ATPase and phosphatase members of the HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) superfamily by structural similarity to the response regulator protein CheY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, Ivo S.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1999-01-01

    The large HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) superfamily of hydrolases comprises P-type ATPases, phosphatases, epoxide hydrolases and L-2-haloacid dehalogenases. A comparison of the three-dimensional structure of L-2-haloacid dehalogenase with that of the response regulator protein CheY allowed the

  2. Diurnal rhythms in neurexins transcripts and inhibitory/excitatory synapse scaffold proteins in the biological clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Reznik, Mika; Jilg, Anje; Lerner, Hadas; Earnest, David J; Zisapel, Nava

    2012-01-01

    The neurexin genes (NRXN1/2/3) encode two families (α and β) of highly polymorphic presynaptic proteins that are involved in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance. Recent studies indicate that neuronal activation and memory formation affect NRXN1/2/3α expression and alternative splicing at splice sites 3 and 4 (SS#3/SS#4). Neurons in the biological clock residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN) act as self-sustained oscillators, generating rhythms in gene expression and electrical activity, to entrain circadian bodily rhythms to the 24 hours day/night cycles. Cell autonomous oscillations in NRXN1/2/3α expression and SS#3/SS#4 exons splicing and their links to rhythms in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in the circadian clock were explored. NRXN1/2/3α expression and SS#3/SS#4 splicing, levels of neurexin-2α and the synaptic scaffolding proteins PSD-95 and gephyrin (representing excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively) were studied in mRNA and protein extracts obtained from SCN of C3H/J mice at different times of the 24 hours day/night cycle. Further studies explored the circadian oscillations in these components and causality relationships in immortalized rat SCN2.2 cells. Diurnal rhythms in mNRXN1α and mNRXN2α transcription, SS#3/SS#4 exon-inclusion and PSD-95 gephyrin and neurexin-2α levels were found in the SCN in vivo. No such rhythms were found with mNRXN3α. SCN2.2 cells also exhibited autonomous circadian rhythms in rNRXN1/2 expression SS#3/SS#4 exon inclusion and PSD-95, gephyrin and neurexin-2α levels. rNRXN3α and rNRXN1/2β were not expressed. Causal relationships were demonstrated, by use of specific siRNAs, between rNRXN2α SS#3 exon included transcripts and gephyrin levels in the SCN2.2 cells. These results show for the first time dynamic, cell autonomous, diurnal rhythms in expression and splicing of NRXN1/2 and subsequent effects on the expression of neurexin-2α and postsynaptic scaffolding proteins

  3. Phylogenomic analysis of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujnicki Janusz M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GIY-YIG domain was initially identified in homing endonucleases and later in other selfish mobile genetic elements (including restriction enzymes and non-LTR retrotransposons and in enzymes involved in DNA repair and recombination. However, to date no systematic search for novel members of the GIY-YIG superfamily or comparative analysis of these enzymes has been reported. Results We carried out database searches to identify all members of known GIY-YIG nuclease families. Multiple sequence alignments together with predicted secondary structures of identified families were represented as Hidden Markov Models (HMM and compared by the HHsearch method to the uncharacterized protein families gathered in the COG, KOG, and PFAM databases. This analysis allowed for extending the GIY-YIG superfamily to include members of COG3680 and a number of proteins not classified in COGs and to predict that these proteins may function as nucleases, potentially involved in DNA recombination and/or repair. Finally, all old and new members of the GIY-YIG superfamily were compared and analyzed to infer the phylogenetic tree. Conclusion An evolutionary classification of the GIY-YIG superfamily is presented for the very first time, along with the structural annotation of all (subfamilies. It provides a comprehensive picture of sequence-structure-function relationships in this superfamily of nucleases, which will help to design experiments to study the mechanism of action of known members (especially the uncharacterized ones and will facilitate the prediction of function for the newly discovered ones.

  4. The ribonuclease A superfamily - Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, JJ

    In this multi-author issue several aspects of the ribonuclease A superfamily are reviewed. This superfamily can be subdivided in a number of mammalian and other vertebrate ribonuclease families. In the introduction chapter the titles of the other contributions are presented. There is little

  5. Update on the olfactory receptor (OR gene superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olender Tsviya

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The olfactory receptor gene (OR superfamily is the largest in the human genome. The superfamily contains 390 putatively functional genes and 465 pseudogenes arranged into 18 gene families and 300 subfamilies. Even members within the same subfamily are often located on different chromosomes. OR genes are located on all autosomes except chromosome 20, plus the X chromosome but not the Y chromosome. The gene:pseudogene ratio is lowest in human, higher in chimpanzee and highest in rat and mouse -- most likely reflecting the greater need of olfaction for survival in the rodent than in the human. The OR genes undergo allelic exclusion, each sensory neurone expressing usually only one odourant receptor allele; the mechanism by which this phenomenon is regulated is not yet understood. The nomenclature system (based on evolutionary divergence of genes into families and subfamilies of the OR gene superfamily has been designed similarly to that originally used for the CYP gene superfamily.

  6. Allergens of the cupin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, E N; Jenkins, J; Marigheto, N; Belton, P S; Gunning, A P; Morris, V J

    2002-11-01

    The cupin family comprises a family of proteins possessing a common beta-barrel structure that is thought to have originated in a prokaryotic ancestor. This structural motif is found as a single domain in fungal spherulins, fern sporulins and the germins/oxalate oxidase proteins of plants, while the globular storage proteins of plants, called legumins (11 S) and euvicilins (7 S), are two-domain cupins. The 11 S globulins are hexameric heteroligomeric proteins of M (r) approximately 360000, with each subunit comprising an acidic 30000-40000- M (r) polypeptide that is disulphide-linked to a 20000- M (r) basic polypeptide. A number of cupins have been identified as major plant food allergens, including the 7 S globulins of soybean (beta-conglycinin), peanut (conarachin; Ara h 1), walnut (Jug r 2) and lentil, and the 11 S globulins of peanut (arachin; Ara h 3), soybean (glycinin) and possibly also coconut and walnut. Other members of the cupin superfamily have not been identified as allergens, with the exception of one germin (germination-specific protein) from pepper. Cupins are generally very stable proteins. A summary of our current knowledge of allergenic seed storage globulins will be presented, together with an overview of cupin structure and stability properties, as illustrated by the allergenic soya globulins, glycinin and beta-conglycinin.

  7. Conformational Plasticity in the Transsynaptic Neurexin-Cerebellin-Glutamate Receptor Adhesion Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shouqiang; Seven, Alpay B.; Wang, Jing; Skiniotis, Georgios; Özkan, Engin (UC); (Michigan)

    2016-12-01

    Synaptic specificity is a defining property of neural networks. In the cerebellum, synapses between parallel fiber neurons and Purkinje cells are specified by the simultaneous interactions of secreted protein cerebellin with pre-synaptic neurexin and post-synaptic delta-type glutamate receptors (GluD). Here, we determined the crystal structures of the trimeric C1q-like domain of rat cerebellin-1, and the first complete ectodomain of a GluD, rat GluD2. Cerebellin binds to the LNS6 domain of α- and β-neurexin-1 through a high-affinity interaction that involves its highly flexible N-terminal domain. In contrast, we show that the interaction of cerebellin with isolated GluD2 ectodomain is low affinity, which is not simply an outcome of lost avidity when compared with binding with a tetrameric full-length receptor. Rather, high-affinity capture of cerebellin by post-synaptic terminals is likely controlled by long-distance regulation within this transsynaptic complex. Altogether, our results suggest unusual conformational flexibility within all components of the complex.

  8. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vamsee S; Shlykov, Maksim A; Castillo, Rostislav; Sun, Eric I; Saier, Milton H

    2012-06-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is the largest known superfamily of secondary carriers found in the biosphere. It is ubiquitously distributed throughout virtually all currently recognized organismal phyla. This superfamily currently (2012) consists of 74 families, each of which is usually concerned with the transport of a certain type of substrate. Many of these families, defined phylogenetically, do not include even a single member that is functionally characterized. In this article, we probe the evolutionary origins of these transporters, providing evidence that they arose from a single 2-transmembrane segment (TMS) hairpin structure that triplicated to give a 6-TMS unit that duplicated to a 12-TMS protein, the most frequent topological type of these permeases. We globally examine MFS protein topologies, focusing on exceptional proteins that deviate from the norm. Nine distantly related families appear to have members with 14 TMSs in which the extra two are usually centrally localized between the two 6-TMS repeat units. They probably have arisen by intragenic duplication of an adjacent hairpin. This alternative topology probably arose multiple times during MFS evolution. Convincing evidence for MFS permeases with fewer than 12 TMSs was not forthcoming, leading to the suggestion that all 12 TMSs are required for optimal function. Some homologs appear to have 13, 14, 15 or 16 TMSs, and the probable locations of the extra TMSs were identified. A few MFS permeases are fused to other functional domains or are fully duplicated to give 24-TMS proteins with dual functions. Finally, the MFS families with no known function were subjected to genomic context analyses leading to functional predictions. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  9. Neuroligin-1 induces neurite outgrowth through interaction with neurexin-1ß and activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørlund, Michelle D; Nielsen, Janne; Pankratova, Stanislava

    2012-01-01

    Neurexin-1 (NRXN1) and neuroligin-1 (NLGN1) are synaptic cell adhesion molecules that connect pre- and postsynaptic neurons at synapses and mediate signaling across the synapse, which modulates synaptic activity and determines the properties of neuronal networks. Defects in the genes encoding NLGN1...

  10. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase cytoplasmic tail-binding protein-1 is a new member of the Cupin superfamily. A possible multifunctional protein acting as an invasion suppressor down-regulated in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekita, Takamasa; Gotoh, Isamu; Kinoshita, Takeshi; Itoh, Yoshifumi; Sato, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Takayuki; Okada, Yasunori; Seiki, Motoharu

    2004-03-26

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14) is an enzyme that promotes tumor cell invasion in tissues. Although the proteolytic activity of MT1-MMP is indispensable for invasion, it is also regulated by functions of the cytoplasmic tail. In this study we obtained a new human gene whose product binds to the tail sequence in yeast. The product, MTCBP-1, is a 19-kDa protein that belongs to the newly proposed Cupin superfamily composed of proteins with diverse functions. MTCBP-1 expressed in cells formed a complex with MT1-MMP and co-localized at the membrane. It was also detected in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, where MT1-MMP does not exist. In human tumor cell lines MTCBP-1 expression was significantly low compared with non-transformed fibroblasts, and enforced expression of MTCBP-1 inhibited the activity of MT1-MMP in promoting cell migration and invasion. MTCBP-1 showed significant homology to the bacterial aci-reductone dioxygenase, which is an enzyme in methionine metabolism. The C-terminal part of MTCBP-1 is identical to Sip-L, which is reported to be important for human hepatitis C virus replication. Thus, MTCBP-1 may have multiple functions other than the regulation of MT1-MMP, which presumably depends on the subcellular compartment.

  11. Evolution of functional diversity in the cupin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunwell, J M; Culham, A; Carter, C E; Sosa-Aguirre, C R; Goodenough, P W

    2001-12-01

    The cupin superfamily of proteins is among the most functionally diverse of any described to date. It was named on the basis of the conserved beta-barrel fold ('cupa' is the Latin term for a small barrel), and comprises both enzymatic and non-enzymatic members, which have either one or two cupin domains. Within the conserved tertiary structure, the variety of biochemical function is provided by minor variation of the residues in the active site and the identity of the bound metal ion. This review discusses the advantages of this particular scaffold and provides an evolutionary analysis of 18 different subclasses within the cupin superfamily.

  12. The human short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily: a bioinformatics summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, James E; Marsden, Brian D; Oppermann, Udo

    2009-03-16

    The short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily represents one of the largest protein superfamilies known to date. Enzymes of this family usually catalyse NAD(P)(H) dependent reactions with a substrate spectrum ranging from polyols, retinoids, steroids and fatty acid derivatives to xenobiotics. We have currently identified 73 SDR superfamily members within the human genome. A status report of the human SDR superfamily is provided in terms of 3D structure determination, co-factor preferences, subcellular localisation and functional annotation. A simple scoring system for measuring structural and functional information (SFS score) has also been introduced to monitor the status of 5 key metrics. Currently there are 17 SDR members with an SFS score of zero indicating that almost a quarter of the human SDR superfamily lacks substantial functional annotation.

  13. Structure and Function of the LmbE-like Superfamily

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    Shane Viars

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The LmbE-like superfamily is comprised of a series of enzymes that use a single catalytic metal ion to catalyze the hydrolysis of various substrates. These substrates are often key metabolites for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which makes the LmbE-like enzymes important targets for drug development. Herein we review the structure and function of the LmbE-like proteins identified to date. While this is the newest superfamily of metallohydrolases, a growing number of functionally interesting proteins from this superfamily have been characterized. Available crystal structures of LmbE-like proteins reveal a Rossmann fold similar to lactate dehydrogenase, which represented a novel fold for (zinc metallohydrolases at the time the initial structure was solved. The structural diversity of the N-acetylglucosamine containing substrates affords functional diversity for the LmbE-like enzyme superfamily. The majority of enzymes identified to date are metal-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the hydrolysis of a N-acetylglucosamine moiety on substrate using a combination of amino acid side chains and a single bound metal ion, predominantly zinc. The catalytic zinc is coordinated to proteins via His2-Asp-solvent binding site. Additionally, studies indicate that protein dynamics play important roles in regulating access to the active site and facilitating catalysis for at least two members of this protein superfamily.

  14. Target selection and annotation for the structural genomics of the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Ursula; Chiang, Ranyee; Seffernick, Jennifer J; Brown, Shoshana D; Glasner, Margaret E; Kelly, Libusha; Eswar, Narayanan; Sauder, J Michael; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Burley, Stephen K; Zheng, Xiaojing; Chance, Mark R; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A; Raushel, Frank M; Jacobson, Matthew P; Babbitt, Patricia C; Sali, Andrej

    2009-04-01

    To study the substrate specificity of enzymes, we use the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies as model systems; members of these superfamilies share a common TIM barrel fold and catalyze a wide range of chemical reactions. Here, we describe a collaboration between the Enzyme Specificity Consortium (ENSPEC) and the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) that aims to maximize the structural coverage of the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies. Using sequence- and structure-based protein comparisons, we first selected 535 target proteins from a variety of genomes for high-throughput structure determination by X-ray crystallography; 63 of these targets were not previously annotated as superfamily members. To date, 20 unique amidohydrolase and 41 unique enolase structures have been determined, increasing the fraction of sequences in the two superfamilies that can be modeled based on at least 30% sequence identity from 45% to 73%. We present case studies of proteins related to uronate isomerase (an amidohydrolase superfamily member) and mandelate racemase (an enolase superfamily member), to illustrate how this structure-focused approach can be used to generate hypotheses about sequence-structure-function relationships.

  15. Research progress of Tc1/Mariner superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dan; Chen, Cai; Wang, Sai-sai; Chen, Wei; Gao, Bo; Song, Cheng-yi

    2017-01-20

    With the rapid improvement of sequencing techniques, more and more genome annotations reveal the transposons are the important components of most genomes and present on almost all organisms. Among them, the Tc1/Mariner superfamily represents the most widespread DNA transposons. Until now, fourteen active Tc1/Mariner transposons (Minos, Mos1, etc.) have been identified and some highly active artificial transposons have been created through molecular reconstruction, such as Sleeping Beauty (SB). The transposons such as SB and Mos1 have been widely used as gene transfer vectors in the fields of transgenosis, gene trapping and gene therapy. In this review, we summarize the structure, classification, distributions, transposition mechanism and excavations of active members of Tc1/Mariner as well as its application in the fields of transgenesis, gene trapping and gene therapy.

  16. A novel 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase from Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T acting as a key enzyme during catabolism of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Marc; Deters, Anika; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    3-Sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase (AcdDPN7) is a new desulfinase that catalyzes the sulfur abstraction from 3SP-CoA in the betaproteobacterium Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T). During investigation of a Tn5::mob-induced mutant defective in growth on 3,3'-dithiodipropionate (DTDP) and also 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), the transposon insertion was mapped to an open reading frame with the highest homology to an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) from Burkholderia phenoliruptrix strain BR3459a (83% identical and 91% similar amino acids). An A. mimigardefordensis Δacd mutant was generated and verified the observed phenotype of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant. For enzymatic studies, AcdDPN7 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pLysS by using pET23a::acdDPN7. The purified protein is yellow and contains a noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, as verified by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analyses. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed a native molecular mass of about 173 kDa, indicating a homotetrameric structure (theoretically 179 kDa), which is in accordance with other members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. In vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated that the purified enzyme converted 3SP-CoA into propionyl-CoA and sulfite (SO3(2-)). Kinetic studies of AcdDPN7 revealed a Vmax of 4.19 μmol min(-1) mg(-1), an apparent Km of 0.013 mM, and a kcat/Km of 240.8 s(-1) mM(-1) for 3SP-CoA. However, AcdDPN7 is unable to perform a dehydrogenation, which is the usual reaction catalyzed by members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Comparison to other known desulfinases showed a comparably high catalytic efficiency of AcdDPN7 and indicated a novel reaction mechanism. Hence, AcdDPN7 encodes a new desulfinase based on an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.x) scaffold. Concomitantly, we identified the gene product that is responsible for the

  17. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Eric N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8. The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are

  18. Structural and evolutionary bioinformatics of the SPOUT superfamily of methyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purta Elzbieta

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SPOUT methyltransferases (MTases are a large class of S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent enzymes that exhibit an unusual alpha/beta fold with a very deep topological knot. In 2001, when no crystal structures were available for any of these proteins, Anantharaman, Koonin, and Aravind identified homology between SpoU and TrmD MTases and defined the SPOUT superfamily. Since then, multiple crystal structures of knotted MTases have been solved and numerous new homologous sequences appeared in the databases. However, no comprehensive comparative analysis of these proteins has been carried out to classify them based on structural and evolutionary criteria and to guide functional predictions. Results We carried out extensive searches of databases of protein structures and sequences to collect all members of previously identified SPOUT MTases, and to identify previously unknown homologs. Based on sequence clustering, characterization of domain architecture, structure predictions and sequence/structure comparisons, we re-defined families within the SPOUT superfamily and predicted putative active sites and biochemical functions for the so far uncharacterized members. We have also delineated the common core of SPOUT MTases and inferred a multiple sequence alignment for the conserved knot region, from which we calculated the phylogenetic tree of the superfamily. We have also studied phylogenetic distribution of different families, and used this information to infer the evolutionary history of the SPOUT superfamily. Conclusion We present the first phylogenetic tree of the SPOUT superfamily since it was defined, together with a new scheme for its classification, and discussion about conservation of sequence and structure in different families, and their functional implications. We identified four protein families as new members of the SPOUT superfamily. Three of these families are functionally uncharacterized (COG1772, COG1901, and COG4080

  19. [Evolution of seed storage globulins and cupin superfamily].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutov, A D; Kakhovskaia, I A

    2011-01-01

    An extensive superfamily of cupins (clan cl09118) currently combines thousands of functionally and structurally diverse prokaryote and eukaryote proteins, which contain a beta-barrel of antiparallel beta-strands (cupin module). Possible ways of the formation of the cupin superfamily were suggested based on the comparison of primary and tertiary structures of proteins from several conserved families of cupins including seed storage globulins and plant oxalate oxydases (germins), and bacterial oxalate decarboxylases, gentisate dioxygenases and epimerases. The origin of two-domain structure of seed storage globulins from cyanobacterial two-domain oxalate decarboxylases has been deduced. The evolutionary pathway of single-domain germins previously suggested to be immediate progenitors of storage globulins was traced back. Common evolutionary roots of germins and oxalate decarboxylases descend from recent bacterial and archaebacterial proteins whose primitive structure is restricted to the cupin module. These root proteins reflect the hypothetical structure of a pro-cupin that probably gave rise to at least a part of the total diversity of members of the cupin superfamily (for instance, to the cupin module of gentisate dioxygenases). The major dilemma for the description of the cupin superfamily is distinguishing evolutionary divergence from convergence. The structural convergence can be exemplified by formation of a beta-barrel inside extremely conserved structures of the otherwise unrelated epimerases from Archaea and bacteria.

  20. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijiang Guo

    Full Text Available The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW, a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  1. A Laminin G-EGF-Laminin G module in Neurexin IV is essential for the apico-lateral localization of Contactin and organization of septate junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Banerjee

    Full Text Available Septate junctions (SJs display a unique ultrastructural morphology with ladder-like electron densities that are conserved through evolution. Genetic and molecular analyses have identified a highly conserved core complex of SJ proteins consisting of three cell adhesion molecules Neurexin IV, Contactin, and Neuroglian, which interact with the cytoskeletal FERM domain protein Coracle. How these individual proteins interact to form the septal arrays that create the paracellular barrier is poorly understood. Here, we show that point mutations that map to specific domains of neurexin IV lead to formation of fewer septae and disorganization of SJs. Consistent with these observations, our in vivo domain deletion analyses identified the first Laminin G-EGF-Laminin G module in the extracellular region of Neurexin IV as necessary for the localization of and association with Contactin. Neurexin IV protein that is devoid of its cytoplasmic region is able to create septae, but fails to form a full complement of SJs. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that specific domains in Neurexin IV are required for protein-protein interactions and organization of SJs. Given the molecular conservation of SJ proteins across species, our studies may provide insights into how vertebrate axo-glial SJs are organized in myelinated axons.

  2. The Evolution of the Actin Binding NET Superfamily

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    Tim eHawkins

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The arabidopsis Networked protein superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in arabidopsis which group into 4 distinct clades or subfamilies. NET homologues are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi, furthermore in Plantae NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single subfamily of the NET proteins are found encoded in the club moss genome; an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from subfamilies 4 and 3 with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 subfamilies, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 subfamilies are only found as independent sequences in angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four subfamilies are conserved across monocots and eudicots with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point due in part to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and complexity of plant species through evolution in the ‘March of Progress’.

  3. Neurexin-Neuroligin Synaptic Complex Regulates Schizophrenia-Related DISC1/Kal-7/Rac1 “Signalosome”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Sylwia Owczarek; Bang, Marie Louise; Berezin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Neurexins (NXs) and neuroligins (NLs) are cell adhesion molecules that are localized at opposite sites of synaptic membranes. They interact with each other to promote the assembly, maintenance, and function of synapses in the central nervous system. Both NX and NL are cleaved from a membrane...... downstream of DISC1. We also show that NL1 binds to a well-characterized DISC1 interaction partner, Kal-7, and this interaction can be compromised by DISC1. Our results indicate that the NX/NL synaptic complex is intrinsically involved in the regulation of DISC1 function, thus contributing to a better...

  4. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zuidscherwoude (Malou); K. Worah (Kuntal); A. Van Der Schaaf (Alie); S.I. Buschow (Sonja I.); A.B. Spriel (Annemiek )

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the

  5. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidscherwoude, M.C.; Worah, K.; Schaaf, A. van der; Buschow, S.I.; Spriel, A.B. van

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the complete

  6. Transient receptor potential channel superfamily: Role in lower urinary tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Teruyuki; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Masaki; Hiragata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Domen, Takahisa; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms associated with neurogenic bladder and overactive bladder syndrome are mediated in part by members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily. The best studied member of this superfamily is the vanilloid receptor. Other transient receptor potential channels, such as the melastatin receptor and the ankyrin receptor, are also active in the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract dysfunction. However, the detailed mechanisms by which the transient receptor potential channels contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms are still not clear, and the therapeutic benefits of modulating transient receptor potential channel activity have not been proved in the clinical setting. In the present review, to better understand the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential for lower urinary tract symptoms, we summarize the presence and role of different members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily in the lower urinary tract. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Update on the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ALDH superfamily

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    Jackson Brian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ALDH superfamily play an important role in the enzymic detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and in the formation of molecules that are important in cellular processes, like retinoic acid, betaine and gamma-aminobutyric acid. ALDHs exhibit additional, non-enzymic functions, including the capacity to bind to some hormones and other small molecules and to diminish the effects of ultraviolet irradiation in the cornea. Mutations in ALDH genes leading to defective aldehyde metabolism are the molecular basis of several diseases, including gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria, pyridoxine-dependent seizures, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome and type II hyperprolinaemia. Interestingly, several ALDH enzymes appear to be markers for normal and cancer stem cells. The superfamily is evolutionarily ancient and is represented within Archaea, Eubacteria and Eukarya taxa. Recent improvements in DNA and protein sequencing have led to the identification of many new ALDH family members. To date, the human genome contains 19 known ALDH genes, as well as many pseudogenes. Whole-genome sequencing allows for comparison of the entire complement of ALDH family members among organisms. This paper provides an update of ALDH genes in several recently sequenced vertebrates and aims to clarify the associated records found in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI gene database. It also highlights where and when likely gene-duplication and gene-loss events have occurred. This information should be useful to future studies that might wish to compare the role of ALDH members among species and how the gene superfamily as a whole has changed throughout evolution.

  8. Processing of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule neurexin-3beta by Alzheimer disease alpha- and gamma-secretases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Nathalie; Schweizer, Claude; Ben Halima, Saoussen; Fraering, Patrick C

    2011-01-28

    Neurexins (NRXNs) are synaptic cell adhesion molecules having essential roles in the assembly and maturation of synapses into fully functional units. Immunocytochemical and electrophysiological studies have shown that specific binding across the synaptic cleft of the ectodomains of presynaptic NRXNs and postsynaptic neuroligins have the potential to bidirectionally coordinate and trigger synapse formation. Moreover, in vivo studies as well as genome-wide association studies pointed out implication of NRXNs in the pathogenesis of cognitive disorders including autism spectrum disorders and different types of addictions including opioid and alcohol dependences, suggesting an important role in synaptic function. Despite extensive investigations, the mechanisms by which NRXNs modulate the properties of synapses remain largely unknown. We report here that α- and γ-secretases can sequentially process NRXN3β, leading to the formation of two final products, an ∼80-kDa N-terminal extracellular domain of Neurexin-3β (sNRXN3β) and an ∼12-kDa C-terminal intracellular NRXN3β domain (NRXN3β-ICD), both of them being potentially implicated in the regulation of NRXNs and neuroligins functions at the synapses or in yet unidentified signal transduction pathways. We further report that this processing is altered by several PS1 mutations in the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase that cause early-onset familial Alzheimer disease.

  9. Systematic classification of the His-Me finger superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Jagoda; Matelska, Dorota; Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2017-11-16

    The His-Me finger endonucleases, also known as HNH or ββα-metal endonucleases, form a large and diverse protein superfamily. The His-Me finger domain can be found in proteins that play an essential role in cells, including genome maintenance, intron homing, host defense and target offense. Its overall structural compactness and non-specificity make it a perfectly-tailored pathogenic module that participates on both sides of inter- and intra-organismal competition. An extremely low sequence similarity across the superfamily makes it difficult to identify and classify new His-Me fingers. Using state-of-the-art distant homology detection methods, we provide an updated and systematic classification of His-Me finger proteins. In this work, we identified over 100 000 proteins and clustered them into 38 groups, of which three groups are new and cannot be found in any existing public domain database of protein families. Based on an analysis of sequences, structures, domain architectures, and genomic contexts, we provide a careful functional annotation of the poorly characterized members of this superfamily. Our results may inspire further experimental investigations that should address the predicted activity and clarify the potential substrates, to provide more detailed insights into the fundamental biological roles of these proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. A new protein superfamily: TPPP-like proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Orosz

    Full Text Available The introduction of the term 'Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein (TPPP-like proteins' is suggested. They constitute a eukaryotic protein superfamily, characterized by the presence of the p25alpha domain (Pfam05517, IPR008907, and named after the first identified member, TPPP/p25, exhibiting microtubule stabilizing function. TPPP-like proteins can be grouped on the basis of two characteristics: the length of their p25alpha domain, which can be long, short, truncated or partial, and the presence or absence of additional domain(s. TPPPs, in the strict sense, contain no other domains but one long or short p25alpha one (long- and short-type TPPPs, respectively. Proteins possessing truncated p25alpha domain are first described in this paper. They evolved from the long-type TPPPs and can be considered as arthropod-specific paralogs of long-type TPPPs. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the two groups (long-type and truncated TPPPs split in the common ancestor of arthropods. Incomplete p25alpha domains can be found in multidomain TPPP-like proteins as well. The various subfamilies occur with a characteristic phyletic distribution: e. g., animal genomes/proteomes contain almost without exception long-type TPPPs; the multidomain apicortins occur almost exclusively in apicomplexan parasites. There are no data about the physiological function of these proteins except two human long-type TPPP paralogs which are involved in developmental processes of the brain and the musculoskeletal system, respectively. I predict that the superfamily members containing long or partial p25alpha domain are often intrinsically disordered proteins, while those with short or truncated domain(s are structurally ordered. Interestingly, members of this superfamily connected or maybe connected to diseases are intrinsically disordered proteins.

  11. PASS2: an automated database of protein alignments organised as structural superfamilies

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    Sowdhamini Ramanathan

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional selection and three-dimensional structural constraints of proteins in nature often relates to the retention of significant sequence similarity between proteins of similar fold and function despite poor sequence identity. Organization of structure-based sequence alignments for distantly related proteins, provides a map of the conserved and critical regions of the protein universe that is useful for the analysis of folding principles, for the evolutionary unification of protein families and for maximizing the information return from experimental structure determination. The Protein Alignment organised as Structural Superfamily (PASS2 database represents continuously updated, structural alignments for evolutionary related, sequentially distant proteins. Description An automated and updated version of PASS2 is, in direct correspondence with SCOP 1.63, consisting of sequences having identity below 40% among themselves. Protein domains have been grouped into 628 multi-member superfamilies and 566 single member superfamilies. Structure-based sequence alignments for the superfamilies have been obtained using COMPARER, while initial equivalencies have been derived from a preliminary superposition using LSQMAN or STAMP 4.0. The final sequence alignments have been annotated for structural features using JOY4.0. The database is supplemented with sequence relatives belonging to different genomes, conserved spatially interacting and structural motifs, probabilistic hidden markov models of superfamilies based on the alignments and useful links to other databases. Probabilistic models and sensitive position specific profiles obtained from reliable superfamily alignments aid annotation of remote homologues and are useful tools in structural and functional genomics. PASS2 presents the phylogeny of its members both based on sequence and structural dissimilarities. Clustering of members allows us to understand diversification of

  12. Dynamic changes in neurexins' alternative splicing: role of Rho-associated protein kinases and relevance to memory formation.

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    Gabriela Rozic

    Full Text Available The three neurexins genes (NRXN1/2/3 encode polymorphic synaptic membrane proteins that are involved in cognitive functioning. Neurexins' selectivity of function is presumably conferred through differential use of 2 promoters and 5 alternative splicing sites (SS#1/2/3/4/5. In day-old rat brain neurons grown in culture, activation (depolarization induces reversible, calcium dependent, repression of NRXN2α SS#3 insert. The effects of depolarization on NRXN1/2/3α splicing and biochemical pathways mediating them were further studied in these neurons. NRXN1/2/3α splicing in the course of memory formation in vivo was also explored, using fear conditioning paradigm in rats in which the animals were trained to associate an aversive stimulus (electrical shock with a neutral context (a tone, resulting in the expression of fear responses to the neutral context.In the cultured neurons depolarization induced, beside NRXN2α SS#3, repression of SS#3 and SS#4 exons in NRXN3α but not NRXN1α. The repressions were mediated by the calcium/protein kinase C/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK pathway. Fear conditioning induced significant and transient repressions of the NRXN1/2/3α SS#4 exons in the rat hippocampus. ROCK inhibition prior to training attenuated the behavioral fear response, the NRXN1/2/3α splicing repressions and subsequent recovery and the levels of excitatory (PSD95 and inhibitory (gephyrin synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. No such effects were observed in the prefrontal cortex. Significant correlations existed between the fear response and hippocampal NRXN3α and NRXN2α SS#4 inserts as well as PSD95 protein levels. Hippocampal NRXN1α SS#4 insert and gephyrin levels did not correlate with the behavioral response but were negatively correlated with each other.These results show for the first time dynamic, experience related changes in NRXN1/2/3α alternative splicing in the rat brain and a role for ROCK in them. Specific neurexins

  13. Aspartase/Fumarase Superfamily : A Common Catalytic Strategy Involving General Base-Catalyzed Formation of a Highly Stabilized aci-Carboxylate Intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veetil, Vinod Puthan; Fibriansah, Guntur; Raj, Hans; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the aspartase/fumarase superfamily share a common tertiary and quaternary fold, as well as a similar active site architecture; the superfamily includes aspartase, fumarase, argininosuccinate lyase, adenylosuccinate lyase, delta-crystallin, and 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme

  14. TNF Superfamily: A Growing Saga of Kidney Injury Modulators

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    Maria D. Sanchez-Niño

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the TNF superfamily participate in kidney disease. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF and Fas ligand regulate renal cell survival and inflammation, and therapeutic targeting improves the outcome of experimental renal injury. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL and its potential decoy receptor osteoprotegerin are the two most upregulated death-related genes in human diabetic nephropathy. TRAIL activates NF-kappaB in tubular cells and promotes apoptosis in tubular cells and podocytes, especially in a high-glucose environment. By contrast, osteoprotegerin plays a protective role against TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Another family member, TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK induces inflammation and tubular cell death or proliferation, depending on the microenvironment. While TNF only activates canonical NF-kappaB signaling, TWEAK promotes both canonical and noncanonical NF-kappaB activation in tubular cells, regulating different inflammatory responses. TWEAK promotes the secretion of MCP-1 and RANTES through NF-kappaB RelA-containing complexes and upregulates CCl21 and CCL19 expression through NF-kappaB inducing kinase (NIK- dependent RelB/NF-kappaB2 complexes. In vivo TWEAK promotes postnephrectomy compensatory renal cell proliferation in a noninflammatory milieu. However, in the inflammatory milieu of acute kidney injury, TWEAK promotes tubular cell death and inflammation. Therapeutic targeting of TNF superfamily cytokines, including multipronged approaches targeting several cytokines should be further explored.

  15. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Xia, Xinli [Beijing Forestry University, China; Yin, Weilun [Beijing Forestry University, China

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  16. Developmental Hypothyroxinemia and Hypothyroidism Reduce Parallel Fiber-Purkinje Cell Synapses in Rat Offspring by Downregulation of Neurexin1/Cbln1/GluD2 Tripartite Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yi; Wei, Wei; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Iodine is a significant micronutrient. Iodine deficiency (ID)-induced hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism during developmental period can cause cerebellar dysfunction. However, mechanisms are still unclear. Therefore, the present research aims to study effects of developmental hypothyroxinemia caused by mild ID and hypothyroidism caused by severe ID or methimazole (MMZ) on parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses in filial cerebellum. Maternal hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism models were established in Wistar rats using ID diet and deionized water supplemented with different concentrations of potassium iodide or MMZ water. Birth weight and cerebellum weight were measured. We also examined PF-PC synapses using immunofluorescence, and western blot analysis was conducted to investigate the activity of Neurexin1/cerebellin1 (Cbln1)/glutamate receptor d2 (GluD2) tripartite complex. Our results showed that hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism decreased birth weight and cerebellum weight and reduced the PF-PC synapses on postnatal day (PN) 14 and PN21. Accordingly, the mean intensity of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT1) and Calbindin immunofluorescence was reduced in mild ID, severe ID, and MMZ groups. Moreover, maternal hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism reduced expression of Neurexin1/Cbln1/GluD2 tripartite complex. Our study supports the hypothesis that developmental hypothyroxinemia and hypothyroidism reduce PF-PC synapses, which may be attributed to the downregulation of Neurexin1/Cbln1/GluD2 tripartite complex.

  17. Differential catalytic promiscuity of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily bimetallo core reveals mechanistic features underlying enzyme evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunden, Fanny; AlSadhan, Ishraq; Lyubimov, Artem; Doukov, Tzanko; Swan, Jeffrey; Herschlag, Daniel

    2017-12-22

    Members of enzyme superfamilies specialize in different reactions but often exhibit catalytic promiscuity for one another's reactions, consistent with catalytic promiscuity as an important driver in the evolution of new enzymes. Wanting to understand how catalytic promiscuity and other factors may influence evolution across a superfamily, we turned to the well-studied alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily, comparing three of its members, two evolutionarily distinct phosphatases and a phosphodiesterase. We mutated distinguishing active-site residues to generate enzymes that had a common Zn 2+ bimetallo core but little sequence similarity and different auxiliary domains. We then tested the catalytic capabilities of these pruned enzymes with a series of substrates. A substantial rate enhancement of ∼10 11 -fold for both phosphate mono- and diester hydrolysis by each enzyme indicated that the Zn 2+ bimetallo core is an effective mono/di-esterase generalist and that the bimetallo cores were not evolutionarily tuned to prefer their cognate reactions. In contrast, our pruned enzymes were ineffective sulfatases, and this limited promiscuity may have provided a driving force for founding the distinct one-metal-ion branch that contains all known AP superfamily sulfatases. Finally, our pruned enzymes exhibited 10 7 -10 8 -fold phosphotriesterase rate enhancements, despite absence of such enzymes within the AP superfamily. We speculate that the superfamily active-site architecture involved in nucleophile positioning prevents accommodation of the additional triester substituent. Overall, we suggest that catalytic promiscuity, and the ease or difficulty of remodeling and building onto existing protein scaffolds, have greatly influenced the course of enzyme evolution. Uncovering principles and properties of enzyme function, promiscuity, and repurposing provides lessons for engineering new enzymes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Mitochondrial dynamics: The dynamin superfamily and execution by collusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2017-07-25

    Distinct dynamin superfamily GTPases catalyze the constant fission and fusion of the elaborate mitochondrial networks that navigate the eukaryotic cytoplasm. Long believed to be the singular handiwork of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), a cytosolic family member that transiently localizes to the mitochondrial surface, the execution of mitochondrial fission is now arguably believed to entail membrane remodeling events that are initiated upstream of Drp1 by ER-associated cytoskeletal networks and completed downstream by the prototypical dynamin, dynamin 2 (Dyn2). Recent developments in the field have also placed a sharp focus on the membrane microenvironment around the division apparatus and the potential facilitatory role of specific lipids in mitochondrial fission. Here, I will review current progress, as well as highlight the most visible gaps in knowledge, in elucidating the varied functions of the dynamin superfamily in the coordinated events of mitochondrial fission and fusion. The essential roles of protein and lipid cofactors are also highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein similarity networks reveal relationships among sequence, structure, and function within the Cupin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberto, Richard; Moomaw, Ellen W

    2013-01-01

    The cupin superfamily is extremely diverse and includes catalytically inactive seed storage proteins, sugar-binding metal-independent epimerases, and metal-dependent enzymes possessing dioxygenase, decarboxylase, and other activities. Although numerous proteins of this superfamily have been structurally characterized, the functions of many of them have not been experimentally determined. We report the first use of protein similarity networks (PSNs) to visualize trends of sequence and structure in order to make functional inferences in this remarkably diverse superfamily. PSNs provide a way to visualize relatedness of structure and sequence among a given set of proteins. Structure- and sequence-based clustering of cupin members reflects functional clustering. Networks based only on cupin domains and networks based on the whole proteins provide complementary information. Domain-clustering supports phylogenetic conclusions that the N- and C-terminal domains of bicupin proteins evolved independently. Interestingly, although many functionally similar enzymatic cupin members bind the same active site metal ion, the structure and sequence clustering does not correlate with the identity of the bound metal. It is anticipated that the application of PSNs to this superfamily will inform experimental work and influence the functional annotation of databases.

  20. Protein similarity networks reveal relationships among sequence, structure, and function within the Cupin superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Uberto

    Full Text Available The cupin superfamily is extremely diverse and includes catalytically inactive seed storage proteins, sugar-binding metal-independent epimerases, and metal-dependent enzymes possessing dioxygenase, decarboxylase, and other activities. Although numerous proteins of this superfamily have been structurally characterized, the functions of many of them have not been experimentally determined. We report the first use of protein similarity networks (PSNs to visualize trends of sequence and structure in order to make functional inferences in this remarkably diverse superfamily. PSNs provide a way to visualize relatedness of structure and sequence among a given set of proteins. Structure- and sequence-based clustering of cupin members reflects functional clustering. Networks based only on cupin domains and networks based on the whole proteins provide complementary information. Domain-clustering supports phylogenetic conclusions that the N- and C-terminal domains of bicupin proteins evolved independently. Interestingly, although many functionally similar enzymatic cupin members bind the same active site metal ion, the structure and sequence clustering does not correlate with the identity of the bound metal. It is anticipated that the application of PSNs to this superfamily will inform experimental work and influence the functional annotation of databases.

  1. Promiscuity and electrostatic flexibility in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabis, Anna; Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic promiscuity, that is, the ability of single enzymes to facilitate the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, is a widespread phenomenon that plays an important role in the evolution of enzyme function. Additionally, such pre-existing multifunctionality can be harnessed in artificial enzyme design. The members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have served extensively as both experimental and computational model systems for enhancing our understanding of catalytic promiscuity. In this Opinion, we present key recent computational studies into the catalytic activity of these highly promiscuous enzymes, highlighting the valuable insight they have provided into both the molecular basis for catalytic promiscuity in general, and its implications for the evolution of phosphatase activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Designer TGFβ superfamily ligands with diversified functionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P Allendorph

    Full Text Available Transforming Growth Factor--beta (TGFβ superfamily ligands, including Activins, Growth and Differentiation Factors (GDFs, and Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, are excellent targets for protein-based therapeutics because of their pervasiveness in numerous developmental and cellular processes. We developed a strategy termed RASCH (Random Assembly of Segmental Chimera and Heteromer, to engineer chemically-refoldable TGFβ superfamily ligands with unique signaling properties. One of these engineered ligands, AB208, created from Activin-βA and BMP-2 sequences, exhibits the refolding characteristics of BMP-2 while possessing Activin-like signaling attributes. Further, we find several additional ligands, AB204, AB211, and AB215, which initiate the intracellular Smad1-mediated signaling pathways more strongly than BMP-2 but show no sensitivity to the natural BMP antagonist Noggin unlike natural BMP-2. In another design, incorporation of a short N-terminal segment from BMP-2 was sufficient to enable chemical refolding of BMP-9, without which was never produced nor refolded. Our studies show that the RASCH strategy enables us to expand the functional repertoire of TGFβ superfamily ligands through development of novel chimeric TGFβ ligands with diverse biological and clinical values.

  3. The accidental assignment of function in the tautomerase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamison P. Huddleston

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cg10062 from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a tautomerase superfamily member with the characteristic β−α−β fold and catalytic Pro-1. It is a cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD homologue with high sequence similarity (53% that includes the six critical active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, and Glu-114. However, Cg10062 is a poor cis-CaaD: it has much lower catalytic efficiency and lacks isomer specificity. Two acetylene compounds (propiolate and 2-butynoate and an allene (2,3-butadienote were investigated as potential substrates for Cg10062. Cg10062 is a hydratase/decarboxylase using propiolate and cis-3-chloro- and 3-bromoacrylates, where malonate semialdehyde is the product of hydration and acetaldehyde is the product of decarboxylation. The two activities occur consecutively using the initial substrate. In contrast, 2-butynoate and 2,3-butadienote only undergo a hydration reaction with Cg10062 to afford acetoacetate. cis-CaaD does not function as a hydratase/decarboxylase using any of these substrates, yielding only the products of hydration. Cg10062 proceeds by direct hydration or covalent catalysis (using Pro-1 depending on the substrate. Direct hydration yields the hydration products and covalent catalysis yields the hydration and decarboxylation products. Cg10062 mutants shift the reaction toward one or the other mechanism. The observation that propiolate is the best substrate suggests that Cg10062 could be a hydratase/decarboxylase in a pathway that transforms an unknown acetylene compound to acetaldehyde via propiolate. The bifunctional activity of Cg10062 might also have implications for the evolution of the dehalogenase and decarboxylase activities in the tautomerase superfamily.

  4. The dystrotelin, dystrophin and dystrobrevin superfamily: new paralogues and old isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Simon M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystrophins and dystrobrevins are distantly related proteins with important but poorly understood roles in the function of metazoan muscular and neuronal tissues. Defects in them and their associated proteins cause a range of neuromuscular disorders. Members of this superfamily have been discovered in a relatively serendipitous way; we set out to compile a comprehensive description of dystrophin- and dystrobrevin-related sequences from available metazoan genome sequences, validated in representative organisms by RT-PCR, or acquired de novo from key species. Results Features of the superfamily revealed by our survey include: a Dystrotelin, an entirely novel branch of the superfamily, present in most vertebrates examined. Dystrotelin is expressed in the central nervous system, and is a possible orthologue of Drosophila DAH. We describe the preliminary characterisation of its function, evolution and expression. b A novel vertebrate member of the dystrobrevin family, γ-dystrobrevin, an ancient branch now extant only in fish, but probably present in our own ancestors. Like dystrophin, zebrafish γ-dystrobrevin mRNA is localised to myosepta. c The extent of conservation of alternative splicing and alternative promoter use in the dystrophin and dystrobrevin genes; alternative splicing of dystrophin exons 73 and 78 and α-dystrobrevin exon 13 are conserved across vertebrates, as are the use of the Dp116, Dp71 and G-utrophin promoters; the Dp260 and Dp140 promoters are tetrapod innovations. d The evolution of the unique N-terminus of DRP2 and its relationship to Dp116 and G-utrophin. e A C-terminally truncated common ancestor of dystrophin and utrophin in cyclostomes. f A severely restricted repertoire of dystrophin complex components in ascidians. Conclusion We have refined our understanding of the evolutionary history and isoform diversity of the five previously reported vertebrate superfamily members and describe two novel members

  5. The chemical versatility of the beta-alpha-beta fold : Catalytic promiscuity and divergent evolution in the tautomerase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, G. J.; Veetil, V. Puthan; Whitman, C. P.

    2008-01-01

    Tautomerase superfamily members have an amino-terminal proline and a beta-alpha-beta fold, and include 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), 5-(carboxymethyl)-2-hydroxymuconate isomerase (CHMI), trans- and cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD and cis-CaaD, respectively), malonate semialdehyde

  6. Molecular phylogeny of the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea (Heterodonta, Veneroida) reveals dynamic evolution of symbiotic lifestyle and interphylum host switching

    OpenAIRE

    Goto Ryutaro; Kawakita Atsushi; Ishikawa Hiroshi; Hamamura Yoichi; Kato Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Galeommatoidea is a superfamily of bivalves that exhibits remarkably diverse lifestyles. Many members of this group live attached to the body surface or inside the burrows of other marine invertebrates, including crustaceans, holothurians, echinoids, cnidarians, sipunculans and echiurans. These symbiotic species exhibit high host specificity, commensal interactions with hosts, and extreme morphological and behavioral adaptations to symbiotic life. Host specialization to va...

  7. Amalgam, an axon guidance Drosophila adhesion protein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily: Over-expression, purification and biophysical characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Paz, Aviv; Peleg, Yoav; Toker, Lilly; Wolf, Sharon G.; Rydberg, Edwin H.; Sussman, Joel L.; Silman, Israel

    Amalgam, a multi-domain member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, possesses homophilic and heterophilic cell adhesion properties. It is required for axon guidance during Drosophila development in which it interacts with the extracellular domain of the transmembrane protein, neurotactin, to promote

  8. TGF-β1, Ghrelin, Neurexin, and Neuroligin are predictive biomarkers for postoperative prognosis of laparoscopic surgery in children with Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangjie, Xiao; Xiaochun, Zhu; Wenyi, Yang; Wuping, Ge; Ying, Zhang; Qiuming, He; Huimin, Xia

    2015-03-01

    The study was set to analyze the predictive values of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), Ghrelin, Neurexin, and Neuroligin protein expression on postoperative prognosis of laparoscopic surgery in children with Hirschsprung disease. 281 cases of children with Hirschsprung disease, admitted into Guangdong Women and Children Hospital and Guangzhou women and children's medical center from March 2009 to March 2014, were treated with laparoscopic radical surgery for Hirschsprung disease. They were divided into the good and the poor prognosis groups according to their recuperation and complications. Protein expressions of TGF-β1, Ghrelin, Neurexin, and Neuroligin were prospectively analyzed. The correlations between the expressions of these proteins and the prognosis were analyzed. There were 129 cases of children with poor prognosis, accounting for 45.9 %. There were no significant differences in the expressions of TGF-β1 mRNA and proteins within the group in both the groups (p > 0.05). TGF-β1 mRNA and protein expressions of the poor prognosis group were significantly higher than those of the good prognosis group in each segment of intestine (p Hirschsprung disease after surgical intervention.

