WorldWideScience

Sample records for neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir

  1. EFFICIENCY AND SAFETY OF NEURAMINIDASE INHIBITOR OSELTAMIVIR FOR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Darmanyan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year 3 to 5 million people suffer from flu. Children are most susceptible to flu. At the moment, the main methods of flu prophylaxis and treatment are flu vaccination and antivirus medications. Of the tested anti virus medications, 3 groups are most interesting and interferon inductors, м 2=channel blockers (derivative of adamantine and neuraminidase inhibitors. neuraminidase inhibitors are a brand new type of virus infection therapy — they selectively inhibit activity of flu virus neuraminidases, which restrains virus from getting into the cell, exit of virion from the cell before the reproduction cycle is over and new cells are affected. Oseltamivir — one of the new neuraminidase inhibitors — can be used for a safe and efficient flu treatment and prophylaxis among adults; yet recently this medication has been authorized for children over 1 year of age, basing upon the findings of randomized controlled surveys. Data shows that usage of oseltamivir reduces the period of diseases and severity of acute flu symptoms for children with no side diseases, as well as for children suffering from cardiovascular and bronchopulmonary system diseases; besides this medication reduces the risk of secondary flu complications.Key words: neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir, flu, bird flu, antivirus medications.

  2. Design, in silico studies, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of oseltamivir derivatives as inhibitors of neuraminidase from influenza A virus H1N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri-Bazán, Rocío M; García-Machorro, Jazmín; Méndez-Luna, David; Tolentino-López, Luis E; Martínez-Ramos, Federico; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia I; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin A; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G; Fragoso-Vázquez, M Jonathan; Barrón, Blanca L; Correa-Basurto, José

    2017-03-10

    Since the neuraminidase (NA) enzyme of the influenza A virus plays a key role in the process of release of new viral particles from a host cell, it is often a target for new drug design. The emergence of NA mutations, such as H275Y, has led to great resistance against neuraminidase inhibitors, including oseltamivir and zanamivir. Hence, we herein designed a set of derivatives by modifying the amine and/or carboxylic groups of oseltamivir. After being screened for their physicochemical (Lipinski's rule) and toxicological properties, the remaining compounds were submitted to molecular and theoretical studies. The docking simulations provided insights into NA recognition patterns, demonstrating that oseltamivir modified at the carboxylic moiety and coupled with anilines had higher affinity and a better binding pose for NA than the derivatives modified at the amine group. Based on these theoretical studies, the new oseltamivir derivatives may have higher affinity to mutant variants and possibly to other viral subtypes. Accordingly, two compounds were selected for synthesis, which together with their respective intermediates were evaluated for their cytotoxicity and antiviral activities. Their biological activity was then tested in cells infected with the A/Puerto Rico/916/34 (H1N1) influenza virus, and virus yield reduction assays were performed. Additionally, by measuring neuraminidase activity with the neuraminidase assay kit it was found that the compounds produced inhibitory activity on this enzyme. Finally, the infected cells were analysed with atomic force microscopy (AFM), observing morphological changes strongly suggesting that these compounds interfered with cellular release of viral particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Systematic review of influenza resistance to the neuraminidase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boivin Guy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antivirals play a critical role in the prevention and the management of influenza. One class of antivirals, neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs, is effective against all human influenza viruses. Currently there are two NAI drugs which are licensed worldwide: oseltamivir (Tamiflu® and zanamivir (Relenza®; and two drugs which have received recent approval in Japan: peramivir and laninamivir. Until recently, the prevalence of antiviral resistance has been relatively low. However, almost all seasonal H1N1 strains that circulated in 2008-09 were resistant to oseltamivir whereas about 1% of tested 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses were found to be resistant to oseltamivir. To date, no studies have demonstrated widespread resistance to zanamivir. It seems likely that the literature on antiviral resistance associated with oseltamivir as well as zanamivir is now sufficiently comprehensive to warrant a systematic review. The primary objectives were to systematically review the literature to determine the incidence of resistance to oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir in different population groups as well as assess the clinical consequences of antiviral resistance. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE without language restrictions in September 2010 to identify studies reporting incidence of resistance to oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir. We used forest plots and meta-analysis of incidence of antiviral resistance associated with the three NAIs. Subgroup analyses were done across a number of population groups. Meta-analysis was also performed to evaluate associations between antiviral resistance and clinical complications and symptoms. Results We identified 19 studies reporting incidence of antiviral resistance. Meta-analysis of 15 studies yielded a pooled incidence rate for oseltamivir resistance of 2.6% (95%CI 0.7% to 5.5%. The incidence rate for all zanamivir resistance studies was 0%. Only one study measured incidence of antiviral

  4. OPPORTUNITIES FOR APPLICATION OF THE NEURAMINIDASE INHIBITORS IN TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF THE FLU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.B. Belan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Flu viruses cause yearly epidemics with the lesion of approximately 20% of population. during the increase of the flu sickness rate, it is necessary to take urgent anti epidemic and treatment steps aimed to reduce the spread of an infection as soon as possible and incorporating the application of the specific antiviral medications. The major aims for prescription of the specific antiviral medications in flu treatment are to reduce the duration and severity of the leading disease symptoms, risks of complications, as well as to prevent the lethal out comes. There were developed medications, effectively inhibiting the replication of B flu virus. At present, there are the 1st generation medications available — adamantane derivatives (amantadine and rimantadine and the 2nd generation medications — neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir. The fast increase of the flu virus resistance towards adamantanes determine the necessity of a wider application of neuraminidase inhibitors, which are highly effective in respect flu viruses of A and B, as well as avian flu virus (h5n1.Key words: neuraminidase inhibitors, adamantanes, oseltamivir, zanamivir, h3n2, h5n1.

  5. Neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza: a systematic review and meta-analysis of regulatory and mortality data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Carl J; Onakpoya, Igho; Jones, Mark A; Doshi, Peter; Del Mar, Chris B; Hama, Rokuro; Thompson, Matthew J; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Mahtani, Kamal R; Nunan, David; Howick, Jeremy; Jefferson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are stockpiled and recommended by public health agencies for treating and preventing seasonal and pandemic influenza. They are used clinically worldwide. OBJECTIVES To (1) describe the potential benefits and harms of NIs for influenza in all age groups by reviewing all clinical study reports (CSRs) of published and unpublished randomised, placebo-controlled trials and regulatory comments; and (2) determine the effect of oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®), Roche) treatment on mortality in patients with 2009A/H1N1 influenza. METHODS We searched trial registries, electronic databases and corresponded with regulators and sponsors to identify randomised trials of NIs. We requested full CSRs and accessed regulators' comments. We included only those trials for which we had CSRs. To examine the effects of oseltamivir on 2009A/H1N1 influenza mortality, we requested individual patient data (IPD) from corresponding authors of all included observational studies. RESULTS Effect of oseltamivir and zanamivir (Relenza®, GlaxoSmithKline) in the prevention and treatment of influenza: Oseltamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms in adults by 16.8 hours [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.4 to 25.1 hours]. Zanamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms in adults by 0.60 days (95% CI 0.39 to 0.81 days). Oseltamivir reduced unverified pneumonia in adult treatment [risk difference (RD) 1.00%, 95% CI 0.22% to 1.49%]; similar findings were observed with zanamivir prophylaxis in adults (RD 0.32%, 95% CI 0.09% to 0.41%). Oseltamivir treatment of adults increased the risk of nausea (RD 3.66%, 95% CI 0.90% to 7.39%) and vomiting (RD 4.56%, 95% CI 2.39% to 7.58%). In the treatment of children, oseltamivir induced vomiting (RD 5.34%, 95% CI 1.75% to 10.29%). Both oseltamivir and zanamivir prophylaxis reduced the risk of symptomatic influenza in individuals (oseltamivir RD 3.05%, 95% CI 1.83% to 3.88%; zanamivir RD 1.98%, 95% CI 0.98% to

  6. Peramivir susceptibilities of recombinant influenza A and B variants selected with various neuraminidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fage, Clément; Tu, Véronique; Carbonneau, Julie; Abed, Yacine; Boivin, Guy

    2017-03-22

    Peramivir is a parenteral neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) approved for treating influenza infections in a few countries. We determined peramivir susceptibilities of several uncharacterized influenza A and B neuraminidase (NA) and haemagglutinin (HA) mutants selected with different NAIs. Recombinant wild-type (WT) and mutant NA proteins were expressed in 293T cells and susceptibility to peramivir, oseltamivir and zanamivir was determined by NA inhibition assay using the MUNANA substrate. Recombinant/reassortant influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and B HA mutants were rescued by reverse genetics and assessed by plaque size or viral yield assays for drug susceptibility. Recombinant R152K, I222K/T, G248R+I266V, Q312R+I427T and R371K (A[H1N1]pdm09); E41G, 1222L/V, Q226H and S247P (A[H3N2]) and D198Y, A246D/S/T and G402S (B) mutant NA proteins (N2 numbering) were analysed. Peramivir exhibited the lowest IC50 values against both influenza A and B WT NAs. Peramivir and oseltamivir generally shared similar phenotypes. Of note, peramivir retained activity against I222K/T (A[H1N1]pdm09), I222L/V (A[H3N2]) and A246T (B) mutants, which had reduced inhibition (RI) or highly RI (HRI) against oseltamivir. Cross-RI/HRI against the three NAIs was observed for R152K, R371K and Q312R+I427T (A[H1N1]pdm09); S247P (A[H3N2]) and D198Y (B) mutants. All tested recombinant/reassortant R208K (A/Puerto Rico/8/34 [H1N1]); A28T, R124M and K189E (A/Victoria/3/75 [H3N2]) and T139N (B/Phuket/3073/13) HA mutants were susceptible to peramivir in cell culture experiments. Peramivir is highly active against seasonal influenza subtypes. Although peramivir and oseltamivir generally share similar phenotypes, peramivir still possesses activity against some variants with RI/HRI against oseltamivir. Finally, NAI-induced HA substitutions alone did not significantly impact NAI susceptibility.

  7. Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in healthy adults and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Jefferson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND:Neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs are stockpiled and recommended by public health agencies for treating and preventing seasonal and pandemic influenza. They are used clinically worldwide.OBJECTIVE:To describe the potential benefits and harms of NIs for influenza in all age groups by reviewing all clinical study reports of published and unpublished randomised, placebo-controlled trials and regulatory comments.METHODSSearch methods: We searched trial registries, electronic databases (to 22 July 2013 and regulatory archives, and corresponded with manufacturers to identify all trials. We also requested clinical study reports. We focused on the primary data sources of manufacturers but we checked that there were no published randomised controlled trials (RCTs from non-manufacturer sources by running electronic searches in the following databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, MEDLINE (Ovid, EMBASE, Embase.com, PubMed (not MEDLINE, the Database of Reviews of Effects, the NHS Economic Evaluation Database and the Health Economic Evaluations Database.Selection criteria: Randomised, placebo-controlled trials on adults and children with confirmed or suspected exposure to naturally occurring influenza.Data collection and analysis: We extracted clinical study reports and assessed risk of bias using purpose-built instruments. We analysed the effects of zanamivir and oseltamivir on time to first alleviation of symptoms, influenza outcomes, complications, hospitalisations and adverse events in the intention-to-treat (ITT population. All trials were sponsored by the manufacturers.MAIN RESULTS: We obtained 107 clinical study reports from the European Medicines Agency (EMA, GlaxoSmithKline and Roche. We accessed comments by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, EMA and Japanese regulator. We included 53 trials in Stage 1 (a judgement of appropriate study design and 46 in Stage 2 (formal analysis, including 20

  8. Virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza a subtype H5N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikesit, A. A.; Ardiansah, B.; Handayani, D. M.; Tambunan, U. S. F.; Kerami, D.

    2016-02-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 poses a significant threat to animal and human health worldwide. The number of H5N1 infection in Indonesia is the highest during 2005-2013, with a mortality rate up to 83%. A mutation that occurred in H5N1 strain made it resistant to commercial antiviral agents such as oseltamivir and zanamivir, so the more potent antiviral agent is needed. In this study, virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of H5N1 was conducted. Total 491 flavonoid compound obtained from HerbalDB were screened. Molecular docking was performed using MOE 2008.10. This research resulted in Guajavin B as the best ligand.

  9. Clinical Effectiveness of Peramivir in Comparison with Other Neuraminidase Inhibitors in Pediatric Influenza Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Hikita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The currently used antivirals in the treatment of influenza in Japan include amantadine, oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir, and peramivir. We compared the efficacy of intravenous peramivir with that of other neuraminidase inhibitors for treating pediatric influenza. The present study included 223 influenza patients (≤18 years who presented at the Hikita Pediatric Clinic between February and April 2011. We compared fever duration after starting treatment with antiviral drugs. Because inhalation drugs are difficult to use in <5-year-old patients and because of the potential adverse effects of oseltamivir in teenagers, we created two different age groups (<10-year-old group and 5–18-year-old group to evaluate treatment results. In influenza A patients between 5 and 18 years old, the median fever duration after treatment with zanamivir was 2 days, compared with 1 day for peramivir (=0.0242. In influenza B patients between 5 and 18 years old, the median fever duration after treatment with laninamivir was 3 days, compared with 1 day for peramivir (=0.0097. We found no significant difference for any of the other combinations of drug/disease type/age groups. No adverse effects were observed with the antiviral drugs used. The results suggest that peramivir is very useful in pediatric influenza patients.

  10. Susceptibility of influenza viruses circulating in Western Saudi Arabia to neuraminidase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Tolah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the sensitivity of circulating influenza viruses in Western Saudi Arabia to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs; mainly, zanamivir and oseltamivir. Methods: Respiratory samples were collected from patients presenting with respiratory symptoms to King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA between September 2013 and October 2014. All samples were tested prospectively by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for influenza A and B viruses. Positive samples were then inoculated on Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK cells and isolated viruses were examined for their sensitivity to NAIs using fluorescent neuraminidase inhibition assay. Results: Out of 406 tested samples, 25 samples (6.2% were positive for influenza A/pdmH1N1 virus, one sample (0.25% was positive for influenza A/H3N2 virus, and 7 samples (1.7% were positive for influenza B Yamagata-like virus. Screening of isolated influenza A and B viruses (9 out of 33 for their sensitivity to NAIs showed no significant resistance to available NAIs. Conclusion: Our results show that circulating influenza viruses in Jeddah are still sensitive to NAIs.

  11. Chalcones as novel influenza A (H1N1) neuraminidase inhibitors from Glycyrrhiza inflata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Lee, Hong Sik

    2011-01-01

    -8) chalcones were isolated as active principles from the acetone extract of Glycyrrhiza inflata. Compounds 3 and 6 without prenyl group showed strong inhibitory effects on various neuraminidases from influenza viral strains, H1N1, H9N2, novel H1N1 (WT), and oseltamivir-resistant novel H1N1 (H274Y) expressed...

  12. Inhibition of neuraminidase by Ganoderma triterpenoids and implications for neuraminidase inhibitor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qinchang; Bang, Tran Hai; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Sawai, Takashi; Sawai, Ken; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors are the dominant antiviral drugs for treating influenza in the clinic. Increasing prevalence of drug resistance makes the discovery of new NA inhibitors a high priority. Thirty-one triterpenoids from the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lingzhi were analyzed in an in vitro NA inhibition assay, leading to the discovery of ganoderic acid T-Q and TR as two inhibitors of H5N1 and H1N1 NAs. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the corresponding triterpenoid structure is a potential scaffold for the design of NA inhibitors. Using these triterpenoids as probes we found, through further in silico docking and interaction analysis, that interactions with the amino-acid residues Arg292 and/or Glu119 of NA are critical for the inhibition of H5N1 and H1N1. These findings should prove valuable for the design and development of NA inhibitors. PMID:26307417

  13. Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in healthy adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Tom; Jones, Mark A; Doshi, Peter; Del Mar, Chris B; Hama, Rokuro; Thompson, Matthew J; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Onakpoya, Igho; Mahtani, Kamal R; Nunan, David; Howick, Jeremy; Heneghan, Carl J

    2014-04-10

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are stockpiled and recommended by public health agencies for treating and preventing seasonal and pandemic influenza. They are used clinically worldwide. To describe the potential benefits and harms of NIs for influenza in all age groups by reviewing all clinical study reports of published and unpublished randomised, placebo-controlled trials and regulatory comments. We searched trial registries, electronic databases (to 22 July 2013) and regulatory archives, and corresponded with manufacturers to identify all trials. We also requested clinical study reports. We focused on the primary data sources of manufacturers but we checked that there were no published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from non-manufacturer sources by running electronic searches in the following databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE, Embase.com, PubMed (not MEDLINE), the Database of Reviews of Effects, the NHS Economic Evaluation Database and the Health Economic Evaluations Database. Randomised, placebo-controlled trials on adults and children with confirmed or suspected exposure to naturally occurring influenza. We extracted clinical study reports and assessed risk of bias using purpose-built instruments. We analysed the effects of zanamivir and oseltamivir on time to first alleviation of symptoms, influenza outcomes, complications, hospitalisations and adverse events in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population. All trials were sponsored by the manufacturers. We obtained 107 clinical study reports from the European Medicines Agency (EMA), GlaxoSmithKline and Roche. We accessed comments by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), EMA and Japanese regulator. We included 53 trials in Stage 1 (a judgement of appropriate study design) and 46 in Stage 2 (formal analysis), including 20 oseltamivir (9623 participants) and 26 zanamivir trials (14,628 participants). Inadequate reporting put most of the

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir when coadministered with probenecid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Craig R; Chanu, Pascal; Gieschke, Ronald; Boak, Lauren M; Jonsson, E Niclas

    2008-08-01

    Oseltamivir is a potent, selective, oral neuraminidase inhibitor for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Plasma concentrations of the active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate, are increased in the presence of probenecid, suggesting that the combination could allow for the use of reduced doses of oseltamivir. To investigate this proposal, we developed a population pharmacokinetic model and simulated the pharmacokinetics of candidate combination regimens of oral oseltamivir (45 mg and 30 mg twice a day) plus oral probenecid (500 mg/6 hourly). Probenecid plus oseltamivir 45 mg achieved all the pharmacokinetic parameters expected of oseltamivir alone, but combination with oseltamivir 30 mg and dose interval extension approaches did not. An oseltamivir-probenecid combination may compromise tolerability and enhance the potential for drug interactions. In addition, increased dosing requirements may affect compliance and attainment of optimal oseltamivir exposure, potentially facilitating the emergence of viral strains with reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir. These factors, set alongside increased capacity for oseltamivir production, should be carefully considered before an oseltamivir-probenecid combination is used.

  15. Droplet digital PCR to investigate quasi-species at codons 119 and 275 of the A(H1N1)pdm09 neuraminidase during zanamivir and oseltamivir therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Yacine; Carbonneau, Julie; L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Kaiser, Laurent; Boivin, Guy

    2017-04-01

    The H275Y and E119D neuraminidase (NA) mutations constitute important molecular markers of resistance to NA inhibitors in A(H1N1) pdm09 viruses. We used reverse transcriptase-droplet digital PCR amplification (RT-ddPCR) to analyze quasi-species at codons 275 and 119 of the NA in A(H1N1) pdm09 viruses recovered from an immuncompromised patient who received oseltamivir and zanamivir therapies. RT-ddPCR assays detected and quantified H275Y and E119D mutations with an efficiency that was comparable to that of high throughput sequencing (HiSeq 2500 Illumina, San Diego, CA) technology. With its sensitivity and reproducibility, RT-ddPCR could be a reliable method for accurate detection and quantification of major NAI-resistance mutations in clinical settings. J. Med. Virol. 89:737-741, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of vaccination and the new neuraminidase inhibitor, laninamivir, on influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuro Mizuno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence of the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in children and elderly adults is limited, although this population has the highest risk for influenza infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We enrolled 4443 participants, aged 3-97 years, who had influenza-kit-positive results during seasons 2007-12, including 2135 with influenza A, 534 with A/H1N1, and 1643 with influenza B. Eligible subjects completed a questionnaire to identify past influenza infection and vaccination history. For the diagnosis of current influenza infection, subjects were examined, and pharyngeal swabs were collected and tested using the Capilia flu rapid diagnosis kit to confirm influenza infection. An interim analysis was performed using clinician-based surveillance data for the entire four seasons of influenza infection in Japan. RESULTS: In 3035 adults aged 14-64 years, administration of the influenza vaccine significantly reduced the frequency of infection (P65 years significantly. Laninamivir, oseltamivir phosphate, zanamivir hydrate, and amantadine hydrochloride were administered to 1381, 2432, 1044, and 100 patients, respectively. They were effective in >97% of patients, with no significant differences being found. Adverse effects were few. However, the recurrence rate of influenza infection after treatment was significantly reduced in patients who received laninamivir compared with that in those who received oseltamivir and zanamivir (P<0.01. The effectiveness of laninamivirdid not decrease. CONCLUSIONS: The vaccines administered had limited efficacy in reducing the frequency of influenza infection in young adults. Laninamivir significantly reduced the recurrence of influenza infection when compared with other neuraminidase inhibitors.

  17. Exploring the chemical space of influenza neuraminidase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttapat Anuwongcharoen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fight against the emergence of mutant influenza strains has led to the screening of an increasing number of compounds for inhibitory activity against influenza neuraminidase. This study explores the chemical space of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs, which provides an opportunity to obtain further molecular insights regarding the underlying basis of their bioactivity. In particular, a large set of 347 and 175 NAIs against influenza A and B, respectively, was compiled from the literature. Molecular and quantum chemical descriptors were obtained from low-energy conformational structures geometrically optimized at the PM6 level. The bioactivities of NAIs were classified as active or inactive according to their half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50 value in which IC50 < 1µM and ≥ 10µM were defined as active and inactive compounds, respectively. Interpretable decision rules were derived from a quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR model established using a set of substructure descriptors via decision tree analysis. Univariate analysis, feature importance analysis from decision tree modeling and molecular scaffold analysis were performed on both data sets for discriminating important structural features amongst active and inactive NAIs. Good predictive performance was achieved as deduced from accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient values in excess of 81% and 0.58, respectively, for both influenza A and B NAIs. Furthermore, molecular docking was employed to investigate the binding modes and their moiety preferences of active NAIs against both influenza A and B neuraminidases. Moreover, novel NAIs with robust binding fitness towards influenza A and B neuraminidase were generated via combinatorial library enumeration and their binding fitness was on par or better than FDA-approved drugs. The results from this study are anticipated to be beneficial for guiding the rational drug design of novel NAIs for treating influenza

  18. Estimating the Fitness Advantage Conferred by Permissive Neuraminidase Mutations in Recent Oseltamivir-Resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jeff; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Petrie, Stephen; Lee, Raphael; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Reh, Lucia; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Baas, Chantal; Xue, Lumin; Vitesnik, Sophie; Leang, Sook-Kwan; McVernon, Jodie; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G.; McCaw, James M.; Bloom, Jesse D.; Hurt, Aeron C.

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir is relied upon worldwide as the drug of choice for the treatment of human influenza infection. Surveillance for oseltamivir resistance is routinely performed to ensure the ongoing efficacy of oseltamivir against circulating viruses. Since the emergence of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), the proportion of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses that are oseltamivir resistant (OR) has generally been low. However, a cluster of OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, encoding the neuraminidase (NA) H275Y oseltamivir resistance mutation, was detected in Australia in 2011 amongst community patients that had not been treated with oseltamivir. Here we combine a competitive mixtures ferret model of influenza infection with a mathematical model to assess the fitness, both within and between hosts, of recent OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. In conjunction with data from in vitro analyses of NA expression and activity we demonstrate that contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more capable of acquiring H275Y without compromising their fitness, than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses circulating in 2009. Furthermore, using reverse engineered viruses we demonstrate that a pair of permissive secondary NA mutations, V241I and N369K, confers robust fitness on recent H275Y A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, which correlated with enhanced surface expression and enzymatic activity of the A(H1N1)pdm09 NA protein. These permissive mutations first emerged in 2010 and are now present in almost all circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Our findings suggest that recent A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more permissive to the acquisition of H275Y than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, increasing the risk that OR A(H1N1)pdm09 will emerge and spread worldwide. PMID:24699865

  19. Estimating the fitness advantage conferred by permissive neuraminidase mutations in recent oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Butler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oseltamivir is relied upon worldwide as the drug of choice for the treatment of human influenza infection. Surveillance for oseltamivir resistance is routinely performed to ensure the ongoing efficacy of oseltamivir against circulating viruses. Since the emergence of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1 influenza virus (A(H1N1pdm09, the proportion of A(H1N1pdm09 viruses that are oseltamivir resistant (OR has generally been low. However, a cluster of OR A(H1N1pdm09 viruses, encoding the neuraminidase (NA H275Y oseltamivir resistance mutation, was detected in Australia in 2011 amongst community patients that had not been treated with oseltamivir. Here we combine a competitive mixtures ferret model of influenza infection with a mathematical model to assess the fitness, both within and between hosts, of recent OR A(H1N1pdm09 viruses. In conjunction with data from in vitro analyses of NA expression and activity we demonstrate that contemporary A(H1N1pdm09 viruses are now more capable of acquiring H275Y without compromising their fitness, than earlier A(H1N1pdm09 viruses circulating in 2009. Furthermore, using reverse engineered viruses we demonstrate that a pair of permissive secondary NA mutations, V241I and N369K, confers robust fitness on recent H275Y A(H1N1pdm09 viruses, which correlated with enhanced surface expression and enzymatic activity of the A(H1N1pdm09 NA protein. These permissive mutations first emerged in 2010 and are now present in almost all circulating A(H1N1pdm09 viruses. Our findings suggest that recent A(H1N1pdm09 viruses are now more permissive to the acquisition of H275Y than earlier A(H1N1pdm09 viruses, increasing the risk that OR A(H1N1pdm09 will emerge and spread worldwide.

  20. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubareva, Larisa V; Besselaar, Terry G; Daniels, Rod S; Fry, Alicia; Gregory, Vicki; Huang, Weijuan; Hurt, Aeron C; Jorquera, Patricia A; Lackenby, Angie; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Lo, Janice; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Siqueira, Marilda M; Takashita, Emi; Odagiri, Takato; Wang, Dayan; Zhang, Wenqing; Meijer, Adam

    2017-10-01

    Four World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza and one WHO Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza (WHO CCs) assessed antiviral susceptibility of 14,330 influenza A and B viruses collected by WHO-recognized National Influenza Centres (NICs) between May 2015 and May 2016. Neuraminidase (NA) inhibition assay was used to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for NA inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. Furthermore, NA sequences from 13,484 influenza viruses were retrieved from public sequence databases and screened for amino acid substitutions (AAS) associated with reduced inhibition (RI) or highly reduced inhibition (HRI) by NAIs. Of the viruses tested by WHO CCs 93% were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Approximately 0.8% (n = 113) exhibited either RI or HRI by at least one of four NAIs. As in previous seasons, the most common NA AAS was H275Y in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, which confers HRI by oseltamivir and peramivir. Two A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses carried a rare NA AAS, S247R, shown in this study to confer RI/HRI by the four NAIs. The overall frequency of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses containing NA AAS associated with RI/HRI was approximately 1.8% (125/6915), which is slightly higher than in the previous 2014-15 season (0.5%). Three B/Victoria-lineage viruses contained a new AAS, NA H134N, which conferred HRI by zanamivir and laninamivir, and borderline HRI by peramivir. A single B/Victoria-lineage virus harboured NA G104E, which was associated with HRI by all four NAIs. The overall frequency of RI/HRI phenotype among type B viruses was approximately 0.6% (43/7677), which is lower than that in the previous season. Overall, the vast majority (>99%) of the viruses tested by WHO CCs were susceptible to all four NAIs, showing normal inhibition (NI). Hence, NAIs remain the recommended antivirals for treatment of

  1. Supply of neuraminidase inhibitors related to reduced influenza A (H1N1 mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic: an ecological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula E Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The influenza A (H1N1 pandemic swept across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010 affecting millions. Many WHO Member States relied on antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Such drugs have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduced morbidity during the pandemic. However, it is less clear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. METHODS: Country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were used to predict H1N1 mortality (per 100,000 people from July 2009 to August 2010 in forty-two WHO Member States. Poisson regression was used to model the association between NAI supply and H1N1 mortality, with adjustment for economic, demographic, and health-related confounders. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100,000 people, was associated with a 1.6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period (relative rate (RR = 0.84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply. While the supply of zanamivir was considerably less than that of oseltamivir in each Member State, each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100,000, was associated with a 0.3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0.97 per log increase. CONCLUSION: While there are limitations to the ecologic nature of these data, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics.

  2. Supply of neuraminidase inhibitors related to reduced influenza A (H1N1) mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paula E; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Hubbard, Roderick J; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W; Rolfes, Melissa A; Penn, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    The influenza A (H1N1) pandemic swept across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010 affecting millions. Many WHO Member States relied on antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Such drugs have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduced morbidity during the pandemic. However, it is less clear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. Country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were used to predict H1N1 mortality (per 100,000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in forty-two WHO Member States. Poisson regression was used to model the association between NAI supply and H1N1 mortality, with adjustment for economic, demographic, and health-related confounders. After adjustment for potential confounders, each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100,000 people, was associated with a 1.6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period (relative rate (RR) = 0.84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply). While the supply of zanamivir was considerably less than that of oseltamivir in each Member State, each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100,000, was associated with a 0.3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0.97 per log increase). While there are limitations to the ecologic nature of these data, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics.

  3. Oseltamivir reduces transmission, morbidity, and mortality of highly pathogenic avian influenza in chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.; Goot, van der J.A.; Koch, G.; Boven, van M.; Kimman, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the neuraminidase inhibitors zanamivir and oseltamivir on the transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in chickens was studied. Per group, five chickens inoculated with HPAI A/Chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/83 H5N2 virus were placed 1 day post-inoculation (p.i.) in one cage

  4. Dual Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitors Open New Opportunities to Disrupt the Lethal Synergism between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eWalther

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae cause severe pneumonia and enhance lethality during influenza epidemics and pandemics. Structural and functional similarities with viral neuraminidase (NA suggest that the highly prevalent pneumococcal NAs, NanA and NanB, might contribute to this lethal synergism by supporting viral replication and that dual acting NA inhibitors (NAIs will disrupt it. To verify this hypothesis, NanA and NanB were expressed in E. coli. After confirming their activity in enzyme assays, in vitro models with influenza virus A/Jena/8178/09 (Jena/8178 and the recombinant NanA or NanB (rNanA and rNanB were established in A549 and MDCK cells to mimic the role of these pneumococcal NAs during co-infection. Studies on the influence of both NAs on viral receptor expression, spread, and yield revealed a distinct effect of NanA and NanB on viral replication in these in vitro models. Both enzymes were able to support Jena/8178 replication at certain concentrations. This synergism was disrupted by the NAIs oseltamivir, DANA, katsumadain A, and artocarpin exerting an inhibitory effect on viral NA and NanA. Interestingly, katsumadain A and artocarpin inhibited rNanA and rNanB similarly. Zanamivir did not show activity. These results demonstrate a key role of pneumococcal NAs in the lethal synergism with influenza viruses and reveal opportunities for its effective disruption.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oseltamivir combined with probenecid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holodniy, Mark; Penzak, Scott R; Straight, Timothy M; Davey, Richard T; Lee, Kelvin K; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Raisch, Dennis W; Cunningham, Francesca; Lin, Emil T; Olivo, Noemi; Deyton, Lawrence R

    2008-09-01

    Oseltamivir is an inhibitor of influenza virus neuraminidase, which is approved for use for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A and B virus infections. In the event of an influenza pandemic, oseltamivir supplies may be limited; thus, alternative dosing strategies for oseltamivir prophylaxis should be explored. Healthy volunteers were randomized to a three-arm, open-label study and given 75 mg oral oseltamivir every 24 h (group 1), 75 mg oseltamivir every 48 h (q48h) combined with 500 mg probenecid four times a day (group 2), or 75 mg oseltamivir q48h combined with 500 mg probenecid twice a day (group 3) for 15 days. Pharmacokinetic data, obtained by noncompartmental methods, and safety data are reported. Forty-eight subjects completed the pharmacokinetic analysis. The study drugs were generally well tolerated, except for one case of reversible grade 4 thrombocytopenia in a subject in group 2. The calculated 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the geometric mean ratios between groups 2 and 3 and group 1 were outside the bioequivalence criteria boundary (0.80 to 1.25) at 0.63 to 0.89 for group 2 versus group 1 and 0.57 to 0.90 for group 3 versus group 1. The steady-state apparent oral clearance of oseltamivir carboxylate was significantly less in groups 2 (7.4 liters/h; 90% CI, 6.08 to 8.71) and 3 (7.19 liters/h; 90% CI, 6.41 to 7.98) than in group 1 (9.75 liters/h; 90% CI, 6.91 to 12.60) (P probenecid four times daily achieved trough oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations adequate for neuraminidase inhibition in vitro, and this combination should be studied further.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability of Oseltamivir Combined with Probenecid▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holodniy, Mark; Penzak, Scott R.; Straight, Timothy M.; Davey, Richard T.; Lee, Kelvin K.; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Raisch, Dennis W.; Cunningham, Francesca; Lin, Emil T.; Olivo, Noemi; Deyton, Lawrence R.

    2008-01-01

    Oseltamivir is an inhibitor of influenza virus neuraminidase, which is approved for use for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A and B virus infections. In the event of an influenza pandemic, oseltamivir supplies may be limited; thus, alternative dosing strategies for oseltamivir prophylaxis should be explored. Healthy volunteers were randomized to a three-arm, open-label study and given 75 mg oral oseltamivir every 24 h (group 1), 75 mg oseltamivir every 48 h (q48h) combined with 500 mg probenecid four times a day (group 2), or 75 mg oseltamivir q48h combined with 500 mg probenecid twice a day (group 3) for 15 days. Pharmacokinetic data, obtained by noncompartmental methods, and safety data are reported. Forty-eight subjects completed the pharmacokinetic analysis. The study drugs were generally well tolerated, except for one case of reversible grade 4 thrombocytopenia in a subject in group 2. The calculated 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the geometric mean ratios between groups 2 and 3 and group 1 were outside the bioequivalence criteria boundary (0.80 to 1.25) at 0.63 to 0.89 for group 2 versus group 1 and 0.57 to 0.90 for group 3 versus group 1. The steady-state apparent oral clearance of oseltamivir carboxylate was significantly less in groups 2 (7.4 liters/h; 90% CI, 6.08 to 8.71) and 3 (7.19 liters/h; 90% CI, 6.41 to 7.98) than in group 1 (9.75 liters/h; 90% CI, 6.91 to 12.60) (P probenecid four times daily achieved trough oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations adequate for neuraminidase inhibition in vitro, and this combination should be studied further. PMID:18559644

  7. Supply of neuraminidase inhibitors related to reduced influenza A (H1N1) mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic: summary of an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paula E; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Hubbard, Roderick J; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W; Rolfes, Melissa A; Penn, Charles R

    2013-09-01

    When the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic spread across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010, many WHO Member States used antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Antivirals have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduce morbidity; however, it is unclear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. To assess the association between antivirals and influenza mortality, at an ecologic level, country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were compared to laboratory-confirmed H1N1 deaths (per 100 000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in 42 WHO Member States. From this analysis, it was found that each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100 000 people, was associated with a 1·6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period [relative rate (RR) = 0·84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply]. Each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100 000, was associated with a 0·3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0·97 per log increase). While limitations exist in the inference that can be drawn from an ecologic evaluation, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics. This article summarises the original study described previously, which can be accessed through the following citation: Miller PE, Rambachan A, Hubbard RJ, Li J, Meyer AE, et al. (2012) Supply of Neuraminidase Inhibitors Related to Reduced Influenza A (H1N1) Mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic: An Ecological Study. PLoS ONE 7(9): e43491. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Neuraminidase inhibitors in the treatment and post exposure prevention of influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza is a viral respiratory infection which presents itself as an acute febrile disease. It is contracted by virus-laden respiratory secretions from infected individuals. Symptoms usually last three to seven days and are accompanied by severely limited activities during this time. A definite diagnosis, however, can only be made by laboratory analysis. Every year, about 20% of children and 5% of adults develop symptomatic influenza of the serotypes A or B worldwide. Typical complications of influenza include viral or bacterial infections, as well as deterioration of an existing cardio-vascular or respiratory disease which may lead to hospitalization and death. Current policy recommends that individuals, who are at-risk of developing serious complications (patients over sixty years of age or patients with concomitant chronic diseases, as well as people in direct contact with high risk patients (i.e. nursing staff in living and care facilities, should be annually vaccinated with inactivated influenza strains. Various pharmaceutical agents for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza have been approved. Amantadine, which inhibits the viral M2-ion channel, is only effective in influenza-serotype A. Neuraminidase inhibitors (NI represent a new class of antivirals for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza A and B. NI interrupt various central functions that are vital for the life cycle and spreading of the virus. Two drugs of this substance class, Zanamivir (RelenzaTM and Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®, are licensed for the treatment of influenza. For adults and teenagers over thirteen years of age Oseltamivir is also approved for the prophylaxis of influenza. Zanamivir is a powder which needs to be inhaled, whereas Oseltamivir is licensed as a capsule for oral administration. M2-inhibitors and NI are only effective at an early stage of the influenza infection, i.e. during the first 36 to 48 hours after symptom onset, before replication

  9. Synergistic Antiviral Activity of S-033188/S-033447, a Novel Inhibitor of Influenza Virus Cap-Dependent Endonuclease, in Combination with Neuraminidase Inhibitors In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Atsuko; Noshi, Takeshi; Kawai, Makoto; Yoshida, Ryu; Sato, Akihiko; Shishido, Takao; Naito, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background S-033447, an active form of orally available prodrug S-033188, is a novel small molecule inhibitor of cap-dependent endonuclease that is essential for influenza virus transcription and replication. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of S-033188 in combination with neuraminidase inhibitors on the replication of influenza A/H1N1 virus in cultured cells. Methods The inhibitory effects of S-033447 in combination with NA inhibitors on the cytopathic effect of A/PR/8/34 strain in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells cultured for 2 days were tested and EC50 were determined. The combination index (CI), which were obtained when S-033188 and NA inhibitor were added at the closest ratio of each EC50 value, were used for the evaluation of these combinational effects (Table 1). CI values were calculated by the Chou and Talalay method, in which combinational effect were determined according to the criteria as follows: synergistic if CI ≤ 0.8, additive if 0.8 < CI < 1.2, and antagonistic if CI ≥ 1.2. CI = (DA/A + B)/DA + (DB/A + B)/DB + (DA/A + B × DB/A + B)/(DA × DB) DA: the EC50 of S-033447 DB: the EC50 of NA inhibitor DA/A + B: the concentration of S-033447 giving 50% inhibition in combination with NA inhibitor at the closest ratio of each EC50 value DB/A + B: the concentration of NA inhibitor giving 50% inhibition in combination with S-033447 at the closest ratio of each EC50 value Results All CI values were lower than 0.8, under the condition that both S-033447 and NA inhibitor (oseltamivir acid, zanamivir hydrate, laninamivir, or peramivir trihydrate) were added at the closest ratio of each EC50 value (Table 1). Conclusion S-033447 in combination with oseltamivir acid, zanamivir hydrate, laninamivir, or peramivir trihydrate synergistically inhibited the replication of influenza A/H1N1 virus in MDCK cells. Table 1. Combination effect of S-033447 and NA inhibitor in MDCK cells infected with A/PR/8/34 strain Substance A

  10. Some novel insights into the binding of oseltamivir and zanamivir to H5N1 and N9 influenza virus neuraminidases:a homology modeling and flexible docking study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIJA L. MIHAJLOVIC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the recent pandemic threat by the worldwide spread of H5N1 avian influenza, novel insights into the mechanism of ligand binding and interaction between various inhibitors (zanamivir – ZMV, oseltamivir – OTV, 2,3-didehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid – DANA, peramivir – PMV and neuraminidases (NA are of vital importance for the structure-based design of new anti-viral drugs. To address this issue, three-dimensional models of H5N1-NA and N9-NA were generated by homology modeling. Traditional residues within the active site throughout the family of NA protein structures were found to be highly conserved in H5N1-NA. A subtle variation between lipophilic and hydrophilic environments in H5N1-NA with respect to N9-NA was observed, thus shedding more light on the high resistance of some H5N1 strains to various NA inhibitors. Based on these models, an ArgusLab4/AScore flexible docking study was performed. The conformational differences between OTV bound to H5N1-NA and OTV bound to N9-NA were structurally identified and quantified. A slight difference of less than 1 kcal mol-1 between the OTV-N9 and OTV-N1 binding free energies is in agreement with the experimentally predicted free energy difference. The conformational differences between ZMV and OTV bound to either H5N1-NA or N9-NA were structurally identified. The binding free energies of the ZMV complexes, being slightly higher than those of OTV, are not in agreement with what was previously proposed using homology modeling. The differences between ZMV and OTV are suggested to be ascribed to the presence/absence of Asn166 in the active cavity of ZMV/OTV in H5N1-NA, and to the presence/absence of Ser165 in the binding site of ZMV/OTV in N9-NA. The charge distribution was evaluated using the semi-empirical AM1 method. The trends of the AM1 charges of the ZMV and OTV side chains in the complexes deviate from those previously reported.

  11. Financial conflicts of interest and conclusions about neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza: an analysis of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Adam G; Arachi, Diana; Hudgins, Joel; Tsafnat, Guy; Coiera, Enrico; Bourgeois, Florence T

    2014-10-07

    Industry funding and financial conflicts of interest may contribute to bias in the synthesis and interpretation of scientific evidence. To examine the association between financial conflicts of interest and characteristics of systematic reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors. Retrospective analysis. Reviews that examined the use of neuraminidase inhibitors in the prophylaxis or treatment of influenza, were published between January 2005 and May 2014, and used a systematic search protocol. Two investigators blinded to all information regarding the review authors independently assessed the presentation of evidence on the use of neuraminidase inhibitors as favorable or not favorable. Financial conflicts of interest were identified using the index reviews, other publications, and Web-based searches. Associations between financial conflicts of interest, favorability assessments, and presence of critical appraisals of evidence quality were analyzed. Twenty-six systematic reviews were identified, of which 13 examined prophylaxis and 24 examined treatment, accounting for 37 distinct assessments. Among assessments associated with a financial conflict of interest, 7 of 8 (88%) were classified as favorable, compared with 5 of 29 (17%) among those without a financial conflict of interest. Reviewers without financial conflicts of interest were more likely to include statements about the quality of the primary studies than those with financial conflicts of interest. The heterogeneity in populations and outcomes examined in the reviews precluded analysis of the contribution of selective inclusion of evidence on the discordance of the assessments made in the reviews. Many of the systematic reviews had overlapping authorship. Reviewers with financial conflicts of interest may be more likely to present evidence about neuraminidase inhibitors in a favorable manner and recommend the use of these drugs than reviewers without financial conflicts of interest. Australian National Health and

  12. Homology modelling and insilico analysis of neuraminidase protein in H1N1 Influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Manohar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, modelling of Neuraminidase protein of Influenza A virus (A/Himeji/1/2009(H1N1 neuraminidase (NA protein was done using Modeller 9V2. Modelled structure was submitted to protein model database and could be downloaded using accession number PM0075830. The modelled protein structure was subjected to In silco analysis using various bioinformatics tools. Two anti-influenza drugs currently being used to treat infected patients are oseltamivir (Tamiflu and zanamivir (Relenza, both of which target the neuraminidase enzyme of the virus. Reports of the emergence of drug resistance make the development of new anti-influenza molecules a priority. Hence the modelled structure of H1NI Neuraminidase could be very useful for in silico analysis of potential neuraminidase inhibitors.

  13. Structural basis for a class of nanomolar influenza A neuraminidase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Philip S.; Mohan, Sankar; Russell, Rupert J. M.; Bance, Nicole; Niikura, Masahiro; Pinto, B. Mario

    2013-10-01

    The influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is essential for the virus life cycle. The rise of resistance mutations against current antiviral therapies has increased the need for the development of novel inhibitors. Recent efforts have targeted a cavity adjacent to the catalytic site (the 150-cavity) in addition to the primary catalytic subsite in order to increase specificity and reduce the likelihood of resistance. This study details structural and in vitro analyses of a class of inhibitors that bind uniquely in both subsites. Crystal structures of three inhibitors show occupation of the 150-cavity in two distinct and novel binding modes. We believe these are the first nanomolar inhibitors of NA to be characterized in this way. Furthermore, we show that one inhibitor, binding within the catalytic site, offers reduced susceptibility to known resistance mutations via increased flexibility of a pendant pentyloxy group and the ability to pivot about a strong hydrogen-bonding network.

  14. Fitness costs for Influenza B viruses carrying neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant substitutions: underscoring the importance of E119A and H274Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Andrew J; Baranovich, Tatiana; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Armstrong, Jianling; Webster, Robert G; Govorkova, Elena A

    2014-05-01

    Influenza B viruses cause annual outbreaks of respiratory illness in humans and are increasingly recognized as a major cause of influenza-associated pediatric mortality. Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) are the only available therapy for patients infected with influenza B viruses, and the potential emergence of NAI-resistant viruses is a public health concern. The NA substitutions located within the enzyme active site could not only reduce NAI susceptibility of influenza B virus but also affect virus fitness. In this study, we investigated the effect of single NA substitutions on the fitness of influenza B/Yamanashi/166/1998 viruses (Yamagata lineage). We generated recombinant viruses containing either wild-type (WT) NA or NA with a substitution in the catalytic (R371K) or framework (E119A, D198E, D198Y, I222T, H274Y, and N294S) residues. We assessed NAI susceptibility, NA biochemical properties, NA protein expression, and virus replication in vitro and in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Our results showed that four NA substitutions (D198E, I222T, H274Y, and N294S) conferred reduced inhibition by oseltamivir and three (E119A, D198Y, and R371K) conferred highly reduced inhibition by oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir. All NA substitutions, except for D198Y and R371K, were genetically stable after seven passages in MDCK cells. Cell surface NA protein expression was significantly increased by H274Y and N294S substitutions. Viruses with the E119A, I222T, H274Y, or N294S substitution were not attenuated in replication efficiency in vitro or in NHBE cells. Overall, viruses with the E119A or H274Y NA substitution possess fitness comparable to NAI-susceptible virus, and the acquisition of these substitutions by influenza B viruses should be closely monitored.

  15. Chemical probes for drug-resistance assessment by binding competition (RABC): oseltamivir susceptibility evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ting-Jen R; Wang, Shi-Yun; Wen, Wen-Hsien; Su, Ching-Yao; Lin, Mengi; Huang, Wen-I; Liu, Ming-Tsan; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Wang, Nung-Sen; Cheng, Chung-Kai; Chen, Chun-Lin; Ren, Chien-Tai; Wu, Chung-Yi; Fang, Jim-Min; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-01-02

    The wizard of OS (resistance): the binding difference of neuraminidase inhibitors (zanamivir versus oseltamivir (OS)) was used to establish an assay to identify the influenza subtypes that are resistant to OS but still sensitive to zanamivir. This assay used a zanamivir-biotin conjugate to determine the OS susceptibility of a wide range of influenza viruses and over 200 clinical isolates. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Molecular Docking of Potential Inhibitors for Influenza H7N9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new strain of virus emerged in 2013, avian influenza A (H7N9 virus is a threat to the public health, due to its high lethality and pathogenicity. Furthermore, H7N9 has already generated various mutations such as neuraminidase R294K mutation which could make the anti-influenza oseltamivir less effective or ineffective. In this regard, it is urgent to develop new effective anti-H7N9 drug. In this study, we used the general H7N9 neuraminidase and oseltamivir-resistant influenza virus neuraminidase as the acceptors and employed the small molecules including quercetin, chlorogenic acid, baicalein, and oleanolic acid as the donors to perform the molecular docking for exploring the binding abilities between these small molecules and neuraminidase. The results showed that quercetin, chlorogenic acid, oleanolic acid, and baicalein present oseltamivir-comparable high binding potentials with neuraminidase. Further analyses showed that R294K mutation in neuraminidase could remarkably decrease the binding energies for oseltamivir, while other small molecules showed stable binding abilities with mutated neuraminidase. Taken together, the molecular docking studies identified four potential inhibitors for neuraminidase of H7N9, which might be effective for the drug-resistant mutants.

  17. The in vivo efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors cannot be determined from the decay rates of influenza viral titers observed in treated patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, John; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral therapy is a first line of defence against new influenza strains. Current pandemic preparations involve stock- piling oseltamivir, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), so rapidly determining the effectiveness of NAIs against new viral strains is vital for deciding how to use the stockpile. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to extract the drug efficacy of antivirals from the viral decay rate of chronic infections. In the present work, we use a nonlinear mathematical model representing the course of an influenza infection to explore the possibility of extracting NAI drug efficacy using only the observed viral titer decay rates seen in patients. We first show that the effect of a time-varying antiviral concentration can be accurately approximated by a constant efficacy. We derive a relationship relating the true treatment dose and time elapsed between doses to the constant drug dose required to approximate the time- varying dose. Unfortunately, even with the simplification of a constant drug efficacy, we show that the viral decay rate depends not just on drug efficacy, but also on several viral infection parameters, such as infection and production rate, so that it is not possible to extract drug efficacy from viral decay rate alone.

  18. Financial competing interests were associated with favorable conclusions and greater author productivity in nonsystematic reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Adam G; Zhou, Xujuan; Hudgins, Joel; Arachi, Diana; Mandl, Kenneth D; Coiera, Enrico; Bourgeois, Florence T

    2016-12-01

    To characterize the conclusions and production of nonsystematic reviews about neuraminidase inhibitors relative to financial competing interests held by the authors. We searched for articles about neuraminidase inhibitors and influenza (January 2005 to April 2015), identifying nonsystematic reviews and grading them according to the favorable/nonfavorable presentation of evidence on safety and efficacy. We recorded financial competing interests disclosed in the reviews and from other articles written by their authors. We measured associations between competing interests, author productivity, and conclusions. Among 213 nonsystematic reviews, 138 (65%) presented favorable conclusions. Financial competing interests were identified for 26% (137/532) of authors; 51% (108/213) of reviews were associated with a financial competing interest. Reviews produced exclusively by authors with financial competing interests (33%; 71/213) were more likely to present favorable conclusions than reviews with no competing interests (risk ratio 1.27; 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.55). Authors with financial competing interests published more articles about neuraminidase inhibitors than their counterparts. Half of nonsystematic reviews about neuraminidase inhibitors included an author with a financial competing interest. Reviews produced exclusively by these authors were more likely to present favorable conclusions, and authors with financial competing interests published a greater number of reviews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the absolute affinity of neuraminidase inhibitor using steered molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Nguyen Minh; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Ngo, Son Tung

    2017-08-24

    The absolute free energy difference of binding (ΔG) between neuraminidase and its inhibitor was evaluated using fast pulling of ligand (FPL) method over steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. The metric was computed through linear interaction approximation. Binding nature was described by free energy differences of electrostatic and van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The finding indicates that vdW metric is dominant over electrostatics in binding process. The computed values are in good agreement with experimental data with a correlation coefficient of R=0.82 and error of σΔGexp=2.2kcal/mol. The results were observed using Amber99SB-ILDN force field in comparison with CHARMM27 and GROMOS96 43a1 force fields. Obtained results may stimulate the search for an Influenza therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthesis of Sulfo-Sialic Acid Analogues: Potent Neuraminidase Inhibitors in Regards to Anomeric Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Christopher J; Muto, Chiaki; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Araki, Michihiro; Wu, Yan; Gao, George F; Ohrui, Hiroshi; Izumi, Minoru; Kiyota, Hiromasa

    2017-08-15

    The design, synthesis and application of N-acetylneuraminic acid-derived compounds bearing anomeric sulfo functional groups are described. These novel compounds, which we refer to as sulfo-sialic acid analogues, include 2-decarboxy-2-deoxy-2-sulfo-N-acetylneuraminic acid and its 4-deoxy-3,4-dehydrogenated pseudoglycal. While 2-decarboxy-2-deoxy-2-sulfo-N-acetylneuraminic acid contains no further modifications of the 2-deoxy-pyranose ring, it is still a more potent inhibitor of avian-origin H5N1 neuraminidase (NA) and drug-resistant His275Tyr NA as compared to the oxocarbenium ion transition state analogue 2,3-dehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid. The sulfo-sialic acid analogues described in this report are also more potent inhibitors of influenza NA (up to 40-fold) and bacterial NA (up to 8.5-fold) relative to the corresponding anomeric phosphonic acids. These results confirm that this novel anomeric sulfo modification offers great potential to improve the potency of next-generation NA inhibitors including covalent inhibitors.

  1. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Coadministration of Hedera helix L. Extract Enabled Mice to Overcome Insufficient Protection against Influenza A/PR/8 Virus Infection under Suboptimal Treatment with Oseltamivir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hye Hong

    Full Text Available Several anti-influenza drugs that reduce disease manifestation exist, and although these drugs provide clinical benefits in infected patients, their efficacy is limited by the emergence of drug-resistant influenza viruses. In the current study, we assessed the therapeutic strategy of enhancing the antiviral efficacy of an existing neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, by coadministering with the leaf extract from Hedera helix L, commonly known as ivy. Ivy extract has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and antihelminthic properties. In the present study, we investigated its potential antiviral properties against influenza A/PR/8 (PR8 virus in a mouse model with suboptimal oseltamivir that mimics a poor clinical response to antiviral drug treatment. Suboptimal oseltamivir resulted in insufficient protection against PR8 infection. Oral administration of ivy extract with suboptimal oseltamivir increased the antiviral activity of oseltamivir. Ivy extract and its compounds, particularly hedrasaponin F, significantly reduced the cytopathic effect in PR8-infected A549 cells in the presence of oseltamivir. Compared with oseltamivir treatment alone, coadministration of the fraction of ivy extract that contained the highest proportion of hedrasaponin F with oseltamivir decreased pulmonary inflammation in PR8-infected mice. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2, were reduced by treatment with oseltamivir and the fraction of ivy extract. Analysis of inflammatory cell infiltration in the bronchial alveolar of PR8-infected mice revealed that CD11b+Ly6G+ and CD11b+Ly6Cint cells were recruited after virus infection; coadministration of the ivy extract fraction with oseltamivir reduced infiltration of these inflammatory cells. In a model of suboptimal oseltamivir treatment, coadministration of ivy extract fraction that includes hedrasaponin F increased protection against PR8

  3. Coadministration of Hedera helix L. Extract Enabled Mice to Overcome Insufficient Protection against Influenza A/PR/8 Virus Infection under Suboptimal Treatment with Oseltamivir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eun-Hye; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Shim, Aeri; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Chang, Sun-Young; Jeong, Hyeon Gun; Kim, Jong Geal; Seo, Sang-Uk; Kim, HyunPyo; Kwon, YongSoo; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Several anti-influenza drugs that reduce disease manifestation exist, and although these drugs provide clinical benefits in infected patients, their efficacy is limited by the emergence of drug-resistant influenza viruses. In the current study, we assessed the therapeutic strategy of enhancing the antiviral efficacy of an existing neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, by coadministering with the leaf extract from Hedera helix L, commonly known as ivy. Ivy extract has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and antihelminthic properties. In the present study, we investigated its potential antiviral properties against influenza A/PR/8 (PR8) virus in a mouse model with suboptimal oseltamivir that mimics a poor clinical response to antiviral drug treatment. Suboptimal oseltamivir resulted in insufficient protection against PR8 infection. Oral administration of ivy extract with suboptimal oseltamivir increased the antiviral activity of oseltamivir. Ivy extract and its compounds, particularly hedrasaponin F, significantly reduced the cytopathic effect in PR8-infected A549 cells in the presence of oseltamivir. Compared with oseltamivir treatment alone, coadministration of the fraction of ivy extract that contained the highest proportion of hedrasaponin F with oseltamivir decreased pulmonary inflammation in PR8-infected mice. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, were reduced by treatment with oseltamivir and the fraction of ivy extract. Analysis of inflammatory cell infiltration in the bronchial alveolar of PR8-infected mice revealed that CD11b+Ly6G+ and CD11b+Ly6Cint cells were recruited after virus infection; coadministration of the ivy extract fraction with oseltamivir reduced infiltration of these inflammatory cells. In a model of suboptimal oseltamivir treatment, coadministration of ivy extract fraction that includes hedrasaponin F increased protection against PR8 infection that could be

  4. Oseltamivir Treatment for Children with Influenza-Like Illness in China: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunling Shen

    Full Text Available Influenza is a common viral respiratory infection that causes epidemics and pandemics in the human population. Oseltamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor-a new class of antiviral therapy for influenza. Although its efficacy and safety have been established, there is uncertainty regarding whether influenza-like illness (ILI in children is best managed by oseltamivir at the onset of illness, and its cost-effectiveness in children has not been studied in China.To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of post rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT treatment with oseltamivir and empiric treatment with oseltamivir comparing with no antiviral therapy against influenza for children with ILI.We developed a decision-analytic model based on previously published evidence to simulate and evaluate 1-year potential clinical and economic outcomes associated with three managing strategies for children presenting with symptoms of influenza. Model inputs were derived from literature and expert opinion of clinical practice and research in China. Outcome measures included costs and quality-adjusted life year (QALY. All the interventions were compared with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER.In base case analysis, empiric treatment with oseltamivir consistently produced the greatest gains in QALY. When compared with no antiviral therapy, the empiric treatment with oseltamivir strategy is very cost effective with an ICER of RMB 4,438. When compared with the post RIDT treatment with oseltamivir, the empiric treatment with oseltamivir strategy is dominant. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis projected that there is a 100% probability that empiric oseltamivir treatment would be considered as a very cost-effective strategy compared to the no antiviral therapy, according to the WHO recommendations for cost-effectiveness thresholds. The same was concluded with 99% probability for empiric oseltamivir treatment being a very cost-effective strategy compared to the post RIDT

  5. Prognosis of hospitalized patients with 2009 H1N1 influenza in Spain: influence of neuraminidase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Castilla, Jesús; Godoy, Pere; Martín, Vicente; Soldevila, Nuria; Alonso, Jordi; Astray, Jenaro; Baricot, Maretva; Cantón, Rafael; Castro, Ady; Gónzález-Candelas, Fernando; Mayoral, José María; Quintana, José María; Pumarola, Tomás; Tamames, Sonia; Sáez, Marc; Domínguez, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Background The H1N1 influenza pandemic strain has been associated with a poor prognosis in hospitalized patients. The present report evaluates the factors influencing prognosis. Methods A total of 813 patients hospitalized with H1N1 influenza in 36 hospitals (nationwide) in Spain were analysed. Detailed histories of variables preceding hospital admission were obtained by interview, validating data on medications and vaccine with their attending physicians. Data on treatment and complications during hospital stay were recorded. As definition of poor outcome, the endpoints of death and admission to intensive care were combined; and as a further outcome, length of stay was used. Results The mean age was 38.5 years (SD 22.8 years). There were 10 deaths and 79 admissions to intensive care (combined, 88). The use of neuraminidase inhibitors was reported by 495 patients (60.9%). The variables significantly associated with a poor outcome were diabetes (OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.21–4.02), corticosteroid therapy (OR = 3.37, 95% CI = 1.39–8.20) and use of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (OR = 2.68, 95% CI = 1.14–6.36), while the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.34–0.94) was protective. Neuraminidase inhibitors within the first 2 days after the influenza onset reduced hospital stay by a mean of 1.9 days (95% CI = 4.7–6.6). Conclusions The use of neuraminidase inhibitors decreases the length of hospital stay and admission to intensive care and/or death. PMID:22467633

  6. Neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses is determined by arginine 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mögling, Ramona; Richard, Mathilde J; Vliet, Stefan van der; Beek, Ruud van; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Spronken, Monique I; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, an increasing proportion of circulating human influenza A(H3N2) viruses exhibited haemagglutination activity that was sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. This change in haemagglutination as compared to older circulating A(H3N2) viruses prompted an investigation of the underlying molecular basis. Recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses were found to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes in a manner that could be blocked with either oseltamivir or neuraminidase-specific antisera, indicating that agglutination was driven by neuraminidase, with a low or negligible contribution of haemagglutinin. Using representative virus recombinants it was shown that the haemagglutinin of a recent A(H3N2) virus indeed had decreased activity to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes, while its neuraminidase displayed increased haemagglutinating activity. Viruses with chimeric and mutant neuraminidases were used to identify the amino acid substitution histidine to arginine at position 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site as the determinant of this neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination. An analysis of publicly available neuraminidase gene sequences showed that viruses with histidine at position 150 were rapidly replaced by viruses with arginine at this position between 2005 and 2008, in agreement with the phenotypic data. As a consequence of neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent A(H3N2) viruses and poor haemagglutination via haemagglutinin, haemagglutination inhibition assays with A(H3N2) antisera are no longer useful to characterize the antigenic properties of the haemagglutinin of these viruses for vaccine strain selection purposes. Continuous monitoring of the evolution of these viruses and potential consequences for vaccine strain selection remains important.

  7. Triple Combination of Amantadine, Ribavirin, and Oseltamivir Is Highly Active and Synergistic against Drug Resistant Influenza Virus Strains In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jack T.; Hoopes, Justin D.; Le, Minh H.; Smee, Donald F.; Patick, Amy K.; Faix, Dennis J.; Blair, Patrick J.; de Jong, Menno D.; Prichard, Mark N.; Went, Gregory T.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid emergence and subsequent spread of the novel 2009 Influenza A/H1N1 virus (2009 H1N1) has prompted the World Health Organization to declare the first pandemic of the 21st century, highlighting the threat of influenza to public health and healthcare systems. Widespread resistance to both classes of influenza antivirals (adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors) occurs in both pandemic and seasonal viruses, rendering these drugs to be of marginal utility in the treatment modality. Worldwide, virtually all 2009 H1N1 and seasonal H3N2 strains are resistant to the adamantanes (rimantadine and amantadine), and the majority of seasonal H1N1 strains are resistant to oseltamivir, the most widely prescribed neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI). To address the need for more effective therapy, we evaluated the in vitro activity of a triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD) regimen composed of drugs with different mechanisms of action against drug-resistant seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses. Amantadine, ribavirin, and oseltamivir, alone and in combination, were tested against amantadine- and oseltamivir-resistant influenza A viruses using an in vitro infection model in MDCK cells. Our data show that the triple combination was highly synergistic against drug-resistant viruses, and the synergy of the triple combination was significantly greater than the synergy of any double combination tested (Pamantadine and oseltamivir contributed to the antiviral activity of the TCAD regimen against amantadine- and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, respectively, at concentrations where they had no activity as single agents, and at concentrations that were clinically achievable. Our data demonstrate that the TCAD regimen composed of amantadine, ribavirin, and oseltamivir is highly synergistic against resistant viruses, including 2009 H1N1. The TCAD regimen overcomes baseline drug resistance to both classes of approved influenza antivirals, and thus may represent a highly active antiviral

  8. Triple combination of amantadine, ribavirin, and oseltamivir is highly active and synergistic against drug resistant influenza virus strains in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack T Nguyen

    Full Text Available The rapid emergence and subsequent spread of the novel 2009 Influenza A/H1N1 virus (2009 H1N1 has prompted the World Health Organization to declare the first pandemic of the 21st century, highlighting the threat of influenza to public health and healthcare systems. Widespread resistance to both classes of influenza antivirals (adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors occurs in both pandemic and seasonal viruses, rendering these drugs to be of marginal utility in the treatment modality. Worldwide, virtually all 2009 H1N1 and seasonal H3N2 strains are resistant to the adamantanes (rimantadine and amantadine, and the majority of seasonal H1N1 strains are resistant to oseltamivir, the most widely prescribed neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI. To address the need for more effective therapy, we evaluated the in vitro activity of a triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD regimen composed of drugs with different mechanisms of action against drug-resistant seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses. Amantadine, ribavirin, and oseltamivir, alone and in combination, were tested against amantadine- and oseltamivir-resistant influenza A viruses using an in vitro infection model in MDCK cells. Our data show that the triple combination was highly synergistic against drug-resistant viruses, and the synergy of the triple combination was significantly greater than the synergy of any double combination tested (P<0.05, including the combination of two NAIs. Surprisingly, amantadine and oseltamivir contributed to the antiviral activity of the TCAD regimen against amantadine- and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, respectively, at concentrations where they had no activity as single agents, and at concentrations that were clinically achievable. Our data demonstrate that the TCAD regimen composed of amantadine, ribavirin, and oseltamivir is highly synergistic against resistant viruses, including 2009 H1N1. The TCAD regimen overcomes baseline drug resistance to both classes of

  9. The accuracy and timeliness of neuraminidase inhibitor dispensing data for predicting laboratory-confirmed influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenburg, J; Charland, K M; DE Serres, G; Buckeridge, D L

    2016-06-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitor (NI) dispensing has emerged as a possible automated data source for influenza surveillance. We aimed to evaluate its timeliness, correlation, and predictive accuracy in relation to influenza activity in Quebec, Canada, 2010-2013. Our secondary objective was to use the same metrics to compare NI dispensing to visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) in emergency departments (EDs). Provincial weekly counts of positive influenza laboratory tests were used as a reference measure for the level of influenza circulation. We applied ARIMA models to account for serial correlation. We computed cross-correlations to measure the strengths of association and lead-lag relationships between NI dispensing, ILI ED visits, and our reference indicator. Finally, using an ARIMA model, we evaluated the ability of NI dispensing and ILI ED visits to predict laboratory-confirmed influenza. NI dispensing was significantly correlated (R = 0·68) with influenza activity with no lag. The maximal correlation of ILI ED visits was not as strong (R = 0·50). Both NI dispensing and ILI ED visits were significant predictors of laboratory-confirmed influenza in a multivariable model; predictive potential was greatest when NI counts were lagged to precede laboratory surveillance by 2 weeks. We conclude that NI dispensing data provides timely and valuable information for influenza surveillance.

  10. Effect of an Echinacea-Based Hot Drink Versus Oseltamivir in Influenza Treatment: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Multicenter, Noninferiority Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rau?, Karel; Pleschka, Stephan; Klein, Peter; Schoop, Roland; Fisher, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Echinacea has antiviral activity against influenza viruses in vitro and has traditionally been used for treatment of colds and flu. Objectives: This randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter, controlled clinical trial compared a new echinacea formulation with the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir, the gold standard treatment for influenza. Methods: Following informed consent, 473 patients with early influenza symptoms (≤48 hours) were recruited in primary care in...

  11. Potent bacterial neuraminidase inhibitors, anthraquinone glucosides from Polygonum cuspidatum and their inhibitory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Zia; Song, Yeong Hun; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Kim, Jeong Yoon; Yuk, Heung Joo; Park, Ki Hun

    2016-12-04

    P. cuspidatum is a popular Chinese medicinal herb, having a long history of usage in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of several inflammatory diseases in the form of powders and decoctions. Similarly there are many reports that P. cuspidatum has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, both of which are properties associated with compounds having activity against bacterial neuraminidase (BNA). We investigated whether P. cuspidatum's metabolites exhibited BNA inhibition. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found several inhibitors from the methanol extract of this plant, and then fully characterized their inhibitory mechanisms. Activity guided separation of methanol extract led to isolation of individual constituents, and subsequently their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Detailed kinetic behaviors of BNA inhibitors were explored by showing the changes of Km and Vmax, the ratios of KI/KIS and Kik/Kiv, and fluorescence quenching effect. This study attempted to isolate the responsible metabolites and elucidate the BNA inhibitory mechanism. The principal BNA inhibitory compounds (2-6) were identified as emodin (2), physcion-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4), emodin-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), and 2-methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyljuglone (6). Unexpectedly, anthraquinone glucosides (3-5) were much more potent than their corresponding aglycones (1 and 2). For example, emodin (2) had an IC50=5.4μM, whereas its glucosides (4 and 5) had IC50=0.85μM and 0.43μM respectively. A similar trend was observed with physcion (1, IC50>200μM) and its glucoside (3, IC50=6.2μM). The anthraquinone (2) was mixed type I inhibitor, whereas its glucosides (4 and 5) were noncompetitive. In addition, the fluorescence quenching study showed that the affinity constants (KSV) of inhibitors increased in proportion to their inhibitory potencies. Furthermore, we quantified the major and minor metabolites through UPLC

  12. Screening for Neuraminidase Inhibitory Activity in Traditional Chinese Medicines Used to Treat Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Ying Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen for influenza virus neuraminidase inhibition and to provide a reference for the clinical treatment of influenza using traditional Chinese medicines (TCM. In this study, 421 crude extracts (solubilized with petroleum ether, ethanol, ethyl acetate, and aqueous solvents were obtained from 113 TCM. The medicine extracts were then reacted with oseltamivir, using 2’-(4-methylumbelliferyl-α-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (MUNANA as the substrate, to determine influenza virus neuraminidase activity using a standard fluorimetric assay. It was found that Chinese medicine extracts from Pyrola calliantha, Cynanchum wilfordii, Balanophora involucrata and Paeonia delavayi significantly inhibited neuraminidase activity at a concentration of 40 μg/mL. Dose-dependent inhibitory assays also revealed significant inhibition. The IC50 range of the TCM extracts for influenza virus neuraminidase was approximately 12.66–34.85 μg/mL, respectively. Some Chinese medicines have clear anti-influenza viral effects that may play an important role in the treatment of influenza through the inhibition of viral neuraminidase. The results of this study demonstrated that plant medicines can serve as a useful source of neuraminidase (NA inhibitors and further investigation into the pharmacologic activities of these extracts is warranted.

  13. Synergistic Antiviral Activity of S-033188/S-033447, a Novel Inhibitor of Influenza Virus Cap-Dependent Endonuclease, in Combination with Neuraminidase Inhibitors In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Atsuko; Noshi, Takeshi; Kawai, Makoto; Yoshida, Ryu; Sato, Akihiko; Shishido, Takao; Naito, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background S-033447, an active form of orally available prodrug S-033188, is a novel small molecule inhibitor of cap-dependent endonuclease that is essential for influenza virus transcription and replication. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of S-033188 in combination with neuraminidase inhibitors on the replication of influenza A/H1N1 virus in cultured cells. Methods The inhibitory effects of S-033447 in combination with NA inhibitors on the cytopathic effect of A/P...

  14. Neuraminidase inhibitor resistance in influenza: assessing the danger of its generation and spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuraminidase Inhibitors (NI are currently the most effective drugs against influenza. Recent cases of NI resistance are a cause for concern. To assess the danger of NI resistance, a number of studies have reported the fraction of treated patients from which resistant strains could be isolated. Unfortunately, those results strongly depend on the details of the experimental protocol. Additionally, knowing the fraction of patients harboring resistance is not too useful by itself. Instead, we want to know how likely it is that an infected patient can generate a resistant infection in a secondary host, and how likely it is that the resistant strain subsequently spreads. While estimates for these parameters can often be obtained from epidemiological data, such data is lacking for NI resistance in influenza. Here, we use an approach that does not rely on epidemiological data. Instead, we combine data from influenza infections of human volunteers with a mathematical framework that allows estimation of the parameters that govern the initial generation and subsequent spread of resistance. We show how these parameters are influenced by changes in drug efficacy, timing of treatment, fitness of the resistant strain, and details of virus and immune system dynamics. Our study provides estimates for parameters that can be directly used in mathematical and computational models to study how NI usage might lead to the emergence and spread of resistance in the population. We find that the initial generation of resistant cases is most likely lower than the fraction of resistant cases reported. However, we also show that the results depend strongly on the details of the within-host dynamics of influenza infections, and most importantly, the role the immune system plays. Better knowledge of the quantitative dynamics of the immune response during influenza infections will be crucial to further improve the results.

  15. The mechanisms of sudden-onset type adverse reactions to oseltamivir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, R; Bennett, C L

    2017-02-01

    Oseltamivir is contraindicated for people aged 10-19 in principle in Japan, due to concern about abnormal behaviours. Sudden death is another concern. This review examines growing evidence of their association and discusses underlying mechanisms of these sudden-onset type reactions to oseltamivir. First, the importance of animal models and the concept of human equivalent dose (HED) is summarized. Second, the specific condition for oseltamivir use, influenza infection, is reviewed. Third, findings from toxicity studies conducted prior to and after the marketing of oseltamivir are reported on to provide context on the observation of a possible causal association. Fourth, similarity and consistency of toxicity in humans with that in other animals is described. Finally, coherence of toxicokinetic and molecular level of evidence (channels, receptors and enzymes), including differences from the toxicity of other neuraminidase inhibitors, is reviewed. It is concluded that unchanged oseltamivir has various effects on the central nervous system (CNS) that may be related to clinical findings including hypothermia, abnormal behaviours including with fatal outcome, and sudden death. Among receptors and enzymes related to CNS action, it is known that oseltamivir inhibits nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which are closely related to hypothermia, as well as human monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A), which is closely related to abnormal or excitatory behaviours. Receptors such as GABAA , GABAB and NMDA and their related receptors/channels including Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels are thought to be other candidates for investigation related to respiratory suppression followed by sudden death and psychotic reactions (both acute and chronic), respectively. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Oral and Intravenous Oseltamivir Treatment of Severe Influenza B Virus Infection Requiring Organ Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch, Katharina; Chen, Xi; Miera, Oliver; Peters, Björn; Obermeier, Patrick; Francis, Roland C; Amann, Válerie; Duwe, Susanne; Fraaij, Pieter; Heider, Alla; de Zwart, Marcel; Berger, Felix; Osterhaus, Albert; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Rath, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    Patients with severe influenza virus infection, multi-organ failure and organ replacement therapy may absorb and metabolize neuraminidase inhibitors differently. Systematic pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic clinical trials are currently lacking in this high-risk group. Inadequate dosing increases the risk of treatment failure and drug resistance, especially in severely ill patients with elevated virus loads. This study aims to explore the impact of organ replacement therapy on oseltamivir drug concentrations. Serial pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic measurements and Sieving coefficients were assessed in two patients with severe influenza B infection requiring organ replacement therapy. Patient #1, a 9-year-old female with severe influenza B virus infection, biventricular assist device, and continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration, received 75 mg oral oseltamivir twice-daily for 2 days, then intravenous oseltamivir with one-time renoprotective dosing (40 mg), followed by regular intravenous administration of 100 mg twice-daily. Plasma oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations were stable initially, but only regular administration of 100 mg resulted in virus load decline and clinical improvement. Patient #2, a 28-year-old female with influenza B virus infection requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, received 75 mg oral oseltamivir twice-daily, resulting in erratic oseltamivir blood concentrations. In both patients, drug concentrations remained well within safety margins. In severe cases with multi-organ failure, administration of 100 mg intravenous oseltamivir twice-daily provided reliable drug concentrations, as opposed to renoprotective and oral dosing, thereby minimizing the risk of treatment failure and drug resistance. Evidence-based pediatric dosing recommendations and effective intravenous antiviral treatment modalities are needed for intensive care patients with life-threatening influenza disease.

  17. Inhibition of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant influenza virus by DAS181, a novel sialidase fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallen B Triana-Baltzer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug resistance for influenza therapies remains a concern due to the high prevalence of H1N1 2009 seasonal influenza isolates which display H274Y associated oseltamivir-resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of novel H1N1 raises the potential that additional reassortments can occur, resulting in drug resistant virus. Thus, additional antiviral approaches are urgently needed. DAS181 (Fludase, a sialidase fusion protein, has been shown to have inhibitory activity against a large number of seasonal influenza strains and a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI strain (H5N1. Here, we examine the in vitro activity of DAS181 against a panel of 2009 oseltamivir-resistant seasonal H1N1 clinical isolates. The activity of DAS181 against nine 2009, two 2007, and two 2004 clinical isolates of seasonal IFV H1N1 was examined using plaque number reduction assay on MDCK cells. DAS181 strongly inhibited all tested isolates. EC50 values remained constant against isolates from 2004, 2007, and 2009, suggesting that there was no change in DAS181 sensitivity over time. As expected, all 2007 and 2009 isolates were resistant to oseltamivir, consistent with the identification of the H274Y mutation in the NA gene of all these isolates. Interestingly, several of the 2007 and 2009 isolates also exhibited reduced sensitivity to zanamivir, and accompanying HA mutations near the sialic acid binding site were observed. DAS181 inhibits IFV that is resistant to NAIs. Thus, DAS181 may offer an alternative therapeutic option for seasonal or pandemic IFVs that become resistant to currently available antiviral drugs.

  18. Emergence and spread of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) influenza viruses in Oceania, South East Asia and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C; Ernest, Joanne; Deng, Yi-Mo; Iannello, Pina; Besselaar, Terry G; Birch, Chris; Buchy, Philippe; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Chiu, Shu-Chun; Dwyer, Dominic; Guigon, Aurélie; Harrower, Bruce; Kei, Ip Peng; Kok, Tuckweng; Lin, Cui; McPhie, Ken; Mohd, Apandi; Olveda, Remigio; Panayotou, Tony; Rawlinson, William; Scott, Lesley; Smith, David; D'Souza, Holly; Komadina, Naomi; Shaw, Robert; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G

    2009-07-01

    The neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) are an effective class of antiviral drugs for the treatment of influenza A and B infections. Until recently, only a low prevalence of NAI resistance (Oceania and SE Asia for their susceptibility to NAIs oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir in a fluorescence-based neuraminidase inhibition assay. Viruses with reduced oseltamivir susceptibility were further analysed by pyrosequencing assay. The frequency of the oseltamivir-resistant H274Y mutant increased significantly after May 2008, resulting in an overall proportion of 64% (168/264) resistance among A(H1N1) strains, although this subtype represented only 11.6% of all isolates received during 2008. H274Y mutant viruses demonstrated on average a 1466-fold reduction in oseltamivir susceptibility and 527-fold reduction in peramivir sensitivity compared to wild-type A(H1N1) viruses. The mutation had no impact on zanamivir susceptibility. Ongoing surveillance is essential to monitor how these strains may spread or persist in the future and to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments against them.

  19. Preliminary investigation on the combined effect of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM and oseltamivir on experimental influenza А virus infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka M. Mileva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available nfluenza is one of the most contageous viral diseases, caused by influenza virus and affects thousands of people every year. The infection causes changes in the intracellular redox balance, increased production of reactive oxygen species, development of antioxidant deficiency and conditions of oxidative stress. Decreased level of gluthatione during flu is responsible for the severe pathology and complications. The purpose of our studies was to follow the effect of the combination S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM as a precursor of glutathione and the specific neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in influenza infected mice. SAM was given as a single daily dose of 50,100 and 150 mg/kg, starting from 5 days before infection until day 4th after viral inoculation. Oseltamivir was given in a daily dose of 2.5 mg/kg in two intakes for 5 days, starting from 4th hour before infection. End-point evaluation was 14 day survival rate, avarege survival time, index of protection, and virus titer in lungs. The results showed that application of SAM alone did not have any antiviral prevention. In mice supplemented with oseltamivir only survival rate was 70%, but combination of oseltamivir and SAM in lower doses led to rising of 90% of protection. The present findings suggest that combined therapy of SAM as a precursor of glutathione and the specific inhibitor of inflienza virus replication oseltamivir could be effective on modulation of host defense mechanism(s in low therapeutic doses.

  20. The I427T neuraminidase (NA) substitution, located outside the NA active site of an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 variant with reduced susceptibility to NA inhibitors, alters NA properties and impairs viral fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Véronique; Abed, Yacine; Barbeau, Xavier; Carbonneau, Julie; Fage, Clément; Lagüe, Patrick; Boivin, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of pan neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI)-resistant variants constitutes a serious clinical concern. An influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 variant containing the I427T/Q313R neuraminidase (NA) substitutions was previously identified in a surveillance study. Although these changes are not part of the NA active site, the variant showed reduced susceptibility to many NAIs. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of resistance for the I427T/Q313R substitution and its impact on the NA enzyme and viral fitness. Recombinant wild-type (WT), I427T/Q313R and I427T A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were generated by reverse genetics and tested for their drug susceptibilities, enzymatic properties and replication kinetics in vitro as well as their virulence in mice. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for NA structural analysis. The I427T substitution, which was responsible for the resistance phenotype observed in the double (I427T/Q313R) mutant, induced 17-, 56-, 7-, and 14-fold increases in IC50 values against oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir, respectively. The I427T substitution alone or combined to Q313R significantly reduced NA affinity. The I427T/Q313R and to a lesser extent I427T recombinant viruses displayed reduced viral titers vs WT in vitro. In experimentally-infected mice, the mortality rates were 62.5%, 0% and 14.3% for the WT, I417T/Q313R and I427T viruses, respectively. There were about 2.5- and 2-Log reductions in mean lung viral titers on day 5 post-infection for the I427T/Q313R and I427T mutants, respectively, compared to WT. Results from simulations revealed that the I427T change indirectly altered the stability of the catalytic R368 residue of the NA enzyme causing its reduced binding to the substrate/inhibitor. This study demonstrates that the I427T/Q313R mutant, not only alters NAI susceptibility but also compromises NA properties and viral fitness, which could explain its infrequent detection in clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  1. QSAR analyses on avian influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors using CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingyue; Yu, Kunqian; Liu, Hong; Luo, Xiaomin; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang; Jiang, Hualiang

    2006-09-01

    The recent wide spreading of the H5N1 avian influenza virus (AIV) in Asia, Europe and Africa and its ability to cause fatal infections in human has raised serious concerns about a pending global flu pandemic. Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors are currently the only option for treatment or prophylaxis in humans infected with this strain. However, drugs currently on the market often meet with rapidly emerging resistant mutants and only have limited application as inadequate supply of synthetic material. To dig out helpful information for designing potent inhibitors with novel structures against the NA, we used automated docking, CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR methods to investigate the quantitative structure-activity relationship for 126 NA inhibitors (NIs) with great structural diversities and wide range of bioactivities against influenza A virus. Based on the binding conformations discovered via molecular docking into the crystal structure of NA, CoMFA and CoMSIA models were successfully built with the cross-validated q 2 of 0.813 and 0.771, respectively. HQSAR was also carried out as a complementary study in that HQSAR technique does not require 3D information of these compounds and could provide a detailed molecular fragment contribution to the inhibitory activity. These models also show clearly how steric, electrostatic, hydrophobicity, and individual fragments affect the potency of NA inhibitors. In addition, CoMFA and CoMSIA field distributions are found to be in well agreement with the structural characteristics of the corresponding binding sites. Therefore, the final 3D-QSAR models and the information of the inhibitor-enzyme interaction should be useful in developing novel potent NA inhibitors.

  2. Novel influenza A(H1N1) 2009 in vitro reassortant viruses with oseltamivir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Michèle; Duchamp, Maude Bouscambert; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Frobert, Emilie; Moulès, Vincent; Ferraris, Olivier; Valette, Martine; Escuret, Vanessa; Lina, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    With the recent emergence of the novel A(H1N1) virus in 2009, the efficacy of available drugs, such as neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, is of great concern for good patient care. Influenza viruses are known to be able to acquire resistance. In 2007, A(H1N1) viruses related to A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1) (A[H1N1] Brisbane-like virus), which are naturally resistant to oseltamivir, emerged. Resistance to oseltamivir can be acquired either by spontaneous mutation in the NA (H275Y in N1), or by reassortment with a mutated NA. It is therefore crucial to determine the risk of pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus acquiring resistance against oseltamivir by reassortment. We estimated the capacity of reassortment between the A(H1N1) 2009 virus and an oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) Brisbane-like virus by in vitro coinfections of influenza-permissive cells. The screening and the analysis of reassortant viruses was performed by specific reverse transcriptase PCRs and by sequencing. Out of 50 analysed reassortant viruses, two harboured the haemagglutinin (HA) segment from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and the mutated NA originated from the A(H1N1) Brisbane-like virus. The replicating capacities of these viruses were measured, showing no difference as compared to the two parental strains, suggesting that acquisition of the mutated NA segment did not impair viral fitness in vitro. Our results suggest that the novel A(H1N1) 2009 virus can acquire by in vitro genetic reassortment the H275Y mutated NA segment conferring resistance to oseltamivir.

  3. Virtual screening approach to identifying influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors using molecular docking combined with machine-learning-based scoring function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Ai, Hai-Xin; Li, Shi-Meng; Qi, Meng-Yuan; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Hong-Sheng

    2017-10-10

    In recent years, an epidemic of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H7N9 virus has persisted in China, with a high mortality rate. To develop novel anti-influenza therapies, we have constructed a machine-learning-based scoring function (RF-NA-Score) for the effective virtual screening of lead compounds targeting the viral neuraminidase (NA) protein. RF-NA-Score is more accurate than RF-Score, with a root-mean-square error of 1.46, Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.707, and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.707 in a 5-fold cross-validation study. The performance of RF-NA-Score in a docking-based virtual screening of NA inhibitors was evaluated with a dataset containing 281 NA inhibitors and 322 noninhibitors. Compared with other docking-rescoring virtual screening strategies, rescoring with RF-NA-Score significantly improved the efficiency of virtual screening, and a strategy that averaged the scores given by RF-NA-Score, based on the binding conformations predicted with AutoDock, AutoDock Vina, and LeDock, was shown to be the best strategy. This strategy was then applied to the virtual screening of NA inhibitors in the SPECS database. The 100 selected compounds were tested in an in vitro H7N9 NA inhibition assay, and two compounds with novel scaffolds showed moderate inhibitory activities. These results indicate that RF-NA-Score improves the efficiency of virtual screening for NA inhibitors, and can be used successfully to identify new NA inhibitor scaffolds. Scoring functions specific for other drug targets could also be established with the same method.

  4. Parallel screening of wild-type and drug-resistant targets for anti-resistance neuraminidase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Cheng Hsu

    Full Text Available Infection with influenza virus is a major public health problem, causing serious illness and death each year. Emergence of drug-resistant influenza virus strains limits the effectiveness of drug treatment. Importantly, a dual H275Y/I223R mutation detected in the pandemic influenza A 2009 virus strain results in multidrug resistance to current neuraminidase (NA drugs. Therefore, discovery of new agents for treating multiple drug-resistant (MDR influenza virus infections is important. Here, we propose a parallel screening strategy that simultaneously screens wild-type (WT and MDR NAs, and identifies inhibitors matching the subsite characteristics of both NA-binding sites. These may maintain their potency when drug-resistant mutations arise. Initially, we analyzed the subsite of the dual H275Y/I223R NA mutant. Analysis of the site-moiety maps of NA protein structures show that the mutant subsite has a relatively small volume and is highly polar compared with the WT subsite. Moreover, the mutant subsite has a high preference for forming hydrogen-bonding interactions with polar moieties. These changes may drive multidrug resistance. Using this strategy, we identified a new inhibitor, Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RB19, an anthraquinone dye, which inhibited WT NA and MDR NA with IC(50 values of 3.4 and 4.5 µM, respectively. RB19 comprises a rigid core scaffold and a flexible chain with a large polar moiety. The former interacts with highly conserved residues, decreasing the probability of resistance. The latter forms van der Waals contacts with the WT subsite and yields hydrogen bonds with the mutant subsite by switching the orientation of its flexible side chain. Both scaffolds of RB19 are good starting points for lead optimization. The results reveal a parallel screening strategy for identifying resistance mechanisms and discovering anti-resistance neuraminidase inhibitors. We believe that this strategy may be applied to other diseases with high

  5. H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus: resistance of the I223R neuraminidase mutant explained by kinetic and structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhard van der Vries

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two classes of antiviral drugs, neuraminidase inhibitors and adamantanes, are approved for prophylaxis and therapy against influenza virus infections. A major concern is that antiviral resistant viruses emerge and spread in the human population. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is already resistant to adamantanes. Recently, a novel neuraminidase inhibitor resistance mutation I223R was identified in the neuraminidase of this subtype. To understand the resistance mechanism of this mutation, the enzymatic properties of the I223R mutant, together with the most frequently observed resistance mutation, H275Y, and the double mutant I223R/H275Y were compared. Relative to wild type, K(M values for MUNANA increased only 2-fold for the single I223R mutant and up to 8-fold for the double mutant. Oseltamivir inhibition constants (K(I increased 48-fold in the single I223R mutant and 7500-fold in the double mutant. In both cases the change was largely accounted for by an increased dissociation rate constant for oseltamivir, but the inhibition constants for zanamivir were less increased. We have used X-ray crystallography to better understand the effect of mutation I223R on drug binding. We find that there is shrinkage of a hydrophobic pocket in the active site as a result of the I223R change. Furthermore, R223 interacts with S247 which changes the rotamer it adopts and, consequently, binding of the pentoxyl substituent of oseltamivir is not as favorable as in the wild type. However, the polar glycerol substituent present in zanamivir, which mimics the natural substrate, is accommodated in the I223R mutant structure in a similar way to wild type, thus explaining the kinetic data. Our structural data also show that, in contrast to a recently reported structure, the active site of 2009 pandemic neuraminidase can adopt an open conformation.

  6. Evolution of oseltamivir resistance mutations in Influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) viruses during selection in experimentally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorno, Andrés; Abed, Yacine; Plante, Pier-Luc; Carbonneau, Julie; Baz, Mariana; Hamelin, Marie-Ève; Corbeil, Jacques; Boivin, Guy

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of oseltamivir resistance mutations during selection through serial passages in animals is still poorly described. Herein, we assessed the evolution of neuraminidase (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) genes of influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) and A/Victoria/3/75 (H3N2) viruses recovered from the lungs of experimentally infected BALB/c mice receiving suboptimal doses (0.05 and 1 mg/kg of body weight/day) of oseltamivir over two generations. The traditional phenotypic and genotypic methods as well as deep-sequencing analysis were used to characterize the potential selection of mutations and population dynamics of oseltamivir-resistant variants. No oseltamivir-resistant NA or HA changes were detected in the recovered A/WSN/33 viruses. However, we observed a positive selection of the I222T NA substitution in the recovered A/Victoria/3/75 viruses, with a frequency increasing over time and with an oseltamivir concentration from 4% in the initial pretherapy inoculum up to 28% after two lung passages. Although the presence of mixed I222T viral populations in mouse lungs only led to a minimal increase in oseltamivir 50% enzyme-inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) (by a mean of 5.7-fold) compared to that of the baseline virus, the expressed recombinant A/Victoria/3/75 I222T NA protein displayed a 16-fold increase in the oseltamivir IC50 level compared to that of the recombinant wild type (WT). In conclusion, the combination of serial in vivo passages under neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) pressure and temporal deep-sequencing analysis enabled, for the first time, the identification and selection of the oseltamivir-resistant I222T NA mutation in an influenza H3N2 virus. Additional in vivo selection experiments with other antivirals and drug combinations might provide important information on the evolution of antiviral resistance in influenza viruses. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Assessing the oseltamivir-induced resistance risk and implications for influenza infection control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh NH

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nan-Hung Hsieh,1 Yi-Jun Lin,2 Ying-Fei Yang,2 Chung-Min Liao2 1Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA; 2Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Oseltamivir-resistant mutants with higher drug resistance rates and low transmission fitness costs have not accounted for influenza (subtype viruses. Predicting the impacts of neuraminidase inhibitor therapy on infection rates and transmission of drug-resistant viral strains requires further investigation.Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the potential risk of oseltamivir-induced resistance for influenza A (H1N1 and A (H3N2 viruses.Materials and methods: An immune-response-based virus dynamic model was used to best fit the oseltamivir-resistant A (H1N1 and A (H3N2 infection data. A probabilistic risk assessment model was developed by incorporating branching process-derived probability distribution of resistance to estimate oseltamivir-induced resistance risk.Results: Mutation rate and sensitive strain number were key determinants in assessing resistance risk. By increasing immune response, antiviral efficacy, and fitness cost, the spread of resistant strains for A (H1N1 and A (H3N2 were greatly decreased. Probability of resistance depends most strongly on the sensitive strain number described by a Poisson model. Risk of oseltamivir-induced resistance increased with increasing the mutation rate for A (H1N1 only. The ≥50% of resistance risk induced by A (H1N1 and A (H3N2 sensitive infected cells were 0.4 (95% CI: 0.28–0.43 and 0.95 (95% CI 0.93–0.99 at a mutation rate of 10−6, respectively. Antiviral drugs must be administrated within 1–1.5 days for A (H1N1 and 2–2.5 days for A (H3N2 virus infections to limit viral production.Conclusion: Probabilistic risk assessment of antiviral drug

  8. Bench to bed evidences for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions involving oseltamivir and chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qi; Wo, Siukwan; Ngai, Karry L K; Wang, Xiaoan; Fok, Benny; Ngan, Teresa M; Wong, Vivian T; Chan, Thomas Y K; Lee, Vincent H L; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul K S; Chow, Moses S S; Zuo, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir (OA), an ethyl ester prodrug of oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is clinically used as a potent and selective inhibitor of neuraminidase. Chinese medicines have been advocated to combine with conventional drug for avian influenza. The current study aims to investigate the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of a Chinese medicine formula, namely, Yin Qiao San and Sang Ju Yin (CMF1), commonly used for anti-influenza in combination with OA in both rat and human, and to reveal the underlined mechanisms. It was found that although C max, AUC and urinary recovery of OC, as well as metabolic ratio (AUCOC/AUCOA), were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner following combination use of CMF1 and OA in rat studies (P < 0.01), such coadministration in 14 healthy volunteers only resulted in a trend of minor decrease in the related parameters. Further mechanistic studies found that although CMF1 could reduce absorption and metabolism of OA, it appears to enhance viral inhibition of OA (P < 0.01). In summary, although there was potential interaction between OA and CMF1 found in rat studies, its clinical impact was expected to be minimal. The coadministration of OA and CMF1 at the clinical recommended dosages is, therefore, considered to be safe.

  9. A randomized, crossover study to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of amantadine and oseltamivir administered alone and in combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Morrison

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The threat of potential pandemic influenza requires a reevaluation of licensed therapies for the prophylaxis or treatment of avian H5N1 infection that may adapt to man. Among the therapies considered for use in pandemic influenza is the co-administration of ion channel and neuraminidase inhibitors, both to potentially increase efficacy as well as to decrease the emergence of resistant isolates. To better understand the potential for drug interactions, a cross-over, randomized, open-label trial was conducted with amantadine, 100 mg po bid, and oseltamivir, 75 mg po bid, given alone or in combination for 5 days. Each subject (N = 17 served as their own control and was administered each drug alone or in combination, with appropriate wash-out. Co-administration with oseltamivir had no clinically significant effect on the pharmacokinetics (PK of amantadine [mean ratios (90% CI for AUC(0-12 0.93 (0.89, 0.98 and C(max 0.96 (0.90, 1.02]. Similarly, amantadine co-administration did not affect oseltamivir PK [AUC(0-12 0.92 (0.86, 0.99 and C(max 0.85 (0.73, 0.99] or the PK of the metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate [AUC(0-12 0.98 (0.95, 1.02 and C(max 0.95 (0.89, 1.01]. In this small trial there was no evidence of an increase in adverse events. Although many more subjects would need to be studied to rule out a synergistic increase in adverse events, the combination in this small human drug-drug interaction trial appears safe and without pharmacokinetic consequences.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00416962.

  10. In vitro neuraminidase inhibitory concentration (IC50) of four neuraminidase inhibitors against clinical isolates of the influenza viruses circulating in the 2010-2011 to 2014-2015 Japanese influenza seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Kawai, Naoki; Iwaki, Norio; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2016-09-01

    To assess the extent of viral resistance to the four neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), we measured their 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for influenza virus isolates from the 2014-2015 influenza season for comparison with those circulating in the 2010-2011 to 2013-2014 influenza seasons. Viral isolation was done with specimens obtained prior to treatment, and the type and subtype of influenza was determined by RT-PCR using type- and subtype-specific primers. The IC50 was determined by a neuraminidase inhibition assay using a fluorescent substrate. IC50 was measured for 200 influenza A(H3N2) and 19 influenza B in the 2014-2015 season, and no virus with highly reduced sensitivity to the four NAIs was detected. The ratios of the geometric means of the A(H3N2) IC50s of 2014-2015 to those of the 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 seasons ranged from 0.72 to 1.05, 0.82 to 1.22, 0.69 to 1.00, and 0.70 to 1.03, respectively. The ratios of the geometric mean of the B IC50s to the previous four seasons ranged from 0.59 to 1.28, 0.66 to 1.34, 0.84 to 1.21, and 1.06 to 1.47, respectively. There was no trend in the change of the IC50s for A(H3N2) or B. Significant differences were found in some seasons, but the differences in the IC50s were all less than two fold. These results show change in the geometric mean IC50 by season but with no trend, which indicates that the influence of viral mutation on the effectiveness of these NAIs was minute for A(H3N2) and B over the past five seasons. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Surveillance of Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Guanajuato State, Mexico from 2009 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueda-Gómez, Juan Luis; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo Francisco; Barba, Adriana; Córdova-Villalobos, José A; Cuellar-Rodríguez, Jennifer Margarita; Ernesto Macías, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus was first identified in Mexico in April 2009, subsequently spreading worldwide. Soon after the WHO declared a pandemic, a series of cases involving oseltamivir-resistant viruses were described, following concerns about the spread of strains resistant to neuraminidase inhibitors that could hamper control measures. To study the prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, we implemented a surveillance program across the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. We collected respiratory samples from patients with confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus between 2009 and 2012 in rural and urban regions in Guanajuato, Mexico. Specimens were screened for the H275Y mutation by Sanger sequencing. A total of 1,192 laboratory confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09-positive samples were processed between 2009 and 2012. Using two endpoint real-time polymerase chain reaction, 575 samples were sequenced. Two different clusters, I and II, were identified. The H275Y substitution was found in only one sample from cluster I. The prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 2009 viruses during the pandemic period and following years was very low in our State.

  12. Oseltamivir-Resistant Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-13

    Dr. Aaron Storms, an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer at CDC, discusses his paper about oseltamivir-resistant H1N1flu.  Created: 4/13/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/17/2012.

  13. Evidence synthesis and decision modelling to support complex decisions: stockpiling neuraminidase inhibitors for pandemic influenza usage [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel I. Watson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The stockpiling of neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI antivirals as a defence against pandemic influenza is a significant public health policy decision that must be made despite a lack of conclusive evidence from randomised controlled trials regarding the effectiveness of NAIs on important clinical end points such as mortality. The objective of this study was to determine whether NAIs should be stockpiled for treatment of pandemic influenza on the basis of current evidence. Methods: A decision model for stockpiling was designed. Data on previous pandemic influenza epidemiology was combined with data on the effectiveness of NAIs in reducing mortality obtained from a recent individual participant meta-analysis using observational data. Evidence synthesis techniques and a bias modelling method for observational data were used to incorporate the evidence into the model. The stockpiling decision was modelled for adults (≥16 years old and the United Kingdom was used as an example. The main outcome was the expected net benefits of stockpiling in monetary terms. Health benefits were estimated from deaths averted through stockpiling. Results: After adjusting for biases in the estimated effectiveness of NAIs, the expected net benefit of stockpiling in the baseline analysis was £444 million, assuming a willingness to pay of £20,000/QALY ($31,000/QALY. The decision would therefore be to stockpile NAIs. There was a greater probability that the stockpile would not be utilised than utilised. However, the rare but catastrophic losses from a severe pandemic justified the decision to stockpile. Conclusions: Taking into account the available epidemiological data and evidence of effectiveness of NAIs in reducing mortality, including potential biases, a decision maker should stockpile anti-influenza medication in keeping with the postulated decision rule.

  14. ["Oseltamivir-induced delirium"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruker, Anna Tina; Krause, Martin

    2010-12-01

    We report the history of a religion teacher who was hospitalized in December 2009 during the H1N1 outbreak at our hospital. The 62-year-old man presented in the emergency room with malaise, high fevers and dyspnea. Relevant findings included rales over both lungs, an elevated CRP and a chest x-ray with bilateral interstitial infiltrates suggesting a H1N1 pneumonia. His comorbidities included coronary and hypertensive heart disease, diabetes mellitus Type 2 and chronic renal insufficiency. Although H1N1 virus was not detected by PCR in the nasopharyngeal swabs, Oseltamivir 2 × 75 mg/die was begun and continued for 4 days. His breathing and general condition improved markedly. However, a delirium with psychotic and paranoid symptoms developed which persisted after discharge at home. There, they almost led to a catastrophic event. Although the infection could have been the cause of the delirious state, we propose that it was caused by Oseltamivir. Neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported in case reports with Oseltamivir, however, this side effect was not specifically investigated when the drug was evaluated.

  15. Effect of an Echinacea-Based Hot Drink Versus Oseltamivir in Influenza Treatment: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Multicenter, Noninferiority Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauš, Karel; Pleschka, Stephan; Klein, Peter; Schoop, Roland; Fisher, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Echinacea has antiviral activity against influenza viruses in vitro and has traditionally been used for treatment of colds and flu. This randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter, controlled clinical trial compared a new echinacea formulation with the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir, the gold standard treatment for influenza. Following informed consent, 473 patients with early influenza symptoms (≤48 hours) were recruited in primary care in the Czech Republic and randomized to either 5 days of oseltamivir followed by 5 days of placebo, or 10 days of an Echinacea purpurea-based formulation called Echinaforce Hotdrink (A. Vogel Bioforce AG, Roggwil, Switzerland). The proportion of recovered patients (influenza symptoms rated as absent or mild in the evening) was analyzed for noninferiority between treatment groups using a generalized Wilcoxon test with significance level α = 0.05 (2-sided) and using a CI approach in the per-protocol sample. Recovery from illness was comparable in the 2 treatment groups at 1.5% versus 4.1% after 1 day, 50.2% versus 48.8% after 5 days, and 90.1% versus 84.8% after 10 days of treatment with Echinaforce Hotdrink and oseltamivir, respectively. Noninferiority was demonstrated for each day and overall (95% CI, 0.487-0.5265 by generalized Wilcoxon test). Very similar results were obtained in the group with virologically confirmed influenza virus infections and in a retrospective analysis during the peak influenza period. The incidence of complications was lower with Echinaforce Hotdrink than with oseltamivir (2.46% vs 6.45%; P = 0.076) and fewer adverse events (particularly nausea and vomiting) were observed with Echinaforce Hotdrink. Echinaforce Hotdrink is as effective as oseltamivir in the early treatment of clinically diagnosed and virologically confirmed influenza virus infections with a reduced risk of complications and adverse events. It appears to be an attractive treatment option, particularly suitable for self

  16. Triple Combination of Oseltamivir, Amantadine, and Ribavirin Displays Synergistic Activity against Multiple Influenza Virus Strains In Vitro ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jack T.; Hoopes, Justin D.; Smee, Donald F.; Prichard, Mark N.; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Engelthaler, David M.; Le, Minh H.; Keim, Paul S.; Spence, R. Paul; Went, Gregory T.

    2009-01-01

    The recurring emergence of influenza virus strains that are resistant to available antiviral medications has become a global health concern, especially in light of the potential for a new influenza virus pandemic. Currently, virtually all circulating strains of influenza A virus in the United States are resistant to either of the two major classes of anti-influenza drugs (adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors). Thus, new therapeutic approaches that can be rapidly deployed and that will address the issue of recurring resistance should be developed. We have tested double and triple combinations of the approved anti-influenza drugs oseltamivir and amantadine together with ribavirin against three influenza virus strains using cytopathic effect inhibition assays in MDCK cells. We selected A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) and A/Sydney/05/97 (H3N2) as representatives of the wild-type versions of the predominant circulating seasonal influenza virus strains and A/Duck/MN/1525/81 (H5N1) as a representative of avian influenza virus strains. Dose-response curves were generated for all drug combinations, and the degree of drug interaction was quantified using a model that calculates the synergy (or antagonism) between the drugs in double and triple combinations. This report demonstrates that a triple combination of antivirals was highly synergistic against influenza A virus. Importantly, the synergy of the triple combination was 2- to 13-fold greater than the synergy of any double combination depending on the influenza virus subtype. These data support the investigation of a novel combination of oseltamivir, amantadine, and ribavirin as an effective treatment for both seasonal and pandemic influenza virus, allowing the efficient use of the existing drug supplies. PMID:19620324

  17. Effects of dexamethasone coadministered with oseltamivir on the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyungho; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Oh, Jaeseong; Lee, SeungHwan; Cho, Joo-Youn; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Choi, Tai Kiu; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Lim, Kyoung Soo

    2017-01-01

    Oseltamivir is widely used in the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A and B viral infections. It is ingested as an oral prodrug that is rapidly metabolized by carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) to its active form, oseltamivir carboxylate. Dexamethasone is also used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe complication of influenza; however, its influence on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of oseltamivir is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coadministering oseltamivir and dexamethasone on the PK of oseltamivir in healthy volunteers. An open-label, two-period, one-sequence, multiple-dose study was conducted in 19 healthy male volunteers. Oseltamivir (75 mg) was orally administered on Day 1 and Day 8, and dexamethasone (1.5 mg) was administered once daily from Day 3 to Day 8. Serial blood and urine samples were collected for PK analysis of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate on Day 1 and Day 8. Oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations in plasma and urine were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate decreased after dexamethasone treatment for 6 days. The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of the metabolic ratio (oseltamivir carboxylate AUC0-48h/oseltamivir AUC0-48h) was 0.92 (0.87-0.97). The amount of unchanged oseltamivir excreted in urine increased by 14% after dexamethasone treatments. Coadministration of dexamethasone with oseltamivir slightly decreased systemic exposure to oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in healthy volunteers. This result suggests that CES1 is inhibited by dexamethasone in humans. However, coadministration of oseltamivir and dexamethasone did not appear to have a clinically relevant effect on the PK of oseltamivir; based on these results, dexamethasone can be coadministered with oseltamivir.