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias Pattern in Human Albumin Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Mirsafian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage bias is an inevitable phenomenon in organismic taxa across the three domains of life. Though the frequency of codon usage is not equal across species and within genome in the same species, the phenomenon is non random and is tissue-specific. Several factors such as GC content, nucleotide distribution, protein hydropathy, protein secondary structure, and translational selection are reported to contribute to codon usage preference. The synonymous codon usage patterns can be helpful in revealing the expression pattern of genes as well as the evolutionary relationship between the sequences. In this study, synonymous codon usage bias patterns were determined for the evolutionarily close proteins of albumin superfamily, namely, albumin, α-fetoprotein, afamin, and vitamin D-binding protein. Our study demonstrated that the genes of the four albumin superfamily members have low GC content and high values of effective number of codons (ENC suggesting high expressivity of these genes and less bias in codon usage preferences. This study also provided evidence that the albumin superfamily members are not subjected to mutational selection pressure.

  10. The origin and function of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/glucagon superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, N M; Krueckl, S L; McRory, J E

    2000-12-01

    The pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/ glucagon superfamily includes nine hormones in humans that are related by structure, distribution (especially the brain and gut), function (often by activation of cAMP), and receptors (a subset of seven-transmembrane receptors). The nine hormones include glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), GLP-2, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), GH-releasing hormone (GRF), peptide histidine-methionine (PHM), PACAP, secretin, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). The origin of the ancestral superfamily members is at least as old as the invertebrates; the most ancient and tightly conserved members are PACAP and glucagon. Evidence to date suggests the superfamily began with a gene or exon duplication and then continued to diverge with some gene duplications in vertebrates. The function of PACAP is considered in detail because it is newly (1989) discovered; it is tightly conserved (96% over 700 million years); and it is probably the ancestral molecule. The diverse functions of PACAP include regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in some cell populations. In addition, PACAP regulates metabolism and the cardiovascular, endocrine, and immune systems, although the physiological event(s) that coordinates PACAP responses remains to be identified.

  11. Two differentially regulated Arabidopsis genes define a new branch of the DFR superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, L; Lauvergeat, V; Naested, H

    2001-01-01

    resembling the expression pattern of late embryogenic abundant ABA-responsive genes. Differential expression of the two genes during plant development was confirmed in plants expressing transcriptional fusions between the two promoters and the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. This showed......Two tandem genes were identified on Arabidopsis chromosome II (AtCRL1 and AtCRL2) encoding proteins with homology to members of the dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) superfamily. The encoded CRL1 and CRL2 proteins share 87% mutual amino acid sequence identity whereas their promoter regions...... are highly divergent, suggesting differential regulation of the CRL genes. Phylogenetic analysis placed CRL1 and CRL2 in a separate branch of the DFR superfamily. Northern blotting showed strong AtCRL1 induction by abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and heat shock, and high expression level in seeds, thus...

  12. A Comprehensive Bioinformatics Analysis of the Nudix Superfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gunawardana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nudix enzymes are a superfamily with a conserved common reaction mechanism that provides the capacity for the hydrolysis of a broad spectrum of metabolites. We used hidden Markov models based on Nudix sequences from the PFAM and PROSITE databases to identify Nudix hydrolases encoded by the Arabidopsis genome. 25 Nudix hydrolases were identified and classified into 11 individual families by pairwise sequence alignments. Intron phases were strikingly conserved in each family. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all multimember families formed monophyletic clusters. Conserved familial sequence motifs were identified with the MEME motif analysis algorithm. One motif (motif 4 was found in three diverse families. All proteins containing motif 4 demonstrated a degree of preference for substrates containing an ADP moiety. We conclude that HMM model-based genome scanning and MEME motif analysis, respectively, can significantly improve the identification and assignment of function of new members of this mechanistically-diverse protein superfamily.

  13. Origin and evolution of TNF and TNF receptor superfamilies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and the TNF receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) have an ancient evolutionary origin that can be traced back to single copy genes within Arthropods. In humans, 18 TNFSF and 29 TNFRSF genes have been identified. Evolutionary models account for the increase in g...

  14. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF superfamily in peach (Prunus persica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C H; Shangguan, L F; Ma, R J; Sun, X; Tao, R; Guo, L; Korir, N K; Yu, M L

    2012-10-17

    We identified 131 AP2/ERF (APETALA2/ethylene-responsive factor) genes in material from peach using the gene sequences of AP2/ERF amino acids of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) as probes. Based on the number of AP2/ERF domains and individual gene characteristics, the AP2/ERF superfamily gene in peach can be classified broadly into three families, ERF (ethylene-responsive factor), RAV (related to ABI3/VP1), and AP2 (APETALA2), containing 104, 5, and 21 members, respectively, along with a solo gene (ppa005376m). The 104 genes in the ERF family were further divided into 11 groups based on the group classification made for Arabidopsis. The scaffold localizations of the AP2/ERF genes indicated that 129 AP2/ERF genes were all located on scaffolds 1 to 8, except for two genes, which were on scaffolds 17 and 10. Although the primary structure varied among AP2/ERF superfamily proteins, their tertiary structures were similar. Most ERF family genes have no introns, while members of the AP2 family have more introns than genes in the ERF and RAV families. All sequences of AP2 family genes were disrupted by introns into several segments of varying sizes. The expression of the AP2/ERF superfamily genes was highest in the mesocarp; it was far higher than in the other seven tissues that we examined, implying that AP2/ERF superfamily genes play an important role in fruit growth and development in the peach. These results will be useful for selecting candidate genes from specific subgroups for functional analysis.

  15. Genome-Wide Identification and Functional Classification of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH) Gene Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C; Lopez-Valverde, Francisco J; Robles-Bolivar, Paula; Lima-Cabello, Elena; Gachomo, Emma W; Kotchoni, Simeon O

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) is a protein superfamily that catalyzes the oxidation of aldehyde molecules into their corresponding non-toxic carboxylic acids, and responding to different environmental stresses, offering promising genetic approaches for improving plant adaptation. The aim of the current study is the functional analysis for systematic identification of S. lycopersicum ALDH gene superfamily. We performed genome-based ALDH genes identification and functional classification, phylogenetic relationship, structure and catalytic domains analysis, and microarray based gene expression. Twenty nine unique tomato ALDH sequences encoding 11 ALDH families were identified, including a unique member of the family 19 ALDH. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 13 groups, with a conserved relationship among ALDH families. Functional structure analysis of ALDH2 showed a catalytic mechanism involving Cys-Glu couple. However, the analysis of ALDH3 showed no functional gene duplication or potential neo-functionalities. Gene expression analysis reveals that particular ALDH genes might respond to wounding stress increasing the expression as ALDH2B7. Overall, this study reveals the complexity of S. lycopersicum ALDH gene superfamily and offers new insights into the structure-functional features and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. The functional characterization of ALDHs is valuable and promoting molecular breeding in tomato for the improvement of stress tolerance and signaling.

  16. Genome-Wide Identification and Functional Classification of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH Gene Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose C Jimenez-Lopez

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs is a protein superfamily that catalyzes the oxidation of aldehyde molecules into their corresponding non-toxic carboxylic acids, and responding to different environmental stresses, offering promising genetic approaches for improving plant adaptation. The aim of the current study is the functional analysis for systematic identification of S. lycopersicum ALDH gene superfamily. We performed genome-based ALDH genes identification and functional classification, phylogenetic relationship, structure and catalytic domains analysis, and microarray based gene expression. Twenty nine unique tomato ALDH sequences encoding 11 ALDH families were identified, including a unique member of the family 19 ALDH. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 13 groups, with a conserved relationship among ALDH families. Functional structure analysis of ALDH2 showed a catalytic mechanism involving Cys-Glu couple. However, the analysis of ALDH3 showed no functional gene duplication or potential neo-functionalities. Gene expression analysis reveals that particular ALDH genes might respond to wounding stress increasing the expression as ALDH2B7. Overall, this study reveals the complexity of S. lycopersicum ALDH gene superfamily and offers new insights into the structure-functional features and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. The functional characterization of ALDHs is valuable and promoting molecular breeding in tomato for the improvement of stress tolerance and signaling.

  17. Evaluating variations of genotype calling: a potential source of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-04-01

    brlmm whitepaper.pdf. Arking D. E., Cutler D. J., Brune C. W., Teslovich T. M., West. K., Ikeda M. et al. 2008 A common genetic variant in the neurexin superfamily member CNTNAP2 increases familial risk of autism. Am. J. Hum.

  18. CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 are mutated in autosomal-recessive Pitt-Hopkins-like mental retardation and determine the level of a common synaptic protein in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweier, Christiane; de Jong, Eiko K; Zweier, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Heterozygous copy-number variants and SNPs of CNTNAP2 and NRXN1, two distantly related members of the neurexin superfamily, have been repeatedly associated with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as developmental language disorders, autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy...

  19. Type I bHLH Proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 Restrict Neurite Branching and Synapse Formation by Repressing Neurexin in Postmitotic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell D’Rozario

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proneural proteins of the class I/II basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH family are highly conserved transcription factors. Class I bHLH proteins are expressed in a broad number of tissues during development, whereas class II bHLH protein expression is more tissue restricted. Our understanding of the function of class I/II bHLH transcription factors in both invertebrate and vertebrate neurobiology is largely focused on their function as regulators of neurogenesis. Here, we show that the class I bHLH proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 are expressed in postmitotic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and mice, respectively, where they function to restrict neurite branching and synapse formation. Our data indicate that Daughterless performs this function in part by restricting the expression of the cell adhesion molecule Neurexin. This suggests a role for these proteins outside of their established roles in neurogenesis.

  20. Mutations in a Conserved Domain of E. coli MscS to the Most Conserved Superfamily Residue Leads to Kinetic Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah R Malcolm

    Full Text Available In Escherichia coli (E. coli the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, MscS, gates in response to membrane tension created from acute external hypoosmotic shock, thus rescuing the bacterium from cell lysis. E. coli MscS is the most well studied member of the MscS superfamily of channels, whose members are found throughout the bacterial and plant kingdoms. Homology to the pore lining helix and upper vestibule domain of E. coli MscS is required for inclusion into the superfamily. Although highly conserved, in the second half of the pore lining helix (TM3B, E. coli MscS has five residues significantly different from other members of the superfamily. In superfamilies such as this, it remains unclear why variations within such a homologous region occur: is it tolerance of alternate residues, or does it define functional variance within the superfamily? Point mutations (S114I/T, L118F, A120S, L123F, F127E/K/T and patch clamp electrophysiology were used to study the effect of changing these residues in E. coli MscS on sensitivity and gating. The data indicate that variation at these locations do not consistently lead to wildtype channel phenotypes, nor do they define large changes in mechanosensation, but often appear to effect changes in the E. coli MscS channel gating kinetics.

  1. Taxonomic distribution and origins of the extended LHC (light-harvesting complex) antenna protein superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The extended light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein superfamily is a centerpiece of eukaryotic photosynthesis, comprising the LHC family and several families involved in photoprotection, like the LHC-like and the photosystem II subunit S (PSBS). The evolution of this complex superfamily has long remained elusive, partially due to previously missing families. Results In this study we present a meticulous search for LHC-like sequences in public genome and expressed sequence tag databases covering twelve representative photosynthetic eukaryotes from the three primary lineages of plants (Plantae): glaucophytes, red algae and green plants (Viridiplantae). By introducing a coherent classification of the different protein families based on both, hidden Markov model analyses and structural predictions, numerous new LHC-like sequences were identified and several new families were described, including the red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like protein (RedCAP) family from red algae and diatoms. The test of alternative topologies of sequences of the highly conserved chlorophyll-binding core structure of LHC and PSBS proteins significantly supports the independent origins of LHC and PSBS families via two unrelated internal gene duplication events. This result was confirmed by the application of cluster likelihood mapping. Conclusions The independent evolution of LHC and PSBS families is supported by strong phylogenetic evidence. In addition, a possible origin of LHC and PSBS families from different homologous members of the stress-enhanced protein subfamily, a diverse and anciently paralogous group of two-helix proteins, seems likely. The new hypothesis for the evolution of the extended LHC protein superfamily proposed here is in agreement with the character evolution analysis that incorporates the distribution of families and subfamilies across taxonomic lineages. Intriguingly, stress-enhanced proteins, which are universally found in the genomes of green plants

  2. Taxonomic distribution and origins of the extended LHC (light-harvesting complex) antenna protein superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelken, Johannes; Brinkmann, Henner; Adamska, Iwona

    2010-07-30

    The extended light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein superfamily is a centerpiece of eukaryotic photosynthesis, comprising the LHC family and several families involved in photoprotection, like the LHC-like and the photosystem II subunit S (PSBS). The evolution of this complex superfamily has long remained elusive, partially due to previously missing families. In this study we present a meticulous search for LHC-like sequences in public genome and expressed sequence tag databases covering twelve representative photosynthetic eukaryotes from the three primary lineages of plants (Plantae): glaucophytes, red algae and green plants (Viridiplantae). By introducing a coherent classification of the different protein families based on both, hidden Markov model analyses and structural predictions, numerous new LHC-like sequences were identified and several new families were described, including the red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like protein (RedCAP) family from red algae and diatoms. The test of alternative topologies of sequences of the highly conserved chlorophyll-binding core structure of LHC and PSBS proteins significantly supports the independent origins of LHC and PSBS families via two unrelated internal gene duplication events. This result was confirmed by the application of cluster likelihood mapping. The independent evolution of LHC and PSBS families is supported by strong phylogenetic evidence. In addition, a possible origin of LHC and PSBS families from different homologous members of the stress-enhanced protein subfamily, a diverse and anciently paralogous group of two-helix proteins, seems likely. The new hypothesis for the evolution of the extended LHC protein superfamily proposed here is in agreement with the character evolution analysis that incorporates the distribution of families and subfamilies across taxonomic lineages. Intriguingly, stress-enhanced proteins, which are universally found in the genomes of green plants, red algae, glaucophytes and in

  3. Taxonomic distribution and origins of the extended LHC (light-harvesting complex antenna protein superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinkmann Henner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extended light-harvesting complex (LHC protein superfamily is a centerpiece of eukaryotic photosynthesis, comprising the LHC family and several families involved in photoprotection, like the LHC-like and the photosystem II subunit S (PSBS. The evolution of this complex superfamily has long remained elusive, partially due to previously missing families. Results In this study we present a meticulous search for LHC-like sequences in public genome and expressed sequence tag databases covering twelve representative photosynthetic eukaryotes from the three primary lineages of plants (Plantae: glaucophytes, red algae and green plants (Viridiplantae. By introducing a coherent classification of the different protein families based on both, hidden Markov model analyses and structural predictions, numerous new LHC-like sequences were identified and several new families were described, including the red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like protein (RedCAP family from red algae and diatoms. The test of alternative topologies of sequences of the highly conserved chlorophyll-binding core structure of LHC and PSBS proteins significantly supports the independent origins of LHC and PSBS families via two unrelated internal gene duplication events. This result was confirmed by the application of cluster likelihood mapping. Conclusions The independent evolution of LHC and PSBS families is supported by strong phylogenetic evidence. In addition, a possible origin of LHC and PSBS families from different homologous members of the stress-enhanced protein subfamily, a diverse and anciently paralogous group of two-helix proteins, seems likely. The new hypothesis for the evolution of the extended LHC protein superfamily proposed here is in agreement with the character evolution analysis that incorporates the distribution of families and subfamilies across taxonomic lineages. Intriguingly, stress-enhanced proteins, which are universally found in the

  4. Understanding transport by the major facilitator superfamily (MFS): structures pave the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quistgaard, Esben M; Löw, Christian; Guettou, Fatma; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-02-01

    Members of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of transport proteins are essential for the movement of a wide range of substrates across biomembranes. As this transport requires a series of conformational changes, structures of MFS transporters captured in different conformational states are needed to decipher the transport mechanism. Recently, a large number of MFS transporter structures have been determined, which has provided us with an unprecedented opportunity to understand general aspects of the transport mechanism. We propose an updated model for the conformational cycle of MFS transporters, the 'clamp-and-switch model', and discuss the role of so-called 'gating residues' and the substrate in modulating these conformational changes.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoming; Li, Ying; Hou, Xilin

    2013-08-23

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) is a member of one of the most important leaf vegetables grown worldwide, which has experienced thousands of years in cultivation and artificial selection. The entire Chinese cabbage genome sequence, and more than forty thousand proteins have been obtained to date. The genome has undergone triplication events since its divergence from Arabidopsis thaliana (13 to 17 Mya), however a high degree of sequence similarity and conserved genome structure remain between the two species. Arabidopsis is therefore a viable reference species for comparative genomics studies. Variation in the number of members in gene families due to genome triplication may contribute to the broad range of phenotypic plasticity, and increased tolerance to environmental extremes observed in Brassica species. Transcription factors are important regulators involved in plant developmental and physiological processes. The AP2/ERF proteins, one of the most important families of transcriptional regulators, play a crucial role in plant growth, and in response to biotic and abiotic stressors. Our analysis will provide resources for understanding the tolerance mechanisms in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis. In the present study, 291 putative AP2/ERF transcription factor proteins were identified from the Chinese cabbage genome database, and compared with proteins from 15 additional species. The Chinese cabbage AP2/ERF superfamily was classified into four families, including AP2, ERF, RAV, and Soloist. The ERF family was further divided into DREB and ERF subfamilies. The AP2/ERF superfamily was subsequently divided into 15 groups. The identification, classification, phylogenetic reconstruction, conserved motifs, chromosome distribution, functional annotation, expression patterns, and interaction networks of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily were predicted and analyzed. Distribution mapping results showed AP2/ERF superfamily genes were localized on the

  6. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wu

    Full Text Available Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST, cytochrome P450 (CYP and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J' and J" clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J' and J" clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis.

  7. Aspergillus niger protein estA defines a new class of fungal esterases within the alfa/beta hydrolase fold superfamily of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourne, Y.; Hasper, A.A.; Chahinian, H.; Juin, M.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2004-01-01

    From the fungus Aspergillus niger, we identified a new gene encoding protein EstA, a member of the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold superfamily but of unknown substrate specificity. EstA was overexpressed and its crystal structure was solved by molecular replacement using a lipaseacetylcholinesterase

  8. MgMfs1, a major facilitator superfamily transporter from the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola, is a strong protectant against natural toxic compounds and fungicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roohparvar, R.; Waard, de M.A.; Kema, G.H.J.; Zwiers, L.H.

    2007-01-01

    MgMfs1, a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) gene from the wheat pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola, was identified in expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries. The encoded protein has high homology to members of the drug:H+ antiporter efflux family of MFS transporters with 14 predicted

  9. Self-Assembly in the Ferritin Nano-Cage Protein Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein self-assembly, through specific, high affinity, and geometrically constraining protein-protein interactions, can control and lead to complex cellular nano-structures. Establishing an understanding of the underlying principles that govern protein self-assembly is not only essential to appreciate the fundamental biological functions of these structures, but could also provide a basis for their enhancement for nano-material applications. The ferritins are a superfamily of well studied proteins that self-assemble into hollow cage-like structures which are ubiquitously found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Structural studies have revealed that many members of the ferritin family can self-assemble into nano-cages of two types. Maxi-ferritins form hollow spheres with octahedral symmetry composed of twenty-four monomers. Mini-ferritins, on the other hand, are tetrahedrally symmetric, hollow assemblies composed of twelve monomers. This review will focus on the structure of members of the ferritin superfamily, the mechanism of ferritin self-assembly and the structure-function relations of these proteins.

  10. Union Members Are Community Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David

    2013-01-01

    Unions serve their members' interests. But union members are also community members, and their interests go well beyond increasing pay and benefits. A local union president has found that his members are best served by participating in a community-wide coalition. Providing eyeglasses to needy students, promoting healthy eating, and increasing…

  11. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  12. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Xia Tian

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs constitute a superfamily of NAD(P+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  13. Perinatal exposure to bisphenol-A impairs spatial memory through upregulation of neurexin1 and neuroligin3 expression in male mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Kumar

    Full Text Available Bisphenol-A (BPA, a well known endocrine disruptor, impairs learning and memory in rodents. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of BPA induced impairment in learning and memory is not well known. As synaptic plasticity is the cellular basis of memory, the present study investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to BPA on the expression of synaptic proteins neurexin1 (Nrxn1 and neuroligin3 (Nlgn3, dendritic spine density and spatial memory in postnatal male mice. The pregnant mice were orally administered BPA (50 µg/kgbw/d from gestation day (GD 7 to postnatal day (PND 21 and sesame oil was used as a vehicle control. In Morris water maze (MWM test, BPA extended the escape latency time to locate the hidden platform in 8 weeks male mice. RT-PCR and Immunoblotting results showed significant upregulation of Nrxn1 and Nlgn3 expression in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus of 3 and 8 weeks male mice. This was further substantiated by in-situ hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques. BPA also significantly increased the density of dendritic spines in both regions, as analyzed by rapid Golgi staining. Thus our data suggest that perinatal exposure to BPA impairs spatial memory through upregulation of expression of synaptic proteins Nrxn1 and Nlgn3 and increased dendritic spine density in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of postnatal male mice.

  14. Structural studies on delta(3)-delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase: the variable mode of assembly of the trimeric disks of the crotonase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursula, Anu M; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Wierenga, Rik K

    2004-01-16

    Subunits of the enzymes in the crotonase superfamily form tight trimeric disks. In most members of this protein superfamily these disks assemble further into hexamers. Here we report on the 2.1 A structure of a tight hexameric crystal form of the yeast peroxisomal delta(3)-delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase (Eci1p). A comparison of this structure to a previously solved crystal form of Eci1p and other structures of this superfamily shows that there is much variability with respect to the relative distance between the disks and their relative orientations. In particular helices H2 and H9 are involved in the inter-trimer contacts and there are considerable structural differences in these helices in this superfamily. Helices H2 and H9 are near the catalytic cavity and it is postulated that the observed structural variability of these helices, stabilized by the different modes of assembly, has allowed the evolution of the wide range of substrate and catalytic specificity within this enzyme superfamily.

  15. The Insect Chemoreceptor Superfamily Is Ancient in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Hugh M

    2015-11-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily consists of 2 gene families, the highly diverse gustatory receptors (GRs) found in all arthropods with sequenced genomes and the odorant receptors that evolved from a GR lineage and have been found only in insects to date. Here, I describe relatives of the insect chemoreceptor superfamily, specifically the basal GR family, in diverse other animals, showing that the superfamily dates back at least to early animal evolution. GR-Like (GRL) genes are present in the genomes of the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, an anemone Nematostella vectensis, a coral Acropora digitifera, a polychaete Capitella teleta, a leech Helobdella robusta, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (and many other nematodes), 3 molluscs (a limpet Lottia gigantea, an oyster Crassostrea gigas, and the sea hare Aplysia californica), the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and the sea acorn Saccoglossus kowalevskii. While some of these animals contain multiple divergent GRL lineages, GRLs have been lost entirely from other animal lineages such as vertebrates. GRLs are absent from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica, and 2 available chaonoflagellate genomes, so it remains unclear whether this superfamily originated before or during animal evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The BAR Domain Superfamily: Membrane-Molding Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, Adam; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Camilli, Pietro De

    2009-01-01

    Membrane-shaping proteins of the BAR domain superfamily are determinants of organelle biogenesis, membrane trafficking, cell division, and cell migration. An upsurge of research now reveals new principles of BAR domain-mediated membrane remodeling, enhancing our understanding of membrane curvature-mediated information processing.

  17. Structural Characterization of the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor: A Stranger in the TNFR Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, M

    2017-01-01

    Although p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) was the founding member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), it is an atypical TNFRSF protein. p75NTR like TNF-R1 and Fas-R contain an extracellular domain with four cysteine-rich domains (CRD) and a death domain (DD) in the intracellular region. While TNFRSF proteins are activated by trimeric TNFSF ligands, p75NTR forms dimers activated by dimeric neurotrophins that are structurally unrelated to TNFSF proteins. In addition, although p75NTR shares with other members the interaction with the TNF receptor-associated factors to activate the NF-κB and cell death pathways, p75NTR does not interact with the DD-containing proteins FADD, TRADD, or MyD88. By contrast, the DD of p75NTR is able to recruit several protein interactors via a full catalog of DD interactions not described before in the TNFRSF. p75-DD forms homotypic symmetrical DD-DD complexes with itself and with the related p45-DD; forms heterotypic DD-CARD interactions with the RIP2-CARD domain, and forms a new interaction between a DD and RhoGDI. All these features, in addition to its promiscuous interactions with several ligands and coreceptors, its processing by α- and γ-secretases, the dimeric nature of its transmembrane domain and its "special" juxtamembrane region, make p75NTR a truly stranger in the TNFR superfamily. In this chapter, I will summarize the known structural aspects of p75NTR and I will analyze from a structural point of view, the similitudes and differences between p75NTR and the other members of the TNFRSF. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional analysis of Hsp70 superfamily proteins of rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Neelam K; Kundnani, Preeti; Grover, Anil

    2013-07-01

    Heat stress results in misfolding and aggregation of cellular proteins. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) enable the cells to maintain proper folding of proteins, both in unstressed as well as stressed conditions. Hsp70 genes encode for a group of highly conserved chaperone proteins across the living systems encompassing bacteria, plants, and animals. In the cellular chaperone network, Hsp70 family proteins interconnect other chaperones and play a dominant role in various cell processes. To assess the functionality of rice Hsp70 genes, rice genome database was analyzed. Rice genome contains 32 Hsp70 genes. Rice Hsp70 superfamily genes are represented by 24 Hsp70 family and 8 Hsp110 family members. Promoter and transcript expression analysis divulges that Hsp70 superfamily genes plays important role in heat stress. Ssc1 (mitochondrial Hsp70 protein in yeast) deleted yeast show compromised growth at 37 °C. Three mitochondrial rice Hsp70 sequences (i.e., mtHsp70-1, mtHsp70-2, and mtHsp70-3) complemented the Ssc1 mutation of yeast to differential extents. The information presented in this study provides detailed understanding of the Hsp70 protein family of rice, the crop species that is the major food for the world population.

  19. The Hotdog fold: wrapping up a superfamily of thioesterases and dehydratases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hotdog fold was initially identified in the structure of Escherichia coli FabA and subsequently in 4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA thioesterase from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS. Since that time structural determinations have shown a number of other apparently unrelated proteins also share the Hotdog fold. Results Using sequence analysis we unify a large superfamily of HotDog domains. Membership includes numerous prokaryotic, archaeal and eukaryotic proteins involved in several related, but distinct, catalytic activities, from metabolic roles such as thioester hydrolysis in fatty acid metabolism, to degradation of phenylacetic acid and the environmental pollutant 4-chlorobenzoate. The superfamily also includes FapR, a non-catalytic bacterial homologue that is involved in transcriptional regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. We have defined 17 subfamilies, with some characterisation. Operon analysis has revealed numerous HotDog domain-containing proteins to be fusion proteins, where two genes, once separate but adjacent open-reading frames, have been fused into one open-reading frame to give a protein with two functional domains. Finally we have generated a Hidden Markov Model library from our analysis, which can be used as a tool for predicting the occurrence of HotDog domains in any protein sequence. Conclusions The HotDog domain is both an ancient and ubiquitous motif, with members found in the three branches of life.

  20. A Novel Member of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein Superfamily in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    9198 from the Fondo de The IGFBP-rPs are cysteine-rich proteins involved in a Investigaci6n Sanitaria , Spain. diversity of biological functions...andisalsoarecipientofGrants97/5309and98/9198fromSpected because we previously demonstrated that epithelial the Fondo de Investigacion Sanitaria , Spain. cells, at least in vitro

  1. CD84 leukocyte antigen is a new member of the Ig superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Fuente García, Miguel Ángel de la; Pizcueta, Pilar; Nadal, Marga; Bosch, Jaime; Engel, Pablo

    1997-01-01

    Producción Científica cDNA isolated from a human B-cell line Raji library was ana- (CD48 and HumLy9) have been mapped. CD84 monoclonal lyzed and shown to encode the full-length cDNA sequence antibodies (MoAbs) were shown to react with cells transof a novel cell-surface glycoprotein, initially termed HLy9-b. fected with the cloned cDNA. These MoAbs were further The predicted mature 307-amino acid protein was composed used to show that CD84 is expressed as a single chain cellof two extrac...

  2. Fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a circulating member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Krogh, T N; Støving, René Klinkby

    1997-01-01

    was 12.3-46.6 ng/ml and the levels were 10 times higher in patients with renal failure. FA1 showed no diurnal variation, no variation during the menstrual cycle and was not influenced by the acute phase reaction. In humans (n = 10) the renal clearance of FA1 was 11 ml/min and an identical high renal...... clearance was found in rats when expressed per 100 g body weight. In rats the initial increase in serum FA1 was 10 ng/ml/h following bilateral nephrectomy, explaining the increased serum concentrations of FA1 observed in patients with renal failure. Udgivelsesdato: 1997-Dec-10...

  3. Transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 gene variant disentangles nonalcoholic steatohepatitis from cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Petta, Salvatore; Maglio, Cristina; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Pipitone, Rosaria; Mozzi, Enrico; Motta, Benedetta Maria; Kaminska, Dorota; Rametta, Raffaela; Grimaudo, Stefania; Pelusi, Serena; Montalcini, Tiziana; Alisi, Anna; Maggioni, Marco; Kärjä, Vesa; Borén, Jan; Käkelä, Pirjo; Di Marco, Vito; Xing, Chao; Nobili, Valerio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Craxi, Antonio; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Fargion, Silvia; Sjöström, Lars; Carlsson, Lena M; Romeo, Stefano; Valenti, Luca

    2015-02-01

    Excess hepatic storage of triglycerides is considered a benign condition, but nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) may progress to fibrosis and promote atherosclerosis. Carriers of the TM6SF2 E167K variant have fatty liver as a result of reduced secretion of very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs). As a result, they have lower circulating lipids and reduced risk of myocardial infarction. In this study, we aimed to assess whether TM6SF2 E167K affects liver damage and cardiovascular outcomes in subjects at risk of NASH. Liver damage was evaluated in 1,201 patients who underwent liver biopsy for suspected NASH; 427 were evaluated for carotid atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular outcomes were assessed in 1,819 controls from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) cohort. Presence of the inherited TM6SF2 E167K variant was determined by TaqMan assays. In the liver biopsy cohort, 188 subjects (13%) were carriers of the E167K variant. They had lower serum lipid levels than noncarriers (P < 0.05), had more-severe steatosis, necroinflammation, ballooning, and fibrosis (P < 0.05), and were more likely to have NASH (odds ratio [OR]: 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-2.79) and advanced fibrosis (OR, 2.08; 95% CI: 1.20-3.55), after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, fasting hyperglycemia, and the I148M PNPLA3 risk variant. However, E167K carriers had lower risk of developing carotid plaques (OR, 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25-0.94). In the SOS cohort, E167K carriers had higher alanine aminotransferase ALT and lower lipid levels (P < 0.05), as well as a lower incidence of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.39-0.95). Carriers of the TM6SF2 E167K variant are more susceptible to progressive NASH, but are protected against cardiovascular disease. Our findings suggest that reduced ability to export VLDLs is deleterious for the liver. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. Characterization of rat serum amyloid A4 (SAA4): A novel member of the SAA superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossmann, Christine [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Windpassinger, Christian; Brunner, Daniela [Institute of Human Genetics, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Kovacevic, Alenka; Schweighofer, Natascha; Malli, Roland [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Schuligoi, Rufina [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Prokesch, Andreas [Institute of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Institute of Biochemistry, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Kluve-Beckerman, Barbara [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Graier, Wolfgang F.; Kratky, Dagmar; Sattler, Wolfgang [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Malle, Ernst, E-mail: ernst.malle@medunigraz.at [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The full length rat SAA4 (rSAA4) mRNA was characterized by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. • rSAA4 mRNA has 1830 bases including a GA dinucleotide tandem repeat in the 5′UTR. • Three consecutive C/EBP promoter elements are crucial for transcription of rSAA4. • rSAA4 is abundantly expressed in the liver on mRNA and protein level. - Abstract: The serum amyloid A (SAA) family of proteins is encoded by multiple genes, which display allelic variation and a high degree of homology in mammals. The SAA1/2 genes code for non-glycosylated acute-phase SAA1/2 proteins, that may increase up to 1000-fold during inflammation. The SAA4 gene, well characterized in humans (hSAA4) and mice (mSaa4) codes for a SAA4 protein that is glycosylated only in humans. We here report on a previously uncharacterized SAA4 gene (rSAA4) and its product in Rattus norvegicus, the only mammalian species known not to express acute-phase SAA. The exon/intron organization of rSAA4 is similar to that reported for hSAA4 and mSaa4. By performing 5′- and 3′RACE, we identified a 1830-bases containing rSAA4 mRNA (including a GA-dinucleotide tandem repeat). Highest rSAA4 mRNA expression was detected in rat liver. In McA-RH7777 rat hepatoma cells, rSAA4 transcription was significantly upregulated in response to LPS and IL-6 while IL-1α/β and TNFα were without effect. Luciferase assays with promoter-truncation constructs identified three proximal C/EBP-elements that mediate expression of rSAA4 in McA-RH7777 cells. In line with sequence prediction a 14-kDa non-glycosylated SAA4 protein is abundantly expressed in rat liver. Fluorescence microscopy revealed predominant localization of rSAA4-GFP-tagged fusion protein in the ER.

  5. The immunoglobulin superfamily member CD200R identifies cells involved in type 2 immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Lars H; Martel, Britta C; Larsen, Lau F

    2017-01-01

    , were stimulated (14-16h) with peanut extract to detect peanut-specific CD4(+) CD154(+) T-cells. Biopsies were obtained for transcriptomic analysis from healthy controls and patients with extrinsic or intrinsic atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. RESULTS: Expression analysis of >300 surface proteins...... cells. Finally, transcriptomic analysis revealed up-regulation of CD200R in lesional skin from subjects with an extrinsic atopic dermatitis phenotype compared to healthy skin. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that CD200R expression strongly correlates with Th2 pathology; though, the mechanism...

  6. SUPFAM: A database of sequence superfamilies of protein domains

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    Anand B

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SUPFAM database is a compilation of superfamily relationships between protein domain families of either known or unknown 3-D structure. In SUPFAM, sequence families from Pfam and structural families from SCOP are associated, using profile matching, to result in sequence superfamilies of known structure. Subsequently all-against-all family profile matches are made to deduce a list of new potential superfamilies of yet unknown structure. Description The current version of SUPFAM (release 1.4 corresponds to significant enhancements and major developments compared to the earlier and basic version. In the present version we have used RPS-BLAST, which is robust and sensitive, for profile matching. The reliability of connections between protein families is ensured better than before by use of benchmarked criteria involving strict e-value cut-off and a minimal alignment length condition. An e-value based indication of reliability of connections is now presented in the database. Web access to a RPS-BLAST-based tool to associate a query sequence to one of the family profiles in SUPFAM is available with the current release. In terms of the scientific content the present release of SUPFAM is entirely reorganized with the use of 6190 Pfam families and 2317 structural families derived from SCOP. Due to a steep increase in the number of sequence and structural families used in SUPFAM the details of scientific content in the present release are almost entirely complementary to previous basic version. Of the 2286 families, we could relate 245 Pfam families with apparently no structural information to families of known 3-D structures, thus resulting in the identification of new families in the existing superfamilies. Using the profiles of 3904 Pfam families of yet unknown structure, an all-against-all comparison involving sequence-profile match resulted in clustering of 96 Pfam families into 39 new potential superfamilies. Conclusion SUPFAM

  7. Comparative genomic study of ALDH gene superfamily in Gossypium: A focus on Gossypium hirsutum under salt stress.

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    Yating Dong

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs are a superfamily of enzymes which play important role in the scavenging of active aldehydes molecules. In present work, a comprehensive whole-genomic study of ALDH gene superfamily was carried out for an allotetraploid cultivated cotton species, G. hirsutum, as well as in parallel relative to their diploid progenitors, G. arboreum and G. raimondii. Totally, 30 and 58 ALDH gene sequences belong to 10 families were identified from diploid and allotetraploid cotton species, respectively. The gene structures among the members from same families were highly conserved. Whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication might be the major driver for the expansion of ALDH gene superfamily in G. hirsutum. In addition, the expression patterns of GhALDH genes were diverse across tissues. Most GhALDH genes were induced or repressed by salt stress in upland cotton. Our observation shed lights on the molecular evolutionary properties of ALDH genes in diploid cottons and their alloallotetraploid derivatives. It may be useful to mine key genes for improvement of cotton response to salt stress.

  8. Evolutionary history and stress regulation of the lectin superfamily in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lectins are a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins. They play roles in various biological processes. However, little is known about their evolutionary history and their functions in plant stress regulation. The availability of full genome sequences from various plant species makes it possible to perform a whole-genome exploration for further understanding their biological functions. Results Higher plant genomes encode large numbers of lectin proteins. Based on their domain structures and phylogenetic analyses, a new classification system has been proposed. In this system, 12 different families have been classified and four of them consist of recently identified plant lectin members. Further analyses show that some of lectin families exhibit species-specific expansion and rapid birth-and-death evolution. Tandem and segmental duplications have been regarded as the major mechanisms to drive lectin expansion although retrogenes also significantly contributed to the birth of new lectin genes in soybean and rice. Evidence shows that lectin genes have been involved in biotic/abiotic stress regulations and tandem/segmental duplications may be regarded as drivers for plants to adapt various environmental stresses through duplication followed by expression divergence. Each member of this gene superfamily may play specialized roles in a specific stress condition and function as a regulator of various environmental factors such as cold, drought and high salinity as well as biotic stresses. Conclusions Our studies provide a new outline of the plant lectin gene superfamily and advance the understanding of plant lectin genes in lineage-specific expansion and their functions in biotic/abiotic stress-related developmental processes.

  9. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Fuconate Dehydratase from Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Rakus, J.; Pierce, R.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structures in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L

  10. Expression profiling and integrative analysis of the CESA/CSL superfamily in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Yuanyuan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like gene superfamily (CESA/CSL is proposed to encode enzymes for cellulose and non-cellulosic matrix polysaccharide synthesis in plants. Although the rice (Oryza sativa L. genome has been sequenced for a few years, the global expression profiling patterns and functions of the OsCESA/CSL superfamily remain largely unknown. Results A total of 45 identified members of OsCESA/CSL were classified into two clusters based on phylogeny and motif constitution. Duplication events contributed largely to the expansion of this superfamily, with Cluster I and II mainly attributed to tandem and segmental duplication, respectively. With microarray data of 33 tissue samples covering the entire life cycle of rice, fairly high OsCESA gene expression and rather variable OsCSL expression were observed. While some members from each CSL family (A1, C9, D2, E1, F6 and H1 were expressed in all tissues examined, many of OsCSL genes were expressed in specific tissues (stamen and radicles. The expression pattern of OsCESA/CSL and OsBC1L which extensively co-expressed with OsCESA/CSL can be divided into three major groups with ten subgroups, each showing a distinct co-expression in tissues representing typically distinct cell wall constitutions. In particular, OsCESA1, -3 & -8 and OsCESA4, -7 & -9 were strongly co-expressed in tissues typical of primary and secondary cell walls, suggesting that they form as a cellulose synthase complex; these results are similar to the findings in Arabidopsis. OsCESA5/OsCESA6 is likely partially redundant with OsCESA3 for OsCESA complex organization in the specific tissues (plumule and radicle. Moreover, the phylogenetic comparison in rice, Arabidopsis and other species can provide clues for the prediction of orthologous gene expression patterns. Conclusions The study characterized the CESA/CSL of rice using an integrated approach comprised of phylogeny, transcriptional

  11. Subdivision of the MDR superfamily of medium-chain dehydrogenases/reductases through iterative hidden Markov model refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Medium-chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases (MDR) form a protein superfamily whose size and complexity defeats traditional means of subclassification; it currently has over 15000 members in the databases, the pairwise sequence identity is typically around 25%, there are members from all kingdoms of life, the chain-lengths vary as does the oligomericity, and the members are partaking in a multitude of biological processes. There are profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) available for detecting MDR superfamily members, but none for determining which MDR family each protein belongs to. The current torrential influx of new sequence data enables elucidation of more and more protein families, and at an increasingly fine granularity. However, gathering good quality training data usually requires manual attention by experts and has therefore been the rate limiting step for expanding the number of available models. Results We have developed an automated algorithm for HMM refinement that produces stable and reliable models for protein families. This algorithm uses relationships found in data to generate confident seed sets. Using this algorithm we have produced HMMs for 86 distinct MDR families and 34 of their subfamilies which can be used in automated annotation of new sequences. We find that MDR forms with 2 Zn2+ ions in general are dehydrogenases, while MDR forms with no Zn2+ in general are reductases. Furthermore, in Bacteria MDRs without Zn2+ are more frequent than those with Zn2+, while the opposite is true for eukaryotic MDRs, indicating that Zn2+ has been recruited into the MDR superfamily after the initial life kingdom separations. We have also developed a web site http://mdr-enzymes.org that provides textual and numeric search against various characterised MDR family properties, as well as sequence scan functions for reliable classification of novel MDR sequences. Conclusions Our method of refinement can be readily applied to create stable and reliable HMMs

  12. Why is the GMN motif conserved in the CorA/Mrs2/Alr1 superfamily of magnesium transport proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Isolde; Daley, Daniel O; Rapp, Mikaela

    2013-07-16

    Members of the CorA/Mrs2/Alr1 superfamily of transport proteins mediate magnesium uptake in all kingdoms of life. Family members have a low degree of sequence conservation but are characterized by a conserved extracellular loop. While the degree of sequence conservation in the loop deviates to some extent between family members, the GMN family signature motif is always present. Structural and functional data imply that the loop plays a central role in magnesium selectivity, and recent biochemical data suggest it is crucial for stabilizing the pentamer in the magnesium-free (putative open) conformation. In this study, we present a detailed structure-function analysis of the extracellular loop of CorA from Thermotoga maritima, which provides molecular insight into how the loop mediates these two functions. The data show that loop residues outside of the GMN motif can be substituted if they support the pentameric state, but the residues of the GMN motif are intolerant to substitution. We conclude that G(312) is absolutely required for magnesium uptake, M(313) is absolutely required for pentamer integrity in the putative open conformation, and N(314) plays a role in both of these functions. These observations suggest a molecular reason why the GMN motif is conserved throughout the CorA/Mrs2/Alr1 superfamily.

  13. Structural Evolution of the Protein Kinase-Like Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  14. The Role of Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in Cancer Metastasis

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    Chee Wai Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major clinical problem and results in a poor prognosis for most cancers. The metastatic pathway describes the process by which cancer cells give rise to a metastatic lesion in a new tissue or organ. It consists of interconnecting steps all of which must be successfully completed to result in a metastasis. Cell-cell adhesion is a key aspect of many of these steps. Adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig-SF commonly play a central role in cell-cell adhesion, and a number of these molecules have been associated with cancer progression and a metastatic phenotype. Surprisingly, the contribution of Ig-SF members to metastasis has not received the attention afforded other cell adhesion molecules (CAMs such as the integrins. Here we examine the steps in the metastatic pathway focusing on how the Ig-SF members, melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, L1CAM, neural CAM (NCAM, leukocyte CAM (ALCAM, intercellular CAM-1 (ICAM-1 and platelet endothelial CAM-1 (PECAM-1 could play a role. Although much remains to be understood, this review aims to raise the profile of Ig-SF members in metastasis formation and prompt further research that could lead to useful clinical outcomes.

  15. Identification of the Hevea brasiliensis AP2/ERF superfamily by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Cuifang; Argout, Xavier; Gébelin, Virginie; Summo, Marilyne; Dufayard, Jean-François; Leclercq, Julie; Kuswanhadi; Piyatrakul, Piyanuch; Pirrello, Julien; Rio, Maryannick; Champion, Antony; Montoro, Pascal

    2013-01-16

    Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) laticifers are the source of natural rubber. Rubber production depends on endogenous and exogenous ethylene (ethephon). AP2/ERF transcription factors, and especially Ethylene-Response Factors, play a crucial role in plant development and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. This study set out to sequence transcript expressed in various tissues using next-generation sequencing and to identify AP2/ERF superfamily in the rubber tree. The 454 sequencing technique was used to produce five tissue-type transcript libraries (leaf, bark, latex, embryogenic tissues and root). Reads from all libraries were pooled and reassembled to improve mRNA lengths and produce a global library. One hundred and seventy-three AP2/ERF contigs were identified by in silico analysis based on the amino acid sequence of the conserved AP2 domain from the global library. The 142 contigs with the full AP2 domain were classified into three main families (20 AP2 members, 115 ERF members divided into 11 groups, and 4 RAV members) and 3 soloist members. Fifty-nine AP2/ERF transcripts were found in latex. Alongside the microRNA172 already described in plants, eleven additional microRNAs were predicted to inhibit Hevea AP2/ERF transcripts. Hevea has a similar number of AP2/ERF genes to that of other dicot species. We adapted the alignment and classification methods to data from next-generation sequencing techniques to provide reliable information. We observed several specific features for the ERF family. Three HbSoloist members form a group in Hevea. Several AP2/ERF genes highly expressed in latex suggest they have a specific function in Hevea. The analysis of AP2/ERF transcripts in Hevea presented here provides the basis for studying the molecular regulation of latex production in response to abiotic stresses and latex cell differentiation.

  16. Structural advances for the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Nieng

    2013-03-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of secondary active transporters conserved from bacteria to humans. MFS proteins selectively transport a wide spectrum of substrates across biomembranes and play a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes. Despite intense investigation, only seven MFS proteins from six subfamilies have been structurally elucidated. These structures were captured in distinct states during a transport cycle involving alternating access to binding sites from either side of the membrane. This review discusses recent progress in MFS structure analysis and focuses on the molecular basis for substrate binding, co-transport coupling, and alternating access. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Supporting members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  18. Melanophore migration and survival during zebrafish adult pigment stripe development require the immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule Igsf11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Seok Eom

    Full Text Available The zebrafish adult pigment pattern has emerged as a useful model for understanding the development and evolution of adult form as well as pattern-forming mechanisms more generally. In this species, a series of horizontal melanophore stripes arises during the larval-to-adult transformation, but the genetic and cellular bases for stripe formation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the seurat mutant phenotype, consisting of an irregular spotted pattern, arises from lesions in the gene encoding Immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (Igsf11. We find that Igsf11 is expressed by melanophores and their precursors, and we demonstrate by cell transplantation and genetic rescue that igsf11 functions autonomously to this lineage in promoting adult stripe development. Further analyses of cell behaviors in vitro, in vivo, and in explant cultures ex vivo demonstrate that Igsf11 mediates adhesive interactions and that mutants for igsf11 exhibit defects in both the migration and survival of melanophores and their precursors. These findings identify the first in vivo requirements for igsf11 as well as the first instance of an immunoglobulin superfamily member functioning in pigment cell development and patterning. Our results provide new insights into adult pigment pattern morphogenesis and how cellular interactions mediate pattern formation.

  19. Transient receptor potential (TRP gene superfamily encoding cation channels

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    Pan Zan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transient receptor potential (TRP non-selective cation channels constitute a superfamily, which contains 28 different genes. In mammals, this superfamily is divided into six subfamilies based on differences in amino acid sequence homology between the different gene products. Proteins within a subfamily aggregate to form heteromeric or homomeric tetrameric configurations. These different groupings have very variable permeability ratios for calcium versus sodium ions. TRP expression is widely distributed in neuronal tissues, as well as a host of other tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. They are activated by environmental stresses that include tissue injury, changes in temperature, pH and osmolarity, as well as volatile chemicals, cytokines and plant compounds. Their activation induces, via intracellular calcium signalling, a host of responses, including stimulation of cell proliferation, migration, regulatory volume behaviour and the release of a host of cytokines. Their activation is greatly potentiated by phospholipase C (PLC activation mediated by coupled GTP-binding proteins and tyrosine receptors. In addition to their importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis, some of these responses may involve various underlying diseases. Given the wealth of literature describing the multiple roles of TRP in physiology in a very wide range of different mammalian tissues, this review limits itself to the literature describing the multiple roles of TRP channels in different ocular tissues. Accordingly, their importance to the corneal, trabecular meshwork, lens, ciliary muscle, retinal, microglial and retinal pigment epithelial physiology and pathology is reviewed.

  20. Structural SCOP superfamily level classification using unsupervised machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Ulavappa B; Venkatesulu, M

    2012-01-01

    One of the major research directions in bioinformatics is that of assigning superfamily classification to a given set of proteins. The classification reflects the structural, evolutionary, and functional relatedness. These relationships are embodied in a hierarchical classification, such as the Structural Classification of Protein (SCOP), which is mostly manually curated. Such a classification is essential for the structural and functional analyses of proteins. Yet a large number of proteins remain unclassified. In this study, we have proposed an unsupervised machine learning approach to classify and assign a given set of proteins to SCOP superfamilies. In the method, we have constructed a database and similarity matrix using P-values obtained from an all-against-all BLAST run and trained the network with the ART2 unsupervised learning algorithm using the rows of the similarity matrix as input vectors, enabling the trained network to classify the proteins from 0.82 to 0.97 f-measure accuracy. The performance of ART2 has been compared with that of spectral clustering, Random forest, SVM, and HHpred. ART2 performs better than the others except HHpred. HHpred performs better than ART2 and the sum of errors is smaller than that of the other methods evaluated.

  1. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  2. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  3. Structural Analysis of Papain-Like NlpC/P60 Superfamily Enzymes with a Circularly Permuted Topology Reveals Potential Lipid Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (SG); (Wellcome)

    2012-07-11

    NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, 'closed' conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6) identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  4. Intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor β superfamily signaling localize to endosomes in chicken embryo and mouse lenses in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Shunsuke

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endocytosis is a key regulator of growth factor signaling pathways. Recent studies showed that the localization to endosomes of intracellular mediators of growth factor signaling may be required for their function. Although there is substantial evidence linking endocytosis and growth factor signaling in cultured cells, there has been little study of the endosomal localization of signaling components in intact tissues or organs. Results Proteins that are downstream of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily signaling pathway were found on endosomes in chicken embryo and postnatal mouse lenses, which depend on signaling by members of the TGFβ superfamily for their normal development. Phosphorylated Smad1 (pSmad1, pSmad2, Smad4, Smad7, the transcriptional repressors c-Ski and TGIF and the adapter molecules Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA and C184M, localized to EEA-1- and Rab5-positive vesicles in chicken embryo and/or postnatal mouse lenses. pSmad1 and pSmad2 also localized to Rab7-positive late endosomes. Smad7 was found associated with endosomes, but not caveolae. Bmpr1a conditional knock-out lenses showed decreased nuclear and endosomal localization of pSmad1. Many of the effectors in this pathway were distributed differently in vivo from their reported distribution in cultured cells. Conclusion Based on the findings reported here and data from other signaling systems, we suggest that the localization of activated intracellular mediators of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily to endosomes is important for the regulation of growth factor signaling.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the expansin gene superfamily reveals grapevine-specific structural and functional characteristics.

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    Silvia Dal Santo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA, expansin B (EXPB, expansin-like A (EXLA and expansin-like B (EXLB. There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon-intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa, compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa. We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. CONCLUSION: Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the

  6. Genome-wide analysis of the expansin gene superfamily reveals grapevine-specific structural and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Santo, Silvia; Vannozzi, Alessandro; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Fasoli, Marianna; Venturini, Luca; Pezzotti, Mario; Zenoni, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP) comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA), expansin B (EXPB), expansin-like A (EXLA) and expansin-like B (EXLB). There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon-intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa), compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the functional characterization of grapevine gene families by combining

  7. Overexpression of Kinesin Superfamily Motor Proteins in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hares, Kelly; Miners, James Scott; Cook, Amelia Jane; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Love, Seth; Wilkins, Alastair

    2017-01-01

    Defects in motor protein-mediated neuronal transport mechanisms have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders but remain relatively little studied in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our aim in the present study was to assess the expression of the anterograde kinesin superfamily motor proteins KIF5A, KIF1B, and KIF21B, and to examine their relationship to levels of hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and amyloid-β (Aβ) in human brain tissue. We used a combination of qPCR, immunoblotting, and ELISA to perform these analyses in midfrontal cortex from 49 AD and 46 control brains. Expression of KIF5A, KIF1B, and KIF21B at gene and protein level was significantly increased in AD. KIF5A protein expression correlated inversely with the levels of AβPP and soluble Aβ in AD brains. Upregulation of KIFs may be an adaptive response to impaired axonal transport in AD.

  8. Implications of Mycobacterium Major Facilitator Superfamily for Novel Measures against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zhen; Xie, Longxiang; Xie, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is an important secondary membrane transport protein superfamily conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The MFS proteins are widespread among bacteria and are responsible for the transfer of substrates. Pathogenic Mycobacterium MFS transporters, their distribution, function, phylogeny, and predicted crystal structures were studied to better understand the function of MFS and to discover specific inhibitors of MFS for better tuberculosis control.

  9. Morphology, phylogeny and evolution of the superfamily Plectoidea Örley, 1880 (Nematoda: Plectida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holovachov, O.V.

    2004-01-01

    The phylogeny and classification of the superfamily Plectoidea Örley, 1880 is revised on the basis of published and updated morphological data for 35 ingroup and 2 outgroup species. The following features are here considered to support the monophyletic origin of the superfamily: 1) stegostom

  10. Erythropoietin and interleukin-2 activate distinct JAK kinase family members.

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, D L; D'Andrea, A D

    1994-01-01

    The erythropoietin (EPO) receptor and the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor beta-chain subunit are members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. They have conserved primary amino acid sequences in their cytoplasmic domains and activate phosphorylation of common substrates, suggesting common biochemical signaling mechanisms. We have generated a cell line, CTLL-EPO-R, that contains functional cell surface receptors for both EPO and IL-2. CTLL-EPO-R cells demonstrated similar growth kinetics in EPO ...

  11. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  12. Molecular phylogeny of the kelch-repeat superfamily reveals an expansion of BTB/kelch proteins in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Josephine C

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kelch motif is an ancient and evolutionarily-widespread sequence motif of 44–56 amino acids in length. It occurs as five to seven repeats that form a β-propeller tertiary structure. Over 28 kelch-repeat proteins have been sequenced and functionally characterised from diverse organisms spanning from viruses, plants and fungi to mammals and it is evident from expressed sequence tag, domain and genome databases that many additional hypothetical proteins contain kelch-repeats. In general, kelch-repeat β-propellers are involved in protein-protein interactions, however the modest sequence identity between kelch motifs, the diversity of domain architectures, and the partial information on this protein family in any single species, all present difficulties to developing a coherent view of the kelch-repeat domain and the kelch-repeat protein superfamily. To understand the complexity of this superfamily of proteins, we have analysed by bioinformatics the complement of kelch-repeat proteins encoded in the human genome and have made comparisons to the kelch-repeat proteins encoded in other sequenced genomes. Results We identified 71 kelch-repeat proteins encoded in the human genome, whereas 5 or 8 members were identified in yeasts and around 18 in C. elegans, D. melanogaster and A. gambiae. Multiple domain architectures were identified in each organism, including previously unrecognised forms. The vast majority of kelch-repeat domains are predicted to form six-bladed β-propellers. The most prevalent domain architecture in the metazoan animal genomes studied was the BTB/kelch domain organisation and we uncovered 3 subgroups of human BTB/kelch proteins. Sequence analysis of the kelch-repeat domains of the most robustly-related subgroups identified differences in β-propeller organisation that could provide direction for experimental study of protein-binding characteristics. Conclusion The kelch-repeat superfamily constitutes a

  13. Prevertebrate Local Gene Duplication Facilitated Expansion of the Neuropeptide GPCR Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seongsik; Furlong, Michael; Sim, Mikang; Cho, Minah; Park, Sumi; Cho, Eun Bee; Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Jaebum; Seong, Jae Young

    2015-11-01

    In humans, numerous genes encode neuropeptides that comprise a superfamily of more than 70 genes in approximately 30 families and act mainly through rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R WGD) during early vertebrate evolution greatly contributed to proliferation within gene families; however, the mechanisms underlying the initial emergence and diversification of these gene families before 2R WGD are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed 25 vertebrate rhodopsin-like neuropeptide GPCR families and their cognate peptides using phylogeny, synteny, and localization of these genes on reconstructed vertebrate ancestral chromosomes (VACs). Based on phylogeny, these GPCR families can be divided into five distinct clades, and members of each clade tend to be located on the same VACs. Similarly, their neuropeptide gene families also tend to reside on distinct VACs. Comparison of these GPCR genes with those of invertebrates including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Branchiostoma floridae, and Ciona intestinalis indicates that these GPCR families emerged through tandem local duplication during metazoan evolution prior to 2R WGD. Our study describes a presumptive evolutionary mechanism and development pathway of the vertebrate rhodopsin-like GPCR and cognate neuropeptide families from the urbilaterian ancestor to modern vertebrates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Function, Structure, and Evolution of the Major Facilitator Superfamily: The LacY Manifesto

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    M. Gregor Madej

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major facilitator superfamily (MFS is a diverse group of secondary transporters with members found in all kingdoms of life. A paradigm for MFS is the lactose permease (LacY of Escherichia coli, which couples the stoichiometric translocation of a galactopyranoside and an H+ across the cytoplasmic membrane. LacY has been the test bed for the development of many methods applied for the analysis of transport proteins. X-ray structures of an inward-facing conformation and the most recent structure of an almost occluded conformation confirm many conclusions from previous studies. Although structure models are critical, they are insufficient to explain the catalysis of transport. The clues to understanding transport are based on the principles of enzyme kinetics. Secondary transport is a dynamic process—static snapshots of X-ray crystallography describe it only partially. However, without structural information, the underlying chemistry is virtually impossible to conclude. A large body of biochemical/biophysical data derived from systematic studies of site-directed mutants in LacY suggests residues critically involved in the catalysis, and a working model for the symport mechanism that involves alternating access of the binding site is presented. The general concepts derived from the bacterial LacY are examined for their relevance to other MFS transporters.

  15. Evolution of the B3 DNA binding superfamily: new insights into REM family gene diversification.

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    Elisson A C Romanel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The B3 DNA binding domain includes five families: auxin response factor (ARF, abscisic acid-insensitive3 (ABI3, high level expression of sugar inducible (HSI, related to ABI3/VP1 (RAV and reproductive meristem (REM. The release of the complete genomes of the angiosperm eudicots Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa, the monocot Orysa sativa, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens,the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri and the red algae Cyanidioschyzon melorae provided an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of this superfamily. METHODOLOGY: In order to better understand the origin and the diversification of B3 domains in plants, we combined comparative phylogenetic analysis with exon/intron structure and duplication events. In addition, we investigated the conservation and divergence of the B3 domain during the origin and evolution of each family. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that showed that the B3 containing genes have undergone extensive duplication events, and that the REM family B3 domain has a highly diverged DNA binding. Our results also indicate that the founding member of the B3 gene family is likely to be similar to the ABI3/HSI genes found in C. reinhardtii and V. carteri. Among the B3 families, ABI3, HSI, RAV and ARF are most structurally conserved, whereas the REM family has experienced a rapid divergence. These results are discussed in light of their functional and evolutionary roles in plant development.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB transcription factor superfamily in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The MYB superfamily constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors described in plants. Nevertheless, their functions appear to be highly diverse and remain rather unclear. To date, no genome-wide characterization of this gene family has been conducted in a legume species. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of the whole MYB superfamily in a legume species, soybean (Glycine max), including the gene structures, phylogeny, chromosome locations, conserved motifs, and expression patterns, as well as a comparative genomic analysis with Arabidopsis. Results A total of 244 R2R3-MYB genes were identified and further classified into 48 subfamilies based on a phylogenetic comparative analysis with their putative orthologs, showed both gene loss and duplication events. The phylogenetic analysis showed that most characterized MYB genes with similar functions are clustered in the same subfamily, together with the identification of orthologs by synteny analysis, functional conservation among subgroups of MYB genes was strongly indicated. The phylogenetic relationships of each subgroup of MYB genes were well supported by the highly conserved intron/exon structures and motifs outside the MYB domain. Synonymous nucleotide substitution (dN/dS) analysis showed that the soybean MYB DNA-binding domain is under strong negative selection. The chromosome distribution pattern strongly indicated that genome-wide segmental and tandem duplication contribute to the expansion of soybean MYB genes. In addition, we found that ~ 4% of soybean R2R3-MYB genes had undergone alternative splicing events, producing a variety of transcripts from a single gene, which illustrated the extremely high complexity of transcriptome regulation. Comparative expression profile analysis of R2R3-MYB genes in soybean and Arabidopsis revealed that MYB genes play conserved and various roles in plants, which is indicative of a divergence in function. Conclusions In this

  17. The WD-repeat protein superfamily in Arabidopsis: conservation and divergence in structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Philip

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The WD motif (also known as the Trp-Asp or WD40 motif is found in a multitude of eukaryotic proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes. Where studied, repeated WD motifs act as a site for protein-protein interaction, and proteins containing WD repeats (WDRs are known to serve as platforms for the assembly of protein complexes or mediators of transient interplay among other proteins. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, members of this superfamily are increasingly being recognized as key regulators of plant-specific developmental events. Results We analyzed the predicted complement of WDR proteins from Arabidopsis, and compared this to those from budding yeast, fruit fly and human to illustrate both conservation and divergence in structure and function. This analysis identified 237 potential Arabidopsis proteins containing four or more recognizable copies of the motif. These were classified into 143 distinct families, 49 of which contained more than one Arabidopsis member. Approximately 113 of these families or individual proteins showed clear homology with WDR proteins from the other eukaryotes analyzed. Where conservation was found, it often extended across all of these organisms, suggesting that many of these proteins are linked to basic cellular mechanisms. The functional characterization of conserved WDR proteins in Arabidopsis reveals that these proteins help adapt basic mechanisms for plant-specific processes. Conclusions Our results show that most Arabidopsis WDR proteins are strongly conserved across eukaryotes, including those that have been found to play key roles in plant-specific processes, with diversity in function conferred at least in part by divergence in upstream signaling pathways, downstream regulatory targets and /or structure outside of the WDR regions.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships among superfamilies of Neritimorpha (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan E; Colgan, Don; Castro, Lyda R; Kano, Yasunori; Zardoya, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    Despite the extraordinary morphological and ecological diversity of Neritimorpha, few studies have focused on the phylogenetic relationships of this lineage of gastropods, which includes four extant superfamilies: Neritopsoidea, Hydrocenoidea, Helicinoidea, and Neritoidea. Here, the nucleotide sequences of the complete mitochondrial genomes of Georissa bangueyensis (Hydrocenoidea), Neritina usnea (Neritoidea), and Pleuropoma jana (Helicinoidea) and the nearly complete mt genomes of Titiscania sp. (Neritopsoidea) and Theodoxus fluviatilis (Neritoidea) were determined. Phylogenetic reconstructions using probabilistic methods were based on mitochondrial (13 protein coding genes and two ribosomal rRNA genes), nuclear (partial 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, actin, and histone H3 genes) and combined sequence data sets. All phylogenetic analyses except one converged on a single, highly supported tree in which Neritopsoidea was recovered as the sister group of a clade including Helicinoidea as the sister group of Hydrocenoidea and Neritoidea. This topology agrees with the fossil record and supports at least three independent invasions of land by neritimorph snails. The mitochondrial genomes of Titiscania sp., G. bangueyensis, N. usnea, and T. fluviatilis share the same gene organization previously described for Nerita mt genomes whereas that of P. jana has undergone major rearrangements. We sequenced about half of the mitochondrial genome of another species of Helicinoidea, Viana regina, and confirmed that this species shares the highly derived gene order of P. jana. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radical SAM, a novel protein superfamily linking unresolved steps in familiar biosynthetic pathways with radical mechanisms: functional characterization using new analysis and information visualization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Beth G.; Reyes-Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-01-01

    A novel protein superfamily with over 600 members was discovered by iterative profile searches and analyzed with powerful bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a radical species by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. The superfamily (named here Radical SAM) provides evidence that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well- studied but unresolved biochemical pathways and reflects an ancient conserved mechanistic approach to difficult chemistries. Radical SAM proteins catalyze diverse reactions, including unusual methylations, isomerization, sulfur insertion, ring formation, anaerobic oxidation and protein radical formation. They function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic and herbicide biosynthesis and in biodegradation pathways. One eukaryotic member is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis; another is observed to bind the neuronal Cdk5 activator protein. Five defining members not previously recognized as homologs are lysine 2,3-aminomutase, biotin synthase, lipoic acid synthase and the activating enzymes for pyruvate formate-lyase and anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase. Two functional predictions for unknown proteins are made based on integrating other data types such as motif, domain, operon and biochemical pathway into an organized view of similarity relationships. PMID:11222759

  20. Protein Similarity Networks Reveal Relationships among Sequence, Structure, and Function within the Cupin Superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Uberto; Moomaw, Ellen W.

    2013-01-01

    The cupin superfamily is extremely diverse and includes catalytically inactive seed storage proteins, sugar-binding metal-independent epimerases, and metal-dependent enzymes possessing dioxygenase, decarboxylase, and other activities. Although numerous proteins of this superfamily have been structurally characterized, the functions of many of them have not been experimentally determined. We report the first use of protein similarity networks (PSNs) to visualize trends of sequence and structur...

  1. Conserved amino acid networks modulate discrete functional properties in an enzyme superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Chitra; Gagn?, Donald; Reynolds, Kimberly A; Doucet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we applied the sequence-based statistical coupling analysis approach to characterize conserved amino acid networks important for biochemical function in the pancreatic-type ribonuclease (ptRNase) superfamily. This superfamily-wide analysis indicates a decomposition of the RNase tertiary structure into spatially distributed yet physically connected networks of co-evolving amino acids, termed sectors. Comparison of this statistics-based description with new NMR experiments data sh...

  2. Two-Stage Approach for Protein Superfamily Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Vipsita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We deal with the problem of protein superfamily classification in which the family membership of newly discovered amino acid sequence is predicted. Correct prediction is a matter of great concern for the researchers and drug analyst which helps them in discovery of new drugs. As this problem falls broadly under the category of pattern classification problem, we have made all efforts to optimize feature extraction in the first stage and classifier design in the second stage with an overall objective to maximize the performance accuracy of the classifier. In the feature extraction phase, Genetic Algorithm- (GA- based wrapper approach is used to select few eigenvectors from the principal component analysis (PCA space which are encoded as binary strings in the chromosome. On the basis of position of 1’s in the chromosome, the eigenvectors are selected to build the transformation matrix which then maps the original high-dimension feature space to lower dimension feature space. Using PCA-NSGA-II (non-dominated sorting GA, the nondominated solutions obtained from the Pareto front solve the trade-off problem by compromising between the number of eigenvectors selected and the accuracy obtained by the classifier. In the second stage, recursive orthogonal least square algorithm (ROLSA is used for training radial basis function network (RBFN to select optimal number of hidden centres as well as update the output layer weighting matrix. This approach can be applied to large data set with much lower requirements of computer memory. Thus, very small architectures having few number of hidden centres are obtained showing higher level of performance accuracy.

  3. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin,Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2005-06-17

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physiopathology.

  4. Evolution of Enzyme Superfamilies: Comprehensive Exploration of Sequence-Function Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, F; Copp, J N; Tokuriki, N

    2016-11-22

    The sequence and functional diversity of enzyme superfamilies have expanded through billions of years of evolution from a common ancestor. Understanding how protein sequence and functional "space" have expanded, at both the evolutionary and molecular level, is central to biochemistry, molecular biology, and evolutionary biology. Integrative approaches that examine protein sequence, structure, and function have begun to provide comprehensive views of the functional diversity and evolutionary relationships within enzyme superfamilies. In this review, we outline the recent advances in our understanding of enzyme evolution and superfamily functional diversity. We describe the tools that have been used to comprehensively analyze sequence relationships and to characterize sequence and function relationships. We also highlight recent large-scale experimental approaches that systematically determine the activity profiles across enzyme superfamilies. We identify several intriguing insights from this recent body of work. First, promiscuous activities are prevalent among extant enzymes. Second, many divergent proteins retain "function connectivity" via enzyme promiscuity, which can be used to probe the evolutionary potential and history of enzyme superfamilies. Finally, we discuss open questions regarding the intricacies of enzyme divergence, as well as potential research directions that will deepen our understanding of enzyme superfamily evolution.

  5. A novel major facilitator superfamily protein at the tonoplast influences zinc tolerance and accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Michael J; Cobbett, Christopher S

    2007-04-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient required by all cells but is toxic in excess. We have identified three allelic Zn-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The gene, designated ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR1 (ZIF1), encodes a member of the major facilitator superfamily of membrane proteins, which are found in all organisms and transport a wide range of small, organic molecules. Shoots of zif1 mutants showed increased accumulation of Zn but not other metal ions. In combination with mutations affecting shoot-to-root Zn translocation, zif1 hma2 hma4 triple mutants accumulated less Zn than the wild type but remained Zn sensitive, suggesting that the zif1 Zn-sensitive phenotype is due to altered Zn distribution. zif1 mutants were also more sensitive to cadmium but less sensitive to nickel. ZIF1 promoter-beta-glucuronidase fusions were expressed throughout the plant, with strongest expression in young tissues, and predominantly in the vasculature in older tissues. ZIF1 expression was highly induced by Zn and, to a lesser extent, by manganese. A ZIF1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized to the tonoplast in transgenic plants. MTP1 has been identified as a tonoplast Zn transporter and a zif1-1 mtp1-1 double mutant was more sensitive to Zn than either of the single mutants, suggesting ZIF1 influences a distinct mechanism of Zn homeostasis. Overexpression of ZIF1 conferred increased Zn tolerance and interveinal leaf chlorosis in some transgenic lines in which ZIF1 expression was high. We propose that ZIF1 is involved in a novel mechanism of Zn sequestration, possibly by transport of a Zn ligand or a Zn ligand complex into vacuoles.

  6. A new computational approach redefines the subtelomeric vir superfamily of Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Francisco Javier; Bernabeu, Maria; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; del Portillo, Hernando A

    2013-01-16

    Subtelomeric multigene families of malaria parasites encode virulent determinants. The published genome sequence of Plasmodium vivax revealed the largest subtelomeric multigene family of human malaria parasites, the vir super-family, presently composed of 346 vir genes subdivided into 12 different subfamilies based on sequence homologies detected by BLAST. A novel computational approach was used to redefine vir genes. First, a protein-weighted graph was built based on BLAST alignments. This graph was processed to ensure that edge weights are not exclusively based on the BLAST score between the two corresponding proteins, but strongly dependant on their graph neighbours and their associations. Then the Markov Clustering Algorithm was applied to the protein graph. Next, the Homology Block concept was used to further validate this clustering approach. Finally, proteome-wide analysis was carried out to predict new VIR members. Results showed that (i) three previous subfamilies cannot longer be classified as vir genes; (ii) most previously unclustered vir genes were clustered into vir subfamilies; (iii) 39 hypothetical proteins were predicted as VIR proteins; (iv) many of these findings are supported by a number of structural and functional evidences, sub-cellular localization studies, gene expression analysis and chromosome localization (v) this approach can be used to study other multigene families in malaria. This methodology, resource and new classification of vir genes will contribute to a new structural framing of this multigene family and other multigene families of malaria parasites, facilitating the design of experiments to understand their role in pathology, which in turn may help furthering vaccine development.

  7. A new computational approach redefines the subtelomeric vir superfamily of Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtelomeric multigene families of malaria parasites encode virulent determinants. The published genome sequence of Plasmodium vivax revealed the largest subtelomeric multigene family of human malaria parasites, the vir super-family, presently composed of 346 vir genes subdivided into 12 different subfamilies based on sequence homologies detected by BLAST. Results A novel computational approach was used to redefine vir genes. First, a protein-weighted graph was built based on BLAST alignments. This graph was processed to ensure that edge weights are not exclusively based on the BLAST score between the two corresponding proteins, but strongly dependant on their graph neighbours and their associations. Then the Markov Clustering Algorithm was applied to the protein graph. Next, the Homology Block concept was used to further validate this clustering approach. Finally, proteome-wide analysis was carried out to predict new VIR members. Results showed that (i three previous subfamilies cannot longer be classified as vir genes; (ii most previously unclustered vir genes were clustered into vir subfamilies; (iii 39 hypothetical proteins were predicted as VIR proteins; (iv many of these findings are supported by a number of structural and functional evidences, sub-cellular localization studies, gene expression analysis and chromosome localization (v this approach can be used to study other multigene families in malaria. Conclusions This methodology, resource and new classification of vir genes will contribute to a new structural framing of this multigene family and other multigene families of malaria parasites, facilitating the design of experiments to understand their role in pathology, which in turn may help furthering vaccine development.

  8. WXG100 protein superfamily consists of three subfamilies and exhibits an α-helical C-terminal conserved residue pattern.

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    Christian Poulsen

    Full Text Available Members of the WXG100 protein superfamily form homo- or heterodimeric complexes. The most studied proteins among them are the secreted T-cell antigens CFP-10 (10 kDa culture filtrate protein, EsxB and ESAT-6 (6 kDa early secreted antigen target, EsxA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are encoded on an operon within a gene cluster, named as ESX-1, that encodes for the Type VII secretion system (T7SS. WXG100 proteins are secreted in a full-length form and it is known that they adopt a four-helix bundle structure. In the current work we discuss the evolutionary relationship between the homo- and heterodimeric WXG100 proteins, the basis of the oligomeric state and the key structural features of the conserved sequence pattern of WXG100 proteins. We performed an iterative bioinformatics analysis of the WXG100 protein superfamily and correlated this with the atomic structures of the representative WXG100 proteins. We find, firstly, that the WXG100 protein superfamily consists of three subfamilies: CFP-10-, ESAT-6- and sagEsxA-like proteins (EsxA proteins similar to that of Streptococcus agalactiae. Secondly, that the heterodimeric complexes probably evolved from a homodimeric precursor. Thirdly, that the genes of hetero-dimeric WXG100 proteins are always encoded in bi-cistronic operons and finally, by combining the sequence alignments with the X-ray data we identify a conserved C-terminal sequence pattern. The side chains of these conserved residues decorate the same side of the C-terminal α-helix and therefore form a distinct surface. Our results lead to a putatively extended T7SS secretion signal which combines two reported T7SS recognition characteristics: Firstly that the T7SS secretion signal is localized at the C-terminus of T7SS substrates and secondly that the conserved residues YxxxD/E are essential for T7SS activity. Furthermore, we propose that the specific α-helical surface formed by the conserved sequence pattern including Yxxx

  9. WXG100 Protein Superfamily Consists of Three Subfamilies and Exhibits an α-Helical C-Terminal Conserved Residue Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Christian; Panjikar, Santosh; Holton, Simon J.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Song, Young-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Members of the WXG100 protein superfamily form homo- or heterodimeric complexes. The most studied proteins among them are the secreted T-cell antigens CFP-10 (10 kDa culture filtrate protein, EsxB) and ESAT-6 (6 kDa early secreted antigen target, EsxA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are encoded on an operon within a gene cluster, named as ESX-1, that encodes for the Type VII secretion system (T7SS). WXG100 proteins are secreted in a full-length form and it is known that they adopt a four-helix bundle structure. In the current work we discuss the evolutionary relationship between the homo- and heterodimeric WXG100 proteins, the basis of the oligomeric state and the key structural features of the conserved sequence pattern of WXG100 proteins. We performed an iterative bioinformatics analysis of the WXG100 protein superfamily and correlated this with the atomic structures of the representative WXG100 proteins. We find, firstly, that the WXG100 protein superfamily consists of three subfamilies: CFP-10-, ESAT-6- and sagEsxA-like proteins (EsxA proteins similar to that of Streptococcus agalactiae). Secondly, that the heterodimeric complexes probably evolved from a homodimeric precursor. Thirdly, that the genes of hetero-dimeric WXG100 proteins are always encoded in bi-cistronic operons and finally, by combining the sequence alignments with the X-ray data we identify a conserved C-terminal sequence pattern. The side chains of these conserved residues decorate the same side of the C-terminal α-helix and therefore form a distinct surface. Our results lead to a putatively extended T7SS secretion signal which combines two reported T7SS recognition characteristics: Firstly that the T7SS secretion signal is localized at the C-terminus of T7SS substrates and secondly that the conserved residues YxxxD/E are essential for T7SS activity. Furthermore, we propose that the specific α-helical surface formed by the conserved sequence pattern including YxxxD/E motif is a key

  10. Utility of the Amborella trichopoda expansin superfamily in elucidating the history of angiosperm expansins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seader, Victoria H; Thornsberry, Jennifer M; Carey, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Expansins form a superfamily of plant proteins that assist in cell wall loosening during growth and development. The superfamily is divided into four families: EXPA, EXPB, EXLA, and EXLB (Sampedro and Cosgrove in Genome Biol 6:242, 2005. doi: 10.1186/gb-2005-6-12-242 ). Previous studies on Arabidopsis, rice, and Populus trichocarpa have clarified the evolutionary history of expansins in angiosperms (Sampedro et al. in Plant J 44:409-419, 2005. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2005.02540.x ). Amborella trichopoda is a flowering plant that diverged very early. Thus, it is a sister lineage to all other extant angiosperms (Amborella Genome Project in 342:1241089, 2013. doi: 10.1126/science.1241089 ). Because of this relationship, comparing the A. trichopoda expansin superfamily with those of other flowering plants may indicate which expansin genes were present in the last common ancestor of all angiosperms. The A. trichopoda expansin superfamily was assembled using BLAST searches with angiosperm expansin queries. The search results were analyzed and annotated to isolate the complete A. trichopoda expansin superfamily. This superfamily is similar to other angiosperm expansin superfamilies, but is somewhat smaller. This is likely because of a lack of genome duplication events (Amborella Genome Project 2013). Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses of A. trichopoda expansins have improved our understanding of the evolutionary history of expansins in angiosperms. Nearly all of the A. trichopoda expansins were placed into an existing Arabidopsis-rice expansin clade. Based on the results of phylogenetic and syntenic analyses, we estimate there were 12-13 EXPA genes, 2 EXPB genes, 1 EXLA gene, and 2 EXLB genes in the last common ancestor of all angiosperms.

  11. Discovery of an L-Fucono-1,5-Lactonase from cog3618 of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Merlin Eric; Vetting, Matthew; Williams, Howard J.; Narindoshvili, Tamari; Kebodeaux, Devon M.; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald D.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    A member of the amidohydrolase superfamily, BmulJ_04915 from Burkholderia multivorans, of unknown function was determined to hydrolyze a series of sugar lactones: L-fucono-1,4-lactone, D-arabino-1,4-lactone, L-xylono-1,4-lactone, D-lyxono-1,4-lactone and L-galactono-1,4-lactone. The highest activity was shown for L-fucono-1,4-lactone with a kcat value of 140 s−1 and a kcat/Km value of 1.0 × 105 M−1 s−1 at pH 8.3. The enzymatic product of an adjacent L-fucose dehydrogenase, BmulJ_04919, was shown to be L-fucono-1,5-lactone, via NMR spectroscopy. L-fucono-1,5-lactone is unstable and rapidly converts non-enzymatically to L-fucono-1,4-lactone. Due to the chemical instability of L-fucono-1,5-lactone, 4-deoxy-L-fucono-1,5-lactone was enzymatically synthesized from 4-deoxy-L-fucose using L-fucose dehydrogenase. BmulJ_04915 hydrolyzed 4-deoxy-L-fucono-1,5-lactone with a kcat value of 990 s−1 and a kcat/Km value of 8.0 × 106 M−1 s−1 at pH 7.1. The protein does not require divalent cations in the active site for catalytic activity. BmulJ_04915 is the second enzyme from cog3618 of the amidohydrolase superfamily that does not require a divalent metal for catalytic activity. BmulJ_04915 is the first enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of either L-fucono-1,4-lactone or L-fucono-1,5-lactone. The structures of the fuconolactonase and the fucose dehydrogenase were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. PMID:23214453

  12. Periplasmic vestibule plays an important role for solute recruitment, selectivity, and gating in the Rh/Amt/MEP superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Ugur; Khademi, Shahram

    2011-03-08

    AmtB, a member of the Rh/Amt/MEP superfamily, is responsible for ammonia transport in Escherichia coli. The ammonia pathway in AmtB consists of a narrow hydrophobic lumen in between hydrophilic periplasmic and cytoplasmic vestibules. A series of molecular dynamics simulations (greater than 0.4 μs in total) were performed to determine the mechanism of solute recruitments and selectivity by the periplasmic vestibule. The results show that the periplasmic vestibule plays a crucial role in solute selectivity, and its solute preferences follow the order of NH4(+) > NH3 > CO2. Based on our results, NH4(+) recruitment is initiated by its interaction with either E70 or E225, highly conserved residues located at the entrance of the vestibule. Subsequently, the backbone carbonyl groups at the periplasmic vestibule direct NH4(+) to the conserved aromatic cage at the bottom of the vestibule (known as the Am1 site). The umbrella sampling simulations suggest that the conserved residue D160 is not directly involved in the ammonia conduction; rather its main function is to keep the structure of periplasmic vestibule intact. The MD simulations also revealed that two partially stacked phenyl rings of F107 and F215, separating the periplasmic vestibule from the hydrophobic lumen, flip open and closed simultaneously with a frequency of approximately 10(8) flipping events per second. These results show how the periplasmic vestibule selectively recruits NH4(+) to the Am1 site, and also that the synchronized flipping of two phenyl rings potentially facilitates the solute transition from the periplasmic vestibule to the hydrophobic lumen in the Rh/Amt/MEP superfamily.

  13. Biochemical and structural analysis of Gox2181, a new member of the SDR superfamily from Gluconobacter oxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Yuan, Zuanning; Adam Yuan, Y; Lin, Jinping; Wei, Dongzhi

    2011-11-18

    Gluconobacter oxydans enable to oxidize sugars and polyols incompletely to corresponding materials with potential industrial applications, containing around 75 putative dehydrogenases. One of these putative dehydrogenases, Gox2181, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and its X-ray crystal structure was determined to a resolution of 1.8 Å. Gox2181 formed a homo-tetramer in the crystal that was coincident with the apparent molecular mass determined in the solution. Gox2181 displayed α/β-folding patterns, the conserved catalytic tetrad of Asn119-Ser147-Tyr162-Lys166, and the NAD-binding pocket, which aligned well with the 'classical' type of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) enzymes. Gox2181 was denoted SDR51C based on the SDR nomenclature system. The purified recombinant Gox2181 was demonstrated to be NAD(H)-dependent and active towards a wide range of substrates, including sugar alcohols, secondary alcohols, ketones, and ketoses. Among the substrates tested, Gox2181 displayed preference for secondary hydroxyl or carbonyl groups, showing low K(m) values with d-arabitol and butanedione. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential allergens of green gram (Vigna radiata L. Millsp) identified as members of cupin superfamily and seed albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A; Kumar, R; Mishra, V; Chaudhari, B P; Raisuddin, S; Das, M; Dwivedi, P D

    2011-08-01

    No systematic study on allergenicity of green gram seed proteins have been performed so far, although incidences of IgE-mediated reaction to green gram seedlings have been reported. We sought to investigate the allergenic potential of green gram, followed by identification and characterization of its relevant allergens using proteomic approaches. BALB/c mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with green gram proteins, and levels of specific Igs, Th2 cytokines, histamine, anaphylactic symptoms and histopathological responses were studied. Twelve naso-bronchial allergic patients with a history of sensitization to green gram were selected on the basis of positive skin prick test and elevated specific IgE levels. Green gram allergens were identified and characterized by their ability to endure pepsin, by IgE immunoblot of two-dimensional (2D) gels in combination with mass spectrometry and by bioinformatics approaches. Increased specific IgE, IgG1, Th2 cytokine and histamine levels, high anaphylactic scores and histological changes in lungs and spleen of green gram crude protein extract-treated mice are indicative of its sensitization ability. Four proteins (molecular weights: 52, 50, 30 and 18 kDa) showed pepsin resistance and IgE-binding capability with sensitized human and mice sera. The four proteins tentatively named as Vig r2 (52 kDa, pI 5.7), Vig r3 (50 kDa, pI 5.8), Vig r4 (30 kDa, pI 6.6) and Vig r5 (18 kDa, pI 5.5) showed significant sequence similarity with known allergens of soybean, lentil, pea, lupin, etc. Mass spectrometric analysis identified Vig r2 as 8S globulin β-isoform precursor, Vig r3 as 8S globulin α-isoform precursor and Vig r4 as seed albumin. Green gram seeds contain at least four clinically relevant allergenic proteins, namely Vig r2, Vig r3, Vig r4 and Vig r5 that were capable of inducing strong IgE-mediated reactions. One of the most important steps towards diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to deal effectively with food allergy is continued identification of newer food allergens and their characterization. The significance of this study can be enormous as the data generated may work as basic biology data in developing a green gram species modified genetically that may have reduced allergenicity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Salarin C, a member of the salarin superfamily of marine compounds, is a potent inducer of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Califa, Nathalie; Bishara, Ashgan; Kashman, Yoel; Neumann, Drorit

    2012-02-01

    The continuous emergence of new diseases and the development of drug-resistant cancers necessitate the development of new drugs with novel mechanisms of action. The richest marine source of natural anti-cancer products has been soft-bodied organisms that lack physical defenses against their predators, and hence rely on chemical defense mechanisms using cytotoxic secondary metabolites. Bio-guided (brine shrimp test) separation of CHCl(3)-CH(3)OH (1:1) extract from the Madagascar Fascaplysinopsis sp. sponge provided several new compounds. Here we focused on the biological activity of a panel of novel natural compounds, salarins A-J. Of these, salarin C was the most potent inhibitor of proliferation, as demonstrated on the K562 leukemia cell line. Salarin C-treated K562 cells underwent apoptotic death as monitored by cell-cycle analysis, annexin V/propidium iodide staining, cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3, and caspase 9 levels. The experimental approach described herein is an essential step towards identifying the cellular pathway(s) affected by salarin C and producing potent synthetic derivatives of salarin C with potential future uses as basic research tools and/or drugs and drug leads.

  16. The plant short-chain dehydrogenase (SDR) superfamily: genome-wide inventory and diversification patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moummou, Hanane; Kallberg, Yvonne; Tonfack, Libert Brice; Persson, Bengt; van der Rest, Benoît

    2012-11-20

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) form one of the largest and oldest NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductase families. Despite a conserved 'Rossmann-fold' structure, members of the SDR superfamily exhibit low sequence similarities, which constituted a bottleneck in terms of identification. Recent classification methods, relying on hidden-Markov models (HMMs), improved identification and enabled the construction of a nomenclature. However, functional annotations of plant SDRs remain scarce. Wide-scale analyses were performed on ten plant genomes. The combination of hidden Markov model (HMM) based analyses and similarity searches led to the construction of an exhaustive inventory of plant SDR. With 68 to 315 members found in each analysed genome, the inventory confirmed the over-representation of SDRs in plants compared to animals, fungi and prokaryotes. The plant SDRs were first classified into three major types - 'classical', 'extended' and 'divergent' - but a minority (10% of the predicted SDRs) could not be classified into these general types ('unknown' or 'atypical' types). In a second step, we could categorize the vast majority of land plant SDRs into a set of 49 families. Out of these 49 families, 35 appeared early during evolution since they are commonly found through all the Green Lineage. Yet, some SDR families - tropinone reductase-like proteins (SDR65C), 'ABA2-like'-NAD dehydrogenase (SDR110C), 'salutaridine/menthone-reductase-like' proteins (SDR114C), 'dihydroflavonol 4-reductase'-like proteins (SDR108E) and 'isoflavone-reductase-like' (SDR460A) proteins - have undergone significant functional diversification within vascular plants since they diverged from Bryophytes. Interestingly, these diversified families are either involved in the secondary metabolism routes (terpenoids, alkaloids, phenolics) or participate in developmental processes (hormone biosynthesis or catabolism, flower development), in opposition to SDR families involved in primary

  17. The Plant Short-Chain Dehydrogenase (SDR superfamily: genome-wide inventory and diversification patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moummou Hanane

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs form one of the largest and oldest NAD(P(H dependent oxidoreductase families. Despite a conserved ‘Rossmann-fold’ structure, members of the SDR superfamily exhibit low sequence similarities, which constituted a bottleneck in terms of identification. Recent classification methods, relying on hidden-Markov models (HMMs, improved identification and enabled the construction of a nomenclature. However, functional annotations of plant SDRs remain scarce. Results Wide-scale analyses were performed on ten plant genomes. The combination of hidden Markov model (HMM based analyses and similarity searches led to the construction of an exhaustive inventory of plant SDR. With 68 to 315 members found in each analysed genome, the inventory confirmed the over-representation of SDRs in plants compared to animals, fungi and prokaryotes. The plant SDRs were first classified into three major types — ‘classical’, ‘extended’ and ‘divergent’ — but a minority (10% of the predicted SDRs could not be classified into these general types (‘unknown’ or ‘atypical’ types. In a second step, we could categorize the vast majority of land plant SDRs into a set of 49 families. Out of these 49 families, 35 appeared early during evolution since they are commonly found through all the Green Lineage. Yet, some SDR families — tropinone reductase-like proteins (SDR65C, ‘ABA2-like’-NAD dehydrogenase (SDR110C, ‘salutaridine/menthone-reductase-like’ proteins (SDR114C, ‘dihydroflavonol 4-reductase’-like proteins (SDR108E and ‘isoflavone-reductase-like’ (SDR460A proteins — have undergone significant functional diversification within vascular plants since they diverged from Bryophytes. Interestingly, these diversified families are either involved in the secondary metabolism routes (terpenoids, alkaloids, phenolics or participate in developmental processes (hormone biosynthesis or

  18. CD40 Induces Apoptosis in Carcinoma Cells through Activation of Cytotoxic Ligands of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliopoulos, Aristides G.; Davies, Clare; Knox, Pauline G.; Gallagher, Neil J.; Afford, Simon C.; Adams, David H.; Young, Lawrence S.

    2000-01-01

    CD40, a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor (TNFR) family member, conveys signals regulating diverse cellular responses, ranging from proliferation and differentiation to growth suppression and cell death. The ability of CD40 to mediate apoptosis in carcinoma cells is intriguing given the fact that the CD40 cytoplasmic C terminus lacks a death domain homology with the cytotoxic members of the TNFR superfamily, such as Fas, TNFR1, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors. In this study, we have probed the mechanism by which CD40 transduces death signals. Using a trimeric recombinant soluble CD40 ligand to activate CD40, we have found that this phenomenon critically depends on the membrane proximal domain (amino acids 216 to 239) but not the TNFR-associated factor-interacting PXQXT motif in the CD40 cytoplasmic tail. CD40-mediated cytotoxicity is blocked by caspase inhibitors, such as zVAD-fmk and crmA, and involves activation of caspase 8 and caspase 3. Interestingly, CD40 ligation was found to induce functional Fas ligand, TRAIL (Apo-2L) and TNF in apoptosis-susceptible carcinoma cells and to up-regulate expression of Fas. These findings identify a novel proapoptotic mechanism which is induced by CD40 in carcinoma cells and depends on the endogenous production of cytotoxic cytokines and autocrine or paracrine induction of cell death. PMID:10891490

  19. In silico identification, phylogeny and expression analysis of expansin superfamily in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expansins are important components of plant cell walls, which are involved in the process of cell wall loosening under low extracellular pH. By using a combinational method for homology search and protein domain analysis, a total of 42 expansin genes were identified from Medicago truncatula genome in this study. They were divided into four families, based on sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. Gene duplication events were identified in the expansins superfamily, especially in the extension of α-expansin family. By analysis of RNA-sequencing data from National Center for Biotechnology Information, the expansin (EXP genes expressed during tissues development were characterized. Meanwhile, lots of cis-acting regulatory DNA elements in the EXP superfamily were identified, which were mainly related to plant growth and development processes. The results presented in this study are expected to facilitate further research works on this gene superfamily and provide new insights about the molecular mechanisms of expansins in M. truncatula.

  20. New members of the chemokine receptor gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raport, C J; Schweickart, V L; Chantry, D; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B; Godiska, R; Gray, P W

    1996-01-01

    Chemokines are relatively small peptides with potent chemoattractant and activation activities for leukocytes. Several chemokine receptors have been cloned and characterized and all are members of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Using degenerate oligonucleotides and polymerase chain reaction, we have identified seven novel receptors. Two of these sequences are presented here for the first time. We have shown, with gene mapping studies, that receptors with the highest sequence similarity are closely linked on human chromosomes. This close genetic association suggests a functional relationship as well.