  18. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  19. Selection for resistance to oseltamivir in seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza and widespread co-circulation of the lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treseder Travis W

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Spring 2009, a novel reassortant strain of H1N1 influenza A emerged as a lineage distinct from seasonal H1N1. On June 11, the World Heath Organization declared a pandemic - the first since 1968. There are currently two main branches of H1N1 circulating in humans, a seasonal branch and a pandemic branch. The primary treatment method for pandemic and seasonal H1N1 is the antiviral drug Tamiflu® (oseltamivir. Although many seasonal H1N1 strains around the world are resistant to oseltamivir, initially, pandemic H1N1 strains have been susceptible to oseltamivir. As of February 3, 2010, there have been reports of resistance to oseltamivir in 225 cases of H1N1 pandemic influenza. The evolution of resistance to oseltamivir in pandemic H1N1 could be due to point mutations in the neuraminidase or a reassortment event between seasonal H1N1 and pandemic H1N1 viruses that provide a neuraminidase carrying an oseltamivir-resistant genotype to pandemic H1N1. Results Using phylogenetic analysis of neuraminidase sequences, we show that both seasonal and pandemic lineages of H1N1 are evolving to direct selective pressure for resistance to oseltamivir. Moreover, seasonal lineages of H1N1 that are resistant to oseltamivir co-circulate with pandemic H1N1 throughout the globe. By combining phylogenetic and geographic data we have thus far identified 53 areas of co-circulation where reassortment can occur. At our website POINTMAP, http://pointmap.osu.edu we make available a visualization and an application for updating these results as more data are released. Conclusions As oseltamivir is a keystone of preparedness and treatment for pandemic H1N1, the potential for resistance to oseltamivir is an ongoing concern. Reassortment and, more likely, point mutation have the potential to create a strain of pandemic H1N1 against which we have a reduced number of treatment options.

  20. Efficacy of Oseltamivir-Zanamivir Combination Compared to Each Monotherapy for Seasonal Influenza: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Xavier; van der Werf, Sylvie; Blanchon, Thierry; Mosnier, Anne; Bouscambert-Duchamp, Maude; Tibi, Annick; Enouf, Vincent; Charlois-Ou, Cécile; Vincent, Corine; Andreoletti, Laurent; Tubach, Florence; Lina, Bruno; Mentré, France; Leport, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Background Neuraminidase inhibitors are thought to be efficacious in reducing the time to alleviation of symptoms in outpatients with seasonal influenza. The objective of this study was to compare the short-term virological efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir combination versus each monotherapy plus placebo. Methods and Findings We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled trial with 145 general practitioners throughout France during the 2008–2009 seasonal influenza epidemic. Patients, general practitioners, and outcome assessors were all blinded to treatment assignment. Adult outpatients presenting influenza-like illness for less than 36 hours and a positive influenza A rapid test diagnosis were randomized to oseltamivir 75 mg orally twice daily plus zanamivir 10 mg by inhalation twice daily (OZ), oseltamivir plus inhaled placebo (O), or zanamivir plus oral placebo (Z). Treatment efficacy was assessed virologically according to the proportion of patients with nasal influenza reverse transcription (RT)-PCR below 200 copies genome equivalent (cgeq)/µl at day 2 (primary outcome), and clinically to the time to alleviation of symptoms until day 14. Overall 541 patients (of the 900 planned) were included (OZ, n = 192; O, n = 176; Z, n = 173), 49% male, mean age 39 years. In the intention-to-treat analysis conducted in the 447 patients with RT-PCR-confirmed influenza A, 46%, 59%, and 34% in OZ (n = 157), O (n = 141), and Z (n = 149) arms had RT-PCR<200 cgeq/µl (−13.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] −23.1 to −2.9, p = 0.025; +12.3%, 95% CI 2.39–22.2, p = 0.028 for OZ/O and OZ/Z comparisons). Mean day 0 to day 2 viral load decrease was 2.14, 2.49, and 1.68 log10 cgeq/µl (p = 0.060, p = 0.016 for OZ/O and OZ/Z). Median time to alleviation of symptoms was 4.0, 3.0, and 4.0 days (+1.0, 95% CI 0.0–4.0, p = 0.018; +0.0, 95% CI −3.0 to 3.0, p = 0.960 for OZ/O and OZ/Z). Four severe adverse events were observed. Nausea

  1. Efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir combination compared to each monotherapy for seasonal influenza: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Duval

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuraminidase inhibitors are thought to be efficacious in reducing the time to alleviation of symptoms in outpatients with seasonal influenza. The objective of this study was to compare the short-term virological efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir combination versus each monotherapy plus placebo.We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled trial with 145 general practitioners throughout France during the 2008-2009 seasonal influenza epidemic. Patients, general practitioners, and outcome assessors were all blinded to treatment assignment. Adult outpatients presenting influenza-like illness for less than 36 hours and a positive influenza A rapid test diagnosis were randomized to oseltamivir 75 mg orally twice daily plus zanamivir 10 mg by inhalation twice daily (OZ, oseltamivir plus inhaled placebo (O, or zanamivir plus oral placebo (Z. Treatment efficacy was assessed virologically according to the proportion of patients with nasal influenza reverse transcription (RT-PCR below 200 copies genome equivalent (cgeq/µl at day 2 (primary outcome, and clinically to the time to alleviation of symptoms until day 14. Overall 541 patients (of the 900 planned were included (OZ,  =192; O, n=176; Z, n=173, 49% male, mean age 39 years. In the intention-to-treat analysis conducted in the 447 patients with RT-PCR-confirmed influenza A, 46%, 59%, and 34% in OZ (n=157, O (n=141, and Z (n=149 arms had RT-PCR<200 cgeq/µl (-13.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -23.1 to -2.9, p=0.025; +12.3%, 95% CI 2.39-22.2, p=0.028 for OZ/O and OZ/Z comparisons. Mean day 0 to day 2 viral load decrease was 2.14, 2.49, and 1.68 log(10 cgeq/µl (p=0.060, p=0.016 for OZ/O and OZ/Z. Median time to alleviation of symptoms was 4.0, 3.0, and 4.0 days (+1.0, 95% CI 0.0-4.0, p=0.018; +0.0, 95% CI -3.0 to 3.0, p=0.960 for OZ/O and OZ/Z. Four severe adverse events were observed. Nausea and/or vomiting tended to be more frequent in the combination arm (OZ, n=13; O, n=4; and Z, n=5 patients

  2. Kinetic, thermodynamic and structural analysis of tamiphosphor binding to neuraminidase of H1N1 (2009) pandemic influenza

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Albinana, C. B.; Machara, A.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Pachl, Petr; Konvalinka, Jan; Kožíšek, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, Oct 4 (2016), s. 100-109 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19561S; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : influenza neuraminidase * oseltamivir * tamiphosphor * isothermal titration calorimetry * crystal structure * lattice-translocation defect Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.519, year: 2016

  3. Genetic makeup of amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant human influenza A/H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Baranovich, Tatiana; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The emergence and widespread occurrence of antiviral drug-resistant seasonal human influenza A viruses, especially oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 virus, are major concerns. To understand the genetic background of antiviral drug-resistant A/H1N1 viruses, we performed full genome sequencing of prepandemic A/H1N1 strains. Seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses, including antiviral-susceptible viruses, amantadine-resistant viruses, and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, obtained from several areas in Japan during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons were analyzed. Sequencing of the full genomes of these viruses was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships among the sequences of each individual genome segment were inferred. Reference genome sequences from the Influenza Virus Resource database were included to determine the closest ancestor for each segment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the oseltamivir-resistant strain evolved from a reassortant oseltamivir-susceptible strain (clade 2B) which circulated in the 2007-2008 season by acquiring the H275Y resistance-conferring mutation in the NA gene. The oseltamivir-resistant lineage (corresponding to the Northern European resistant lineage) represented 100% of the H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 season and further acquired at least one mutation in each of the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes. Therefore, a reassortment event involving two distinct oseltamivir-susceptible lineages, followed by the H275Y substitution in the NA gene and other mutations elsewhere in the genome, contributed to the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant lineage. In contrast, amantadine-resistant viruses from the 2007-2008 season distinctly clustered in clade 2C and were characterized by extensive amino acid substitutions across their genomes, suggesting that a fitness gap among its genetic components might have driven these mutations to maintain it in the

  4. Effects of dexamethasone coadministered with oseltamivir on the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang K

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kyungho Jang,1,2,* Min-Kyoung Kim,3,4,* Jaeseong Oh,1 SeungHwan Lee,1 Joo-Youn Cho,1 Kyung-Sang Yu,1 Tai Kiu Choi,3 Sang-Hyuk Lee,3,4 Kyoung Soo Lim4 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, 2Center for Clinical Pharmacology and Biomedical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, 3Department of Psychiatry, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CHA University School of Medicine and CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Oseltamivir is widely used in the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A and B viral infections. It is ingested as an oral prodrug that is rapidly metabolized by carboxylesterase 1 (CES1 to its active form, oseltamivir carboxylate. Dexamethasone is also used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a severe complication of influenza; however, its influence on the pharmacokinetics (PK of oseltamivir is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coadministering oseltamivir and dexamethasone on the PK of oseltamivir in healthy volunteers. Methods: An open-label, two-period, one-sequence, multiple-dose study was conducted in 19 healthy male volunteers. Oseltamivir (75 mg was orally administered on Day 1 and Day 8, and dexamethasone (1.5 mg was administered once daily from Day 3 to Day 8. Serial blood and urine samples were collected for PK analysis of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate on Day 1 and Day 8. Oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate concentrations in plasma and urine were determined using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate decreased after dexamethasone treatment for 6 days. The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval of the metabolic ratio

  5. Antiviral resistance due to deletion in the neuraminidase gene and defective interfering-like viral polymerase basic 2 RNA of influenza A virus subtype H3N2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Fischer, Thea Kølsen

    2018-01-01

    two major out-of-frame deletions in the polymerase basic 2 (PB2) gene, indicating defective interfering-like viral RNA. Conclusions: The viruses harboring the 245–248 deletion in the neuraminidase gene were still present after discontinuation of oseltamivir treatment and passages in cell cultures...... to zanamivir. Nine days after discontinuation of oseltamivir treatment the deleted H3N2 virus was still present in the patient. After three passages of the deleted virus in cell culture, the deletion was retained. Several variant mutations appeared in the other genes of the H3N2 virus, where most striking were...

  6. Development of oseltamivir and zanamivir resistance in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, Denmark, 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Vorborg, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral treatment of immunocompromised patients with prolonged influenza virus infection can lead to multidrug resistance. This study reveals the selection of antiviral resistance mutations in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in an immunocompromised patient during a 6-month period. The patient......-frequency-variant-detection analysis was performed. Neuraminidase-inhibition tests were conducted for samples isolated in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In a sample collected 15 days after the end of the first treatment with oseltamivir (Day 20 post-symptom onset), oseltamivir resistance was detected (mutation H275Y with 60.......3% frequency by NGS). Day 149 when the patient had almost completed the second zanamivir treatment, mixes of the following resistance mutations were detected; H275Y(65.1%), I223R(9.2%), and E119G(89.6%), accompanied by additional mutations, showing a more complex viral population in the long-term treated...

  7. Simple, intuitive calculations of free energy of binding for protein-ligand complexes. 2. Computational titration and pH effects in molecular models of neuraminidase-inhibitor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornabaio, Micaela; Cozzini, Pietro; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Abraham, Donald J; Kellogg, Glen E

    2003-10-09

    One factor that can strongly influence predicted free energy of binding is the ionization state of functional groups on the ligands and at the binding site at which calculations are performed. This analysis is seldom performed except in very detailed computational simulations. In this work, we address the issues of (i) modeling the complexity resulting from the different ionization states of ligand and protein residues involved in binding, (ii) if, and how, computational methods can evaluate the pH dependence of ligand inhibition constants, and (iii) how to score the protonation-dependent models. We developed a new and fairly rapid protocol called "computational titration" that enables parallel modeling of multiple ionization ensembles for each distinct protonation level. Models for possible protonation combinations for site/ligand ionizable groups are built, and the free energy of interaction for each of them is quantified by the HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions) software. We applied this procedure to the evaluation of the binding affinity of nine inhibitors (six derived from 2,3-didehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid, DANA) of influenza virus neuraminidase (NA), a surface glycoprotein essential for virus replication and thus a pharmaceutically relevant target for the design of anti-influenza drugs. The three-dimensional structures of the NA enzyme-inhibitor complexes indicate considerable complexity as the ligand-protein recognition site contains several ionizable moieties. Each computational titration experiment reveals a peak HINT score as a function of added protons. This maximum HINT score indicates the optimum pH (or the optimum protonation state of each inhibitor-protein binding site) for binding. The pH at which inhibition is measured and/or crystals were grown and analyzed can vary from this optimum. A protonation model is proposed for each ligand that reconciles the experimental complex structure with measured inhibition and the free energy of binding

  8. Sequence analysis of haemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H1N1 strain from a patient coinfected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ahmed N; Mahfouz, Mohammad E; Hamdi, Fahd A; Al Aboud, Daifullah; Al-Laylah, Tawfiq Z; Alotaibi, Mohammed I; Al-Thomali, Khalid W A; Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S

    2017-08-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm09) was associated with a considerable influenza-related morbidity and mortality. Among the complications, Mycobacterial tuberculosis was recorded as a coinfection with influenza in rare cases. The full-length sequences of the viral haemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H1N1pdm09 influenza A virus were analyzed from a recently infected patient. The patient was chronically infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular modelling and in-silico docking of the virus, and other selected strains with the drug oseltamivir were conducted and compared. Sequence analysis of the viral haemagglutinin revealed it to be closely related to the 6B.1 clade, with high identity to the circulating H1N1pdm09 strains, and confirmed that the virus still harbouring high affinity to the α-2,6-sialic acid human receptor. The viral neuraminidase showed high identity to the neuraminidase of the recently circulating strains of the virus with no evidence of the development of oseltamivir-resistant mutants. Regular monitoring of the circulating strains is recommended to screen for a possible emergence of drug-resistant strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Syntheses and neuraminidase inhibitory activity of multisubstituted cyclopentane amide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Pooran; Babu, Y Sudhakar; Bantia, Shanta; Rowland, Scott; Dehghani, Ali; Kotian, Pravin L; Hutchison, Tracy L; Ali, Shoukath; Brouillette, Wayne; El-Kattan, Yahya; Lin, Tsu-Hsing

    2004-04-08

    In further studies aimed toward identifying effective and safe inhibitors of influenza neuraminidases, we synthesized a series of multisubstituted cyclopentane amide derivatives. Amides prepared were 14 examples of N-substituted alkyl or aralkyl types from primary amines, 13 examples of the N,N-disubstituted alkyl, aralkyl, or substituted-alkyl type from secondary amines, and 12 examples from cycloaliphatic or substituted cycloaliphatic secondary amines. These compounds bearing two chiral centers, at position-1 in the ring and position-1' in the side chain attached at position 3, were tested for their ability to inhibit A and B forms of influenza neuraminidase. The 1-ethylpropylamide, diethylamide, dipropylamide, and 4-morpholinylamide showed very good inhibitory activity (IC(50) = 0.015-0.080 microM) vs the neuraminidase A form, but modest activity (IC(50) = 3.0-9.2 microM) vs the neuraminidase B form. Since the parent amides bear two chiral centers (C-1 and C-1'), three of the better inhibitors were tested at higher levels of diastereomeric purity. The diastereomers corresponding to the active forms of the 1-(ethyl)propylamide, the diethylamide, and the dipropylamide (all of the same configuration at the C-1' chiral center), and the diastereomer of the diethylamide representing the active form at both C-1' and C-1 were isolated or synthesized from precursors that were isolated as diastereomers. These diastereomers showed some improvement in neuraminidase inhibition over the parent diastereomeric mixtures. 1-Carboxy-1-hydroxy derivatives of the best active compounds, the diethylamide and the dipropylamide, were also prepared. These compounds were not as active as the compounds without the 1-hydroxy group. In an in vivo study, the C-1' active isomer of the diethylamide from the 1-carboxy series was tested in influenza-infected mice by oral and intranasal administration and found to be very effective only intranasally in preventing weight loss at doses as low as 0

  10. Oseltamivir

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used to treat and prevent infections from avian (bird) influenza (a virus that usually infects birds but can also cause serious illness in humans). ... the flu, you should watch his or her behavior very carefully and call the doctor right away ...

  11. Drug: D00900 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00900 Drug Oseltamivir phosphate (JAN/USAN); Tamiflu (TN) C16H28N2O4. H3PO4 410.18...ainst pathologic organisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00900 Oseltami...5AH Neuraminidase inhibitors J05AH02 Oseltamivir D00900 Oseltamivir phosphate (JAN/USAN) USP drug classifica...tion [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-influenza Agents Oseltamivir D00900 Oseltamivir phosphate (JAN/USAN) Antii...nzavirus A/B neuraminidase inhibitor Oseltamivir [ATC:J05AH02] D00900 Oseltamivir phosphate (JAN/USAN) CAS:

  12. Neuraminidase activity of blue eye disease porcine rubulavirus: Specificity, affinity and inhibition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-López, Gerardo; Borraz-Argüello, María T; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Priem, Bernard; Fort, Sébastien; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Herrera-Camacho, Irma

    2017-10-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV), also known as La Piedad Michoacan Virus (LPMV) causes encephalitis and reproductive failure in newborn and adult pigs, respectively. The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein is the most exposed and antigenic of the virus proteins. HN plays central roles in PorPV infection; i.e., it recognizes sialic acid-containing cell receptors that mediate virus attachment and penetration; in addition, its neuraminidase (sialic acid releasing) activity has been proposed as a virulence factor. This work describes the purification and characterization of PorPV HN protein (isolate PAC1). The specificity of neuraminidase is restricted to sialyl(α2,3)lactose (3SL). HN showed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics with fetuin as substrate (km=0.029μM, Vmax=522.8nmolmin-1mg-1). When 3SL was used as substrate, typical cooperative kinetics were found (S50=0.15μM, Vmax=154.3nmolmin-1mg-1). The influenza inhibitor zanamivir inhibited the PorPV neuraminidase with IC50 of 0.24μM. PorPV neuraminidase was activated by Ca2+ and inhibited by nucleoside triphosphates with the level of inhibition depending on phosphorylation level. The present results open possibilities to study the role of neuraminidase in the pathogenicity of PorPV infection and its potential inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Computational analysis and determination of a highly conserved surface exposed segment in H5N1 avian flu and H1N1 swine flu neuraminidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandy Ashesh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catalytic activity of influenza neuraminidase (NA facilitates elution of progeny virions from infected cells and prevents their self-aggregation mediated by the catalytic site located in the body region. Research on the active site of the molecule has led to development of effective inhibitors like oseltamivir, zanamivir etc, but the high rate of mutation and interspecies reassortment in viral sequences and the recent reports of oseltamivir resistant strains underlines the importance of determining additional target sites for developing future antiviral compounds. In a recent computational study of 173 H5N1 NA gene sequences we had identified a 50-base highly conserved region in 3'-terminal end of the NA gene. Results We extend the graphical and numerical analyses to a larger number of H5N1 NA sequences (514 and H1N1 swine flu sequences (425 accessed from GenBank. We use a 2D graphical representation model for the gene sequences and a Graphical Sliding Window Method (GSWM for protein sequences scanning the sequences as a block of 16 amino acids at a time. Using a protein sequence descriptor defined in our model, the protein sliding scan method allowed us to compare the different strains for block level variability, which showed significant statistical correlation to average solvent accessibility of the residue blocks; single amino acid position variability results in no correlation, indicating the impact of stretch variability in chemical environment. Close to the C-terminal end the GSWM showed less descriptor-variability with increased average solvent accessibility (ASA that is also supported by conserved predicted secondary structure of 3' terminal RNA and visual evidence from 3D crystallographic structure. Conclusion The identified terminal segment, strongly conserved in both RNA and protein sequences, is especially significant as it is surface exposed and structural chemistry reveals the probable role of this stretch in

  14. Simultaneous Detection of Oseltamivir- and Amantadine-Resistant Influenza by Oligonucleotide Microarray Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dou; Chen, Suhong; Wang, Shengqi

    2013-01-01

    Presently, the resistance of Influenza A virus isolates causes great difficulty for the prevention and treatment of influenza A virus infection. It is important to establish a drug-resistance detection method for epidemiological study and personalized medicine in the clinical setting. Consequently, a cost-effective oligonucleotide microarray visualization method, which was based on quantum dot-catalyzed silver deposition, was developed and evaluated for the simultaneous detection of neuraminidase H275Y and E119V; matrix protein 2 V27A and S31N mutations of influenza A (H3N2), seasonal influenza A (H1N1), and 2009 influenza A (H1N1). Then, 307 clinical throat swab specimens were detected and the drug-resistance results showed that 100% (17/17) of influenza A (H3N2) and 100% (259/259) of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) samples were resistant to amantadine and susceptible to oseltamivir; and 100% (5/5) of seasonal influenza A (H1N1) samples were resistant to both amantadine and oseltamivir. PMID:23451169

  15. Catalytically defective ganglioside neuraminidase in mucolipidosis IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yoseph, Y.; Momoi, T.; Hahn, L.C.; Nadler, H.L. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (USA))

    1982-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with mucolipidosis IV were found to be deficient in neuraminidase activity toward GDsub(la) and GDsub(lb) gangliosides radiolabelled in C/sub 3/ and C/sub 7/ analogs of their sialic acid residues. Neuraminidase activities toward 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, neuraminlactose, and radiolabelled neuraminlactitol, fetuin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-acid glycoprotein were within the range of normal controls. Fibroblasts from parents of patients with mucolipidosis IV demonstrated intermediate levels of ganglioside neuraminidase activity and normal levels of glycoprotein neuraminidase activity. The redidual acidic neuraminidase activity toward GDsub(1a) ganglioside in the patients' fibroblasts did not differ from that of controls in its pH optimum and thermostability, but had an abnormal apparent Ksub(m) which was about 18 times higher than that of the normal enzyme. These findings suggest that mucolipidosis IV is a ganglioside sialidosis due to a catalytically defective ganglioside neuraminidase.

  16. A Model-based Assessment of Oseltamivir Prophylaxis Strategies to Prevent Influenza in Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dool, Carline; Hak, Eelko; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Wallinga, Jacco

    2009-01-01

    Prophylaxis with neuraminidase inhibitors is important for controlling seasonal influenza outbreaks in long-term care settings. We used a stochastic individual-based model that simulates influenza virus transmission in a long-term care nursing home department to study the protection offered to

  17. Ode to Oseltamivir and Amantadine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Conly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A and B viruses are the two major types of influenza viruses that cause human epidemic disease. Influenza A viruses are further categorized into subtypes based on two surface antigens: hemagglutinin (H and neuraminidase (N. Influenza B viruses are not categorized into subtypes (1. Influenza A viruses are found in many animal species, including humans, ducks, chickens, pigs, whales, horses and seals, whereas influenza B viruses circulate only among humans. The H antigen contains common and strain-specific antigens, demonstrates antigenic variation, and acts as a site of attachment of the virus to host cells to initiate infection (1. The N antigen contains subtype-specific antigens and also demonstrates antigenic variation between subtypes. It is a surface glycoprotein possessing enzymatic activity essential for viral replication in both influenza A and B viruses. The N antigen allows the release of newly produced virions from infected host cells, prevents the formation of viral aggregates after release from the host cells, and prevents viral inactivation by respiratory mucous (2,3. It is thought that this enzyme may also promote viral penetration into respiratory epithelial cells and may contribute to the pathogenicity of the virus by promoting production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor from macrophages (4-6.

  18. Plasma concentrations of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in critically ill children on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enno D Wildschut

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the effect of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO support on pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate (OC in children. METHODOLOGY: Steady state 0-12 hour pharmacokinetic sampling was performed in new influenza A (H1N1 infected children treated with oseltamivir while on ECMO support. Cmax, Cmin and AUC(0-12 h were calculated. The age-specific oseltamivir dosage was doubled to counter expected decreased plasma drug concentrations due to increased volume of distribution on ECMO support. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three patients were enrolled aged 15, 6 and 14 years in this pharmacokinetic case series. For two children the OC plasma concentrations were higher than those found in children and adults not on ECMO. These increased plasma concentrations related to the increased oseltamivir dosage and decreased kidney function. In one patient suboptimal plasma concentrations coincided with a decreased gastric motility. CONCLUSION: Oseltamivir pharmacokinetics do not appear to be significantly influenced by ECMO support. Caution is required in case of nasogastric administration and decreased gastric motility. Due to the limited number of (paediatric patients available further multicenter studies are warranted.

  19. 6SLN-lipo PGA specifically catches (coats) human influenza virus and synergizes neuraminidase-targeting drugs for human influenza therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwilaijaroen, Nongluk; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Takashita, Emi; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Kanie, Osamu; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new compound to overcome influenza epidemics and pandemics as well as drug resistance. We synthesized a new compound carrying: (i) Neu5Acα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc (6SLN) for targeting immutable haemagglutinins (HAs) unless switched from human-type receptor preference; (ii) an acyl chain (lipo) for locking the compound with the viral HA via hydrophobic interactions; and (iii) a flexible poly-α-L-glutamic acid (PGA) for enhancing the compound solubility and for coating the viral surface, precluding accessibility of the PGA-coated virus to the negatively charged sialic acid on the host cell surface. 6SLN-lipo PGA appears to subvert binding of pandemic H1 and seasonal H3 HAs to receptors, as assessed by using guinea pig erythrocytes, which is critical for virus entry into host cells for multiplication. It shows high potency with IC50 values in the range of 300-500 nM against multiplication of both influenza pandemic H1N1/2009 and seasonal H3N2/2004 viruses in cell culture. It acts in synergism with either of the two FDA-approved neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) clinical drugs, zanamivir (Relenza(®)) and oseltamivir carboxylate (active form of Tamiflu(®)), and it has the potential to aid NAI drugs to achieve complete clearance of the virus from the culture. 6SLN-lipo PGA is a new potential candidate drug for influenza control and is an attractive candidate for use in combination with an NAI drug for minimized toxicity, delayed development of resistance, prevention and treatment with the potential for eradication of human influenza. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Determining the Quality of Oseltamivir (Tamiflu)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-02-04

    The possibility of an avian flu pandemic has given Tamiflu attention. Because of fear of a pandemic, this drug has been in high demand. Unfortunately, this demand has prompted production of counterfeit Tamiflu. CDC's Dr. Mike Green discusses a test that is simple and affordable and can test the quality of products purported to be oseltamivir (Tamiflu).  Created: 2/4/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 2/20/2008.

  1. Drug: D08306 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08306 Drug Oseltamivir (INN); Agucort (TN) C16H28N2O4 312.2049 312.4045 D08306.gif...USE J05 ANTIVIRALS FOR SYSTEMIC USE J05A DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AH Neuraminidase inhibitors J05AH02 Oseltamivir D08306 Oseltam...ivir (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-influenza Agents Oseltamivir D08306 Oseltam...uenza agent Uncoating inhibitor influenzavirus A/B neuraminidase inhibitor Oseltamivir [ATC:J05AH02] D08306 Oseltam

  2. A broad spectrum, one-step reverse-transcription PCR amplification of the neuraminidase gene from multiple subtypes of influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wenbin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of high pathogenicity strains of Influenza A virus in a variety of human and animal hosts, with wide geographic distribution, has highlighted the importance of rapid identification and subtyping of the virus for outbreak management and treatment. Type A virus can be classified into subtypes according to the viral envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Here we review the existing specificity and amplification of published primers to subtype neuraminidase genes and describe a new broad spectrum primer pair that can detect all 9 neuraminidase subtypes. Results Bioinformatic analysis of 3,337 full-length influenza A neuraminidase segments in the NCBI database revealed semi-conserved regions not previously targeted by primers. Two degenerate primers with M13 tags, NA8F-M13 and NA10R-M13 were designed from these regions and used to generate a 253 bp cDNA product. One-step RT-PCR testing was successful in 31/32 (97% cases using a touchdown protocol with RNA from over 32 different cultured influenza A virus strains representing the 9 neuraminidase subtypes. Frozen blinded clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates were also assayed and were mostly of subtype N2. The region amplified was direct sequenced and then used in database searches to confirm the identity of the template RNA. The RT-PCR fragment generated includes one of the mutation sites related to oseltamivir resistance, H274Y. Conclusion Our one-step RT-PCR assay followed by sequencing is a rapid, accurate, and specific method for detection and subtyping of different neuraminidase subtypes from a range of host species and from different geographical locations.

  3. Published sequences do not support transfer of oseltamivir resistance mutations from avian to human influenza A virus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Peter; Lindh, Magnus; Olofsson, Sigvard

    2015-03-28

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate ester, OE) is a widely used antiviral active against influenza A virus. Its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is chemically stable and secreted into wastewater treatment plants. OC contamination of natural habitats of waterfowl might induce OC resistance in influenza viruses persistently infecting waterfowl, and lead to transfer of OC-resistance from avian to human influenza. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such has occurred. A genomics approach including phylogenetic analysis and probability calculations for homologous recombination was applied on altogether 19,755 neuraminidase (N1 and N2) genes from virus sampled in humans and birds, with and without resistance mutations. No evidence for transfer of OE resistance mutations from avian to human N genes was obtained, and events suggesting recombination between human and avian influenza virus variants could not be traced in the sequence material studied. The results indicate that resistance in influenza viruses infecting humans is due to the selection pressure posed by the global OE administration in humans rather than transfer from avian influenza A virus strains carrying mutations induced by environmental exposure to OC.

  4. [Naturally occurring oseltamivir resistance in influenza A.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Laura; Nielsen, Alex; Lundgren, Jens

    2010-01-01

    During the last two influenza seasons, one of the predominant influenza A types (H1N1) has developed complete resistance to oseltamivir, the primary treatment option. The virus does, however, remain sensitive to zanamavir and amantadine. There is no unequivocal explanation for this slide...... in the development of resistance. The best prevention strategy remains vaccination of the general population to avoid immunity. Future antiviral treatment calls for knowledge about resistance to existing types of influenza and the availability of all three types of antiviral medication. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Aug...

  5. Reassortment and mutations associated with emergence and spread of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses in 2005-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Rong Yang

    Full Text Available A dramatic increase in the frequency of the H275Y mutation in the neuraminidase (NA, conferring resistance to oseltamivir, has been detected in human seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses since the influenza season of 2007-2008. The resistant viruses emerged in the ratio of 14.3% and quickly reached 100% in Taiwan from September to December 2008. To explore the mechanisms responsible for emergence and spread of the resistant viruses, we analyzed the complete genome sequences of 25 viruses collected during 2005-2009 in Taiwan, which were chosen from various clade viruses, 1, 2A, 2B-1, 2B-2, 2C-1 and 2C-2 by the classification of hemagglutinin (HA sequences. Our data revealed that the dominant variant, clade 2B-1, in the 2007-2008 influenza emerged through an intra-subtype 4+4 reassortment between clade 1 and 2 viruses. The dominant variant acquired additional substitutions, including A206T in HA, H275Y and D354G in NA, L30R and H41P in PB1-F2, and V411I and P453S in basic polymerase 2 (PB2 proteins and subsequently caused the 2008-2009 influenza epidemic in Taiwan, accompanying the widespread oseltamivir-resistant viruses. We also characterized another 3+5 reassortant virus which became double resistant to oseltamivir and amantadine. Comparison of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/H1N1 viruses belonging to various clades in our study highlighted that both reassortment and mutations were associated with emergence and spread of these viruses and the specific mutation, H275Y, conferring to antiviral resistance, was acquired in a hitch-hiking mechanism during the viral evolutionary processes.

  6. Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and exercise, immune tolerance therapy, and needs of older adults with hemophilia and an inhibitor. For more information, visit https://www.hemophilia.org/Events-Educational-Programs/Inhibitor-Education/Inhibitor-Education-Summits The NHF’s Inhibitor Education Summits ...

  7. Neuraminidase deficiency: case report and review of the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I D; Young, E P; Mossman, J; Fielder, A R; Moore, J R

    1987-01-01

    A 12 year old boy with neuraminidase deficiency (sialidosis, mucolipidosis I) is described. His clinical features included coarse facies, cherry red spot, ataxia, myoclonus, and dysotosis multiplex. The level of neuraminidase activity in cultured fibroblasts was very low and intermediate levels were observed in both parents. The clinical disorders associated with neuraminidase deficiency are reviewed. Images PMID:3585942

  8. Large-scale FMO-MP3 calculations on the surface proteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Yuji; Yamashita, Katsumi; Fukuzawa, Kaori; Takematsu, Kazutomo; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Naoki; Okiyama, Yoshio; Tsuboi, Misako; Nakano, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2010-06-01

    Two proteins on the influenza virus surface have been well known. One is hemagglutinin (HA) associated with the infection to cells. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations were performed on a complex consisting of HA trimer and two Fab-fragments at the third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP3) level. The numbers of residues and 6-31G basis functions were 2351 and 201276, and thus a massively parallel-vector computer was utilized to accelerate the processing. This FMO-MP3 job was completed in 5.8 h with 1024 processors. Another protein is neuraminidase (NA) involved in the escape from infected cells. The FMO-MP3 calculation was also applied to analyze the interactions between oseltamivir and surrounding residues in pharmacophore.

  9. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, Beate I., E-mail: b.escher@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 39 Kessels Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4108 (Australia); Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Straub, Juerg Oliver [F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Corporate Safety, Health and Environmental Protection, 4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24 h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  10. Detection of the antiviral drug oseltamivir in aquatic environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Söderström

    Full Text Available Oseltamivir (Tamiflu is the most important antiviral drug available and a cornerstone in the defence against a future influenza pandemic. Recent publications have shown that the active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC, is not degraded in sewage treatment plants and is also persistent in aquatic environments. This implies that OC will be present in aquatic environments in areas where oseltamivir is prescribed to patients for therapeutic use. The country where oseltamivir is used most is Japan, where it is used to treat seasonal flu. We measured the levels of OC in water samples from the Yodo River system in the Kyoto and Osaka prefectures, Japan, taken before and during the flu-season 2007/8. No OC was detected before the flu-season but 2-58 ng L(-1 was detected in the samples taken during the flu season. This study shows, for the first time, that low levels of oseltamivir can be found in the aquatic environment. Therefore the natural reservoir of influenza virus, dabbling ducks, is exposed to oseltamivir, which could promote the evolution of viral resistance.

  11. Use of oseltamivir in the treatment of canine parvoviral enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savigny, Michelle R; Macintire, Douglass K

    2010-02-01

    To determine if oseltamivir with standard therapy for canine parvoviral enteritis ameliorates disease morbidity, mortality, or both; to document significant adverse effects associated with its use. Prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. University veterinary teaching hospital. Thirty-five dogs. Standard therapy was administered to all dogs. Treatment dogs also received oseltamivir, while control dogs received an equivalent volume of placebo. Dogs were monitored daily according to a clinical scoring system, physical parameters, and diagnostic evaluations. Dogs in the treatment group gained a significant percentage of weight during hospitalization (mean, +2.6%; SD, 7.1%) versus the control dogs (mean, -4.5%; SD, 6.9%) (P=0.006). Treatment dogs did not have any significant changes in their white blood cell (WBC) count, while control dogs experienced a significant drop in their WBC counts during their initial stay. In addition, it did not appear that oseltamivir use was associated with any major adverse clinical effects. While a clear advantage to the use of oseltamivir was not established, a significant weight loss during hospitalization, as well as a significant decrease in WBC count were documented in the control group. No major adverse effects were identified that could be associated with oseltamivir administration. Based on these results, the true role of oseltamivir in the treatment of parvoviral enteritis remains speculative, although it is believed that further investigation is warranted.

  12. In silico molecular modeling of neuraminidase enzyme H1N1 avian influenza virus and docking with zanamivir ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthiyan Ramachandran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neuraminidase is an enzyme aspartic protease that is essential for the life cycle of H1N1. Methods: Constructed a model of Neuraminidase enzyme the 3D structure as template using with Modeller software. The Neuraminidase enzyme model was predicted and validated by Procheck, What check, Errat, Verify-3D and AutoDock web server for reliability. Results: The Modeller homology-modeling algorithm was demonstrated excellent accuracy in blind predictions. The Neuraminidase enzyme model built with little, 35% identity could be accurate enough to be successfully used in receptor based rational drug design. The closest homologue with the highest sequence identity 100% was selected. Zanamivir drug and analogues were retrieved from PubChem database, as well as subjected to docking interaction with Neuraminidase enzyme used AutoDock programme. Based on the root mean square deviation and lowest binding energy values the best docking orientation was selected. The better lowest binding energy value -6.91 was selected of CID_25209232. Conclusions: This study will be used in broad screening of inhibitors of the protein. However, further implemented experimental and clinical verification is needed to establishment these analogues as drug.

  13. AVALIAÇÃO DO TRATAMENTO REALIZADO COM O ANTIVIRAL FOSFATO DE OSELTAMIVIR (TAMIFLU® E OS EXAMES LABORATORIAIS DE PACIENTES DIAGNOSTICADOS COM GRIPE A SUBTIPO H1N1 EM UM HOSPITAL DA CIDADE DE TOLEDO – PARANÁ, BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiara Regina Canzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available O fosfato de oseltamivir, uma pró-droga do carboxilato de oseltamivir, é um inibidor potente e seletivo das enzimas neuraminidase. A atividade da enzima viral, neuraminidase, é importante tanto para a entrada do vírus em células não infectadas quanto para a liberação de partículas virais. O carboxilato de oseltamivir inibe a neuraminidase do vírus da gripe de ambos os tipos: Influenza A e B, impedindo a replicação do mesmo. 46 pacientes com idades entre 1 e 76 anos de idade, de ambos os sexos, internados em um Hospital na cidade de Toledo durante o período de Junho de 2009 a Janeiro de 2010, com casos confirmados ou suspeitos de gripe A subtipo H1N1. Durante o período de internamento, foi avaliado o uso do Fosfato de Oseltamivir, bem como reações adversas e tempo de uso do medicamento e os exames empregados para auxiliar o diagnóstico (Hemograma completo e a gasometria arterial. O tempo de uso do medicamento não excedeu o preconizado, o qual foi de 5 (cinco dias ininterruptos, e entre as reações adversas ou efeitos colaterais estão náusea (43,47%, cefaléia (8,69% e vômitos (17,39%. As alterações laboratoriais evidenciam leucócitos normais (média de 9.145 mL, plaquetas de 246.166 mm³, pH sanguíneo (gasometria arterial levemente ácido e PO2 (mmHg e SO2 abaixo dos valores de referência. A abordagem da infecção pelo vírus Influenza A H1N1 2009 representa desafio epidemiológico-clinico-laboratorial-terapêutico em todo o mundo. Logo, requer esforço coletivo para impedir o seu avanço e os riscos de letalidade e mortalidade incluídos em sua disseminação.

  14. Regulation of neuraminidase expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualdi Luciana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid; NeuNAc is one of the most important carbohydrates for Streptococcus pneumoniae due of its role as a carbon and energy source, receptor for adhesion and invasion and molecular signal for promotion of biofilm formation, nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion of the lung. Results In this work, NeuNAc and its metabolic derivative N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc were used to analyze regulatory mechanisms of the neuraminidase locus expression. Genomic and metabolic comparison to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis elucidates the metabolic association of the two amino sugars to different parts of the locus coding for the two main pneumococcal neuraminidases and confirms the substrate specificity of the respective ABC transporters. Quantitative gene expression analysis shows repression of the locus by glucose and induction of all predicted transcriptional units by ManNAc and NeuNAc, each inducing with higher efficiency the operon encoding for the transporter with higher specificity for the respective amino sugar. Cytofluorimetric analysis demonstrated enhanced surface exposure of NanA on pneumococci grown in NeuNAc and ManNAc and an activity assay allowed to quantify approximately twelve times as much neuraminidase activity on induced cells as opposed to glucose grown cells. Conclusions The present data increase the understanding of metabolic regulation of the nanAB locus and indicate that experiments aimed at the elucidation of the relevance of neuraminidases in pneumococcal virulence should possibly not be carried out on bacteria grown in glucose containing media.

  15. Antibody administration in experimental influenza increases survival and enhances the effect of oseltamivir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourroy, Brit Naldahl Jessen; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2012-01-01

    and treatment of a number of infectious diseases. In this experimental study anti-influenza antibodies were passively administrated to mice, subsequently they were infected with influenza virus and treated with oseltamivir. The aim was to investigate, if anti-influenza antibodies influenced the out come...... of oseltamivir treatment and development of resistance towards oseltamivir. We show, that oseltamivir alone was not able to effectively prevent a fatal outcome, but that oseltamivir administered together with a limited amount of antibodies, resulted in improvement of the clinical condition of the mice...

  16. Computational design of drug candidates for influenza A virus subtype H1N1 by inhibiting the viral neuraminidase-1 enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambunan Usman Sumo Friend

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is critical to seek potential alternative treatments for H1N1 infections by inhibiting neuraminidase-1 enzyme. One of the viable options for inhibiting the activity of neuraminidase- 1 is peptide drug design. In order to increase peptide stability, cyclization is necessary to prevent its digestion by protease enzyme. Cyclization of peptide ligands by formation of disulfide bridges is preferable for designing inhibitors of neuraminidase-1 because of their high activity and specificity. Here we designed ligands by using molecular docking, drug scan and dynamics computational methods. Based on our docking results, short polypeptides of cystein-arginine-methionine-tyrosine- -proline-cysteine (CRMYPC and cysteine-arginine-aspargine- phenylalanine-proline-cysteine (CRNFPC have good residual interactions with the target and the binding energy ΔGbinding of -31.7402 and -31.0144 kcal mol-1, respectively. These values are much lower than those of the standards, and it means that both ligands are more accessible to ligand-receptor binding. Based on drug scan results, both of these ligands are neither mutagenic nor carcinogenic. They also show good oral bioavailability. Moreover, both ligands show relatively stable molecular dynamics progression of RMSD vs. time plot. However, based on our metods, the CRMYPC ligand has sufficient hydrogen bonding interactions with residues of the active side of neuraminidase-1 and can be therefore proposed as a potential inhibitor of neuraminidase-1

  17. H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus: Resistance of the I223R Neuraminidase Mutant Explained by Kinetic and Structural Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van der Vries (Erhard); P.J. Collins (Patrick ); S.G. Vachieri (Sebastien); X. Xiong (Xiaoli); J. Liu (Jinhua); P.A. Walker (Philip); L.F. Haire (Lesley ); A.J. Hay (Alan); M. Schutten (Martin); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); S.R. Martin (Steve ); C.A. Boucher (Charles); J.J. Skehel (John ); S.J. Gamblin (Steve )

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTwo classes of antiviral drugs, neuraminidase inhibitors and adamantanes, are approved for prophylaxis and therapy against influenza virus infections. A major concern is that antiviral resistant viruses emerge and spread in the human population. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is already

  18. Adamantane and Neuraminidase resistant influenza A/H3N2 isolated in Iran from 2005 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Yavarian

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: This study showed circulating A/H3N2 viruses was resistant to adaman-tanes but susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors. The national data analyzed in this re-search may help increase knowledge about influenza virus antiviral drug resistance, which is a global public health concern. The authors suggested continuing this study and also the investigation of antiviral drug resistance of influenza A/H1N1 and B viruses.

  19. Purification and renaturation of membrane neuraminidase from Haemophilus parasuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtensteiger, Carol A; Vimr, Eric R

    2003-05-02

    Haemophilus parasuis, which causes polyserositis, polysynovitis, meningitis, septicemia, and pneumonia in pigs, has emerged as an increasing problem in modern swine production systems. Co-factors for and the pathogenesis of H. parasuis disease are not defined. One of the potential virulence factors of H. parasuis is its neuraminidase (sialidase). While purifying the H. parasuis neuraminidase from the membrane fraction, we developed a protocol to renature enzymatic activity after enzyme preparations were resolved electrophorectically in denaturing polyacrylamide gels. The H. parasuis neuraminidase co-resolved with recombinant neuraminidase of Vibrio cholera; thus its apparent molecular mass is 82 kilodalton (kDa). The H. parasuis neuraminidase was associated with the membrane fraction and the purification protocol removed over 99% of the H. parasuis cell protein while retaining over 90% of the neuraminidase activity. Purified protein will provide another avenue to clone the neuraminidase gene that has been refractory to cloning and the protocol will be a means to purify recombinant protein. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. A generic system for the expression and purification of soluble and stable influenza neuraminidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Schmidt

    Full Text Available The influenza surface glycoprotein neuraminidase (NA is essential for the efficient spread of the virus. Antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu (oseltamivir and Relenza (zanamivir that inhibit NA enzyme activity have been shown to be effective in the treatment of influenza infections. The recent 'swine flu' pandemic and world-wide emergence of Tamiflu-resistant seasonal human influenza A(H1N1 H(274Y have highlighted the need for the ongoing development of new anti-virals, efficient production of vaccine proteins and novel diagnostic tools. Each of these goals could benefit from the production of large quantities of highly pure and stable NA. This publication describes a generic expression system for NAs in a baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS that is capable of expressing milligram amounts of recombinant NA. To construct NAs with increased stability, the natural influenza NA stalk was replaced by two different artificial tetramerization domains that drive the formation of catalytically active NA homotetramers: GCN4-pLI from yeast or the Tetrabrachion tetramerization domain from Staphylothermus marinus. Both recombinant NAs are secreted as FLAG-tagged proteins to allow for rapid and simple purification. The Tetrabrachion-based NA showed good solubility, increased stability and biochemical properties closer to the original viral NA than the GCN4-pLI based construct. The expressed quantities and high quality of the purified recombinant NA suggest that this expression system is capable of producing recombinant NA for a broad range of applications including high-throughput drug screening, protein crystallisation, or vaccine development.

  1. Targeted antiviral prophylaxis with oseltamivir in a summer camp setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberlin, David W; Escude, Janell; Gantner, Janel; Ott, Jeanne; Dronet, Melissa; Stewart, Timothy A; Jester, Penelope; Redden, David T; Chapman, Whitney; Hammond, Rob

    2010-04-01

    To describe the effectiveness of containment of novel influenza A(H1N1) infection at a summer camp. Targeted use of oseltamivir phosphate by individuals in close contact with influenza-confirmed cases. Boys' camp in Alabama in July 2009. A total of 171 campers, 48 camp counselors, and 27 camp staff. Campers with confirmed influenza received oseltamivir and were immediately isolated and sent home. All boys and counselors in the infected child's adjoining cabins received prophylactic oseltamivir for 10 days, including 8 campers at higher risk for influenza infection (eg, those with asthma, seizure disorder, or diabetes). Alcohol-based hand sanitizer was provided at each of the daily activities, in the boys' cabins, and in the dining hall, and counselors were educated by the medical staff on the spread of influenza and its prevention through good hand hygiene. All cabins, bathrooms, and community sports equipment were sprayed or wiped down with disinfectant each day. Main Outcome Measure Virologic confirmation of influenza. Three of the 171 campers tested positive for influenza A during the course of the 2-week fourth session, for an attack rate of 1.8%. The probability of observing 3 or fewer infected campers if the attack rate was 12% is less than 1 in 10,000,000 (P camp session. In conjunction with comprehensive hand sanitization and surface decontamination, a targeted approach to antiviral prophylaxis contained the spread of influenza in a summer camp setting.

  2. Novel Ranking System for Identifying Efficacious Anti-Influenza Virus PB2 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Alice W; McNeil, Colleen F; Leeman, Joshua R; Bennett, Hamilton B; Nti-Addae, Kwame; Huang, Cassey; Germann, Ursula A; Byrn, Randal A; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Rijnbrand, Rene; Clark, Michael P; Charifson, Paul S; Jones, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Through antigenic drift and shifts, influenza virus infections continue to be an annual cause of morbidity in healthy populations and of death among elderly and at-risk patients. The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses such as H5N1 and H7N9 and the rapid spread of the swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus in 2009 demonstrate the continued need for effective therapeutic agents for influenza. While several neuraminidase inhibitors have been developed for the treatment of influenza virus infections, these have shown a limited window for treatment initiation, and resistant variants have been noted in the population. In addition, an older class of antiviral drugs for influenza, the adamantanes, are no longer recommended for treatment due to widespread resistance. There remains a need for new influenza therapeutic agents with improved efficacy as well as an expanded window for the initiation of treatment. Azaindole compounds targeting the influenza A virus PB2 protein and demonstrating excellent in vitro and in vivo properties have been identified. To evaluate the in vivo efficacy of these PB2 inhibitors, we utilized a mouse influenza A virus infection model. In addition to traditional endpoints, i.e., death, morbidity, and body weight loss, we measured lung function using whole-body plethysmography, and we used these data to develop a composite efficacy score that takes compound exposure into account. This model allowed the rapid identification and ranking of molecules relative to each other and to oseltamivir. The ability to identify compounds with enhanced preclinical properties provides an opportunity to develop more-effective treatments for influenza in patients. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Characterization of the neuraminidase genes from human influenza A viruses circulating in Iran from 2010 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moasser, Elham; Behzadian, Farida; Moattari, Afagh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Zaraket, Hassan

    2017-10-31

    Characterization of influenza viruses is critical for detection of new emerging variants. Herein, we analyzed the genetic diversity and drug susceptibility of the neuraminidase gene (NAs) expressed by influenza A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 viruses circulating in Iran from 2010 to 2015. We genetically analyzed the NAs of 38 influenza A/H1N1pdm09 and 35 A/H3N2 isolates. The Iranian A/H1N1pdm09 viruses belonged to seven genogroups/subgenogroups, with the dominant groups being genogroups 6B and 6C. The A/H3N2 isolates fell into six gneogroups/subgenogroups, with the dominant genogroups being 3C and 3C.2a. The most common mutations detected among the A/H1N1pdm09 viruses included N44S, V106I, N200S, and N248D. All H1N1pdm09 viruses were genetically susceptible to the NAIs. However, one A/H1N1pdm09 virus from the 2013-2014 season possessed an NA-S247N mutation, which reduces the susceptibility to oseltamivir. In case of H3N2, none of the analyzed Iranian strains carried a substitution that might affect its susceptibility to NAIs. The ongoing evolution of influenza viruses and the detect of influenza viruses with reduced susceptibility to NAIs warrants continuous monitoring of the circulating strains.

  4. Potential adverse effects of oseltamivir in rats: males are more vulnerable than females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Wael M; Al-Kahtani, Mohamed Ali

    2011-09-01

    Oseltamivir is the most widely used antiviral drug for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. However, not much is known about its adverse effects. The potential side effects were investigated in male and female rats (140-170 g). Oseltamivir was administered at 2.2 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) for 5 days. For both genders, treatment with oseltamivir resulted in significant reductions in the hepatic activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase. Also for both genders, oseltamivir produced modest reductions in the hepatic activities of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, quinone oxidoreductase, thioredoxin reductase, CYP1A1/2, and CYP3A, as well as hepatic glutathione content. For both genders, neither the kidney functions nor protein profile was affected by oseltamivir. Oseltamivir also caused significant elevation in serum levels of both triacylglycerols and LDL-cholesterol and in the activity of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, in both genders. For male animals only, oseltamivir treatment elevated the serum level of total cholesterol as well as the activity of serum alanine aminotransferase, and reduced the hepatic activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Oseltamivir caused oxidative stress and acute toxicity in the liver, and disrupted the cholesterol and lipid metabolism but was less likely to cause serious drug interactions. There was a sexual differentiation in these adverse effects, with adverse effects being more evident in male rats.

  5. Radioassay method of neuraminidase towards N-acetylneuraminosyl hexasaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, M.; Someya, F.; Yamada, T.; Miyatake, T. (Tokyo Metropolitan Research Lab. of Public Health (Japan))

    1982-02-26

    The authors have devised a sensitive method to assay for neuraminidase activities towards ..cap alpha..-(2..-->..3)-N-acetylneuraminosyl hexasaccharide and ..cap alpha..-(2..-->..6)-N-acetylneuraminosyl hexasaccharide, which were isolated from the urine of a patient with adult sialidosis with partial deficiency of ..beta..-galactosidase. Standard assay conditions for the determination of these neuraminidase activities were established and the radiolabeled reduced derivatives of these substrates were used. The fibroblast neuraminidase had its maximum activity at pH 4.0-4.2, with Ksub(m) values of 2.22 x 10/sup -3/ and 4.17 x 10/sup -3/ mol/l and Vsub(max) values of 76.9 and 28.6 nmol.mg/sup -1/ protein.h/sup -1/ towards the 2..-->..3 isomer and the 2..-->..6 isomer, respectively. Neuraminidase deficiencies were found in the fibroblasts of adult sialidosis, mucolipidosis II and III. These studies were compared with the neuraminidase activity towards ..cap alpha..-(2..-->..3)-N-acetylneuraminosyl lactose.

  6. Synthesis of a cluster-forming sialylthio-D-galactose fullerene conjugate and evaluation of its interaction with influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollas, Szilvia; Bereczki, Ilona; Borbás, Anikó; Batta, Gyula; Vanderlinden, Evelien; Naesens, Lieve; Herczegh, Pál

    2014-06-01

    In order to obtain self assembling, multivalent ligand for influenza virus hemagglutinin α-N-acetylneuraminyl-(2-6)-D-galactopyranose has been synthesized and bonded to a water soluble fullerene derivative using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition click reaction. The aggregating amphiphilic compound did not inhibit the influenza virus hemagglutinin, but it proved to be an inhibitor of its neuraminidase with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 81 μM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cloning of neuraminidase (NA) gene and identification of its antiviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the sialic acid receptor required by virus infection of the host cell surface which protects the host from virus damage. In order to explore a new idea to use neuraminidase (NA) gene and produce disease-resistant transgenic poultry, prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-NA was constructed to make NA polyclone antibody.