  1. Keanekaragaman Jenis Kupu-Kupu Superfamili Papilionoidae di Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Oqtafiana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupu-kupu turut memberi andil dalam mempertahankan keseimbangan ekosistem dan memperkaya keanekaragaman hayati. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae di Dukuh Banyuwindu Desa Limbangan Kecamatan Limbangan Kabupaten Kendal khususnya di habitat hutan sekunder, permukiman, Daerah Aliran Sungai (DAS dan persawahan.Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah semua jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang ada di Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal. Sampel penelitian ini adalah jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang teramati di Banyuwindu Limbangan Kendal khususnya di habitat hutan sekunder, permukiman, DAS dan persawahan. Penelitian dilakukan dengan metode Indeks Point Abudance (IPA atau metode titik hitung.Hasil penelitian ditemukan sebanyak 62 jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang terdiri dari 737 individu yang tergolong kedalam empat famili yaitu Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae dan Nymphalidae. Hasil analisis indeks keanekaragaman jenis berkisar antara 2,74-3,09, indeks kemerataan jenis berkisar antara 0,86-0,87 dan memiliki dominansi berkisar antara 0,07-0,09. Indeks keanekaragaman jenis dan indeks kemerataan jenis tertinggi tercatat pada habitat permukiman yaitu 3,09 dan 0,87 dan memiliki dominansi 0,07 sedangkan terendah tercatat pada habitat persawahan yaitu 2,74 dan 0,86 dan memiliki dominansi 0,07.Butterfly also contribute in maintaining the ecological balance and enrich biodiversity. The aim of this research was to determine the diversity of butterflies’ superfamily Papilionoidae in Banyuwindu Hamlet Limbangan Sub district Kendal Regency, especially in the secondary forest habitat, settlements, river flow area (RFA and rice field. The population in this research were all kinds of butterflies’ Papilionoidae superfamily in Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal. The sample was kind of butterfly superfamily Papilionoidae that observed in Banyuwindu Limbangan Kendal

  2. Domain swapping in the low-similarity isomerase/hydratase superfamily: the crystal structure of rat mitochondrial Delta3, Delta2-enoyl-CoA isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Paul A; Yu, Wenfeng; Schulz, Horst; Kim, Jung-Ja P

    2005-06-01

    Two monofunctional Delta(3), Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerases, one in mitochondria (mECI) and the other in both mitochondria and peroxisomes (pECI), belong to the low-similarity isomerase/hydratase superfamily. Both enzymes catalyze the movement of a double bond from C3 to C2 of an unsaturated acyl-CoA substrate for re-entry into the beta-oxidation pathway. Mutagenesis has shown that Glu165 of rat mECI is involved in catalysis; however, the putative catalytic residue in yeast pECI, Glu158, is not conserved in mECI. To elucidate whether Glu165 of mECI is correctly positioned for catalysis, the crystal structure of rat mECI has been solved. Crystal packing suggests the enzyme is trimeric, in contrast to other members of the superfamily, which appear crystallographically to be dimers of trimers. The polypeptide fold of mECI, like pECI, belongs to a subset of this superfamily in which the C-terminal domain of a given monomer interacts with its own N-terminal domain. This differs from that of crotonase and 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphtoyl-CoA synthase, whose C-terminal domains are involved in domain swapping with an adjacent monomer. The structure confirms Glu165 as the putative catalytic acid/base, positioned to abstract the pro-R proton from C2 and reprotonate at C4 of the acyl chain. The large tunnel-shaped active site cavity observed in the mECI structure explains the relative substrate promiscuity in acyl-chain length and stereochemistry. Comparison with the crystal structure of pECI suggests the catalytic residues from both enzymes are spatially conserved but not in their primary structures, providing a powerful reminder of how catalytic residues cannot be determined solely by sequence alignments.

  3. Targeting of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand and cognate TNF receptor superfamilies constitute an important regulatory axis that is pivotal for immune homeostasis and correct execution of immune responses. TNF ligands and receptors are involved in diverse biological processes ranging from the selective

  4. Phylogeny, Function and evolution of the cupins, a structurally conserved, functionally diverse superfamily of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khuri, S.; Bakker, F.T.; Dunwell, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The cupin superfamily is a group of functionally diverse proteins that are found in all three kingdoms of life, Archaea, Eubacteria, and Eukaryota. These proteins have a characteristic signature domain comprising two histidine- containing motifs separated by an intermotif region of variable length.

  5. Disease causing mutations in the TNF and TNFR superfamilies: Focus on molecular mechanisms driving disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobito, Adrian A.; Gabriel, Tanit L.; Medema, Jan Paul; Kimberley, Fiona C.

    2011-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor (TNFR) superfamilies comprise multidomain proteins with diverse roles in cell activation, proliferation and cell death. These proteins play pivotal roles in the initiation, maintenance and termination of immune responses and have vital roles outside

  6. Evolutionary history of the TBP-domain superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindefalk, Björn; Dessailly, Benoit H; Yeats, Corin; Orengo, Christine; Werner, Finn; Poole, Anthony M

    2013-03-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is an essential transcription initiation factor in Archaea and Eucarya. Bacteria lack TBP, and instead use sigma factors for transcription initiation. TBP has a symmetric structure comprising two repeated TBP domains. Using sequence, structural and phylogenetic analyses, we examine the distribution and evolutionary history of the TBP domain, a member of the helix-grip fold family. Our analyses reveal a broader distribution than for TBP, with TBP-domains being present across all three domains of life. In contrast to TBP, all other characterized examples of the TBP domain are present as single copies, primarily within multidomain proteins. The presence of the TBP domain in the ubiquitous DNA glycosylases suggests that this fold traces back to the ancestor of all three domains of life. The TBP domain is also found in RNase HIII, and phylogenetic analyses show that RNase HIII has evolved from bacterial RNase HII via TBP-domain fusion. Finally, our comparative genomic screens confirm and extend earlier reports of proteins consisting of a single TBP domain among some Archaea. These monopartite TBP-domain proteins suggest that this domain is functional in its own right, and that the TBP domain could have first evolved as an independent protein, which was later recruited in different contexts.

  7. Proteome scale census of major facilitator superfamily transporters in Trichoderma reesei using protein sequence and structure based classification enhanced ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Kumari, Indu; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been acknowledged as potent bio-control agents against microbial pathogens and also as plant growth promoters. Various secondary metabolites are attributed for these beneficial activities. Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) includes the large proportion of efflux-pumps which are linked with membrane transport of these secondary metabolites. We have carried out a proteome-wide identification of MFS transporters using protein sequence and structure based hierarchical method in Trichoderma reesei. 448 proteins out of 9115 were detected to carry transmembrane helices. MFS specific intragenic gene duplication and its context with transport function have been presented. Finally, using homology based techniques, domains and motifs of MFS families have been identified and utilized to classify them. From query dataset of 448 transmembrane proteins, 148 proteins are identified as potential MFS transporters. Sugar porter, drug: H(+) antiporter-1, monocarboxylate porter and anion: cation symporter emerged as major MFS families with 51, 35, 17 and 11 members respectively. Representative protein tertiary structures of these families are homology modeled for structure-function analysis. This study may help to understand the molecular basis of secretion and transport of agriculturally valuable secondary metabolites produced by these bio-control fungal agents which may be exploited in future for enhancing its biotechnological applications in eco-friendly sustainable development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Maternal circulating levels of transforming growth factor-β superfamily and its soluble receptors in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-Ting; Shen, Min-Hong; Jin, Ai-Ying; Li, Hong; Zhu, Rui

    2017-06-01

    To assess circulating levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily members and their soluble receptors in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and to investigate associations with clinical manifestations. A retrospective study was conducted using data for women admitted to a center in China for delivery between May 2011 and April 2013. Women with severe pre-eclampsia, mild pre-eclampsia, and gestational hypertension were included, along with a control group. Serum levels of activin A, inhibin A, TGF-β1, soluble endoglin (sEng), and soluble betaglycan (sBG) were measured. Women with severe pre-eclampsia (n = 17) had higher mean levels of activin A (23.5±2.1 μg/L), inhibin A (1.7±0.2 μg/L), sEng (32.1±3.2 μg/L), and sBG (84.1±9.4 μg/L) than did normotensive controls (n = 18), women with gestational hypertension (n = 15), and those with mild pre-eclampsia (n = 14; all Psoluble receptors, which might contribute to the development of pre-eclampsia and help to predict onset and severity. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  9. Genome-wide characterization and expression analysis of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily under abiotic stresses in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinlei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Hejun; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xingxing; Zhou, Zhongli; Wang, Chunying; Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Zhenmei; Wang, Kunbo; Liu, Fang

    2017-09-10

    In plants, aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) function as 'aldehyde scavengers' by removing reactive aldehydes and thus play important roles in stress responses. To date, 30 ALDHs have been identified in Gossypium raimondii, whereas ALDHs have not been studied in Gossypium arboreum or in tetraploid cotton. In this study, we identified 30, 59 and 59 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes from G. arboreum, G. hirsutum and G. barbadense, respectively. Gene structure analysis revealed that members of the same family exhibit similar exon-intron structures and structural domains, and all members of the ALDH18 family possess a distinct AA-kinase domain. Synteny analysis showed that segmental and tandem duplications have played an important role in the expansion and evolution of ALDHs in cotton. Phylogenetic and synteny analysis between G. arboreum and G. raimondii demonstrated that all GaALDHs and GrALDHs are orthologous and that most GaALDHs are located in syntenic blocks corresponding to those of G. raimondii, implying that these genes appeared before the divergence of G. arboreum and G. raimondii and that no expansion of the ALDH superfamily has occurred in these two cotton species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the majority of GaALDHs and GhALDHs are up-regulated under conditions of high salinity and drought, indicating that these genes may be stress responsive. The findings of this study, based on genome-wide identification of ALDHs in Gossypium and analysis of their evolution and expression, provide a foundation for further analysis of ALDHs and suggest potential target genes for improving stress resistance in cotton. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Reduced tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily 13C inversely correlated with tumour necrosis factor superfamily 13B in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Shi, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Yao, Qing-Min; Liu, Yan-Xia; Shan, Ning-Ning; Wang, Dan; Peng, Jun; Xu, Jian; Hou, Ming

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the expression of tumour necrosis factor superfamily 13B (TNFSF13B) receptors in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and their correlation with disease activity, we investigated the protein and mRNA levels of TNFSF13B, tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily 13C (TNFRSF13C), TNFRSF13B and TNFRSF17 by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. All CD19(+) B lymphocytes expressed TNFRSF13C by flow cytometry, but the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) was decreased in patients with active disease compared to patients in remission and healthy controls, while no significant difference of TNFRSF13C mRNA was found between ITP patients and controls. The mRNA and plasma TNFSF13B were elevated in active ITP patients, and TNFRSF13C MFI level was inversely correlated with plasma TNFSF13B in active patients. In vitro assays showed that TNFRSF13C MFI was decreased after long exposure to TNFSF13B. No significant difference for TNFRSF13B or TNFRSF17 was found between ITP patients and controls. In conclusion, TNFRSF13C expression is reduced on CD19(+) cells in active ITP patients. This down-regulation occurs through a post-transcriptional mechanism and could be a consequence of chronic increase of TNFSF13B. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Kinetic and Structural Characterization of a Heterohexamer 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl: Implications for Functional and Structural Diversity in the Tautomerase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, Elizabeth A.; Fleming, Christopher D.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Whitman, Christian P.; Pegan, Scott D. (Texas); (UIC)

    2010-09-30

    4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) isozymes play prominent roles in the bacterial utilization of aromatic hydrocarbons as sole carbon sources. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate (or 2-hydroxymuconate) to 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate, where Pro-1 functions as a general base and shuttles a proton from the 2-hydroxyl group of the substrate to the C-5 position of the product. 4-OT, a homohexamer from Pseudomonas putida mt-2, is the most extensively studied 4-OT isozyme and the founding member of the tautomerase superfamily. A search of five thermophilic bacterial genomes identified a coded amino acid sequence in each that had been annotated as a tautomerase-like protein but lacked Pro-1. However, a nearby sequence has Pro-1, but the sequence is not annotated as a tautomerase-like protein. To characterize this group of proteins, two genes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl were cloned, and the corresponding proteins were expressed. Kinetic, biochemical, and X-ray structural analyses show that the two expressed proteins form a functional heterohexamer 4-OT (hh4-OT), composed of three {alpha}{beta} dimers. Like the P. putida enzyme, hh4-OT requires the amino-terminal proline and two arginines for the conversion of 2-hydroxymuconate to the product, implicating an analogous mechanism. In contrast to 4-OT, hh4-OT does not exhibit the low-level activity of another tautomerase superfamily member, the heterohexamer trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD). Characterization of hh4-OT enables functional assignment of the related enzymes, highlights the diverse ways the {beta}-{alpha}-{beta} building block can be assembled into an active enzyme, and provides further insight into the molecular basis of the low-level CaaD activity in 4-OT.

  12. Kinetic and structural characterization of a heterohexamer 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl: implications for functional and structural diversity in the tautomerase superfamily .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Elizabeth A; Fleming, Christopher D; Mesecar, Andrew D; Whitman, Christian P; Pegan, Scott D

    2010-06-22

    4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) isozymes play prominent roles in the bacterial utilization of aromatic hydrocarbons as sole carbon sources. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate (or 2-hydroxymuconate) to 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate, where Pro-1 functions as a general base and shuttles a proton from the 2-hydroxyl group of the substrate to the C-5 position of the product. 4-OT, a homohexamer from Pseudomonas putida mt-2, is the most extensively studied 4-OT isozyme and the founding member of the tautomerase superfamily. A search of five thermophilic bacterial genomes identified a coded amino acid sequence in each that had been annotated as a tautomerase-like protein but lacked Pro-1. However, a nearby sequence has Pro-1, but the sequence is not annotated as a tautomerase-like protein. To characterize this group of proteins, two genes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl were cloned, and the corresponding proteins were expressed. Kinetic, biochemical, and X-ray structural analyses show that the two expressed proteins form a functional heterohexamer 4-OT (hh4-OT), composed of three alphabeta dimers. Like the P. putida enzyme, hh4-OT requires the amino-terminal proline and two arginines for the conversion of 2-hydroxymuconate to the product, implicating an analogous mechanism. In contrast to 4-OT, hh4-OT does not exhibit the low-level activity of another tautomerase superfamily member, the heterohexamer trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD). Characterization of hh4-OT enables functional assignment of the related enzymes, highlights the diverse ways the beta-alpha-beta building block can be assembled into an active enzyme, and provides further insight into the molecular basis of the low-level CaaD activity in 4-OT.

  13. In silico investigation of conformational motions in superfamily 2 helicase proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Flechsig

    Full Text Available Helicases are motor proteins that play a central role in the metabolism of DNA and RNA in biological cells. Using the energy of ATP molecules, they are able to translocate along the nucleic acids and unwind their duplex structure. They have been extensively characterized in the past and grouped into superfamilies based on structural similarities and sequential motifs. However, their functional aspects and the mechanism of their operation are not yet well understood. Here, we consider three helicases from the major superfamily 2--Hef, Hel308 and XPD--and study their conformational dynamics by using coarse-grained relaxational elastic network models. Specifically, their responses to mechanical perturbations are analyzed. This enables us to identify robust and ordered conformational motions which may underlie the functional activity of these proteins. As we show, such motions are well-organized and have large amplitudes. Their possible roles in the processing of nucleic substrate are discussed.

  14. Structural relationships in the lysozyme superfamily: significant evidence for glycoside hydrolase signature motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wohlkönig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin is a polysaccharide that forms the hard, outer shell of arthropods and the cell walls of fungi and some algae. Peptidoglycan is a polymer of sugars and amino acids constituting the cell walls of most bacteria. Enzymes that are able to hydrolyze these cell membrane polymers generally play important roles for protecting plants and animals against infection with insects and pathogens. A particular group of such glycoside hydrolase enzymes share some common features in their three-dimensional structure and in their molecular mechanism, forming the lysozyme superfamily. RESULTS: Besides having a similar fold, all known catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolase proteins of lysozyme superfamily (families and subfamilies GH19, GH22, GH23, GH24 and GH46 share in common two structural elements: the central helix of the all-α domain, which invariably contains the catalytic glutamate residue acting as general-acid catalyst, and a β-hairpin pointed towards the substrate binding cleft. The invariant β-hairpin structure is interestingly found to display the highest amino acid conservation in aligned sequences of a given family, thereby allowing to define signature motifs for each GH family. Most of such signature motifs are found to have promising performances for searching sequence databases. Our structural analysis further indicates that the GH motifs participate in enzymatic catalysis essentially by containing the catalytic water positioning residue of inverting mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: The seven families and subfamilies of the lysozyme superfamily all have in common a β-hairpin structure which displays a family-specific sequence motif. These GH β-hairpin motifs contain potentially important residues for the catalytic activity, thereby suggesting the participation of the GH motif to catalysis and also revealing a common catalytic scheme utilized by enzymes of the lysozyme superfamily.

  15. Characterization of two bacterial hydroxynitrile lyases with high similarity to cupin superfamily proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zahid; Wiedner, Romana; Steiner, Kerstin; Hajek, Tanja; Avi, Manuela; Hecher, Bianca; Sessitsch, Angela; Schwab, Helmut

    2012-03-01

    Hydroxynitrile lyases (HNLs) catalyze the cleavage of cyanohydrins. In the reverse reaction, they catalyze the formation of carbon-carbon bonds by enantioselective condensation of hydrocyanic acid with carbonyls. In this study, we describe two proteins from endophytic bacteria that display activity in the cleavage and the synthesis reaction of (R)-mandelonitrile with up to 74% conversion of benzaldehyde (enantiopreference ee 89%). Both showed high similarity to proteins of the cupin superfamily which so far were not known to exhibit HNL activity.

  16. Molecular evolution of the insect chemoreceptor gene superfamily in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Hugh M; Warr, Coral G; Carlson, John R

    2003-11-25

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily in Drosophila melanogaster is predicted to consist of 62 odorant receptor (Or) and 68 gustatory receptor (Gr) proteins, encoded by families of 60 Or and 60 Gr genes through alternative splicing. We include two previously undescribed Or genes and two previously undescribed Gr genes; two previously predicted Or genes are shown to be alternative splice forms. Three polymorphic pseudogenes and one highly defective pseudogene are recognized. Phylogenetic analysis reveals deep branches connecting multiple highly divergent clades within the Gr family, and the Or family appears to be a single highly expanded lineage within the superfamily. The genes are spread throughout the Drosophila genome, with some relatively recently diverged genes still clustered in the genome. The Gr5a gene on the X chromosome, which encodes a receptor for the sugar trehalose, has transposed from one such tandem cluster of six genes at cytological location 64, as has Gr61a, and all eight of these receptors might bind sugars. Analysis of intron evolution suggests that the common ancestor consisted of a long N-terminal exon encoding transmembrane domains 1-5 followed by three exons encoding transmembrane domains 6-7. As many as 57 additional introns have been acquired idiosyncratically during the evolution of the superfamily, whereas the ancestral introns and some of the older idiosyncratic introns have been lost at least 48 times independently. Altogether, these patterns of molecular evolution suggest that this is an ancient superfamily of chemoreceptors, probably dating back at least to the origin of the arthropods.

  17. Five Drosophila Genomes Reveal Nonneutral Evolution and the Signature of Host Specialization in the Chemoreceptor Superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Carolyn S.; Arguello, J. Roman

    2007-01-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily comprises the olfactory receptor (Or) and gustatory receptor (Gr) multigene families. These families give insects the ability to smell and taste chemicals in the environment and are thus rich resources for linking molecular evolutionary and ecological processes. Although dramatic differences in family size among distant species and high divergence among paralogs have led to the belief that the two families evolve rapidly, a lack of evolutionary data over s...

  18. Recent advances in the study of enzyme promiscuity in the tautomerase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Bert-Jan; Zandvoort, Ellen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-05-27

    Catalytic promiscuity and evolution: Many enzymes exhibit catalytic promiscuity--the ability to catalyze reactions other than their biologically relevant one. These reactions can serve as starting points for both natural and laboratory evolution of new enzymatic functions. Recent advances in the study of enzyme promiscuity in the tautomerase superfamily are discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Filling the gaps in the classification of the Digenea Carus, 1863: systematic position of the Proterodiplostomidae Dubois, 1936 within the superfamily Diplostomoidea Poirier, 1886, inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Mena, David Iván; García-Varela, Martín; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2017-10-01

    The Diplostomida Olson, Cribb, Tkach, Bray & Littlewood, 2003 is the less diverse order of the two orders within the subclass Digenea Carus, 1863 and is currently classified into three superfamilies, i.e. Brachylaimoidea Joyeux & Foley, 1930, Diplostomoidea Poirier, 1886, and Schistosomatoidea Stiles & Hassall, 1898. Although the suprageneric-level relationships have been elucidated with the use of molecular markers, the lack of representation of some groups obscure the phylogenetic relationships among families, rendering the classification unstable. Here, we tested the phylogenetic position of the family Proterodiplostomidae Dubois, 1936 based on partial 28S rDNA and complete 18S rDNA sequences for Crocodilicola pseudostoma (Willemoes-Suhm, 1870), a crocodile parasite that has been found as a progenetic metacercaria parasitising the pale catfish Rhamdia guatemalensis (Günther) in Mexico and in other siluruforms in the Neotropics. We augmented the representation of the species, genera and families within the Diplostomida, including mostly representatives of the superfamily Diplostomoidea, and assembled a dataset that contains 49 species for the 28S rRNA gene, and 45 species for the 18S rRNA gene. Additionally, we explored the phylogenetic signal of the mitochondrial gene cox1 in reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships of selected members of the superfamily. Our analyses showed that the family Proterodiplostomidae is the sister taxon to the paraphyletic Diplostomidae Poirier, 1886 and Strigeidae Railliet, 1919, with Cyathocotylidae Mühling, 1898 + Brauninidae Wolf, 1903 as their sister group. Analysis of concatenated 18S + 28S sequences revealed the Liolopidae Odhner, 1912 as the basal group of the superfamily Diplostomoidea, although analyses of independent datasets showed that the position of this family remains uncertain. Analysis based on cox1 unequivocally resolved the Proterodiplostomidae as the sister taxon to the Diplostomidae and Strigeidae

  20. Lipid- and polyion complex-based micelles as agonist platforms for TNFR superfamily receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Ryan N; Novarra, Shabazz; Wetzel, Leslie; Florinas, Stelios; Cabral, Horacio; Kataoka, Kazunori; Rios-Doria, Jonathan; Christie, Ronald J; Baca, Manuel

    2016-07-28

    Receptor clustering is important for signaling among the therapeutically relevant TNFR superfamily of receptors. In nature, this clustering is driven by trimeric ligands often presented in large numbers as cell surface proteins. Molecules capable of driving similar levels of clustering could make good agonists and hold therapeutic value. However, recapitulating such extensive clustering using typical biotherapeutic formats, such as antibodies, is difficult. Consequently, generating effective agonists of TNFR superfamily receptors is challenging. Toward addressing this challenge we have used lipid- and polyion complex-based micelles as platforms for presenting receptor-binding biologics in a multivalent format that facilitates receptor clustering and imparts strong agonist activity. We show that receptor-binding scFvs or small antibody mimetics that have no agonist activity on their own can be transformed into potent agonists through multivalent presentation on a micelle surface and that the activity of already active multivalent agonists can be enhanced. Using this strategy, we generated potent agonists against two different TNFR superfamily receptors and mouse tumor model studies demonstrate that these micellar agonists have therapeutic efficacy in vivo. Due to its ease of implementation and applicability independent of agonist molecular format, we anticipate that this strategy could be useful for developing agonists to a variety of receptors that rely on clustering to signal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Origination, expansion, evolutionary trajectory, and expression bias of AP2/ERF superfamily in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The AP2/ERF superfamily, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far, a comprehensive evolutionary inference of its origination and expansion has not been available. Here, we identified 515 AP2/ERF genes in B. napus, a neo-tetraploid forming ~7500 years ago, and found that 82.14% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization. A prominent subgenome bias was revealed in gene expression, tissue-specific, and gene conversion. Moreover, a large-scale analysis across plants and alga suggested that this superfamily could have been originated from AP2 family, expanding to form other families (ERF, and RAV. This process was accompanied by duplicating and/or alternative deleting AP2 domain, intragenic domain sequence conversion, and/or by acquiring other domains, resulting in copy number variations, alternatively contributing to functional innovation. We found that significant positive selection occurred at certain critical nodes during the evolution of land plants, possibly responding to changing environment. In conclusion, the present research revealed origination, functional innovation, and evolutionary trajectory of the AP2/ERF superfamily, contributing to understanding their roles in plant stress tolerance.

  2. Exploring fold space preferences of new-born and ancient protein superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Edwards

    Full Text Available The evolution of proteins is one of the fundamental processes that has delivered the diversity and complexity of life we see around ourselves today. While we tend to define protein evolution in terms of sequence level mutations, insertions and deletions, it is hard to translate these processes to a more complete picture incorporating a polypeptide's structure and function. By considering how protein structures change over time we can gain an entirely new appreciation of their long-term evolutionary dynamics. In this work we seek to identify how populations of proteins at different stages of evolution explore their possible structure space. We use an annotation of superfamily age to this space and explore the relationship between these ages and a diverse set of properties pertaining to a superfamily's sequence, structure and function. We note several marked differences between the populations of newly evolved and ancient structures, such as in their length distributions, secondary structure content and tertiary packing arrangements. In particular, many of these differences suggest a less elaborate structure for newly evolved superfamilies when compared with their ancient counterparts. We show that the structural preferences we report are not a residual effect of a more fundamental relationship with function. Furthermore, we demonstrate the robustness of our results, using significant variation in the algorithm used to estimate the ages. We present these age estimates as a useful tool to analyse protein populations. In particularly, we apply this in a comparison of domains containing greek key or jelly roll motifs.

  3. Origination, Expansion, Evolutionary Trajectory, and Expression Bias of AP2/ERF Superfamily in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoming; Wang, Jinpeng; Ma, Xiao; Li, Yuxian; Lei, Tianyu; Wang, Li; Ge, Weina; Guo, Di; Wang, Zhenyi; Li, Chunjin; Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Xiyin

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far, a comprehensive evolutionary inference of its origination and expansion has not been available. Here, we identified 515 AP2/ERF genes in B. napus, a neo-tetraploid forming ~7500 years ago, and found that 82.14% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization. A prominent subgenome bias was revealed in gene expression, tissue-specific, and gene conversion. Moreover, a large-scale analysis across plants and alga suggested that this superfamily could have been originated from AP2 family, expanding to form other families (ERF, and RAV). This process was accompanied by duplicating and/or alternative deleting AP2 domain, intragenic domain sequence conversion, and/or by acquiring other domains, resulting in copy number variations, alternatively contributing to functional innovation. We found that significant positive selection occurred at certain critical nodes during the evolution of land plants, possibly responding to changing environment. In conclusion, the present research revealed origination, functional innovation, and evolutionary trajectory of the AP2/ERF superfamily, contributing to understanding their roles in plant stress tolerance.

  4. Analysis and update of the human solute carrier (SLC gene superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Lei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The solute-carrier gene (SLC superfamily encodes membrane-bound transporters. The SLC superfamily comprises 55 gene families having at least 362 putatively functional protein-coding genes. The gene products include passive transporters, symporters and antiporters, located in all cellular and organelle membranes, except, perhaps, the nuclear membrane. Transport substrates include amino acids and oligopeptides, glucose and other sugars, inorganic cations and anions (H+, HCO3-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, PO43-, HPO42-, H2PO4-, SO42-, C2O42-, OH-,CO32-, bile salts, carboxylate and other organic anions, acetyl coenzyme A, essential metals, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, vitamins, fatty acids and lipids, nucleosides, ammonium, choline, thyroid hormone and urea. Contrary to gene nomenclature commonly assigned on the basis of evolutionary divergence http://www.genenames.org/, the SLC gene superfamily has been named based largely on transporter function by proteins having multiple transmembrane domains. Whereas all the transporters exist for endogenous substrates, it is likely that drugs, non-essential metals and many other environmental toxicants are able to 'hitch-hike' on one or another of these transporters, thereby enabling these moieties to enter (or leave the cell. Understanding and characterising the functions of these transporters is relevant to medicine, genetics, developmental biology, pharmacology and cancer chemotherapy.

  5. Analysis and update of the human solute carrier (SLC) gene superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Vasiliou, Konstandinos; Nebert, Daniel W

    2009-01-01

    The solute-carrier gene (SLC) superfamily encodes membrane-bound transporters. The SLC superfamily comprises 55 gene families having at least 362 putatively functional protein-coding genes. The gene products include passive transporters, symporters and antiporters, located in all cellular and organelle membranes, except, perhaps, the nuclear membrane. Transport substrates include amino acids and oligopeptides, glucose and other sugars, inorganic cations and anions (H(+), HCO(3)(-), Cl(-), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), PO(4)(3-), HPO(4)(2-), H(2)PO(4)(-), SO(4)(2-), C(2)O(4)(2-), OH(-), CO(3)(2-)), bile salts, carboxylate and other organic anions, acetyl coenzyme A, essential metals, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, vitamins, fatty acids and lipids, nucleosides, ammonium, choline, thyroid hormone and urea. Contrary to gene nomenclature commonly assigned on the basis of evolutionary divergence (http://www.genenames.org/), the SLC gene superfamily has been named based largely on transporter function by proteins having multiple transmembrane domains. Whereas all the transporters exist for endogenous substrates, it is likely that drugs, non-essential metals and many other environmental toxicants are able to 'hitch-hike' on one or another of these transporters, thereby enabling these moieties to enter (or leave) the cell. Understanding and characterising the functions of these transporters is relevant to medicine, genetics, developmental biology, pharmacology and cancer chemotherapy.

  6. PSI Member Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professional Secretaries International, Kansas City, MO.

    A survey of 2,700 of the 27,000 members of Professional Secretaries International received 755 responses yielding the following profile of secretarial workers: (1) the average member is female, about 45 years old, married with no dependents living at home, and owns a single-family home in the suburbs; (2) most respondents have worked in office or…

  7. Radiation shielding member

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Tsutomu

    1998-03-17

    An iron box having optional width, depth and height with no back board is secured to the outer surface of an iron shielding member formed by laminating optional number of iron plates having an optional thickness. Optional number of structural walls acting also as partition walls and comprising a synthetic resin and having a neutron shielding function of a predetermined thickness is disposed between the front plate and the back face of the iron box. Pellets made of a synthetic resin having a radiation shielding function are filled in the iron box. As the synthetic resin having a neutron ray shielding function, a polyethylene resin is preferably used. The radiation shielding member thus constituted is used for a radiation shielding door. Radiation rays irradiated from a chamber are shielded except for neutron rays by the iron shielding member. Neutron rays permeate the iron shielding member, and are shielded by the layers of polyethylene pellets filled in the iron box. (I.N.)

  8. Molecular phylogeny of the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea (Heterodonta, Veneroida) reveals dynamic evolution of symbiotic lifestyle and interphylum host switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Ryutaro; Kawakita, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Yoichi; Kato, Makoto

    2012-09-06

    Galeommatoidea is a superfamily of bivalves that exhibits remarkably diverse lifestyles. Many members of this group live attached to the body surface or inside the burrows of other marine invertebrates, including crustaceans, holothurians, echinoids, cnidarians, sipunculans and echiurans. These symbiotic species exhibit high host specificity, commensal interactions with hosts, and extreme morphological and behavioral adaptations to symbiotic life. Host specialization to various animal groups has likely played an important role in the evolution and diversification of this bivalve group. However, the evolutionary pathway that led to their ecological diversity is not well understood, in part because of their reduced and/or highly modified morphologies that have confounded traditional taxonomy. This study elucidates the taxonomy of the Galeommatoidea and their evolutionary history of symbiotic lifestyle based on a molecular phylogenic analysis of 33 galeommatoidean and five putative galeommatoidean species belonging to 27 genera and three families using two nuclear ribosomal genes (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA) and a nuclear (histone H3) and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I) protein-coding genes. Molecular phylogeny recovered six well-supported major clades within Galeommatoidea. Symbiotic species were found in all major clades, whereas free-living species were grouped into two major clades. Species symbiotic with crustaceans, holothurians, sipunculans, and echiurans were each found in multiple major clades, suggesting that host specialization to these animal groups occurred repeatedly in Galeommatoidea. Our results suggest that the evolutionary history of host association in Galeommatoidea has been remarkably dynamic, involving frequent host switches between different animal phyla. Such an unusual pattern of dynamic host switching is considered to have resulted from their commensalistic lifestyle, in which they maintain filter-feeding habits even in symbiotic

  9. Molecular phylogeny of the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea (Heterodonta, Veneroida reveals dynamic evolution of symbiotic lifestyle and interphylum host switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto Ryutaro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galeommatoidea is a superfamily of bivalves that exhibits remarkably diverse lifestyles. Many members of this group live attached to the body surface or inside the burrows of other marine invertebrates, including crustaceans, holothurians, echinoids, cnidarians, sipunculans and echiurans. These symbiotic species exhibit high host specificity, commensal interactions with hosts, and extreme morphological and behavioral adaptations to symbiotic life. Host specialization to various animal groups has likely played an important role in the evolution and diversification of this bivalve group. However, the evolutionary pathway that led to their ecological diversity is not well understood, in part because of their reduced and/or highly modified morphologies that have confounded traditional taxonomy. This study elucidates the taxonomy of the Galeommatoidea and their evolutionary history of symbiotic lifestyle based on a molecular phylogenic analysis of 33 galeommatoidean and five putative galeommatoidean species belonging to 27 genera and three families using two nuclear ribosomal genes (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA and a nuclear (histone H3 and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I protein-coding genes. Results Molecular phylogeny recovered six well-supported major clades within Galeommatoidea. Symbiotic species were found in all major clades, whereas free-living species were grouped into two major clades. Species symbiotic with crustaceans, holothurians, sipunculans, and echiurans were each found in multiple major clades, suggesting that host specialization to these animal groups occurred repeatedly in Galeommatoidea. Conclusions Our results suggest that the evolutionary history of host association in Galeommatoidea has been remarkably dynamic, involving frequent host switches between different animal phyla. Such an unusual pattern of dynamic host switching is considered to have resulted from their commensalistic lifestyle, in

  10. Divergence of structure and function in the haloacid dehalogenase enzyme superfamily: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BT2127 is an inorganic pyrophosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hua; Patskovsky, Yury; Toro, Rafael; Farelli, Jeremiah D; Pandya, Chetanya; Almo, Steven C; Allen, Karen N; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2011-10-18

    The explosion of protein sequence information requires that current strategies for function assignment evolve to complement experimental approaches with computationally based function prediction. This necessitates the development of strategies based on the identification of sequence markers in the form of specificity determinants and a more informed definition of orthologues. Herein, we have undertaken the function assignment of the unknown haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily member BT2127 (Uniprot accession code Q8A5 V9) from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron using an integrated bioinformatics-structure-mechanism approach. The substrate specificity profile and steady-state rate constants of BT2127 (with a k(cat)/K(m) value for pyrophosphate of ~1 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), together with the gene context, support the assigned in vivo function as an inorganic pyrophosphatase. The X-ray structural analysis of wild-type BT2127 and several variants generated by site-directed mutagenesis shows that substrate discrimination is based, in part, on active site space restrictions imposed by the cap domain (specifically by residues Tyr76 and Glu47). Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis coupled with kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes identified the residues required for catalysis, substrate binding, and domain-domain association. On the basis of this structure-function analysis, the catalytic residues Asp11, Asp13, Thr113, and Lys147 as well the metal binding residues Asp171, Asn172, and Glu47 were used as markers to confirm BT2127 orthologues identified via sequence searches. This bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that the biological range of BT2127 orthologue is restricted to the phylum Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi. The key structural determinants in the divergence of BT2127 and its closest homologue, β-phosphoglucomutase, control the leaving group size (phosphate vs glucose phosphate) and the position of the Asp acid/base in the open versus closed conformations. HADSF

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Superfamily Genes and their Responses to Abiotic Stress in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yongjun; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Song, Lili; Guo, Changhong

    2015-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily is a large, plant-specific transcription factor family that is involved in many important processes, including plant growth, development, and stress responses. Using Medicago truncatula genome information, we identified and characterized 123 putative AP2/ERF genes, which were named as MtERF1-123. These genes were classified into four families based on phylogenetic analysis, which is consistent with the results of other plant species. MtERF genes are distributed throughout all chromosomes but are clustered on various chromosomes due to genomic tandem and segmental duplication. Using transcriptome, high-throughput sequencing data, and qRT-PCR analysis, we assessed the expression patterns of the MtERF genes in tissues during development and under abiotic stresses. In total, 87 MtERF genes were expressed in plant tissues, most of which were expressed in specific tissues during development or under specific abiotic stress treatments. These results support the notion that MtERF genes are involved in developmental regulation and environmental responses in M. truncatula. Furthermore, a cluster of DREB subfamily members on chromosome 6 was induced by both cold and freezing stress, representing a positive gene regulatory response under low temperature stress, which suggests that these genes might contribute to freezing tolerance to M. truncatula. In summary, our genome-wide characterization, evolutionary analysis, and expression pattern analysis of MtERF genes in M. truncatula provides valuable information for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes and utilizing them to improve stress tolerance in plants.

  12. The viral transmembrane superfamily: possible divergence of Arenavirus and Filovirus glycoproteins from a common RNA virus ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchmeier Michael J

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies of viral entry proteins from influenza, measles, human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1, and Ebola virus have shown, first with molecular modeling, and then X-ray crystallographic or other biophysical studies, that these disparate viruses share a coiled-coil type of entry protein. Results Structural models of the transmembrane glycoproteins (GP-2 of the Arenaviruses, lymphochoriomeningitis virus (LCMV and Lassa fever virus, are presented, based on consistent structural propensities despite variation in the amino acid sequence. The principal features of the model, a hydrophobic amino terminus, and two antiparallel helices separated by a glycosylated, antigenic apex, are common to a number of otherwise disparate families of enveloped RNA viruses. Within the first amphipathic helix, demonstrable by circular dichroism of a peptide fragment, there is a highly conserved heptad repeat pattern proposed to mediate multimerization by coiled-coil interactions. The amino terminal 18 amino acids are 28% identical and 50% highly similar to the corresponding region of Ebola, a member of the Filovirus family. Within the second, charged helix just prior to membrane insertion there is also high similarity over the central 18 amino acids in corresponding regions of Lassa and Ebola, which may be further related to the similar region of HIV-1 defining a potent antiviral peptide analogue. Conclusions These findings indicate a common pattern of structure and function among viral transmembrane fusion proteins from a number of virus families. Such a pattern may define a viral transmembrane superfamily that evolved from a common precursor eons ago.

  13. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristan Katja

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor.

  14. Crystal Structure Analysis of Wild Type and Fast Hydrolyzing Mutant of EhRabX3, a Tandem Ras Superfamily GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Chandra, Mintu; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2016-01-16

    The enteric protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is the causative agent of amoebic dysentery, liver abscess and colitis in human. Vesicular trafficking plays a key role in the survival and virulence of the protozoan and is regulated by various Rab GTPases. EhRabX3 is a catalytically inefficient amoebic Rab protein, which is unique among the eukaryotic Ras superfamily by virtue of its tandem domain organization. Here, we report the crystal structures of GDP-bound fast hydrolyzing mutant (V71A/K73Q) and GTP-bound wild type EhRabX3 at 3.1 and 2.8Å resolutions, respectively. Though both G-domains possess "phosphate binding loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases fold", only the N-terminal domain binds to guanine nucleotide. The relative orientation of the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain is stabilized by numerous inter-domain interactions. Compared to other Ras superfamily members, both the GTPase domains displayed large deviation in switch II perhaps due to non-conservative substitutions in this region. As a result, entire switch II is restructured and moved away from the nucleotide binding pocket, providing a rationale for the diminished GTPase activity of EhRabX3. The N-terminal GTPase domain possesses unusually large number of cysteine residues. X-ray crystal structure of the fast hydrolyzing mutant of EhRabX3 revealed that C39 and C163 formed an intra-molecular disulfide bond. Subsequent mutational and biochemical studies suggest that C39 and C163 are critical for maintaining the structural integrity and function of EhRabX3. Structure-guided functional investigation of cysteine mutants could provide the physiological implications of the disulfide bond and could allow us to design potential inhibitors for the better treatment of intestinal amebiasis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. FLORA: a novel method to predict protein function from structure in diverse superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver C Redfern

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Predicting protein function from structure remains an active area of interest, particularly for the structural genomics initiatives where a substantial number of structures are initially solved with little or no functional characterisation. Although global structure comparison methods can be used to transfer functional annotations, the relationship between fold and function is complex, particularly in functionally diverse superfamilies that have evolved through different secondary structure embellishments to a common structural core. The majority of prediction algorithms employ local templates built on known or predicted functional residues. Here, we present a novel method (FLORA that automatically generates structural motifs associated with different functional sub-families (FSGs within functionally diverse domain superfamilies. Templates are created purely on the basis of their specificity for a given FSG, and the method makes no prior prediction of functional sites, nor assumes specific physico-chemical properties of residues. FLORA is able to accurately discriminate between homologous domains with different functions and substantially outperforms (a 2-3 fold increase in coverage at low error rates popular structure comparison methods and a leading function prediction method. We benchmark FLORA on a large data set of enzyme superfamilies from all three major protein classes (alpha, beta, alphabeta and demonstrate the functional relevance of the motifs it identifies. We also provide novel predictions of enzymatic activity for a large number of structures solved by the Protein Structure Initiative. Overall, we show that FLORA is able to effectively detect functionally similar protein domain structures by purely using patterns of structural conservation of all residues.

  16. Radiation of the Tnt1 retrotransposon superfamily in three Solanaceae genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetti, Maria E; Rossi, Magdalena; Costa, Ana PP; Clausen, Andrea M; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne

    2007-01-01

    Background Tnt1 was the first active plant retrotransposon identified in tobacco after nitrate reductase gene disruption. The Tnt1 superfamily comprises elements from Nicotiana (Tnt1 and Tto1) and Lycopersicon (Retrolyc1 and Tlc1) species. The study presented here was conducted to characterise Tnt1-related sequences in 20 wild species of Solanum and five cultivars of Solanum tuberosum. Results Tnt1-related sequences were amplified from total genomic DNA using a PCR-based approach. Purified fragments were cloned and sequenced, and clustering analysis revealed three groups that differ in their U3 region. Using a network approach with a total of 453 non-redundant sequences isolated from Solanum (197), Nicotiana (140) and Lycopersicon (116) species, it is demonstrated that the Tnt1 superfamily can be treated as a population to resolve previous phylogenetic multifurcations. The resulting RNAseH network revealed that sequences group according to the Solanaceae genus, supporting a strong association with the host genome, whereas tracing the U3 region sequence association characterises the modular evolutionary pattern within the Tnt1 superfamily. Within each genus, and irrespective of species, nearly 20% of Tnt1 sequences analysed are identical, indicative of being part of an active copy. The network approach enabled the identification of putative "master" sequences and provided evidence that within a genus these master sequences are associated with distinct U3 regions. Conclusion The results presented here support the hypothesis that the Tnt1 superfamily was present early in the evolution of Solanaceae. The evidence also suggests that the RNAseH region of Tnt1 became fixed at the host genus level whereas, within each genus, propagation was ensured by the diversification of the U3 region. Different selection pressures seemed to have acted on the U3 and RNAseH modules of ancestral Tnt1 elements, probably due to the distinct functions of these regions in the retrotransposon

  17. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanath Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS.

  18. Identification and characterization of subfamily-specific signatures in a large protein superfamily by a hidden Markov model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikura Mitsuhiko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most profile and motif databases strive to classify protein sequences into a broad spectrum of protein families. The next step of such database studies should include the development of classification systems capable of distinguishing between subfamilies within a structurally and functionally diverse superfamily. This would be helpful in elucidating sequence-structure-function relationships of proteins. Results Here, we present a method to diagnose sequences into subfamilies by employing hidden Markov models (HMMs to find windows of residues that are distinct among subfamilies (called signatures. The method starts with a multiple sequence alignment (MSA of the subfamily. Then, we build a HMM database representing all sliding windows of the MSA of a fixed size. Finally, we construct a HMM histogram of the matches of each sliding window in the entire superfamily. To illustrate the efficacy of the method, we have applied the analysis to find subfamily signatures in two well-studied superfamilies: the cadherin and the EF-hand protein superfamilies. As a corollary, the HMM histograms of the analyzed subfamilies revealed information about their Ca2+ binding sites and loops. Conclusions The method is used to create HMM databases to diagnose subfamilies of protein superfamilies that complement broad profile and motif databases such as BLOCKS, PROSITE, Pfam, SMART, PRINTS and InterPro.

  19. Evolutionary Pattern of N-Glycosylation Sequon Numbers  in Eukaryotic ABC Protein Superfamilies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shyama Prasad Rao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline which are the potential sites of asparagine (N linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins and their underlying causes have largely been unexplored. We computed the actual and probabilistic occurrence of NXS/T sequons in ABC protein superfamilies from eight diverse eukaryotic organisms. The ABC proteins contained significantly higher NXS/T sequon numbers compared to respective genome-wide average, but the sequon density was significantly lower owing to the increase in protein size and decrease in sequon specific amino acids. However, mammalian ABC proteins have significantly higher sequon density, and both serine and threonine containing sequons (NXS and NXT have been positively selected—against the recent findings of only threonine specific Darwinian selection of sequons in proteins. The occurrence of sequons was positively correlated with the frequency of sequon specific amino acids and negatively correlated with proline and the NPS/T sequences. Further, the NPS/T sequences were significantly higher than expected in plant ABC proteins which have the lowest number of NXS/T sequons. Accord- ingly, compared to overall proteins, N-glycosylation sequons in ABC protein superfamilies have a distinct pattern of occurrence, and the results are discussed in an evolutionary perspective.

  20. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Souza Robson F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan.

  1. AGU members receive Fulbrights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five AGU members were granted senior Fulbright awards for university teaching and advanced research abroad for 1981-1982, according to the U.S. International Communications Agency and the Board of Foreign Scholarships.Yvonne Herman-Rosenberg, associate professor of geology at the Washington State University in Pullman, will research Black Sea Quaternary benthoic foraminifera as indicators of sea-level fluctuations. The research will be conducted at the University of Bucharest in Romania from May through July, 1982.

  2. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Summer is coming, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 24 € instead of 30 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  3. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 24 € instead of 30 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  4. Alateen Members' and Non-Members' Understanding of Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Joseph A.; McCormick, Peggy

    1992-01-01

    Alateen (n=49) and non-Alateen (n=52) members were compared on knowledge and understanding of alcoholism. Results indicated Alateen members understood alcoholism as family disease and alcoholism as treatable. Alateen members suggested educational curriculum with message of successful treatment for alcoholic, whereas non-Alateen members stressed…

  5. [Comment on] BOSP members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The new Board on Ocean Science and Policy (BOSP) (Eos, June 7, 1983, p. 402) met for the first time on May 4. John B. Slaughter, former director of the National Science Foundation and now chancellor of the University of Maryland in College Park, is the board's chairman. Other board members are D. James Baker, Jr. (University of Washington, Seattle); Kirk Bryan (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University); John P. Craven (University of Hawaii); Charles L. Drake (Dartmouth College); Paul M. Fye (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Edward D. Goldberg (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); G. Ross Heath (Oregon State University); Judith T. Kildow (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); John A. Knauss (University of Rhode Island); James J. McCarthy (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University); H. William Menard (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); C. Barry Raleigh (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Roger Revelle (University of California, San Diego); David A. Ross (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Brian J. Rothschild (University of Maryland); William M. Sackett (University of South Florida); John H. Steele (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Carl Wunsch (MIT). Wallace Broecker (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), an original board member, resigned after the first meeting. Broecker told Eos that combining the science and policy boards resulted in a new board whose mission is too broad. A new board member will be appointed in Broecker's place

  6. X-linked mental retardation and autism are associated with a mutation in the NLGN4 gene, a member of the neuroligin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonnier, Frédéric; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Gomot, Marie; Blanc, Romuald; David, Albert; Moizard, Marie-Pierre; Raynaud, Martine; Ronce, Nathalie; Lemonnier, Eric; Calvas, Patrick; Laudier, Béatrice; Chelly, Jamel; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Hamel, Ben C J; Andres, Christian; Barthélémy, Catherine; Moraine, Claude; Briault, Sylvain

    2004-03-01

    A large French family including members affected by nonspecific X-linked mental retardation, with or without autism or pervasive developmental disorder in affected male patients, has been found to have a 2-base-pair deletion in the Neuroligin 4 gene (NLGN4) located at Xp22.33. This mutation leads to a premature stop codon in the middle of the sequence of the normal protein and is thought to suppress the transmembrane domain and sequences important for the dimerization of neuroligins that are required for proper cell-cell interaction through binding to beta-neurexins. As the neuroligins are mostly enriched at excitatory synapses, these results suggest that a defect in synaptogenesis may lead to deficits in cognitive development and communication processes. The fact that the deletion was present in both autistic and nonautistic mentally retarded males suggests that the NLGN4 gene is not only involved in autism, as previously described, but also in mental retardation, indicating that some types of autistic disorder and mental retardation may have common genetic origins.