  8. Cloning of neuraminidase (NA) gene and identification of its antiviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... neuraminidase (NA) gene and produce disease-resistant transgenic poultry, prokaryotic expression ... transfected cells were challenged by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the morphology of CEF cells were observed to detect the .... eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.0-NA and pcDNA3.0/EGFP-. NA.

  9. Neuraminidase-Mediated, NKp46-Dependent Immune-Evasion Mechanism of Influenza Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam Bar-On

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play an essential role in the defense against influenza virus, one of the deadliest respiratory viruses known today. The NKp46 receptor, expressed by NK cells, is critical for controlling influenza infections, as influenza-virus-infected cells are eliminated through the recognition of the viral hemagglutinin (HA protein by NKp46. Here, we describe an immune-evasion mechanism of influenza viruses that is mediated by the neuraminidase (NA protein. By using various NA blockers, we show that NA removes sialic acid residues from NKp46 and that this leads to reduced recognition of HA. Furthermore, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the existence of this NA-mediated, NKp46-dependent immune-evasion mechanism and demonstrate that NA inhibitors, which are commonly used for the treatment of influenza infections, are useful not only as blockers of virus budding but also as boosters of NKp46 recognition.

  10. Oseltamivir Pharmacokinetics, Dosing, and Resistance Among Children Aged <2 Years With Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberlin, David W.; Acosta, Edward P.; Prichard, Mark N.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Ampofo, Krow; Lang, David; Ashouri, Negar; Vanchiere, John A.; Abzug, Mark J.; Abughali, Nazha; Caserta, Mary T.; Englund, Janet A.; Sood, Sunil K.; Spigarelli, Michael G.; Bradley, John S.; Lew, Judy; Michaels, Marian G.; Wan, Wen; Cloud, Gretchen; Jester, Penelope; Lakeman, Fred D.; Whitley, Richard J.; Giles, Dusty; Cotton, Bari; Judy, Sharon; Cowie, Margaret; Francis, Jeanne; Evans, Candice; O'Donnell, Nan; Shiraishi, Ofelia Vargas; Latiolais, Lisa; Aymami, Valeri; Dole, Ken; Gaultier, Julie; Lofthus, Gerry; Kinnunen, Diane; Lacombe, Kirsten; Stellato, Nancy; Denlinger, Julie; Hingtgen, Sara; Mason, Christina; Jeffrey, Noreen

    2013-01-01

    Background. Children <2 years of age are at high risk of influenza-related mortality and morbidity. However, the appropriate dose of oseltamivir for children <2 years of age is unknown. Methods. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group evaluated oseltamivir in infants aged <2 years in an age–de-escalation, adaptive design with a targeted systemic exposure. Results. From 2006 to 2010, 87 subjects enrolled. An oseltamivir dose of 3.0 mg/kg produced drug exposures within the target range in subjects 0–8 months of age, although there was a greater degree of variability in infants <3 months of age. In subjects 9–11 months of age, a dose of 3.5 mg/kg produced drug exposures within the target range. Six of 10 subjects aged 12–23 months receiving the Food and Drug Administration–approved unit dose for this age group (ie, 30 mg) had oseltamivir carboxylate exposures below the target range. Virus from 3 subjects developed oseltamivir resistance during antiviral treatment. Conclusions. The appropriate twice-daily oral oseltamivir dose for infants ≤8 months of age is 3.0 mg/kg, while the dose for infants 9–11 months old is 3.5 mg/kg. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00391768. PMID:23230059

  11. Antibody against Microbial Neuraminidases Recognizes Human Sialidase 3 (NEU3: the Neuraminidase/Sialidase Superfamily Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiguang Feng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuraminidases (NAs are critical virulence factors for several microbial pathogens. With a highly conserved catalytic domain, a microbial NA “superfamily” has been proposed. We previously reported that murine polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN sialidase activity was important in leukocyte trafficking to inflamed sites and that antibodies to Clostridium perfringens NA recognized a cell surface molecule(s, presumed to be a sialidase of eukaryotic origin on interleukin-8-stimulated human and murine PMNs. These antibodies also inhibited cell sialidase activity both in vitro and, in the latter instance, in vivo. We therefore hypothesized that mammalian sialidases share structural homology and epitopes with microbial NAs. We now report that antibodies to one of the isoforms of C. perfringens NA, as well as anti-influenza virus NA serum, recognize human NEU3 but not NEU1 and that antibodies to C. perfringens NA inhibit NEU3 enzymatic activity. We conclude that the previously described microbial NA superfamily extends to human sialidases. Strategies designed to therapeutically inhibit microbial NA may need to consider potential compromising effects on human sialidases, particularly those expressed in cells of the immune system.

  12. Positive regulation of insulin signaling by neuraminidase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Larbi; Seyrantepe, Volkan; Fougerat, Anne; Pan, Xuefang; Bonneil, Eric; Thibault, Pierre; Moreau, Allain; Mitchell, Grant A; Heveker, Nikolaus; Cairo, Christopher W; Issad, Tarik; Hinek, Alexander; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2013-07-01

    Neuraminidases (sialidases) catalyze the removal of sialic acid residues from sialylated glycoconjugates. We now report that mammalian neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), in addition to its catabolic function in lysosomes, is transported to the cell surface where it is involved in the regulation of insulin signaling. Insulin binding to its receptor rapidly induces interaction of the receptor with Neu1, which hydrolyzes sialic acid residues in the glycan chains of the receptor and, consequently, induces its activation. Cells from sialidosis patients with a genetic deficiency of Neu1 show impairment of insulin-induced phosphorylation of downstream protein kinase AKT, and treatment of these cells with purified Neu1 restores signaling. Genetically modified mice with ∼10% of the normal Neu1 activity exposed to a high-fat diet develop hyperglycemia and insulin resistance twice as fast as their wild-type counterparts. Together, these studies identify Neu1 as a novel component of the signaling pathways of energy metabolism and glucose uptake.

  13. Neuraminidase Inhibitory Activity and Constituent Characterization of Fagopyrum dibotrys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify a new biological activity of the widely distributed species Fagopyrum dibotrys. Four F. dibotrys extracts (ethyl acetate (EA, petroleum ether (P, ethanol (E, and water (W were explored for their anti-neuraminidase (NA activity. A total of 32 compounds were identified using UHPLC-Q-Exactive Orbitrap HRMS in the EA extract, which had the best NA inhibitory effects. We used the docking data for supporting compounds’ anti-neuraminidase activity. Among them, five compounds including one flavonoid, three organic acids, and one glucoside were discovered for the first time in F. dibotrys. Docking studies and NA activity assay revealed the remarkable NA inhibitory activity of eight components in EA extract, especially rutin, hesperidin, procyanidin B2, and quercitrin. Therefore, F. dibotrys could be used to develop anti-influenza drugs.

  14. The novel carboxylesterase 1 variant c.662A>G may decrease the bioactivation of oseltamivir in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeseong Oh

    Full Text Available Human carboxylesterase 1 (CES1 is a serine esterase that hydrolyses various exogenous and endogenous compounds including oseltamivir, a prodrug used to treat influenza. A novel CES1 c.662A>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP was predicted to decrease CES1 enzymatic activity in an in silico analysis. This study evaluated the effect of the c.662A>G SNP on the pharmacokinetics (PK of oseltamivir in humans.A single oral dose of oseltamivir at 75 mg was administered to 20 healthy subjects, 8 heterozygous c.662A>G carriers (c.662AG and 12 non-carriers (c.662AA. The concentrations of oseltamivir and its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate, were measured in plasma and urine using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method. The PK parameters were calculated using a noncompartmental method. The geometric mean ratios (GMR, c.662AG to c.662AA of the PK parameters and their 90% confidence intervals (CI were calculated.The systemic exposure to oseltamivir, as assessed by the AUC0-48h of oseltamivir, was increased by 10% in c.662AG subjects, whereas the AUC0-48h of oseltamivir carboxylate was 5% lower in c.662AG subjects. The GMR and 90% CI of the metabolic ratio (AUC0-48h, Oseltamivir carboxylate/AUC0-48h, Oseltamivir was 0.87 (0.66-1.14. The amount of unchanged oseltamivir excreted in the urine was increased by 15% in subjects with the c.662AG genotype.This result suggests that CES1 enzymatic activity may be decreased in these heterozygous allele carriers, although further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical implications of this genetic variation on CES1 substrate drugs.ClinicalTtrials.gov NCT01902342.

  15. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations for protein-ligand complexes: free energies of binding of water molecules in influenza neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher J; Shaw, Katherine E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2015-01-22

    The applicability of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for the calculation of absolute binding free energies of conserved water molecules in protein/ligand complexes is demonstrated. Here, we apply QM/MM Monte Carlo simulations to investigate binding of water molecules to influenza neuraminidase. We investigate five different complexes, including those with the drugs oseltamivir and peramivir. We investigate water molecules in two different environments, one more hydrophobic and one hydrophilic. We calculate the free-energy change for perturbation of a QM to MM representation of the bound water molecule. The calculations are performed at the BLYP/aVDZ (QM) and TIP4P (MM) levels of theory, which we have previously demonstrated to be consistent with one another for QM/MM modeling. The results show that the QM to MM perturbation is significant in both environments (greater than 1 kcal mol(-1)) and larger in the more hydrophilic site. Comparison with the same perturbation in bulk water shows that this makes a contribution to binding. The results quantify how electronic polarization differences in different environments affect binding affinity and also demonstrate that extensive, converged QM/MM free-energy simulations, with good levels of QM theory, are now practical for protein/ligand complexes.

  16. Neuraminidase as an enzymatic marker for detecting airborne Influenza virus and other viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Ho, Jim; Li, Dongqing; Duchaine, Caroline

    2017-02-01

    Little information is available regarding the effectiveness of air samplers to collect viruses and regarding the effects of sampling processes on viral integrity. The neuraminidase enzyme is present on the surface of viruses that are of agricultural and medical importance. It has been demonstrated that viruses carrying this enzyme can be detected using commercial substrates without having to process the sample by methods such as RNA extraction. This project aims at evaluating the effects of 3 aerosol-sampling devices on the neuraminidase enzyme activity of airborne viruses. The purified neuraminidase enzymes from Clostridium perfringens, a strain of Influenza A (H1N1) virus, the FluMist influenza vaccine, and the Newcastle disease virus were used as models. The neuraminidase models were aerosolized in aerosol chambers and sampled with 3 different air samplers (SKC BioSampler, 3-piece cassettes with polycarbonate filters, and Coriolis μ) to assess the effect on neuraminidase enzyme activity. Our results demonstrated that Influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus neuraminidase enzymes are resistant to aerosolization and sampling with all air samplers tested. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enzymatic neuraminidase assay is as sensitive as RT-qPCR for detecting low concentrations of Influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus. Therefore, given the sensitivity of the assay and its compatibility with air sampling methods, viruses carrying the neuraminidase enzyme can be rapidly detected from air samples using neuraminidase activity assay without having to preprocess the samples.

  17. Surveillance van het verloop van influenza-uitbraken en oseltamivir gebruik in verpleeg- en verzorgingshuizen in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gageldonk-Lafeber AB; van der Sande MAB; van Vliet JA; Koopmans MPG; Ruijs WLM; Meijer A; Wilbrink B; van der Plas SM; CIE; LIS

    2006-01-01

    Er is nog niet met zekerheid vastgesteld of het middel oseltamivir griepuitbraken in verpleeg- en verzorgingshuizen verkort. De lage vaccinatiegraad onder het personeel en verlate inzet van oseltamivir veroorzaken deze onzekerheid. Dit blijkt uit een surveillance in negen zorginstellingen in het

  18. Using high-throughput sequencing to leverage surveillance of genetic diversity and oseltamivir resistance: a pilot study during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1 pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Téllez-Sosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza viruses display a high mutation rate and complex evolutionary patterns. Next-generation sequencing (NGS has been widely used for qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of genetic diversity in complex biological samples. The "deep sequencing" approach, enabled by the enormous throughput of current NGS platforms, allows the identification of rare genetic viral variants in targeted genetic regions, but is usually limited to a small number of samples. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a proof-of-principle study to test whether redistributing sequencing throughput from a high depth-small sample number towards a low depth-large sample number approach is feasible and contributes to influenza epidemiological surveillance. Using 454-Roche sequencing, we sequenced at a rather low depth, a 307 bp amplicon of the neuraminidase gene of the Influenza A(H1N1 pandemic (A(H1N1pdm virus from cDNA amplicons pooled in 48 barcoded libraries obtained from nasal swab samples of infected patients (n  =  299 taken from May to November, 2009 pandemic period in Mexico. This approach revealed that during the transition from the first (May-July to second wave (September-November of the pandemic, the initial genetic variants were replaced by the N248D mutation in the NA gene, and enabled the establishment of temporal and geographic associations with genetic diversity and the identification of mutations associated with oseltamivir resistance. CONCLUSIONS: NGS sequencing of a short amplicon from the NA gene at low sequencing depth allowed genetic screening of a large number of samples, providing insights to viral genetic diversity dynamics and the identification of genetic variants associated with oseltamivir resistance. Further research is needed to explain the observed replacement of the genetic variants seen during the second wave. As sequencing throughput rises and library multiplexing and automation improves, we foresee that

  19. Using High-Throughput Sequencing to Leverage Surveillance of Genetic Diversity and Oseltamivir Resistance: A Pilot Study during the 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E.; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Hidalgo, Ana Cecilia; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Luna, René Santos; Carrillo-Valenzo, Erik; Ramos, Celso; García-García, Lourdes; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses display a high mutation rate and complex evolutionary patterns. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used for qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of genetic diversity in complex biological samples. The “deep sequencing” approach, enabled by the enormous throughput of current NGS platforms, allows the identification of rare genetic viral variants in targeted genetic regions, but is usually limited to a small number of samples. Methodology and Principal Findings We designed a proof-of-principle study to test whether redistributing sequencing throughput from a high depth-small sample number towards a low depth-large sample number approach is feasible and contributes to influenza epidemiological surveillance. Using 454-Roche sequencing, we sequenced at a rather low depth, a 307 bp amplicon of the neuraminidase gene of the Influenza A(H1N1) pandemic (A(H1N1)pdm) virus from cDNA amplicons pooled in 48 barcoded libraries obtained from nasal swab samples of infected patients (n  =  299) taken from May to November, 2009 pandemic period in Mexico. This approach revealed that during the transition from the first (May-July) to second wave (September-November) of the pandemic, the initial genetic variants were replaced by the N248D mutation in the NA gene, and enabled the establishment of temporal and geographic associations with genetic diversity and the identification of mutations associated with oseltamivir resistance. Conclusions NGS sequencing of a short amplicon from the NA gene at low sequencing depth allowed genetic screening of a large number of samples, providing insights to viral genetic diversity dynamics and the identification of genetic variants associated with oseltamivir resistance. Further research is needed to explain the observed replacement of the genetic variants seen during the second wave. As sequencing throughput rises and library multiplexing and automation improves, we foresee that the approach

  20. A novel coated platinum electrode for oseltamivir determination in pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, Ikram; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2014-04-01

    New coated platinum selective electrodes have been prepared and used for the determination of oseltamivir phosphate (OSL) in bulk drug solutions and in pharmaceutical preparations. Electrodes were using plasticized PVC membranes doped with ion-pair complexes based on drug-phosphomolybdate and drug-tetraphenylborate as electroactive materials. The influence of membrane composition (plasticizers and ion-pair complexes) has been investigated. Optimum performance was obtained for two polymeric membranes: PVC:o-NPPE:OSL-TPB in the ratio of 30:68:2 (%, w:w:w) and PVC:DPP:OSL-PMA in the ratio of 30:68:2 (%, w:w:w). The electrodes exhibited linear responses over large concentration ranges (1.0×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2) and 5.0×10(-5)-5.0×10(-2)M, respectively) with near-Nernstian responses (58.9 and 57.3mV/decade, respectively). The selectivity coefficients indicated good selectivity for OSL drug over a large number of organic compounds and some inorganic cations. The proposed electrodes were successfully applied to the determination of OSL in raw material and in pharmaceutical formulations. The results were validated by comparison with a capillary electrophoresis method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Economic evaluation of oseltamivir phosphate for postexposure prophylaxis of influenza in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risebrough, Nancy A; Bowles, Susan K; Simor, Andrew E; McGeer, Alison; Oh, Paul I

    2005-03-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of oseltamivir postexposure prophylaxis during influenza A outbreaks with that of amantadine postexposure prophylaxis or no postexposure prophylaxis in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Cost-effectiveness analysis based on decision analytic model from a government-payer perspective. A Canadian LTCF, with high staff vaccination, at the beginning of influenza season. Elderly, influenza-vaccinated patients living in a Canadian LTCF. Incremental costs (or savings) per influenza-like illness case avoided compared with usual care. From a government-payer perspective, this analysis showed that oseltamivir was a dominant strategy because it was associated with the fewest influenza-like illness cases, with cost savings of $1,249 per 100 patients in 2001 Canadian dollars compared with amantadine and $3,357 per 100 patients compared with no prophylaxis. Costs for amantadine dose calculation and hospitalization for adverse events contributed to amantadine being a more-expensive prophylaxis strategy than oseltamivir. Both prophylaxis strategies were more cost-effective than no prophylaxis. Despite high influenza vaccination rates, influenza outbreaks continue to emerge in LTCFs, necessitating cost-effective measures to further limit the spread of influenza and related complications. Although amantadine has a lower acquisition cost than oseltamivir, it is associated with more adverse events, lower efficacy, and individualized dosing requirements, leading to higher overall costs and more influenza-like illness cases than oseltamivir. Therefore the use of oseltamivir postexposure prophylaxis is more cost-effective than the current standard of care with amantadine prophylaxis or no prophylaxis.

  2. Sialidosis and galactosialidosis: chromosomal assignment of two genes associated with neuraminidase-deficiency disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, O.T.; Henry, W.M.; Haley, L.L.; Byers, M.G.; Eddy, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1986-03-01

    The inherited human disorders sialidosis and galactosialidosis are the result of deficiencies of glycoprotein-specific ..cap alpha..-neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18; sialidase) activity. Two genes were determined to be necessary for expression of neuraminidase by using human-mouse somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes. A panel of mouse RAG-human hybrid cells demonstrated a single-gene requirement for human neuraminidase and allowed assignment of this gene to the (pter ..-->.. q23) region of chromosome 10. A second panel of mouse thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient LM/TK/sup -/-human hybrid cells demonstrated that human neuraminidase activity required both chromosomes 10 and 20 to be present. Analysis of human neuraminidase expression in interspecific hybrid cells or polykaryocytes formed from fusion of mouse RAG or LM/TK/sup -/ cell lines with human sialidosis or galactosialidosis fibroblasts indicated that the RAG cell line complemented the galactosialidosis defect, but the LM/TK/sup -/ cell line did not. This eliminates the requirement for this gene in RAG-human hybrid cells and explains the different chromosome requirements of these two hybrid panels. Fusion of LM/TK/sup -/ cell hybrids lacking chromosome 10 or 20 and neuraminidase-deficient fibroblasts confirmed by complementation analysis that the sialidosis disorder results from a mutation on chromosome 10, presumably encoding the neuraminidase structural gene. Galactosialidosis is caused by a mutation in a second gene required for neuraminidase expression located on chromosome 20.

  3. Pitfalls in Diagnosing Neuraminidase Deficiency : Psychosomatics and Normal Sialic Acid Excretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schene, Imre F; Ayuso, Viera Kalinina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33793259X; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817910; van Gassen, Koen L I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304819417; Cuppen, Inge|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314436529; van Hasselt, Peter M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814423; Visser, Gepke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229317057

    2015-01-01

    Neuraminidase deficiency (mucolipidosis I, sialidosis types I and II, cherry-red spot myoclonus syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder with an expanding clinical phenotype. Here, we report the striking diagnostic history of late-onset neuraminidase deficiency in two sisters, currently aged 14

  4. Structural basis for substrate specificity of mammalian neuraminidases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Smutova

    Full Text Available The removal of sialic acid (Sia residues from glycoconjugates in vertebrates is mediated by a family of neuraminidases (sialidases consisting of Neu1, Neu2, Neu3 and Neu4 enzymes. The enzymes play distinct physiological roles, but their ability to discriminate between the types of linkages connecting Sia and adjacent residues and between the identity and arrangement of the underlying sugars has never been systematically studied. Here we analyzed the specificity of neuraminidases by studying the kinetics of hydrolysis of BODIPY-labeled substrates containing common mammalian sialylated oligosaccharides: 3'Sia-LacNAc, 3'SiaLac, SiaLex, SiaLea, SiaLec, 6'SiaLac, and 6'SiaLacNAc. We found significant differences in substrate specificity of the enzymes towards the substrates containing α2,6-linked Sia, which were readily cleaved by Neu3 and Neu1 but not by Neu4 and Neu2. The presence of a branching 2-Fuc inhibited Neu2 and Neu4, but had almost no effect on Neu1 or Neu3. The nature of the sugar residue at the reducing end, either glucose (Glc or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc had only a minor effect on all neuraminidases, whereas core structure (1,3 or 1,4 bond between D-galactose (Gal and GlcNAc was found to be important for Neu4 strongly preferring β3 (core 1 to β4 (core 2 isomer. Neu3 and Neu4 were in general more active than Neu1 and Neu2, likely due to their preference for hydrophobic substrates. Neu2 and Neu3 were examined by molecular dynamics to identify favorable substrate orientations in the binding sites and interpret the differences in their specificities. Finally, using knockout mouse models, we confirmed that the substrate specificities observed in vitro were recapitulated in enzymes found in mouse brain tissues. Our data for the first time provide evidence for the characteristic substrate preferences of neuraminidases and their ability to discriminate between distinct sialoside targets.

  5. Thrombocytopenia from combination treatment with oseltamivir and probenecid: case report, MedWatch data summary, and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisch, Dennis W; Straight, Timothy M; Holodniy, Mark

    2009-08-01

    The possibility of an avian flu pandemic has spurred interest in preventive treatments with antivirals such as oseltamivir. Combining treatment with probenecid to delay excretion may extend limited supplies of oseltamivir. We previously conducted a pharmacokinetic study of oseltamivir plus probenecid among healthy volunteers. In this article, we describe a 68-year-old woman who, during the pharmacokinetic study, developed severe thrombocytopenia 2 weeks after starting oseltamivir plus probenecid. She was receiving no other drug therapy at the time. Her platelet count decreased from 200 to 15 x 10(3)/mm(3), although no clinically evident bleeding abnormalities were noted. The two drugs were discontinued. One week later, without any therapeutic intervention, her platelet count returned to normal. By using the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale to assess the strength of the association between the drugs and the adverse event, a score of 7 was derived for both drugs, indicating that the association was probable. We found no previous literature reports of thrombocytopenia associated with either drug. However, a review of the United States Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System database found 93 cases of thrombocytopenia and/or decreased platelet counts associated with oseltamivir and 24 cases associated with probenecid administration. Signal detection analyses were significant for oseltamivir (p=0.001), but not probenecid. The underlying mechanism of thrombocytopenia with these drugs is unknown. Clinicians should be aware that the use of oseltamivir and probenecid has been reported to be associated with thrombocytopenia.

  6. Neuraminidase-1, a Subunit of the Cell Surface Elastin Receptor, Desialylates and Functionally Inactivates Adjacent Receptors Interacting with the Mitogenic Growth Factors PDGF-BB and IGF-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinek, Aleksander; Bodnaruk, Tetyana D.; Bunda, Severa; Wang, Yanting; Liu, Kela

    2008-01-01

    We recently established that the elastin-binding protein, which is identical to the spliced variant of β-galactosidase, forms a cell surface-targeted complex with two proteins considered “classic lysosomal enzymes”: protective protein/cathepsin A and neuraminidase-1 (Neu1). We also found that cell surface-residing Neu1 can desialylate neighboring microfibrillar glycoproteins and facilitate the deposition of insoluble elastin, which contributes to the maintenance of cellular quiescence. Here we provide evidence that cell surface-residing Neu1 contributes to a novel mechanism that limits cellular proliferation by desialylating cell membrane-residing sialoglycoproteins that directly propagate mitogenic signals. We demonstrated that treatment of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with either a sialidase inhibitor or an antibody that blocks Neu1 activity induced significant up-regulation in SMC proliferation in response to fetal bovine serum. Conversely, treatment with Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase (which is highly homologous to Neu1) decreased SMC proliferation, even in cultures that did not deposit elastin. Further, we found that pretreatment of aortic SMCs with exogenous neuraminidase abolished their mitogenic responses to recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-2 and that sialidosis fibroblasts (which are exclusively deficient in Neu1) were more responsive to PDGF-BB and IGF-2 compared with normal fibroblasts. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that neuraminidase caused the desialylation of both PDGF and IGF-1 receptors and diminished the intracellular signals induced by the mitogenic ligands PDGF-BB and IGF-2. PMID:18772331

  7. Oseltamivir produces hypothermic and neuromuscular effects by inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor functions: comparison to procaine and bupropion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Akihiro; Chazono, Kaori; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Iwajima, Yui; Yamamoto, Shohei; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Ono, Hideki

    2015-09-05

    Oseltamivir, an anti-influenza virus drug, induces marked hypothermia in normal mice. We have proposed that the hypothermic effect arises from inhibition of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function of sympathetic ganglion neurons which innervate the brown adipose tissue (a heat generator). It has been reported that local anesthetics inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function by acting on its ionic channels, and that bupropion, a nicotinic antagonist, induces hypothermia. In this study, we compared the effects of oseltamivir, procaine and bupropion on body temperature, cardiovascular function and neuromuscular transmission. Intraperitoneal administration of oseltamivir (100mg/kg), procaine (86.6mg/kg) and bupropion (86.7mg/kg) lowered the core body temperature of normal mice. At lower doses (10-30mg/kg oseltamivir, 8.7-26mg/kg procaine and bupropion), when administered subcutaneously, the three drugs antagonized the hypothermia induced by intraperitoneal injection of nicotine (1mg/kg). In anesthetized rats, intravenous oseltamivir (30-100mg/kg), procaine (10mg/kg) and bupropion (10mg/kg) induced hypotension and bradycardia. Oseltamivir alone (100mg/kg) did not inhibit neuromuscular twitch contraction of rats, but at 3-30mg/kg it augmented the muscle-relaxing effect of d-tubocurarine. Similar effects were observed when lower doses of procaine (10-30mg/kg) and bupropion (3-10mg/kg) were administered, suggesting that systemic administration of oseltamivir inhibits muscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These results support the idea that the hypothermic effect of oseltamivir is due to its effects on sympathetic ganglia which innervate the brown adipose tissue, and suggest that oseltamivir may exert non-selective ion channel blocking effects like those of ester-type local anesthetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Near-Fatal Infection with Oseltamivir-Resistant Seasonal Influenza A in a Previously Healthy Child: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Papenburg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of near-fatal oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A infection in a previously healthy four-year-old boy is reported. This case highlights three important points for physicians: oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1 has recently emerged in North America; contrary to previously held beliefs, such strains are capable of causing severe disease in healthy children; and given this change in epidemiology, clinicians caring for children with severe seasonal influenza A infection should consider empiric dual therapy with oseltamivir and amantadine.

  9. A multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking approach to investigate the interaction of antiviral drug oseltamivir with ct-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour; Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Golbedaghi, Reza

    2017-07-03

    The possible interaction between the antiviral drug oseltamivir and calf thymus DNA at physiological pH was studied by spectrophotometry, competitive spectrofluorimetry, differential pulse voltammogram (DPV), circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), viscosity measurements, salt effect, and computational studies. Intercalation of oseltamivir between the base pairs of DNA was shown by a sharp increase in specific viscosity of DNA and a decrease of the peak current and a positive shift in differential pulse voltammogram. Competitive fluorescence experiments were performed using neutral red (NR) as a probe for the intercalation binding mode. The studies showed that oseltamivir is able to release the NR.

  10. Compliance and side effects of prophylactic oseltamivir treatment in a school in South West England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallensten, A; Oliver, I; Lewis, D; Harrison, S

    2009-07-30

    School closure along with mass prophylactic oseltamivir treatment of pupils have been used in England and elsewhere to contain school outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)v. We evaluated the protective effect, compliance with and side effects of oseltamivir chemoprophylactic treatment with a ten-day course of 1x 75mg given to 11-12-year-old pupils in one school year in a secondary school in South West England closed for ten days in response to a symptomatic laboratory-confirmed pupil. We distributed a questionnaire to pupils in the affected school year in class after the school had re-opened. Questions included symptoms of flu-like illness, compliance with chemoprophylaxis and side effects. All present on the day, 248 (93.2%) participated. Compliance with chemoprophylaxis was high, 77% took the full course, 91% took at least seven days. Fifty-one percent experienced symptoms such as feeling sick (31.2%), headaches (24.3%) and stomach ache (21.1%). Although some children were ill with flu-like symptoms, those tested did not have A(H1N1)v infection. Compliance with oseltamivir chemoprophylaxis was high, although likely side effects were common. The burden of side effects needs to be considered when deciding on mass oseltamivir chemoprophylaxis in children especially given that the symptoms of A(H1N1)v influenza are generally mild.

  11. Antiviral oseltamivir is not removed or degraded in normal sewage water treatment: implications for development of resistance by influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerker Fick

    Full Text Available Oseltamivir is the main antiviral for treatment and prevention of pandemic influenza. The increase in oseltamivir resistance reported recently has therefore sparked a debate on how to use oseltamivir in non pandemic influenza and the risks associated with wide spread use during a pandemic. Several questions have been asked about the fate of oseltamivir in the sewage treatment plants and in the environment. We have assessed the fate of oseltamivir and discuss the implications of environmental residues of oseltamivir regarding the occurrence of resistance. A series of batch experiments that simulated normal sewage treatment with oseltamivir present was conducted and the UV-spectra of oseltamivir were recorded.Our experiments show that the active moiety of oseltamivir is not removed in normal sewage water treatments and is not degraded substantially by UV light radiation, and that the active substance is released in waste water leaving the plant. Our conclusion is that a ubiquitous use of oseltamivir may result in selection pressures in the environment that favor development of drug-resistance.

  12. Seroconversion and asymptomatic infections during oseltamivir prophylaxis against Influenza A H1N1 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Boon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-viral prophylaxis is used to prevent the transmission of influenza. We studied serological confirmation of 2009 Influenza A (H1N1 infections during oseltamivir prophylaxis and after cessation of prophylaxis. Methods Between 22 Jun and 16 Jul 09, we performed a cohort study in 3 outbreaks in the Singapore military where post-exposure oseltamivir ring chemoprophylaxis (75 mg daily for 10 days was administered. The entire cohort was screened by RT-PCR (with HA gene primers using nasopharyngeal swabs three times a week. Three blood samples were taken for haemagglutination inhibition testing - at the start of outbreak, 2 weeks after completion of 10 day oseltamivir prophylaxis, and 3 weeks after the pandemic's peak in Singapore. Questionnaires were also administered to collect clinical symptoms. Results 237 personnel were included for analysis. The overall infection rate of 2009 Influenza A (H1N1 during the three outbreaks was 11.4% (27/237. This included 11 index cases and 16 personnel (7.1% who developed four-fold or higher rise in antibody titres during oseltamivir prophylaxis. Of these 16 personnel, 8 (3.5% were symptomatic while the remaining 8 personnel (3.5% were asymptomatic and tested negative on PCR. Post-cessation of prophylaxis, an additional 23 (12.1% seroconverted. There was no significant difference in mean fold-rise in GMT between those who seroconverted during and post-prophylaxis (11.3 vs 11.7, p = 0.888. No allergic, neuropsychiatric or other severe side-effects were noted. Conclusions Post-exposure oseltamivir prophylaxis reduced the rate of infection during outbreaks, and did not substantially increase subsequent infection rates upon cessation. Asymptomatic infections occur during prophylaxis, which may confer protection against future infection. Post-exposure prophylaxis is effective as a measure in mitigating pandemic influenza outbreaks.

  13. Neuraminidase-mediated, NKp46-dependent immune-evasion mechanism of influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Yotam; Glasner, Ariella; Meningher, Tal; Achdout, Hagit; Gur, Chamutal; Lankry, Dikla; Vitenshtein, Alon; Meyers, Adrienne F A; Mandelboim, Michal; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2013-04-25

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an essential role in the defense against influenza virus, one of the deadliest respiratory viruses known today. The NKp46 receptor, expressed by NK cells, is critical for controlling influenza infections, as influenza-virus-infected cells are eliminated through the recognition of the viral hemagglutinin (HA) protein by NKp46. Here, we describe an immune-evasion mechanism of influenza viruses that is mediated by the neuraminidase (NA) protein. By using various NA blockers, we show that NA removes sialic acid residues from NKp46 and that this leads to reduced recognition of HA. Furthermore, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the existence of this NA-mediated, NKp46-dependent immune-evasion mechanism and demonstrate that NA inhibitors, which are commonly used for the treatment of influenza infections, are useful not only as blockers of virus budding but also as boosters of NKp46 recognition. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of Combined Therapy with Amantadine, Oseltamivir, and Ribavirin In Vivo against Susceptible and Amantadine-Resistant Influenza A Viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Jack T.; Smee, Donald F.; Barnard, Dale L.; Julander, Justin G.; Gross, Matthew; de Jong, Menno D.; Went, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    The limited efficacy of existing antiviral therapies for influenza - coupled with widespread baseline antiviral resistance highlights the urgent need for more effective therapy. We describe a triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD) regimen composed of amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin that is

  15. A multicentre, randomized, controlled trial of oseltamivir in the treatment of influenza in a high-risk Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiang-Tao; Yu, Xue-Zhong; Cui, De-Jian; Chen, Xu-Yan; Zhu, Ji-Hong; Wang, Yu-Zhen; Wu, Xiao-di

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oseltamivir treatment in a population at high risk for influenza. This was a randomized, open-label, controlled trial involving Chinese patients with chronic respiratory diseases (chronic bronchitis, obstructive emphysema, bronchial asthma or bronchiectasis) or chronic cardiac disease. Patients showing symptoms of influenza were randomly assigned to receive oral oseltamivir 75 mg twice daily for 5 days (oseltamivir group), or symptomatic treatment (control group) within 48 h after symptom onset. The main outcome measures were duration and severity of illness in influenza-infected patients. Other outcome measures included incidence of complications, antibiotic use, hospitalization and total medical cost. Of the 118 recruited patients, 56 were identified as influenza-infected through laboratory tests (oseltamivir, N = 27; control, N = 29). Relative to symptomatic treatment, oseltamivir significantly reduced the duration of influenza symptoms by 36.8% (p = 0.0479), and the severity by 43.1% (p = 0.0002). In addition, oseltamivir significantly reduced the duration of fever by 45.2% (p = 0.0051), and the time to return to baseline health status by 5 days (p = 0.0011). The incidence of complications (11% vs. 45%, p = 0.0053) and antibiotic use (37% vs. 69%, p = 0.0167) were also significantly lower in the oseltamivir group compared with the control group. The cost of treating influenza and its complications was comparable between the two groups (p = 0.2462). Oseltamivir is effective and well tolerated in high-risk patients with chronic respiratory or cardiac diseases. It can reduce the duration and severity of influenza symptoms and decrease the incidence of secondary complications and antibiotic use, without increasing the total medical cost.

  16. Neuraminidase 1 is a Negative Regulator of Lysosomal Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogalingam, Gouri; Bonten, Erik J.; van de Vlekkert, Diantha; Hu, Huimin; Moshiach, Simon; Connell, Samuel A.; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysosomal exocytosis is a Ca2+-regulated mechanism that involves proteins responsible for cytoskeletal attachment and fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane. However, whether luminal lysosomal enzymes contribute to this process remains unknown. Here we show that neuraminidase Neu1 negatively regulates lysosomal exocytosis in hematopoietic cells by processing the sialic acids on the lysosomal membrane protein Lamp-1. In macrophages from Neu1-deficient mice, a model of the disease sialidosis, and in patients’ fibroblasts, oversialylated Lamp-1 enhances lysosomal exocytosis. Silencing of Lamp-1 reverts this phenotype by interfering with the docking of lysosomes at the plasma membrane. In Neu1-/- mice the excessive exocytosis of serine proteases in the bone niche leads to inactivation of extracellular serpins, premature degradation of VCAM-1, and loss of bone marrow retention. Our findings uncover an unexpected mechanism influencing lysosomal exocytosis and argue that exacerbations of this process form the basis for certain genetic diseases. PMID:18606142

  17. Neuraminidase activity provides a practical read-out for a high throughput influenza antiviral screening assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of influenza strains that are resistant to commonly used antivirals has highlighted the need to develop new compounds that target viral gene products or host mechanisms that are essential for effective virus replication. Existing assays to identify potential antiviral compounds often use high throughput screening assays that target specific viral replication steps. To broaden the search for antivirals, cell-based replication assays can be performed, but these are often labor intensive and have limited throughput. Results We have adapted a traditional virus neutralization assay to develop a practical, cell-based, high throughput screening assay. This assay uses viral neuraminidase (NA as a read-out to quantify influenza replication, thereby offering an assay that is both rapid and sensitive. In addition to identification of inhibitors that target either viral or host factors, the assay allows simultaneous evaluation of drug toxicity. Antiviral activity was demonstrated for a number of known influenza inhibitors including amantadine that targets the M2 ion channel, zanamivir that targets NA, ribavirin that targets IMP dehydrogenase, and bis-indolyl maleimide that targets protein kinase A/C. Amantadine-resistant strains were identified by comparing IC50 with that of the wild-type virus. Conclusion Antivirals with specificity for a broad range of targets are easily identified in an accelerated viral inhibition assay that uses NA as a read-out of replication. This assay is suitable for high throughput screening to identify potential antivirals or can be used to identify drug-resistant influenza strains.

  18. Purification and properties of rabbit spermatozoal acrosomal neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P N; Abou-Issa, H

    1977-01-01

    Treatment of rabbit spermatozoa with 50mM-MgCl2 removes the plasma and the outer acrosomal membranes. Subsequent treatment with the detergents Hyamine 2389 and Triton X-100 solubilizes spermatozoal neuraminidase bound to the inner acrosomal membrane. The enzyme was further purified by DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-150 and Bio-Gel P-300 column chromato. The enzyme showed a single major band, with the possibility of some minor contaminants, on disc-gel electrophoresis. It had a specific activity of 0.37 micronmal of sialic acid released/min per mg with purified boar Cowper's-gland mucin as the substrate. The enzyme had marked specificity for 2 leads to 6'-linked sialic acid in glycoproteins. The Km of spermatozoal neuraminidase was 1.72 X 10(-6)M with Cowper's-gland mucin, 1.17 X 10(-5)M with fetuin and 8.8 X 10(-4)M with sialyl-lactose as a substrates. The Vmax. was 0.112 micronmol/min per mg with the Cowper's-gland mucin, 0.071 micronmol/min per mg with fetuin and 0.033 micronmol/min per mg with sialyl-lactose as substrate. The enzyme hydrolysed sheep submaxillary-gland mucin as readily as the Cowper's-gland mucin. The optimum of enzyme activity was at pH 5.0 on the Cowper's-gland mucin and at pH4.3 on sialyl-lactose. The enzyme activity was unaffected by 20mM-Na+ and-K+, but was inhibited by 20mM-Ca2+,-Mn2+,-Co2+ and -Cu2+. The enzyme was unstable in dilute solutions, but could be stored indefinitely freeze-dried at --20 degrees C. Images PLATE 1 PMID:66917

  19. Sialidosis and galactosialidosis: chromosomal assignment of two genes associated with neuraminidase-deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, O T; Henry, W M; Haley, L L; Byers, M G; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B

    1986-01-01

    The inherited human disorders sialidosis and galactosialidosis are the result of deficiencies of glycoprotein-specific alpha-neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18; sialidase) activity. Two genes were determined to be necessary for expression of neuraminidase by using human-mouse somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes. A panel of mouse RAG-human hybrid cells demonstrated a single-gene requirement for human neuraminidase and allowed assignment of this gene to the (pter----q23) region of chromosome 10. A second panel of mouse thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient LM/TK- -human hybrid cells demonstrated that human neuraminidase activity required both chromosomes 10 and 20 to be present. Analysis of human neuraminidase expression in interspecific hybrid cells or polykaryocytes formed from fusion of mouse RAG (hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient) or LM/TK- cell lines with human sialidosis or galactosialidosis fibroblasts indicated that the RAG cell line complemented the galactosialidosis defect, but the LM/TK- cell line did not. This eliminates the requirement for this gene in RAG-human hybrid cells and explains the different chromosome requirements of these two hybrid panels. Fusion of LM/TK- cell hybrids lacking chromosome 10 or 20 (phenotype 10+,20- and 10-,20+) and neuraminidase-deficient fibroblasts confirmed by complementation analysis that the sialidosis disorder results from a mutation on chromosome 10, presumably encoding the neuraminidase structural gene. Galactosialidosis is caused by a mutation in a second gene required for neuraminidase expression located on chromosome 20. PMID:3081902

  20. Neuraminidase production by a Streptococcus sanguis strain associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Straus, D. C.; Portnoy-Duran, C

    1983-01-01

    The properties of an extracellular neuraminidase produced by a Streptococcus sanguis strain (isolated from a confirmed case of subacute bacterial endocarditis) during growth in a defined medium was examined in this investigation. This enzyme, isolated from concentrated culture supernatants of S. sanguis biotype II, was active against human alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, N-acetylneuramin lactose, bovine submaxillary mucin, and fetuin. Neuraminidase production paralleled bacterial growth in defined...

  1. Application of Heterogeneous Catalysts in the First Steps of the Oseltamivir Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Fraile

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The first steps of oseltamivir synthesis from quinic acid involve acetalization and ester formation. These reactions are catalyzed by either acids or bases, which may be accomplished by heterogeneous catalysts. Sulfonic solids are efficient acid catalysts for acetalization and esterification reactions. Supported tetraalkylammonium hydroxide or 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene are also efficient base catalysts for lactone alcoholysis and in this work, these catalysts have been applied in two alternative synthetic routes that lead to oseltamivir. The classical route consists of an acetalization, followed by a lactonization, and then a lactone alcoholysis. This achieves a 66% isolated yield. The alternative route consists of esterification followed by acetalization and is only efficient when an acetone acetal is used.

  2. Oseltamivir (Tamiflu-induced bilateral acute angle closure glaucoma and transient myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Woong Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old woman developed bilateral acute angle closure glaucoma (AACG and transient myopia after taking oseltamivir for four days. On the fourth day, she received systemic and topical intraocular pressure (IOP-lowering agents, and IOP decreased in both eyes. However, her visual acuity was unchanged. A myopic shift of -5.25 D OD and -5.0 D OS was estimated to have occurred in the acute phase. A-scan ultrasonography and Pentacam showed markedly shallow anterior chambers and increased lens thickness. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed an annular ciliochoroidal effusion with forward displacement of the lens-iris diaphragm. Ciliochoroidal effusion and transient myopia were resolved after discontinuation of oseltamivir.

  3. Detection and management of antiviral resistance for influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guy

    2013-11-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) are first-line agents for the treatment and prevention of influenza virus infections. As for other antivirals, the development of resistance to NAIs has become an important concern particularly in the case of A(H1N1) viruses and oseltamivir. The most frequently reported change conferring oseltamivir resistance in that viral context is the H275Y neuraminidase mutation (N1 numbering). Recent studies have shown that, in the presence of the appropriate permissive mutations, the H275Y variant can retain virulence and transmissibility in some viral backgrounds. Most oseltamivir-resistant influenza A virus infections can be managed with the use of inhaled or intravenous zanamivir, another NAI. New NAI compounds and non-neuraminidase agents as well as combination therapies are currently in clinical evaluation for the treatment for severe influenza infections. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Severe human influenza infections in Thailand: oseltamivir treatment and risk factors for fatal outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanna Hanshaoworakul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza is often not recognized as an important cause of severe or fatal disease in tropical and subtropical countries in Southeast Asia. The extent to which Oseltamivir treatment may protect against a fatal outcome in severe influenza infections is not known. Thailand's National Avian Influenza Surveillance (NAIS system affords a unique opportunity to describe the epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed severe and fatal human influenza infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During January 2004 through December 2006, 11,641 notifications to the NAIS were investigated in 73 of 76 Thai provinces. Clinical and demographic data and respiratory swab specimens were collected and tested by PCR for influenza. Using the NAIS database, we identified all patients with laboratory confirmed human influenza (A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and Type B infection. A retrospective medical record review was conducted on all fatal cases with laboratory confirmed influenza and from a sample of hospitalized cases in 28 provinces. The association of underlying risk factors, Oseltamivir treatment and risk of a fatal outcome were examined. Human influenza infections were identified in 2,075 (18% cases. Twenty-two (1% deaths occurred including seven deaths in children less than ten years of age. Thirty-five percent of hospitalized human influenza infections had chest X-ray confirmed pneumonia. Current or former smoking; advanced age, hypertension and underlying cardiovascular, pulmonary or endocrine disease were associated with a fatal outcome from human influenza infection. Treatment with Oseltamivir was statistically associated with survival with a crude OR of .11 (95% CI: 0.04-0.30 and .13 (95% CI: 0.04-0.40 after controlling for age. CONCLUSIONS: Severe and fatal human influenza infections were commonly identified in the NAIS designed to identify avian A/H5N1 cases. Treatment with Oseltamivir is associated with survival in hospitalized human influenza pneumonia

  5. Severe human influenza infections in Thailand: oseltamivir treatment and risk factors for fatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaoworakul, Wanna; Simmerman, James Mark; Narueponjirakul, Ubolrat; Sanasuttipun, Wiwan; Shinde, Vivek; Kaewchana, Suchada; Areechokechai, Darin; Levy, Jens; Ungchusak, Kumnuan

    2009-06-25

    Influenza is often not recognized as an important cause of severe or fatal disease in tropical and subtropical countries in Southeast Asia. The extent to which Oseltamivir treatment may protect against a fatal outcome in severe influenza infections is not known. Thailand's National Avian Influenza Surveillance (NAIS) system affords a unique opportunity to describe the epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed severe and fatal human influenza infections. During January 2004 through December 2006, 11,641 notifications to the NAIS were investigated in 73 of 76 Thai provinces. Clinical and demographic data and respiratory swab specimens were collected and tested by PCR for influenza. Using the NAIS database, we identified all patients with laboratory confirmed human influenza (A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and Type B) infection. A retrospective medical record review was conducted on all fatal cases with laboratory confirmed influenza and from a sample of hospitalized cases in 28 provinces. The association of underlying risk factors, Oseltamivir treatment and risk of a fatal outcome were examined. Human influenza infections were identified in 2,075 (18%) cases. Twenty-two (1%) deaths occurred including seven deaths in children less than ten years of age. Thirty-five percent of hospitalized human influenza infections had chest X-ray confirmed pneumonia. Current or former smoking; advanced age, hypertension and underlying cardiovascular, pulmonary or endocrine disease were associated with a fatal outcome from human influenza infection. Treatment with Oseltamivir was statistically associated with survival with a crude OR of .11 (95% CI: 0.04-0.30) and .13 (95% CI: 0.04-0.40) after controlling for age. Severe and fatal human influenza infections were commonly identified in the NAIS designed to identify avian A/H5N1 cases. Treatment with Oseltamivir is associated with survival in hospitalized human influenza pneumonia patients.

  6. Oseltamivir and Neuropsychiatric Behaviors – A Case Report on an Adolescent Teen and Evaluation of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz-Yin SO

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To illustrate a case of oseltamivir induced neuropsychiatric behaviors in an adolescent teen. CASE SUMMARY: A 15-year-old previously healthy adolescent presented to the emergency department with acute onset of altered mental status after taking two doses of oseltamivir prescribed to him by his primary care physician for presumed influenza infection. A thorough examination at the hospital, which included a urine drug screen, complete blood count, complete metabolic panel, urine and blood cultures, head computed tomography, and chest radiograph, did not indicate any other clinical conditions that could explain his abnormal behaviors. No other medications were given to him in the hospital. About 20 hours after the last dose of oseltamivir, he awoke from a nap and his mental status was completely back to baseline. He had no memory of the events transpired in the past 24 hours and was discharged home with no further incidence.DISSCUSION: Oseltamivir is an anti-viral agent that is often used as treatment and prophylaxis for influenza infection. Neuropsychiatric adverse events such as hallucination and delirium can potentially occur with this agent. This rare adverse event may be due to the binding of the medication to the enzyme sialidase causing increase in dopamine activity. Most of the reports were in young Japanese children less than 16 years old. Some studies have shown a causal relationship with oseltamivir leading to this adverse event, while some have failed to do so, probably due to flaws in their analytical method. The Naranjo ADR probability scale showed a possible causality between neuropsychiatric behaviors and oseltamivir administration in this patient.CONCLUSIONS: Oseltamivir is an effective anti-viral for influenza infection if started early in the course of the illness. Clinicians should monitor for neuropsychiatric symptoms when starting patients on this medication.

  7. Oseltamivir for treatment and prevention of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus infection in households, Milwaukee, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Joel C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During an influenza pandemic, a substantial proportion of transmission is thought to occur in households. We used data on influenza progression in individuals and their contacts collected by the City of Milwaukee Health Department (MHD to study the transmission of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus in 362 households in Milwaukee, WI, and the effects of oseltamivir treatment and chemoprophylaxis. Methods 135 households had chronological information on symptoms and oseltamivir usage for all household members. The effect of oseltamivir treatment and other factors on the household secondary attack rate was estimated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression with households as the unit of analysis. The effect of oseltamivir treatment and other factors on the individual secondary attack rate was estimated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression with individual household contacts as the unit of analysis, and a generalized estimating equations approach was used to fit the model to allow for clustering within households. Results Oseltamivir index treatment on onset day or the following day (early treatment was associated with a 42% reduction (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.19, 1.73 in the odds of one or more secondary infections in a household and a 50% reduction (OR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.17, 1.46 in the odds of a secondary infection in individual contacts. The confidence bounds are wide due to a small sample of households with early oseltamivir index usage - in 29 such households, 5 had a secondary attack. Younger household contacts were at higher risk of infection (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.50-5.20. Conclusions Early oseltamivir treatment may be beneficial in preventing H1N1pdm influenza transmission; this may have relevance to future control measures for influenza pandemics. Larger randomized trials are needed to confirm this finding statistically.

  8. Adsorption removal of antiviral drug oseltamivir and its metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate by carbon nanotubes: Effects of carbon nanotube properties and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Niu, Li-Xia; Wang, Chao; Sun, Ming-Chao; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2015-10-01

    This investigation evaluated the adsorption behavior of the antiviral drugs of oseltamivir (OE) and its metabolites (i.e., oseltamivir carboxylate (OC)) on three types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including single-walled CNT (SWCNT), multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), and carboxylated SWCNT (SWCNT-COOH). CNTs can efficiently remove more than 90% of the OE and OC from aqueous solution when the initial concentration was lower than 10(-4) mmol/L. The Polanyi-Manes model depicted the adsorption isotherms of OE and OC on CNTs better than the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The properties of OE/OC and the characteristics of CNTs, particularly the oxygen functional groups (e.g., SWCNT-COOH) played important roles during the adsorption processes. OE showed a higher adsorption affinity than OC. By comparing the different adsorbates adsorption on each CNT and each adsorbate adsorption on different CNTs, the adsorption mechanisms of hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, van der Waals force, and H-bonding were proposed as the contributing factors for OE and OC adsorption on CNTs. Particularly, for verifying the contribution of electrostatic interaction, the changes of adsorption partition efficiency (Kd) of OE and OC on CNTs were evaluated by varying pH from 2 to 11 and the importance of isoelectric point (pHIEP) of CNTs on OE and OC adsorption was addressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oseltamivir, amantadine, and ribavirin combination antiviral therapy versus oseltamivir monotherapy for the treatment of influenza: a multicentre, double-blind, randomised phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigel, John H; Bao, Yajing; Beeler, Joy; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Slandzicki, Alex; Dar, Sadia M; Panuto, John; Beasley, Richard L; Perez-Patrigeon, Santiago; Suwanpimolkul, Gompol; Losso, Marcelo H; McClure, Natalie; Bozzolo, Dawn R; Myers, Christopher; Holley, H Preston; Hoopes, Justin; Lane, H Clifford; Hughes, Michael D; Davey, Richard T

    2017-12-01

    Influenza continues to have a substantial socioeconomic and health impact despite a long established vaccination programme and approved antivirals. Preclinical data suggest that combining antivirals might be more effective than administering oseltamivir alone in the treatment of influenza. We did a randomised, double-blind, multicentre phase 2 trial of a combination of oseltamivir, amantadine, and ribavirin versus oseltamivir monotherapy with matching placebo for the treatment of influenza in 50 sites, consisting of academic medical centre clinics, emergency rooms, and private physician offices in the USA, Thailand, Mexico, Argentina, and Australia. Participants who were aged at least 18 years with influenza and were at increased risk of complications were randomly assigned (1:1) by an online computer-generated randomisation system to receive either oseltamivir (75 mg), amantadine (100 mg), and ribavirin (600 mg) combination therapy or oseltamivir monotherapy twice daily for 5 days, given orally, and participants were followed up for 28 days. Blinded treatment kits were used to achieve masking of patients and staff. The primary endpoint was the percentage of participants with virus detectable by PCR in nasopharyngeal swab at day 3, and was assessed in participants who were randomised, had influenza infection confirmed by the central laboratory on a baseline nasopharyngeal sample, and had received at least one dose of study drug. Safety assessment was done in all patients in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01227967. Between March 1, 2011, and April 29, 2016, 633 participants were randomly assigned to receive combination antiviral therapy (n=316) or monotherapy (n=317). Seven participants were excluded from analysis: three were not properly randomised, three withdrew from the study, and one was lost to follow-up. The primary analysis included 394 participants, excluding 47 in the pilot phase, 172 without

  10. Baculovirus Surface Display Using Infuenza Neuraminidase (NA Transmembrane Anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irisa Trianti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Baculovirus surface display has been employed as an excellent tools for presentation of foreign peptides and proteins on virus surface with native conformation, functions and immunogenicity. A baculovirus major envelope protein, gp64, or a capsid protein, vp39 are generally used as fusion partners for displaying of polypeptides on the surface of virions. Alternatively, a membrane anchoring domain of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G can also be used. In this study, an influenza neuraminidase (NA was proposed as a new membrane anchor for the display of Angiotensin II (AngII, DRVYIHPFHL, peptides. The AngII peptides were inserted into NA by replacing NA amino acid number 60-67 with AngII, and then integrated into a baculovirus genome. A recombinant baculovirus expressing the NA fusion-AngII peptides was generated from infected insect cells. Those peptides were found to express and translocated on the membrane of the baculovirus infected insect cell (Sf9 cell as detected by immunocytochemistry using anti-AngII monoclonal antibody. Upon budding of the recombinant baculovirus progenies through the insect cells membrane, the recombinant NA-AngII peptides was acquired to envelopes of the new baculovirus progenies. The conformation of NA on baculovirus surface was not affected by the deletion, as the 55 kDa band of NA can be detected from Western Blotting analysis by specific anti-NA monoclonal antibody. In addition, the same protein was also found by anti-AngII antibody indicating that the AngII peptides had been successfully fused with the recombinant NA. Interestingly, electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that not only the recombinant baculovirus displaying AngII peptides were generated by infected insect cells, but also the NA virus-like-particle displaying AngII peptides.

  11. Regeneration of membrane sialic acid after neuraminidase treatment of leukemic granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, R N; Hindenburg, A A; Baker, M A

    1985-01-01

    Granulocytes from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) were studied for their ability to regenerate surface sialic acid following treatment with Vibrio cholera neuraminidase (VCN) in vitro. Immediately after neuraminidase treatment, CML and normal granulocytes showed similar incorporation of radioactivity after surface labelling with sodium periodate/potassium-H3-borohydride (PI/BH3(4)). CML granulocytes treated with neuraminidase then incubated for 18 h in nutrient medium showed strikingly increased PI/BH3(4) labelling, usually greater than initial pretreatment values, consistent with a rapid reappearance of sialic acid in the cell membrane. This pattern was not seen in normal granulocytes. The aberrant regeneration of sialic acid in CML granulocytes in vitro could be inhibited by addition of 3 X 10(-6) M retinoic acid, suggesting either a direct effect on membrane glycoconjugate synthesis or an association with granulocyte differentiation.

  12. Melissa offiinalis effiacy against human inflenza virus (New H1N1 in comparison with oseltamivir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvane Jalali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antiviral activity of Melissa officinalis (MO extract against the influenza virus H1N1 in vitro. Methods: The cytotoxicity of MO extract was identified on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cell culture by MTT assay. The virus was inoculated to the cells (multiplicity of infection = 0.1 in two protocols. In protocol 1, the MO extracts at concentrations of 0.005, 0.050, 0.010, 0.100 and 0.500 mg/mL were incubated with the virus for one hour preinoculation. In protocol 2, the mentioned concentrations of MO extracts were added to the cells one-hour post infection. Furthermore, the antiviral effect of oseltamivir with different concentrations was tested as the positive controls. The 50% tissue culture infective dose, neutralizing index and hemagglutination titer were determined. Results: The medicine oseltamivir and MO extracts were not toxic for MDCK at concentrations less than 1 mg/mL. All utilized concentrations of MO extracts were vigorously efficient to decrease the viral yield in both experiments. The 50% tissue culture infective dose of the groups containing up to 0.100 mg/mL of MO extracts in the first experiment in compare with 0.050 mg/mL in the second experiment reduced to 0. Although hemagglutination tests showed little titers, the viral quantity significantly decreased in both experiments. By the way, the medicine oseltamivir could completely suppress viral replication in MDCK. Conclusions: The present study suggests that MO extracts have a potent anti-influenza effect in cell culture.

  13. Sialidosis Type 1 with a Novel Mutation in the Neuraminidase-1 (NEU1) Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K; Srinivasan, Varun M; Benakappa, Naveen; Benakappa, Asha

    2017-05-01

    A patient with Sialidosis type 1 with a novel variation in neuraminidase-1 (NEU1) is described. The patient developed ataxia and myoclonus at 9 y of age. He was born to a second degree consanguineous marriage couple. On examination child had cerebellar signs and bilateral macular cherry-red spots. MRI of the brain and electroencephalogram were normal. The enzyme analysis revealed deficiency of neuraminidase. Genetic analysis identified novel homozygous missense mutation c.742G > T (p.G248C) in exon 4 of NEU1 gene. At 13 y of age, the ataxia and had myoclonus progressed.

  14. Influenza virus inactivation for studies of antigenicity and phenotypic neuraminidase inhibitor resistance profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jonges (Marcel); W.M. Liu; E. van der Vries (Erhard); R. Jacobi (Ronald); I. Pronk (Inge); C. Boog (Claire); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A. Meijer (Adam); E. Soethout (Ernst)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction of a new influenza virus in humans urges quick analysis of its virological and immunological characteristics to determine the impact on public health and to develop protective measures for the human population. At present, however, the necessity of executing pandemic

  15. Influenza A (H1N1) neuraminidase inhibitors from Vitis amurensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Anh; Dao, Trong Tuan; Tung, Bui Thanh

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a novel H1N1 influenza A virus (H1N1/09 virus) was identified and considered a strong candidate for a novel influenza pandemic. As part of an ongoing anti-influenza screening programme on natural products, eight oligostilbenes were isolated as active principles from the methanol extract...

  16. Clinical presentation of congenital sialidosis in a patient with a neuraminidase gene frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, T; Molitor, G; Lukong, K E; Praun, M; Genzel-Boroviczény, O; Freund, M; Pshezhetsky, A V; Schulze, A

    2001-01-01

    Congenital sialidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a primary neuraminidase deficiency which results from defects in the neuraminidase gene on chromosome 6p. The inheritance is autosomal recessive. Patients exhibit excessive urinary excretion of bound sialic acid and decreased or undetectable amounts of neuraminidase activity in various tissues. The clinical expression is variable, but ascites and hepatosplenomegaly are hallmarks of the disease. Skeletal abnormalities, facial dysmorphism and inguinal herniae have been described in most of the few reported cases. We describe a baby girl with biochemically proven sialidosis, who in addition to the above clinical features, had severely dilated coronary arteries, excessive retinal vascular tortuosity and an erythematous, macular rash. Homozygosity for a frameshift mutation at residue 623 of the neuraminidase cDNA was found. We speculate that the additional features found in our patient might be associated with the here described genotype of congenital sialidosis. Severely dilated coronary arteries, excessive retinal vascular tortuosity and an erythematous macular rash might be associated features of congenital sialidosis.

  17. Novel mutations in lysosomal neuraminidase identify functional domains and determine clinical severity in sialidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, E J; Arts, W F; Beck, M; Covanis, A; Donati, M A; Parini, R; Zammarchi, E; d'Azzo, A

    2000-11-01

    Lysosomal neuraminidase is the key enzyme for the intralysosomal catabolism of sialylated glycoconjugates and is deficient in two neurodegenerative lysosomal disorders, sialidosis and galactosialidosis. Here we report the identification of eight novel mutations in the neuraminidase gene of 11 sialidosis patients with various degrees of disease penetrance. Comparison of the primary structure of human neuraminidase with the primary and tertiary structures of bacterial sialidases indicated that most of the single amino acid substitutions occurred in functional motifs or conserved residues. On the basis of the subcellular distribution and residual catalytic activity of the mutant neuraminidases we assigned the mutant proteins to three groups: (i) catalytically inactive and not lysosomal; (ii) catalytically inactive, but localized in lysosome; and (iii) catalytically active and lysosomal. In general, there was a close correlation between the residual activity of the mutant enzymes and the clinical severity of disease. Patients with the severe infantile type II disease had mutations from group I, whereas patients with a mild form of type I disease had at least one mutation from group III. Mutations from the second group were mainly found in juvenile type II patients with intermediate clinical severity. Overall, our findings explain the clinical heterogeneity observed in sialidosis and may help in the assignment of existing or new allelic combinations to specific phenotypes.

  18. Neuraminidase Inhibition Primes Short-Term Depression and Suppresses Long-Term Potentiation of Synaptic Transmission in the Rat Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Savotchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuraminidase (NEU is a key enzyme that cleaves negatively charged sialic acid residues from membrane proteins and lipids. Clinical and basic science studies have shown that an imbalance in NEU metabolism or changes in NEU activity due to various pathological conditions parallel with behavior and cognitive impairment. It has been suggested that the decreases of NEU activity could cause serious neurological consequences. However, there is a lack of direct evidences that modulation of endogenous NEU activity can impair neuronal function. Using combined rat entorhinal cortex/hippocampal slices and a specific inhibitor of NEU, 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (NADNA, we examined the effect of downregulation of NEU activity on different forms of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA3-to-CA1 network. We show that NEU inhibition results in a significant decrease in long-term potentiation (LTP and an increase in short-term depression. Synaptic depotentiation restores LTP in NADNA-pretreated slices to the control level. These data suggest that short-term NEU inhibition produces the LTP-like effect on neuronal network, which results in damping of further LTP induction. Our findings demonstrate that downregulation of NEU activity could have a major impact on synaptic plasticity and provide a new insight into the cellular mechanism underlying behavioral and cognitive impairment associated with abnormal metabolism of NEU.

  19. Oseltamivir Population Pharmacokinetics in the Ferret: Model Application for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaela B Reddy

    Full Text Available The ferret is a suitable small animal model for preclinical evaluation of efficacy of antiviral drugs against various influenza strains, including highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Rigorous pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD assessment of ferret data has not been conducted, perhaps due to insufficient information on oseltamivir PK. Here, based on PK data from several studies on both uninfected and influenza-infected groups (i.e., with influenza A viruses of H5N1 and H3N2 subtypes and an influenza B virus and several types of anesthesia we developed a population PK model for the active compound oseltamivir carboxylate (OC in the ferret. The ferret OC population PK model incorporated delayed first-order input, two-compartment distribution, and first-order elimination to successfully describe OC PK. Influenza infection did not affect model parameters, but anesthesia did. The conclusion that OC PK was not influenced by influenza infection must be viewed with caution because the influenza infections in the studies included here resulted in mild clinical symptoms in terms of temperature, body weight, and activity scores. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine that administration of a 5.08 mg/kg dose of oseltamivir phosphate to ferret every 12 h for 5 days results in the same median OC area under the plasma concentration-time curve 0-12 h (i.e., 3220 mg h/mL as that observed in humans during steady state at the approved dose of 75 mg twice daily for 5 days. Modeling indicated that PK variability for OC in the ferret model is high, and can be affected by anesthesia. Therefore, for proper interpretation of PK/PD data, sparse PK sampling to allow the OC PK determination in individual animals is important. Another consideration in appropriate design of PK/PD studies is achieving an influenza infection with pronounced clinical symptoms and efficient virus replication, which will allow adequate evaluation of drug effects.

  20. Effects of Double Combinations of Amantadine, Oseltamivir, and Ribavirin on Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Infections in Cell Culture and in Mice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Donald F.; Hurst, Brett L.; Wong, Min-Hui; Bailey, Kevin W.; Morrey, John D.

    2009-01-01

    An amantadine-resistant influenza A/Duck/MN/1525/81 (H5N1) virus was developed from the low-pathogenic North American wild-type (amantadine-sensitive) virus for studying treatment of infections in cell culture and in mice. Double combinations of amantadine, oseltamivir (or the cell culture-active form, oseltamivir carboxylate), and ribavirin were used. Amantadine-oseltamivir carboxylate and amantadine-ribavirin combinations showed synergistic interactions over a range of doses against wild-type virus in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell culture, but oseltamivir carboxylate-ribavirin combinations did not. Primarily additive interactions were seen with oseltamivir carboxylate-ribavirin combinations against amantadine-resistant virus. The presence of amantadine in drug combinations against the resistant virus did not improve activity. The wild-type and amantadine-resistant viruses were lethal to mice by intranasal instillation. The resistant virus infection could not be treated with amantadine up to 100 mg/kg body weight/day, whereas the wild-type virus infection was treatable with oral doses of 10 (weakly effective) to 100 mg/kg/day administered twice a day for 5 days starting 4 h prior to virus exposure. Drug combination studies showed that treatment of the amantadine-resistant virus infection with amantadine-oseltamivir or amantadine-ribavirin combinations was not significantly better than using oseltamivir or ribavirin alone. In contrast, the oseltamivir-ribavirin (25- and 75-mg/kg/day combination) treatments produced significant reductions in mortality. The wild-type virus infection was markedly reduced in severity by all three combinations (amantadine, 10 mg/kg/day combined with the other compounds at 20 or 40 mg/kg/day) compared to monotherapy with the three compounds. Results indicate a lack of benefit of amantadine in combinations against amantadine-resistant virus, but positive benefits in combinations against amantadine-sensitive virus. PMID:19273672

  1. Delayed Dosing of S-033188, a Novel Inhibitor of Influenza Virus Cap-dependent Endonuclease, Exhibited Significant Reduction of Viral Titer and Mortality in Mice Infected with Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, Keita; Ando, Yoshinori; Noshi, Takeshi; Kawai, Makoto; Yoshida, Ryu; Shishido, Takao; Naito, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Both epidemic and pandemic influenza are major public health concerns, but current standard treatment limits its usage by 48 hours from onsets. Furthermore, no antiviral drug has been shown to definitively reduce serious complications, hospitalization, or mortality in a randomized clinical trial. S-033188 is an orally available small molecule inhibitor of cap-dependent endonuclease that is essential for transcription and replication of influenza A and B virus. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of delayed dosing of S-033188, either as single agent or in combination with oseltamivir, in mice infected with lethal doses of influenza A virus. Methods BALB/c mice were intranasally inoculated with A/PR/8/34 strain at 8.0 × 102 tissue culture infectious dose 50 (TCID50)/mouse. Mice were orally treated with S-033188 (0.5, 1.5, 15 or 50 mg/kg), oseltamivir phosphate (10 or 50 mg/kg), S-033188 (0.5 or 1.5 mg/kg) in combination with oseltamivir phosphate (10 or 50 mg/kg), or vehicle BID for 5 days, beginning at 96 hours after virus infection. Survival and body weight were then monitored through a 28-day period after infection. In addition, viral titer in the lung was determined during the treatment. Mice were euthanized and regarded as dead if their body weights were lower than 70% of the initial body weights according to humane endpoints. Results S-033188 monotherapy (15 or 50 mg/kg, BID for 5 days) completely eliminated mortality in mice, whereas oseltamivir monotherapy (10 or 50 mg/kg, BID for 5 days) exhibited only 10% or 40% survival (Figure1), respectively. S-033188 monotherapy also significantly reduced viral titer and prevented body weight loss, consistent with the prolonged survival. Furthermore, S-033188 (0.5 or 1.5 mg/kg) in combination with oseltamivir phosphate (10 or 50 mg/kg) exhibited significant improvement of mortality as compared with each oseltamivir phosphate monotherapy. Conclusion Delayed dosing of S-033188 exhibited

  2. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus outbreak among boarding school pupils in Madagascar: compliance and adverse effects of prophylactic oseltamivir treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Heraud, Jean-Michei; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Razanajatovo, Norosoa; Ramandimbisoa, Tombo; Ratsitorahina, Maherisoa; Richard, Vincent

    2011-03-21

    In October 2009, the first outbreak of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus  in Madagascar occurred at a school in Antananarivo. Among the first 12 cases, five were reported in boarding pupils at the school. The school closed 10 days into the outbreak. Mass oseltamivir prophylactic treatment was used to contain the outbreak. This study aimed to determine the transmission of infection among boarding school pupils and to evaluate the adverse effects of oseltamivir chemoprophylactic treatment and their impact on compliance. After conducting an initial investigation of the outbreak we administered a questionnaire to 132 boarders who were present after the school re-opened. Questions addressed symptoms of influenza-like illness, compliance with chemoprophylaxis, and adverse effects. Of 59 boarders, 20 (45.0%) had confirmed pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection. Among the asymptomatic boarders, compliance with oseltamivir chemoprophylaxis was moderate: 56.2% took the full 10-day course, and 66.9% completed at least seven days. In contrast, among symptomatic boarders, only two did not take the full course of oseltamivir. Fifty percent of the boarders receiving oseltamivir experienced symptoms such as fatigue (38.7%), difficulty concentrating (22.6%) and headaches (19.4%). Bad compliance was not associated with adverse effects. Since the symptoms of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus were generally mild, the burden of adverse effects must be considered when deciding on mass oseltamivir chemoprophylaxis among teenagers.

  3. Brauchen wir die Grippemittel Tamiflu und Relenza?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidtke, Michaela

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lately, several press releases as well as a parliamentary inquiry questioned the effectiveness of the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAI, oseltamivir and zanamivir in concerns of therapy of influenza. However, in combination with the unfortunate data communication by the pharma industry after the latest analysis by the Cochrane Collaboration an opinion evolved and was spread supporting the view that the neuraminidase inhibitors are in fact not effective at all.All three scientific expert societies (GfV, DVV and PEG are considering this point illegitimate and also dangerous simplification. On the one hand, the recent analysis by the Cochrane Collaboration confirms a significant reduction in time to first alleviation of symptoms in children (oseltamivir and adults (oseltamivir and zanamivir. On the other hand, due to basic methodical specifications, the analyses of the Cochrane Collaboration does not include any results of observational studies revealing that especially with patients at risk, indeed, there was a positive effect of neuraminidase inhibitors. As long as there is no availability of any better antiviral substances against influenza viruses, the possibility of applying the existing neuraminidase inhibitors must be considered carefully for each respective situation and used for the good of the patients as well.

  4. Second Sialic Acid Binding Site in Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase: Implications for Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitsev, Viatcheslav; von Itzstein, Mark; Groves, Darrin; Kiefel, Milton; Takimoto, Toru; Portner, Allen; Taylor, Garry

    2004-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are the leading cause of respiratory disease in children. Several paramyxoviruses possess a surface glycoprotein, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), that is involved in attachment to sialic acid receptors, promotion of fusion, and removal of sialic acid from infected cells and progeny virions. Previously we showed that Newcastle disease virus (NDV) HN contained a pliable sialic acid recognition site that could take two states, a binding state and a catalytic state. Here we ...

  5. Microcapsules functionalized with neuraminidase can enter vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weizhi; Wang, Xiaocong; Bai, Ke; Lin, Miao; Sukhorukov, Gleb; Wang, Wen

    2014-12-06

    Microcapsules made of polyelectrolyte multilayers exhibit no or low toxicity, appropriate mechanical stability, variable controllable degradation and can incorporate remote release mechanisms triggered by various stimuli, making them well suited for targeted drug delivery to live cells. This study investigates interactions between microcapsules made of synthetic (i.e. polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt/polyallylamine hydrochloride) or natural (i.e. dextran sulfate/poly-L-arginine) polyelectrolyte and human umbilical vein endothelial cells with particular focus on the effect of the glycocalyx layer on the intake of microcapsules by endothelial cells. Neuraminidase cleaves N-acetyl neuraminic acid residues of glycoproteins and targets the sialic acid component of the glycocalyx on the cell membrane. Three-dimensional confocal images reveal that microcapsules, functionalized with neuraminidase, can be internalized by endothelial cells. Capsules without neuraminidase are blocked by the glycocalyx layer. Uptake of the microcapsules is most significant in the first 2 h. Following their internalization by endothelial cells, biodegradable DS/PArg capsules rupture by day 5; however, there is no obvious change in the shape and integrity of PSS/PAH capsules within the period of observation. Results from the study support our hypothesis that the glycocalyx functions as an endothelial barrier to cross-membrane movement of microcapsules. Neuraminidase-loaded microcapsules can enter endothelial cells by localized cleavage of glycocalyx components with minimum disruption of the glycocalyx layer and therefore have high potential to act as drug delivery vehicles to reach tissues beyond the endothelial barrier of blood vessels. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhengliang L., E-mail: Leon.wu@bio-techne.com [Bio-Techne Inc., 614 McKinley Place NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413 (United States); Zhou, Hui [Gregg Hall, UNH Glycomics Center, University of New Hampshire (United States); Ethen, Cheryl M. [Bio-Techne Inc., 614 McKinley Place NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413 (United States); Reinhold, Vernon N., E-mail: Vernon.Reinhold@unh.edu [Gregg Hall, UNH Glycomics Center, University of New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and {sup 3}H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. - Graphical abstract: Proposed mechanism for how core-fucose prohibits the tetramerization of the 1918 pandemic viral neuraminidase. Only the cross section of the stalk region with two N-linked glycans are depicted for clarity. (A) Carbohydrate–carbohydrate interaction on non-fucosylated monomer allows tetramerization. (B) Core-fucosylation disrupts the interaction and prevents the tetramerization. - Highlights: • Expressed 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase has inactive and active forms. • The inactive form contains high level of core-6 fucose, while the active form lacks such modification. • Core fucose could interfere the oligomerization of the neuraminidase and thus its activation. • This discovery may explain

  7. Exploring the mechanism of zanamivir resistance in a neuraminidase mutant: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanyu Han

    Full Text Available It is critical to understand the molecular basis of the drug resistance of influenza viruses to efficiently treat this infectious disease. Recently, H1N1 strains of influenza A carrying a mutation of Q136K in neuraminidase were found. The new strain showed a strong Zanamivir neutralization effect. In this study, normal molecular dynamics simulations and metadynamics simulations were employed to explore the mechanism of Zanamivir resistance. The wild-type neuraminidase contained a 3(10 helix before the 150 loop, and there was interaction between the 150 and 430 loops. However, the helix and the interaction between the two loops were disturbed in the mutant protein due to interaction between K136 and nearby residues. Hydrogen-bond network analysis showed weakened interaction between the Zanamivir drug and E276/D151 on account of the electrostatic interaction between K136 and D151. Metadynamics simulations showed that the free energy landscape was different in the mutant than in the wild-type neuraminidase. Conformation with the global minimum of free energy for the mutant protein was different from the wild-type conformation. While the drug fit completely into the active site of the wild-type neuraminidase, it did not match the active site of the mutant variant. This study indicates that the altered hydrogen-bond network and the deformation of the 150 loop are the key factors in development of Zanamivir resistance. Furthermore, the Q136K mutation has a variable effect on conformation of different N1 variants, with conformation of the 1918 N1 variant being more profoundly affected than that of the other N1 variants studied in this paper. This observation warrants further experimental investigation.

  8. Aggregation of Streptococcus sanguis by a neuraminidase-sensitive component of serum and crevicular fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, E. J.; McBride, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    A number of strains of Streptococcus sanguis were found to aggregate in nonimmune serum and in crevicular fluid. All strains which aggregated in serum also aggregated in saliva, but some strains which aggregated in saliva did not aggregate in serum. Aggregation was destroyed by treatment of serum or crevicular fluid with neuraminidase and was inhibited by gangliosides. Treatment of serum with proteases reduced aggregating activity. Adsorption of serum to hydroxyapatite did not reduce the aggr...

  9. 'a'-Position-mutated and G4-mutated hemagglutinin-neuraminidase proteins of Newcastle disease virus impair fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase-fusion interaction by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fu-lu; Wen, Hong-ling; Zhang, Wen-qiang; Lin, Bin; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Cheng-xi; Ren, Gui-jie; Song, Yan-yan; Wang, Zhiyu

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effects of heptad repeat regions (HRs) and N-linked carbohydrate sites of the Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein on fusion of HN and fusion (F) proteins and HN-F interaction. We mutated six 'a' residues in the HRs and four asparagines in N-linked carbohydrate sites to alanine in the HN protein. A vaccinia-T7 RNA polymerase expression system was used to express HN cDNAs in BHK-21 cells to determine the HN functions. Deglycosylation was treated with PGNase F digestion. The formation of HN-F protein complexes was determined by the coimmunoprecipitation assay. Each HR-mutated protein interfered with fusion and the HN-F interaction. The G4-mutated protein not only impaired fusion and HN-F interaction but also decreased activities in cell fusion promotion, hemadsorption and neuraminidase. It is assumed that two different mechanisms for mutations in these two regions are responsible for the decreased fusion promotion activity and the reduced ability of interaction with F protein. Mutations in the HRs impair fusion and HN-F interaction by altering the transmission of a signal from the globular domain to the F-specific region in the stalk, but the G4 mutation modulates fusion and HN-F interaction by the misfolding of some important structures. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Efficacy of combined therapy with amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin in vivo against susceptible and amantadine-resistant influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jack T; Smee, Donald F; Barnard, Dale L; Julander, Justin G; Gross, Matthew; de Jong, Menno D; Went, Gregory T

    2012-01-01

    The limited efficacy of existing antiviral therapies for influenza--coupled with widespread baseline antiviral resistance--highlights the urgent need for more effective therapy. We describe a triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD) regimen composed of amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin that is highly efficacious at reducing mortality and weight loss in mouse models of influenza infection. TCAD therapy was superior to dual and single drug regimens in mice infected with drug-susceptible, low pathogenic A/H5N1 (A/Duck/MN/1525/81) and amantadine-resistant 2009 A/H1N1 influenza (A/California/04/09). Treatment with TCAD afforded >90% survival in mice infected with both viruses, whereas treatment with dual and single drug regimens resulted in 0% to 60% survival. Importantly, amantadine had no activity as monotherapy against the amantadine-resistant virus, but demonstrated dose-dependent protection in combination with oseltamivir and ribavirin, indicative that amantadine's activity had been restored in the context of TCAD therapy. Furthermore, TCAD therapy provided survival benefit when treatment was delayed until 72 hours post-infection, whereas oseltamivir monotherapy was not protective after 24 hours post-infection. These findings demonstrate in vivo efficacy of TCAD therapy and confirm previous reports of the synergy and broad spectrum activity of TCAD therapy against susceptible and resistant influenza strains in vitro.

  11. Efficacy of combined therapy with amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin in vivo against susceptible and amantadine-resistant influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack T Nguyen

    Full Text Available The limited efficacy of existing antiviral therapies for influenza--coupled with widespread baseline antiviral resistance--highlights the urgent need for more effective therapy. We describe a triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD regimen composed of amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin that is highly efficacious at reducing mortality and weight loss in mouse models of influenza infection. TCAD therapy was superior to dual and single drug regimens in mice infected with drug-susceptible, low pathogenic A/H5N1 (A/Duck/MN/1525/81 and amantadine-resistant 2009 A/H1N1 influenza (A/California/04/09. Treatment with TCAD afforded >90% survival in mice infected with both viruses, whereas treatment with dual and single drug regimens resulted in 0% to 60% survival. Importantly, amantadine had no activity as monotherapy against the amantadine-resistant virus, but demonstrated dose-dependent protection in combination with oseltamivir and ribavirin, indicative that amantadine's activity had been restored in the context of TCAD therapy. Furthermore, TCAD therapy provided survival benefit when treatment was delayed until 72 hours post-infection, whereas oseltamivir monotherapy was not protective after 24 hours post-infection. These findings demonstrate in vivo efficacy of TCAD therapy and confirm previous reports of the synergy and broad spectrum activity of TCAD therapy against susceptible and resistant influenza strains in vitro.

  12. Reducing Occurrence and Severity of Pneumonia Due to Pandemic H1N1 2009 by Early Oseltamivir Administration: A Retrospective Study in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera Iglesias, Anjarath Lorena; Kudo, Koichiro; Manabe, Toshie; Corcho Berdugo, Alexander Enrique; Baeza, Ariel Corrales; Ramos, Leticia Alfaro; Gutiérrez, René Guevara; Manjarrez Zavala, María Eugenia; Takasaki, Jin; Izumi, Shinyu; Bautista, Edgar; Perez Padilla, José Rogelio

    2011-01-01

    Background Anti-viral treatment has been used to treat severe or progressive illness due to pandemic H1N1 2009. A main cause of severe illness in pandemic H1N1 2009 is viral pneumonia; however, it is unclear how effective antiviral treatment is against pneumonia when administered >48 hours after symptom onset. Therefore, we aimed to determine how time from symptom onset to antiviral administration affected the effectiveness of antiviral treatment against pneumonia due to pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Methods/Principal Findings A retrospective medical chart review of 442 patients was conducted in a hospital in Mexico. Subjects had tested positive for pandemic H1N1 2009 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction and were administered oseltamivir. Median time from symptom onset to oseltamivir administration was 5.0 days (range, 0–43). 442 subjects, 71 (16.1%) had severe pneumonia which required mechanical ventilation, 191 (43.2%) had mild to moderate pneumonia, and 180 (40%) did not have pneumonia. Subjects were divided into four groups based on time to oseltamivir administration: ≤2, 3–7, 8–14, and >14 days. Severity of respiratory features was associated with time to treatment, and multivariate analysis indicated that time to oseltamivir administration was associated with severity of respiratory features. A proportional odds model indicated that 50% probability for occurrence of pneumonia of any severity and that of severe pneumonia in patients who would develop pneumonia reached at approximately 3.4 and 21 days, respectively, after symptom onset. Patients with a shorter time to oseltamivir administration were discharged earlier from the hospital. Conclusions Earlier initiation of oseltamivir administration after symptom onset significantly reduced occurrence and severity of pneumonia and shortened hospitalization due to pandemic H1N1 2009. Even when administered >48 hours after symptom onset, oseltamivir showed considerable potential for

  13. Oseltamivir for influenza in adults and children: systematic review of clinical study reports and summary of regulatory comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Tom; Jones, Mark; Doshi, Peter; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Onakpoya, Igho; Heneghan, Carl J

    2014-04-09

    To describe the potential benefits and harms of oseltamivir by reviewing all clinical study reports (or similar document when no clinical study report exists) of randomised placebo controlled trials and regulatory comments ("regulatory information"). Systematic review of regulatory information. Clinical study reports, trial registries, electronic databases, regulatory archives, and correspondence with manufacturers. Randomised placebo controlled trials on adults and children who had confirmed or suspected exposure to natural influenza. Time to first alleviation of symptoms, influenza outcomes, complications, admissions to hospital, and adverse events in the intention to treat population. From the European Medicines Agency and Roche, we obtained clinical study reports for 83 trials. We included 23 trials in stage 1 (reliability and completeness screen) and 20 in stage 2 (formal analysis). In treatment trials on adults, oseltamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms by 16.8 hours (95% confidence interval 8.4 to 25.1 hours, Ptreatment trials there was no difference in admissions to hospital in adults (risk difference 0.15%, 95% confidence interval -0.91% to 0.78%, P=0.84) and sparse data in children and for prophylaxis. In adult treatment trials, oseltamivir reduced investigator mediated unverified pneumonia (risk difference 1.00%, 0.22% to 1.49%; number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) 100, 95% confidence interval 67 to 451). The effect was not statistically significant in the five trials that used a more detailed diagnostic form for "pneumonia," and no clinical study reports reported laboratory or diagnostic confirmation of "pneumonia." The effect on unverified pneumonia in children and for prophylaxis was not significant. There was no significant reduction in risk of unverified bronchitis, otitis media, sinusitis, or any complication classified as serious or that led to study withdrawal. 14 of 20 trials prompted participants to self report all

  14. Zanamivir immobilized magnetic beads for voltammetric measurement of neuraminidase at gold-modified boron doped diamond electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahyuni, Wulan Tri, E-mail: wulantriws@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bogor Agricultural University, Kampus IPB Darmaga, Bogor 16680 (Indonesia); Department of Chemistry, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia); Ivandini, Tribidasari A.; Saepudin, Endang [Department of Chemistry, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia); Einaga, Yasuaki [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); CREST, JST, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2016-04-19

    Biomolecule modified magnetic beads has been widely used in separation and sensing process. This study used streptavidin modified magnetic beads to immobilize biotin modified zanamivir. Biotin-streptavidin affinity facilitates immobilization of zanamivir on magnetic beads. Then interaction of zanamivir and neuraminidase was adopted as basic for enzyme detection. Detection of neuraminidase was performed at gold modified BDD using cyclic voltammetry technique. The measurement was carried out based on alteration of electrochemical signals of working electrode as neuraminidase response. The result showed that zanamivir was successfully immobilized on magnetic beads. The optimum amount of magnetic beads for zanamivir immobilization was 120 ug. Linear responses of neuraminidase were detected in concentration range of 0-15 mU. Detection limit (LOD) of measurement was 2.32 mU (R2 = 0.959) with precision as % RSD of 1.41%. Measurement of neuraminidase on magnetic beads could be also performed in the presence of mucin matrix. The linearity range was 0-8 mU with LOD of 0.64 mU (R2 = 0.950) and % RSD of 7.25%.

  15. Intestinal neuraminidase activity of suckling rats and other mammals. Relationship to the sialic acid content of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, J J; Messer, M

    1978-02-15

    1. The neuraminidase activity of homogenates of the mucosa of the middle and distal thirds of the small intestine of rats increased about 5-fold between birth and 4 to 8 days of age, and then gradually declined to the much lower adult activity by 24 days. No comparable changes occurred in the proximal third. 2. In 8-day-old rats, the neuraminidase activity of the middle and distal thirds of the small intestine was about 10 times greater than that of the proximal third, 20 times greater than that of the colon and at least 100 times greater than that of the liver, brain, gastric mucosa or pancreas. 3. In all other species investigated (mice, rabbits, cats and guinea pigs), the neuraminidase activity of the middle and distal thirds of the small intestine was greater in suckling animals than in adults. 4. The sialic acid content of rat milk increased about 2-fold between birth and 8 days post partum and then declined. 5. There was a highly significant positive correlation between the intestinal neuraminidase activity of suckling animals of various species and ages and the sialic acid content of milk obtained from the corresponding species and stage of lactation. 6. It is suggested that the intestinal neuraminidase of suckling mammals functions primarily to remove sialic acid from various components of milk, thus providing sialic acid for the synthesis of sialoglycoproteins and gangliosides by the young.

  16. Compliance to oseltamivir among two populations in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom affected by influenza A(H1N1pdm09, November 2009--a waste water epidemiology study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Singer

    Full Text Available Antiviral provision remains the focus of many pandemic preparedness plans, however, there is considerable uncertainty regarding antiviral compliance rates. Here we employ a waste water epidemiology approach to estimate oseltamivir (Tamiflu® compliance. Oseltamivir carboxylate (oseltamivir's active metabolite was recovered from two waste water treatment plant (WWTP catchments within the United Kingdom at the peak of the autumnal wave of the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1pdm09 pandemic. Predictions of oseltamivir consumption from detected levels were compared with two sources of national government statistics to derive compliance rates. Scenario and sensitivity analysis indicated between 3-4 and 120-154 people were using oseltamivir during the study period in the two WWTP catchments and a compliance rate between 45-60%. With approximately half the collected antivirals going unused, there is a clear need to alter public health messages to improve compliance. We argue that a near real-time understanding of drug compliance at the scale of the waste water treatment plant (hundreds to millions of people can potentially help public health messages become more timely, targeted, and demographically sensitive, while potentially leading to less mis- and un-used antiviral, less wastage and ultimately a more robust and efficacious pandemic preparedness plan.

  17. Oseltamivir use and severe abnormal behavior in Japanese children and adolescents with influenza: Is a self-controlled case series study applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Wakaba; Ozasa, Kotaro; Okumura, Akihisa; Mori, Masaaki; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Nakano, Takashi; Tanabe, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Mori, Mitsuru; Hatayama, Hideaki; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Kondo, Kyoko; Ito, Kazuya; Ohfuji, Satoko; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Hirota, Yoshio

    2017-08-24

    Since the 1990s, self-controlled designs including self-controlled case series (SCCS) studies have been occasionally used in post-marketing evaluation of drug or vaccine safety. An SCCS study was tentatively applied to evaluate the relationship between oseltamivir use and abnormal behavior Type A (serious abnormal behavior potentially leading to an accident or harm to another person) in influenza patients. From the original prospective cohort study with approximately 10,000 Japanese children and adolescents with influenza (aged study, 24 subjects (86%) were administered oseltamivir and 4 subjects (14%) were not. Abnormal behavior Type A was more likely to occur in the effect period than the control period in every pattern (M-H RR: 1.90-29.1). We observed the highest estimate when the effect period was set between the initial intake of oseltamivir and Tmax (M-H RR: 29.1, 95% CI: 4.21-201). Abnormal behavior Type A was more likely to develop up to approximately 30 times during the period between the initial intake of oseltamivir and Tmax. However, this period overlapped with the early period of influenza where high fever was observed. Since useful approaches to control the influence of the natural disease course of influenza were not available in this study, we could not deny the possibility that abnormal behavior was induced by influenza itself. The SCCS study was not an optimal method to evaluate the relationship between oseltamivir use and abnormal behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Validated spectrophotometric methods for the evaluation of Oseltamivir counterfeit pharmaceutical capsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha M. Youssef

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Four rapid, reliable and economical spectrophotometric methods have been established for the quantitative determination of Oseltamivir phosphate (OST without the interference of ascorbic acid (ASC found in some of its counterfeit capsules. The first method involves the use of derivative spectrophotometry with the zero-crossing technique where OST was easily determined using its 1D (Δλ = 3 at 219 nm. The second method is based on a first-order derivative ratio spectrophotometry (1DD, Δλ = 5 where 218 nm was selected for its quantification, while the third method applies a more advanced spectrophotometric method based on the ratio difference spectrophotometry (RD in which the difference in absorbance ratio was measured between 217 and 210 nm. In the fourth method, difference spectrophotometric method (ΔA is applied by subtracting absorbance at 252 from that at 263 nm where the difference in absorbance was zero for ASC. The proposed methods were validated for linearity, accuracy, precision and selectivity. Synthetic mixtures of different proportions and commercial capsules were assayed by the proposed methods and the results revealed good accuracy and repeatability of the developed methods.

  19. In Silico Biology of H1N1: Molecular Modelling of Novel Receptors and Docking Studies of Inhibitors to Reveal New Insight in Flu Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar Behera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an infectious disease caused by RNA viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae. The new influenza H1N1 viral stain has emerged by the genetic combination of genes from human, pig, and bird’s H1N1 virus. The influenza virus is roughly spherical and is enveloped by a lipid membrane. There are two glycoproteins in this lipid membrane; namely, hemagglutinin (HA which helps in attachment of the viral strain on the host cell surface and neuraminidase (NA that is responsible for initiation of viral infection. We have developed homology models of both Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase receptors from H1N1 strains in eastern India. The docking studies of B-Sialic acid and O-Sialic acid in the optimized and energy-minimized homology models show important H-bonding interactions with ALA142, ASP230, GLN231, GLU232, and THR141. This information can be used for structure-based and pharmacophore-based new drug design. We have also calculated ADME properties (Human Oral Absorption (HOA and % HOA for Oseltamivir which have been subject of debate for long.

  20. Neuraminidase production by a Streptococcus sanguis strain associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D C; Portnoy-Duran, C

    1983-01-01

    The properties of an extracellular neuraminidase produced by a Streptococcus sanguis strain (isolated from a confirmed case of subacute bacterial endocarditis) during growth in a defined medium was examined in this investigation. This enzyme, isolated from concentrated culture supernatants of S. sanguis biotype II, was active against human alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, N-acetylneuramin lactose, bovine submaxillary mucin, and fetuin. Neuraminidase production paralleled bacterial growth in defined medium and was maximal in the early stationary phase of growth but decreased dramatically, probably owing to protease production, during the late stationary phase. The enzyme was purified to near homogeneity by a combination of salt fractionation, ion-exchanged chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, and gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. These procedures yielded an enzyme preparation that possessed a specific activity of 174.4 mumol of sialic acid released per min per mg of protein against human alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. The Km value for this enzyme with human alpha-1 acid glycoprotein as substrate was 2.5 X 10(-3) M, and the enzyme possessed a pH optimum of 6.5. The S. sanguis neuraminidase had a molecular weight of approximately 85,000 as estimated by gel filtration and approximately 90,000 when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was stable at temperatures of 4 and 37 degrees C for 3 h, but approximately 50% of the enzymatic activity was lost within 30 min at 50 degrees C, with 100% of the enzymatic activity being destroyed within 10 min at temperatures of greater than or equal to 65 degrees C. Images PMID:6874067

  1. Neuraminidase inhibitory polyketides from the marine-derived fungus Phoma herbarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gao Fei; Han, Wen Bo; Cui, Jiang Tao; Ng, Seik Weng; Guo, Zhi Kai; Tan, Ren Xiang; Ge, Hui Ming

    2012-01-01

    Two new polyketides, arthropsadiol C (1) and massarilactone H (2), together with six known derivatives (3-8) were isolated from the culture broth of the marine-derived fungus Phoma herbarum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 2, 4, 5, and 8 showed moderate neuraminidase inhibitory activity with IC(50) values ranging from 4.15 to 9.16 µM. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. The equilibrium constant for the interaction between a monoclonal Fab fragment and an influenza virus neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D C; Howlett, G J; Nestorowicz, A; Webster, R G

    1983-03-01

    The affinity or equilibrium constant between an Fab fragment derived from monoclonal IgG directed against influenza virus neuraminidase was measured as 4.1 X 10(7) M-1. The method, which makes use of an air-driven ultracentrifuge, is simple and uses extremely small amounts (10(-11) mol) of material. Furthermore, interpretation of the data is based on sound theoretical considerations. The technique also allows m.w. of the interacting species to be measured and the stoichiometry of the reaction to be determined.

  3. Structure-function analysis of two variants of mumps virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Santos-López

    Full Text Available A point mutation from guanine (G to adenine (A at nucleotide position 1081 in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN gene has been associated with neurovirulence of Urabe AM9 mumps virus vaccine. This mutation corresponds to a glutamic acid (E to lysine (K change at position 335 in the HN glycoprotein. We have experimentally demonstrated that two variants of Urabe AM9 strain (HN-A1081 and HN-G1081 differ in neurotropism, sialic acidbinding affinity and neuraminidase activity. In the present study, we performed a structure-function analysis of that amino acid substitution; the structures of HN protein of both Urabe AM9 strain variants were predicted. Based on our analysis, the E/K mutation changes the protein surface properties and to a lesser extent their conformations, which in turn reflects in activity changes. Our modeling results suggest that this E/K interchange does not affect the structure of the sialic acid binding motif; however, the electrostatic surface differs drastically due to an exposed short alpha helix. Consequently, this mutation may affect the accessibility of HN to substrates and membrane receptors of the host cells. Our findings appear to explain the observed differences in neurotropism of these vaccine strains.

  4. Lactococcus lactis displayed neuraminidase confers cross protective immunity against influenza A viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Zhao, Daxian; Ouyang, Jiexiu; Jiao, Huifeng; Shu, Handing; Ge, Xinqi

    2015-02-01

    Influenza A viruses pose a serious threat to public health. Current influenza A vaccines predominantly focus on hemagglutinin (HA) and show strain-specific protection. Neuraminidase (NA) is much less studied in the context of humoral immunity against influenza A viruses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the cross protective immunity of NA presented on Lactococcus lactis (L.lactis) surface against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses in the mouse model. L.lactis/pNZ8110-pgsA-NA was constructed in which pgsA was used as an anchor protein. Mice vaccinated orally with L.lactis/pNZ8110-pgsA-NA could elicit significant NA-specific serum IgG and mucosa IgA antibodies, as well as neuraminidase inhibition (NI) titers. Importantly, L.lactis/pNZ8110-pgsA-NA provided 80% protection against H5N1, 60% protection against H3N2 and H1N1, respectively. These findings suggest that recombinant L.lactis/pNZ110-pgsA-NA in the absence of adjuvant via oral administration can be served as an effective vaccine candidate against diverse strains of influenza A viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of Anti-Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Antibodies in Children, Adults, and the Elderly by ELISA and Enzyme Inhibition: Evidence for Original Antigenic Sin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Madhusudan; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Ermler, Megan E; Bunduc, Paul; Amanat, Fatima; Izikson, Ruvim; Cox, Manon; Palese, Peter; Eichelberger, Maryna; Krammer, Florian

    2017-03-21

    Antibody responses to influenza virus hemagglutinin provide protection against infection and are well studied. Less is known about the human antibody responses to the second surface glycoprotein, neuraminidase. Here, we assessed human antibody reactivity to a panel of N1, N2, and influenza B virus neuraminidases in different age groups, including children, adults, and the elderly. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), we determined the breadth, magnitude, and isotype distribution of neuraminidase antibody responses to historic, current, and avian strains, as well as to recent isolates to which these individuals have not been exposed. It appears that antibody levels against N1 neuraminidases were lower than those against N2 or B neuraminidases. The anti-neuraminidase antibody levels increased with age and were, in general, highest against strains that circulated during the childhood of the tested individuals, providing evidence for "original antigenic sin." Titers measured by ELISA correlated well with titers measured by the neuraminidase inhibition assays. However, in the case of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, we found evidence of interference from antibodies binding to the conserved stalk domain of the hemagglutinin. In conclusion, we found that antibodies against the neuraminidase differ in magnitude and breadth between subtypes and age groups in the human population. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00336453, NCT00539981, and NCT00395174.)IMPORTANCE Anti-neuraminidase antibodies can afford broad protection from influenza virus infection in animal models and humans. However, little is known about the breadth and magnitude of the anti-neuraminidase response in the human population. Here we assessed antibody levels of children, adults, and the elderly against a panel of N1, N2, and type B influenza virus neuraminidases. We demonstrated that antibody levels measured by ELISA correlate well with functional

  6. C-Methylated Flavonoids from Cleistocalyx operculatus and Their Inhibitory Effects on Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Neuraminidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Trong-Tuan; Tung, Bui-Thanh; Nguyen, Phi-Hung

    2010-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study focused on the discovery of anti-influenza agents from plants, four new (1-4) and 10 known (5-14) C-methylated flavonoids were isolated from a methanol extract of Cleistocalyx operculatus buds using an influenza H1N1 neuraminidase inhibition assay. Compounds 4, 7, 8...

  7. Correlation of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein content with protective antibody response after immunisation with inactivated Newcastle disease vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, R.A.; Komen, M.; Diepen, van M.; Oei, H.L.; Claassen, I.J.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The correlation between the antigen content of inactivated Newcastle disease (ND) oil emulsion-vaccines and the serological response after immunisation was studied. The haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) proteins of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were quantified in 33 inactivated

  8. Treatment of Immunocompromised, Critically Ill Patients with Influenza A H1N1 Infection with a Combination of Oseltamivir, Amantadine, and Zanamivir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Wouter J; Kromdijk, Wiete; van den Broek, Marcel P H; Haas, Pieter-Jan A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814857; Minnema, Monique C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/171618149; Boucher, Charles A; de Lange, Dylan W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815497; Wensing, Annemarie M J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30817724X

    2015-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of complications of influenza virus infection. We report on two critically ill patients on immunosuppressive medication with influenza pneumonia. In both patients, oseltamivir monotherapy did not result in clearance of the virus after 18 and five

  9. Combinations of 1,8-cineol and oseltamivir for the treatment of influenza virus A (H3N2) infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yan-Ni; Li, Yun; Fu, Lin-Chun; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Ni; Zhang, Feng-Xue; Xu, Pei-Ping

    2017-07-01

    It is need for development of new means against influenza virus due to the lack of efficacy of available therapeutic strategies. In previous research, 1,8-cineol exert its inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, the main regulator of cytokine and chemokine production in influenza, and anti-inflammatory activity. These fact supports and helps establish the hypothesis that 1,8-cineol may have synergism with an antiviral on influenza virus infection. The combined effect of 1,8-cineol with oseltamivir in a mouse type A influenza virus (Victoria/3/75,H3N2) model were examined. We initially tested combinations of 1,8-cineol (30, 60, and 120 mg/kg/day) and oseltamivir (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg/day). In addition, the 0.4 mg/kg/day of oseltamivir combined with 120 mg/kg of 1,8-cineol was selected for further combination studies. Oseltamivir was 30%, 40%, and 60% protective at 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg/d. Combinations of 1,8-cineol (30, 60, and 120 mg/kg/d) and oseltamivir (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg/d) increased the number of survivors and mean survival time (MST) following combination treatment was greater than monotherapy alone. Three dimensional analysis of drug interactions using the MacSynergy method showed a strong synergistic effect of these drug combinations. Survival, MST, lung parameters (lung index, viral titers, and pathology), and cytokines (IL-10, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) expression in lung demonstrated the high effectiveness of the combination. Combined treatment was associated with longer MST and more reduced cytokine levels than oseltamivir alone. These data demonstrate that combinations of 1,8-cineol and oseltamivir have synergistic effect against influenza A virus (H3N2) infection. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reducing occurrence and severity of pneumonia due to pandemic H1N1 2009 by early oseltamivir administration: a retrospective study in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjarath Lorena Higuera Iglesias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-viral treatment has been used to treat severe or progressive illness due to pandemic H1N1 2009. A main cause of severe illness in pandemic H1N1 2009 is viral pneumonia; however, it is unclear how effective antiviral treatment is against pneumonia when administered >48 hours after symptom onset. Therefore, we aimed to determine how time from symptom onset to antiviral administration affected the effectiveness of antiviral treatment against pneumonia due to pandemic (H1N1 2009. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective medical chart review of 442 patients was conducted in a hospital in Mexico. Subjects had tested positive for pandemic H1N1 2009 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction and were administered oseltamivir. Median time from symptom onset to oseltamivir administration was 5.0 days (range, 0-43. 442 subjects, 71 (16.1% had severe pneumonia which required mechanical ventilation, 191 (43.2% had mild to moderate pneumonia, and 180 (40% did not have pneumonia. Subjects were divided into four groups based on time to oseltamivir administration: ≤2, 3-7, 8-14, and >14 days. Severity of respiratory features was associated with time to treatment, and multivariate analysis indicated that time to oseltamivir administration was associated with severity of respiratory features. A proportional odds model indicated that 50% probability for occurrence of pneumonia of any severity and that of severe pneumonia in patients who would develop pneumonia reached at approximately 3.4 and 21 days, respectively, after symptom onset. Patients with a shorter time to oseltamivir administration were discharged earlier from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Earlier initiation of oseltamivir administration after symptom onset significantly reduced occurrence and severity of pneumonia and shortened hospitalization due to pandemic H1N1 2009. Even when administered >48 hours after symptom onset, oseltamivir showed considerable

  11. Successful use of oseltamivir prophylaxis in managing a nosocomial outbreak of influenza A in a hematology and allogeneic stem cell transplant unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Mimi C; Collins, Joel T; Subramoniapillai, Elango; Kennedy, Glen A

    2017-02-01

    To describe a nosocomial outbreak of H1N1 influenza A in an inpatient hematology and allogeneic stem cell transplant unit and outcomes of universal oseltamivir prophylaxis. Medical records of all patients admitted to the unit were reviewed to define the nosocomial outbreak, commencing 1 week prior to the index case until 4 weeks following institution of oseltamivir prophylaxis. Timelines for clinical symptoms, viral spread, management, patient outcomes and follow up testing were constructed. All cases of influenza were confirmed on nasopharyngeal swabs and/or bronchoalveolar lavages collected for polymerase chain reaction testing. In addition to the index case, further 11 patients were diagnosed with influenza A during the outbreak. Six patients (50%) had influenza-like-illness, five (42%) had respiratory symptoms only and one (8%) was asymptomatic. In total, five patients died, including four (33%) patients who were admitted to intensive care. A clustering of seven cases led to recognition of the outbreak and subsequent commencement of universal prophylaxis with oseltamivir 75 mg/day in all inpatients within the unit. Strict infection control processes were reinforced concurrently. There were no further cases of influenza A linked to the outbreak after the implementation of universal oseltamivir prophylaxis. Three later cases were linked to H1N1 exposure during the original outbreak. H1N1 influenza infection is associated with significant mortality in hematology patients. Universal prophylaxis with oseltamivir during a nosocomial outbreak appeared to be effective in controlling spread of the virus. We recommend early institution of infection control and universal prophylaxis in any nosocomial outbreak of influenza. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Molecular Characterizations of Surface Proteins Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase from Recent H5Nx Avian Influenza Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J.; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Guo, Zhu; Chang, Jessie C.; Wentworth, David E.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Stevens, James; Schultz-Cherry, S.