  7. Erythropoietin and interleukin-2 activate distinct JAK kinase family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D L; D'Andrea, A D

    1994-01-01

    The erythropoietin (EPO) receptor and the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor beta-chain subunit are members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. They have conserved primary amino acid sequences in their cytoplasmic domains and activate phosphorylation of common substrates, suggesting common biochemical signaling mechanisms. We have generated a cell line, CTLL-EPO-R, that contains functional cell surface receptors for both EPO and IL-2. CTLL-EPO-R cells demonstrated similar growth kinetics in EPO and IL-2. Stimulation with EPO resulted in the rapid, dose-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2. In contrast, stimulation with IL-2 or the related cytokine IL-4 resulted in the rapid, dose-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK1 and an additional 116-kDa protein. This 116-kDa protein was itself immunoreactive with a polyclonal antiserum raised against JAK2 and appears to be a novel member of the JAK kinase family. Immune complex kinase assays confirmed that IL-2 and IL-4 activated JAK1 and EPO activated JAK2. These results demonstrate that multiple biochemical pathways are capable of conferring a mitogenic signal in CTLL-EPO-R cells and that the EPO and IL-2 receptors interact with distinct JAK kinase family members within the same cellular background. Images PMID:7935373

  8. RASOnD - A comprehensive resource and search tool for RAS superfamily oncogenes from various species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Tej P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras superfamily plays an important role in the control of cell signalling and division. Mutations in the Ras genes convert them into active oncogenes. The Ras oncogenes form a major thrust of global cancer research as they are involved in the development and progression of tumors. This has resulted in the exponential growth of data on Ras superfamily across different public databases and in literature. However, no dedicated public resource is currently available for data mining and analysis on this family. The present database was developed to facilitate straightforward accession, retrieval and analysis of information available on Ras oncogenes from one particular site. Description We have developed the RAS Oncogene Database (RASOnD as a comprehensive knowledgebase that provides integrated and curated information on a single platform for oncogenes of Ras superfamily. RASOnD encompasses exhaustive genomics and proteomics data existing across diverse publicly accessible databases. This resource presently includes overall 199,046 entries from 101 different species. It provides a search tool to generate information about their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, chromosome positions, orthologies, motifs, structures, related pathways and associated diseases. We have implemented a number of user-friendly search interfaces and sequence analysis tools. At present the user can (i browse the data (ii search any field through a simple or advance search interface and (iii perform a BLAST search and subsequently CLUSTALW multiple sequence alignment by selecting sequences of Ras oncogenes. The Generic gene browser, GBrowse, JMOL for structural visualization and TREEVIEW for phylograms have been integrated for clear perception of retrieved data. External links to related databases have been included in RASOnD. Conclusions This database is a resource and search tool dedicated to Ras oncogenes. It has

  9. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Parton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (superfamilies, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences-from a single sequence to an entire superfamily-and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest, reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics-such as Markov state models (MSMs-which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human

  10. The eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily of the necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Dwayne D; Gerbrandt, Kelsey; Coutu, Cathy

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases have been implicated in the regulation of many processes that guide pathogen development throughout the course of infection. A survey of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum genome for genes encoding proteins containing the highly conserved eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) domain, the largest protein kinase superfamily, revealed 92 S. sclerotiorum ePKs. This review examines the composition of the S. sclerotiorum ePKs based on conserved motifs within the ePK domain family, and relates this to orthologues found in other filamentous fungi and yeasts. The ePKs are also discussed in terms of their proposed role(s) in aspects of host pathogenesis, including the coordination of mycelial growth/development and deployment of pathogenicity determinants in response to environmental stimuli, nutrients and stress. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  11. Evolutionary Pattern of N-Glycosylation Sequon Numbers in Eukaryotic ABC Protein Superfamilies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Buus, Ole Thomsen; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline) which are the potential sites of asparagine (N) linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins and their underly......Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline) which are the potential sites of asparagine (N) linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins...... higher than expected in plant ABC proteins which have the lowest number of NXS/T sequons. Accord- ingly, compared to overall proteins, N-glycosylation sequons in ABC protein superfamilies have a distinct pattern of occurrence, and the results are discussed in an evolutionary perspective...

  12. Phi Class of Glutathione S-transferase Gene Superfamily Widely Exists in Nonplant Taxonomic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes involved in detoxification of noxious compounds and protection against oxidative damage. GST class Phi (GSTF), one of the important classes of plant GSTs, has long been considered as plant specific but was recently found in basidiomycete fungi. However, the range of nonplant taxonomic groups containing GSTFs remains unknown. In this study, the distribution and phylogenetic relationships of nonplant GSTFs were investigated. We identified GSTFs in ascomycete fungi, myxobacteria, and protists Naegleria gruberi and Aureococcus anophagefferens. GSTF occurrence in these bacteria and protists correlated with their genome sizes and habitats. While this link was missing across ascomycetes, the distribution and abundance of GSTFs among ascomycete genomes could be associated with their lifestyles to some extent. Sequence comparison, gene structure, and phylogenetic analyses indicated divergence among nonplant GSTFs, suggesting polyphyletic origins during evolution. Furthermore, in silico prediction of functional partners suggested functional diversification among nonplant GSTFs.

  13. Presence of Foraminifera of Superfamily Komokioidea (Order Astrorhizida) in Colombian deep Caribbean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavera-Martínez, Laura; Marchant, Margarita

    2017-10-20

    Research regarding deep-sea benthic foraminifera in the Colombian Caribbean requires further development given the complete lack of information related to the different groups that constitute associations and the ecological functions they fulfill. For this purpose, a taxonomic description of Superfamily Komokioidea was composed from macrofauna samples from between 1,215 m and 3,179 m depth, obtained during the research cruise ANH-COL 4 and COL 5 carried out in 2014. Results showed foraminifera belonging to the three families: Komokiidae, Baculellidae, and Normaninidae, inclu-ding five genera (Lana, Komokia, Ipoa, Normaninam, and Catena) and five species (Lana neglecta, Komokia multiramosa, Normanina conferta, Ipoa fragila, and Catena piriformis). This study presents knowledge regarding deep-sea Colombian Caribbean benthic foraminifera, which to date have not been recorded from this region. Their depth distribution when compared with other studies from the Atlantic and Pacific, allows the expansion of taxonomic inventories and the characterization of biodiversity within poorly explored regions.

  14. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P; Paterson, Neil G; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-08-25

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinesin superfamily proteins and the regulation of microtubule dynamics in morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are microtubule-dependent molecular motors that serve as sources of force for intracellular transport and cell division. Recent studies have revealed new roles of KIFs as microtubule stabilizers and depolymerizers, and these activities are fundamental to cellular morphogenesis and mammalian development. KIF2A and KIF19A have microtubule-depolymerizing activities and regulate the neuronal morphology and cilia length, respectively. KIF21A and KIF26A work as microtubule stabilizers that regulate axonal morphology. Morphological defects that are similar to human diseases are observed in mice in which these KIF genes have been deleted. Actually, KIF2A and KIF21A have been identified as causes of human neuronal diseases. In this review, the functions of these atypical KIFs that regulate microtubule dynamics are discussed. Moreover, some interesting unanswered questions and hypothetical answers to them are discussed.

  16. Characteristics and expression patterns of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH gene superfamily of foxtail millet (Setaria italica L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Chen

    Full Text Available Recent genomic sequencing of the foxtail millet, an abiotic, stress-tolerant crop, has provided a great opportunity for novel gene discovery and functional analysis of this popularly-grown grass. However, few stress-mediated gene families have been studied. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs comprise a gene superfamily encoding NAD (P +-dependent enzymes that play the role of "aldehyde scavengers", which indirectly detoxify cellular ROS and reduce the effect of lipid peroxidation meditated cellular toxicity under various environmental stresses. In the current paper, we identified a total of 20 ALDH genes in the foxtail millet genome using a homology search and a phylogenetic analysis and grouped them into ten distinct families based on their amino acid sequence identity. Furthermore, evolutionary analysis of foxtail millet reveals that both tandem and segmental duplication contributed significantly to the expansion of its ALDH genes. The exon-intron structures of members of the same family in foxtail millet or the orthologous genes in rice display highly diverse distributions of their exonic and intronic regions. Also, synteny analysis shows that the majority of foxtail millet and rice ALDH gene homologs exist in the syntenic blocks between the two, implying that these ALDH genes arose before the divergence of cereals. Semi-quantitative and real-time quantitative PCR data reveals that a few SiALDH genes are expressed in an organ-specific manner and that the expression of a number of foxtail millet ALDH genes, such as, SiALDH7B1, SiALDH12A1 and SiALDH18B2 are up-regulated by osmotic stress, cold, H2O2, and phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA. Furthermore, the transformation of SiALDH2B2, SiALDH10A2, SiALDH5F1, SiALDH22A1, and SiALDH3E2 into Escherichia coli (E.coli was able to improve their salt tolerance. Taken together, our results show that genome-wide identification characteristics and expression analyses provide unique opportunities for assessing

  17. Offers for our members

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    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21,50 € instead of 27 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12:00 p.m. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  18. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

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    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

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    CERN Multimedia

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    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 23 € instead of 29 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12:00 p.m. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  20. Cloning, crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Ying-Der; Chin, Ko-Hsin [Institute of Biochemistry, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 40227,Taiwan (China); Shr, Hui-Lin [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei,Taiwan (China); Core Facility for Protein Crystallography, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei,Taiwan (China); Gao, Fei Philip [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Lyu, Ping-Chiang [Department of Life Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu,Taiwan (China); Wang, Andrew H.-J. [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei,Taiwan (China); Core Facility for Protein Crystallography, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei,Taiwan (China); Chou, Shan-Ho, E-mail: shchou@nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemistry, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 40227,Taiwan (China)

    2006-10-01

    A CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen X. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. CN-hydrolase superfamily proteins are involved in a wide variety of non-peptide carbon–nitrogen hydrolysis reactions, producing some important natural products such as auxin, biotin, precursors of antibiotics etc. These reactions all involve attack on a cyano or carbonyl carbon by a conserved novel catalytic triad Glu-Lys-Cys through a thiol acylenzyme intermediate. However, classification into the CN-hydrolase superfamily based on sequence similarity alone is not straightforward and further structural data are necessary to improve this categorization. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc), are reported. The SeMet-substituted XC1258 crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.73 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 143.8, b = 154.63, c = 51.3 Å, respectively.

  1. External pH modulates EAG superfamily K+ channels through EAG-specific acidic residues in the voltage sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, Marcin; Zhang, Xiaofei; Chen, Bihan; Mulkey, Daniel K; Shi, Yingtang; Wagner, Paul G; Pivaroff-Ward, Kendra; Sassic, Jessica K; Bayliss, Douglas A; Jegla, Timothy

    2013-06-01

    The Ether-a-go-go (EAG) superfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels consists of three functionally distinct gene families (Eag, Elk, and Erg) encoding a diverse set of low-threshold K(+) currents that regulate excitability in neurons and muscle. Previous studies indicate that external acidification inhibits activation of three EAG superfamily K(+) channels, Kv10.1 (Eag1), Kv11.1 (Erg1), and Kv12.1 (Elk1). We show here that Kv10.2, Kv12.2, and Kv12.3 are similarly inhibited by external protons, suggesting that high sensitivity to physiological pH changes is a general property of EAG superfamily channels. External acidification depolarizes the conductance-voltage (GV) curves of these channels, reducing low threshold activation. We explored the mechanism of this high pH sensitivity in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. We first examined the role of acidic voltage sensor residues that mediate divalent cation block of voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels because protons reduce the sensitivity of Kv12.1 to Zn(2+). Low pH similarly reduces Mg(2+) sensitivity of Kv10.1, and we found that the pH sensitivity of Kv11.1 was greatly attenuated at 1 mM Ca(2+). Individual neutralizations of a pair of EAG-specific acidic residues that have previously been implicated in divalent block of diverse EAG superfamily channels greatly reduced the pH response in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. Our results therefore suggest a common mechanism for pH-sensitive voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels. The EAG-specific acidic residues may form the proton-binding site or alternatively are required to hold the voltage sensor in a pH-sensitive conformation. The high pH sensitivity of EAG superfamily channels suggests that they could contribute to pH-sensitive K(+) currents observed in vivo.

  2. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    La banque LCL propose aux membres de l’Association du personnel les avantages suivants : – Un barème Privilège sur le Prêt immobilier – Des avantages tarifaires sur l’épargne, notamment l’assurance-vie. – Un taux préférentiel de prêt à la consommation. En outre, jusqu’au 30 septembre 2013, elle offre 50€ à tous les nouveaux clients, membres de l'Association du personnel. Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Tickets "Zone terrestre" : 21 € instead of de 26 €. Access to Aqualibi : 5 euros instead of 8 euros on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Free car park. * * * * * * * Full day ticket: – Children : 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF &...

  3. Melt containment member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  4. Offers for our members

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    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    The Courir shops propose the following offer: 15% discount on all articles (not on sales) in the Courir shops (Val Thoiry, Annemasse and Neydens) and 5% discount on sales upon presentation of your Staff Association membership card and an identity card before payment. Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  5. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

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    2013-01-01

    The warm weather arrives, it's time to take advantage of our offers Walibi and Aquapark! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 € Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Half-day ticket (5 hours): – Children: 26 CHF instead of 35 CHF – Adults : 32 CHF instead of 43 CHF Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Free for children under 5.

  6. A novel sterol 14alpha-demethylase/ferredoxin fusion protein (MCCYP51FX) from Methylococcus capsulatus represents a new class of the cytochrome P450 superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colin J; Lamb, David C; Marczylo, Timothy H; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Manning, Nigel J; Lowe, David J; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2002-12-06

    Sterol 14alpha-demethylase encoded by CYP51 is a member of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes and has been shown to have an essential role in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes, with orthologues recently being described in some bacteria. Examination of the genome sequence data for the proteobacterium Methylococcus capsulatus, a bacterial species known to produce sterol, revealed the presence of a single CYP with strong homology to CYP51, particularly to a form in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This M. capsulatus CYP51 protein represents a new class of CYP consisting of the CYP domain naturally fused to a ferredoxin domain at the C terminus via an alanine-rich linker. Expression of the M. capsulatus MCCYP51FX fusion in Escherichia coli yielded a P450, which, when purified to homogeneity, had the predicted molecular mass approximately 62 kDa on SDS/PAGE and bound lanosterol as a putative substrate. Sterol 14alpha-demethylase activity was shown (0.24 nmol of lanosterol metabolized per minute per nanomole of MCCYP51FX fusion) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with the activity dependent upon the presence of ferredoxin reductase and NADPH. Our unique findings describe a new class of naturally existing cytochrome P450, which will provide pivotal information for CYP structure/function in general.

  7. Personality characteristics of Wikipedia members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amichai-Hamburger, Yair; Lamdan, Naama; Madiel, Rinat; Hayat, Tsahi

    2008-12-01

    Wikipedia is an online, free access, volunteer-contributed encyclopedia. This article focuses on the Wikipedians' (Wikipedia users) personality characteristics, studying Wikipedians' conceptions of Real-Me and BFI dimensions. To survey these aspects, we posted links to two online web questionnaires; one was targeted at Wikipedians and the second to non-Wikipedia users. One hundred and thirty-nine subjects participated in the study, of which 69 were active Wikipedia members. It was found that Wikipedia members locate their real me on the Internet more frequently as compared to non-Wikipedia members. Variance analysis revealed significant differences between Wikipedia members and non-Wikipedia members in agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness, which were lower for the Wikipedia members. An interaction was found between Wikipedia membership and gender: introverted women were more likely to be Wikipedia members as compared with extroverted women. The results of this study are discussed with special emphasis on the understanding of the motivators of Wikipedia members.

  8. The conserved scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily in therapy and diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, Vanesa Gabriela; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Holmskov, Uffe

    2011-01-01

    members of the SRCR-SF, but also of the sequence versatility of the SRCR domains. Indeed, involvement of SRCR-SF members in quite different functions, such as pathogen recognition, modulation of the immune response, epithelial homeostasis, stem cell biology, and tumor development, have all been described...... expansion, now up to more than 30 members. The study of these members is attracting growing interest, which parallels that in innate immunity. No unifying function has been described to date for the SRCR domains, this being the result of the limited knowledge still available on the physiology of most...

  9. Family members' experiences of autopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppewal, F; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Background. The experiences of family members will teach us how to handle an autopsy, the ultimate quality assessment tool. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine surviving family members' experience of autopsy. Method. Seven GPs were asked to approach surviving family members of

  10. Identification and Molecular Characterization of the Switchgrass AP2/ERF Transcription Factor Superfamily, and Overexpression of PvERF001 for Improvement of Biomass Characteristics for Biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuddineh, Wegi A; Mazarei, Mitra; Turner, Geoffrey B; Sykes, Robert W; Decker, Stephen R; Davis, Mark F; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-01-01

    The APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) superfamily of transcription factors (TFs) plays essential roles in the regulation of various growth and developmental programs including stress responses. Members of these TFs in other plant species have been implicated to play a role in the regulation of cell wall biosynthesis. Here, we identified a total of 207 AP2/ERF TF genes in the switchgrass genome and grouped into four gene families comprised of 25 AP2-, 121 ERF-, 55 DREB (dehydration responsive element binding)-, and 5 RAV (related to API3/VP) genes, as well as a singleton gene not fitting any of the above families. The ERF and DREB subfamilies comprised seven and four distinct groups, respectively. Analysis of exon/intron structures of switchgrass AP2/ERF genes showed high diversity in the distribution of introns in AP2 genes versus a single or no intron in most genes in the ERF and RAV families. The majority of the subfamilies or groups within it were characterized by the presence of one or more specific conserved protein motifs. In silico functional analysis revealed that many genes in these families might be associated with the regulation of responses to environmental stimuli via transcriptional regulation of the response genes. Moreover, these genes had diverse endogenous expression patterns in switchgrass during seed germination, vegetative growth, flower development, and seed formation. Interestingly, several members of the ERF and DREB families were found to be highly expressed in plant tissues where active lignification occurs. These results provide vital resources to select candidate genes to potentially impart tolerance to environmental stress as well as reduced recalcitrance. Overexpression of one of the ERF genes (PvERF001) in switchgrass was associated with increased biomass yield and sugar release efficiency in transgenic lines, exemplifying the potential of these TFs in the development of lignocellulosic feedstocks with improved biomass

  11. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the first Porifera tumor necrosis factor superfamily member and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Ghignone, Stefano; Mussino, Francesca; Vezzulli, Luigi; Cerrano, Carlo; Giovine, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the molecular cloning and characterization of the first Tumor Necrosis Factor homologous and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis: chTNF and chTNFR, respectively. The deduced chTNF amino acid sequence is a type II transmembrane protein containing the typical TNFSF domain. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that chTNF is more related to Chordata TNFs rather than to other invertebrates. chTNF and chTNFR are constitutively expressed both in the ectosome and in the choanosome of the sponge, with higher levels in the ectosome. chTNF and chTNFR mRNAs were monitored in sponge fragmorphs treated with Gram(+) or Gram(-) bacteria. chTNF was significantly upregulated in Gram(+)-treated fragmorphs as compared to controls, while chTNFR was upregulated by both treatments. Finally, the possible chTNF fibrogenic role in sponge fragmorphs was studied by TNF inhibitor treatment measuring fibrillar and non fibrillar collagen gene expression; results indicate that the cytokine is involved in sponge collagen deposition and homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Elevated serum levels of fetal antigen 1,a member of the epidermal growth factor superfamily, in patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harken Jensen, C; Drivsholm, L; Laursen, I

    1999-01-01

    of limited/extensive disease. Immunohistochemical analysis of a biopsy from 1 SCLC patient with an elevated serum FA1 also showed the presence of FA1 in tumor cells. FA1 in serum from SCLC patients was identical to that of FA1 in normal serum/amniotic fluid with respect to size distribution and also revealed...... a reaction of immunological identity with FA1 in amniotic fluid. Udgivelsesdato: null-null...

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 1B Haplotypes Increase or Decrease the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in a New Zealand Caucasian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynnette R. Ferguson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs comprising Crohn disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are chronic inflammatory conditions with polygenic susceptibility. Interactions between TNF-alpha and TNF-alpha receptor play a fundamental role in inflammatory response. This study investigates the role that selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and haplotypes in the TNF-alpha receptor (TNSFRSF1B gene play in the risk of IBD in a New Zealand Caucasian population. DNA samples from 388 CD, 405 UC, 27 indeterminate colitis patients, and 293 randomly selected controls, from Canterbury, New Zealand were screened for 3 common SNPs in TNSFRSF1B: rs1061622 (c.676T>C, rs1061624 (c.∗1663A>G, and rs3397 (c.∗1690T>C, using TaqMan technologies. Carrying the rs1061624 variant decreased the risk of UC in the left colon (OR 0.73, 95% CI=0.54–1.00 and of being a smoker at diagnosis (OR 0.62; 95% CI=0.40–0.96. Carrying the rs3397 variant decreased the risk of penetrating CD (OR 0.62, 95% CI=0.40–0.95. Three marker haplotype analyses revealed highly significant differences between CD patients and control subjects (χ2=29.9, df=7, P=.0001 and UC cases and controls (χ2=46.3, df=7, P<.0001. We conclude that carrying a 3-marker haplotype in the TNSFRSF1B gene may increase (e.g., haplotype of GGC was 2.9-fold more in the CD or UCpatients or decrease (e.g., TGT was 0.47-fold less in UC patients the risk of IBD in a New Zealand Caucasian population.

  14. Thioesterase superfamily member 1 suppresses cold thermogenesis by limiting the oxidation of lipid droplet-derived fatty acids in brown adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Okada

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: These results show that Them1 may act as a break on uncontrolled heat production and limit the extent of energy expenditure. Pharmacologic inhibition of Them1 could provide a targeted strategy for the management of metabolic disorders via activation of brown fat.

  15. Expression of globulin-2, a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins with similarity to known food allergens, is increased under high temperature regimen during wheat grain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-three expressed sequence tags (ESTs)from the US spring wheat Butte 86 were identified that encode proteins similar to a globulin-2 protein from maize embryos. The ESTs assembled into three contigs, two of which include the entire coding region for the mature protein. The encoded proteins co...

  16. Myxoma virus M064 is a novel member of the poxvirus C7L superfamily of host range factors that controls the kinetics of myxomatosis in European rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Moussatche, Nissin; Reinhard, Mary; Condit, Richard; McFadden, Grant

    2012-05-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV) carries three tandem C7L-like host range genes (M062R, M063R, and M064R). However, despite the fact that the sequences of these three genes are similar, they possess very distinctive functions in vivo. The role of M064 in MYXV pathogenesis was investigated and compared to the roles of M062 and M063. We report that M064 is a virulence factor that contributes to MYXV pathogenesis but lacks the host range properties associated with M062 and M063.

  17. Fetal antigen 1, a member of the epidermal growth factor superfamily, in neurofibromas and serum from patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Schroder, H D; Teisner, B

    1999-01-01

    Fetal antigen 1 (FA1) is a 26-32 kDa glycoprotein containing six epidermal growth factor-like repeats closely related to the delta/notch/serrate proteins in Drosophila. FA1 has been shown to be involved in cell differentiation in a juxtacrine/paracrine manner. As neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1......), also called von Recklinghausen disease, involves aberrant growth of tissues derived from the neural crest, the expression of FA1 was examined in neurofibroma skin biopsies and serum from patients with NF-1. FA1 was found in the spindle cells of all (n = 10) skin tumour specimens from adult NF-1...... patients, whereas normal dermis was FA1 negative. In adults, the serum FA1 levels were significantly higher in NF-1 patients (n = 13) than in normal healthy controls (n = 177) (P = 0.037). In the group of children with NF-1 (n = 9), significantly higher serum FA1 levels were observed in those known to have...

  18. Identification of the GTPase superfamily in Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Luiz Borges

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are the smallest known prokaryotes with self-replication ability. They are obligate parasites, taking up many molecules of their hosts and acting as pathogens in men, animals, birds and plants. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the infective agent of swine mycoplasmosis and Mycoplasma synoviae is responsible for subclinical upper respiratory infections that may result in airsacculitis and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. These highly infectious organisms present a worldwide distribution and are responsible for major economic problems. Proteins of the GTPase superfamily occur in all domains of life, regulating functions such as protein synthesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Despite their functional diversity, all GTPases are believed to have evolved from a single common ancestor. In this work we have identified mycoplasma GTPases by searching the complete genome databases of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, J (non-pathogenic and 7448 (pathogenic strains. Fifteen ORFs encoding predicted GTPases were found in M. synoviae and in the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae. Searches for conserved G domains in GTPases were performed and the sequences were classified into families. The GTPase phylogenetic analysis showed that the subfamilies were well resolved into clades. The presence of GTPases in the three strains suggests the importance of GTPases in 'minimalist' genomes.

  19. Antibody against Microbial Neuraminidases Recognizes Human Sialidase 3 (NEU3: the Neuraminidase/Sialidase Superfamily Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiguang Feng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuraminidases (NAs are critical virulence factors for several microbial pathogens. With a highly conserved catalytic domain, a microbial NA “superfamily” has been proposed. We previously reported that murine polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN sialidase activity was important in leukocyte trafficking to inflamed sites and that antibodies to Clostridium perfringens NA recognized a cell surface molecule(s, presumed to be a sialidase of eukaryotic origin on interleukin-8-stimulated human and murine PMNs. These antibodies also inhibited cell sialidase activity both in vitro and, in the latter instance, in vivo. We therefore hypothesized that mammalian sialidases share structural homology and epitopes with microbial NAs. We now report that antibodies to one of the isoforms of C. perfringens NA, as well as anti-influenza virus NA serum, recognize human NEU3 but not NEU1 and that antibodies to C. perfringens NA inhibit NEU3 enzymatic activity. We conclude that the previously described microbial NA superfamily extends to human sialidases. Strategies designed to therapeutically inhibit microbial NA may need to consider potential compromising effects on human sialidases, particularly those expressed in cells of the immune system.

  20. Immunoglobulin superfamily receptors: cis-interactions, intracellular adapters and alternative splicing regulate adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brümmendorf, T; Lemmon, V

    2001-10-01

    The immunoglobulin domain is a module found in vertebrates and invertebrates. Its ability to form linear rods when deployed in series, combined with its propensity to bind specifically to other proteins has made it ideal for building cell surface receptors and cell adhesion molecules. These features have resulted in the incorporation of immunoglobulin domains into many hundreds of cell surface molecules. Recently three major advances have been made in understanding immunoglobulin receptors. One is the recognition that their intracellular binding partners are likely to link to multiple cell surface molecules, allowing cross-talk or oligomeric complex formation. A second, but related phenomenon, is their participation in cis-interactions on the extracellular surface that regulate signaling or adhesion. The third is the dramatic ability to form dozens to thousands of different isoforms via alternative splicing. Although antibodies may have been the first example of immunoglobulin-domain-containing proteins using cis-interactions to form receptor like molecules, and the grandest instance of diversity production from limited genetic material, these are clearly old ideas in this superfamily.

  1. Correlated Mutation in the Evolution of Catalysis in Uracil DNA Glycosylase Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bo; Liu, Yinling; Guevara, Jose; Li, Jing; Jilich, Celeste; Yang, Ye; Wang, Liangjiang; Dominy, Brian N.; Cao, Weiguo

    2017-04-01

    Enzymes in Uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) superfamily are essential for the removal of uracil. Family 4 UDGa is a robust uracil DNA glycosylase that only acts on double-stranded and single-stranded uracil-containing DNA. Based on mutational, kinetic and modeling analyses, a catalytic mechanism involving leaving group stabilization by H155 in motif 2 and water coordination by N89 in motif 3 is proposed. Mutual Information analysis identifies a complexed correlated mutation network including a strong correlation in the EG doublet in motif 1 of family 4 UDGa and in the QD doublet in motif 1 of family 1 UNG. Conversion of EG doublet in family 4 Thermus thermophilus UDGa to QD doublet increases the catalytic efficiency by over one hundred-fold and seventeen-fold over the E41Q and G42D single mutation, respectively, rectifying the strong correlation in the doublet. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the correlated mutations in the doublet in motif 1 position the catalytic H155 in motif 2 to stabilize the leaving uracilate anion. The integrated approach has important implications in studying enzyme evolution and protein structure and function.

  2. The major facilitator superfamily transporter Knq1p modulates boron homeostasis in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrbicka, Alexandra; Toth Hervay, Nora; Gbelska, Yvetta

    2016-03-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for living cells, yet its excess causes toxicity. To date, the mechanisms of boron toxicity are poorly understood. Recently, the ScATR1 gene has been identified encoding the main boron efflux pump in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we analyzed the ScATR1 ortholog in Kluyveromyces lactis--the KNQ1 gene, to understand whether it participates in boron stress tolerance. We found that the KNQ1 gene, encoding a permease belonging to the major facilitator superfamily, is required for K. lactis boron tolerance. Deletion of the KNQ1 gene led to boron sensitivity and its overexpression increased K. lactis boron tolerance. The KNQ1 expression was induced by boron and the intracellular boron concentration was controlled by Knq1p. The KNQ1 promoter contains two putative binding motifs for the AP-1-like transcription factor KlYap1p playing a central role in oxidative stress defense. Our results indicate that the induction of the KNQ1 expression requires the presence of KlYap1p and that Knq1p like its ortholog ScAtr1p in S. cerevisiae functions as a boron efflux pump providing boron resistance in K. lactis.

  3. [HINT1--a novel tumor suppressor protein of the HIT superfamily].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozga, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    The histidine triad nucleotide binding protein1 (Hint1) belongs to the first branch of the HIT superfamily. Hint1 catalyses the process of hydrolysis of the P-N bond in AMP-lysine, AMP-alanine, AMP-NH2. The physiological role of this enzyme is still unclear. There is accumulating evidence that HINT1 is a novel tumor suppressor protein, albeit the mechanism of action of HINT1 in respect to tumor suppression is not fully understood. Recent findings have shown that Hint1 inhibits the activity of the transcription factors AP1, MITF and USF2, as well as influences the transcription process of some genes of Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Thereby, it seems that Hint1 exerts its major cellular function as gene transcription regulator, and thus, this function provides its potential role as a tumor suppressor protein. The clinical relevance of impairments in the Hint1 expression with the respect to specific human cancers is still a matter of extensive studies.

  4. Relative Stabilities of Conserved and Non-Conserved Structures in the OB-Fold Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei T. Alexandrescu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The OB-fold is a diverse structure superfamily based on a β-barrel motif that is often supplemented with additional non-conserved secondary structures. Previous deletion mutagenesis and NMR hydrogen exchange studies of three OB-fold proteins showed that the structural stabilities of sites within the conserved β-barrels were larger than sites in non-conserved segments. In this work we examined a database of 80 representative domain structures currently classified as OB-folds, to establish the basis of this effect. Residue-specific values were obtained for the number of Cα-Cα distance contacts, sequence hydrophobicities, crystallographic B-factors, and theoretical B-factors calculated from a Gaussian Network Model. All four parameters point to a larger average flexibility for the non-conserved structures compared to the conserved β-barrels. The theoretical B-factors and contact densities show the highest sensitivity.Our results suggest a model of protein structure evolution in which novel structural features develop at the periphery of conserved motifs. Core residues are more resistant to structural changes during evolution since their substitution would disrupt a larger number of interactions. Similar factors are likely to account for the differences in stability to unfolding between conserved and non-conserved structures.

  5. Roles of major facilitator superfamily transporters in phosphate response in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Bergwitz

    Full Text Available The major facilitator superfamily (MFS transporter Pho84 and the type III transporter Pho89 are responsible for metabolic effects of inorganic phosphate in yeast. While the Pho89 ortholog Pit1 was also shown to be involved in phosphate-activated MAPK in mammalian cells, it is currently unknown, whether orthologs of Pho84 have a role in phosphate-sensing in metazoan species. We show here that the activation of MAPK by phosphate observed in mammals is conserved in Drosophila cells, and used this assay to characterize the roles of putative phosphate transporters. Surprisingly, while we found that RNAi-mediated knockdown of the fly Pho89 ortholog dPit had little effect on the activation of MAPK in Drosophila S2R+ cells by phosphate, two Pho84/SLC17A1-9 MFS orthologs (MFS10 and MFS13 specifically inhibited this response. Further, using a Xenopus oocyte assay, we show that MSF13 mediates uptake of [(33P]-orthophosphate in a sodium-dependent fashion. Consistent with a role in phosphate physiology, MSF13 is expressed highest in the Drosophila crop, midgut, Malpighian tubule, and hindgut. Altogether, our findings provide the first evidence that Pho84 orthologs mediate cellular effects of phosphate in metazoan cells. Finally, while phosphate is essential for Drosophila larval development, loss of MFS13 activity is compatible with viability indicating redundancy at the levels of the transporters.

  6. The insect chemoreceptor superfamily of the parasitoid jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, H M; Gadau, J; Wanner, K W

    2010-02-01

    Chemoreception is important for locating food, mates and other resources in many insects, including the parasitoid jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis. In the insect chemoreceptor superfamily, Nasonia has 58 gustatory receptor (Gr) genes, of which 11 are pseudogenes, leaving 47 apparently intact proteins encoded. No carbon dioxide receptors, two candidate sugar receptors, a DmGr43a orthologue, and several additional Gr lineages were identified, including significant gene subfamily expansions related to the 10 Grs found in the honey bee Apis mellifera. Nasonia has a total of 301 odorant receptor (Or) genes, of which 76 are pseudogenes, leaving 225 apparently intact Ors. Phylogenetic comparison with the 174 honey bee Ors reveals differential gene subfamily expansion in each hymenopteran lineage, along with a few losses from each species. The only simple orthologous relationship is the expected single DmOr83b orthologue. The large number of Nasonia Ors is the result of several major subfamily expansions, including one of 55 genes. Nasonia does not have the elaborate social chemical communication of honey bees, nor the diversity of floral odours honey bees detect, however, Nasonia wasps might need to detect a diversity of odours to find potential mates and hosts or avoid harmful substances in its environment.

  7. Cache Domains That are Homologous to, but Different from PAS Domains Comprise the Largest Superfamily of Extracellular Sensors in Prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Amit A; Fleetwood, Aaron D; Adebali, Ogun; Finn, Robert D; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-04-01

    Cellular receptors usually contain a designated sensory domain that recognizes the signal. Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domains are ubiquitous sensors in thousands of species ranging from bacteria to humans. Although PAS domains were described as intracellular sensors, recent structural studies revealed PAS-like domains in extracytoplasmic regions in several transmembrane receptors. However, these structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains do not match sequence-derived PAS domain models, and thus their distribution across the genomic landscape remains largely unknown. Here we show that structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains belong to the Cache superfamily, which is homologous to, but distinct from the PAS superfamily. Our newly built computational models enabled identification of Cache domains in tens of thousands of signal transduction proteins including those from important pathogens and model organisms. Furthermore, we show that Cache domains comprise the dominant mode of extracellular sensing in prokaryotes.

  8. Systematics of some Lower and Middle Devonian spiriferid brachiopods from Gaspe with a revision of the superfamily Delthyridoidea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Lespérance, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    The component subfamilies of the Delthyridoidea are critically reviewed and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. This shows the presence of two clades, assigned to the Delthyrididae and Acrospiriferidae, within the superfamily. The subfamilial categories are redefined mainly on the basis of the ch......The component subfamilies of the Delthyridoidea are critically reviewed and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. This shows the presence of two clades, assigned to the Delthyrididae and Acrospiriferidae, within the superfamily. The subfamilial categories are redefined mainly on the basis...... of the characters used in the phylogenetic analysis. The spiriferid, mainly delthyridide, Gaspe fauna is formally revised and redescribed. This new taxonomic treatment leads to more precise biostratigraphy and to the recognition of a new subfamily, the Gaspespiriferinae, based on the new genus Gaspespirifer. Five...... new species aye described: Howellella (Howellella) forillonensis, Brachyspirifer (Brachyspirifer) briseboisi, Paraspirifer desbiensi, Brevispirifer florentinus, and B. quebecensis, The occurrence of Brevispirifer species with Middle Devonian chonetaceans confirms the presence of marine Eifelian strata...

  9. Expression of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in the Developing Spinal Cord and Dorsal Root Ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    Zirong Gu; Fumiyasu Imai; In Jung Kim; Hiroko Fujita; Kei ichi Katayama; Kensaku Mori; Yoshihiro Yoshihara; Yutaka Yoshida

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control synaptic specificity through hetero- or homophilic interactions in different regions of the nervous system. In the developing spinal cord, monosynaptic connections of exquisite specificity form between proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons, however, it is not known whether IgSF molecules participate in regulating this process. To determine whether IgSF molecules influence the establishment of synapti...

  10. The Insect Chemoreceptor Superfamily in Drosophila pseudoobscura: Molecular Evolution of Ecologically-Relevant Genes Over 25 Million Years

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Hugh M.

    2009-01-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily, consisting of the odorant receptor (Or) and gustatory receptor (Gr) families, exhibits patterns of evolution ranging from highly conserved proteins to lineage-specific gene subfamily expansions when compared across insect suborders and orders. Here their evolution across the timespan of 25 million years is examined which yield orthologous divergences ranging from 5–50%. They also reveal the beginnings of lineage-specific gene subfamilies as multiple dupli...

  11. The Structure of a Sugar Transporter of the Glucose EIIC Superfamily Provides Insight into the Elevator Mechanism of Membrane Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jason G; Ren, Zhenning; Stanevich, Vitali; Lee, Jumin; Mitra, Sharmistha; Levin, Elena J; Poget, Sebastien; Quick, Matthias; Im, Wonpil; Zhou, Ming

    2016-06-07

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems are found in bacteria, where they play central roles in sugar uptake and regulation of cellular uptake processes. Little is known about how the membrane-embedded components (EIICs) selectively mediate the passage of carbohydrates across the membrane. Here we report the functional characterization and 2.55-Å resolution structure of a maltose transporter, bcMalT, belonging to the glucose superfamily of EIIC transporters. bcMalT crystallized in an outward-facing occluded conformation, in contrast to the structure of another glucose superfamily EIIC, bcChbC, which crystallized in an inward-facing occluded conformation. The structures differ in the position of a structurally conserved substrate-binding domain that is suggested to play a central role in sugar transport. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations suggest a potential pathway for substrate entry from the periplasm into the bcMalT substrate-binding site. These results provide a mechanistic framework for understanding substrate recognition and translocation for the glucose superfamily EIIC transporters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinesha L. Hollman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases.

  13. Biochemical properties of human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambergova, Hana; Skarydova, Lucie; Dunford, James E; Wsol, Vladimir

    2014-01-25

    Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 7 (DHRS7, retSDR4, SDR34C1) is a previously uncharacterized member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. While human SDR members are known to play an important role in various (patho)biochemical pathways including intermediary metabolism and biotransformation of xenobiotics, only 20% of them are considered to be well characterized. Based on phylogenetic tree and SDR sequence clusters analysis DHRS7 is a close relative to well-known SDR member 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) that participates in metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic substances with carbonyl group. The aim of present study is to determine the basic biochemical properties of DHRS7 and its possible involvement in metabolism of substrates with carbonyl group. For the first time the computational predictions of this membrane protein and membrane topology were experimentally confirmed. DHRS7 has been demonstrated to be an integral protein facing the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum with lack of posttranscriptional glycosylation modification. Subsequently, NADP(H) cofactor preference and enzymatic reducing activity of DHRS7 was determined towards endogenous substrates with a steroid structure (cortisone, 4-androstene-3,17-dion) and also toward relevant exogenous substances bearing a carbonyl group harmful to human health (1,2-naphtoquinone, 9,10-phenantrenequinone). In addition to 11β-HSD1, DHRS7 is another enzyme from SDR superfamily that have been proved, at least in vitro, to contribute to the metabolism of xenobiotics with carbonyl group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transforming Growth Factor β Superfamily Signaling in Development of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Barbara; Staudacher, Jonas J; Beauchamp, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β cytokines signal via a complex network of pathways to regulate proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration, and other functions in many cell types. A high percentage of colorectal tumors contain mutations that disrupt TGF-β family member signaling. We review how TGF-β family member signaling is altered during development of colorectal cancer, models of study, interaction of pathways, and potential therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Zarazaga, Miguel-Angel; Slipinski, Adam; Nilsson, Anders; Jelínek, Josef; Taglianti, Augusto Vigna; Turco, Federica; Otero, Carlos; Canepari, Claudio; Kral, David; Liberti, Gianfranco; Sama, Gianfranco; Nardi, Gianluca; Löbl, Ivan; Horak, Jan; Kolibac, Jiri; Háva, Jirí; Sapiejewski, Maciej; Jäch, Manfred; Bologna, Marco Alberto; Biondi, Maurizio; Nikitsky, Nikolai B.; Mazzoldi, Paolo; Zahradnik, Petr; Wegrzynowicz, Piotr; Constantin, Robert; Gerstmeier, Roland; Zhantiev, Rustem; Fattorini, Simone; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Rücker, Wolfgang H.; Vazquez-Albalate, Xavier; Cassola, Fabio; Angelini, Fernando; Johnson, Colin; Schawaller, Wolfgang; Regalin, Renato; Baviera, Cosimo; Rocchi, Saverio; Cianferoni, Fabio; Beenen, Ron; Schmitt, Michael; Sassi, David; Kippenberg, Horst; Zampetti, Marcello Franco; Trizzino, Marco; Chiari, Stefano; Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Sabatelli, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea) encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework) and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde

  16. Genome-wide comparison of AP2/ERF superfamily genes between Gossypium arboreum and G. raimondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Z P; He, D H; Xing, H Y; Tang, B S; Lu, B X

    2016-07-29

    The APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor superfamily is known to regulate diverse processes of plant development and stress responses. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF gene in Gossypium arboreum and G. raimondii. Using RPSBLAST and HMMsearch, a total of 271 and 269 AP2/ERF genes were identified in the G. arboreum and G. raimondii genomes, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis classified diploid Gossypium spp AP2/ERF genes into 4 families and 16 subfamilies. Orthologous genes predominated the terminal branch of the phylogenetic tree. Physical mapping showed at least 30% of AP2/ERF genes clustered together. A high level of intra- and inter-species collinearity involving AP2/ERF genes was observed, indicating common (before species divergence) or parallel (after species divergence) segmental duplications, along with tandem duplications, resulting in the species-specific expansion of AP2/ERF genes in diploid Gossypium species. Motif analyses of the AP2/ERF proteins revealed that motif arrangements were highly diverse among subfamilies, but shared by orthologous gene pairs. An examination of nucleotide divergence of AP2/ERF coding regions identified small and non-significant sequence differences among orthologs. Expression profiling of AP2/ERF orthologous gene pairs showed similar abundance levels of orthologous copies between G. arboreum and G. raimondii. Thus, cotton species possess abundant and diverse AP2/ERF genes, resulting from tandem and segmental duplications. Protein and nucleotide sequence and mRNA expression analyses revealed symmetrical evolution, indicating that most AP2/ ERF genes may not have undergone significant biochemical and morphological divergence between sister species. Our study provides detailed insights into the evolutionary characteristics and functional importance of AP2/ERF genes, and could aid in the genetic improvement of agriculturally significant crops in this genus.

  17. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audisio, Paolo; Alonso Zarazaga, Miguel-Angel; Slipinski, Adam; Nilsson, Anders; Jelínek, Josef; Taglianti, Augusto Vigna; Turco, Federica; Otero, Carlos; Canepari, Claudio; Kral, David; Liberti, Gianfranco; Sama, Gianfranco; Nardi, Gianluca; Löbl, Ivan; Horak, Jan; Kolibac, Jiri; Háva, Jirí; Sapiejewski, Maciej; Jäch, Manfred; Bologna, Marco Alberto; Biondi, Maurizio; Nikitsky, Nikolai B; Mazzoldi, Paolo; Zahradnik, Petr; Wegrzynowicz, Piotr; Constantin, Robert; Gerstmeier, Roland; Zhantiev, Rustem; Fattorini, Simone; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Rücker, Wolfgang H; Vazquez-Albalate, Xavier; Cassola, Fabio; Angelini, Fernando; Johnson, Colin; Schawaller, Wolfgang; Regalin, Renato; Baviera, Cosimo; Rocchi, Saverio; Cianferoni, Fabio; Beenen, Ron; Schmitt, Michael; Sassi, David; Kippenberg, Horst; Zampetti, Marcello Franco; Trizzino, Marco; Chiari, Stefano; Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Sabatelli, Simone; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea) encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework) and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde.

  18. A new gene superfamily of pathogen-response (repat) genes in Lepidoptera: classification and expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Cerrillo, G; Hernández-Martínez, P; Vogel, H; Ferré, J; Herrero, S

    2013-01-01

    Repat (REsponse to PAThogens) genes were first identified in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in response to Bacillus thuringiensis and baculovirus exposure. Since then, additional repat gene homologs have been identified in different studies. In this study the comprehensive larval transcriptome from S. exigua was analyzed for the presence of novel repat-homolog sequences. These analyses revealed the presence of at least 46 repat genes in S. exigua, establishing a new gene superfamily in this species. Phylogenetic analysis and studies of conserved motifs in these hypothetical proteins have allowed their classification in two main classes, αREPAT and βREPAT. Studies on the transcriptional response of repat genes have shown that αREPAT and βREPAT differ in their sequence but also in the pattern of regulation. The αREPAT were mainly regulated in response to the Cry1Ca toxin from B. thuringiensis but not to the increase in the midgut microbiota load. In contrast, βREPAT were neither responding to Cry1Ca toxin nor to midgut microbiota. Differential expression between midgut stem cells and the whole midgut tissue was studied for the different repat genes revealing changes in the gene expression distribution between midgut stem cells and midgut tissue in response to midgut microbiota. This high diversity found in their sequence and in their expression profile suggests that REPAT proteins may be involved in multiple processes that could be of relevance for the understanding of the insect gut physiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diverticulitis and Crohn's disease have distinct but overlapping tumor necrosis superfamily 15 haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Tara M; Choi, Christine S; Berg, Arthur S; Harris, Leonard; Coble, Joel; Koltun, Walter A

    2017-06-15

    Diverticulitis (DD) and Crohn's disease (CD) have overlapping features including bowel structuring, inflammation, and infection. Tumor necrosis superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) is an immunoregulatory, anti-angiogenic gene. CD has been previously associated with a haplotype of five TNFSF15 single-nucleotide polymorphism alleles: rs3810936 (G allele), rs6478108 (A), rs6478109 (G), rs7848647 (G), and rs7869487 (A). We aimed to determine the TNFSF15 risk haplotype for DD versus controls with a subgroup analysis of youthful DD patients (aged ≤55 y) versus older controls (aged ≥55 y). A total of 148 diverticulitis patients (90 aged ≤55 y) and 200 controls (87 aged ≥55 y) were genotyped using our custom-designed Illumina Veracode microarray chip. Genotypes from rs3810936, rs6478108, rs6478109, rs7848647, rs7869487 and two additional TNFSF15 single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs3810936 and rs11554257, were analyzed. PHASE version 2.1, R with HaploStats and the Broad Institute's Haploview program were used for statistics and imputed haplotype frequency. Permutation corrected for multiple comparisons. The CD GAGGA haplotype was significantly associated with diverticulitis (P = 0.03) in the all DD versus all controls comparison. A second haplotype, rs6478108 (A), rs6478109 (G), rs7869487 (A), and rs4263839 (G), was also associated with DD in this cohort (P = 0.025). A third haplotype rs6478108 (A), rs6478109 (G), rs7848647 (G) and rs7869487 (A), rs4263839 (G) was demonstrated in the DD 55 comparison (P = 0.045). Distinct but overlapping TNFSF15 haplotypes were demonstrated in diverticulitis patients versus healthy controls when compared with the known Crohn's risk haplotype suggesting similar but distinct genetic predispositions. This study strengthens the role for a genetic predisposition to diverticulitis that involves the TNFSF15 gene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Major Facilitator Superfamily Protein at the Tonoplast Influences Zinc Tolerance and Accumulation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Michael J.; Cobbett, Christopher S.