    2016-04-06

    ABSTRACT

    During 2014, a subclade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks around the world. In late 2014/early 2015, the virus was detected in wild birds in Canada and the United States, and these viruses also gave rise to reassortant progeny, composed of viral RNA segments (vRNAs) from both Eurasian and North American lineages. In particular, viruses were found with N1, N2, and N8 neuraminidase vRNAs, and these are collectively referred to as H5Nx viruses. In the United States, more than 48 million domestic birds have been affected. Here we present a detailed structural and biochemical analysis of the surface antigens of H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses in addition to those of a recent human H5N6 virus. Our results with recombinant hemagglutinin reveal that these viruses have a strict avian receptor binding preference, while recombinantly expressed neuraminidases are sensitive to FDA-approved and investigational antivirals. Although H5Nx viruses currently pose a low risk to humans, it is important to maintain surveillance of these circulating viruses and to continually assess future changes that may increase their pandemic potential.

    IMPORTANCEThe H5Nx viruses emerging in North America, Europe, and Asia pose a great public health concern. Here we report a molecular and structural study of the major surface proteins of several H5Nx influenza viruses. Our results improve the understanding of these new viruses and provide important information on their receptor preferences and susceptibilities to antivirals, which are central to pandemic risk assessment.

  13. Cap-dependent Endonuclease Inhibitor S-033188 for the Treatment of Influenza: Results from a Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo- and Active-Controlled Study in Otherwise Healthy Adolescents and Adults with Seasonal Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portsmouth, Simon; Kawaguchi, Keiko; Arai, Masatsugu; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Uehara, Takeki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Cap-dependent endonuclease (CEN) resides in the PA subunit of influenza virus polymerase and mediates the “cap-snatching” process during viral mRNA biosynthesis. S-033188 is a potent, selective, small molecule inhibitor of CEN. Here we report clinical and virologic outcomes from a global Phase 3 study CAPSTONE-1. Method This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study. Key eligibility criteria included 12–64 years of age, fever (axillary temperature ≥38.0°C), ≥1 general symptom and ≥1 respiratory symptom (moderate to severe), and ≤48 hours from symptom onset. Patients between 20 and 64 years of age were randomized in 2:2:1 ratio to receive a single oral administration of S-033188, placebo, or 75 mg oseltamivir BID for 5 days. Patients between 12 and 19 years of age were randomized in 2:1 ratio to receive either a single oral administration of S-033188 or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was time to alleviation of influenza symptoms (TTAS) in the infected intent to treat population. Viral titer and RNA content were determined from pre- and postdose nasal/throat swabs. Result A total of 1436 patients were randomized. TTAS was significantly shorter in the S-033188 group than that in the placebo group (median TTAS: 53.7 hours vs. 80.2 hours, P S-033188, compared with 72 hours in those treated with oseltamivir (P S-033188 group had significantly greater reductions from baseline in both viral titer and RNA content than those in oseltamivir or placebo groups at all time-points until Day 3 (compared with oseltamivir) or Day 5 (compared with placebo). S-033188 was generally well tolerated, with overall incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events lower than that seen with oseltamivir. Conclusion Treatment with S-033188 was superior to placebo in alleviating influenza symptoms, and superior to both oseltamivir and placebo in virologic outcomes. Safety profile of S-033188 compared

  14. Neuraminidase Activity in Streptococcus sanguis and in the Viridans Group, and Occurrence of Acylneuraminate Lyase in Viridans Organisms Isolated from Patients with Septicemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    The enzyme neuraminidase (EC 3.2.1.18) was found to be strongly active in different types of Streptococcus sanguis and S. viridans, and, in addition, the occurrence of the enzyme acylneuraminate pyruvate lyase (EC 4.1.3.3) was described in S. viridans. The enzyme-active bacteria strains were isolated from blood cultures of patients with septicemia. Whereas S. sanguis lost its strong neuraminidase activity after some weeks, S. viridans retained its enzyme activity for a long time in culture. Immunoelectrophoretic studies of the blood cultures of patients with streptococcal infections showed the loss of neuraminic acid in most glycoproteins of the serum, proving the in vivo action of neuraminidase. The pathogenic role of neuraminidase is discussed in streptococcal septicemia from the viewpoint of present knowledge. Images PMID:4816461

  15. Molecular docking of selected phytocompounds with H1N1 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazmi, Mohammed I

    2015-01-01

    The H1N1 influenza virus is a serious threat to human population. Oseltamivir and Zanamivir are known antiviral drugs for swine flu with observed side effects. These drugs are viral neuraminidase and hemagglutinin inhibitor prevents early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. Therefore, it is of interest to identify naturally occurring novel compounds to control viral growth. Thus, H1N1 proteins (neuraminidase and hemagglutinin) were screened with phytocompounds isolated from Tulsi plant (Ocimum sanctum L.) using molecular docking tools. This identified Apigenin as an alternative to Oseltamivir and Zanamivir with improved predicted binding properties. Hence, it is of interest to consider this compound for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

  16. Assessment of Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsule in Conjunctivitis and Keratitis in vivo Neuraminidase Activity Increases in Nonencapsulated Pneumococci following Conjunctival Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Erin W.; Tullos, Nathan A.; Taylor, Sidney D.; Sanders, Melissa E.; Marquart, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The pneumococcal capsule is required for pathogenesis in systemic infections, yet reports show most conjunctivitis outbreaks are caused by nonencapsulated pneumococci, while keratitis infections are caused by encapsulated strains. This study aims to determine the effect of capsule in pneumococcal keratitis and conjunctivitis in rabbit models of infection. Methods A capsule-deficient isogenic mutant was created using homologous transformation. Parent and mutant strains were injected within the upper bulbar conjunctiva (conjunctivitis) or into the corneal stroma (keratitis) of New Zealand white rabbits. Clinical examinations were performed 24 and 48 hr post-infection at which time corneas or conjunctivae were removed, homogenized, and plated to determine the recovered bacterial load. Whole eyes were removed for histological examination. The neuraminidase activity was determined following in vitro and in vivo growth. Results There were no significant differences in clinical scores between the eyes infected with the parent or mutant for either infection, nor was there a difference in the amount of bacteria recovered from the cornea. In the conjunctivae, however, the mutant strain was cleared by the host faster than the parent strain. Histological examination showed slightly more infiltrating polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages in the conjunctivae infected with the parent strain. The neuraminidase activity of both strains was not significantly different when the strains were grown in vitro. However, the neuraminidase activity of the parent was significantly less than that of the mutant at 3 and 12 hr post conjunctival infection. Conclusions Although more outbreaks of pneumococcal conjunctivitis are tied to nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains, this study showed that an encapsulated strain was capable of establishing conjunctivitis in a rabbit injection model and survive attack by the host immune system longer than its nonencapsulated isogenic

  17. Ependymal denudation, aqueductal obliteration and hydrocephalus after a single injection of neuraminidase into the lateral ventricle of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondona, J M; Pérez-Martín, M; Cifuentes, M; Pérez, J; Jiménez, A J; Pérez-Fígares, J M; Fernández-Llebrez, P

    1996-09-01

    To investigate the role of sialic acid in the ependyma of the rat brain, we injected neuraminidase from Clostridium perfingens into the lateral ventricle of 86 adult rats that were sacrificed at various time intervals. After administration of 10 micrograms neuraminidase, ciliated cuboidal ependymal cells of the lateral ventricles, third ventricle, cerebral aqueduct, and the rostral half of the fourth ventricle died and detached. The ependymal regions sealed by tight junctions such as the choroid plexus and the subcommissural organ were not affected. Debris was removed by infiltrating neutrophils and macrophagic cells. At the same time, after ependymal disappearance, the aqueduct was obliterated. In this region, mitoses were evident and cystic ependymal cells were frequent. Hydrocephalus of the lateral and third ventricles was evident 4 days after neuraminidase injection. Gliosis was restricted to the dorsal telencephalic wall of the injected lateral ventricle. It is thought that cleavage of sialic acid from ependymal surface glycoproteins or glycolipids, likely involved in cell adhesion, led to the detaching and death of the ependymal cells. Thereafter, ependymal loss, together with edema, led to fusion of the lateral walls of the cerebral aqueduct and this in turn provoked hydrocephalus of the third and lateral ventricles. This model of experimental hydrocephalus is compared with other models, in particular those of hydrocephalus after viral invasion of the cerebral ventricles.

  18. Effect of an Echinacea-Based Hot Drink Versus Oseltamivir in Influenza Treatment: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Multicenter, Noninferiority Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Rauš

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Echinaforce Hotdrink is as effective as oseltamivir in the early treatment of clinically diagnosed and virologically confirmed influenza virus infections with a reduced risk of complications and adverse events. It appears to be an attractive treatment option, particularly suitable for self-care. Clinical trial identifier: Eudra-CT: 2010-021571-88. (Curr Ther Res Clin Exp. 2015; 77:66–72

  19. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Zhou, Hui; Ethen, Cheryl M; N Reinhold, Vernon

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and (3)H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influenza virus uses its neuraminidase protein to evade the recognition of two activating NK cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Yotam; Seidel, Einat; Tsukerman, Pinchas; Mandelboim, Michal; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2014-08-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells play a central role in the defense against viral infections and in the elimination of transformed cells. The recognition of pathogen-infected and tumor cells is controlled by inhibitory and activating receptors. We have previously shown that among the activating (killer) NK cell receptors the natural cytotoxicity receptors, NKp44 and NKp46, interact with the viral hemagglutinin (HA) protein expressed on the cell surface of influenza-virus-infected cells. We further showed that the interaction between NKp44/NKp46 and viral HA is sialic-acid dependent and that the recognition of HA by NKp44 and NKp46 leads to the elimination of the infected cells. Here we demonstrate that the influenza virus developed a counter-attack mechanism and that the virus uses its neuraminidase (NA) protein to prevent the recognition of HA by both the NKp44 and NKp46 receptors, resulting in reduced elimination of the infected cells by NK cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Structural Characterization of the 1918 Influenza H1N1 Neuraminidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X.; Zhu, X.; Dwek, R.A.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) plays a crucial role in facilitating the spread of newly synthesized virus in the host and is an important target for controlling disease progression. The NA crystal structure from the 1918 'Spanish flu' (A/Brevig Mission/1/18 H1N1) and that of its complex with zanamivir (Relenza) at 1.65-{angstrom} and 1.45-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively, corroborated the successful expression of correctly folded NA tetramers in a baculovirus expression system. An additional cavity adjacent to the substrate-binding site is observed in N1, compared to N2 and N9 NAs, including H5N1. This cavity arises from an open conformation of the 150 loop (Gly147 to Asp151) and appears to be conserved among group 1 NAs (N1, N4, N5, and N8). It closes upon zanamivir binding. Three calcium sites were identified, including a novel site that may be conserved in N1 and N4. Thus, these high-resolution structures, combined with our recombinant expression system, provide new opportunities to augment the limited arsenal of therapeutics against influenza.

  2. Protective Protein/Cathepsin A Rescues N-glycosylation defects in Neuraminidase-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongning; Zaitsev, Slava; Taylor, Garry; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Bonten, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background Neuraminidase-1 (NEU1) catabolizes the hydrolysis of sialic acids from sialo-glycoconjugates. NEU1 depends on its interaction with the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA) for lysosomal compartmentalization and catalytic activation. Murine NEU1 contains 4 N-glycosylation sites, 3 of which are conserved in the human enzyme. The expression of NEU1 gives rise to differentially glycosylated proteins. Methods We generated single-point mutations in mouse NEU1 at each of the 4 N-glycosylation sites. Mutant enzymes were expressed in NEU1-deficient cells in the presence and absence of PPCA. Results All 4 N-glycosylation variants were targeted to the lysosomal/endosomal compartment. All N-glycans, with the exception of the most C-terminal glycan, were important for maintaining stability or catalytic activity. The loss of catalytic activity caused by the deletion of the second N-glycan was rescued by increasing PPCA expression. Similar results were obtained with a human NEU1 N-glycosylation mutant identified in a sialidosis patient. Conclusions The N-terminal N-glycan of NEU1 is indispensable for its function, whereas the C-terminal N-glycan appears to be non-essential. The omission of the second N-glycan can be compensated for by upregulating the expression of PPCA. General Significance These findings could be relevant for the design of target therapies for patients carrying specific NEU1 mutations. PMID:19714866

  3. Aggregation of Streptococcus sanguis by a neuraminidase-sensitive component of serum and crevicular fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, E J; McBride, B C

    1983-01-01

    A number of strains of Streptococcus sanguis were found to aggregate in nonimmune serum and in crevicular fluid. All strains which aggregated in serum also aggregated in saliva, but some strains which aggregated in saliva did not aggregate in serum. Aggregation was destroyed by treatment of serum or crevicular fluid with neuraminidase and was inhibited by gangliosides. Treatment of serum with proteases reduced aggregating activity. Adsorption of serum to hydroxyapatite did not reduce the aggregating activity. The aggregating factor was partially purified by gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and was found to be an acidic glycoprotein with a molecular weight of greater than 200,000, comprised of subunits with molecular weights of approximately 100,000. It did not appear to be an immunoglobulin and could not be identified with any other serum component tested. The possible role of the aggregating factor in providing nonimmune protection against colonization of S. sanguis in the gingival crevice and blood is discussed. Images PMID:6358038

  4. New Insights into Molecular Organization of Human Neuraminidase-1: Transmembrane Topology and Dimerization Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Pascal; Baud, Stéphanie; Bocharova, Olga V.; Bocharov, Eduard V.; Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Kawecki, Charlotte; Bocquet, Olivier; Romier, Beatrice; Gorisse, Laetitia; Ghirardi, Maxime; Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Debelle, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) is a lysosomal sialidase catalyzing the removal of terminal sialic acids from sialyloconjugates. A plasma membrane-bound NEU1 modulating a plethora of receptors by desialylation, has been consistently documented from the last ten years. Despite a growing interest of the scientific community to NEU1, its membrane organization is not understood and current structural and biochemical data cannot account for such membrane localization. By combining molecular biology and biochemical analyses with structural biophysics and computational approaches, we identified here two regions in human NEU1 - segments 139-159 (TM1) and 316-333 (TM2) - as potential transmembrane (TM) domains. In membrane mimicking environments, the corresponding peptides form stable α-helices and TM2 is suited for self-association. This was confirmed with full-size NEU1 by co-immunoprecipitations from membrane preparations and split-ubiquitin yeast two hybrids. The TM2 region was shown to be critical for dimerization since introduction of point mutations within TM2 leads to disruption of NEU1 dimerization and decrease of sialidase activity in membrane. In conclusion, these results bring new insights in the molecular organization of membrane-bound NEU1 and demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of two potential TM domains that may anchor NEU1 in the membrane, control its dimerization and sialidase activity.

  5. Estimation of the neuraminidase content of influenza viruses and split-product vaccines by immunochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Takeshi; Nakatsu, Ritsuko; Fuke, Isao; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Ishibashi, Masahide; Yamanishi, Kouichi; Takahashi, Michiaki; Tamura, Shin-ichi

    2005-08-31

    The neuraminidase (NA) of the influenza virus, as well as the hemagglutinin, is the most important protective components in the vaccine. However, the NA content of the vaccine remains to be standardized because of the labile nature of this glycoprotein during various chemical treatments and storage. In the present study, the NA content of the split-product (SP) vaccine (virus treated with ether then formalin) was estimated together with that of the virus by an immunochoromatography technique using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to viral NA for A/Panama/2007/99 (A/Pa) (H3N2), B/Shangdong/7/97 (B/S) or A/New Caledonia/20/99 (A/NC) (H1N1) viral strains. In the new method, the NA catalytic activity of each fraction from steps of NA purification was measured as an index of NA content. The NA level of A/Pa, B/S or A/NC viral particles was estimated at 6.9+/-0.9, 7.6+/-0.8 or 8.5+/-1.7% of total viral protein (not significant difference between viral strains). The NA level of the corresponding A/Pa, B/S or A/NC vaccines was estimated at 9.6+/-1.5, 12.7+/-0.4 or 12.2+/-1.2% of the total vaccine protein (a significant difference between each strain of virus and its vaccine). These results suggest that the NA content in the N1, N2 or B type NA virus ranges from 5 to 11% of the total viral protein, and that the NA level in each split-product vaccine is 1.4- to 1.6-fold higher than that in the corresponding viral particles. They also suggest that the NA content can be estimated by the immunochoromatography technique using anti-viral NA mAbs.

  6. Preterm human milk contains a large pool of latent TGF-β, which can be activated by exogenous neuraminidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Blanco, Cynthia L.; Frost, Brandy L.; Reeves, Aaron A.; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Safarulla, Azif; Mandal, Partha; Garzon, Steven A.; Raj, J. Usha

    2013-01-01

    Human milk contains substantial amounts of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, particularly the isoform TGF-β2. We previously showed in preclinical models that enterally administered TGF-β2 can protect against necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), an inflammatory bowel necrosis of premature infants. In this study we hypothesized that premature infants remain at higher risk of NEC than full-term infants, even when they receive their own mother's milk, because preterm human milk contains less bioactive TGF-β than full-term milk. Our objective was to compare TGF-β bioactivity in preterm vs. full-term milk and identify factors that activate milk-borne TGF-β. Mothers who delivered between 23 0/7 and 31 6/7 wk or at ≥37 wk of gestation provided milk samples at serial time points. TGF-β bioactivity and NF-κB signaling were measured using specific reporter cells and in murine intestinal tissue explants. TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and various TGF-β activators were measured by real-time PCR, enzyme immunoassays, or established enzymatic activity assays. Preterm human milk showed minimal TGF-β bioactivity in the native state but contained a large pool of latent TGF-β. TGF-β2 was the predominant isoform of TGF-β in preterm milk. Using a combination of several in vitro and ex vivo models, we show that neuraminidase is a key regulator of TGF-β bioactivity in human milk. Finally, we show that addition of bacterial neuraminidase to preterm human milk increased TGF-β bioactivity. Preterm milk contains large quantities of TGF-β, but most of it is in an inactive state. Addition of neuraminidase can increase TGF-β bioactivity in preterm milk and enhance its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:23558011

  7. Methanolic soluble fractions of lingzhi or reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes) extract inhibit neuraminidase activity in Newcastle disease virus (LaSota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaki, Bala U; Sandabe, Umar K; Ogbe, Adamu O; Abdulrahman, Fanna I; El-Yuguda, Abdul-Dahiru

    2014-01-01

    The antineuraminidase activity of different organic soluble fractions of Ganoderma lucidum extract was investigated using inhibition of hemagglutination and elution of chicken erythrocytes by Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Fractions of methanol, ethylacetate, and normal butanol (n-butanol) of the G. lucidum were tested against neuraminidase producing NDV as antigen. Different dilutions of the organic soluble fractions inhibited elution of 1% red blood cells by neuraminidase of NDV While the methanolic and n-butanol extracts inhibited neuraminidase activity even at a dilution of 1:16 and that of ethylacetate fraction inhibited even at 1:32 respectively. This finding indicates that G. lucidum has some antineuraminidase activity against NDV and may be exploited in the management of NDV infection.

  8. Controlled clinical trial of adjuvant immunotherapy with BCG and neuraminidase-treated autologous tumour cells in large bowel cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B N; Walker, C; Andrewartha, L; Freeman, S; Bennett, R C

    1989-01-01

    A controlled, randomised clinical trial of immunotherapy was performed in 301 patients with stage B or C colorectal cancer. The immunotherapy treatment consisted of 18 vaccinations over a 2 year period following surgery with a combination of BCG given by scarification plus subcutaneous injection of Vibrio cholera neuraminidase (VCN)-modified autologous tumour cells. Five year follow-up has now been completed in all patients. The immunotherapy did not alter either the disease-free interval or the overall survival of patients in comparison with a control group of patients not receiving immunotherapy.

  9. Optimizing Viral Protein Yield of Influenza Virus Strain A/Vietnam/1203/2004 by Modification of the Neuraminidase Gene▿

    OpenAIRE

    Adamo, Joan E.; Liu, Teresa; Schmeisser, Falko; Ye, Zhiping

    2009-01-01

    The preparation of high-yield prepandemic influenza virus H5N1 strains has presented a challenge to both researchers and vaccine manufacturers. The reasons for the relatively low yield of the H5N1 strains are not fully understood, but it might be partially dependent on the interactions between the hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) surface glycoprotein and other influenza virus proteins. In this study, we have constructed chimeras between the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) NA gene and the A/V...

  10. Differential actions of proteinases and neuraminidase on mammalian erythrocyte surface and its impact on erythrocyte agglutination by concanavalin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savita; Gokhale, Sadashiv M

    2012-12-01

    Action of proteinases viz. trypsin and chymotrypsin, and neuraminidase on intact erythrocyte membrane proteins and glycophorins (sialoglycoproteins) exposed to cell surface and its impact on lectin (concanavalin A)-mediated agglutination were studied in Homo sapiens (human), Capra aegagrus hircus (goat) and Bubalus bubalis (buffalo). Membrane proteins and glycophorins analysis by SDS-PAGE as visualized by coomassie brilliant blue and periodic acid-schiff stains, respectively, and agglutination behaviour revealed marked differences: 1) there were prominent dissimilarities in the number and molecular weights of glycophorins in human, goat and buffalo erythrocyte membranes; 2) proteinase action(s) on human and buffalo erythrocyte surface membrane proteins and glycophorins showed similarity but was found different in goat; 3) significant differences in erythrocyte agglutinability with concanavalin A can be attributed to differences in membrane composition and alterations in the surface proteins after enzyme treatment; 4) a direct correlation was found between degradation of glycophorins and concanavalin A agglutinability; 5) action of neuraminidase specifically indicated the negative role of cell surface sialic acids in determining concanavalin A agglutinability of goat and buffalo erythrocytes, similar to human. Present studies clearly indicate that there are some basic differences in human, goat and buffalo erythrocyte membrane proteins, especially with respect to glycophorins, which determine the concanavalin A-mediated agglutination in enzyme treated erythrocytes.

  11. Different Origins of Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Modulate the Replication Efficiency and Pathogenicity of the Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-hui Jin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the exact effects of different origins of Newcastle disease virus (NDV hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN protein to the biological characteristics of the virus, we systematically studied the correlation between the HN protein and NDV virulence by exchanging the HN of velogenic or lentogenic NDV strains with the HN from other strains of different virulence. The results revealed that the rSG10 or rLaSota derivatives bearing the HN gene of other viruses exhibited decreased or increased hemadsorption (HAd, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activities. In vitro and in vivo tests further showed that changes in replication level, tissue tropism and virulence of the chimeric viruses were also consistent with these biological activities. These findings demonstrated that the balance among three biological activities caused variation in replication and pathogenicity of the virus, which was closely related to the origin of the HN protein. Our study highlights the importance of the HN glycoprotein in modulating the virulence of NDV and contributes to a more complete understanding of the virulence of NDV.

  12. Determinação rápida de oseltamivir em cápsulas por cromatografia líquida de ultraeficiência com detector por arranjo de diodos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Venzon Antunes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method for determination of oseltamivir in capsules was developed and validated. The mobile phase consisted of 5 mmol/L triethylammonium buffer (pH 3.0 and acetonitrile (70:30, v/v. Separation was performed in a Hypersil Gold® column, with octylsilil as stationary phase (100 x 2.1 mm, p.d. 1.9 µm. Chromatography run time was 1.2 min. The method presented adequate specificity, linearity, precision, ruggedness and accuracy and was adequate for determination of oseltamivir in capsules.

  13. Positive Selection on Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Genes of H1N1 Influenza Viruses

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Wenfu

    2011-04-21

    Abstract Background Since its emergence in March 2009, the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has posed a serious threat to public health. To trace the evolutionary path of these new pathogens, we performed a selection-pressure analysis of a large number of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences of H1N1 influenza viruses from different hosts. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both HA and NA genes have evolved into five distinct clusters, with further analyses indicating that the pandemic 2009 strains have experienced the strongest positive selection. We also found evidence of strong selection acting on the seasonal human H1N1 isolates. However, swine viruses from North America and Eurasia were under weak positive selection, while there was no significant evidence of positive selection acting on the avian isolates. A site-by-site analysis revealed that the positively selected sites were located in both of the cleaved products of HA (HA1 and HA2), as well as NA. In addition, the pandemic 2009 strains were subject to differential selection pressures compared to seasonal human, North American swine and Eurasian swine H1N1 viruses. Conclusions Most of these positively and\\/or differentially selected sites were situated in the B-cell and\\/or T-cell antigenic regions, suggesting that selection at these sites might be responsible for the antigenic variation of the viruses. Moreover, some sites were also associated with glycosylation and receptor-binding ability. Thus, selection at these positions might have helped the pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses to adapt to the new hosts after they were introduced from pigs to humans. Positive selection on position 274 of NA protein, associated with drug resistance, might account for the prevalence of drug-resistant variants of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses, but there was no evidence that positive selection was responsible for the spread of the drug resistance of the pandemic H1N1 strains.

  14. Partial antiviral activities detection of chicken Mx jointing with neuraminidase gene (NA against Newcastle disease virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhang

    Full Text Available As an attempt to increase the resistance to Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV and so further reduction of its risk on the poultry industry. This work aimed to build the eukaryotic gene co-expression plasmid of neuraminidase (NA gene and myxo-virus resistance (Mx and detect the gene expression in transfected mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3 cells, it is most important to investigate the influence of the recombinant plasmid on the chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF cells. cDNA fragment of NA and mutant Mx gene were derived from pcDNA3.0-NA and pcDNA3.0-Mx plasmid via PCR, respectively, then NA and Mx cDNA fragment were inserted into the multiple cloning sites of pVITRO2 to generate the eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pVITRO2-Mx-NA. The recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction endonuclease treatment and sequencing, and it was transfected into the mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3 cells. The expression of genes in pVITRO2-Mx-NA were measured by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CEF cells then RT-PCR and the micro-cell inhibition tests were used to test the antiviral activity for NDV. Our results showed that co-expression vector pVITRO2-Mx-NA was constructed successfully; the expression of Mx and NA could be detected in both NIH-3T3 and CEF cells. The recombinant proteins of Mx and NA protect CEF cells from NDV infection until after 72 h of incubation but the individually mutagenic Mx protein or NA protein protects CEF cells from NDV infection till 48 h post-infection, and co-transfection group decreased significantly NDV infection compared with single-gene transfection group (P<0. 05, indicating that Mx-NA jointing contributed to delaying the infection of NDV in single-cell level and the co-transfection of the jointed genes was more powerful than single one due to their synergistic effects.

  15. [ALK inhibitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, the molecular mechanism underlying its carcinogenesis is mainly unknown. We have discovered a small, fusion-type tyrosine kinase EML4-ALK that is generated through a tiny inversion within the short arm of human chromosome 2. Transgenic mice expressing EML4-ALK in lung developed hundreds of lung cancer nodules soon after birth, but such nodules were readily eradicated upon treatment with an ALK inhibitor. Clinical trials for EML4-ALK-positive lung cancer with an ALK inhibitor is ongoing, with its interim results being highly promising.

  16. Treatment of Immunocompromised, Critically Ill Patients with Influenza A H1N1 Infection with a Combination of Oseltamivir, Amantadine, and Zanamivir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter J. Meijer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of complications of influenza virus infection. We report on two critically ill patients on immunosuppressive medication with influenza pneumonia. In both patients, oseltamivir monotherapy did not result in clearance of the virus after 18 and five days, respectively. After adding zanamivir and amantadine to the treatment, PCRs on pharyngeal and/or plasma specimens turned negative in both patients after four and three days, respectively. We suggest, that in critically ill patients with influenza A H1N1 infection, treatment efficacy should be monitored closely and treatment with a combination of antiviral drugs should be considered.

  17. Two single mutations in the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus confer hemagglutinin-neuraminidase independent fusion promotion and attenuate the pathogenicity in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fusion (F) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) plays an important role in viral infection and pathogenicity through mediating membrane fusion between the virion and host cells in the presence of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Previously, we obtained a velogenic NDV genotype VII muta...

  18. Cross-protection of newly emerging HPAI H5 viruses by neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies: A viable alternative to oseltamivir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huanhuan; Wang, Guiqin; Wang, Shuangshuang; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Hu, Hongxing; Cheng, Genhong; Zhou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Newly emerging highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2, H5N3, H5N5, H5N6, H5N8 and H5N9 viruses have been spreading in poultry and wild birds. The H5N6 viruses have also caused 10 human infections with 4 fatal cases in China. Here, we assessed the cross-neutralization and cross-protection of human and mouse monoclonal antibodies against 2 viruses: a HPAI H5N8 virus, A/chicken/Netherlands/14015526/2014 (NE14) and a HPAI H5N6 virus, A/Sichuan/26221/2014 (SC14). The former was isolated from an infected chicken in Netherlands in 2014 and the latter was isolated from an infected human patient in Sichuan, China. We show that antibodies FLA5.10, FLD21.140, 100F4 and 65C6, but not AVFluIgG01, AVFluIgG03, S139/1 and the VRC01 control, potently cross-neutralize the H5N8 NE14 and H5N6 SC14 viruses. Furthermore, we show that a single injection of >1 mg/kg of antibody 100F4 at 4 hours before, or 20 mg/kg antibody 100F4 at 72 hours after, a lethal dose of H5N8 NE14 enables mice to withstand the infection. Finally, we show that a single injection of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg antibody 100F4 prophylactically or 10 mg/kg 100F4 therapeutically outperforms a 5-day course of 10 mg/kg/day oseltamivir treatment against lethal H5N8 NE14 or H5N6 SC14 infection in mice. Our results suggest that further preclinical evaluation of human monoclonal antibodies against newly emerging H5 viruses is warranted.

  19. Angiogenesis Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood vessels “feed” growing tumors with oxygen and nutrients , allowing the cancer cells to invade nearby tissue , to move throughout ... any angiogenesis inhibitors currently being used to treat cancer in humans? Yes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved bevacizumab to ...

  20. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. M. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir, M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine, and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir. In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed.

  1. Neoechinulin B and its analogues as potential entry inhibitors of influenza viruses, targeting viral hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueqing; Si, Longlong; Liu, Dong; Proksch, Peter; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin; Lin, Wenhan

    2015-03-26

    A class of prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloids including 15 new compounds namely rubrumlines A-O obtained from marine-derived fungus Eurotium rubrum, were tested against influenza A/WSN/33 virus. Neoechinulin B (18) exerted potent inhibition against H1N1 virus infected in MDCK cells, and is able to inhibit a panel of influenza virus strains including amantadine- and oseltamivir-resistant clinical isolates. Mechanism of action studies indicated that neoechinulin B binds to influenza envelope hemagglutinin, disrupting its interaction with the sialic acid receptor and the attachment of viruses to host cells. In addition, neoechinulin B was still efficient in inhibiting influenza A/WSN/33 virus propagation even after a fifth passage. The high potency and broad-spectrum activities against influenza viruses with less drug resistance make neoechinulin B as a new lead for the development of potential inhibitor of influenza viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Active 1918 pandemic flu viral neuraminidase has distinct N-glycan profile and is resistant to trypsin digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Ethen, Cheryl; Hickey, Gregg E; Jiang, Weiping

    2009-02-13

    The 1918 pandemic flu virus caused one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. To search for unique structural features of the neuraminidase from this virus that might have contributed to its unusual virulence, we expressed this enzyme. The purified enzyme appeared as a monomer, a dimer and a tetramer, with only the tetramer being active and therefore biologically relevant. The monomer and the dimer could not be oligomerized into the tetramer in solution, suggesting that some unique structural features were required for oligomerization and activation. These features could be related to N-glycosylation, because the tetramer displayed different N-glycans than the monomer and the dimer. Furthermore, the tetramer was found to be resistant to trypsin digestion, which may give the virus the capability to invade tissues that are normally not infected by influenza viruses and make the virus more robust for infection.

  3. Triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD composed of amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin impedes the selection of drug-resistant influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D Hoopes

    Full Text Available Widespread resistance among circulating influenza A strains to at least one of the anti-influenza drugs is a major public health concern. A triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD regimen comprised of amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin has been shown to have synergistic and broad spectrum activity against influenza A strains, including drug resistant strains. Here, we used mathematical modeling along with three different experimental approaches to understand the effects of single agents, double combinations, and the TCAD regimen on resistance in influenza in vitro, including: 1 serial passage at constant drug concentrations, 2 serial passage at escalating drug concentrations, and 3 evaluation of the contribution of each component of the TCAD regimen to the suppression of resistance. Consistent with the modeling which demonstrated that three drugs were required to suppress the emergence of resistance in influenza A, treatment with the TCAD regimen resulted in the sustained suppression of drug resistant viruses, whereas treatment with amantadine alone or the amantadine-oseltamivir double combination led to the rapid selection of resistant variants which comprised ∼100% of the population. Furthermore, the TCAD regimen imposed a high genetic barrier to resistance, requiring multiple mutations in order to escape the effects of all the drugs in the regimen. Finally, we demonstrate that each drug in the TCAD regimen made a significant contribution to the suppression of virus breakthrough and resistance at clinically achievable concentrations. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the TCAD regimen was superior to double combinations and single agents at suppressing resistance, and that three drugs at a minimum were required to impede the selection of drug resistant variants in influenza A virus. The use of mathematical modeling with multiple experimental designs and molecular readouts to evaluate and optimize combination drug regimens for

  4. A Viable Recombinant Rhabdovirus Lacking Its Glycoprotein Gene and Expressing Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Is a Potent Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alex B.; Buonocore, Linda; Vogel, Leatrice; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Krammer, Florian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of novel influenza viruses that cause devastating human disease is an ongoing threat and serves as an impetus for the continued development of novel approaches to influenza vaccines. Influenza vaccine development has traditionally focused on producing humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity, often against the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Here, we describe a new vaccine candidate that utilizes a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector backbone that lacks the native G surface glycoprotein gene (VSVΔG). The expression of the H5 HA of an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), A/Vietnam/1203/04 (VN1203), and the NA of the mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) in the VSVΔG vector restored the ability of the recombinant virus to replicate in cell culture, without the requirement for the addition of trypsin. We show here that this recombinant virus vaccine candidate was nonpathogenic in mice when given by either the intramuscular or intranasal route of immunization and that the in vivo replication of VSVΔG-H5N1 is profoundly attenuated. This recombinant virus also provided protection against lethal H5N1 infection after a single dose. This novel approach to vaccination against HPAIVs may be widely applicable to other emerging strains of influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Preparation for a potentially catastrophic influenza pandemic requires novel influenza vaccines that are safe, can be produced and administered quickly, and are effective, both soon after administration and for a long duration. We have created a new influenza vaccine that utilizes an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector, to deliver and express influenza virus proteins against which vaccinated animals develop potent antibody responses. The influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins, expressed on the surface of VSV particles, allowed this vaccine to grow in cell

  5. A viable recombinant rhabdovirus lacking its glycoprotein gene and expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase is a potent influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alex B; Buonocore, Linda; Vogel, Leatrice; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Krammer, Florian; Rose, John K

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of novel influenza viruses that cause devastating human disease is an ongoing threat and serves as an impetus for the continued development of novel approaches to influenza vaccines. Influenza vaccine development has traditionally focused on producing humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity, often against the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Here, we describe a new vaccine candidate that utilizes a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector backbone that lacks the native G surface glycoprotein gene (VSVΔG). The expression of the H5 HA of an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), A/Vietnam/1203/04 (VN1203), and the NA of the mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) in the VSVΔG vector restored the ability of the recombinant virus to replicate in cell culture, without the requirement for the addition of trypsin. We show here that this recombinant virus vaccine candidate was nonpathogenic in mice when given by either the intramuscular or intranasal route of immunization and that the in vivo replication of VSVΔG-H5N1 is profoundly attenuated. This recombinant virus also provided protection against lethal H5N1 infection after a single dose. This novel approach to vaccination against HPAIVs may be widely applicable to other emerging strains of influenza virus. Preparation for a potentially catastrophic influenza pandemic requires novel influenza vaccines that are safe, can be produced and administered quickly, and are effective, both soon after administration and for a long duration. We have created a new influenza vaccine that utilizes an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector, to deliver and express influenza virus proteins against which vaccinated animals develop potent antibody responses. The influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins, expressed on the surface of VSV particles, allowed this vaccine to grow in cell culture and induced a

  6. Isolation of Panels of Llama Single-Domain Antibody Fragments Binding All Nine Neuraminidase Subtypes of Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guus Koch

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza A virus comprises sixteen hemagglutinin (HA and nine neuraminidase (NA subtypes (N1–N9. To isolate llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs against all N subtypes, four llamas were immunized with mixtures of influenza viruses. Selections using influenza virus yielded predominantly VHHs binding to the highly immunogenic HA and nucleoprotein. However, selection using enzymatically active recombinant NA (rNA protein enabled us to isolate NA binding VHHs. Some isolated VHHs cross-reacted to other N subtypes. These were subsequently used for the capture of N subtypes that could not be produced as recombinant protein (rN6 or were enzymatically inactive (rN1, rN5 in phage display selection, yielding novel VHHs. In total we isolated 188 NA binding VHHs, 64 of which were expressed in yeast. Most VHHs specifically recognize a single N subtype, but some VHHs cross-react with other N-subtypes. At least one VHH bound to all N subtypes, except N4, identifying a conserved antigenic site. Thus, this work (1 describes methods for isolating NA binding VHHs, (2 illustrates the suitability of llama immunization with multiple antigens for retrieving many binders against different antigens and (3 describes 64 novel NA binding VHHs, including a broadly reactive VHH, which can be used in various assays for influenza virus subtyping, detection or serology.

  7. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by haemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajão, Daniela S; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Shanks, G Dennis; Vincent, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigenic drift, but have been shown to induce vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) when challenged with an antigenic variant of the same haemagglutinin (HA) subtype. This study investigated the role the immune response against HA, neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) may play in VAERD by reverse engineering vaccine and challenge viruses on a common backbone and using them in a series of vaccination/challenge trials. Mismatched HA between vaccine and challenge virus was necessary to induce VAERD. However, vaccines containing a matched NA abrogated the VAERD phenomenon induced by the HA mismatch and this was correlated with NA-inhibiting (NI) antibodies. Divergence between the two circulating swine N2 lineages (92 % identity) resulted in a loss of NI cross-reactivity and also resulted in VAERD with the mismatched HA. The NP lineage selected for use in the WIV vaccine strains did not affect protection or pathology. Thus the combination of HA and NA in the vaccine virus strains played a substantial role in vaccine protection versus immunopathology, suggesting that vaccines that target the HA protein alone could be more prone to VAERD due to the absence of cross-protective NI antibodies.

  8. Avian adeno-associated virus-based expression of Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein for poultry vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozo, F; Villegas, P; Estevez, C; Alvarado, I R; Purvis, L B; Saume, E

    2008-06-01

    The avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV) is a replication-defective nonpathogenic virus member of the family Parvoviridae that has been proved to be useful as a viral vector for gene delivery. The use of AAAV for transgenic expression of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein and its ability to induce immunity in chickens were assessed. Proposed advantages of this system include no interference with maternal antibodies, diminished immune response against the vector, and the ability to accommodate large fragments of genetic information. In this work the generation of recombinant AAAV virions expressing the HN protein (rAAAV-HN) was demonstrated by electron microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and western blot analysis. Serological evidence of HN protein expression after in ovo or intramuscular inoculation of the recombinant virus in specific-pathogen-free chickens was obtained. Serum from rAAAV-HN-vaccinated birds showed a systemic immune response evidenced by NDV-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hemagglutination inhibition testing. Positive virus neutralization in embryonated chicken eggs and indirect immunofluorescence detection of NDV infected cells by serum from rAAAV-HN vaccinated birds is also reported. A vaccine-challenge experiment in commercial broiler chickens using a Venezuelan virulent viscerotropic strain of NDV was performed. All unvaccinated controls died within 5 days postchallenge. Protection up to 80% was observed in birds vaccinated in ovo and revaccinated at 7 days of age with the rAAAV-HN. The results demonstrate the feasibility of developing and using an AAAV-based gene delivery system for poultry vaccination.

  9. The special neuraminidase stalk-motif responsible for increased virulence and pathogenesis of H5N1 influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Zhou

    Full Text Available The variation of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus results in gradually increased virulence in poultry, and human cases continue to accumulate. The neuraminidase (NA stalk region of influenza virus varies considerably and may associate with its virulence. The NA stalk region of all N1 subtype influenza A viruses can be divided into six different stalk-motifs, H5N1/2004-like (NA-wt, WSN-like, H5N1/97-like, PR/8-like, H7N1/99-like and H5N1/96-like. The NA-wt is a special NA stalk-motif which was first observed in H5N1 influenza virus in 2000, with a 20-amino acid deletion in the 49(th to 68(th positions of the stalk region. Here we show that there is a gradual increase of the special NA stalk-motif in H5N1 isolates from 2000 to 2007, and notably, the special stalk-motif is observed in all 173 H5N1 human isolates from 2004 to 2007. The recombinant H5N1 virus with the special stalk-motif possesses the highest virulence and pathogenicity in chicken and mice, while the recombinant viruses with the other stalk-motifs display attenuated phenotype. This indicates that the special stalk-motif has contributed to the high virulence and pathogenicity of H5N1 isolates since 2000. The gradually increasing emergence of the special NA stalk-motif in H5N1 isolates, especially in human isolates, deserves attention by all.

  10. Transforming growth factor-β: activation by neuraminidase and role in highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Carlson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, a multifunctional cytokine regulating several immunologic processes, is expressed by virtually all cells as a biologically inactive molecule termed latent TGF-β (LTGF-β. We have previously shown that TGF-β activity increases during influenza virus infection in mice and suggested that the neuraminidase (NA protein mediates this activation. In the current study, we determined the mechanism of activation of LTGF-β by NA from the influenza virus A/Gray Teal/Australia/2/1979 by mobility shift and enzyme inhibition assays. We also investigated whether exogenous TGF-β administered via a replication-deficient adenovirus vector provides protection from H5N1 influenza pathogenesis and whether depletion of TGF-β during virus infection increases morbidity in mice. We found that both the influenza and bacterial NA activate LTGF-β by removing sialic acid motifs from LTGF-β, each NA being specific for the sialic acid linkages cleaved. Further, NA likely activates LTGF-β primarily via its enzymatic activity, but proteases might also play a role in this process. Several influenza A virus subtypes (H1N1, H1N2, H3N2, H5N9, H6N1, and H7N3 except the highly pathogenic H5N1 strains activated LTGF-β in vitro and in vivo. Addition of exogenous TGF-β to H5N1 influenza virus-infected mice delayed mortality and reduced viral titers whereas neutralization of TGF-β during H5N1 and pandemic 2009 H1N1 infection increased morbidity. Together, these data show that microbe-associated NAs can directly activate LTGF-β and that TGF-β plays a pivotal role protecting the host from influenza pathogenesis.

  11. Anti-influenza Virus Effects of Catechins: A Molecular and Clinical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Kazuke; Kawasaki, Yohei; Kawakami, Koji; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Influenza infection and associated epidemics represent a serious public health problem. Several preventive and curative measures exist against its spread including vaccination and therapeutic agents such as neuraminidase inhibitors (e.g., oseltamivir, zanamivir, as well as peramivir and laninamivir, which are licensed in several countries) and adamantanes (e.g., amantadine and rimantadine). However, neuraminidase inhibitor- and adamantane- resistant viruses have been detected, whereas vaccines exhibit strain-specific effects and are limited in supply. Thus, new approaches are needed to prevent and treat influenza infections. Catechins, a class of polyphenolic flavonoids present in tea leaves, have been reported as potential anti-influenza virus agents based on experimental and clinical studies. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major and highly bioactive catechin, is known to inhibit influenza A and B virus infections in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Additionally, EGCG and other catechin compounds such as epicatechin gallate and catechin-5-gallate also show neuraminidase inhibitory activities as demonstrated via molecular docking. These catechins can bind differently to neuraminidase and might overcome known drug resistancerelated virus mutations. Furthermore, the antiviral effects of chemically modified catechin derivatives have also been investigated, and future structure-based drug design studies of catechin derivatives might contribute to improvements in influenza prevention and treatment. This review briefly summarizes probable mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of tea catechins against influenza infection and their clinical benefits on influenza prevention and treatment. Additionally, the great potential of tea catechins and their chemical derivatives as effective antiviral agents is described.

  12. Splice donor site mutation in the lysosomal neuraminidase gene causing exon skipping and complete loss of enzyme activity in a sialidosis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzel, R; Uhl, J; Kopitz, J; Beck, M; Otto, H F; Cantz, M

    2001-07-20

    Sialidosis is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the deficiency of alpha-N-acetylneuraminidase (NEU1; sialidase), the key enzyme for the intralysosomal catabolism of sialylated glycoconjugates. We have identified a homozygous transversion in the last intron (IVSE +1 G>C) in neu1 of a sialidosis patient. Sequencing of the truncated cDNA revealed an alternatively spliced neu1 transcript which lacks the complete sequence of exon 5. Skipping of exon 5 leads to a frameshift and results in a premature termination codon. This is the first description of an intronic point mutation causing a complete deficiency of the lysosomal neuraminidase activity.

  13. Using Common Spatial Distributions of Atoms to Relate Functionally Divergent Influenza Virus N10 and N11 Protein Structures to Functionally Characterized Neuraminidase Structures, Toxin Cell Entry Domains, and Non-Influenza Virus Cell Entry Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weininger, Arthur; Weininger, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify the functional correlates of structural and sequence variation in proteins is a critical capability. We related structures of influenza A N10 and N11 proteins that have no established function to structures of proteins with known function by identifying spatially conserved atoms. We identified atoms with common distributed spatial occupancy in PDB structures of N10 protein, N11 protein, an influenza A neuraminidase, an influenza B neuraminidase, and a bacterial neuraminidase. By superposing these spatially conserved atoms, we aligned the structures and associated molecules. We report spatially and sequence invariant residues in the aligned structures. Spatially invariant residues in the N6 and influenza B neuraminidase active sites were found in previously unidentified spatially equivalent sites in the N10 and N11 proteins. We found the corresponding secondary and tertiary structures of the aligned proteins to be largely identical despite significant sequence divergence. We found structural precedent in known non-neuraminidase structures for residues exhibiting structural and sequence divergence in the aligned structures. In N10 protein, we identified staphylococcal enterotoxin I-like domains. In N11 protein, we identified hepatitis E E2S-like domains, SARS spike protein-like domains, and toxin components shared by alpha-bungarotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin I, anthrax lethal factor, clostridium botulinum neurotoxin, and clostridium tetanus toxin. The presence of active site components common to the N6, influenza B, and S. pneumoniae neuraminidases in the N10 and N11 proteins, combined with the absence of apparent neuraminidase function, suggests that the role of neuraminidases in H17N10 and H18N11 emerging influenza A viruses may have changed. The presentation of E2S-like, SARS spike protein-like, or toxin-like domains by the N10 and N11 proteins in these emerging viruses may indicate that H17N10 and H18N11 sialidase-facilitated cell

  14. Therapeutic designed poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) cylindrical oseltamivir phosphate-loaded implants impede tumor neovascularization, growth and metastasis in mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynyk, Michael; Ellis, Jordon P; Haxho, Fiona; Allison, Stephanie; Steele, Joseph AM; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2015-01-01

    Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) copolymers have been extensively used in cancer research. PLGA can be chemically engineered for conjugation or encapsulation of drugs in a particle formulation. We reported that oseltamivir phosphate (OP) treatment of human pancreatic tumor-bearing mice disrupted the tumor vasculature with daily injections. Here, the controlled release of OP from a biodegradable PLGA cylinder (PLGA-OP) implanted at tumor site was investigated for its role in limiting tumor neovascularization, growth, and metastasis. PLGA-OP cylinders over 30 days in vitro indicated 20%–25% release profiles within 48 hours followed by a continuous metronomic low dose release of 30%–50% OP for an additional 16 days. All OP was released by day 30. Surgically implanted PLGA-OP containing 20 mg OP and blank PLGA cylinders at the tumor site of heterotopic xenografts of human pancreatic PANC1 tumors in RAGxCγ double mutant mice impeded tumor neovascularization, growth rate, and spread to the liver and lungs compared with the untreated cohort. Xenograft tumors from PLGA and PLGA-OP-treated cohorts expressed significant higher levels of human E-cadherin with concomitant reduced N-cadherin and host CD31+ endothelial cells compared with the untreated cohort. These results clearly indicate that OP delivered from PLGA cylinders surgically implanted at the site of the solid tumor show promise as an effective treatment therapy for cancer. PMID:26309402

  15. A non-biological method for screening active components against influenza virus from traditional Chinese medicine by coupling a LC column with oseltamivir molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Jun Yang

    Full Text Available To develop a non-biological method for screening active components against influenza virus from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM extraction, a liquid chromatography (LC column prepared with oseltamivir molecularly imprinted polymer (OSMIP was employed with LC-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. From chloroform extracts of compound TCM liquid preparation, we observed an affinitive component m/z 249, which was identified to be matrine following analysis of phytochemical literatures, OSMIP-LC column on-line of control compounds and MS/MS off-line. The results showed that matrine had similar bioactivities with OS against avian influenza virus H9N2 in vitro for both alleviating cytopathic effect and hemagglutination inhibition and that the stereostructures of these two compounds are similar while their two-dimensional structures were different. In addition, our results suggested that the bioactivities of those affinitive compounds were correlated with their chromatographic behaviors, in which less difference of the chromatographic behaviors might have more similar bioactivities. This indicates that matrine is a potential candidate drug to prevent or cure influenza for human or animal. In conclusion, the present study showed that molecularly imprinted polymers can be used as a non-biological method for screening active components against influenza virus from TCM.

  16. Alpha glucosidase inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Alpha glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are a unique class of anti-diabetic drugs. Derived from bacteria, these oral drugs are enzyme inhibitors which do not have a pancreato -centred mechanism of action...

  17. Proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  18. Virus-like particles displaying H5, H7, H9 hemagglutinins and N1 neuraminidase elicit protective immunity to heterologous avian influenza viruses in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushko, Peter; Tretyakova, Irina; Hidajat, Rachmat; Zsak, Aniko; Chrzastek, Klaudia; Tumpey, Terrence M; Kapczynski, Darrell R

    2017-01-15

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses circulating in wild birds pose a serious threat to public health. Human and veterinary vaccines against AI subtypes are needed. Here we prepared triple-subtype VLPs that co-localized H5, H7 and H9 antigens derived from H5N1, H7N3 and H9N2 viruses. VLPs also contained influenza N1 neuraminidase and retroviral gag protein. The H5/H7/H9/N1/gag VLPs were prepared using baculovirus expression. Biochemical, functional and antigenic characteristics were determined including hemagglutination and neuraminidase enzyme activities. VLPs were further evaluated in a chicken AI challenge model for safety, immunogenicity and protective efficacy against heterologous AI viruses including H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2 subtypes. All vaccinated birds survived challenges with H5N2 and H7N3 highly pathogenic AI (HPAI) viruses, while all controls died. Immune response was also detectable after challenge with low pathogenicity AI (LPAI) H9N2 virus suggesting that H5/H7/H9/N1/gag VLPs represent a promising approach for the development of broadly protective AI vaccine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. A contributing role for anti-neuraminidase antibodies on immunity to pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glendie Marcelin

    Full Text Available Exposure to contemporary seasonal influenza A viruses affords partial immunity to pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus (pH1N1 infection. The impact of antibodies to the neuraminidase (NA of seasonal influenza A viruses to cross-immunity against pH1N1 infection is unknown.Antibodies to the NA of different seasonal H1N1 influenza strains were tested for cross-reactivity against A/California/04/09 (pH1N1. A panel of reverse genetic (rg recombinant viruses was generated containing 7 genes of the H1N1 influenza strain A/Puerto Rico/08/34 (PR8 and the NA gene of either the pandemic H1N1 2009 strain (pH1N1 or one of the following contemporary seasonal H1N1 strains: A/Solomon/03/06 (rg Solomon or A/Brisbane/59/07 (rg Brisbane. Convalescent sera collected from mice infected with recombinant viruses were measured for cross-reactive antibodies to pH1N1 via Hemagglutinin Inhibition (HI or Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. The ectodomain of a recombinant NA protein from the pH1N1 strain (pNA-ecto was expressed, purified and used in ELISA to measure cross-reactive antibodies. Analysis of sera from elderly humans immunized with trivalent split-inactivated influenza (TIV seasonal vaccines prior to 2009 revealed considerable cross-reactivity to pNA-ecto. High titers of cross-reactive antibodies were detected in mice inoculated with either rg Solomon or rg Brisbane. Convalescent sera from mice inoculated with recombinant viruses were used to immunize naïve recipient Balb/c mice by passive transfer prior to challenge with pH1N1. Mice receiving rg California sera were better protected than animals receiving rg Solomon or rg Brisbane sera.The NA of contemporary seasonal H1N1 influenza strains induces a cross-reactive antibody response to pH1N1 that correlates with reduced lethality from pH1N1 challenge, albeit less efficiently than anti-pH1N1 NA antibodies. These findings demonstrate that seasonal NA antibodies contribute to but are not sufficient for cross

  20. The low-pH stability discovered in neuraminidase of 1918 pandemic influenza A virus enhances virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadanobu Takahashi

    Full Text Available The "Spanish" pandemic influenza A virus, which killed more than 20 million worldwide in 1918-19, is one of the serious pathogens in recorded history. Characterization of the 1918 pandemic virus reconstructed by reverse genetics showed that PB1, hemagglutinin (HA, and neuraminidase (NA genes contributed to the viral replication and virulence of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus. However, the function of the NA gene has remained unknown. Here we show that the avian-like low-pH stability of sialidase activity discovered in the 1918 pandemic virus NA contributes to the viral replication efficiency. We found that deletion of Thr at position 435 or deletion of Gly at position 455 in the 1918 pandemic virus NA was related to the low-pH stability of the sialidase activity in the 1918 pandemic virus NA by comparison with the sequences of other human N1 NAs and sialidase activity of chimeric constructs. Both amino acids were located in or near the amino acid resides that were important for stabilization of the native tetramer structure in a low-pH condition like the N2 NAs of pandemic viruses that emerged in 1957 and 1968. Two reverse-genetic viruses were generated from a genetic background of A/WSN/33 (H1N1 that included low-pH-unstable N1 NA from A/USSR/92/77 (H1N1 and its counterpart N1 NA in which sialidase activity was converted to a low-pH-stable property by a deletion and substitutions of two amino acid residues at position 435 and 455 related to the low-pH stability of the sialidase activity in 1918 NA. The mutant virus that included "Spanish Flu"-like low-pH-stable NA showed remarkable replication in comparison with the mutant virus that included low-pH-unstable N1 NA. Our results suggest that the avian-like low-pH stability of sialidase activity in the 1918 pandemic virus NA contributes to the viral replication efficiency.