    2007-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient required by all cells but is toxic in excess. We have identified three allelic Zn-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The gene, designated ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR1 (ZIF1), encodes a member of the major facilitator superfamily of membrane proteins, which are found in all organisms and transport a wide range of small, organic molecules. Shoots of zif1 mutants showed increased accumulation of Zn but not other metal ions. In combination with mutations affecting shoot-to-root Zn translocation, zif1 hma2 hma4 triple mutants accumulated less Zn than the wild type but remained Zn sensitive, suggesting that the zif1 Zn-sensitive phenotype is due to altered Zn distribution. zif1 mutants were also more sensitive to cadmium but less sensitive to nickel. ZIF1 promoter-β-glucuronidase fusions were expressed throughout the plant, with strongest expression in young tissues, and predominantly in the vasculature in older tissues. ZIF1 expression was highly induced by Zn and, to a lesser extent, by manganese. A ZIF1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized to the tonoplast in transgenic plants. MTP1 has been identified as a tonoplast Zn transporter and a zif1-1 mtp1-1 double mutant was more sensitive to Zn than either of the single mutants, suggesting ZIF1 influences a distinct mechanism of Zn homeostasis. Overexpression of ZIF1 conferred increased Zn tolerance and interveinal leaf chlorosis in some transgenic lines in which ZIF1 expression was high. We propose that ZIF1 is involved in a novel mechanism of Zn sequestration, possibly by transport of a Zn ligand or a Zn ligand complex into vacuoles. PMID:17277087

  1. Towards the rational design of antimicrobial proteins: single point mutations can switch on bactericidal and agglutinating activities on the RNase A superfamily lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, David; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Nogués, M Victòria; Torrent, Marc; Boix, Ester

    2013-11-01

    The ribonuclease (RNase) A superfamily lineage includes distant members with antimicrobial properties, suggesting a common ancestral host-defense role. In an effort to identify the minimal requirements for the eosinophil cationic protein (ECP or RNase 3) antimicrobial properties we applied site-directed mutagenesis on its closest family homolog, the eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN or RNase 2). Both eosinophil secretion proteins are involved in human immune defense, and are reported as being among the most rapidly evolving coding sequences in primates. Previous studies in our laboratory defined two regions at the N-terminus involved in the protein antimicrobial action, encompassing residues 8-16 and 34-36. Here, we demonstrate that switching two single residues is enough to provide EDN with ECP antipathogen properties. That is, the EDN double-mutant Q34R/R35W displays enhanced bactericidal activity, particularly towards Gram-negative bacteria, and a significant increase in its affinity towards the bacterial outer membrane lipopolysaccharides. Moreover, we confirmed the direct contribution of residue W35 in lipopolysaccharide binding, membrane interaction and permeabilization processes. Furthermore, additional T13 to I substitution provides EDN with an exposed hydrophobic patch required for protein self-aggregation and triggers bacterial agglutination, thereby increasing the final antimicrobial activity by up to 20-fold. Our results highlight how single selected mutations can reshape the entire protein function. This study provides an example of how structure-guided protein engineering can successfully reproduce an evolution selection process towards the emergence of new physiological roles. © 2013 FEBS.

  2. Expansion and stress responses of the AP2/EREBP superfamily in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2017-01-31

    The allotetraploid cotton originated from one hybridization event between an extant progenitor of Gosssypium herbaceum (A1) or G. arboreum (A2) and another progenitor, G. raimondii Ulbrich (D5) 1-1.5 million years ago (Mya). The APETALA2/ethylene-responsive element binding protein (AP2/EREBP) transcription factors constitute one of the largest and most conserved gene families in plants. They are characterized by their AP2 domain, which comprises 60-70 amino acids, and are classified into four main subfamilies: the APETALA2 (AP2), Related to ABI3/VP1 (RAV), Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding protein (DREB) and Ethylene-Responsive Factor (ERF) subfamilies. The AP2/EREBP genes play crucial roles in plant growth, development and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Hence, understanding the molecular characteristics of cotton stress tolerance and gene family expansion would undoubtedly facilitate cotton resistance breeding and evolution research. A total of 269 AP2/EREBP genes were identified in the G. raimondii (D5) cotton genome. The protein domain architecture and intron/exon structure are simple and relatively conserved within each subfamily. They are distributed throughout all chromosomes but are clustered on various chromosomes due to genomic tandem duplication. We identified 73 tandem duplicated genes and 221 segmental duplicated gene pairs which contributed to the expansion of AP2/EREBP superfamily. Of them, tandem duplication was the most important force of the expansion of the B3 group. Transcriptome analysis showed that 504 AP2/EREBP genes were expressed in at least one tested G. hirsutum TM-1 tissues. In G. hirsutum, 151 non-repeated genes of the DREB and ERF subfamily genes were responsive to different stresses: 132 genes were induced by cold, 63 genes by drought and 94 genes by heat. qRT-PCR confirmed that 13 GhDREB and 15 GhERF genes were induced by cold and/or drought. No transcripts detected for 53 of the 111 tandem duplicated genes in TM-1. In

  3. Discovery of a distinct superfamily of Kunitz-type toxin (KTT from tarantulas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hua Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kuntiz-type toxins (KTTs have been found in the venom of animals such as snake, cone snail and sea anemone. The main ancestral function of Kunitz-type proteins was the inhibition of a diverse array of serine proteases, while toxic activities (such as ion-channel blocking were developed under a variety of Darwinian selection pressures. How new functions were grafted onto an old protein scaffold and what effect Darwinian selection pressures had on KTT evolution remains a puzzle. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the presence of a new superfamily of ktts in spiders (TARANTULAS: Ornithoctonus huwena and Ornithoctonus hainana, which share low sequence similarity to known KTTs and is clustered in a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree of KTT evolution. The representative molecule of spider KTTs, HWTX-XI, purified from the venom of O. huwena, is a bi-functional protein which is a very potent trypsin inhibitor (about 30-fold more strong than BPTI as well as a weak Kv1.1 potassium channel blocker. Structural analysis of HWTX-XI in 3-D by NMR together with comparative function analysis of 18 expressed mutants of this toxin revealed two separate sites, corresponding to these two activities, located on the two ends of the cone-shape molecule of HWTX-XI. Comparison of non-synonymous/synonymous mutation ratios (omega for each site in spider and snake KTTs, as well as PBTI like body Kunitz proteins revealed high Darwinian selection pressure on the binding sites for Kv channels and serine proteases in snake, while only on the proteases in spider and none detected in body proteins, suggesting different rates and patterns of evolution among them. The results also revealed a series of key events in the history of spider KTT evolution, including the formation of a novel KTT family (named sub-Kuntiz-type toxins derived from the ancestral native KTTs with the loss of the second disulfide bridge accompanied by several dramatic sequence modifications

  4. Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic analysis of the AP2/ERF gene superfamily in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T M; Polido, P B; Rampim, M C; Kaschuk, G; Souza, S G H

    2014-09-26

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) plays an important role in the economy of more than 140 countries, but it is grown in areas with intermittent stressful soil and climatic conditions. The stress tolerance could be addressed by manipulating the ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factors because they orchestrate plant responses to environmental stress. We performed an in silico study on the ERFs in the expressed sequence tag database of C. sinensis to identify potential genes that regulate plant responses to stress. We identified 108 putative genes encoding protein sequences of the AP2/ERF superfamily distributed within 10 groups of amino acid sequences. Ninety-one genes were assembled from the ERF family containing only one AP2/ERF domain, 13 genes were assembled from the AP2 family containing two AP2/ERF domains, and four other genes were assembled from the RAV family containing one AP2/ERF domain and a B3 domain. Some conserved domains of the ERF family genes were disrupted into a few segments by introns. This irregular distribution of genes in the AP2/ERF superfamily in different plant species could be a result of genomic losses or duplication events in a common ancestor. The in silico gene expression revealed that 67% of AP2/ERF genes are expressed in tissues with usual plant development, and 14% were expressed in stressed tissues. Because the AP2/ERF superfamily is expressed in an orchestrated way, it is possible that the manipulation of only one gene may result in changes in the whole plant function, which could result in more tolerant crops.

  5. Insights into the evolution of the snail superfamily from metazoan wide molecular phylogenies and expression data in annelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Gouar Martine

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important issue concerning the evolution of duplicated genes is to understand why paralogous genes are retained in a genome even though the most likely fate for a redundant duplicated gene is nonfunctionalization and thereby its elimination. Here we study a complex superfamily generated by gene duplications, the snail related genes that play key roles during animal development. We investigate the evolutionary history of these genes by genomic, phylogenetic, and expression data studies. Results We systematically retrieved the full complement of snail related genes in several sequenced genomes. Through phylogenetic analysis, we found that the snail superfamily is composed of three ancestral families, snail, scratchA and scratchB. Analyses of the organization of the encoded proteins point out specific molecular signatures, indicative of functional specificities for Snail, ScratchA and ScratchB proteins. We also report the presence of two snail genes in the annelid Platynereis dumerilii, which have distinct expression patterns in the developing mesoderm, nervous system, and foregut. The combined expression of these two genes is identical to that of two independently duplicated snail genes in another annelid, Capitella spI, but different aspects of the expression patterns are differentially shared among paralogs of Platynereis and Capitella. Conclusion Our study indicates that the snail and scratchB families have expanded through multiple independent gene duplications in the different bilaterian lineages, and highlights potential functional diversifications of Snail and ScratchB proteins following duplications, as, in several instances, paralogous proteins in a given species show different domain organizations. Comparisons of the expression pattern domains of the two Platynereis and Capitella snail paralogs provide evidence for independent subfunctionalization events which have occurred in these two species. We propose that the

  6. How Deployments Affect Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Interestingly, some service members welcomed the longer working days as a way to keep themselves busy and distracted from homesickness or thoughts of...want more-frequent communica- tion home. Some members with whom we spoke felt that talking to family while on deploy- ment only increased homesickness ...debt, to save for college , or to buy such items as cars. In this way, the rewards of a hard de- ployment can have long-term effects for military

  7. 7 CFR 985.25 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 985.25 Section 985.25 Agriculture....25 Alternate members. An alternate for a member shall act in the place of such member (a) in the member's absence, (b) in the event of the member's death, removal, resignation, or disqualification...

  8. 7 CFR 925.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 925.27 Section 925.27 Agriculture... SOUTHEASTERN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 925.27 Alternate members. An alternate member shall act in the place of the member during such member's absence or at such member's request, and may be assigned other...

  9. Use of RNA Interference by In Utero Electroporation to Study Cortical Development: The Example of the Doublecortin Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raanan Greenman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The way we study cortical development has undergone a revolution in the last few years following the ability to use shRNA in the developing brain of the rodent embryo. The first gene to be knocked-down in the developing brain was doublecortin (Dcx. Here we will review knockdown experiments in the developing brain and compare them with knockout experiments, thus highlighting the advantages and disadvantages using the different systems. Our review will focus on experiments relating to the doublecortin superfamily of proteins.

  10. 7 CFR 982.32 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial members and nomination of successor members... Initial members and nomination of successor members. (a) Members and alternate members of the Board... members and alternate members specified in § 982.30(b) (1) through (3) shall be made by the largest...

  11. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushegian, Arcady R., E-mail: mushegian2@gmail.com [Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Elena, Santiago F., E-mail: sfelena@ibmcp.upv.es [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, CSIC-UPV, 46022 València (Spain); The Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  12. The Unique Role of the ECERIFERUM2-LIKE Clade of the BAHD Acyltransferase Superfamily in Cuticular Wax Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Tegan M.; Gerelle, Wesley K.; Graham, Sean W.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2017-01-01

    The elongation of very-long-chain fatty acids is a conserved process used for the production of many metabolites, including plant cuticular waxes. The elongation of precursors of the most abundant cuticular wax components of some plants, however, is unique in requiring ECERIFERUM2-LIKE (CER2-LIKE) proteins. CER2-LIKEs are a clade within the BAHD superfamily of acyltransferases. They are known to be required for cuticular wax production in both Arabidopsis and maize based on mutant studies. Heterologous expression of Arabidopsis and rice CER2-LIKEs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has demonstrated that they modify the chain-length specificity of elongation when paired with particular condensing enzymes. Despite sequence homology, CER2-LIKEs are distinct from the BAHD superfamily in that they do not appear to use acyl transfer activity to fulfill their biological function. Here, we review the discovery and characterization of CER2-LIKEs, propose several models to explain their function, and explore the importance of CER2-LIKE proteins for the evolution of plant cuticles. PMID:28608803

  13. Tracing the Evolutionary History of the CAP Superfamily of Proteins Using Amino Acid Sequence Homology and Conservation of Splice Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anup; Chandler, Douglas E

    2017-10-01

    Proteins of the CAP superfamily play numerous roles in reproduction, innate immune responses, cancer biology, and venom toxicology. Here we document the breadth of the CAP (Cysteine-RIch Secretory Protein (CRISP), Antigen 5, and Pathogenesis-Related) protein superfamily and trace the major events in its evolution using amino acid sequence homology and the positions of exon/intron borders within their genes. Seldom acknowledged in the literature, we find that many of the CAP subfamilies present in mammals, where they were originally characterized, have distinct homologues in the invertebrate phyla. Early eukaryotic CAP genes contained only one exon inherited from prokaryotic predecessors and as evolution progressed an increasing number of introns were inserted, reaching 2-5 in the invertebrate world and 5-15 in the vertebrate world. Focusing on the CRISP subfamily, we propose that these proteins evolved in three major steps: (1) origination of the CAP/PR/SCP domain in bacteria, (2) addition of a small Hinge domain to produce the two-domain SCP-like proteins found in roundworms and anthropoids, and (3) addition of an Ion Channel Regulatory domain, borrowed from invertebrate peptide toxins, to produce full length, three-domain CRISP proteins, first seen in insects and later to diversify into multiple subtypes in the vertebrate world.

  14. The enzymatic nature of an anonymous protein sequence cannot reliably be inferred from superfamily level structural information alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brüls, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    As the largest fraction of any proteome does not carry out enzymatic functions, and in order to leverage 3D structural data for the annotation of increasingly higher volumes of sequence data, we wanted to assess the strength of the link between coarse grained structural data (i.e., homologous superfamily level) and the enzymatic versus non-enzymatic nature of protein sequences. To probe this relationship, we took advantage of 41 phylogenetically diverse (encompassing 11 distinct phyla) genomes recently sequenced within the GEBA initiative, for which we integrated structural information, as defined by CATH, with enzyme level information, as defined by Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. This analysis revealed that only a very small fraction (about 1%) of domain sequences occurring in the analyzed genomes was found to be associated with homologous superfamilies strongly indicative of enzymatic function. Resorting to less stringent criteria to define enzyme versus non-enzyme biased structural classes or excluding highly prevalent folds from the analysis had only modest effect on this proportion. Thus, the low genomic coverage by structurally anchored protein domains strongly associated to catalytic activities indicates that, on its own, the power of coarse grained structural information to infer the general property of being an enzyme is rather limited. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  15. The Insect Chemoreceptor Superfamily in Drosophila pseudoobscura: Molecular Evolution of Ecologically-Relevant Genes Over 25 Million Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Hugh M.

    2009-01-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily, consisting of the odorant receptor (Or) and gustatory receptor (Gr) families, exhibits patterns of evolution ranging from highly conserved proteins to lineage-specific gene subfamily expansions when compared across insect suborders and orders. Here their evolution across the timespan of 25 million years is examined which yield orthologous divergences ranging from 5–50%. They also reveal the beginnings of lineage-specific gene subfamilies as multiple duplications of particular gene lineages in either or both Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura (Frolova and Astaurov) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). Gene losses and pseudogenes are similarly evident in both lineages, and even in closer comparisons of D. melanogaster with D. yakuba, leaving these species with roughly similar numbers of chemoreceptors despite considerable gene turnover. The large range of divergences and gene duplications provide abundant raw material for studies of structure and function in this novel superfamily, which contains proteins that evolved to bind specific ligands that mediate much of the ecology and mating behavior of insects. PMID:19613461

  16. [Research advances in CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing member 5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye-qing; Xiao, Yun-bei; Liu, Zhen-hua; Zhang, Xiao-wei; Xu, Tao; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2012-12-01

    CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing member(CMTM)is a novel generic family firstly reported by Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics. CMTM5 belongs to this family and has exhibited tumor-inhibiting activities. It can encode proteins approaching to the transmembrane 4 superfamily(TM4SF). CMTM5 is broadly expressed in normal adult and fetal human tissues, but is undetectable or down-regulated in most carcinoma cell lines and tissues. Restoration of CMTM5 may inhibit the proliferation, migration, and invasion of carcinoma cells. Although the exact mechanism of its anti-tumor activity remains unclear, CMTM5 may be involved in various signaling pathways governing the occurrence and development of tumors. CMTM5 may be a new target in the gene therapies for tumors, while further studies on CMTM5 and its anti-tumor mechanisms are warranted.

  17. 17 CFR 190.09 - Member property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Member property. 190.09... Member property. (a) Member property. “Member property” means, in connection with a clearing organization bankruptcy, the property which may be used to pay that portion of the net equity claim of a member which is...

  18. 42 CFR 93.214 - Institutional member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Institutional member. 93.214 Section 93.214 Public... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.214 Institutional member. Institutional member or members means a person who is... members may include, but are not limited to, officials, tenured and untenured faculty, teaching and...

  19. 7 CFR 966.31 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 966.31 Section 966.31 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Committee § 966.31 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee shall act in the place and stead of the member for whom he is an alternate, during such member's absence. In the...

  20. 7 CFR 959.31 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 959.31 Section 959.31 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Committee § 959.31 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee shall act in the place and stead of the member for whom he is an alternate, during such member's absence or when...

  1. 7 CFR 929.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 929.27 Section 929.27 Agriculture... members. An alternate member of the committee shall act in the place and stead of a member during the absence of such member and may perform such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal...

  2. 7 CFR 924.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 924.27 Section 924.27 Agriculture....27 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee, during the absence or at the request of the member for whom he is an alternate, shall act in the place and stead of such member and perform...

  3. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 1216.45 Section 1216.45... members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary peanut-producing state or at-large member for whom the person is the alternate, shall act in the place and stead of...

  4. 7 CFR 945.29 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 945.29 Section 945.29 Agriculture... § 945.29 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee shall act in the place and stead of the member for whom he is an alternate during such member's absence and may perform such other duties as may...

  5. 7 CFR 1218.44 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 1218.44 Section 1218.44... Council § 1218.44 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Council, during the absence of the member for whom the person is the alternate, shall act in the place and stead of such member and perform such...

  6. 7 CFR 989.29 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial members and nomination of successor members... Committee § 989.29 Initial members and nomination of successor members. (a) Initial members. Members and alternate members of the Committee serving immediately prior to the effective date of this amended subpart...

  7. 7 CFR 983.42 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial members and nomination of successor members... members and nomination of successor members. Nomination of committee members and alternates shall follow... approved by the Secretary. (a) Initial members. Nominations for initial producer and handler members shall...

  8. Kentucky Hispanic School Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero, Victor; Wright, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to provide information on Kentucky Hispanic school board members. The data was obtained from Kentucky school superintendents or their designees in the 174 public school districts through a survey mailed in the spring, 2009. The survey was mailed to Kentucky Superintendents on March 12, 2009. The follow-up survey was mailed…

  9. Communication Among Melanoma Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Deborah J; Albrecht, Terrance; Hay, Jennifer; Eggly, Susan; Harris-Wei, Julie; Meischke, Hendrika; Burke, Wylie

    2017-03-01

    Interventions to improve communication among family members may facilitate information flow about familial risk and preventive health behaviors. This is a secondary analysis of the effects of an interactive website intervention aimed at increasing communication frequency and agreement about health risk among melanoma families. Participants were family units, consisting of one family member with melanoma identified from a previous research study (the Case) and an additional first degree relative and a parent of a child 0-17. Family triads were randomized to receive access to the website intervention or to serve as control families. Family communication frequency and agreement about melanoma prevention behaviors and beliefs were measured at baseline and again at 1 year post randomization. Intervention participants of all three types significantly increased the frequency of communication to their first degree relatives (Parents, siblings, children; range = 14-18 percentage points; all p family members talked with at least some member of the family about cancer risk. Agreement between Cases and First Degree Relatives and between Cases and Parents increased from pre to post intervention in the intervention participants compared to the control participants (p family communication about cancer risk.

  10. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  11. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Pan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human cytochrome P450 (CYP superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA (“Orthologous MAtrix” Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery.

  12. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Xue, Danfeng; Li, Zhi-Ling; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Yang, Yinxue; Yang, Tianxin; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-06-28

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA ("Orthologous MAtrix") Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery.

  13. TGF-b superfamily cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 is a physiological appetite and body weight regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Wang-Wei Tsai

    Full Text Available The TGF-b superfamily cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 circulates in all humans and when overproduced in cancer leads to anorexia/cachexia, by direct action on brain feeding centres. In these studies we have examined the role of physiologically relevant levels of MIC-1/GDF15 in the regulation of appetite, body weight and basal metabolic rate. MIC-1/GDF15 gene knockout mice (MIC-1(-/- weighed more and had increased adiposity, which was associated with increased spontaneous food intake. Female MIC-1(-/- mice exhibited some additional alterations in reduced basal energy expenditure and physical activity, possibly owing to the associated decrease in total lean mass. Further, infusion of human recombinant MIC-1/GDF15 sufficient to raise serum levels in MIC-1(-/- mice to within the normal human range reduced body weight and food intake. Taken together, our findings suggest that MIC-1/GDF15 is involved in the physiological regulation of appetite and energy storage.

  14. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin and Mark Ragan.

  15. KinMutRF: a random forest classifier of sequence variants in the human protein kinase superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pons, Tirso; Vazquez, Miguel; Matey-Hernandez, María Luisa

    2016-01-01

    remains challenging: cells tolerate most genomic alterations and only a minor fraction disrupt molecular function sufficiently and drive disease. Results: KinMutRF is a novel random-forest method to automatically identify pathogenic variants in human kinases. Twenty six decision trees implemented......Background: The association between aberrant signal processing by protein kinases and human diseases such as cancer was established long time ago. However, understanding the link between sequence variants in the protein kinase superfamily and the mechanistic complex traits at the molecular level...... as a random forest ponder a battery of features that characterize the variants: a) at the gene level, including membership to a Kinbase group and Gene Ontology terms; b) at the PFAM domain level; and c) at the residue level, the types of amino acids involved, changes in biochemical properties, functional...

  16. Functional Annotation and Three-Dimensional Structure of Dr0930 from Deinococcus radiodurans, a Close Relative of Phosphotriesterase in the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Kolb, P; Fedorov, A; Meier, M; Fedorov, L; Nguyen, T; Sterner, R; Almo, S; Shoichet, B; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    Dr0930, a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily in Deinococcus radiodurans, was cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme crystallized in the space group P3121, and the structure was determined to a resolution of 2.1 Angstroms. The protein folds as a (e/a)7e-barrel, and a binuclear metal center is found at the C-terminal end of the e-barrel. The purified protein contains a mixture of zinc and iron and is intensely purple at high concentrations. The purple color was determined to be due to a charge transfer complex between iron in the e-metal position and Tyr-97. Mutation of Tyr-97 to phenylalanine or complexation of the metal center with manganese abolished the absorbance in the visible region of the spectrum. Computational docking was used to predict potential substrates for this previously unannotated protein. The enzyme was found to catalyze the hydrolysis of d- and ?-lactones with an alkyl substitution at the carbon adjacent to the ring oxygen. The best substrate was d-nonanoic lactone with a kcat/Km of 1.6 x 106 M-1 s-1. Dr0930 was also found to catalyze the very slow hydrolysis of paraoxon with values of kcat and kcat/Km of 0.07 min-1 and 0.8 M-1 s-1, respectively. The amino acid sequence identity to the phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta is 30%. The eight substrate specificity loops were transplanted from PTE to Dr0930, but no phosphotriesterase activity could be detected in the chimeric PTE-Dr0930 hybrid. Mutation of Phe-26 and Cys-72 in Dr0930 to residues found in the active site of PTE enhanced the kinetic constants for the hydrolysis of paraoxon. The F26G/C72I mutant catalyzed the hydrolysis of paraoxon with a kcat of 1.14 min-1, an increase of 16-fold over the wild-type enzyme. These results support previous proposals that phosphotriesterase activity evolved from an ancestral parent enzyme possessing lactonase activity.

  17. A Major Facilitator Superfamily protein encoded by TcMucK gene is not required for cuticle pigmentation, growth and development in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Seulgi; Noh, Mi Young; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Kramer, Karl J; Arakane, Yasuyuki

    2014-06-01

    Insect cuticle pigmentation and sclerotization (tanning) are vital physiological processes for insect growth, development and survival. We have previously identified several colorless precursor molecules as well as enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and processing to yield the mature intensely colored body cuticle pigments. A recent study indicated that the Bombyx mori (silkmoth) gene, BmMucK, which encodes a protein orthologous to a Culex pipiens quiquefasciatus (Southern house mosquito) cis,cis, muconate transporter, is a member of the "Major Facilitator Superfamily" (MFS) of transporter proteins and is associated with the appearance of pigmented body segments of naturally occurring body color mutants of B. mori. While RNA interference of the BmMucK gene failed to result in any observable phenotype, RNAi using a dsRNA for an orthologous gene from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, was reported to result in molting defects and darkening of the cuticle and some body parts, leading to the suggestion that orthologs of MucK genes may differ in their functions among insects. To verify the role and essentiality of the ortholog of this gene in development and body pigmentation function in T. castaneum we obtained cDNAs for the orthologous gene (TcMucK) from RNA isolated from the GA-1 wild-type strain of T. castaneum. The sequence of a 1524 nucleotides-long cDNA for TcMucK which encodes the putatively full-length protein, was assembled from two overlapping RT-PCR fragments and the expression profile of this gene during development was analyzed by real-time PCR. This cDNA encodes a 55.8 kDa protein consisting of 507 amino acid residues and includes 11 putative transmembrane segments. Transcripts of TcMucK were detected throughout all of the developmental stages analyzed. The function of this gene was explored by injection of two different double-stranded RNAs targeting different regions of the TcMucK gene (dsTcMucKs) into young larvae to down

  18. The phylogenetic relationships among infraorders and superfamilies of Diptera based on morphological evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambkin, Christine L.; Sinclair, Bradley J.; Pape, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Members of the megadiverse insect order Diptera (flies) have successfully colonized all continents and nearly all habitats. There are more than 154 000 described fly species, representing 1012% of animal species. Elucidating the phylogenetic relationships of such a large component of global......, quantitative phylogenetic methods have been used on both morphological and molecular data. All previous quantitative morphological studies addressed narrower phylogenetic problems, often below the suborder or infraorder level. Here we present the first numerical analysis of phylogenetic relationships...... of the entire order using a comprehensive morphological character matrix. We scored 371 external and internal morphological characters from larvae, pupae and adults for 42 species, representing all infraorders selected from 42 families. Almost all characters were obtained from previous studies but required...

  19. Community Members Draw the Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Freeland

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether a community-based task force’s redistricting plan in Ventura County, California, positively affected fair representation, social equity issues, community interests, and the electoral process. Examination and evaluation of the organizational strategies and collaborations involved in the task force’s redistricting process find that the Board of Supervisors districts that members of the community drew were successful in improving and maintaining fair representation. This finding is based on comparing supervisorial votes and policies with community members’ votes on state propositions and local measures, in addition to conducting interviews with task force members, politicians, and community activists. This study finds that citizen participation in governmental processes improves overall community health and political participation.

  20. Energy-Absorbing Beam Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An energy-absorbing (EA) beam member and having a cell core structure is positioned in an aircraft fuselage proximate to the floor of the aircraft. The cell core structure has a length oriented along a width of the fuselage, a width oriented along a length of the fuselage, and a depth extending away from the floor. The cell core structure also includes cell walls that collectively define a repeating conusoidal pattern of alternating respective larger and smaller first and second radii along the length of the cell core structure. The cell walls slope away from a direction of flight of the aircraft at a calibrated lean angle. An EA beam member may include the cell core structure and first and second plates along the length of the cell core structure on opposite edges of the cell material.

  1. Analysis of Leader Member Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Santoso

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to find out how the relationship of superiors and subordinates works or we call it, LEADER MEMBER EXCHANGE (LMX in another term. The object of this research is an Integrated Nursing Home for Impaired Speech and Hearing (INISPH, ''Meohai” Kendari, with 5 superiors and subordinates of this institution as the research informants. The method used in this research is descriptive qualitative analysis. The research found that the relationship of superiors and subordinates or Leader Member Exchange (LMX, has been well-intertwined, based on the affection, loyalty, enormous contribution, and respect one another toward the profession done in creating a close relationship to achieve the goal.DOI: 10.15408/etk.v15i2.3244

  2. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  3. Mm19, a Mycoplasma meleagridis Major Surface Nuclease that Is Related to the RE_AlwI Superfamily of Endonucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhem Yacoub

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma meleagridis infection is widespread in turkeys, causing poor growth and feathering, airsacculitis, osteodystrophy, and reduction in hatchability. Like most mycoplasma species, M. meleagridis is characterized by its inability to synthesize purine and pyrimidine nucleotides de novo. Consistent with this intrinsic deficiency, we here report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a M. meleagridis gene sequence encoding a major surface nuclease, referred to as Mm19. Mm19 consists of a 1941-bp ORF encoding a 646-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 74,825 kDa. BLASTP analysis revealed a significant match with the catalytic/dimerization domain of type II restriction enzymes of the RE_AlwI superfamily. This finding is consistent with the genomic location of Mm19 sequence, which dispalys characteristics of a typical type II restriction-modification locus. Like intact M. meleagridis cells, the E. coli-expressed Mm19 fusion product was found to exhibit a nuclease activity against plasmid DNA, double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA. The Mm19-associated nuclease activity was consistently enhanced with Mg2+ divalent cations, a hallmark of type II restriction enzymes. A rabbit hyperimmune antiserum raised against the bacterially expressed Mm19 strongly reacted with M. meleagridis intact cells and fully neutralized the surface-bound nuclease activity. Collectively, the results show that M. meleagridis expresses a strong surface-bound nuclease activity, which is the product of a single gene sequence that is related to the RE_AlwI superfamily of endonucleases.

  4. Characterization of a novel SINE superfamily from invertebrates: "Ceph-SINEs" from the genomes of squids and cuttlefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaki, Tetsuya; Nikaido, Masato; Nishihara, Hidenori; Tsuchiya, Kotaro; Segawa, Susumu; Okada, Norihiro

    2010-04-01

    Five tRNA-derived short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs), named SepiaSINE, Sepioth-SINE1, Sepioth-SINE2A, Sepioth-SINE2B and OegopSINE, were isolated from the genomes of three decabrachian species [Sepia officinalis (order Sepiida), Sepiotheuthis lessoniana (suborder Myopsida), and Mastigoteuthis cordiformes (suborder Oegopsida)], by random sequencing and genome screening. In addition, two tRNA-derived SINEs, named IdioSINE1 and IdioSINE2, were further detected from EST (expressed sequence tag) data of Idiosepius paradoxus (order Idiosepiida), using a GenBank FASTA search with a conserved sequence of the SepiaSINE as the query. All the isolated SINEs had a common and unique highly conserved 149-bp sequence in their central structures (Sepioth-SINE2B and IdioSINEs, however, had a continuous 73-bp deletion in the conserved region.), and are therefore grouped as the fourth SINE superfamily "Ceph-SINEs", following the CORE-SINE, V-SINE, and DeuSINE superfamilies. Our analysis suggested that the central conserved region called the "Ceph-domain" might have originated before the diversification of cephalopods (505 myr ago). A sequence alignment of Sepioth-SINE1, Sepioth-SINE2A, and Sepioth-SINE2B demonstrated that Sepioth-SINE2A has a chimeric structure shared with two other SINEs. The above relationship suggests possible template switching in the central conserved domain during reverse transcription for the birth of Sepioth-SINE2A, providing the possibility that the presence of the conserved domain contributed to yield a variety of SINEs during evolution. Furthermore, the distributions of the isolated SINEs showed that order Sepiida, suborders Oegopsida and Myopsida, and order Idiosepiida have their own independent SINE(s), and suggest that order Sepiida can be largely separated into two groups, with clarification of the phylogenetic relatedness between subfamily Sepioteuthinae and the other loliginid squids.

  5. A novel inhibitor of α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Conus vexillum delineates a new conotoxin superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulan Luo

    Full Text Available Conotoxins (CTxs selectively target a range of ion channels and receptors, making them widely used tools for probing nervous system function. Conotoxins have been previously grouped into superfamilies according to signal sequence and into families based on their cysteine framework and biological target. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a new conotoxin, from Conus vexillum, named αB-conotoxin VxXXIVA. The peptide does not belong to any previously described conotoxin superfamily and its arrangement of Cys residues is unique among conopeptides. Moreover, in contrast to previously characterized conopeptide toxins, which are expressed initially as prepropeptide precursors with a signal sequence, a ''pro'' region, and the toxin-encoding region, the precursor sequence of αB-VxXXIVA lacks a ''pro'' region. The predicted 40-residue mature peptide, which contains four Cys, was synthesized in each of the three possible disulfide arrangements. Investigation of the mechanism of action of αB-VxXXIVA revealed that the peptide is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR antagonist with greatest potency against the α9α10 subtype. (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra indicated that all three αB-VxXXIVA isomers were poorly structured in aqueous solution. This was consistent with circular dichroism (CD results which showed that the peptides were unstructured in buffer, but adopted partially helical conformations in aqueous trifluoroethanol (TFE solution. The α9α10 nAChR is an important target for the development of analgesics and cancer chemotherapeutics, and αB-VxXXIVA represents a novel ligand with which to probe the structure and function of this protein.

  6. The Catalytic Scaffold fo the Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzyme Superfamily Acts as a Mold for the Trigonal Bipyramidal Transition State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu,Z.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of new catalytic activities and specificities within an enzyme superfamily requires the exploration of sequence space for adaptation to a new substrate with retention of those elements required to stabilize key intermediates/transition states. Here, we propose that core residues in the large enzyme family, the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzyme superfamily (HADSF) form a 'mold' in which the trigonal bipyramidal transition states formed during phosphoryl transfer are stabilized by electrostatic forces. The vanadate complex of the hexose phosphate phosphatase BT4131 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 (HPP) determined at 1.00 Angstroms resolution via X-ray crystallography assumes a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry with the nucleophilic Asp-8 and one oxygen ligand at the apical position. Remarkably, the tungstate in the complex determined to 1.03 Angstroms resolution assumes the same coordination geometry. The contribution of the general acid/base residue Asp-10 in the stabilization of the trigonal bipyramidal species via hydrogen-bond formation with the apical oxygen atom is evidenced by the 1.52 Angstroms structure of the D10A mutant bound to vanadate. This structure shows a collapse of the trigonal bipyramidal geometry with displacement of the water molecule formerly occupying the apical position. Furthermore, the 1.07 Angstroms resolution structure of the D10A mutant complexed with tungstate shows the tungstate to be in a typical 'phosphate-like' tetrahedral configuration. The analysis of 12 liganded HADSF structures deposited in the protein data bank (PDB) identified stringently conserved elements that stabilize the trigonal bipyramidal transition states by engaging in favorable electrostatic interactions with the axial and equatorial atoms of the transferring phosphoryl group.

  7. Toothbrush contamination in family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Contreras

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial contamination of toothbrushes in family members. Materials and Methods: One hundred and two healthy subjects were included in this descriptive study. Every individual was examined clinically and microbiologically using the CPITN index and collecting subgingival plaque samples. Each participant received a toothbrush for home use and after one month they returned it to the investigators. All toothbrushes were cultured to determine the presence of periodontopathic bacteria and enteric rods. Wilkoxon signed rank test and t student test (P d"0.05 were used to compare differences in the subgingival microbiota and toothbrush contamination and CPITN index among family members. Results: A high proportion of toothbrushes resulted highly contaminated with enteric rods (P d"0.001 compared to the subgingival environment where periodontopathic bacteria were more prevalent. The most frequent microorganisms found in toothbrushes used by parents and children for one month were Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae species (>50% and Fusobacterium spp (30%. Conclusions: High levels of enteric rods were commonly detected in toothbrushes used for 1 month among members of the families. These opportunistic organisms may have an important role in oral infections including gingivitis and periodontitis. Monthly replacement or disinfection of the toothbrush can reduce the risk of bacterial transmission/translocation and thus diminish the incidence of biofilm associated oral diseases.

  8. Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily transporter from Botrytis cinerea, provides tolerance towards the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin and towards fungicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily gene from Botrytis cinerea, was cloned, and replacement and overexpression mutants were constructed to study its function. Replacement mutants showed increased sensitivity to the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin, produced by the plant

  9. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any person...

  10. 7 CFR 1425.19 - Member cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member cooperatives. 1425.19 Section 1425.19... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.19 Member cooperatives. A CMA may obtain loans or LDP's on behalf of a member cooperative when the member...

  11. 7 CFR 923.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 923.27 Section 923.27 Agriculture... COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 923.27 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee, during the absence or at the request of the member for whom he is an...

  12. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a significant...

  13. 7 CFR 1220.207 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 1220.207 Section 1220.207... CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order United Soybean Board § 1220.207 Alternate members... members of the Board. (b) The Secretary shall appoint one alternate member of the Board for each unit...

  14. 7 CFR 946.23 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 946.23 Section 946.23 Agriculture... Order Regulating Handling Administrative Committee § 946.23 Alternate members. (a) An alternate member of the committee shall act in the place and stead of the member for whom he is an alternate, during...

  15. 29 CFR 452.92 - Unemployed members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unemployed members. 452.92 Section 452.92 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Right To Vote § 452.92 Unemployed members. Members who are otherwise qualified to vote may...-time basis in the industry served by the union, provided, of course, that such members are paying dues. ...

  16. 7 CFR 920.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 920.27 Section 920.27 Agriculture... Administrative Body § 920.27 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee, during the absence of either the member for whom that individual is an alternate, or, in the case of districts with two grower...

  17. 7 CFR 906.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 906.27 Section 906.27 Agriculture... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.27 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee shall act in the place and stead of the member for whom he is an alternate...

  18. 7 CFR 922.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 922.27 Section 922.27 Agriculture... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 922.27 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee, during the absence or at the request of the member for whom he is an alternate...

  19. 7 CFR 916.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 916.27 Section 916.27 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 916.27 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee, during the absence of the member for whom he is an alternate, shall act in the place and stead of such...

  20. 7 CFR 953.23 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 953.23 Section 953.23 Agriculture... STATES Order Regulating Handling Administrative Committee § 953.23 Alternate members. An alternate member of the committee shall act in the place and stead of the member for whom he is alternate during such...

  1. 12 CFR 267.3 - Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Members. 267.3 Section 267.3 Banks and Banking... AND PROCEDURE OF THE CONSUMER ADVISORY COUNCIL § 267.3 Members. (a) The Council shall consist of not more than 30 members appointed by the Board. The term of office of each member of the Council shall be...

  2. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Associate Members. 701... ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of the... the work of the Council to become Associate Members. Associate Members, on the same terms and...

  3. 7 CFR 1205.328 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 1205.328 Section 1205.328... Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.328 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for whom the person is the alternate, shall act in the place and...

  4. 7 CFR 1250.332 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 1250.332 Section 1250.332... Research and Promotion Order Egg Board § 1250.332 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for whom he is the alternate, shall act in the place and stead of such...

  5. 7 CFR 989.33 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 989.33 Section 989.33 Agriculture... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Raisin Administrative Committee § 989.33 Alternate members. The alternate for a member of the committee shall act in the place and stead of such member (a) during his...

  6. Instrument access device for instrument access system, has connector member connecting proximal member with instrument seals, where proximal member and connector member are configured to retain proximal end of retractor member

    OpenAIRE

    Bonadio, Frank; Vaugh, Trevor; McManus, Ronan; MacNally, Shane

    2010-01-01

    The device (203) has instrument seals sealingly arranged in a body of a patient, and a distal anchoring member located in a wound interior. A retractor member is proximally extended from a distal anchoring member to retract sides of a wound opening. A proximal member is adopted for locating an external part of the wound opening. A connector member connects the proximal member with the instrument seals. The proximal member and the connector member are configured to retain a proximal end of the...

  7. Isolation, classification and transcription profiles of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiu-lan; Shen, Shu-ling; Yin, Xue-ren; Xu, Qian; Sun, Chong-de; Grierson, Donald; Ferguson, Ian; Chen, Kun-song

    2014-07-01

    The AP2/ERF gene family encodes plant-specific transcription factors. In model plants, AP2/ERF genes have been shown to be expressed in response to developmental and environmental stimuli, and many function downstream of the ethylene, biotic, and abiotic stress signaling pathways. In citrus, ethylene is effective in regulation citrus fruit quality, such as degreening and aroma. However, information about the citrus AP2/ERF family is limited, and would enhance our understanding of fruit responses to environmental stress, fruit development and quality. CitAP2/ERF genes were isolated using the citrus genome database, and their expression patterns analyzed by real-time PCR using various orange organs and samples from a fruit developmental series. 126 sequences with homologies to AP2/ERF proteins were identified from the citrus genome, and, on the basis of their structure and sequence, assigned to the ERF family (102), AP2 family (18), RAV family (4) and Soloist (2). MEME motif analysis predicted the defining AP2/ERF domain and EAR repressor domains. Analysis of transcript accumulation in Citrus sinensis cv. 'Newhall' indicated that CitAP2/ERF genes show organ-specific and temporal expression, and provided a framework for understanding the transcriptional regulatory roles of AP2/ERF gene family members in citrus. Hierarchical cluster analysis and t tests identified regulators that potentially function during orange fruit growth and development.

  8. Expansion and stress responses of AP2/EREBP superfamily in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Han, Jiapeng; Deng, Xiaomin; Tan, Shenglong; Li, Lili; Li, Lun; Zhou, Junfei; Peng, Hai; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan; Zhang, Weixiong

    2016-02-12

    APETALA2/ethylene-responsive element binding protein (AP2/EREBP) transcription factors constitute one of the largest and most conserved gene families in plant, and play essential roles in growth, development and stress response. Except a few members, the AP2/EREBP family has not been characterized in Brachypodium distachyon, a model plant of Poaceae. We performed a genome-wide study of this family in B. distachyon by phylogenetic analyses, transactivation assays and transcript profiling. A total of 149 AP2/EREBP genes were identified and divided into four subfamilies, i.e., ERF (ethylene responsive factor), DREB (dehydration responsive element binding gene), RAV (related to ABI3/VP) and AP2. Tandem duplication was a major force in expanding B. distachyon AP2/EREBP (BdAP2/EREBP) family. Despite a significant expansion, genomic organizations of BdAP2/EREBPs were monotonous as the majority of them, except those of AP2 subfamily, had no intron. An analysis of transcription activities of several closely related and duplicated BdDREB genes showed their functional divergence and redundancy in evolution. The expression of BdAP2/EREBPs in different tissues and the expression of DREB/ERF subfamilies in B. distachyon, wheat and rice under abiotic stresses were investigated by next-generation sequencing and microarray profiling. Our results are valuable for further function analysis of stress tolerant AP2/EREBP genes in B. distachyon.

  9. Characterization of a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) tripartite efflux pump EmrCABsm from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Wei; Hu, Rouh-Mei; Chu, Fang-Yeh; Lin, Hui-Rung; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2013-11-01

    To characterize the emrRCABsm operon of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The presence of the emrRCABsm operon was verified by RT-PCR. The regulatory role of EmrRsm was investigated by ΔemrRsm mutant construction and promoter transcriptional fusion assay. A susceptibility test was employed to assess the substrate spectrum of the EmrCABsm efflux pump. The requirement for each component of the EmrCABsm pump was assessed by individual mutant construction and susceptibility testing. The expression of the emrRCABsm operon was evaluated by an induction assay, using different compounds as inducers. emrRsm, emrCsm, emrAsm and emrBsm formed a four-member operon that was negatively regulated by the MarR-type transcriptional regulator EmrRsm. The emrRCABsm operon was intrinsically poorly expressed and the EmrCAB pump favoured extrusion of the uncoupling agents carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS), and the hydrophobic antibiotics nalidixic acid and erythromycin. However, the emrRCABsm operon could not be derepressed by CCCP, nalidixic acid, TCS, 2-chlorophenylhydrazine hydrochloride or salicylate, which are known to be possible inducers for MarR-type regulons. Each component of the EmrCABsm pump was apparently essential for pump function. The EmrRsm-regulated EmrCABsm efflux pump is involved in the extrusion of hydrophobic compounds.

  10. The WRKY transcription factor superfamily: its origin in eukaryotes and expansion in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Liangjiang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WRKY proteins are newly identified transcription factors involved in many plant processes including plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To date, genes encoding WRKY proteins have been identified only from plants. Comprehensive search for WRKY genes in non-plant organisms and phylogenetic analysis would provide invaluable information about the origin and expansion of the WRKY family. Results We searched all publicly available sequence data for WRKY genes. A single copy of the WRKY gene encoding two WRKY domains was identified from Giardia lamblia, a primitive eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, a slime mold closely related to the lineage of animals and fungi, and the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an early branching of plants. This ancestral WRKY gene seems to have duplicated many times during the evolution of plants, resulting in a large family in evolutionarily advanced flowering plants. In rice, the WRKY gene family consists of over 100 members. Analyses suggest that the C-terminal domain of the two-WRKY-domain encoding gene appears to be the ancestor of the single-WRKY-domain encoding genes, and that the WRKY domains may be phylogenetically classified into five groups. We propose a model to explain the WRKY family's origin in eukaryotes and expansion in plants. Conclusions WRKY genes seem to have originated in early eukaryotes and greatly expanded in plants. The elucidation of the evolution and duplicative expansion of the WRKY genes should provide valuable information on their functions.

  11. Exceptional Family Member Program EFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    patient facilities. e6 Points of Contact for the Exceptional Family Member Program ’ American Cleft Palate National Association for Foundation Alzheimer’s 1...area, D 0 Contact the Easter Seal Society regarding the Early Intervention Program for infants with special needs. 3 0 "!i I . . Other’Resources...800-24- CLEFT - (412) 481-1370 1-800-272-3900 -- (312) 335-8700 American Liver Foundation National Cancer Institute 1-800-223-0171) - (201) 256-2550 1

  12. Identification of NAD(P)H Quinone Oxidoreductase Activity in Azoreductases from P. aeruginosa: Azoreductases and NAD(P)H Quinone Oxidoreductases Belong to the Same FMN-Dependent Superfamily of Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Ali; Kaplan, Elise; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Polycarpou, Elena; Crescente, Vincenzo; Lowe, Edward; Preston, Gail M.; Sim, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Water soluble quinones are a group of cytotoxic anti-bacterial compounds that are secreted by many species of plants, invertebrates, fungi and bacteria. Studies in a number of species have shown the importance of quinones in response to pathogenic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. Two electron reduction is an important mechanism of quinone detoxification as it generates the less toxic quinol. In most organisms this reaction is carried out by a group of flavoenzymes known as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases. Azoreductases have previously been separate from this group, however using azoreductases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa we show that they can rapidly reduce quinones. Azoreductases from the same organism are also shown to have distinct substrate specificity profiles allowing them to reduce a wide range of quinones. The azoreductase family is also shown to be more extensive than originally thought, due to the large sequence divergence amongst its members. As both NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases and azoreductases have related reaction mechanisms it is proposed that they form an enzyme superfamily. The ubiquitous and diverse nature of azoreductases alongside their broad substrate specificity, indicates they play a wide role in cellular survival under adverse conditions. PMID:24915188

  13. Identification of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase activity in azoreductases from P. aeruginosa: azoreductases and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases belong to the same FMN-dependent superfamily of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Ali; Kaplan, Elise; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Polycarpou, Elena; Crescente, Vincenzo; Lowe, Edward; Preston, Gail M; Sim, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Water soluble quinones are a group of cytotoxic anti-bacterial compounds that are secreted by many species of plants, invertebrates, fungi and bacteria. Studies in a number of species have shown the importance of quinones in response to pathogenic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. Two electron reduction is an important mechanism of quinone detoxification as it generates the less toxic quinol. In most organisms this reaction is carried out by a group of flavoenzymes known as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases. Azoreductases have previously been separate from this group, however using azoreductases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa we show that they can rapidly reduce quinones. Azoreductases from the same organism are also shown to have distinct substrate specificity profiles allowing them to reduce a wide range of quinones. The azoreductase family is also shown to be more extensive than originally thought, due to the large sequence divergence amongst its members. As both NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases and azoreductases have related reaction mechanisms it is proposed that they form an enzyme superfamily. The ubiquitous and diverse nature of azoreductases alongside their broad substrate specificity, indicates they play a wide role in cellular survival under adverse conditions.