  1. Human carboxylesterases HCE1 and HCE2: ontogenic expression, inter-individual variability and differential hydrolysis of oseltamivir, aspirin, deltamethrin and permethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongfang; Pearce, Robin E; Wang, Xiliang; Gaedigk, Roger; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne; Yan, Bingfang

    2009-01-15

    Carboxylesterases hydrolyze chemicals containing such functional groups as a carboxylic acid ester, amide and thioester. The liver contains the highest carboxylesterase activity and expresses two major carboxylesterases: HCE1 and HCE2. In this study, we analyzed 104 individual liver samples for the expression patterns of both carboxylesterases. These samples were divided into three age groups: adults (>or= 18 years of age), children (0 days-10 years) and fetuses (82-224 gestation days). In general, the adult group expressed significantly higher HCE1 and HCE2 than the child group, which expressed significantly higher than the fetal group. The age-related expression was confirmed by RT-qPCR and Western immunoblotting. To determine whether the expression patterns reflected the hydrolytic activity, liver microsomes were pooled from each group and tested for the hydrolysis of drugs such as oseltamivir and insecticides such as deltamethrin. Consistent with the expression patterns, adult microsomes were approximately 4 times as active as child microsomes and 10 times as active as fetal microsomes in hydrolyzing these chemicals. Within the same age group, particularly in the fetal and child groups, a large inter-individual variability was detected in mRNA (430-fold), protein (100-fold) and hydrolytic activity (127-fold). Carboxylesterases are recognized to play critical roles in drug metabolism and insecticide detoxication. The findings on the large variability among different age groups or even within the same age group have important pharmacological and toxicological implications, particularly in relation to pharmacokinetic alterations of ester drugs in children and vulnerability of fetuses and children to pyrethroid insecticides.

  2. Simultaneous detection of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of novel influenza A (H7N9) by duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Tao; Qi, Xian; Ge, Yiyue; Guo, Xiling; Wu, Bin; Yu, Huiyan; Zhu, Yefei; Shi, Zhiyang; Wang, Hua; Cui, Lunbiao; Zhou, Minghao

    2013-12-01

    A novel reassortant influenza A (H7N9) virus emerged recently in China. In this study, a duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of H7N9 influenza viruses. The sensitivity of the assay was determined to be 10 RNA copies per reaction for both HA and NA genes. No cross-reactivity was observed with other influenza virus subtypes or respiratory tract viruses. One hundred and forty-six clinical and environmental specimens were tested and compared with reference methods and were found to be consistent. The assay is suitable for large-scale screening due to short turnaround times and high specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Improved immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus inactivated vaccine following DNA vaccination using Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Ideris, Aini

    2016-03-01

    The present study describes the development of DNA vaccines using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes from AF2240 Newcastle disease virus strain, namely pIRES/HN, pIRES/F and pIRES-F/HN. Transient expression analysis of the constructs in Vero cells revealed the successful expression of gene inserts in vitro. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that single vaccination with the constructed plasmid DNA (pDNA) followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine induced a significant difference in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody levels (p inactivated vaccine alone. Taken together, these results indicated that recombinant pDNA could be used to increase the efficacy of the inactivated vaccine immunization procedure.

  4. Neuraminidase stalk length and additional glycosylation of the hemagglutinin influence the virulence of influenza H5N1 viruses for mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yumiko; Swayne, David E; Thomas, Colleen; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Naffakh, Nadia; Warnes, Christine; Altholtz, Melanie; Donis, Ruben; Subbarao, Kanta

    2009-05-01

    Following circulation of avian influenza H5 and H7 viruses in poultry, the hemagglutinin (HA) can acquire additional glycosylation sites, and the neuraminidase (NA) stalk becomes shorter. We investigated whether these features play a role in the pathogenesis of infection in mammalian hosts. From 1996 to 2007, H5N1 viruses with a short NA stalk have become widespread in several avian species. Compared to viruses with a long-stalk NA, viruses with a short-stalk NA showed a decreased capacity to elute from red blood cells and an increased virulence in mice, but not in chickens. The presence of additional HA glycosylation sites had less of an effect on virulence than did NA stalk length. The short-stalk NA of H5N1 viruses circulating in Asia may contribute to virulence in humans.

  5. Discovery of potential drugs for human-infecting H7N9 virus containing R294K mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He JY

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jiao-Yu He,1,* Cheng Li,2,* Guo Wu3 1College of Life Sciences and Key Laboratory for Bio-resources of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, 2College of Agronomy, Sichuan Agricultural University, 3College of Life Sciences, Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: After the first epidemic wave from February through May 2013, the influenza A (H7N9 virus emerged and has followed a second epidemic wave since June 2013. As of June 27, 2014, the outbreak of H7N9 had caused 450 confirmed cases of human infection, with 165 deaths included. The case-fatality rate of all confirmed cases is about 36%, making the H7N9 virus a significant threat to people’s health. At present, neuraminidase inhibitors are the only licensed antiviral medications available to treat H7N9 infections in humans. Oseltamivir is the most commonly used inhibitor, and it is also a front-line drug for the threatening H7N9. Unfortunately, it has been reported that patients treated with oseltamivir can induce R294K (Arg294Lys substitution in the H7N9 virus, which is a rare mutation and can reduce the antiviral efficacy of inhibitors. Even worse, deaths caused by such mutation after oseltamivir treatment have already been reported, indicating that the need to find substitutive neuraminidase inhibitors for currently available drugs to treat drug-resistant H7N9 is really pressing.Materials and methods: First, the structure of H7N9 containing the R294K substitution was downloaded from the Protein Data Bank, and structural information of approved drugs was downloaded from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial database. Taking oseltamivir carboxylate as a reference drug, we then filtered these molecules through virtual screening to find out potential inhibitors targeting the mutated H7N9 virus. For further evaluation, we carried out a 14 ns molecular dynamic simulation for each H7N9–drug complex and

  6. Filament-producing mutants of influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1 virus have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical wild-type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Seladi-Schulman

    Full Text Available Influenza virus exhibits two morphologies - spherical and filamentous. Strains that have been grown extensively in laboratory substrates are comprised predominantly of spherical virions while clinical or low passage isolates produce a mixture of spheres and filamentous virions of varying lengths. The filamentous morphology can be lost upon continued passage in embryonated chicken eggs, a common laboratory substrate for influenza viruses. The fact that the filamentous morphology is maintained in nature but lost in favor of a spherical morphology in ovo suggests that filaments confer a selective advantage within the infected host that is not necessary for growth in laboratory substrates. Indeed, we have recently shown that filament-producing variant viruses are selected upon passage of the spherical laboratory strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1 [PR8] in guinea pigs. Toward determining the nature of the selective advantage conferred by filaments, we sought to identify functional differences between spherical and filamentous particles. We compared the wild-type PR8 virus to two previously characterized recombinant PR8 viruses in which single point mutations within M1 confer a filamentous morphology. Our results indicate that these filamentous PR8 mutants have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical PR8 virus. Conversely, no differences were observed in HAU:PFU or HAU:RNA ratios, binding avidity, sensitivity to immune serum in hemagglutination inhibition assays, or virion stability at elevated temperatures. Based on these results, we propose that the pleomorphic nature of influenza virus particles is important for the optimization of neuraminidase functions in vivo.

  7. Single electrode genosensor for simultaneous determination of sequences encoding hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of avian influenza virus type H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Iwona; Malecka, Kamila; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2013-11-05

    The duo-genosensor consisting of two different oligonucleotide probes immobilized covalently on the surface of one gold electrode via Au-S bond formation was used for simultaneous determination of two different oligonucleotide targets. One of the probes, decorated on its 5'-end with ferrocene (SH-ssDNA-Fc), is complementary to the cDNA representing a sequence encoding part of H5 hemagglutinin from H5N1 virus. The second probe, decorated on its 5'-end with methylene blue (SH-ssDNA-MB), is complementary to cDNA representing the fragment of N1 neuraminidase from the same virus. The presence of both probes on the surface of gold electrodes was confirmed with Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). The changes in redox activity of both redox active complexes before and after the hybridization process were used as analytical signal. The peak at +400 ± 2 mV was observed in the presence of 40 nM ssDNA used as a target for SH-ssDNA-Fc probe. This peak increased with the increase of concentration of target ssDNA. It indicates the "signal on" mode of analytical signal generation. The peak at -250 ± 4 mV, characteristic for SH-ssDNA-MB probe, was decreasing with the increase of the concentration of the complementary ssDNA target starting from 8 to 100 nM. This indicates the generation of electrochemical signal according to the "signal off" mode. The proposed duo-genosensor is capable of simultaneous, specific, and good sensitivity probing for the sequences derived from genes encoding two main markers of the influenza virus, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase.

  8. DPP-4 inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors inhibit the activity of the enzyme responsible for the initial rapid degradation of the incretin hormones, thereby enhancing their antihyperglycemic effects.......Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors inhibit the activity of the enzyme responsible for the initial rapid degradation of the incretin hormones, thereby enhancing their antihyperglycemic effects....

  9. New influenza A Virus Entry Inhibitors Derived from the Viral Fusion Peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjiao Wu

    Full Text Available Influenza A viral (IAV fusion peptides are known for their important role in viral-cell fusion process and membrane destabilization potential which are compatible with those of antimicrobial peptides. Thus, by replacing the negatively or neutrally charged residues of FPs with positively charged lysines, we synthesized several potent antimicrobial peptides derived from the fusogenic peptides (FPs of hemagglutinin glycoproteins (HAs of IAV. The biological screening identified that in addition to the potent antibacterial activities, these positively charged fusion peptides (pFPs effectively inhibited the replication of influenza A viruses including oseltamivir-resistant strain. By employing pseudovirus-based entry inhibition assays including H5N1 influenza A virus (IAV, and VSV-G, the mechanism study indicated that the antiviral activity may be associated with the interactions between the HA2 subunit and pFP, of which, the nascent pFP exerted a strong effect to interrupt the conformational changes of HA2, thereby blocking the entry of viruses into host cells. In addition to providing new peptide "entry blockers", these data also demonstrate a useful strategy in designing potent antibacterial agents, as well as effective viral entry inhibitors. It would be meaningful in treatment of bacterial co-infection during influenza pandemic periods, as well as in our current war against those emerging pathogenic microorganisms such as IAV and HIV.

  10. Optimization of Droplet Digital PCR from RNA and DNA extracts with direct comparison to RT-qPCR: Clinical implications for quantification of Oseltamivir-resistant subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sean C; Carbonneau, Julie; Shelton, Dawne N; Boivin, Guy

    2015-11-01

    The recent introduction of Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) has provided researchers with a tool that permits direct quantification of nucleic acids from a wide range of samples with increased precision and sensitivity versus RT-qPCR. The sample interdependence of RT-qPCR stemming from the measurement of Cq and ΔCq values is eliminated with ddPCR which provides an independent measure of the absolute nucleic acid concentration for each sample without standard curves thereby reducing inter-well and inter-plate variability. Well-characterized RNA purified from H275-wild type (WT) and H275Y-point mutated (MUT) neuraminidase of influenza A (H1N1) pandemic 2009 virus was used to demonstrate a ddPCR optimization workflow to assure robust data for downstream analysis. The ddPCR reaction mix was also tested with RT-qPCR and gave excellent reaction efficiency (between 90% and 100%) with the optimized MUT/WT duplexed assay thus enabling the direct comparison of the two platforms from the same reaction mix and thermal cycling protocol. ddPCR gave a marked improvement in sensitivity (>30-fold) for mutation abundance using a mixture of purified MUT and WT RNA and increased precision (>10 fold, p<0.05 for both inter- and intra-assay variability) versus RT-qPCR from patient samples to accurately identify residual mutant viral population during recovery. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of a large deletion in the neuraminidase protein identified in a laninamivir-selected influenza A/Brisbane/10/2007 (H3N2) variant on viral fitness in vitro and in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann, Julie; Abed, Yacine; Beaulieu, Edith; Bouhy, Xavier; Joly, Marie-Hélène; Dubé, Karen; Carbonneau, Julie; Hamelin, Marie-Eve; Mallett, Corey; Boivin, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Viral fitness of a laninamivir-selected influenza A/Brisbane/10/2007-like (H3N2) isolate (LRVp9) containing a 237-amino acid neuraminidase deletion and a P194L hemagglutinin mutation was evaluated in vitro and in ferrets. LRVp9 and the wild-type (WT) virus showed comparable replication kinetics in MDCK-ST6GalI cells. Cultured virus was recovered between days 2 and 5 post-infection in nasal washes (NW) from the 4 WT-infected ferrets whereas no virus was recovered from the LRVp9-infected animals. There was a ≥1 log reduction in viral RNA copies/μl of NW for LRVp9 compared to WT at most time points. The large neuraminidase deletion compromises viral infectivity in vivo. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Anti-influenza A virus characteristics of a fucoidan from sporophyll of Undaria pinnatifida in mice with normal and compromised immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kyoko; Lee, Jung-Bum; Nakano, Takahisa; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2013-04-01

    Undaria pinnatifida, an edible brown alga, contains fucoidan (FuC), a sulfated polysaccharide, that inhibited the in vitro replication of influenza A virus, and stimulated both innate and adaptive immune defense functions in virus-infected mice. In the present study, the effects of oral administration of FuC were evaluated on influenza virus infection in immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice, where the efficacy of FuC was demonstrated in reducing viral replication, decreasing weight loss and mortality, and prolonging survival. Oral FuC resulted in increased neutralizing antibody production in the mucosa and blood. In contrast, while suppressing virus yields in mice more markedly than FuC, oseltamivir significantly reduced the neutralizing antibody titers in both the mucosa and blood. In immunocompromised mice, drug-resistant viruses frequently recovered after oseltamivir treatment; no resistant viruses were isolated from FuC-treated mice. FuC could be a candidate for the development of new therapeutic options including its combination with neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The M segment of the 2009 pandemic influenza virus confers increased neuraminidase activity, filamentous morphology, and efficient contact transmissibility to A/Puerto Rico/8/1934-based reassortant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Patricia J; Danzy, Shamika; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Deymier, Martin J; Lowen, Anice C; Steel, John

    2014-04-01

    The 2009 H1N1 lineage represented the first detection of a novel, highly transmissible influenza A virus genotype: six gene segments originated from the North American triple-reassortant swine lineage, and two segments, NA and M, derived from the Eurasian avian-like swine lineage. As neither parental lineage transmits efficiently between humans, the adaptations and mechanisms underlying the pandemic spread of the swine-origin 2009 strain are not clear. To help identify determinants of transmission, we used reverse genetics to introduce gene segments of an early pandemic isolate, A/Netherlands/602/2009 [H1N1] (NL602), into the background of A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 [H1N1] (PR8) and evaluated the resultant viruses in a guinea pig transmission model. Whereas the NL602 virus spread efficiently, the PR8 virus did not transmit. Swapping of the HA, NA, and M segments of NL602 into the PR8 background yielded a virus with indistinguishable contact transmissibility to the wild-type pandemic strain. Consistent with earlier reports, the pandemic M segment alone accounted for much of the improvement in transmission. To aid in understanding how the M segment might affect transmission, we evaluated neuraminidase activity and virion morphology of reassortant viruses. Transmission was found to correlate with higher neuraminidase activity and a more filamentous morphology. Importantly, we found that introduction of the pandemic M segment alone resulted in an increase in the neuraminidase activity of two pairs of otherwise isogenic PR8-based viruses. Thus, our data demonstrate the surprising result that functions encoded by the influenza A virus M segment impact neuraminidase activity and, perhaps through this mechanism, have a potent effect on transmissibility. Our work uncovers a previously unappreciated mechanism through which the influenza A virus M segment can alter the receptor-destroying activity of an influenza virus. Concomitant with changes to neuraminidase activity, the M

  14. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  15. Wheat germ cell-free system-based production of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of human parainfluenza virus type 3: generation and characterization of monoclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko eMatsunaga

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV3 commonly causes respiratory disorders in infants and young children. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been produced to several components of HPIV3 and commercially available. However, the utility of these antibodies for several immunological and proteomic assays for understanding the nature of HPIV3 infection remain to be characterized. Herein, we report the development and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN of HPIV3. A recombinant full-length HPIV3-HN was successfully synthesized using the wheat-germ cell-free protein production system. After immunization and cell fusion, 36 mouse hybridomas producing MAbs to HPIV3-HN were established. The MAbs obtained were fully characterized using ELISA, immunoblotting and immunofluorescent analyses. Of the MAbs tested, single clone was found to be applicable in both flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation procedures. By utilizing the antibody, we newly identified HPIV3-HN binding host proteins via immunoprecipitation-based mass spectrometry analysis. This study provides the availability of our newly-developed MAbs as a valuable tool for the study of HPIV3 infection as well as the several diagnostic tests of this virus.

  16. [High-yield reassortant virus containing hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of pandemic influenza A/Moscowl/01/2009 (H1N1) virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'eva, A V; Rudneva, I A; Timofeeva, T A; Shilov, A A; Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I; Kaverin, N V; L'vov, D K

    2011-01-01

    The crossing of influenza A/Moscow/01/2009 (H1N1) virus and reassortant strain X31 (H3N2) containing the genes of internal and non-structural proteins of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) strain gave rise to reassortant virus ReM8. The reassortant contained hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of pandemic 2009 influenza virus and 6 genes of high-yield A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) strain. The reassortant ReM8 produced higher yields in the embryonated chicken eggs than the parent pandemic virus, as suggested by infectivity and HA activity titration as well as by ELISA and the measurement of HA protein content by scanning electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel slabs. High immunogenicity of ReM8 reassortant was demonstrated by immune protection studies in mice. The reassortant virus ReM8 is suitable as a candidate strain for the production of inactivated and subunit influenza vaccines.

  17. Replication of H9 influenza viruses in the human ex vivo respiratory tract, and the influence of neuraminidase on virus release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Renee W Y; Chan, Louisa L Y; Mok, Chris K P; Lai, Jimmy; Tao, Kin P; Obadan, Adebimpe; Chan, Michael C W; Perez, Daniel R; Peiris, J S Malik; Nicholls, John M

    2017-07-24

    H9N2 viruses are the most widespread influenza viruses in poultry in Asia. We evaluated the infection and tropism of human and avian H9 influenza virus in the human respiratory tract using ex vivo respiratory organ culture. H9 viruses infected the upper and lower respiratory tract and the majority of H9 viruses had a decreased ability to release virus from the bronchus rather than the lung. This may be attributed to a weak neuraminidase (NA) cleavage of carbon-6-linked sialic acid (Sia) rather than carbon-3-linked Sia. The modified cleavage of N-acetlylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) by NA in H9 virus replication was observed by reverse genetics, and recombinant H9N2 viruses with amino acids (38KQ) deleted in the NA stalk, and changing the amino acid at position 431 from Proline-to-Lysine. Using recombinant H9 viruses previously evaluated in the ferret, we found that viruses which replicated well in the ferret did not replicate to the same extent in the human ex vivo cultures. The existing risk assessment models for H9N2 viruses in ferrets may not always have a strong correlation with the replication in the human upper respiratory tract. The inclusion of the human ex vivo cultures would further strengthen the future risk-assessment strategies.

  18. Proteome Response of Chicken Embryo Fibroblast Cells to Recombinant H5N1 Avian Influenza Viruses with Different Neuraminidase Stalk Lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Ming, Fan; Huang, Huimin; Guo, Kelei; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin; Zhou, Hongbo

    2017-01-12

    The variation on neuraminidase (NA) stalk region of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus results in virulence change in animals. In our previous studies, the special NA stalk-motif of H5N1 viruses has been demonstrated to play a significant role in the high virulence and pathogenicity in chickens. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of viruses with different NA stalk remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response of chicken cells to recombinant H5N1 virus with stalk-short NA (rNA-wt) and the stalkless NA mutant virus (rSD20). 208 proteins with differential abundance profiles were identified differentially expressed (DE), and these proteins were mainly related to stress response, transcription regulation, transport, metabolic process, cellular component and cytoskeleton. Through Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA), the significant biological functions of DE proteins represented included Post-Translational Modification, Protein Folding, DNA Replication, Recombination and Repair. It was interesting to find that most DE proteins were involved in the TGF-β mediated functional network. Moreover, the specific DE proteins may play important roles in the innate immune responses and H5N1 virus replication. Our data provide important information regarding the comparable host response to H5N1 influenza virus infection with different NA stalk lengths.

  19. [Accessing the features of surface neuraminidase (N1) of influenza A virus presenting on the platforms for anti-NA Abs screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lan; Qin, Kun; Zhou, Jian-fang; Shu, Yue-long; Wei, Hong

    2013-02-01

    To understand if the Neuraminidase (N1) of Influenza A virus at the surface of yeast-displaying system, eukaryotic expression system and the infected cells could be used for anti-NA Abs screening, their activities and bindings to five candidate Abs were assayed. The surface NA expression was obtained by transfecting by recombinant NA constructors with specific tag-labels or live virus infection. The functional activity was measured by the fluorescent assay. Their bindings to the Abs were detected by flow cytometry. The surface NAs presenting on the yeast-displaying system and eukaryotic expression system exhibited functional NA activities as the NA at the surface of virus-infected cells which showed affinities to Ab1, 4, and 5. The same bindings to Abl and 5 were found in the surface NA expressed by eukaryotic expression system while minor binding was observed in the yeast displayed-NA. The epitopes of yeast-displayed NA may be different from the NAs present at eukaryotic expression system and the infected cells which more likely suitable for the screening of anti-NA Abs.

  20. Production of an enzymatically active and immunogenic form of ectodomain of Porcine rubulavirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerriteño-Sánchez, José Luis; Santos-López, Gerardo; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Herrera-Camacho, Irma

    2016-04-10

    Blue-eye disease (BED) of swine is a viral disease endemic in Mexico. The etiological agent is a paramyxovirus classified as Porcine rubulavirus (PoRV-LPMV), which exhibits in its envelope the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein, the most immunogenic and a major target for vaccine development. We report in this study the obtaining of ectodomain of PoRV HN (eHN) through the Pichia pastoris expression system. The expression vector (pPICZαB-HN) was integrated by displacement into the yeast chromosome and resulted in a Mut(+) phenotype. Expressed eHN in the P. pastoris X33 strain was recovered from cell-free medium, featuring up to 67 nmol/min/mg after 6 days of expression. eHN was recognized by the serum of infected pigs with strains currently circulating in the Mexican Bajio region. eHN induces antibodies in mice after 28 days of immunization with specific recognition in ELISA test. These antibodies were able to inhibit >80% replication by viral neutralization assays in cell culture. These studies show the obtaining of a protein with similar characteristics to the native HN and which may be a candidate to propose a vaccine or to use the antigen in a serologic diagnostic test. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cathepsin D inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gacko

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of cathepsin D belong to chemical compounds that estrify carboxyl groups of the Asp33 and Asp231residues of its catalytic site, penta-peptides containing statin, i.e. the amino acid similar in structure to the tetraedric indirectproduct, and polypeptides found in the spare organs of many plants and forming permanent noncovalent complexes withcathepsin. Cathepsin D activity is also inhibited by alpha2-macroglobulin and antibodies directed against this enzyme.Methods used to determine the activity and concentration of these inhibitors and their analytical, preparative and therapeuticapplications are discussed.

  2. Inhibitors of histone demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Brian; Kristensen, Jesper L; Kristensen, Line H

    2011-01-01

    Methylated lysines are important epigenetic marks. The enzymes involved in demethylation have recently been discovered and found to be involved in cancer development and progression. Despite the relative recent discovery of these enzymes a number of inhibitors have already appeared. Most of the i...

  3. Protease inhibitors and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    A new generation of protease inhibitors is entering studies. Abbott Lab's ABT-378 and Pharmacia/Upjohn's PNU-140690 are beginning clinical studies and both are designed to overcome resistance problems. Several companies are developing new compounds to inhibit reverse transcriptase, such as Bristol-Myers Squibb's lobucavir and Hoechst/Bayer's HBY097. Calanolide A, which will soon begin trials, has a different resistance pattern than other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, which may be an important advantage. Several groups are developing compounds to inhibit the HIV zinc finger, such as Parke-Davis' compound, CI-1012; and a Dutch company who is developing Azodicarbonamide, a drug currently in phase I/II trials for people with advanced disease in Europe. HIV drugs to date have not been successful in blocking viral fusion. However, three new fusion inhibitors are showing promise within the laboratory: Pentafuside (currently in phase I trials), Fuji ImmunoPharmaceuticals' FP-21399 (currently in phase I trials), and ISIS Pharmaceuticals' ISIS 5320. A new class of drugs known as integrase inhibitors has been of interest to pharmaceutical companies for the past several years; only one drug, Aronex Pharmaceuticals' Zintevir, has reached phase I/II trials.

  4. Transglutaminase inhibitor from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, G.A.H. de; Wijngaards, G.; Koppelman, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cross-linking experiments of skimmed bovine milk with bacterial transglutaminase isolated from Streptoverticillium mobaraense showed only some degree of formation of high-molecular-weight casein polymers. Studies on the nature of this phenomenon revealed that bovine milk contains an inhibitor of

  5. HIV protease inhibitor resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.J.; Fun, Axel; Nijhuis, Monique

    2017-01-01

    HIV protease is pivotal in the viral replication cycle and directs the formation of mature infectious virus particles. The development of highly specific HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), based on thorough understanding of the structure of HIV protease and its substrate, serves as a prime example of

  6. Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebda, Rema; Paller, Amy S

    2018-03-01

    Historically, drugs available for treating atopic dermatitis (AD) have been limited to topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors, with systemic immunosuppressants and phototherapy reserved for severe AD. Despite their efficacy and infrequent adverse events, phobia about the use of topical steroids and calcineurin inhibitors has limited their use. More targeted options with fewer systemic and cutaneous side effects are needed for treating AD. Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) is involved in the regulation of proinflammatory cytokines via the degradation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. PDE4 activity is increased in the inflammatory cells of patients with AD, leading to increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Targeting PDE4 reduces the production of these proinflammatory mediators in AD. Both topical and oral PDE4 inhibitors have a favorable safety profile. Crisaborole 2% ointment, a topical PDE4, is now US Food and Drug Administration-approved for children older than 2 years and adults in the treatment of AD. Crisaborole 2% ointment shows early and sustained improvement in disease severity and pruritus and other AD symptoms, with burning and/or stinging upon application as the only related adverse event. Other PDE4 inhibitors are currently in trials with promising efficacy and safety. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Proton-pump inhibitors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) work by binding irreversibly to the. H+/K+-ATPase pump of the parietal cell, leading to inhibition of acid production in approximately 70% of active pumps.1The result is a dramatic increase in gastric pH mitigating the deleterious effects of acid in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and.

  8. Analyzing the interaction of a herbal compound Andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata as a folklore against swine flu (H1N1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrabhan Seniya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find new bioactive molecules for the treatment of swine flu. Methods: The present study is an attempt to elucidate inhibition potential of andrographolide and its derivatives along with an associated binding mechanism through virtual screening and molecular docking simulation studies. Results: Our findings revealed structural conformation changes in 150 loop, secondary sialic acid binding site residues of ACZ97474 {Neuraminidase (A/Blore/NIV236/2009(H1N1}. Andrographolide have been identified as the highest binging energy of -1 0.88 Kcal/mol, 3 hydrogen bond interactions (Arg152, Lys150, and Gly197, total intermolecular energy of -12.07 Kcal/mol with bioactivity value (Ki of 10.59 nmol/L, while the Food and Drug Admistraton approved drug Oseltamivir and Zanamivir have shown 2 and 4 hydrogen bond interactions with binding energies of -6.28 Kcal/mol and -7.73Kcal/mol, respectively, which is higher than andrographolide. The guanidine group of Arg152 has binding affinities to the hydrophilic nature of the inhibitors (-OH and =O groups, as identified by docking of andrographolide (CID: 5318517 on neuraminidase. Conclusions: Hence, andrographolide has the potential to inhibit neuraminidase activity of H1N1 and may be used as an alternative medicinal therapy for swine flu positive patient. With potent antiviral activity and a potentially new mechanism of action, andrographolide may warrant further evaluation as a possible therapy for influenza.

  9. Characterization of human Influenza Viruses in Lebanon during 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 post-pandemic seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraket, Hassan; Dapat, Clyde; Ghanem, Soha; Ali, Zainab; Lteif, Mireille; Kondo, Hiroki; Dapat, Isolde C; Saito, Kousuke; Kayali, Ghazi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Saito, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    To genetically characterize human influenza viruses and their susceptibilities to antivirals during two post-pandemic seasons in Lebanon. Influenza virus was isolated from nasopharyngeal swabs that were obtained from patients with influenza-like illness during 2010-2012 and further analyzed both phenotypically and genotypically. During the 2010-2011 season, both 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1p) and B viruses co-circulated with equal prevalence, while the H3N2 virus predominated during the 2011-2012 season. All H3N2 and H1N1 viruses were resistant to amantadine. Importantly, all viruses of the influenza A and B types were susceptible to the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, and laninamivir. Nonetheless, all 2011-2012 H1N1p isolates had three mutations (V241I, N369K, and N386S) in the NA gene that were suggested to be permissive of the H275Y mutation, which confers resistance to oseltamivir. We also detected one H1N1p virus during the 2010-2011 season with a 4-fold decrease in susceptibility to oseltamivir due to an NA-S247N mutation. This isolate was phylogenetically distinct from other H1N1p viruses that were isolated in other regions. Influenza A viruses with reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir and mutations permissive for acquiring NA resistance-conferring mutation with minimal burden on their fitness were isolated in Lebanon. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Chimeric Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus with Attachment and Fusion Glycoproteins Replaced by Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stope, Matthias B.; Karger, Axel; Schmidt, Ulrike; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2001-01-01

    Chimeric bovine respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV) expressing glycoproteins of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3) instead of BRSV glycoproteins were generated from cDNA. In the BRSV antigenome cDNA, the open reading frames of the major BRSV glycoproteins, attachment protein G and fusion protein F, were replaced individually or together by those of the BPIV-3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and/or fusion (F) glycoproteins. Recombinant virus could not be recovered from cDNA when the BRSV F open reading frame was replaced by the BPIV-3 F open reading frame. However, cDNA recovery of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HNF, with both glycoproteins replaced simultaneously, and of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HN, with the BRSV G protein replaced by BPIV-3 HN, was successful. The replication rates of both chimeras were similar to that of standard rBRSV. Moreover, rBRSV-HNF was neutralized by antibodies specific for BPIV-3, but not by antibodies specific to BRSV, demonstrating that the BRSV glycoproteins can be functionally replaced by BPIV-3 glycoproteins. In contrast, rBRSV-HN was neutralized by BRSV-specific antisera, but not by BPIV-3 specific sera, showing that infection of rBRSV-HN is mediated by BRSV F. Hemadsorption of cells infected with rBRSV-HNF and rBRSV-HN proved that BPIV-3 HN protein expressed by rBRSV is functional. Colocalization of the BPIV-3 glycoproteins with BRSV M protein was demonstrated by confocal laser scan microscopy. Moreover, protein analysis revealed that the BPIV-3 glycoproteins were present in chimeric virions. Taken together, these data indicate that the heterologous glycoproteins were not only expressed but were incorporated into the envelope of recombinant BRSV. Thus, the envelope glycoproteins derived from a member of the Respirovirus genus can together functionally replace their homologs in a Pneumovirus background. PMID:11533200

  11. Anti-Tumor Effects of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase of Newcastle Disease Virus in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyun He

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy has been an attractive drug platform for targeted therapy of cancer over the past few years. Viral vectors can be used to target and lyse cancer cells, but achieving good efficacy and specificity with this treatment approach is a major challenge. Here, we assessed the ability of a novel dual-specific anti-tumor oncolytic adenovirus, expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN gene from the Newcastle disease virus under the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT promoter (Ad-hTERTp-E1a-HN, to inhibit esophageal cancer EC-109 cells in culture and to reduce tumor burden in xenografted BALB/c nude mice. In vitro, infection with Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN could inhibit the growth of EC-109 cells significantly and also protect normal human liver cell line L02 from growth suppression in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN also effectively and selectively decreased the sialic acid level on EC-109 cells, but not on L02 cells. Furthermore, Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN was shown to induce the apoptosis pathway via acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining (AO/EB staining, increase reactive oxygen species (ROS, reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and release cytochrome c. In vivo, xenografted BALB/c nude mice were treated via intratumoral or intravenous injections of Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN. Although both treatments showed an obvious suppression in tumor volume, only Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN delivered via intratumoral injection elicited a complete response to treatment. These results reinforced previous findings and highlighted the potential therapeutic application of Ad-hTERT-E1a-HN for treatment of esophageal cancer in clinical trials.

  12. Baicalein, Ethyl Acetate, and Chloroform Extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis Inhibit the Neuraminidase Activity of Pandemic 2009 H1N1 and Seasonal Influenza A Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann-Jen Hour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study rated antiviral activity of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (S. baicalensis extracts against influenza A virus subtypes, for example, pandemic 2009 H1N1, seasonal H1N1 and H3N2. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc and chloroform extracts inhibited in vitro neuraminidase (NA enzymatic activity and viral replication more than methanol (MeOH extract. EtOAc extract demonstrated NA inhibition IC50 values ranging from 73.16 to 487.40 μg/mL and plaque reduction IC50 values ranging from 23.7 to 27.4 μg/mL. Chloroform extract showed antiviral activities with plaque reduction IC50 values ranging from 14.16 to 41.49 μg/mL Time-of-addition assay indicated that EtOAc and chloroform extracts also significantly inhibited virus yields after infection. HPLC analysis demonstrated that baicalin was dominant in the MeOH extract; baicalein and chrysin were rich in the EtOAc and chloroform extracts. Molecular simulation revealed baicalein hydrogen bonding with Glu277 as well as hydrophobic and Van der Waals interactions with Ile222, Arg224, Ser246, and Tyr347 in NA1 active sites of NA1. Baicalein inhibited in vitro replication of influenza A viruses pandemic 2009 H1N1 (IC50 = 0.018 μM and seasonal 2007 H1N1 using plaque reduction assays. A combination of low-dose baicalein with other anti-influenza agents could be applicable for development of alternative remedies treating influenza A virus infection.

  13. Identification of potential B cell epitope determinants by computer techniques, in hemagglutinin-neuraminidase from the porcine rubulavirus La Piedad Michoacan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández-Jáuregui, Pablo; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Agundis, Concepción; Zenteno, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) from porcine rubulavirus La Piedad Michoacan (RvpLPM) is one of the most antigenic proteins known, and is responsible for virus-host cell interaction. We analyzed the amino acid sequence of HN, using computer-assisted techniques to identify B cell epitopes. From a pool of 18 possible antigenic peptides, we evaluated the antigenicity of the 2 peptides with the highest scores and the 1 with lowest score. Antibodies from RvpLPM-infected pigs recognized the synthesized HN-A, HN-B, and HN-R peptides (optical density [OD]: 0.33 +/- 0.02 for HN-A, 0.20 +/- 0.02 for HN-B, and 0.07 +/- 0.01 for HN-R); bovine serum albumin-coupled HN-A and HN-B induced rabbit anti-RvpLPM antibodies (OD: 0.39 +/- 0.01 for HN-A and 0.35 +/- 0.02 for HN-B). Loop 5 from the outer membrane protein, OmpC, from Salmonella typhi was replaced with HN-B; this protein was then expressed in Escherichia coli UH302. BALB/c mice were challenged intraperitoneally or orogastrically with the fusion protein expressed in E. coli and murine antibodies obtained from both types of administration inhibited virus-hemagglutinating activity, as did the antibodies from RvpLPM-infected swine. These results suggest that HN-A and HN-B are peptides involved in RvpLPM cell carbohydrate recognition, and could therefore be considered potential targets for vaccine and diagnostic procedures development.

  14. Molecular basis for broad neuraminidase immunity: conserved epitopes in seasonal and pandemic H1N1 as well as H5N1 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongquan; Gao, Jin; Xu, Kemin; Chen, Hongjun; Couzens, Laura K; Rivers, Katie H; Easterbrook, Judy D; Yang, Kevin; Zhong, Lei; Rajabi, Mohsen; Ye, Jianqiang; Sultana, Ishrat; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiufan; Perez, Daniel R; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Eichelberger, Maryna C

    2013-08-01

    Influenza A viruses, including H1N1 and H5N1 subtypes, pose a serious threat to public health. Neuraminidase (NA)-related immunity contributes to protection against influenza virus infection. Antibodies to the N1 subtype provide protection against homologous and heterologous H1N1 as well as H5N1 virus challenge. Since neither the strain-specific nor conserved epitopes of N1 have been identified, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that exhibit different reactivity spectra with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and used these MAbs to map N1 antigenic domains. We identified 12 amino acids essential for MAb binding to the NA of a recent seasonal H1N1 virus, A/Brisbane/59/2007. Of these, residues 248, 249, 250, 341, and 343 are recognized by strain-specific group A MAbs, while residues 273, 338, and 339 are within conserved epitope(s), which allows cross-reactive group B MAbs to bind the NAs of seasonal H1N1 and the 1918 and 2009 pandemic (09pdm) H1N1 as well as H5N1 viruses. A single dose of group B MAbs administered prophylactically fully protected mice against lethal challenge with seasonal and 09pdm H1N1 viruses and resulted in significant protection against the highly pathogenic wild-type H5N1 virus. Another three N1 residues (at positions 396, 397, and 456) are essential for binding of cross-reactive group E MAbs, which differ from group B MAbs in that they do not bind 09pdm H1N1 viruses. The identification of conserved N1 epitopes reveals the molecular basis for NA-mediated immunity between H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and demonstrates the potential for developing broadly protective NA-specific antibody treatments for influenza.

  15. Composition of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase affects the antigen yield of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 candidate vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakura, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Akira; Tashiro, Masato; Nobusawa, Eri

    2013-01-01

    To improve the hemagglutinin (HA) antigen yield of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 candidate vaccine viruses, we generated 7:1, 6:2, and 5:3 genetic reassortant viruses between wild-type (H1N1)pdm09 (A/California/7/2009) (Cal7) and a high-yielding master virus, A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8). These viruses contained the HA; HA and neuraminidase (NA); and HA, NA, and M genes, respectively, derived from Cal7, on a PR8 backbone. The influence of the amino acid residue at position 223 in Cal7 HA on virus growth and HA antigen yield differed between these reassortant viruses. NIIDRG-7, a 7:1 virus possessing arginine at position 223, exhibited a 10-fold higher 50% egg infectious dose (EID(50)) (10.0 log(10)EID(50)/ml) than the 5:3 and 6:2 viruses. It also had 1.5- to 3-fold higher protein (13.8 μg/ml of allantoic fluids) and HA antigen (4.1 μg/ml of allantoic fluids) yields than the 5:3 and 6:2 viruses, which possessed identical Cal7 HA proteins. However, the HA antigen yield of the other 7:1 virus, which possessed glutamine at position 223 was 60% of that of NIIDRG-7. In addition, a novel 6:2 virus possessing Cal7 HA and the NA of A/Wisconsin/10/98 (a triple reassortant swine-like H1N1 virus), produced 107% of the HA yield of NIIDRG-7. In this study, we showed that the balance between HA and NA in the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus affects its protein and antigen yield.

  16. Newcastle Disease Virus Establishes Persistent Infection in Tumor Cells In Vitro: Contribution of the Cleavage Site of Fusion Protein and Second Sialic Acid Binding Site of Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Wang, Weijia; Cheng, Xing; McTamney, Patrick; Carroll, Danielle; Jin, Hong

    2017-08-15

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an oncolytic virus being developed for the treatment of cancer. Following infection of a human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR3) with a recombinant low-pathogenic NDV, persistent infection was established in a subset of tumor cells. Persistently infected (PI) cells exhibited resistance to superinfection with NDV and established an antiviral state, as demonstrated by upregulation of interferon and interferon-induced genes such as myxoma resistance gene 1 (Mx1) and retinoic acid-inducing gene-I (RIG-I). Viruses released from PI cells induced higher cell-to-cell fusion than the parental virus following infection in two tumor cell lines tested, HT1080 and HeLa, and remained attenuated in chickens. Two mutations, one in the fusion (F) protein cleavage site, F117S (F117S), and another in hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), G169R (HN169R), located in the second sialic acid binding region, were responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype. F117S improves F protein cleavage efficiency, facilitating cell-to-cell fusion, while HN169R possesses a multifaceted role in contributing to higher fusion, reduced receptor binding, and lower neuraminidase activity, which together result in increased fusion and reduced viral replication. Thus, establishment of persistent infection in vitro involves viral genetic changes that facilitate efficient viral spread from cell to cell as a potential mechanism to escape host antiviral responses. The results of our study also demonstrate a critical role in the viral life cycle for the second receptor binding region of the HN protein, which is conserved in several paramyxoviruses.IMPORTANCE Oncolytic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) could establish persistent infection in a tumor cell line, resulting in a steady antiviral state reflected by constitutively expressed interferon. Viruses isolated from persistently infected cells are highly fusogenic, and this phenotype has been mapped to two mutations, one each in the

  17. Meeting report: 4th ISIRV antiviral group conference: Novel antiviral therapies for influenza and other respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Fry, Alicia M

    2016-05-01

    The International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (isirv) held its 4th Antiviral Group Conference at the University of Texas on 2-4 June, 2015. With emerging resistance to the drugs currently licensed for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza viruses, primarily the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) and the M2 inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine, and the lack of effective interventions against other respiratory viruses, the 3-day programme focused on the discovery and development of inhibitors of several virus targets and key host cell factors involved in virus replication or mediating the inflammatory response. Virus targets included the influenza haemagglutinin, neuraminidase and M2 proteins, and both the respiratory syncytial virus and influenza polymerases and nucleoproteins. Therapies for rhinoviruses and MERS and SARS coronaviruses were also discussed. With the emerging development of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics, the potential implications of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease were also addressed. Topics covered all aspects from structural and molecular biology to preclinical and clinical studies. The importance of suitable clinical trial endpoints and regulatory issues were also discussed from the perspectives of both industry and government. This meeting summary provides an overview, not only for the conference participants, but also for those interested in the current status of antivirals for respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Cytoplasmic kinase inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Hiroyuki

    2010-10-01

    Protein kinases play essential roles in the regulation of cell proliferation. Point mutations or/and fusions of protein kinases are frequently identified in human cancers, and targeting such activated kinases provides us with a chance to eradicate tumor cells. This was first proved by imatinib mesylate that inhibits ABL tyrosine kinase and, thereby, efficiently kills malignant cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. In addition, other clinical trials are ongoing for kinase inhibitors against EML4--ALK in lung cancer, JAK2 in myeloproliferative disorders and BRAF in malignant melanoma. Early reports indeed reveal that such targeting compounds are promising drugs for human cancers with activated kinases.

  19. Influenza vaccination and antiviral therapy: is there a role for concurrent administration in the institutionalised elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinka, Paul J

    2003-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is estimated to be 50-68% efficacious in preventing pneumonia, hospitalisation or death in nursing home residents. Large culture-proven outbreaks may occur despite high resident vaccination rates. There is, therefore, a significant role for concurrent administration of influenza vaccination and antiviral therapy. The use of antiviral treatment and chemoprophylaxis requires community reporting of viral isolates, and contingency plans for rapid case identification and application of antiviral therapy. Clinicians must react quickly to control a highly infectious seasonal pathogen that may strike as an explosive outbreak. This situation is unique in geriatric practice. Current antiviral treatment should be administered within 48 hours of symptom onset, and is more efficacious if administered within 12 hours. In the case of an explosive institutional outbreak, a 1-day delay in prophylaxis may allow infection of many residents with a potentially fatal illness. Influenza must be differentiated from other respiratory viruses or syndromes. Grouped rapid diagnostic tests can aid laboratory confirmation. Antiviral agents include the M(2) inhibitors, amantadine and rimantadine, active against influenza A, and the neuraminidase inhibitors, zanamivir and oseltamivir, active against influenza A and B. In our experience, influenza B illness is as severe as influenza A. All agents have similar efficacy as treatment and prophylaxis against sensitive strains. When M(2) inhibitors are used simultaneously within an enclosed space (i.e. household or nursing home) as both treatment and prophylaxis, resistant strains may emerge that limit prophylactic efficacy. When M(2) inhibitors are administered to suspected cases (residents or staff) in institutions, precautions against secretion are especially important to diminish the risk of transmission of resistant virus. Rimantadine has been shown to have significantly fewer CNS adverse events compared with amantadine

  20. European guidelines for prevention and management of influenza in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and leukemia patients: summary of ECIL-4 (2011), on behalf of ECIL, a joint venture of EBMT, EORTC, ICHS, and ELN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, D; Mohty, B; de la Camara, R; Cordonnier, C; Ljungman, P

    2013-06-01

    Influenza may cause severe disease and mortality in leukemia patients and in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. The 4th European Conference of Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-4) has developed evidence-based guidelines for prevention and management of influenza infections in these patients. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction is the diagnostic test of choice, as it is the most sensitive and specific test for influenza. The risks for severe influenza and fatal outcome include lymphopenia, older age, influenza soon after transplantation or chemotherapy, steroid treatment, and lack of early antiviral therapy. Neuraminidase inhibitors (oral oseltamivir or inhalation of zanamivir) are currently the most effective therapeutic agents for influenza. Main preventive measures include annual vaccination of patients, household contacts, and hospital staff. This review summarizes ECIL-4's main recommendations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Combination Chemotherapy for Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Webster

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in April 2009 and the continuous evolution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses underscore the urgency of novel approaches to chemotherapy for human influenza infection. Anti-influenza drugs are currently limited to the neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir and to M2 ion channel blockers (amantadine and rimantadine, although resistance to the latter class develops rapidly. Potential targets for the development of new anti-influenza agents include the viral polymerase (and endonuclease, the hemagglutinin, and the non-structural protein NS1. The limitations of monotherapy and the emergence of drug-resistant variants make combination chemotherapy the logical therapeutic option. Here we review the experimental data on combination chemotherapy with currently available agents and the development of new agents and therapy targets.

  2. Charged amino acid variability related to N-glyco -sylation and epitopes in A/H3N2 influenza: Hem -agglutinin and neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhong-Zhou; Yu, Liang; Huang, Ping; Liang, Li-Jun; Guo, Qing

    2017-01-01

    The A/H3N2 influenza viruses circulated in humans have been shown to undergo antigenic drift, a process in which amino acid mutations result from nucleotide substitutions. There are few reports regarding the charged amino acid mutations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relations between charged amino acids, N-glycosylation and epitopes in hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). A total of 700 HA genes (691 NA genes) of A/H3N2 viruses were chronologically analyzed for the mutational variants in amino acid features, N-glycosylation sites and epitopes since its emergence in 1968. It was found that both the number of HA N-glycosylation sites and the electric charge of HA increased gradually up to 2016. The charges of HA and HA1 increased respectively 1.54-fold (+7.0 /+17.8) and 1.08-fold (+8.0/+16.6) and the number of NGS in nearly doubled (7/12). As great diversities occurred in 1990s, involving Epitope A, B and D mutations, the charged amino acids in Epitopes A, B, C and D in HA1 mutated at a high frequency in global circulating strains last decade. The charged amino acid mutations in Epitopes A (T135K) has shown high mutability in strains near years, resulting in a decrease of NGT135-135. Both K158N and K160T not only involved mutations charged in epitope B, but also caused a gain of NYT158-160. Epitope B and its adjacent N-glycosylation site NYT158-160 mutated more frequently, which might be under greater immune pressure than the rest. The charged amino acid mutations in A/H3N2 Influenza play a significant role in virus evolution, which might cause an important public health issue. Variability related to both the epitopes (A and B) and N-glycosylation is beneficial for understanding the evolutionary mechanisms, disease pathogenesis and vaccine research.

  3. Cross-reactive neuraminidase antibodies afford partial protection against H5N1 in mice and are present in unexposed humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Sandbulte

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A pandemic H5N1 influenza outbreak would be facilitated by an absence of immunity to the avian-derived virus in the human population. Although this condition is likely in regard to hemagglutinin-mediated immunity, the neuraminidase (NA of H5N1 viruses (avN1 and of endemic human H1N1 viruses (huN1 are classified in the same serotype. We hypothesized that an immune response to huN1 could mediate cross-protection against H5N1 influenza virus infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice were immunized against the NA of a contemporary human H1N1 strain by DNA vaccination. They were challenged with recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 viruses bearing huN1 (PR8-huN1 or avN1 (PR8-avN1 or with H5N1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/04. Additional naïve mice were injected with sera from vaccinated mice prior to H5N1 challenge. Also, serum specimens from humans were analyzed for reactivity with avN1. Immunization elicited a serum IgG response to huN1 and robust protection against the homologous challenge virus. Immunized mice were partially protected from lethal challenge with H5N1 virus or recombinant PR8-avN1. Sera transferred from immunized mice to naïve animals conferred similar protection against H5N1 mortality. Analysis of human sera showed that antibodies able to inhibit the sialidase activity of avN1 exist in some individuals. CONCLUSIONS: These data reveal that humoral immunity elicited by huN1 can partially protect against H5N1 infection in a mammalian host. Our results suggest that a portion of the human population could have some degree of resistance to H5N1 influenza, with the possibility that this could be induced or enhanced through immunization with seasonal influenza vaccines.

  4. Methyl Jasmonate Induces Papain Inhibitor(s) in Tomato Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolter, C. J.

    1993-12-01

    Leaves of 18- to 24-d-old tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants exposed to gaseous methyl jasmonate (MJ) for 24 h at 30[deg]C in continuous light contained high levels of soluble protein that inhibited papain. Chromatographic analysis demonstrated that the active protein had a molecular mass of 80 to 90 kD. Induction of papain inhibitor was directly related to the concentration of air-borne MJ up to a maximum of 0.1 [mu]L MJ per treatment and depended on the duration of exposure up to 18 h. Inhibitor activity in plants treated for less than 18 h increased with time after treatment. Levels remained constant for up to 4 d after treatment, after which time activity decreased. The youngest leaf, leaf 5, consistently lost activity at a faster rate than older, lower leaves. Inhibitor concentration in all leaves was reduced to minimum levels by 11 d after MJ treatment, but did not return to control levels. Treatment with MJ in the dark did induce inhibitor activity, but at a significantly lower rate. Polyclonal antibodies raised to purified potato tuber skin cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPI) cross-reacted with the tomato inhibitor, suggesting that the tomato papain inhibitor and the potato CPI are closely related. No papain inhibitor activity was observed in extracts from wounded tomato leaves, nor was there any immunoreactivity with antibodies raised to potato tuber skin CPI.