  14. Identification of NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase activity in azoreductases from P. aeruginosa: azoreductases and NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductases belong to the same FMN-dependent superfamily of enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ryan

    Full Text Available Water soluble quinones are a group of cytotoxic anti-bacterial compounds that are secreted by many species of plants, invertebrates, fungi and bacteria. Studies in a number of species have shown the importance of quinones in response to pathogenic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. Two electron reduction is an important mechanism of quinone detoxification as it generates the less toxic quinol. In most organisms this reaction is carried out by a group of flavoenzymes known as NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductases. Azoreductases have previously been separate from this group, however using azoreductases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa we show that they can rapidly reduce quinones. Azoreductases from the same organism are also shown to have distinct substrate specificity profiles allowing them to reduce a wide range of quinones. The azoreductase family is also shown to be more extensive than originally thought, due to the large sequence divergence amongst its members. As both NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductases and azoreductases have related reaction mechanisms it is proposed that they form an enzyme superfamily. The ubiquitous and diverse nature of azoreductases alongside their broad substrate specificity, indicates they play a wide role in cellular survival under adverse conditions.

  15. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the AP2/ERF superfamily in Vitis vinifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzotti Mario

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The AP2/ERF protein family contains transcription factors that play a crucial role in plant growth and development and in response to biotic and abiotic stress conditions in plants. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera is the only woody crop whose genome has been fully sequenced. So far, no detailed expression profile of AP2/ERF-like genes is available for grapevine. Results An exhaustive search for AP2/ERF genes was carried out on the Vitis vinifera genome and their expression profile was analyzed by Real-Time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR in different vegetative and reproductive tissues and under two different ripening stages. One hundred and forty nine sequences, containing at least one ERF domain, were identified. Specific clusters within the AP2 and ERF families showed conserved expression patterns reminiscent of other species and grapevine specific trends related to berry ripening. Moreover, putative targets of group IX ERFs were identified by co-expression and protein similarity comparisons. Conclusions The grapevine genome contains an amount of AP2/ERF genes comparable to that of other dicot species analyzed so far. We observed an increase in the size of specific groups within the ERF family, probably due to recent duplication events. Expression analyses in different aerial tissues display common features previously described in other plant systems and introduce possible new roles for members of some ERF groups during fruit ripening. The presented analysis of AP2/ERF genes in grapevine provides the bases for studying the molecular regulation of berry development and the ripening process.

  16. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the AP2/ERF superfamily in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licausi, Francesco; Giorgi, Federico M; Zenoni, Sara; Osti, Fabio; Pezzotti, Mario; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2010-12-20

    The AP2/ERF protein family contains transcription factors that play a crucial role in plant growth and development and in response to biotic and abiotic stress conditions in plants. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) is the only woody crop whose genome has been fully sequenced. So far, no detailed expression profile of AP2/ERF-like genes is available for grapevine. An exhaustive search for AP2/ERF genes was carried out on the Vitis vinifera genome and their expression profile was analyzed by Real-Time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) in different vegetative and reproductive tissues and under two different ripening stages.One hundred and forty nine sequences, containing at least one ERF domain, were identified. Specific clusters within the AP2 and ERF families showed conserved expression patterns reminiscent of other species and grapevine specific trends related to berry ripening. Moreover, putative targets of group IX ERFs were identified by co-expression and protein similarity comparisons. The grapevine genome contains an amount of AP2/ERF genes comparable to that of other dicot species analyzed so far. We observed an increase in the size of specific groups within the ERF family, probably due to recent duplication events. Expression analyses in different aerial tissues display common features previously described in other plant systems and introduce possible new roles for members of some ERF groups during fruit ripening. The presented analysis of AP2/ERF genes in grapevine provides the bases for studying the molecular regulation of berry development and the ripening process.

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the MYB Transcription Factor Superfamily in Solanum lycopersicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenjun; Peng, Rihe; Tian, Yongsheng; Han, Hongjuan; Xu, Jing; Yao, Quanhong

    2016-08-01

    MYB proteins constitute one of the largest transcription factor families in the plant kingdom, members of which perform a variety of functions in plant biological processes. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of MYB transcription factors in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). In our study, a total of 127 MYB genes have been identified in the tomato genome. A complete overview of these MYB genes is presented, including the phylogeny, gene structures, protein motifs, chromosome locations and expression patterns. The 127 SlMYB proteins could be classified into 18 subgroups based on domain similarity and phylogenetic topology. Phylogenetic analysis of SlMYBs along with MYBs from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) indicated 14 subfamilies. Conserved motifs outside the MYB domain may reflect their functional conservation. The identified tomato MYB genes were distributed on 12 chromosomes at various densities but mainly in chromosomes 6 and 10 (12.6% and 11.8%, respectively). Genome-wide segmental and tandem duplications were also found, which may contribute to the expansion of SlMYB genes. RNA-sequencing and microarray data revealed tissue-specific and stress-responsive expression patterns of SlMYB genes. The expression profiles of SlMYB genes in response to salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid methyl ester (MeJA) were also investigated by real-time PCR. Moreover, ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motifs were found in 24 SlMYB proteins. Collectively, our comprehensive analysis of SlMYB genes will facilitate future functional studies of the tomato MYB gene family and probably other Solanaceae plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the AP2/ERF superfamily in Vitis vinifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The AP2/ERF protein family contains transcription factors that play a crucial role in plant growth and development and in response to biotic and abiotic stress conditions in plants. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) is the only woody crop whose genome has been fully sequenced. So far, no detailed expression profile of AP2/ERF-like genes is available for grapevine. Results An exhaustive search for AP2/ERF genes was carried out on the Vitis vinifera genome and their expression profile was analyzed by Real-Time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) in different vegetative and reproductive tissues and under two different ripening stages. One hundred and forty nine sequences, containing at least one ERF domain, were identified. Specific clusters within the AP2 and ERF families showed conserved expression patterns reminiscent of other species and grapevine specific trends related to berry ripening. Moreover, putative targets of group IX ERFs were identified by co-expression and protein similarity comparisons. Conclusions The grapevine genome contains an amount of AP2/ERF genes comparable to that of other dicot species analyzed so far. We observed an increase in the size of specific groups within the ERF family, probably due to recent duplication events. Expression analyses in different aerial tissues display common features previously described in other plant systems and introduce possible new roles for members of some ERF groups during fruit ripening. The presented analysis of AP2/ERF genes in grapevine provides the bases for studying the molecular regulation of berry development and the ripening process. PMID:21171999

  19. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 8 (DHRS8): a description and evaluation of its biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundová, Tereza; Štambergová, Hana; Zemanová, Lucie; Svobodová, Markéta; Havránková, Jana; Šafr, Miroslav; Wsól, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 8 (DHRS8, SDR16C2) belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, one of the largest enzyme groups. In addition to the well-known members which participate in the metabolism of important eobiotics and xenobiotics, this superfamily contains many poorly characterized proteins. DHRS8 is a member of the Multisubstrate NADP(H)-dependent SDR16C family, which generally contains insufficiently described enzymes. Despite the limited knowledge about DHRS8, preliminary indicators have emerged regarding its significant function in the modulation of steroidal activity, at least in the case of 3α-adiol, lipid metabolism and detoxification. The aim of this study was to describe additional biochemical properties of DHRS8 and to unify knowledge about this enzyme. The DHRS8 was prepared in recombinant form and its membrane topology in the endoplasmic reticulum as an integral protein with cytosolic orientation was demonstrated. The enzyme participates in the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of steroid hormones as β-estradiol and testosterone in vitro; apparent K m and V max values were 39.86 µM and 0.80 nmol × mg(-1) × min(-1) for β-estradiol and 1207.29 µM and 3.45 nmol × mg(-1) × min(-1) for testosterone. Moreover, synthetic steroids (methyltestosterone and nandrolone) used as anabolics as well as all-trans-retinol were for the first time identified as substrates of DHRS8. This knowledge of its in vitro activity together with a newly described expression pattern at the protein level in tissues involved in steroidogenesis (adrenal gland and testis) and detoxification (liver, lung, kidney and small intestine) could suggest a potential role of DHRS8 in vivo.

  20. Wound retractor for use during laparoscopic surgery, has connecting member extending between proximal and distal members, and release member stowed away before release member is required to be used to release distal member

    OpenAIRE

    Bonadio, Frank; Butler, John; Deegan, C; Vaugh, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    The retractor has a connecting member extending between a proximal member and a distal member to retract sides of a wound opening (6). A release member (81) releases the distal member from a retracting configuration for removal of the distal member from the opening. The release member is stowed away before the release member is required to be used to release the distal member. An outer layer of a sleeve (2) is interposed between a proximal ring (4) and a guide member (51) to control pulling o...

  1. Comprehensive analysis of the HEPN superfamily: identification of novel roles in intra-genomic conflicts, defense, pathogenesis and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Vivek; Makarova, Kira S; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2013-06-15

    The major role of enzymatic toxins that target nucleic acids in biological conflicts at all levels has become increasingly apparent thanks in large part to the advances of comparative genomics. Typically, toxins evolve rapidly hampering the identification of these proteins by sequence analysis. Here we analyze an unexpectedly widespread superfamily of toxin domains most of which possess RNase activity. The HEPN superfamily is comprised of all α-helical domains that were first identified as being associated with DNA polymerase β-type nucleotidyltransferases in prokaryotes and animal Sacsin proteins. Using sensitive sequence and structure comparison methods, we vastly extend the HEPN superfamily by identifying numerous novel families and by detecting diverged HEPN domains in several known protein families. The new HEPN families include the RNase LS and LsoA catalytic domains, KEN domains (e.g. RNaseL and Ire1) and the RNase domains of RloC and PrrC. The majority of HEPN domains contain conserved motifs that constitute a metal-independent endoRNase active site. Some HEPN domains lacking this motif probably function as non-catalytic RNA-binding domains, such as in the case of the mannitol repressor MtlR. Our analysis shows that HEPN domains function as toxins that are shared by numerous systems implicated in intra-genomic, inter-genomic and intra-organismal conflicts across the three domains of cellular life. In prokaryotes HEPN domains are essential components of numerous toxin-antitoxin (TA) and abortive infection (Abi) systems and in addition are tightly associated with many restriction-modification (R-M) and CRISPR-Cas systems, and occasionally with other defense systems such as Pgl and Ter. We present evidence of multiple modes of action of HEPN domains in these systems, which include direct attack on viral RNAs (e.g. LsoA and RNase LS) in conjunction with other RNase domains (e.g. a novel RNase H fold domain, NamA), suicidal or dormancy-inducing attack on self

  2. Molecular systematics of the marine gastropod families Trochidae and Calliostomatidae (Mollusca: Superfamily Trochoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S T; Donald, K M; Spencer, H G; Nakano, T

    2010-03-01

    This study is the most extensive molecular study of the gastropod families Trochidae and Calliostomatidae published to date, in terms of both numbers of taxa and of gene sequences. As a result of Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of molecular sequence data from one nuclear gene and three mitochondrial genes, we propose dramatic changes to Trochidae family systematics, present the first molecular phylogeny for Calliostomatidae and include the first published sequence data for the enigmatic subfamily Thysanodontinae. Our phylogeny demonstrates that within the family Trochidae there is strong support for three subfamilies new to traditional classifications: Alcyninae subfam. nov., Fossarininae and Chrysostomatinae subfam. nov. As proposed, Alcyninae consists only of the nominotypical genus Alcyna, which is sister to all other trochids. The subfamily Fossarininae, as defined here, includes Fossarina, Broderipia, Synaptocochlea and "Roya"eximia and probably also Clydonochilus and Minopa. The subfamily Chrysostomatinae comprises the genera Chrysostoma and Chlorodiloma. Additional molecular support is also obtained for recently redefined Trochinae, Monodontinae, and Cantharidinae and for the traditionally recognised subfamilies Umboniinae and Stomatellinae. The subfamily Lirulariinae is not supported by the molecular data, but rather is incorporated into Umboniinae. We also demonstrate that the current concept of the subfamily Margaritinae (previously a trochid subfamily, but recently and provisionally assigned to Turbinidae) is not monophyletic. We provide preliminary evidence that whereas Margarella rosea (previously a member of Margaritinae) belongs in the trochid subfamily Cantharidinae, its presumptive congener M. antarctica is not a trochid, but instead clusters with the thysanodontine genus Carinastele. Based on the phylogenetic placement of C. kristelleae, we agree with previous proposals based on morphological data that Thysanodontinae are more closely related to

  3. Re-membering Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne

    2016-01-01

    -Soviet states into the “Eurovision” has been represented and discussed in Britain and Denmark, two countries with their own complex and complicated relationship to "Europe". Taking the cue from a growing scholarly production that argues for the importance of pop culture in the construction of social...... and political memories and perspectives (e.g. Couldry, Dittmer, Grey, Plate), this paper explores the ways that “Europe” is constructed and challenged in and by media in Denmark and Britain. The paper starts with a brief discussion of what the Eurovision Song Contest is and why it is an interesting framework......, Ukraine and Russia in order to explore how they are re-membered in relation to various perceptions of Europe....

  4. Members of Parliament on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.

    at political party meetings and at public meetings and hearings. However, the upcoming of new social media like Facebook provides new, interesting platforms for this conversation. And many opinion makers and scholars have high expectations for the democratic potential of these platforms. The paper examines...... what happens when traditional democratic conversations between citizens and politicians are moved away from the old face-to-face meetings and into Facebook. Through interviews with Danish Members of Parliament (MPs) the paper examines the advantages and disadvantages of online democratic conversations...... on Facebook as experienced by the MPs. The paper builds on a former quantitative mapping of the political conversation activities between Danish MPs and their followers on Facebook (Sørensen, 2015)....

  5. Depression: Supporting a Family Member or Friend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression: Supporting a family member or friend Help a family member or friend dealing with depression get treatment and find resources. By Mayo Clinic Staff Helping someone with depression can be a challenge. If someone in your ...

  6. Functional annotation and three-dimensional structure of an incorrectly annotated dihydroorotase from cog3964 in the amidohydrolase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Argentina; Korczynska, Magdalena; Ragumani, Sugadev; Kumaran, Desigan; Narindoshvili, Tamari; Shoichet, Brian K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Raushel, Frank M

    2013-01-08

    The substrate specificities of two incorrectly annotated enzymes belonging to cog3964 from the amidohydrolase superfamily were determined. This group of enzymes are currently misannotated as either dihydroorotases or adenine deaminases. Atu3266 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 and Oant2987 from Ochrobactrum anthropi ATCC 49188 were found to catalyze the hydrolysis of acetyl-(R)-mandelate and similar esters with values of k(cat)/K(m) that exceed 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). These enzymes do not catalyze the deamination of adenine or the hydrolysis of dihydroorotate. Atu3266 was crystallized and the structure determined to a resolution of 2.62 Å. The protein folds as a distorted (β/α)(8) barrel and binds two zincs in the active site. The substrate profile was determined via a combination of computational docking to the three-dimensional structure of Atu3266 and screening of a highly focused library of potential substrates. The initial weak hit was the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-D-serine (k(cat)/K(m) = 4 M(-1) s(-1)). This was followed by the progressive identification of acetyl-(R)-glycerate (k(cat)/K(m) = 4 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)), acetyl glycolate (k(cat)/K(m) = 1.3 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), and ultimately acetyl-(R)-mandelate (k(cat)/K(m) = 2.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)).

  7. Structures of C1q-like proteins reveal unique features among the C1q/TNF superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressl, Susanne; Vu, Brandon K; Vivona, Sandro; Martinelli, David C; Südhof, Thomas C; Brunger, Axel T

    2015-04-07

    C1q-like (C1QL) -1, -2, and -3 proteins are encoded by homologous genes that are highly expressed in brain. C1QLs bind to brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 3 (BAI3), an adhesion-type G-protein coupled receptor that may regulate dendritic morphology by organizing actin filaments. To begin to understand the function of C1QLs, we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the globular C1q-domains of C1QL1, C1QL2, and C1QL3. Each structure is a trimer, with each protomer forming a jelly-roll fold consisting of 10 β strands. Moreover, C1QL trimers may assemble into higher-order oligomers similar to adiponectin and contain four Ca(2+)-binding sites along the trimeric symmetry axis, as well as additional surface Ca(2+)-binding sites. Mutation of Ca(2+)-coordinating residues along the trimeric symmetry axis lowered the Ca(2+)-binding affinity and protein stability. Our results reveal unique structural features of C1QLs among C1q/TNF superfamily proteins that may be associated with their specific brain functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. SC1, an immunoglobulin-superfamily cell adhesion molecule, is involved in the brain metastatic activity of lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yuka; Kirimura, Naoki; Shiba, Hatsuki; Adachi, Kazuhide; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    SC1 is a cell adhesion molecule that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily; this molecule was initially purified from the chick embryonic nervous system and was reported to exhibit homophilic adhesion activity. SC1 is transiently expressed in various organs during development and has been identified in numerous neoplastic tissues, including lung cancer and colorectal carcinomas. The present study focused on the encephalic metastasis of lung cancer cells with respect to the potential function of SC1, as this molecule is known to be consistently expressed in the central nervous system as well as lung cancers. SC1 complementary DNA was introduced into A549 cells, a human lung cancer-derived cell line. The stable overexpression of the SC1 protein in A549 cells was demonstrated to enhance the self-aggregation of the cells. In addition, the SC1 transfectants enhanced the metastatic and invasive potential to the encephalic parenchyma following implantation into nude mice. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that cell adhesion due interactions between SC1 on brain tissue and SC1 on lung cancer cells was involved in the malignant aspects of lung cancer, including invasion and metastasis to the brain.

  9. GH97 is a new family of glycoside hydrolases, which is related to the α-galactosidase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumoff Daniil G

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a rule, about 1% of genes in a given genome encode glycoside hydrolases and their homologues. On the basis of sequence similarity they have been grouped into more than ninety GH families during the last 15 years. The GH97 family has been established very recently and initially included only 18 bacterial proteins. However, the evolutionary relationship of the genes encoding proteins of this family remains unclear, as well as their distribution among main groups of the living organisms. Results The extensive search of the current databases allowed us to double the number of GH97 family proteins. Five subfamilies were distinguished on the basis of pairwise sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis. Iterative sequence analysis revealed the relationship of the GH97 family with the GH27, GH31, and GH36 families of glycosidases, which belong to the α-galactosidase superfamily, as well as a more distant relationship with some other glycosidase families (GH13 and GH20. Conclusion The results of this study show an unexpected sequence similarity of GH97 family proteins with glycoside hydrolases from several other families, that have (β/α8-barrel fold of the catalytic domain and a retaining mechanism of the glycoside bond hydrolysis. These data suggest a common evolutionary origin of glycosidases representing different families and clans.

  10. Hind limb scaling of kangaroos and wallabies (superfamily Macropodoidea): implications for hopping performance, safety factor and elastic savings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, C P; Skinner, J; Biewener, A A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hind limb scaling of the musculoskeletal system in the Macropodoidea, the superfamily containing wallabies and kangaroos, to re-examine the effect of size on the locomotor mechanics and physiology of marsupial hopping. Morphometric musculoskeletal analyses were conducted of 15 species and skeletal specimens of 21 species spanning a size range from 0.8 to 80 kg that included representatives of 12 of the 16 extant genera of macropodoids. We found that unlike other groups, macropodoids are able to match force demands associated with increasing body size primarily through a combination of positive allometry in muscle area and muscle moment arms. Isometric scaling of primary hind limb bones suggests, however, that larger species experience relatively greater bone stresses. Muscle to tendon area ratios of the ankle extensors scale with strong positive allometry, indicating that peak tendon stresses also increase with increasing body size but to a lesser degree than previously reported. Consistent with previous morphological and experimental studies, large macropodoids are therefore better suited for elastic strain energy recovery but operate at lower safety factors, which likely poses an upper limit to body size. Scaling patterns for extant macropodoids suggest that extinct giant kangaroos (∼250 kg) were likely limited in locomotor capacity. PMID:18086129

  11. Hind limb scaling of kangaroos and wallabies (superfamily Macropodoidea): implications for hopping performance, safety factor and elastic savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, C P; Skinner, J; Biewener, A A

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hind limb scaling of the musculoskeletal system in the Macropodoidea, the superfamily containing wallabies and kangaroos, to re-examine the effect of size on the locomotor mechanics and physiology of marsupial hopping. Morphometric musculoskeletal analyses were conducted of 15 species and skeletal specimens of 21 species spanning a size range from 0.8 to 80 kg that included representatives of 12 of the 16 extant genera of macropodoids. We found that unlike other groups, macropodoids are able to match force demands associated with increasing body size primarily through a combination of positive allometry in muscle area and muscle moment arms. Isometric scaling of primary hind limb bones suggests, however, that larger species experience relatively greater bone stresses. Muscle to tendon area ratios of the ankle extensors scale with strong positive allometry, indicating that peak tendon stresses also increase with increasing body size but to a lesser degree than previously reported. Consistent with previous morphological and experimental studies, large macropodoids are therefore better suited for elastic strain energy recovery but operate at lower safety factors, which likely poses an upper limit to body size. Scaling patterns for extant macropodoids suggest that extinct giant kangaroos (approximately 250 kg) were likely limited in locomotor capacity.

  12. Regulation of WNT Signaling at the Neuromuscular Junction by the Immunoglobulin Superfamily Protein RIG-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pratima; Bhardwaj, Ashwani; Babu, Kavita

    2017-07-01

    Perturbations in synaptic function could affect the normal behavior of an animal, making it important to understand the regulatory mechanisms of synaptic signaling. Previous work has shown that in Caenorhabditis elegans an immunoglobulin superfamily protein, RIG-3, functions in presynaptic neurons to maintain normal acetylcholine receptor levels at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In this study, we elucidate the molecular and functional mechanism of RIG-3. We demonstrate by genetic and BiFC (Bi-molecular Fluorescence Complementation) assays that presynaptic RIG-3 functions by directly interacting with the immunoglobulin domain of the nonconventional Wnt receptor, ROR receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), CAM-1, which functions in postsynaptic body-wall muscles. This interaction in turn inhibits Wnt/LIN-44 signaling through the ROR/CAM-1 receptor, and allows for maintenance of normal acetylcholine receptor, AChR/ACR-16, levels at the neuromuscular synapse. Further, this work reveals that RIG-3 and ROR/CAM-1 function through the β-catenin/HMP-2 at the NMJ. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RIG-3 functions as an inhibitory molecule of the Wnt/LIN-44 signaling pathway through the RTK, CAM-1. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, José R.

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  14. 7 CFR 1215.3 - Board member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Board member. 1215.3 Section 1215.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... member. Board member means an officer or employee of a processor appointed by the Secretary to serve on...

  15. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COOPERATIVE MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS § 1425.14 Member... for marketing must be produced by its members for the CMA to obtain a loan or LDP for such crop. CCC...

  16. 76 FR 45724 - Clearing Member Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 1 and 23 RIN 3038-AD51 Clearing Member Risk Management AGENCY: Commodity Futures... are clearing members. DATES: Submit comments on or before September 30, 2011. ADDRESSES: You may... requirement that a DCO adopt rules addressing each clearing member's risk management policies and procedures...

  17. Mobilization's Impact on Army Reserve Family Members

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koplin, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... The primary focus of this paper is to identify the impact of mobilization on the family member, identify programs and initiatives that were implemented to diminish the impact of mobilization on the family member, and, finally, to draw conclusions about how well the Army Reserve programs and initiatives have addressed family member issues and concerns following mobilization.

  18. 33 CFR 5.25 - Honorary members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Honorary members. 5.25 Section 5... AUXILIARY § 5.25 Honorary members. For conspicuous service to or active interest in the Auxiliary, the Commandant may award any person with honorary membership in the Auxiliary. An honorary member of the...

  19. 75 FR 72872 - Performance Review Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... AFFAIRS Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Register of the appointment of Performance Review Board (PRB) members. This notice updates the VA... Review Board (PRB) Primary Board Members John U. Sep lveda, Assistant Secretary for Human Resources and...

  20. 78 FR 69097 - Performance Review Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Performance Review Board Members Title 5, U.S.C. Section 4314(c)(4) of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members... Service members of the Department of Health and Human Services. LAST NAME FIRST NAME ETZINGER MICHAEL...

  1. 76 FR 58277 - Performance Review Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Performance Review Board Members Title 5, U.S.C. Section 4314(c)(4) of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members... Service members of the Department of Health and Human Services. Joel S. Ario, Julia G. Bataille, Mirtha R...

  2. 77 FR 71873 - Performance Review Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... AFFAIRS Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: Corporate Senior Executive Management Office, Department... Board (PRB) members. This notice announces the appointment of persons to serve on the Performance Review... follows: Primary Board Members Jose Riojas, Assistant Secretary for Operations, Security, and Preparedness...

  3. 77 FR 61755 - Performance Review Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Performance Review Board Members Title 5 U.S.C. 4314(c)(4) of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members be... members of the Department of Health and Human Services. Employee last name Employee first name ARONSON...

  4. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to, such...

  5. 42 CFR 412.246 - MGCRB members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false MGCRB members. 412.246 Section 412.246 Public... Board Composition and Procedures § 412.246 MGCRB members. (a) Composition. The Medicare Geographical Classification Review Board (MGCRB) consists of five members, including a Chairman, all of whom are appointed by...

  6. 29 CFR 452.90 - Visiting members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visiting members. 452.90 Section 452.90 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Right To Vote § 452.90 Visiting members. A decision about the voting rights of visiting members is properly one for resolution by the union in accordance with the organization's constitution and...

  7. 78 FR 69093 - Performance Review Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Performance Review Board Members AGENCY... Health and Human Services (HHS) is publishing the names of the Performance Review Board Members who are... of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members be...

  8. The X-ray Crystallographic Structure and Specificity profile of HAD Superfamily Phosphohydrolase BT1666: Comparison of Paralogous Functions in B. thetaiotaomicron†

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhibing; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Karen N Allen

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) has uncovered homologues occurring within the same organism that are found to possess broad, overlapping substrate specificities and low catalytic efficiencies. Here we compare the HADSF phosphatase BT1666 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 to a homologue with high sequence identity (40%) from the same organism BT4131, a known hexose-phosphate phosphatase. The goal is to find if these enzymes represent duplicated versus pa...

  9. Superfamilies SDR and MDR: from early ancestry to present forms. Emergence of three lines, a Zn-metalloenzyme, and distinct variabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörnvall, Hans; Hedlund, Joel; Bergman, Tomas; Oppermann, Udo; Persson, Bengt

    2010-05-21

    Two large gene and protein superfamilies, SDR and MDR (short- and medium-chain dehydrogenases/reductases), were originally defined from analysis of alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases. The superfamilies contain minimally 82 and 25 genes, respectively, in humans, minimally 324 and 86 enzyme families when known lines in other organisms are also included, and over 47,000 and 15,000 variants in existing sequence data bank entries. SDR enzymes have one-domain subunits without metal and MDR two-domain subunits without or with zinc, and these three lines appear to have emerged in that order from the universal cellular ancestor. This is compatible with their molecular architectures, present multiplicity, and overall distribution in the kingdoms of life, with SDR also of viral occurrence. An MDR-zinc, when present, is often, but not always, catalytic. It appears also to have a structural role in inter-domain interactions, coenzyme binding and substrate pocket formation, as supported by domain variability ratios and ligand positions. Differences among structural and catalytic zinc ions may be relative and involve several states. Combined, the comparisons trace evolutionary properties of huge superfamilies, with partially redundant enzymes in cellular redox functions. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bifunctional phosphoglucose/phosphomannose isomerases from the Archaea Aeropyrum pernix and Thermoplasma acidophilum constitute a novel enzyme family within the phosphoglucose isomerase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Wendorff, Daniel; Schönheit, Peter

    2004-01-16

    The hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix contains phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) activity. However, obvious homologs with significant identity to known PGIs could not be identified in the sequenced genome of this organism. The PGI activity from A. pernix was purified and characterized. Kinetic analysis revealed that, unlike all known PGIs, the enzyme catalyzed reversible isomerization not only of glucose 6-phosphate but also of epimeric mannose 6-phosphate at similar catalytic efficiency, thus defining the protein as bifunctional phosphoglucose/phosphomannose isomerase (PGI/PMI). The gene pgi/pmi encoding PGI/PMI (open reading frame APE0768) was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analyses; the gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as functional PGI/PMI. Putative PGI/PMI homologs were identified in several (hyper)thermophilic archaea and two bacteria. The homolog from Thermoplasma acidophilum (Ta1419) was overexpressed in E. coli, and the recombinant enzyme was characterized as bifunctional PGI/PMI. PGI/PMIs showed low sequence identity to the PGI superfamily and formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster. However, secondary structure predictions and the presence of several conserved amino acids potentially involved in catalysis indicate some structural and functional similarity to the PGI superfamily. Thus, we propose that bifunctional PGI/PMI constitutes a novel protein family within the PGI superfamily.

  11. Members of the LHC Resources Review Boards

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Members of the LHCRRB visiting Point 2, hosting the ALICE experiment From l. to r. : W. Korda, Head of the VIP Office; P. Rimmer, CERN public relations, J. Seed, Member of the LHCRRB, J.-P. Revol, ALICE CERN Team Leader; J. Bartke, Member of the LHCRRB; F. Suransky, Member of the LHCRRB; J. Schukraft, Spokesperson, ALICE experiment and S. Molinari, VIP Office. Photo 02: Members of the LHC Resources Review Boards visiting the ALICE magnet at Point 2. L. to. r.: O. Dines-Hansen, H. Boggild, S. Irgens-Jensens, H.A. Gustafsson Photo 03: Members of the LHCRRB visiting Point 2, hosting the ALICE experiment From l. t to r.: J.Richter, Member of the LHCRRB; H. Gutbrod, Deputy Spokesperson, ALICE experiment; G. Paic, ALICE experiment; D. Muller, Member of the LHCRRB; P. Brau-Munzinger, ALICE experiment; R. Santo, Member of the LHCRRB, A. Van Rijn, Member of the LHCRRB; J. Engelen, Member of the LHCRRB.

  12. [Identification of a novel human MAST4 gene, a new member of the microtubule associated serine-threonine kinase family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Gu, S; Li, X; Sun, Y; Zheng, D; Yu, K; Ji, C; Tang, R; Xie, Y; Mao, Y

    2006-01-01

    Human protein kinases make up a large superfamily of homologous proteins, which are related by virtue of their kinase domains (also known as catalytic domains). Here we report the cloning and characterization of a novel human MAST4 (microtubule associated serine/threonine kinase family member 4) gene, which locates on human chromosome 5q13. The MAST4 cDNA is 7587 base pairs in length and encodes a putative protein of 2435 amino acids which contains a serine/threonine kinase domain and a PDZ domain. MAST4 protein has 64%, 63%, 59% and 39% identical aminoacid residues with MAST1, MAST2, MAST3 and MASTL respectively. RT-PCR analysis revealed relatively high expression level of MAST4 in most normal human tissues, with an exception of in testis, small intestine, colon and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  13. A role for calcium in the regulation of ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C, member 3 (ABCC3) gene expression in a model of epidermal growth factor-mediated breast cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Azimi, Iman; Thompson, Erik W; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-03-13

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process implicated in cancer metastasis, is associated with the transcriptional regulation of members of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux pumps, and drug resistance in breast cancer cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EMT in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent. In this study induction of EMT was shown to result in the transcriptional up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C, member 3 (ABCC3), a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, which has a recognized role in multidrug resistance. Buffering of cytosolic free calcium inhibited EGF-mediated ABCC3 increases, indicating a calcium-dependent mode of regulation. Silencing of TRPM7 (an ion channel involved in EMT associated vimentin induction) did not inhibit ABCC3 up-regulation. Silencing of the store operated calcium entry (SOCE) pathway components ORAI1 and STIM1 also did not alter ABCC3 induction by EGF. However, the calcium permeable ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 1 (TRPC1) appears to contribute to the regulation of both basal and EGF-induced ABCC3 mRNA. Improved understanding of the relationship between calcium signaling, EMT and the regulation of genes important in therapeutic resistance may help identify novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Type II restriction endonuclease R.Hpy188I belongs to the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily, but exhibits an unusual active site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Ichizo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catalytic domains of Type II restriction endonucleases (REases belong to a few unrelated three-dimensional folds. While the PD-(D/EXK fold is most common among these enzymes, crystal structures have been also determined for single representatives of two other folds: PLD (R.BfiI and half-pipe (R.PabI. Bioinformatics analyses supported by mutagenesis experiments suggested that some REases belong to the HNH fold (e.g. R.KpnI, and that a small group represented by R.Eco29kI belongs to the GIY-YIG fold. However, for a large fraction of REases with known sequences, the three-dimensional fold and the architecture of the active site remain unknown, mostly due to extreme sequence divergence that hampers detection of homology to enzymes with known folds. Results R.Hpy188I is a Type II REase with unknown structure. PSI-BLAST searches of the non-redundant protein sequence database reveal only 1 homolog (R.HpyF17I, with nearly identical amino acid sequence and the same DNA sequence specificity. Standard application of state-of-the-art protein fold-recognition methods failed to predict the relationship of R.Hpy188I to proteins with known structure or to other protein families. In order to increase the amount of evolutionary information in the multiple sequence alignment, we have expanded our sequence database searches to include sequences from metagenomics projects. This search resulted in identification of 23 further members of R.Hpy188I family, both from metagenomics and the non-redundant database. Moreover, fold-recognition analysis of the extended R.Hpy188I family revealed its relationship to the GIY-YIG domain and allowed for computational modeling of the R.Hpy188I structure. Analysis of the R.Hpy188I model in the light of sequence conservation among its homologs revealed an unusual variant of the active site, in which the typical Tyr residue of the YIG half-motif had been substituted by a Lys residue. Moreover, some of its homologs

  15. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Xiaoming; Li, Ying; Hou, Xilin

    2013-01-01

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) is a member of one of the most important leaf vegetables grown worldwide, which has experienced thousands of years in cultivation and artificial selection...

  16. Novel evolutionary lineages of the invertebrate oxytocin/vasopressin superfamily peptides and their receptors in the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Atsuhiro; Satake, Honoo; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Minakata, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, is the first invertebrate species that was shown to possess two oxytocin/vasopressin (OT/VP) superfamily peptides, octopressin (OP) and cephalotocin (CT). Previously, we cloned a GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor) specific to CT [CTR1 (CT receptor 1)]. In the present study, we have identified an additional CTR, CTR2, and a novel OP receptor, OPR. Both CTR2 and OPR include domains and motifs typical of GPCRs, and the intron– exon structures are in accord with those of OT/VP receptor genes. CTR2 and OPR expressed in Xenopus oocytes induced calcium-mediated inward chloride current in a CT- and OP-specific manner respectively. Several regions and residues, which are requisite for binding of the vertebrate OT/VP receptor family with their ligands, are highly conserved in CTRs, but not in OPR. These different sequences between CTRs and OPR, as well as the amino acid residues of OP and CT at positions 2–5, were presumed to play crucial roles in the binding selectivity to their receptors, whereas the difference in the polarity of OT/VP family peptide residues at position 8 confers OT and VP with the binding specificity in vertebrates. CTR2 mRNA was present in various peripheral tissues, and OPR mRNA was detected in both the nervous system and peripheral tissues. Our findings suggest that the CT and OP genes, similar to the OT/VP family, evolved through duplication, but the ligand–receptor selectivity were established through different evolutionary lineages from those of their vertebrate counterparts. PMID:15504101

  17. The phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a unique glycolytic enzyme that belongs to the cupin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhees, C H; Huynen, M A; Ward, D E; Schiltz, E; de Vos, W M; van der Oost, J

    2001-11-02

    Pyrococcus furiosus uses a variant of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway during growth on sugars. All but one of the genes that encode the glycolytic enzymes of P. furiosus have previously been identified, either by homology searching of its genome or by reversed genetics. We here report the isolation of the missing link of the pyrococcal glycolysis, the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), which was purified to homogeneity from P. furiosus and biochemically characterized. The P. furiosus PGI, a dimer of identical 23.5-kDa subunits, catalyzes the reversible isomerization of glucose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate, with K(m) values of 1.99 and 0.63 mm, respectively. An optimum pH of 7.0 has been determined in both directions, and at its optimum temperature of 90 degrees C the enzyme has a half-life of 2.4 h. The N-terminal sequence was used for the identification of the pgiA gene in the P. furiosus genome. The pgiA transcription start site has been determined, and a monocistronic messenger was detected in P. furiosus during growth on maltose and pyruvate. The pgiA gene was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The deduced amino acid sequence of this first archaeal PGI revealed that it is not related to its bacterial and eukaryal counterparts. In contrast, this archaeal PGI shares similarity with the cupin superfamily that consists of a variety of proteins that are generally involved in sugar metabolism in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. As for the P. furiosus PGI, distinct phylogenetic origins have previously been reported for other enzymes from the pyrococcal glycolytic pathway. Apparently, convergent evolution by recruitment of several unique enzymes has resulted in the unique Pyrococcus glycolysis.

  18. Realm of PD-(D/EXK nuclease superfamily revisited: detection of novel families with modified transitive meta profile searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knizewski Lukasz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PD-(D/EXK nucleases constitute a large and highly diverse superfamily of enzymes that display little sequence similarity despite retaining a common core fold and a few critical active site residues. This makes identification of new PD-(D/EXK nuclease families a challenging task as they usually escape detection with standard sequence-based methods. We developed a modified transitive meta profile search approach and to consider the structural diversity of PD-(D/EXK nuclease fold more thoroughly we analyzed also lower than threshold Meta-BASIC hits to select potentially correct predictions placed among unreliable or incorrect ones. Results Application of a modified transitive Meta-BASIC searches on updated PFAM families and PDB structures resulted in detection of five new PD-(D/EXK nuclease families encompassing hundreds of so far uncharacterized and poorly annotated proteins. These include four families catalogued in PFAM database as domains of unknown function (DUF506, DUF524, DUF1626 and DUF1703 and YhgA-like family of putative transposases. Three of these families represent extremely distant homologs (DUF506, DUF524, and YhgA-like, while two are newly defined in updated database (DUF1626 and DUF1703. In addition, we also confidently identified an extended AAA-ATPase domain in the N-terminal region of DUF1703 family proteins. Conclusion Obtained results suggest that detailed analysis of below threshold Meta-BASIC hits may push limits further for distant homology detection in the 'midnight zone' of homology. All identified families conserve the core evolutionary fold, secondary structure and hydrophobic patterns common to existing PD-(D/EXK nucleases and maintain critical active site motifs that contribute to nucleic acid cleavage. Further experimental investigations should address the predicted activity and clarify potential substrates providing further insight into detailed biological role of these newly detected nucleases.

  19. Expression of the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules in the developing spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zirong; Imai, Fumiyasu; Kim, In Jung; Fujita, Hiroko; Katayama, Kei ichi; Mori, Kensaku; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control synaptic specificity through hetero- or homophilic interactions in different regions of the nervous system. In the developing spinal cord, monosynaptic connections of exquisite specificity form between proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons, however, it is not known whether IgSF molecules participate in regulating this process. To determine whether IgSF molecules influence the establishment of synaptic specificity in sensory-motor circuits, we examined the expression of 157 IgSF genes in the developing dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord by in situ hybridization assays. We find that many IgSF genes are expressed by sensory and motor neurons in the mouse developing DRG and spinal cord. For instance, Alcam, Mcam, and Ocam are expressed by a subset of motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Further analyses show that Ocam is expressed by obturator but not quadriceps motor neurons, suggesting that Ocam may regulate sensory-motor specificity in these sensory-motor reflex arcs. Electrophysiological analysis shows no obvious defects in synaptic specificity of monosynaptic sensory-motor connections involving obturator and quadriceps motor neurons in Ocam mutant mice. Since a subset of Ocam+ motor neurons also express Alcam, Alcam or other functionally redundant IgSF molecules may compensate for Ocam in controlling sensory-motor specificity. Taken together, these results reveal that IgSF molecules are broadly expressed by sensory and motor neurons during development, and that Ocam and other IgSF molecules may have redundant functions in controlling the specificity of sensory-motor circuits.

  20. Expression of the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules in the developing spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zirong Gu

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF control synaptic specificity through hetero- or homophilic interactions in different regions of the nervous system. In the developing spinal cord, monosynaptic connections of exquisite specificity form between proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons, however, it is not known whether IgSF molecules participate in regulating this process. To determine whether IgSF molecules influence the establishment of synaptic specificity in sensory-motor circuits, we examined the expression of 157 IgSF genes in the developing dorsal root ganglion (DRG and spinal cord by in situ hybridization assays. We find that many IgSF genes are expressed by sensory and motor neurons in the mouse developing DRG and spinal cord. For instance, Alcam, Mcam, and Ocam are expressed by a subset of motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Further analyses show that Ocam is expressed by obturator but not quadriceps motor neurons, suggesting that Ocam may regulate sensory-motor specificity in these sensory-motor reflex arcs. Electrophysiological analysis shows no obvious defects in synaptic specificity of monosynaptic sensory-motor connections involving obturator and quadriceps motor neurons in Ocam mutant mice. Since a subset of Ocam+ motor neurons also express Alcam, Alcam or other functionally redundant IgSF molecules may compensate for Ocam in controlling sensory-motor specificity. Taken together, these results reveal that IgSF molecules are broadly expressed by sensory and motor neurons during development, and that Ocam and other IgSF molecules may have redundant functions in controlling the specificity of sensory-motor circuits.

  1. Leader Trust, Competence, LMX, and Member Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Gukdo; Dai, Ye; Lee, Soojin; Kang, Seungwan

    2017-01-01

    Based on social exchange theory, this study examines the influence of leaders' trusting behavior and competence in in-role activities on members' perceived leader-member exchange (LMX) relationships. Our study proposes that a leader's trust in a member contributes to the member's perceived LMX, and that the leader's competence in in-role activities moderates this relationship. Furthermore, our study suggests that perceived LMX mediates the relationship between the leader's trust and members' task performance. Finally, the study proposes that the leader's competence moderates the mediating role of LMX in transmitting the effect of the leader's trust on members' task performance. Analyses of the data collected from soldiers and platoon leaders in the South Korean army support these hypotheses.

  2. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Deployed Military Members 5b. GRANT NUMBER HU0001-10-1-TS10 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER N10-P20 Wilson...training literature of new recruits or accessions, the rate of ID and IDA was a significant health risk to these military members . It was surmised...study inform nurses and health care professionals that are involved in the deployment preparation of military members . They should target assessing

  3. The structure of BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus reveals a superfamily of bacterial periplasmic proteins with possible inhibitory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debanu; Finn, Robert D; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    Proteins that contain the DUF2874 domain constitute a new Pfam family PF11396. Members of this family have predominantly been identified in microbes found in the human gut and oral cavity. The crystal structure of one member of this family, BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus, has been determined, revealing a β-lactamase inhibitor protein-like structure with a tandem repeat of domains. Sequence analysis and structural comparisons reveal that BVU2987 and other DUF2874 proteins are related to β-lactamase inhibitor protein, PepSY and SmpA_OmlA proteins and hence are likely to function as inhibitory proteins.

  4. KinMutRF: a random forest classifier of sequence variants in the human protein kinase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Tirso; Vazquez, Miguel; Matey-Hernandez, María Luisa; Brunak, Søren; Valencia, Alfonso; Izarzugaza, Jose Mg

    2016-06-23

    The association between aberrant signal processing by protein kinases and human diseases such as cancer was established long time ago. However, understanding the link between sequence variants in the protein kinase superfamily and the mechanistic complex traits at the molecular level remains challenging: cells tolerate most genomic alterations and only a minor fraction disrupt molecular function sufficiently and drive disease. KinMutRF is a novel random-forest method to automatically identify pathogenic variants in human kinases. Twenty six decision trees implemented as a random forest ponder a battery of features that characterize the variants: a) at the gene level, including membership to a Kinbase group and Gene Ontology terms; b) at the PFAM domain level; and c) at the residue level, the types of amino acids involved, changes in biochemical properties, functional annotations from UniProt, Phospho.ELM and FireDB. KinMutRF identifies disease-associated variants satisfactorily (Acc: 0.88, Prec:0.82, Rec:0.75, F-score:0.78, MCC:0.68) when trained and cross-validated with the 3689 human kinase variants from UniProt that have been annotated as neutral or pathogenic. All unclassified variants were excluded from the training set. Furthermore, KinMutRF is discussed with respect to two independent kinase-specific sets of mutations no included in the training and testing, Kin-Driver (643 variants) and Pon-BTK (1495 variants). Moreover, we provide predictions for the 848 protein kinase variants in UniProt that remained unclassified. A public implementation of KinMutRF, including documentation and examples, is available online ( http://kinmut2.bioinfo.cnio.es ). The source code for local installation is released under a GPL version 3 license, and can be downloaded from https://github.com/Rbbt-Workflows/KinMut2 . KinMutRF is capable of classifying kinase variation with good performance. Predictions by KinMutRF compare favorably in a benchmark with other state

  5. Characterization of transforming growth factor beta superfamily, growth factors, transcriptional factors, and lipopolysaccharide in bovine cystic ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, I M; Alçiğir, E; Pekcan, M; Vural, S A; Özenç, E; Canatan, H E; Küplülü, Ş; Dal, G E; Yazlik, M O; Baklaci, C; Vural, M R

    2015-10-01

    The process of transformation of growing bovine follicles into cysts is still a mystery. Local expression of proteins or factors, including transforming growth factor β, growth factors, and transcription factors, plays a central role in mammals. Therefore, in abattoir-derived cystic ovarian follicles and follicular fluid, the role of some transforming growth factor β superfamily proteins, insulinlike growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and GATA-4 and GATA-6, were investigated. The relationship between intrafollicular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and etiopathogenesis of ovarian cysts was also assessed. Data on the preovulatory follicle and the largest follicle (F1) were compared. The number of intrafollicular LPS-positive samples and LPS concentrations were higher in cysts. Immunohistochemical staining was mildly positive for IGF-1, inhibin alpha, and GATA-4 in thecal cells. Staining for anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), growth differentiation factor-9, bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6), and GATA-6 was insufficient for their quantitation, and oocytes could not be stained for any of the proteins tested in the cystic follicles. Expression of BMP-6, inhibin alpha, and IGF-1 was moderately higher in granulosa cells of F1 follicles, and all the proteins were moderately expressed in granulosa cells in preovulatory follicles. However, loss of GATA-6 staining was significant in F1 follicles. Intrafollicular progesterone, IGF-1, and AMH concentrations in cysts and F1 follicles were significantly higher than those in preovulatory follicles. Western blot analyses revealed that follicular fluid inhibin-α was strongly expressed, whereas expression of growth differentiation factor-9, BMP-6, GATA-4 and GATA-6 was lower in cysts than in preovulatory follicles. Also, high intrafollicular AMH concentration and low BMP-6 expression were closely associated with cystic degeneration and atresia. In conclusion, immunohistochemical loss of BMP-6 and GATA-6 in the granulosa cells together with high

  6. Fraternity Member Reflections about Civic Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Malinda M.; Biddix, J. Patrick; Arsenoff, Sarah; Keller, Teal; Dusendang, Jennifer; Martin, Darin

    2016-01-01

    Fraternity members are exposed to developmental opportunities through service, leadership, and involvement, guided by organizational values. The purpose of this study was to learn more about how members interpret their experiences in relation to civic values. Data sources were responses from essays (n = 196) written by graduate and undergraduate…

  7. Understanding and Limiting School Board Member Liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Terry; Jones, Stephanie; Purvis, Mary L.; Rubin, David B.; Thrasher, Doralee; Underwood, Julie; Watkins, W. David

    This book is a primer on board-member liability issues and is intended for both board members and school attorneys. The first chapter, "The Legal System," examines federal sources of legal authority, state and local sources of legal authority, and federal and state judicial structures. Liability under state tort law is the subject of chapter 2,…

  8. Fire resistance of exposed wood members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White

    2004-01-01

    Fire resistance data on exposed wood beams and columns are plentiful, but few studies have been done on exposed wood members in tension and in decks. To provide data to verify the application of a new calculation procedure, a limited series of fire resistance tests were conducted on wood members loaded in tension and on exposed wood decks.

  9. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... group (grower or handler) as the member. In the event of the death, removal, resignation or... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 930.28 Section 930.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  10. Faculty Members' Instructional Priorities for Adopting OER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Hong, Seongyoun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate and classify faculty members' instructional priorities for adopting OER. In-depth interview data were collected from 10 faculty members from different regions and analyzed with NVivo 10. The original supposition was that the well-established instructional priorities, effectiveness, efficiency, and appeal would…

  11. 29 CFR 452.93 - Retired members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retired members. 452.93 Section 452.93 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS... OF 1959 Right To Vote § 452.93 Retired members. The right of retirees to vote may be restricted to...

  12. Family Therapy with Deaf Member Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloman, Leon; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines how family therapists can be more responsive to the unique needs and problems of deaf family members. Compares methods of training in communication for deaf children, addressing the conflicts that may accompany the adoption of a given method. Stresses the pivotal role of communication problems between hearing and deaf family members in…

  13. Comparative genomics of the FtsK-HerA superfamily of pumping ATPases: implications for the origins of chromosome segregation, cell division and viral capsid packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Makarova, Kira S; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2004-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that a predicted P-loop ATPase (the HerA or MlaA protein), which is highly conserved in archaea and also present in many bacteria but absent in eukaryotes, has a bidirectional helicase activity and forms hexameric rings similar to those described for the TrwB ATPase. In this study, the FtsK-HerA superfamily of P-loop ATPases, in which the HerA clade comprises one of the major branches, is analyzed in detail. We show that, in addition to the FtsK and HerA clades, this superfamily includes several families of characterized or predicted ATPases which are predominantly involved in extrusion of DNA and peptides through membrane pores. The DNA-packaging ATPases of various bacteriophages and eukaryotic double-stranded DNA viruses also belong to the FtsK-HerA superfamily. The FtsK protein is the essential bacterial ATPase that is responsible for the correct segregation of daughter chromosomes during cell division. The structural and evolutionary relationship between HerA and FtsK and the nearly perfect complementarity of their phyletic distributions suggest that HerA similarly mediates DNA pumping into the progeny cells during archaeal cell division. It appears likely that the HerA and FtsK families diverged concomitantly with the archaeal-bacterial division and that the last universal common ancestor of modern life forms had an ancestral DNA-pumping ATPase that gave rise to these families. Furthermore, the relationship of these cellular proteins with the packaging ATPases of diverse DNA viruses suggests that a common DNA pumping mechanism might be operational in both cellular and viral genome segregation. The herA gene forms a highly conserved operon with the gene for the NurA nuclease and, in many archaea, also with the orthologs of eukaryotic double-strand break repair proteins MRE11 and Rad50. HerA is predicted to function in a complex with these proteins in DNA pumping and repair of double-stranded breaks introduced during this process and

  14. Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry to Define the Specific Interactions of the Phospholipase A2 Superfamily with Lipid Substrates, Inhibitors, and Membranes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Burke, John E.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) superfamily consists of 16 groups and many subgroups and constitutes a diverse set of enzymes that have a common catalytic activity due to convergent evolution. However, different PLA2 types have unique three-dimensional structures and catalytic residues as well as specific tissue localization and distinct biological functions. Understanding how the different PLA2 enzymes associate with phospholipid membranes, specific phospholipid substrate molecules, and inhibitors on a molecular basis has advanced in recent years due to the introduction of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Its theory, practical considerations, and application to understanding PLA2/membrane interactions are addressed. PMID:23209293

  15. Deubiquitinating activity of Sdu1, a putative member of the PPPDE peptidase family, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunsik; Jo, Hannah; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2013-12-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe sdu⁺ gene encoding a putative member of the PPPDE (Permuted Papain fold Peptidases of DsRNA viruses and Eukaryotes) superfamily was cloned into an Escherichia coli - yeast shuttle vector pRS316, resulting in the recombinant plasmid pYSTP. The determined nucleotide sequence carries 1207 bp, which would encode a protein of 201 amino acid residues. The S. pombe cells harboring pYSTP contained higher sdu1⁺ mRNA and deubiquitinating activity levels than the vector control cells, indicating that the sdu1⁺ gene is functioning. They exhibited a better growth in normal rich medium than the vector control cells. When shifted into the fresh medium containing hydrogen peroxide, menadione, or sodium nitroprusside, the S. pombe cells harboring pYSTP were able to grow reasonably well, while the growth of the vector control cells was arrested. The reactive oxygen species and total glutathione levels of the S. pombe cells harboring pYSTP were lower and higher than those of the vector control cells under the same stressful conditions, respectively. They exhibited a lower nitric oxide level than the vector control cells when subjected to sodium nitroprusside. Taken together, the sdu1⁺ gene encodes an actual protein having deubiquitinating activity and is involved in the response against oxidative and nitrosative stresses in S. pombe.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana NIP7;1: An Anther-Specific Boric Acid Transporter of the Aquaporin Superfamily Regulated by an Unusual Tyrosine in Helix 2 of the Transport Pore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tian [ORNL; Choi, Won-Gyu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Roberts, Daniel M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Plant nodulin-26 intrinsic proteins (NIPs) are members of the aquaporin superfamily that serve as multifunctional transporters of uncharged metabolites. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a specific NIP pore subclass, known as the NIP II proteins, is represented by AtNIP5;1 and AtNIP6;1, which encode channel proteins expressed in roots and leaf nodes, respectively, that participate in the transport of the critical cell wall nutrient boric acid. Modeling of the protein encoded by the AtNIP7;1 gene shows that it is a third member of the NIP II pore subclass in Arabidopsis. However, unlike AtNIP5;1 and AtNIP6;1 proteins, which form constitutive boric acid channels, AtNIP7;1 forms a channel with an extremely low intrinsic boric acid transport activity. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of AtNIP7;1 suggest that a conserved tyrosine residue (Tyr81) located in transmembrane helix 2 adjacent to the aromatic arginine (ar/R) pore selectivity region stabilizes a closed pore conformation through interaction with the canonical Arg220 in ar/R region. Substitution of Tyr81 with a Cys residue, characteristic of established NIP boric acid channels, results in opening of the AtNIP7;1 pore that acquires a robust, transport activity for boric acid as well as other NIP II test solutes (glycerol and urea). Substitution of a Phe for Tyr81 also opens the channel, supporting the prediction from MD simulations that hydrogen bond interaction between the Tyr81 phenol group and the ar/R Arg may contribute to the stabilization of a closed pore state. Expression analyses show that AtNIP7;1 is selectively expressed in developing anther tissues of young floral buds of A. thaliana, principally in developing pollen grains of stage 9 11 anthers. Because boric acid is both an essential nutrient as well as a toxic compound at high concentrations, it is proposed that Tyr81 modulates transport and may provide an additional level of regulation for this transporter in male gametophyte development.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana NIP7;1: an anther-specific boric acid transporter of the aquaporin superfamily regulated by an unusual tyrosine in helix 2 of the transport pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian; Choi, Won-Gyu; Wallace, Ian S; Baudry, Jerome; Roberts, Daniel M

    2011-08-09

    Plant nodulin-26 intrinsic proteins (NIPs) are members of the aquaporin superfamily that serve as multifunctional transporters of uncharged metabolites. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a specific NIP pore subclass, known as the NIP II proteins, is represented by AtNIP5;1 and AtNIP6;1, which encode channel proteins expressed in roots and leaf nodes, respectively, that participate in the transport of the critical cell wall nutrient boric acid. Modeling of the protein encoded by the AtNIP7;1 gene shows that it is a third member of the NIP II pore subclass in Arabidopsis. However, unlike AtNIP5;1 and AtNIP6;1 proteins, which form constitutive boric acid channels, AtNIP7;1 forms a channel with an extremely low intrinsic boric acid transport activity. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of AtNIP7;1 suggest that a conserved tyrosine residue (Tyr81) located in transmembrane helix 2 adjacent to the aromatic arginine (ar/R) pore selectivity region stabilizes a closed pore conformation through interaction with the canonical Arg220 in ar/R region. Substitution of Tyr81 with a Cys residue, characteristic of established NIP boric acid channels, results in opening of the AtNIP7;1 pore that acquires a robust, transport activity for boric acid as well as other NIP II test solutes (glycerol and urea). Substitution of a Phe for Tyr81 also opens the channel, supporting the prediction from MD simulations that hydrogen bond interaction between the Tyr81 phenol group and the ar/R Arg may contribute to the stabilization of a closed pore state. Expression analyses show that AtNIP7;1 is selectively expressed in developing anther tissues of young floral buds of A. thaliana, principally in developing pollen grains of stage 9-11 anthers. Because boric acid is both an essential nutrient as well as a toxic compound at high concentrations, it is proposed that Tyr81 modulates transport and may provide an additional level of regulation for this transporter in male gametophyte development

  18. How Not to Be a Terrible School Board Member: Lessons for School Administrators and Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Veteran school board member, Richard E. Mayer, takes a humorous but substantive approach to the serious relationship between school administrators and board members. While the overwhelming majority of school board members have good motives, even people who mean well can make bad moves. This book shows how to prevent good intentions from creating…

  19. Leader-Member Exchange, the "Pelz Effect," and Cooperative Communication between Group Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaesub

    1997-01-01

    Explores effects of differential quality of leader-member exchange on cooperative communication among work group members. Suggests that the nature of an individual's exchange with his/her leader and his/her leader's upward leader-member exchange significantly impact perceived use of coworker cooperative communication. Provides evidence of linkage…

  20. Member states buoy up beleagured EMBL

    CERN Multimedia

    Balter, M

    1999-01-01

    EMBL's governing council, made up of delegates from the lab's 16 member countries, agreed in principle to meet the costs of a multimillion-dollar pay claim, the result of a recent ruling by the ILO in Geneva (1 page).

  1. Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program Member Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program (PESP) handbook is a resource with information to help prospective members to learn about PESP, to understand how the program works, and to assist in applying for membership.

  2. Israel, CERN’s new Member State

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 15 January 2014, the official Israeli Flag-raising Ceremony took place to mark the accession of Israel to Membership of CERN, bringing the Organization’s number of Member States to 21.

  3. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  4. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  5. Roles and Responsibilities for Web Council Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members represent their Region or AAship on the Web Council, act as a primary point of contact, coordinate Regional/AAship web development within broader Agency efforts including One EPA Web standards and best practices, and have other responsibilites.

  6. Team Members | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Team Members The Foregut Team includes experts in the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases listed below. Our clinical experience and active research offers patients the highest quality care in the setting of groundbreaking clinical trials.

  7. Defense mechanisms against herbivory in Picea: sequence evolution and expression regulation of gene family members in the phenylpropanoid pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porth Ilga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In trees, a substantial amount of carbon is directed towards production of phenolics for development and defense. This metabolic pathway is also a major factor in resistance to insect pathogens in spruce. In such gene families, environmental stimuli may have an important effect on the evolutionary fate of duplicated genes, and different expression patterns may indicate functional diversification. Results Gene families in spruce (Picea have expanded to superfamilies, including O-methyltransferases, cytochrome-P450, and dirigents/classIII-peroxidases. Neo-functionalization of superfamily members from different clades is reflected in expression diversification. Genetical genomics can provide new insights into the genetic basis and evolution of insect resistance in plants. Adopting this approach, we merged genotype data (252 SNPs in a segregating pedigree, gene expression levels (for 428 phenylpropanoid-related genes and measures of susceptibility to Pissodes stobi, using a partial-diallel crossing-design with white spruce (Picea glauca. Thirty-eight expressed phenylpropanoid-related genes co-segregated with weevil susceptibility, indicating either causative or reactive effects of these genes to weevil resistance. We identified eight regulatory genomic regions with extensive overlap of quantitative trait loci from susceptibility and growth phenotypes (pQTLs and expression QTL (eQTL hotspots. In particular, SNPs within two different CCoAOMT loci regulate phenotypic variation from a common set of 24 genes and three resistance traits. Conclusions Pest resistance was associated with individual candidate genes as well as with trans-regulatory hotspots along the spruce genome. Our results showed that specific genes within the phenylpropanoid pathway have been duplicated and diversified in the conifer in a process fundamentally different from short-lived angiosperm species. These findings add to the information about the role of the

  8. Finding Street Gang Members on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Lakshika; Wijeratne, Sanjaya; Doran, Derek; Sheth, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Most street gang members use Twitter to intimidate others, to present outrageous images and statements to the world, and to share recent illegal activities. Their tweets may thus be useful to law enforcement agencies to discover clues about recent crimes or to anticipate ones that may occur. Finding these posts, however, requires a method to discover gang member Twitter profiles. This is a challenging task since gang members represent a very small population of the 320 million Twitter users. This paper studies the problem of automatically finding gang members on Twitter. It outlines a process to curate one of the largest sets of verifiable gang member profiles that have ever been studied. A review of these profiles establishes differences in the language, images, YouTube links, and emojis gang members use compared to the rest of the Twitter population. Features from this review are used to train a series of supervised classifiers. Our classifier achieves a promising F1 score with a low false positive rate. PMID:28713880

  9. Finding Street Gang Members on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Lakshika; Wijeratne, Sanjaya; Doran, Derek; Sheth, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Most street gang members use Twitter to intimidate others, to present outrageous images and statements to the world, and to share recent illegal activities. Their tweets may thus be useful to law enforcement agencies to discover clues about recent crimes or to anticipate ones that may occur. Finding these posts, however, requires a method to discover gang member Twitter profiles. This is a challenging task since gang members represent a very small population of the 320 million Twitter users. This paper studies the problem of automatically finding gang members on Twitter. It outlines a process to curate one of the largest sets of verifiable gang member profiles that have ever been studied. A review of these profiles establishes differences in the language, images, YouTube links, and emojis gang members use compared to the rest of the Twitter population. Features from this review are used to train a series of supervised classifiers. Our classifier achieves a promising F 1 score with a low false positive rate.

  10. Migration processes in SCO member states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Sergeevna Antonyuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns modern state and development of migration processes in SCO member states. As a main method of research statistical analysis was applied. The article shows that migration streams between SCO member states are rather intensive, and the problem of labor migration becomes more and more urgent. The countries of consuming and supplying of labour force are clearly differentiated in the region. For some countries, labor export is the key sector of economy. At the same time, interstate relations between SCO member states sometimes are rather disputed. The most urgent factors causing the development of migration processes in the region were determined. Among them, thefactor of growing outflows from China isespecially noted. It is noted that migration processes are discussed by SCO member states nowadays in terms of illegal migration and international criminality connected with it. It means that the question of labor migration is a real problem. It is indicated that the creation of a specific joint commission on migration policy affiliated with the Council of Foreign Ministers of SCO member states is the necessary condition of effective interaction in migration questions within the framework of Shanghai Cooperation Organization.

  11. Cracking in Flexural Reinforced Concrete Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Fisker, Jakob; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    The system of cracks developing in reinforced concrete is in many aspects essential when modelling structures in both serviceability- and ultimate limit state. This paper discusses the behavior concerning crack development in flexural members observed from tests and associates it with two different...... existing models. From the investigations an approach is proposed on how to predict the crack pattern in flexural members involving two different crack systems; primary flexural cracks and local secondary cracks. The results of the approach is in overall good agreement with the observed tests and captures...... the pronounced size effect associated with flexural cracking in which the crack spacing and crack widths are approximately proportional to the depth of the member....

  12. Radioactive waste management in member states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this part of the report is to present a brief overview of key issues in radioactive waste management on a nation-by-nation basis. Member State representatives were asked to address nine questions in no more than three or four pages. Hence, by design, the presentations are not comprehensive. Even so, the information set out here should provide the reader valuable insights into the nature of problems associated with radioactive waste management. The materials may also be used as a ready reference for specific information about radioactive waste management in individual Member States as well as for comparative purposes. (author).

  13. Geneva University honours two CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Albert Hofmann Steve Myers On 8 June, two CERN staff members will receive Geneva University's highest distinction. On the proposal of the University's particle physicists, Steve Myers and Albert Hoffmann, who orchestrated LEP commissioning and operation and were instrumental in its success, will awarded the distinction of doctor honoris causa. The ceremony, interspersed with musical interludes, will be followed by a formal reception and is open to all. The Uni Dufour car park will be free to members of the public attending the ceremony. 8 June 2001 at 10.00 a.m. Uni Dufour, Auditoire Piaget 24, rue Général Dufour, Geneva.

  14. 12 CFR 925.24 - Consolidations involving members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consolidations involving members. 925.24 Section 925.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK MEMBERS AND HOUSING ASSOCIATES MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Consolidations Involving Members § 925.24 Consolidations involving members...

  15. 42 CFR 405.1847 - Disqualification of Board members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disqualification of Board members. 405.1847 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1847 Disqualification of Board members. No Board member shall join in the... party may have with respect to a Board member shall be presented in writing to such Board member by the...

  16. 17 CFR 200.57 - Relationships with other members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... members. 200.57 Section 200.57 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... other members. Each member should recognize that his conscience and those of other members are distinct... commission type of administration. However, a member should never permit his personal opinion so to conflict...

  17. 48 CFR 9.703 - Contracting with individual pool members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... individual pool members. 9.703 Section 9.703 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Development Pools 9.703 Contracting with individual pool members. (a) Pool members may submit individual... by a pool member if that pool member participates in a competing offer submitted by the pool. (b) If...

  18. HP0902 from Helicobacter pylori is a thermostable, dimeric protein belonging to an all-beta topology of the cupin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Dae-Won; Lee, Yoo-Sup; Kim, Ji-Hun; Seo, Min-Duk; Lee, Bong-Jin; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2009-06-30

    Here, we report the first biochemical and structural characterization of the hypothetical protein HP0902 from Helicobacter pylori, in terms of structural genomics. Gel-permeation chromatography and dynamic light scattering indicated that the protein behaves as a dimer in solution. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that HP0902 primarily adopts a beta-structure and the protein was highly thermostable with a denaturing temperature higher than 70 degrees C. Finally, the backbone NMR assignments were obtained on the [(13)C,(15)N]HP0902 and the secondary structure was determined using the chemical shift data. Additionally, the local flexibility was assessed via a heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N steady state NOE experiment. The results revealed that HP0902 would adopt a compactly folded, all-beta topology with 11 beta-strands. All of the results clearly support the notion that HP0902 belongs to the cupin superfamily of proteins.

  19. Functional Characterization of a Novel Member of the Amidohydrolase 2 Protein Family, 2-Hydroxy-1-Naphthoic Acid Nonoxidative Decarboxylase from Burkholderia sp. Strain BC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal Chowdhury, Piyali; Basu, Soumik; Dutta, Arindam; Dutta, Tapan K

    2016-06-15

    The gene encoding a nonoxidative decarboxylase capable of catalyzing the transformation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid (2H1NA) to 2-naphthol was identified, recombinantly expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The putative gene sequence of the decarboxylase (hndA) encodes a 316-amino-acid protein (HndA) with a predicted molecular mass of 34 kDa. HndA exhibited high identity with uncharacterized amidohydrolase 2 proteins of various Burkholderia species, whereas it showed a modest 27% identity with γ-resorcylate decarboxylase, a well-characterized nonoxidative decarboxylase belonging to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Biochemically characterized HndA demonstrated strict substrate specificity toward 2H1NA, whereas inhibition studies with HndA indicated the presence of zinc as the transition metal center, as confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A three-dimensional structural model of HndA, followed by docking analysis, identified the conserved metal-coordinating and substrate-binding residues, while their importance in catalysis was validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Microbial nonoxidative decarboxylases play a crucial role in the metabolism of a large array of carboxy aromatic chemicals released into the environment from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources. Among these, hydroxynaphthoic acids are usually encountered as pathway intermediates in the bacterial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present study reveals biochemical and molecular characterization of a 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid nonoxidative decarboxylase involved in an alternative metabolic pathway which can be classified as a member of the small repertoire of nonoxidative decarboxylases belonging to the amidohydrolase 2 family of proteins. The strict substrate specificity and sequence uniqueness make it a novel member of the metallo-dependent hydrolase superfamily. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Role Orientations of Members of Parliament

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Jacques J.A.; Esaiasson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To what extent would a change of the Dutch electoral system, strengthening the bond between individual Members of Parliament (MPs) and specific constituencies, improve the quality of political representation, and increase the legitimacy of the political system in the process? In order to answer this

  1. Lecturers, students and community members sharing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lecturers, students and community members sharing the responsibility of assessing project-based poster presentations. ... Active participation in the process of learning rather than transmission of information is prominent in modern higher education contexts. In alignment with this trend, traditional modes of assessment, ...

  2. Board Member Testifies at Cyber Safety Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Mary

    2011-01-01

    House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Healthy Families and Communities unanimously expressed concern for the growing trend in cyberbullying during a hearing last June 24. The event, which featured National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) board member Barbara-Jane Paris and other witnesses, including TV personality Dr. Phil…

  3. Important characteristics of operational force members

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, Adelai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The operational forces military context is generally acknowledged as one of the most stressful contexts as it is demanding of members on a physical, psychological, social level with organisational, intra- and inter-personal demands of an extreme...

  4. Geographical distances and support from family members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, C.H.; van der Meer, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    We address two questions: to what extent does geographical distance to parents, siblings and children living outside the household influence receiving support from them? And to what extent does the availability of other network members living closer play a part in receiving support? We use the

  5. Israel, CERN’s new Member State

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 15 January 2014, the official Israeli Flag-raising Ceremony took place to mark the accession of Israel to Membership of CERN, bringing the Organization’s number of Member States to 21.     For more information, click here.

  6. Physical Fitness of University Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, H. N.; Barksdale, J. M.

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare physical activity, aerobic fitness, and selected coronary heart disease risk factors in 27 male and 21 female university faculty members. Results of t-tests indicate that the males had significantly greater values for physical activity index, systolic blood pressure, aerobic fitness (V02 max), and…

  7. 7 CFR 915.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 915.27 Section 915.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order...

  8. 7 CFR 1219.37 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate members. 1219.37 Section 1219.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH...

  9. Issues Causing Stress among Business Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, C. Mitchell; Cox, Susie S.; Phelps, Lonnie D.; Schuldt, Barbara A.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines factors contributing to faculty stress. Factors including demographics, tenure, discipline, and teaching medium are all examined. Whereas once faculty members were inundated with learning new electronic technology (and the stress it created), many appear to have become somewhat comfortable with this change and have adapted to…

  10. The Individual Member and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jenny; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The needs and expectations of members of the Library Association of Australia are explored in four articles. Highlights include fee requirements, lobbying by the association, the inclusion of information professionals in the membership, the possible role of trade unions, and the distribution of women in leadership positions. (CLB)

  11. Disability Services Partnerships with Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sally; Markle, Larry; Wessel, Roger D.; Desmond, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Creating impactful partnerships across university divisions can enhance the effectiveness and impact of the Disability Services Office. Research has shown the benefits of practitioners and faculty members collaborating; however, careful consideration and communication is needed in order for these collaborations to be successful and beneficial. In…

  12. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  13. Gauging the Commitment of Clandestine Group Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    than continue to use the family business as their only source of income, a few members have elected to only support the family business part-time and...human intelligence, or by national technical means. For example, the individual that remains in the family business even though it is obviously not

  14. Why are Faculty Members Not Teaching Blended Courses? Insights from Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Mehmet Akif

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of an exploratory, qualitative case study and examines problems and impediments faculty members encountered in blended learning environments in Turkish Higher Education system. A total of 117 faculty members from 4 universities responded to 8 interview questions. Findings were based on content analyses of…

  15. Does Sex of Dyad Members Really Matter? A Review of Leader-Member Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Brent J.; Fritz, Susan M.

    2004-01-01

    Leader-member exchange (LMX) generally refers to the leadership process centered on the interactions between leaders and direct reports. The basic premise of high quality leader-member exchange relationships holds that direct reports gain tremendous benefits through these partnerships. LMX is perhaps the most commonly researched theory of…

  16. 7 CFR 905.150 - Eligibility requirements for public member and alternate member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES, AND TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Rules and... direct financial interest in the production or marketing of citrus fruit (except as a consumer of... the industry. (c) The public member must be a resident of the production area. (d) The public member...

  17. Development prospects of the banking industry in the new EU member countries and forthcoming member countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Košak

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Bank consolidation has substantially decreased the number of banks in European banking, which has had important implications for the banking sectors structure in all EU member countries. The consolidation processes have had a tremendous impact on the developments in banking sectors of new EU member countries, wheremajor structural changes have been initiated mostly by new entrant banks from the old EU member countries. The future banking development in new EU member countries will very likely follow some main patterns known from the old EU members. Rather speculative conjectures, which are based on a comparison with banking sectors in other EU member countries indicate, that the total-asset-to-GDPratio in new member countries should further improve in the future. The banking sector growth will be based mostly on the growth of the credit to non-banking sector, while banks are not expected anymore to use non-bank deposits as a predominant way of funding. Instead potentials for alternative funding possibilities should be activated. Although the non-bank financial intermediaries in new EU membersrepresent a serious competition to banks, their relative underdevelopment prevents them from impacting the developments in banking sectors as known from old EU member countries.

  18. Resident versus faculty member simulation debriefing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Traci; Newton, Chad; Patel, Hetal; Sulistio, Melanie; Tomlinson, Andrew; Lee, Won

    2017-11-16

    Near-peer teaching is effective in graduate medical education, but it has not been compared with faculty member teaching in resident simulation. In this study, we sought to compare debriefing sessions of internal medicine (IM) intern simulation sessions led by academic faculty doctors with those led by senior IM residents in order to measure the effectiveness of near-peer teaching in this setting. Near-peer teaching is effective in graduate medical education, but has not been compared with faculty member teaching in resident simulation METHOD: Internal medicine interns participated in four simulation cases, two of which were debriefed by faculty members and two of which were debriefed by residents. Pre-simulation knowledge assessment was completed prior to the case. Following each debriefing, interns completed a Debriefing Assessment for Simulation in Healthcare (DASH) survey. Post-simulation knowledge assessments were completed 6 months after simulation. Debriefings were recorded and transcribed. Each statement made during debriefing was classified as either correct or erroneous by blinded reviewers. Fifty interns participated in simulation, and the response rate on the DASH survey was 88%. There was no difference between DASH scores (p = 0.13), post-simulation knowledge assessments or error rates during debriefing (p = 0.31) for faculty member and resident instructors. Our study suggests that residents and faculty members provide a similar quality of simulation instruction based on qualitative and quantitative evaluation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  19. 77 FR 40892 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Crew Member's Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Crew Member's... other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the Crew Member's... CBP is soliciting comments concerning the following information collection: Title: Crew Member's...

  20. Why 4-H Members Leave: A Study of Discontinuance through Both Current 4-H Members and Former Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilek, Kevin Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    4-H members quit. It is part of every 4-H program, and according to the research, it is even part of growing up. If only we knew why they quit, we could possibly do something about it. To date, the reasons youth join 4-H have been more thoroughly researched than the reasons they quit. This study explores why youth choose to discontinue membership…

  1. The diversity and expansion of the trans-sialidase gene family is a common feature in Trypanosoma cruzi clade members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Cortez, Danielle R; Lima, Fábio M; Cortez, Caroline; Ramírez, José Luis; Martins, Andre G; Serrano, Myrna G; Teixeira, Marta M G; da Silveira, José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Trans-sialidase (TS) is a polymorphic protein superfamily described in members of the protozoan genus Trypanosoma. Of the eight TS groups recently described, TS group I proteins (some of which have catalytic activity) are present in the distantly related Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi phylogenetic clades, whereas other TS groups have only been described in some species belonging to the T. cruzi clade. In the present study we analyzed the repertoire, distribution and phylogenetic relationships of TS genes among species of the T. cruzi clade based on sequence similarity, multiple sequence alignment and tree-reconstruction approaches using TS sequences obtained with the aid of PCR-based strategies or retrieved from genome databases. We included the following representative isolates of the T. cruzi clade from South America: T. cruzi, T. cruzi Tcbat, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma conorhini. The cloned sequences encoded conserved TS protein motifs Asp-box and VTVxNVxLYNR but lacked the FRIP motif (conserved in TS group I). The T. conorhini sequences were the most divergent. The hybridization patterns of TS probes with chromosomal bands confirmed the abundance of these sequences in species in the T. cruzi clade. Divergence and relationship analysis placed most of the TS sequences in the groups defined in T. cruzi. Further examination of members of TS group II, which includes T. cruzi surface glycoproteins implicated in host cell attachment and invasion, showed that sequences of T. cruzi Tcbat grouped with those of T. cruzi genotype TcI. Our analysis indicates that different members of the T. cruzi clade, with different vertebrate hosts, vectors and pathogenicity, share the extensive expansion and sequence diversification of the TS gene family. Altogether, our results are congruent with the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade and represent a contribution to the understanding of the molecular

  2. Peptide discovery in the ectoparasitic crustacean Argulus siamensis: identification of the first neuropeptides from a member of the Branchiura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have facilitated the generation of large transcriptomic datasets for an ever-growing number of crustaceans, one being the carp louse Argulus siamensis. This and other members of the subclass Branchiura are obligate fish ectoparasites, and as such, are a major concern for commercial aquaculture. Using the extant transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequences for A. siamensis, 27 transcripts encoding putative neuropeptide precursors were identified, and their pre/preprohormones deduced and characterized using a well-established bioinformatics workflow. The structures of 105 distinct peptides were predicted from the deduced proteins, including isoforms of adipokinetic hormone (AKH), allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, allatotropin, bursicon α, bursicon β, crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), diuretic hormone 31, diuretic hormone 44, eclosion hormone, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide Y, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone, proctolin, short neuropeptide F, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin-related peptide. While several of the predicted peptides are known from other crustacean and/or insect species, e.g. RYLPT, a broadly conserved arthropod proctolin isoform, and PFCNAFTGCamide (disulfide bridging between the two cysteines), the stereotypical crustacean CCAP, the vast majority of them are described here for the first time, e.g. pQVNFSTKWamide, a new AKH/red pigment concentrating hormone superfamily member, pQEGLDHMFMRFamide, a novel myosuppressin, and SYKSKPPFNGSIFamide, a new member of the SIFamide family. As the peptides presented here are the only ones thus far described from A. siamensis, or for that matter, any branchiuran, they represent a new resource to begin investigations of peptidergic control of physiology and behavior in this and other related aquacultural pests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Migration from New EU Member Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pytlikova, Mariola

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of the paper is to give predictions of the migration potential from the 7 new EU member countries to the EEA/EU-13 countries. Being able to analyze 'real' migration behavior from these particular countries over the period 1990-2000 helps me to avoid problems related to (double) out......-of sample forecasts and to the assumption of invariance of migration behavior across a space that previous studies had to hold. Results of the econometric analyses reveal the importance of controlling for pairs of countries unobserved heterogeneity. Preliminary results regarding the predictions of future...... gross and net migration flows show that the magnitude of the estimated gross and net migration flows is relatively high and lower, respectively, compared to forecasts from previous studies. Such a development in gross and net migration flows indicates that migration from the new EU member countries...

  4. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrive Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Photo 01: CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani (left) speaks to Forum members and public figures from the Geneva area during the visit. In the background is Jean-Claude Landry from the Department of the Interior, Agriculture and Environment, State of Geneva. Photo 02: CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani (left) speaks to Forum members and public figures from the Geneva area during the visit. In the background is Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg.

  5. Molecular and comparative morphological analysis of central European parasitic flatworms of the superfamily Brachylaimoidea Allison, 1943 (Trematoda: Plagiorchiida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneberg, Petr; Sitko, Jiljí; Bizos, Jiří

    2016-04-01

    The Brachylaimoidea are digenean parasites of vertebrates, including humans, domestic animals, poultry and wild game. Numerous Brachylaimoidea, particularly adults of Brachylaima and Leucochloridium, are difficult to identify to species. We provide and analyse sequences of two nuclear (18S rDNA, ITS2) and two mitochondrial (CO1, ND1) DNA loci of central European species of the Brachylaimoidea, namely Leucochloridium holostomum, Leucochloridium paradoxum, Leucochloridium perturbatum, Leucochloridium subtilis, Leucochloridium vogtianum, Urotocus rossitensis, Urogonimus macrostomus, Michajlovia migrata, Leucochloridiomorpha lutea, Brachylaima arcuatus, Brachylaima fuscata and Brachylaima mesostoma. We identified three clades in the genus Leucochloridium, which do not correspond to the previously suggested subgenera Neoleucochloridium, Papilloleucochloridium and Leucochloridium. We reject classification of Urotocus and Urogonimus in Leucochloridiinae, and, instead, re-establish the subfamilies Urotocinae and Urogoniminae. We synonymize the genus Renylaima with the genus Brachylaima. We reject M. migrata as a member of Leucochloridiinae sensu stricto or Brachylaimidae suggested by some previous authors. We found that the previously sequenced Glaphyrostomum sp. does not cluster with any hitherto sequenced Brachylaimidae. We also provide comparative measurements of the examined central European Brachylaimoidea, address the the specificity of their localization in the host and discuss their host-specific prevalence and intensity of infections based on the extensive dataset of birds examined in 1962-2015.

  6. Member State Event: Telling CERN's story !

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the events to mark the Laboratory's fiftieth anniversary, members of the CERN personnel are telling the story of CERN. Robert Cailliau (on the right), currently responsible for CERN's external communications, and Chiara Mariotti (in the center), a physicist working at CMS, were invited to talk about the history of CERN and the Web at a conference in the 'Science Thursdays' series entitled 'From the Quark to the Web' in Turin on 26 February.

  7. Lithuania to become Associate Member of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Dačkus, Robertas

    2017-01-01

    On 27 June 2017, in Vilnius, Lithuania, CERN Director General, Fabiola Gianotti, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Lithuania, Linas Linkevičius, in the presence of the President of the Republic of Lithuania, Dalia Grybauskaitė, signed the Agreement admitting Lithuania as an Associate Member of CERN. The last step for the Agreement to enter into force requires final approval by the Government of Lithuania.

  8. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. He is pictured here (right) alongside CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani during the visit of Forum members to CERN.

  9. Perceptions of teamwork among code team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahramus, Tara; Frewin, Sarah; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Sole, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) teams, known as code teams, provide coordinated and evidenced-based interventions by various disciplines during a CPA. Teamwork behaviors are essential during CPA resuscitation and may have an impact on patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of teamwork during CPA events among code team members and to determine if differences in perception existed between disciplines within the code team. A prospective, descriptive, comparative design using the Code Teamwork Perception Tool online survey was used to assess the perception of teamwork during CPA events by medical residents, critical care nurses, and respiratory therapists. Sixty-six code team members completed the Code Teamwork Perception Tool. Mean teamwork scores were 2.63 on a 5-point scale (0-4). No significant differences were found in mean scores among disciplines. Significant differences among scores were found on 7 items related to code leadership, roles and responsibilities between disciplines, and in those who had participated on a code team for less than 2 years and certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support for less than 4 years. Teamwork perception among members of the code team was average. Teamwork training for resuscitation with all disciplines on the code team may promote more effective teamwork during actual CPA events. Clinical nurse specialists can aid in resuscitation efforts by actively participating on committees, identifying opportunities for improvement, being content experts, leading the development of team training programs, and conducting research in areas lacking evidence.

  10. Qigong in Injured Military Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reb, Anne Marie; Saum, Nancy Seaby; Murphy, Deborah Ann; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara Todd; Su, Xiaogang; Bormann, Jill Ellen

    2017-03-01

    Wounded, ill, and injured (WII) Military Service members experience significant stress and are at risk for developing chronic conditions including posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Qigong, a meditative movement practice, may positively affect their ability to engage in successful rehabilitation. We assessed the feasibility of Qigong practice in WII Service members returning from combat; effects on stress, sleep, and somatic symptoms; satisfaction; and participants' experience with the practice. Single-group, pre- and posttest, mixed methods approach. Twenty-six WII were enrolled. The program was designed to include 20 classes over 10 weeks. Participants completed self-report questionnaires, practice logs, and an exit interview. Average attendance was 8.14 classes ( SD = 4.9); mean engagement was 5.7 ( SD = 3.5) weeks. Participants endorsed a high level of satisfaction with the practice. Qualitative themes included coping with stress; feeling more resilient and empowered; improvement in symptoms including sleep and physical function; and factors affecting practice. Participant-reported facilitators included accessibility and portability of the practice; barriers included scheduling conflicts and personal challenges. Participants recommended offering shorter programs with flexible scheduling options, increasing program awareness, and including significant others in future classes. Qigong was safe, portable, and easily adapted for WII Service members.

  11. Member State Event: Telling CERN's Story

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the events to mark the Laboratory's fiftieth anniversary, members of the CERN personnel are telling the story of CERN. Robert Cailliau (on the right of the photograph), co-inventor of the Web and currently responsible for CERN's external communications, and Chiara Mariotti (in the center), a physicist working at CMS, were invited to talk about the history of CERN and the Web at a conference in the 'Science Thursdays' series entitled 'From the Quark to the Web' in Turin on 26 February. This was not their first appearance before a non-specialist audience (almost 1000 people that day!) eager to find out what goes on in a unique research centre like CERN as talking about the Laboratory's activities and its history are part and parcel of their work for the Organization. Anniversary Events in the Member States: This 'Science Thursday' event devoted to CERN was one of Italy's contributions to CERN's fiftieth anniversary celebrations. Coming up soon in the Member States: Italy International Centre...

  12. Role of the tumor necrosis factor family member LIGHT in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifeldin, Neveen Salah; El Sayed, Shereen Bendary; Asaad, Marwa Kamal; Aly, Alaa Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    LIGHT (the name of which is derived from "homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, competes with herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D for herpes simplex virus entry mediator, and expressed by T lymphocytes"), is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that is involved in various inflammatory diseases. To assess serum LIGHT levels in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) before and after treatment and compare it with controls. To correlate serum LIGHT with the severity scoring of AD (SCORAD) index. Another objective is to compare LIGHT levels between lesional skin in patients with AD and controls. Twenty patients with AD and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Serum LIGHT levels were examined using an enzyme immunoassay technique. Serum total IgE levels, absolute eosinophil count, and eosinophil percentage were also done for both patients and controls. The SCORAD index was done for every patient before and after treatment. Skin LIGHT levels were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and compared with control skin. Serum LIGHT levels in patients with AD were significantly higher than that of healthy controls and correlated positively with SCORAD index. LIGHT concentrations decreased as the symptoms were improved by treatment. A significant correlation was found on comparing the LIGHT serum levels and other established markers of disease severity. LIGHT levels in lesional skin in these patients were markedly higher than LIGHT levels in normal skin. LIGHT may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD. This may presumably have possible future implications on the treatment of this chronic disease. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  13. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    career repercussions, and some type of “step-down” time between the end of deployment and soldiers’ return to the family , to ease integration... family continues to be negatively affected by more common experiences, such as frequent moves, difficulty communicating, etc. Female spouses without...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-2-0113 TITLE: Spouses/ Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keith D

  14. The superfamily keeps growing: Identification in trypanosomatids of RibJ, the first riboflavin transporter family in protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcazar, Darío E; Vanrell, María Cristina; Romano, Patricia S; Pereira, Claudio A; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Bonomi, Hernán R; Carrillo, Carolina

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites represent a major health issue affecting hundreds of million people worldwide, with clinical treatments that are partially effective and/or very toxic. They are responsible for serious human and plant diseases including Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease), Trypanosoma brucei (Sleeping sickness), Leishmania spp. (Leishmaniasis), and Phytomonas spp. (phytoparasites). Both, animals and trypanosomatids lack the biosynthetic riboflavin (vitamin B2) pathway, the vital precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactors. While metazoans obtain riboflavin from the diet through RFVT/SLC52 transporters, the riboflavin transport mechanisms in trypanosomatids still remain unknown. Here, we show that riboflavin is imported with high affinity in Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana, Crithidia fasciculata and Phytomonas Jma using radiolabeled riboflavin transport assays. The vitamin is incorporated through a saturable carrier-mediated process. Effective competitive uptake occurs with riboflavin analogs roseoflavin, lumiflavin and lumichrome, and co-factor derivatives FMN and FAD. Moreover, important biological processes evaluated in T. cruzi (i.e. proliferation, metacyclogenesis and amastigote replication) are dependent on riboflavin availability. In addition, the riboflavin competitive analogs were found to interfere with parasite physiology on riboflavin-dependent processes. By means of bioinformatics analyses we identified a novel family of riboflavin transporters (RibJ) in trypanosomatids. Two RibJ members, TcRibJ and TbRibJ from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, were functionally characterized using homologous and/or heterologous expression systems. The RibJ family represents the first riboflavin transporters found in protists and the third eukaryotic family known to date. The essentiality of riboflavin for trypanosomatids, and the structural/biochemical differences that RFVT

  15. The superfamily keeps growing: Identification in trypanosomatids of RibJ, the first riboflavin transporter family in protists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío E Balcazar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid parasites represent a major health issue affecting hundreds of million people worldwide, with clinical treatments that are partially effective and/or very toxic. They are responsible for serious human and plant diseases including Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease, Trypanosoma brucei (Sleeping sickness, Leishmania spp. (Leishmaniasis, and Phytomonas spp. (phytoparasites. Both, animals and trypanosomatids lack the biosynthetic riboflavin (vitamin B2 pathway, the vital precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD cofactors. While metazoans obtain riboflavin from the diet through RFVT/SLC52 transporters, the riboflavin transport mechanisms in trypanosomatids still remain unknown.Here, we show that riboflavin is imported with high affinity in Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania (Leishmania mexicana, Crithidia fasciculata and Phytomonas Jma using radiolabeled riboflavin transport assays. The vitamin is incorporated through a saturable carrier-mediated process. Effective competitive uptake occurs with riboflavin analogs roseoflavin, lumiflavin and lumichrome, and co-factor derivatives FMN and FAD. Moreover, important biological processes evaluated in T. cruzi (i.e. proliferation, metacyclogenesis and amastigote replication are dependent on riboflavin availability. In addition, the riboflavin competitive analogs were found to interfere with parasite physiology on riboflavin-dependent processes. By means of bioinformatics analyses we identified a novel family of riboflavin transporters (RibJ in trypanosomatids. Two RibJ members, TcRibJ and TbRibJ from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, were functionally characterized using homologous and/or heterologous expression systems.The RibJ family represents the first riboflavin transporters found in protists and the third eukaryotic family known to date. The essentiality of riboflavin for trypanosomatids, and the structural/biochemical differences

  16. TGF superfamily and MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 genes expression in the endometrium of women with impaired reproduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Wirstlein

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available During the putative "implantation window", a period of maximal endometrial receptivity that spans 7-9 days after ovulation, a series of changes on the structural and molecular level occur that render the endometrium susceptible to implantation for the human embryo. Many members of the TGFbetas are expressed by human endometrium at different stages of menstrual cycle. Also studies regarding the MMP2 gene expression and activity of MMP2 in the implantation window have shown a higher expression and activity of MMP2 in women with impaired fertility. We have examined by RT-PCR the expression of TGFbeta2 and MMP2, MMP9 and TIMP1 in 28 patients with idiopathic infertility, 16 patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriage and 16 control women were enrolled in this study. Seven to nine days after ovulation endometrial biopsy by Pipelle or hysteroscopy was performed to assess the expression of TGFbeta2 , MMP2, MMP9 and TIMP1. We found that in endometria from women with idiopathic infertility TGFbeta2 expression was 2.8 fold higher than in endometria from control group and 2.1 fold higher in endometrial samples from women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage compared to the control group. The MMP2, MMP9 and TIMP1 expression in endometrial samples revealed no significant differences between the study groups and control group. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between TGFbeta2 and MMP9 expression in endometria from women in control group. The present investigations suggest that dysregulated TGFbeta2, MMP2, MMP9 and TIMP1 expression are associated with infertility and early pregnancy loss. However the exact mechanism of how overexpression of endometrial TGFbetaand MMPs interferes with implantation may be more complex.

  17. A Non-Member Spouse's Entitlement To The Member's Pension Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motseotsile Clement Marumoagae

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important that married couples seek legal advice with regard to the assets falling within their joint estate, more particularly their retirement benefits. This article reflects on the entitlement (if any of non-member spouses to their spouses' retirement fund benefits. Pension benefits can be due before, during or after divorce, and parties to the marriage should be aware of their rights with regard to the accruing pension benefits of their spouses. While it is settled law that non-member spouses are entitled to receive a portion of their member spouses' pension benefits (known as "pension interest" immediately on divorce, it is not particularly clear whether non-member spouses are also entitled to receive the same before or sometime after divorce. In this article I provide a contextual understanding of the entitlements (if any which spouses or former spouses of members of pension funds have on such member spouses' retirement benefits. Furthermore, it shown in this article that various divisions of South African High Courts have been inconsistent in how they have approached the issue of the pension interest between divorcing spouses or divorced ex-spouses.

  18. Crows cross-modally recognize group members but not non-group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Noriko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2012-05-22

    Recognizing other individuals by integrating different sensory modalities is a crucial ability of social animals, including humans. Although cross-modal individual recognition has been demonstrated in mammals, the extent of its use by birds remains unknown. Herein, we report the first evidence of cross-modal recognition of group members by a highly social bird, the large-billed crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). A cross-modal expectancy violation paradigm was used to test whether crows were sensitive to identity congruence between visual presentation of a group member and the subsequent playback of a contact call. Crows looked more rapidly and for a longer duration when the visual and auditory stimuli were incongruent than when congruent. Moreover, these responses were not observed with non-group member stimuli. These results indicate that crows spontaneously associate visual and auditory information of group members but not of non-group members, which is a demonstration of cross-modal audiovisual recognition of group members in birds.

  19. 7 CFR 4284.17 - Member delegate clause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member delegate clause. 4284.17 Section 4284.17... Grant Programs § 4284.17 Member delegate clause. No Member of Congress shall be admitted to any share or... Member of Congress. ...

  20. 7 CFR 4284.699 - Member delegate clause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member delegate clause. 4284.699 Section 4284.699... Member delegate clause. No member of Congress shall be admitted to any share or part of this grant or any... the grant a publicly held corporation whose ownership might include a member of Congress. ...