  5. Proteinase inhibitors in Brazilian leguminosae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. M. Sampaio

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine proteinase inhitors, in the seeds of several Leguminosae from the Pantanal region (West Brazil, were studied using bovine trypsin, a digestive enzyme, Factor XIIa and human plasma Kallikrein, two blood clotting factors. The inhibitors were purified from Enterolobium contortisiliquum (Mr=23,000, Torresea cearensis (Mr = 13,000, Bauhinia pentandra (Mr = 20,000 and Bauhinia bauhinioides (Mr = 20,000. E. contortisiliquum inhibitor inactivates all three enzymes, whereas the T. cearensis inhibitor inactivates trypsin and Factor XSSa, but does nor affect plasma kallikrein; both Bauhinia inhibitors, on the other hand, inactivate trypsin and plasma kallikrein but only the Bpentandra inhibitor affects Factor XIIa. Ki values were calculated between 10 [raised to the power of] -7 and 10 [raised to the power of] -8 M.

  6. Issues in pharmacotherapy of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pandemic caused by the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has been a cause of great concern for healthcare professionals and the scientific community worldwide. Due to the widespread resistance of the virus to adamantanes, pharmacotherapy is currently limited to neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir. The use of neuraminidase inhibitors in India is primarily associated with issues of patient and physician awareness, variability in disease management guidelines, safety and efficacy in the Indian population, need for active drug safety monitoring, and development of resistance due to possible misuse. In addition, other issues like availability of the drugs in retail and stockpiling by the public health authorities need careful introspection. The development of influenza vaccines in India and its adequate availability to the country′s populace also poses significant challenges in the management of the pandemic. In light of the limited therapeutic options available for the management of the disease, research on novel targets and pharmacological agents would also be beneficial in addressing the challenges of future outbreaks.

  7. Issues in pharmacotherapy of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y K; Padhy, B M

    2010-01-01

    The pandemic caused by the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has been a cause of great concern for healthcare professionals and the scientific community worldwide. Due to the widespread resistance of the virus to adamantanes, pharmacotherapy is currently limited to neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir. The use of neuraminidase inhibitors in India is primarily associated with issues of patient and physician awareness, variability in disease management guidelines, safety and efficacy in the Indian population, need for active drug safety monitoring, and development of resistance due to possible misuse. In addition, other issues like availability of the drugs in retail and stockpiling by the public health authorities need careful introspection. The development of influenza vaccines in India and its adequate availability to the country's populace also poses significant challenges in the management of the pandemic. In light of the limited therapeutic options available for the management of the disease, research on novel targets and pharmacological agents would also be beneficial in addressing the challenges of future outbreaks.

  8. [Progress on matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingling, Jia; Qianbing, Wan

    2017-04-01

    Continuing advances in dentin bonding technology and adhesives revolutionized bonding of resin-based composite restorations. However, hybrid layers created by contemporary dentin adhesives present imperfect durability, and degradation of collagen matrix by endogenous enzymes is a significant factor causing destruction of hybrid layers. Bond durability can be improved by using enzyme inhibitors to prevent collagen degradation and to preserve integrity of collagen matrix. This review summarizes progress on matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (including chlorhexidine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, quaternary ammonium salt, tetracycline and its derivatives, hydroxamic acid inhibitors, bisphosphonate derivative, and cross-linking agents) and suggests prospects for these compounds.

  9. Application of electrolysis for inactivation of an antiviral drug that is one of possible selection pressure to drug-resistant influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hirose, Jun; Wu, Hong; Sano, Kouichi; Katsumata, Takahiro; Tsujibo, Hiroshi; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    The recent development of antiviral drugs has led to concern that the release of the chemicals in surface water due to expanded medical use could induce drug-resistant mutant viruses in zoonosis. Many researchers have noted that the appearance of an oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®))-resistant avian influenza mutant virus, which may spread to humans, could be induced by oseltamivir contamination of surface water. Although past studies have reported electrolysis as a possible method for degradation of antineoplastics and antibacterials in water, the validity of the method for treatment of antiviral drugs is unknown. In this study, electrolysis was used to degrade an antiviral prodrug, oseltamivir, and a stable active form, oseltamivir carboxylate, and the degradation process was monitored with HPLC-UV and the neuraminidase inhibitory assay. HPLC-UV-detectable oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were decomposed by electrolysis within 60 min, and inhibitory activity of neuraminidase decreased below the detection limit of the assay used. Cytotoxic and genotoxic activity were not detected in electrolyzed fluid. These results indicate that electrolysis is a possible treatment for inactivation of the antiviral drug oseltamivir. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Angiogenesis Inhibitors in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Manzo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a complex biological process that plays a relevant role in sustaining the microenvironment, growth, and metastatic potential of several tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Bevacizumab was the first angiogenesis inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC in combination with chemotherapy; however, it was limited to patients with non-squamous histology and first-line setting. Approval was based on the results of two phase III trials (ECOG4599 and AVAIL that demonstrated an improvement of about two months in progression-free survival (PFS in both trials, and in the ECOG4599 trial, an improvement in overall survival (OS also. Afterwards, other antiangiogenic agents, including sunitinib, sorafenib, and vandetanib have been unsuccessfully tested in first and successive lines. Recently, two new antiangiogenic agents (ramucirumab and nintedanib produced a significant survival benefit in second-line setting. In the REVEL study, ramucirumab plus docetaxel prolonged the median OS of patients with any histology NSCLC when compared with docetaxel alone (10.4 versus 9.1 months, hazard ratio (HR 0.857, p = 0.0235. In the LUME-Lung 1 study, nintedanib plus docetaxel prolonged the median PFS of patients with any tumor histology (p = 0.0019, and improved OS (12.6 versus 10.3 months in patients with adenocarcinoma. As a result, it became a new option for the second-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC and adenocarcinoma histology. Identifying predictive biomarkers to optimize the benefit of antiangiogenic drugs remains an ongoing challenge.

  11. Thrombin inhibitors from different animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka-Azevedo, A M; Morais-Zani, K; Torquato, R J S; Tanaka, A S

    2010-01-01

    Venous and arterial thromboembolic diseases are still the most frequent causes of death and disability in high-income countries. Clinical anticoagulants are inhibitors of enzymes involved in the coagulation pathway, such as thrombin and factor X(a). Thrombin is a key enzyme of blood coagulation system, activating the platelets, converting the fibrinogen to the fibrin net, and amplifying its self-generation by the activation of factors V, VIII, and XI. Thrombin has long been a target for the development of oral anticoagulants. Furthermore, selective inhibitors of thrombin represent a new class of antithrombotic agents. For these reasons, a number of specific thrombin inhibitors are under evaluation for possible use as antithrombotic drugs. This paper summarizes old and new interests of specific thrombin inhibitors described in different animals.

  12. Thrombin Inhibitors from Different Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Tanaka-Azevedo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous and arterial thromboembolic diseases are still the most frequent causes of death and disability in high-income countries. Clinical anticoagulants are inhibitors of enzymes involved in the coagulation pathway, such as thrombin and factor Xa. Thrombin is a key enzyme of blood coagulation system, activating the platelets, converting the fibrinogen to the fibrin net, and amplifying its self-generation by the activation of factors V, VIII, and XI. Thrombin has long been a target for the development of oral anticoagulants. Furthermore, selective inhibitors of thrombin represent a new class of antithrombotic agents. For these reasons, a number of specific thrombin inhibitors are under evaluation for possible use as antithrombotic drugs. This paper summarizes old and new interests of specific thrombin inhibitors described in different animals.

  13. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: Pharmacology, administration, and side effects. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 2, 2016. Mental health medications. National Institute of Mental Health. http://www. ...

  14. Formulary management of ACE inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbrandt, K R; Yedinak, K C

    1996-12-01

    An increasing number of ACE inhibitors have become available in recent years. Because these agents are all similar, careful scrutiny is required in order to determine specific advantages of particular agents when making formulary decisions. Differences between agents with regard to structure and tissue specificity have been identified, but the clinical relevance of these differences is not clear. ACE inhibitors vary greatly with regard to bioconversion, distribution and elimination. Disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and hepatic or renal insufficiency may affect the disposition of specific ACE inhibitors. These agents may differ substantially in duration of action, and ACE inhibitors that are given once daily may optimise patient compliance and decrease costs. ACE inhibitors have been extensively studied in patients with hypertension, CHF or nephropathy, and following myocardial infarction (MI). Differences in efficacy between agents are often a result of variations in study design, or because nonequipotent dosages were compared. It is likely that the benefits of ACE inhibitors are class effects, and it is probably reasonable to use an agent even if large scale clinical trials have not been performed with that particular drug. Few differences have been found between ACE inhibitors with regard to adverse effects or drug interactions, and these factors are of minor importance when making formulary decisions. Cost and availability may vary among agents, and will depend on geographical location and institution-specific purchasing contracts. ACE inhibitors have shown positive effects on quality of life when compared with agents of other classes. Quality-of-life studies that have directly compared ACE inhibitors have produced conflicting results. In the setting of hypertension, cost-effectiveness evaluations typically find that the newer, longer-acting ACE inhibitors provide the greatest financial benefit. Differences in cost effectiveness in the post

  15. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influenza virus drug resistance: a time-sampled population genetics perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Foll

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of distinguishing genetic drift from selection remains a central focus of population genetics. Time-sampled data may provide a powerful tool for distinguishing these processes, and we here propose approximate Bayesian, maximum likelihood, and analytical methods for the inference of demography and selection from time course data. Utilizing these novel statistical and computational tools, we evaluate whole-genome datasets of an influenza A H1N1 strain in the presence and absence of oseltamivir (an inhibitor of neuraminidase collected at thirteen time points. Results reveal a striking consistency amongst the three estimation procedures developed, showing strongly increased selection pressure in the presence of drug treatment. Importantly, these approaches re-identify the known oseltamivir resistance site, successfully validating the approaches used. Enticingly, a number of previously unknown variants have also been identified as being positively selected. Results are interpreted in the light of Fisher's Geometric Model, allowing for a quantification of the increased distance to optimum exerted by the presence of drug, and theoretical predictions regarding the distribution of beneficial fitness effects of contending mutations are empirically tested. Further, given the fit to expectations of the Geometric Model, results suggest the ability to predict certain aspects of viral evolution in response to changing host environments and novel selective pressures.

  17. Identification of small molecule inhibitors for influenza a virus using in silico and in vitro approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliann Nzembi Makau

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses have acquired resistance to approved neuraminidase-targeting drugs, increasing the need for new drug targets for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs. Nucleoprotein (NP is an attractive target since it has an indispensable role in virus replication and its amino acid sequence is well conserved. In this study, we aimed to identify new inhibitors of the NP using a structure-based drug discovery algorithm, named Nagasaki University Docking Engine (NUDE, which has been established especially for the Destination for GPU Intensive Machine (DEGIMA supercomputer. The hit compounds that showed high binding scores during in silico screening were subsequently evaluated for anti-influenza virus effects using a cell-based assay. A 4-hydroxyquinolinone compound, designated as NUD-1, was found to inhibit the replication of influenza virus in cultured cells. Analysis of binding between NUD-1 and NP using surface plasmon resonance assay and fragment molecular orbital calculations confirmed that NUD-1 binds to NP and could interfere with NP-NP interactions essential for virus replication. Time-of-addition experiments showed that the compound inhibited the mid-stage of infection, corresponding to assembly of the NP and other viral proteins. Moreover, NUD-1 was also effective against various types of influenza A viruses including a clinical isolate of A(H1N1pdm09 influenza with a 50% inhibitory concentration range of 1.8-2.1 μM. Our data demonstrate that the combined use of NUDE system followed by the cell-based assay is useful to obtain lead compounds for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs.

  18. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tajima, Shigeru [Department of Virology I, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko [Influenza and Prion Disease Research Center, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan); Aida, Yoko, E-mail: aida@riken.jp [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  19. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  20. PROTEIN INHIBITORS SYNTHESISED BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Matseliukh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a review the literature data on protein inhibitors of peptidases synthesised by different types of microorganisms are systematized. It is shown that at the present time on the basis of amino acid sequence homology protein inhibitors are grouped into 77 families, 29 of which include inhibitors of microorganisms. The mechanism of inhibition of peptidases by proteins may be related to their catalytic mechanism of action or include unrelated blocking of the active site or its surroundings. The structural elements of the protein inhibitors are responsible for binding to the peptidases, mostly include the N- or C-terminal sequences, the unprotected polypeptide loops (chains, which are acting independently or in combination with other elements. The basic properties, structural features and, where it is established, the functions of the protein inhibitors of peptidases are considered. Since some of these proteins effectively inhibit such peptidases as subtilisin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, their practical use in the treatment of diseases such as emphysema, arthritis, pancreatitis, thrombosis, hypertension, muscular dystrophy, cancer. It is suggested that the role of a bacterial homologue of Escherichia coli alphaacroglobulin, which is a periplasmic protein, is to protect the periplasmic space from the action of bacteria own proteases. Based on the specific properties of alpha-2-macroglobulin to bind endopeptidases active molecules, they are used in biotechnology to isolate endopeptidases from crude biological preparations and titration of its active centers. Some free–living bacteria are able to synthesize protein inhibitors to protect from the effects of its own enzymes, while the presence of these proteins in pathogens may play a certain role both in the infectious process and in the protection of the host proteases.

  1. In silico design of cyclic peptides as influenza virus, a subtype H1N1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arli Parikesit

    2012-06-28

    Jun 28, 2012 ... disease because of the occurrence of mutation in the influenza virus. Influenza virus is also resistant to some antiviral drugs like oseltamivir and zanamivir, which inhibit neuraminidase. Another solution for controlling this virus is to find new design for antiviral drugs. Cyclic peptides can be used to make new.

  2. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Hassing (Robert); A. Verbon (Annelies); H. de Visser (Herman); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAn association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam

  3. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitors, design, preparation and SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Knak; Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Olesen, Uffe Hogh

    2013-01-01

    Existing pharmacological inhibitors for nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) are promising therapeutics for treating cancer. Using medicinal and computational chemistry methods, the structure-activity relationship for novel classes of NAMPT inhibitors is described and compounds optimize...

  4. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    current barriers of kinase inhibitors, including poor selectivity and emergence of drug resistance. In spite of the small number of identified allosteric inhibitors in comparison with that of inhibitors targeting the ATP pocket, encouraging results, such as the FDA-approval of the first small...

  5. Detailed genetic analysis of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein gene in human parainfluenza virus type 1 isolates from patients with acute respiratory infection between 2002 and 2009 in Yamagata prefecture, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuta Katsumi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1 causes various acute respiratory infections (ARI. Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN glycoprotein of HPIV1 is a major antigen. However, the molecular epidemiology and genetic characteristics of such ARI are not exactly known. Recent studies suggested that a phylogenetic analysis tool, namely the maximum likelihood (ML method, may be applied to estimate the evolutionary time scale of various viruses. Thus, we conducted detailed genetic analyses including homology analysis, phylogenetic analysis (using both the neighbor joining (NJ and ML methods, and analysis of the pairwise distances of HN gene in HPIV1 isolated from patients with ARI in Yamagata prefecture, Japan. Results A few substitutions of nucleotides in the second binding site of HN gene were observed among the present isolates. The strains were classified into two major clusters in the phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Another phylogenetic tree constructed by the ML method showed that the strains diversified in the late 1980s. No positively selected sites were found in the present strains. Moreover, the pairwise distance among the present isolates was relatively short. Conclusions The evolution of HN gene in the present HPIV1 isolates was relatively slow. The ML method may be a useful phylogenetic method to estimate the evolutionary time scale of HPIV and other viruses.

  6. Proteasome inhibitors with photocontrolled activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mickel J; Velema, Willem A; de Bruin, Gerjan; Overkleeft, Herman S; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-09-22

    Proteasome inhibitors are widely used in cancer treatment as chemotherapeutic agents. However, their employment often results in severe side effects, due to their non-specific cytotoxicity towards healthy tissue. This problem might be overcome by using a photopharmacological approach, that is, by attaining external, dynamic, spatiotemporal photocontrol over the activity of a cytotoxic agent, achieved by the introduction of a photoswitchable moiety into its molecular structure. Here we describe the design, synthesis, and activity of photoswitchable proteasome inhibitors. Substantial differences in proteasome inhibitory activity in cell extracts were observed before and after irradiation with light. The presented results show potential for the development of chemotherapeutic agents that can be switched on and off with light, constituting a new strategy for spatiotemporally modulating proteasomal activity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Small-molecule arginase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenkov, Yan A; Chufarova, Nina V

    2014-01-01

    Arginase is an enzyme that metabolizes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. In addition to its fundamental role in the hepatic ornithine cycle, it also influences the immune systems in humans and mice. Arginase participates in many inflammatory disorders by decreasing the synthesis of nitric oxide and inducing fibrosis and tissue regeneration. L-arginine deficiency, which is modulated by myeloid cell arginase, suppresses T-cell immune response. This mechanism plays a fundamental role in inflammation-associated immunosuppression. Pathogens can synthesize their own arginase to elude immune reaction. Small-molecule arginase inhibitors are currently described as promising therapeutics for the treatment of several diseases, including allergic asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, cardiovascular diseases (atherosclerosis and hypertension), diseases associated with pathogens (e.g., Helicobacter pylori, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Salmonella), cancer and induced or spontaneous immune disorders. This article summarizes recent patents in the area of arginase inhibitors and discusses their properties.

  8. Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioletta Romaniuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238, delanzomib (CEP-18770, oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047 and marizomib (NPI-0052.

  9. Natural Inhibitors of Maillard Browning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    incorporated into pre-selected candidate ration components for evaluation via storage, sensory and chemical analysis. The concentration of inhibitor was...inhibiting Maillard browning, also known as non-enzymatic browning, a complex reaction which can lead to darkening of color, off- odors , off-flavors...nutritional intake, and decrease waste due to non-consumption of sensory degraded ration components. 1.1 Maillard Browning Maillard browning, also

  10. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are novel compounds that strongly inhibit the H+/K+-ATPase in the gastric parietal cells to cause profound suppression of acid secretion. Acid-generating ATPase, also known as vacuolar-type ATPase, is located in the lysozomes of leukocytes and osteoclasts and its activity is also reportedly influenced by treatment with PPIs. This concept is supported by the results of studies using autoradiography in which 3H-Lansoprazole uptake sites were clearly detected in the...

  11. Stabilization versus inhibition of TAFIa by competitive inhibitors in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, J.B.; Hughes, B.; James, I.; Haddock, P.; Kluft, C.; Bajzar, L.

    2003-01-01

    Two competitive inhibitors of TAFIa (activated thrombin-activable fibrinolysis inhibitor), 2-guanidinoethyl-mercaptosuccinic acid and potato tuber carboxypeptidase inhibitor, variably affect fibrinolysis of clotted human plasma. Depending on their concentration, the inhibitors shortened, prolonged,

  12. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: JAK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, David G; Schairer, David; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2018-03-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway is a conserved master regulator of immunity and myeloproliferation. Advanced understanding of this pathway has led to development of targeted inhibitors of Janus kinases (Jakinibs). As a class, JAK inhibitors effectively treat a multitude of hematologic and inflammatory diseases. Given such success, use of JAK inhibitors for mitigation of atopic dermatitis is under active investigation. Herein, we review the evolving data on the safety and efficacy of JAK inhibitors in treatment of atopic dermatitis. Although it is still early in the study of JAK inhibitors for atopic dermatitis, evidence identifies JAK inhibitors as effective alternatives to conventional therapies. Nonetheless, multiple large safety and efficacy trials are needed before widespread use of JAK inhibitors can be advocated for atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. [Avian influenza and oseltamivir; a retrospective view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2003-01-01

    The outbreak of avian influenza A due to an H7N7 virus in Dutch poultry farms turned out to have public-health effects for those who were involved in the management of the epidemic and who were thus extensively exposed to contaminated excreta and dust. An outbreak-management team (OMT) of experts in

  14. [Naturally occurring oseltamivir resistance in influenza A.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Laura; Nielsen, Alex; Lundgren, Jens

    2010-01-01

    in the development of resistance. The best prevention strategy remains vaccination of the general population to avoid immunity. Future antiviral treatment calls for knowledge about resistance to existing types of influenza and the availability of all three types of antiviral medication. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Aug...

  15. Targeting telomerase with radiolabeled inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorn, Philip A; Jackson, Mark R; Gouverneur, Veronique; Vallis, Katherine A

    2017-01-05

    The expression of telomerase in approximately 85% of cancers and its absence in the majority of normal cells makes it an attractive target for cancer therapy. However the lag period between initiation of telomerase inhibition and growth arrest makes direct inhibition alone an insufficient method of treatment. However, telomerase inhibition has been shown to enhance cancer cell radiosensitivity. To investigate the strategy of simultaneously inhibiting telomerase while delivering targeted radionuclide therapy to cancer cells, 123 I-radiolabeled inhibitors of telomerase were synthesized and their effects on cancer cell survival studied. An 123 I-labeled analogue of the telomerase inhibitor MST-312 inhibited telomerase with an IC 50 of 1.58 μM (MST-312 IC 50 : 0.23 μM). Clonogenic assays showed a dose dependant effect of 123 I-MST-312 on cell survival in a telomerase positive cell line, MDA-MB-435. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  16. Vanadium Compounds as PTP Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Irving

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphotyrosine signaling is regulated by the opposing actions of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs. Here we discuss the potential of vanadium derivatives as PTP enzyme inhibitors and metallotherapeutics. We describe how vanadate in the V oxidized state is thought to inhibit PTPs, thus acting as a pan-inhibitor of this enzyme superfamily. We discuss recent developments in the biological and biochemical actions of more complex vanadium derivatives, including decavanadate and in particular the growing number of oxidovanadium compounds with organic ligands. Pre-clinical studies involving these compounds are discussed in the anti-diabetic and anti-cancer contexts. Although in many cases PTP inhibition has been implicated, it is also clear that many such compounds have further biochemical effects in cells. There also remain concerns surrounding off-target toxicities and long-term use of vanadium compounds in vivo in humans, hindering their progress through clinical trials. Despite these current misgivings, interest in these chemicals continues and many believe they could still have therapeutic potential. If so, we argue that this field would benefit from greater focus on improving the delivery and tissue targeting of vanadium compounds in order to minimize off-target toxicities. This may then harness their full therapeutic potential.

  17. Proteasome inhibitor patents (2010 - present).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Rainer; Scott, Latanya M; Daniel, Kenyon G; Dou, Q Ping

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 3 years, numerous patents and patent applications have been submitted and published involving compounds designed to inhibit the proteasome. Proteasome inhibition has been of great interest in cancer research since disruption of proteolysis leads to a significant buildup of cytotoxic proteins and activation of apoptotic pathways, particularly in rapidly proliferating cells. The current standards in proteasome inhibition are the only FDA-approved inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib. Although these drugs are quite effective in treating multiple myeloma and other blood tumors, there are shortcomings, including toxicities and resistance. Most of the current patents attempt to improve on existing compounds, by increasing bioavailability and selectivity, while attempting to reduce toxicity. A general categorization of similar compounds was employed to evaluate and compare drug design strategies. This review focuses on novel compounds and subsequent analogs developed for proteasome inhibition, used in preventing and treating human cancers. A comprehensive description and categorization of patents related to each type of compound and its derivatives, as well as their uses and efficacies as anticancer agents is included. A review of combination therapy patents has also been included. Although there are many diverse chemical scaffolds being published, there are few patented proteasome inhibitors whose method of inhibition is genuinely novel. Most patents utilize a destructive chemical warhead to attack the catalytic threonine residue of the proteasome active sites. Few patents try to depart from this, emphasizing the need for developing new mechanisms of action and specific targeting.

  18. Proton pump inhibitors and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarne Nesgaard; Johansen, Per Birger; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to provide an update on recent advances in the evidence based on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) as a possible cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. This review focuses, in particular, on new studies published in the last 18 months and a di......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of the review is to provide an update on recent advances in the evidence based on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) as a possible cause of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. This review focuses, in particular, on new studies published in the last 18 months...... and a discussion of these findings and how this has influenced our understanding of this association, the clinical impact and the underlying pathophysiology. RECENT FINDINGS: New studies have further strengthened existing evidence linking use of PPIs to osteoporosis. Short-term use does not appear to pose a lower...... risk than long-term use. There is a continued lack of conclusive studies identifying the pathogenesis. Direct effects on calcium absorption or on osteoblast or osteoclast action cannot at present plausibly explain the mechanism. SUMMARY: The use of PPIs is a risk factor for development of osteoporosis...

  19. Laura: Soybean variety lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebrić Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain of conventional soybean varieties requires heat processing to break down trypsin inhibitor's activity before using as food or animal feed. At the same time, protein denaturation and other qualitative changes occur in soybean grain, especially if the temperature of heating is not controlled. Two types of trypsin inhibitor were found in soybean grain the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk inhibitor. Mature grain of soybean Laura is lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. Grain yield of variety Laura is equal to high yielding varieties from the maturity group I, where it belongs. Lacking of Kunitz-trypsin inhibitor makes soybean grain suitable for direct feeding in adult non ruminant animals without previous thermal processing. Grain of variety Laura can be processed for a shorter period of time than conventional soybeans. This way we save energy, and preserve valuable nutritional composition of soybean grain, which is of interest in industrial processing.

  20. Sialyltransferase and Neuraminidase Levels/Ratios and Sialic Acid Levels in Peripheral Blood B Cells Correlate with Measures of Disease Activity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieh-Bang Liou

    Full Text Available We attempted to determine whether the level of enzymes sialyltransferase (ST and neuraminidase (Neu and sialic acid (SIA in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE correlates with the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA correlates with the Disease Activity Score28 (DAS28.We examined cell-surface levels of ST6Gal-1, Neu1, ST3Gal-1, Neu3, α-2,6-SIA, and α-2,3-SIA by using fluorescent anti-enzyme antibodies, fluorescent-conjugated Sambucus nigra lectin, and fluorescent-conjugated Maackia amurensis lectin on blood cells in SLE and RA patients and assessed correlations of these levels with SLEDAI and with DAS28. Areas under the curve (AUC were calculated for different variables against SLEDAI.The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio positively correlated with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.409 and P = 0.002, statistically significant after Bonferroni' correction for multiple analyses.. It was supported by the inverse correlation of B-cell Neu3 levels with SLEDAI scores (ρ = -0.264, P = 0.048. The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio against SLEDAI yielded an AUC of 0.689, which was comparable to that of anti-dsDNA levels at 0.635. In contrast, both ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels of RA B cells (r = 0.376, P = 0.013; r = 0.425, P = 0.005, respectively correlated positively with high disease-activity DAS28 scores.B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratios in SLE and B-cell ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels in RA with high disease-activity DAS28 scores correlated with disease activity measures and may be useful in monitoring disease activities.

  1. Improvement of influenza vaccine strain A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1) growth with the neuraminidase packaging sequence from A/Puerto Rico/8/34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weiqi; Dong, Zhenyuan; Meng, Weixu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ting; Li, Chufang; Zhang, Beiwu; Chen, Ling

    2012-02-01

    H5N1 influenza candidate vaccine viruses were developed using the "6+2" approach. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes were derived from the popular H5N1 virus and the remaining six internal segments were derived from the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 strain (H1N1, PR8). However, some of these candidate strains have been reported to produce relatively low yields in vaccine manufacture. In this study, we found that the NA vRNA of the A/Vietnam/1194/2004 strain (H5N1, VN1194) was poorly packaged into recombinant viruses with a backbone of PR8 genes, which resulted in the formation of defective virions that did not include the NA vRNA in the genome. Using recombinant DNA techniques, we constructed a chimeric NA gene with the coding region of VN1194 NA flanked by the packaging signal sequence of the PR8 NA gene (41 bp form the 3' end of the vRNA and 67 bp from the 5' end). The packaging of the NA vRNA was restored to normal levels in the recombinant viruses containing the chimeric NA gene. Recombinant viruses containing the chimeric NA replicated much better in chicken embryonated eggs than viruses with the wild-type NA from VN1194. These findings suggest a novel strategy to improve in ovo growth of vaccine strains and to increase the number of vaccine doses available to save people if a pandemic were to occur.

  2. SYBR green-based real-time reverse transcription-PCR for typing and subtyping of all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of avian influenza viruses and comparison to standard serological subtyping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, K.; Javier, P.C.; Shishido, M.; Noguchi, D.; Pearce, J.; Kang, H.-M.; Jeong, O.M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Nakanishi, K.; Ashizawa, T.

    2012-01-01

    Continuing outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV) infections of wild birds and poultry worldwide emphasize the need for global surveillance of wild birds. To support the future surveillance activities, we developed a SYBR green-based, real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) for detecting nucleoprotein (NP) genes and subtyping 16 hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 neuraminidase (NA) genes simultaneously. Primers were improved by focusing on Eurasian or North American lineage genes; the number of mixed-base positions per primer was set to five or fewer, and the concentration of each primer set was optimized empirically. Also, 30 cycles of amplification of 1:10 dilutions of cDNAs from cultured viruses effectively reduced minor cross- or nonspecific reactions. Under these conditions, 346 HA and 345 NA genes of 349 AIVs were detected, with average sensitivities of NP, HA, and NA genes of 10 1.5, 10 2.3, and 10 3.1 50% egg infective doses, respectively. Utility of rRT-PCR for subtyping AIVs was compared with that of current standard serological tests by using 104 recent migratory duck virus isolates. As a result, all HA genes and 99% of the NA genes were genetically subtyped, while only 45% of HA genes and 74% of NA genes were serologically subtyped. Additionally, direct subtyping of AIVs in fecal samples was possible by 40 cycles of amplification: approximately 70% of HA and NA genes of NP gene-positive samples were successfully subtyped. This validation study indicates that rRT-PCR with optimized primers and reaction conditions is a powerful tool for subtyping varied AIVs in clinical and cultured samples. Copyright ?? 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. An inhibitor of phospholipase D in saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Rex M. C.; Hemington, Norma

    1974-01-01

    1. Bovine, dog and human saliva contain substances which inhibit the soluble phospholipase D present in grass leaf or celery stalk. 2. The inhibitor in bovine saliva is of high molecular weight and exhibits considerable stability to heat, acids and alkalis. 3. The inhibitor has been purified free from salivary mucoprotein. 4. It is suggested that the inhibitor could protect the upper alimentary tract of a herbage-eating animal from the necrotic action of phospholipase D. PMID:4376946

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew A; Chabner, Bruce A

    2009-11-10

    Epigenetic processes are implicated in cancer causation and progression. The acetylation status of histones regulates access of transcription factors to DNA and influences levels of gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity diminishes acetylation of histones, causing compaction of the DNA/histone complex. This compaction blocks gene transcription and inhibits differentiation, providing a rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors. In this review, we explore the biology of the HDAC enzymes, summarize the pharmacologic properties of HDAC inhibitors, and examine results of selected clinical trials. We consider the potential of these inhibitors in combination therapy with targeted drugs and with cytotoxic chemotherapy. HDAC inhibitors promote growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis of tumor cells, with minimal effects on normal tissue. In addition to decompaction of the histone/DNA complex, HDAC inhibition also affects acetylation status and function of nonhistone proteins. HDAC inhibitors have demonstrated antitumor activity in clinical trials, and one drug of this class, vorinostat, is US Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Other inhibitors in advanced stages of clinical development, including depsipeptide and MGCD0103, differ from vorinostat in structure and isoenzyme specificity, and have shown activity against lymphoma, leukemia, and solid tumors. Promising preclinical activity in combination with cytotoxics, inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, and inhibitors of proteasome function have led to combination therapy trials. HDAC inhibitors are an important emerging therapy with single-agent activity against multiple cancers, and have significant potential in combination use.

  5. [Development of new antiatherosclerotic agents--ACAT inhibitors and CETP inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, A; Horiuchi, S

    1999-12-01

    Development of new antiatherosclerotic agents were reviewed focusing on ACAT inhibitors and CETP inhibitors. ACAT inhibitors enhance intracellular degradation of VLDL in hepatocytes. Cholesterol absorption in small intestine is inhibited by ACAT inhibitors. Thus, ACAT inhibitors reduce plasma cholesterol levels. In atherosclerotic lesions, ACAT inhibitors suppress foam cell formation (cholesteryl ester accumulation) in macrophages. Since ACAT inhibitors have multiple anti-atherogenic effects, they are considered future drugs controlling hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. CETP inhibitors are expected to increase HDL and decrease LDL. Although the patients with CETP deficiency show high level of HDL, recent studies showed that they are not necessarily resistant to atherosclerosis. The strategy to inhibit CETP for suppressing atherosclerosis has not been established.

  6. Development of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Shigehisa

    2017-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are the most striking innovation in the clinical development of immunotherapy. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) restore and augment the antitumor immune activities of cytotoxic T cells by mainly blocking immune checkpoint molecules on T cells or their ligands on antigen-presenting and tumor cells. Based on preclinical data, many clinical trials have demonstrated the acceptable safety profiles and efficacies of mAb in various cancers. The A first-in-class approved immune checkpoint inhibitor is ipilimumab, which is a fully humanized mAb that blocks the immunosuppressive signal by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of ipilimumab for the treatment of advanced metastatic melanoma. Then, nivolumab, which is a humanized mAb that blocks programmed death-1 (PD-1), was approved for use in the treatment of advanced melanoma in 2014 and of advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in 2015 in Japan. Pembrolizumab, which is another anti-PD-1 antibody, was approved for use in the treatment of advanced melanoma and advanced NSCLC as the first-line therapy in 2016 in Japan. Thereafter, nivolumab was also approved for use in the treatment of advanced renal cell cancer in August 2016, of Hodgkin's lymphoma in December 2016, and of head and neck cancer in March 2017 in Japan. Moreover, phase III trials of anti-PD-1 mAb and anti-PD-ligand 1 mAb for use in the treatment of cancers, such as gastric, ovarian, bladder, and esophageal cancers, are ongoing. Several clinical trials have investigated new agents, alone and in combination, for use in the treatment of various cancers. Current advances in tumor immunology have unveiled the importance of immunosuppressive cells, such as regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages, especially in a tumor microenvironment (TME). Some data from basic research in mouse models and the immunomonitoring of cancer patients

  7. Calcineurin inhibitor minimisation versus continuation of calcineurin inhibitor treatment for liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Wettergren, Andre; Chan, An-Wen

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic success of liver transplantation has been largely attributable to the development of effective immunosuppressive treatment regimens. In particular, calcineurin inhibitors were essential in reducing acute rejection and improving early survival. Currently, more than 90% of all liver...... transplant recipients are treated with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine or tacrolimus. Unfortunately, calcineurin inhibitors cause adverse events, such as nephrotoxicity, and because of this, minimisation (reduction and withdrawal) regimens of calcineurin inhibitor have been developed and studied...

  8. Integrin Inhibitors in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maylein C. Juan-Rivera

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the third highest cause of cancer-related deaths in men in the U.S. The development of chemotherapeutic agents that can bind PCa tumor cells with high specificity is critical in order to increase treatment effectiveness. Integrin receptors and their corresponding ligands have different expression patterns in PCa cells. They have been identified as promising targets to inhibit pathways involved in PCa progression. Currently, several compounds have proven to target specific integrins and their subunits in PCa cells. In this article, we review the role of integrins inhibitors in PCa and their potential as therapeutic targets for PCa treatments. We have discussed the following: natural compounds, monoclonal antibodies, statins, campothecins analog, aptamers, d-aminoacid, and snake venom. Recent studies have shown that their mechanisms of action result in decrease cell migration, cell invasion, cell proliferation, and metastasis of PCa cells.

  9. Protein C inhibitor (plasminogen activator inhibitor-3) and the risk of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, JCM; Marquart, JA; Bertina, RM; Rosendaal, FR; Bouma, Bonno N.

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI), also known as plasminogen activator inhibitor-3, is a serine proteinase inhibitor that can inhibit enzymes in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and fertility. The role of PCI in regulating the blood coagulation mechanism is not known, as it can inhibit both procoagulant

  10. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  11. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  12. [Interaction between clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsze, A.M.; Boer, A. de; Boot, H.; Deneer, V.H.; Heringa, M.; Mol, P.G.; Schalekamp, T.; Verduijn, M.M.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Comte, M. le

    2011-01-01

    The drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel has been the subject of much study in recent years. Contradictory results regarding the effect of proton pump inhibitors on platelet reactivity and on clinical outcome in clopidogrel-treated patients have been reported in

  13. Potential physiological role of plant glycosidase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellincampi, D.; Carmadella, L.; Delcour, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes including glycosidases, transglycosidases, glycosyltransferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases are responsible for the enzymatic processing of carbohydrates in plants. A number of carbohydrate-active enzymes are produced by microbial pathogens...... and insects responsible of severe crop losses. Plants have evolved proteinaceous inhibitors to modulate the activity of several of these enzymes. The continuing discovery of new inhibitors indicates that this research area is still unexplored and may lead to new exciting developments. To date, the role...... of the inhibitors is not completely understood. Here we review recent results obtained on the best characterised inhibitors, pointing to their possible biological role in vivo. Results recently obtained with plant transformation technology indicate that this class of inhibitors has potential biotechnological...

  14. Virological surveillance and antiviral resistance of human influenza virus in Argentina, 2005-2008 Vigilancia virológica y resistencia a los antivíricos del virus de la gripe humana en la Argentina, 2005-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pontoriero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the virological characteristics of the influenza strains circulating in Argentina in 2005-2008 and to assess the prevalence of antiviral resistance. METHODS: On the basis of their geographical spread and prevalence, influenza A and B isolates grown in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells were selected after antigenic and genomic characterization to be analyzed for antiviral resistance by enzymatic assay and pyrosequencing. Amantadine susceptibility was evaluated by pyrosequencing for known resistance markers on 45 strains of influenza A. Susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir was evaluated by enzymatic assay of 67 influenza A and 46 influenza B strains, some of which were further analyzed by sequencing the neuraminidase gene. RESULTS: Resistance to amantadine was observed only on A(H3N2 strains (29/33; all of them carried the mutation S31N in their M2 sequence. Oseltamivir resistance was observed in 12 (34.3% of the 35 A(H1N1 strains from 2008; all of them carried the mutation H275Y in their neuraminidase sequence. All these viruses remained sensitive to zanamivir. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes a high incidence of amantadine-resistant influenza A(H3N2 viruses since 2006 and an unprecedented increase in oseltamivir resistance detected only in influenza A(H1N1 viruses isolated in 2008. Influenza A and B viruses were more sensitive to oseltamivir than to zanamivir, and influenza A viruses were more sensitive to both neuraminidase inhibitors than the influenza B viruses. The national data generated and analyzed in this study may help increase knowledge about influenza antiviral drug resistance, which is a problem of global concern.OBJETIVO: Describir las características virológicas de las cepas de virus de la gripe que circulaban en la Argentina entre el 2005 y el 2008, y evaluar la prevalencia de la resistencia a los antivíricos. MÉTODOS: Según su diseminación geográfica y su prevalencia, se seleccionaron aislados

  15. AZT as a telomerase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Gomez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase is a highly specialized reverse transcriptase and the maintenance of telomeric length is determined by this specific enzyme. The human holoenzyme telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein composed by a catalytic subunit, hTERT, an RNA component, hTR, and a group of associated proteins. Telomerase is normally expressed in embryonic cells and is repressed during adulthood. The enzyme is reexpressed in around 85% of solid tumors. This observation makes it a potential target for developing drugs that could be developed for therapeutic purposes. The identification of the hTERT as a functional catalytic reverse transcriptase prompted studies of inhibiting telomerase with the HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor azidothymidine (AZT. Previously, we have demonstrated that AZT binds preferentially to telomeres, inhibits telomerase and enhances tumor cell senescence and apoptosis after AZT treatment in breast mammary adenocarcinoma cells. Since then, several studies have considered AZT for telomerase inhibition and have led to potential clinical strategies for anticancer therapy. This review covers present thinking of the inhibition of telomerase by AZT and future treatment protocols using the drug.

  16. ALK inhibitors, a pharmaceutical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo eGalvani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, the ALK tyrosine kinase, already known to be translocated and activated in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, and a few other rare cancers, was described as a potential therapeutic target for a subset of non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Clinical proof of concept, culminating in the recent approval by the FDA of the Pfizer drug Xalkori (crizotinib, formerly known as PF-02341066 followed in record time. The drug was approved together with a companion diagnostic, the Vysis ALK Break Apart FISH Probe Kit (Abbott Molecular, Inc. for detection of eligible patients. This remarkable example of the coming of age of personalized medicine in cancer therapy is hopefully only an auspice of things to come in this rapidly developing field. Perhaps unsurprisingly, however, the appearance of clinical acquired resistance to crizotinib has already been observed early on in clinical testing, with the identification of several ALK secondary point mutations which diminish drug efficacy, and which open the way for development of second-generation inhibitors. It is also emerging that acquired resistance to crizotinib may also occur through ALK-independent mechanisms, which still need to be elucidated in detail.

  17. Novel Toxoplasma gondii inhibitor chemotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, A G; Schulze, T T; Potluri, L P; Hemsley, R M; Larson, J J; Judge, A K; Zach, S J; Wang, X; Charman, S A; Vennerstrom, J L; Davis, P H

    2018-04-01

    We profiled three novel T. gondii inhibitors identified from an antimalarial phenotypic high throughput screen (HTS) campaign: styryl 4-oxo-1,3-benzoxazin-4-one KG3, tetrahydrobenzo[b]pyran KG7, and benzoquinone hydrazone KG8. These compounds inhibit T. gondii in vitro with IC 50 values ranging from 0.3 to 2μM, comparable to that of 0.25 to 1.5μM for the control drug pyrimethamine. KG3 had no measurable cytotoxicity against five mammalian cell lines, whereas KG7 and KG8 inhibited the growth of 2 of 5 cell lines with KG8 being the least selective for T. gondii. None of the compounds were mutagenic in an Ames assay. Experimental gLogD 7.4 and calculated PSA values for the three compounds were well within the ranges predicted to be favorable for good ADME, even though each compound had relatively low aqueous solubility. All three compounds were metabolically unstable, especially KG3 and KG7. Multiple IP doses of 5mg/kg KG7 and KG8 increased survival in a T. gondii mouse model. Despite their liabilities, we suggest that these compounds are useful starting points for chemical prospecting, scaffold-hopping, and optimization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Vascular calcification: Inducers and inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Donghyun, E-mail: dhlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} Types of vascular calcification processes. {center_dot} Inducers of vascular calcification. {center_dot} Inhibitors of vascular calcifications. {center_dot} Clinical utility for vascular calcification therapy. {center_dot} Implications for the development of new tissue engineering strategies. - Abstract: Unlike the traditional beliefs, there are mounting evidences suggesting that ectopic mineral depositions, including vascular calcification are mostly active processes, many times resembling that of the bone mineralization. Numbers of agents are involved in the differentiation of certain subpopulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into the osteoblast-like entity, and the activation and initiation of extracellular matrix ossification process. On the other hand, there are factors as well, that prevent such differentiation and ectopic calcium phosphate formation. In normal physiological environments, activities of such procalcific and anticalcific regulatory factors are in harmony, prohibiting abnormal calcification from occurring. However, in certain pathophysiological conditions, such as atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetes, such balances are altered, resulting in abnormal ectopic mineral deposition. Understanding the factors that regulate the formation and inhibition of ectopic mineral formation would be beneficial in the development of tissue engineering strategies for prevention and/or treatment of such soft-tissue calcification. Current review focuses on the factors that seem to be clinically relevant and/or could be useful in developing future tissue regeneration strategies. Clinical utilities and implications of such factors are also discussed.

  19. Development of green vapour corrosion inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmara, Y. P.; Suraj, V.; Siregar, J. P.; Kurniawan, T.; Bachtiar, D.; Mohamed, N. M. Z. N.

    2017-10-01

    Corrosion control using inhibitor is an effective method to protect carbon steel from corrosion. Due to environmental toxicity of chemical inorganic corrosion inhibitors (synthetic), green inhibitors are potentially to develop. In atmospheric conditions, green vapour corrosion inhibitors are the best solutions to replace the uses of inorganic corrosion inhibitors. This research used chemical acid extraction from the key lime (citrus aurantiifolia) leaves and seeds. They are used as the main ingredients to produce this effective green corrosion inhibitor. The experiments investigated effects of corrosion inhibition on corrosion rate of low carbon steel in 3% NaCl solution using both fog salt chamber and electrochemical cell. Using salt fog chamber to represent atmospheric conditions, and corrosion rates are evaluated visually and calculated using weight loss methods. Corrosion rate on electrochemical cell were calculated using linear polarization resistance (LPR) methods. All of the experiments were set in natural conditions at pH 7. Using weight loss for three days exposure time, the efficiency of the inhibitor reached 82.39%.

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Eckschlager

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis cannot be explained only by genetic alterations, but also involves epigenetic processes. Modification of histones by acetylation plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and is controlled by the balance between histone deacetylases (HDAC and histone acetyltransferases (HAT. HDAC inhibitors induce cancer cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death, reduce angiogenesis and modulate immune response. Mechanisms of anticancer effects of HDAC inhibitors are not uniform; they may be different and depend on the cancer type, HDAC inhibitors, doses, etc. HDAC inhibitors seem to be promising anti-cancer drugs particularly in the combination with other anti-cancer drugs and/or radiotherapy. HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, romidepsin and belinostat have been approved for some T-cell lymphoma and panobinostat for multiple myeloma. Other HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials for the treatment of hematological and solid malignancies. The results of such studies are promising but further larger studies are needed. Because of the reversibility of epigenetic changes during cancer development, the potency of epigenetic therapies seems to be of great importance. Here, we summarize the data on different classes of HDAC inhibitors, mechanisms of their actions and discuss novel results of preclinical and clinical studies, including the combination with other therapeutic modalities.

  1. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckschlager, Tomas; Plch, Johana; Stiborova, Marie; Hrabeta, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Carcinogenesis cannot be explained only by genetic alterations, but also involves epigenetic processes. Modification of histones by acetylation plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and is controlled by the balance between histone deacetylases (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferases (HAT). HDAC inhibitors induce cancer cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death, reduce angiogenesis and modulate immune response. Mechanisms of anticancer effects of HDAC inhibitors are not uniform; they may be different and depend on the cancer type, HDAC inhibitors, doses, etc. HDAC inhibitors seem to be promising anti-cancer drugs particularly in the combination with other anti-cancer drugs and/or radiotherapy. HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, romidepsin and belinostat have been approved for some T-cell lymphoma and panobinostat for multiple myeloma. Other HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials for the treatment of hematological and solid malignancies. The results of such studies are promising but further larger studies are needed. Because of the reversibility of epigenetic changes during cancer development, the potency of epigenetic therapies seems to be of great importance. Here, we summarize the data on different classes of HDAC inhibitors, mechanisms of their actions and discuss novel results of preclinical and clinical studies, including the combination with other therapeutic modalities.

  2. An Updated Review of Tyrosinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Sheng Chang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase is a multifunctional, glycosylated, and copper-containing oxidase, which catalyzes the first two steps in mammalian melanogenesis and is responsible for enzymatic browning reactions in damaged fruits during post-harvest handling and processing. Neither hyperpigmentation in human skin nor enzymatic browning in fruits are desirable. These phenomena have encouraged researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods and cosmetics. This article surveys tyrosinase inhibitors newly discovered from natural and synthetic sources. The inhibitory strength is compared with that of a standard inhibitor, kojic acid, and their inhibitory mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Contemporary protease inhibitors and cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the evidence linking use of HIV protease inhibitors with excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in HIV+ populations. RECENT FINDINGS: For the two contemporary most frequently used protease inhibitors, darunavir and atazanavir [both pharmacologically boosted...... with ritonavir (/r)], darunavir/r has been shown to be associated with increased CVD risk. The effect is cumulative with longer exposure increasing risk and an effect size comparable to what has been observed for previously developed protease inhibitors. Biological mechanisms may be overlapping and include...... on individualization of care based on underlying risk of CVD....

  4. Calcineurin inhibitors in heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Anne

    2004-05-01

    The use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs; cyclosporine and tacrolimus) has dramatically increased medium-term life expectancy after heart transplantation but has had only limited impact on long-term outcomes for heart transplant recipients. The original oil-based formulation of cyclosporine has been superceded by a microemulsion formulation (Neoral), which has more predictable pharmacokinetics and allows more precise dose-tailoring. Cyclosporine microemulsion and tacrolimus (Prograf) have a similar efficacy in the prevention of acute rejection of heart transplants, but their use is accompanied by nephrotoxicity and by cardiovascular side effects. The efficacy of immunosuppression can be improved by adjunctive therapy, such as azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF; Cellcept), corticosteroids, and induction therapy. One of the most important predictors of patient mortality at >5 years after heart transplantation is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV)/late graft failure, which accounts for 31% of deaths. Neither cyclosporine nor tacrolimus have been shown to prevent the development of CAV. In terms of efficacy, MMF provides a modest advantage over azathioprine in preventing CAV, and the combination of cyclosporine plus MMF results in significantly lower mortality than cyclosporine plus azathioprine. Overall, CNIs have multiple cardiovascular side effects, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia and new-onset diabetes after transplantation, although cyclosporine and tacrolimus have somewhat different cardiovascular side-effect profiles. The challenge in choosing the best immunosuppressive regimen is to balance efficacy and safety to optimize graft and patient survival over the course of many decades. Because cyclosporine and tacrolimus have similar efficacy against acute rejection the choice of CNI for heart transplant recipients should be based on the relative risk of cardiovascular and renal side effects.

  5. Predicting the Performance of Organic Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Winkler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The withdrawal of effective but toxic corrosion inhibitors has provided an impetus for the discovery of new, benign organic compounds to fill that role. Concurrently, developments in the high-throughput synthesis of organic compounds, the establishment of large libraries of available chemicals, accelerated corrosion inhibition testing technologies, and the increased capability of machine learning methods have made discovery of new corrosion inhibitors much faster and cheaper than it used to be. We summarize these technical developments in the corrosion inhibition field and describe how data-driven machine learning methods can generate models linking molecular properties to corrosion inhibition that can be used to predict the performance of materials not yet synthesized or tested. We briefly summarize the literature on quantitative structure–property relationships models of small organic molecule corrosion inhibitors. The success of these models provides a paradigm for rapid discovery of novel, effective corrosion inhibitors for a range of metals and alloys in diverse environments.

  6. Kinase inhibitors for advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schlumberger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent availability of molecular targeted therapies leads to a reconsideration of the treatment strategy for patients with distant metastases from medullary thyroid carcinoma. In patients with progressive disease, treatment with kinase inhibitors should be offered.

  7. Electrochemical Behaviour of Environmentally Friendly Inhibitor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrochemical Behaviour of Environmentally Friendly Inhibitor of Aloe Secundiflora Extract in Corrosion Control of Carbon Steel in Soft Water Media. ... corrosion control in neutral and aerated soft water solutions have been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Tafel polarization techniques.

  8. Inhibitors of Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Meet Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Pohanka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE. Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system.

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Urea Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkman, Alan S.; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Anderson, Marc O.; Li, Fei; Li, Min; Lei, Tianluo; Ren, Huiwen; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-01-01

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, which include isoforms of UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta endothelia and erythrocytes, facilitate urinary concentrating function. Inhibitors of urea transporter function have potential clinical applications as sodium-sparing diuretics, or ‘urearetics,’ in edema from different etiologies, such as congestive heart failure and cirrhosis, as well as in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). High-throughput screening of drug-like small molecules has identified UT-A and UT-B inhibitors with nanomolar potency. Inhibitors have been identified with different UT-A versus UT-B selectivity profiles and putative binding sites on UT proteins. Studies in rodent models support the utility of UT inhibitors in reducing urinary concentration, though testing in clinically relevant animal models of edema has not yet been done. PMID:25298345

  10. The effect of chemical anti-inhibitors on fibrinolytic enzymes and inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Jespersen, J; Kluft, C

    1997-01-01

    proteases. We studied the influence of chemical anti-inhibitors (chloramine T, flufenamate, sodium lauryl sulfate, and methylamine) on fibrinolytic serine proteases and fibrinolytic enzyme inhibitors using the physiological substrate fibrin as plasmin substrate. Low concentrations of chloramine T (0.01 mmol....../l) prevent the inhibition of plasminogen activators. Higher concentrations (1 mmol/l) reduce the inhibition of plasmin, but simultaneously quench the plasminogen activator activity. Flufenamate eliminates most fibrinolytic enzyme inhibitors, but increases the activity of plasmin (apparent recovery 140......Fibrinolytic enzyme inhibitors hamper the determination of the specific fibrinolytic serine protease activity. Reportedly, chemical anti-inhibitors eliminate the influence of fibrinolytic inhibitors, but it remains unclear to what extent they change the specific activity of fibrinolytic serine...

  11. Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezsi, Livia; Vecsei, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with a prevalence increasing with age. Oxidative stress and glutamate toxicity are involved in its pathomechanism. There are still many unmet needs of PD patients, including the alleviation of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, and the development of therapies with neuroprotective potential. To give an overview of the pharmacological properties, the efficacy and safety of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors in the treatment of PD, with special focus on the results of randomized clinical trials. A literature search was conducted in PubMed for 'PD treatment', 'MAO-B inhibitors', 'selegiline', 'rasagiline', 'safinamide' and 'clinical trials' with 'MAO-B inhibitors' in 'Parkinson' disease'. MAO-B inhibitors have a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, improve the dopamine deficient state and may have neuroprotective properties. Safinamide exhibits an anti-glutamatergic effect as well. When applied as monotherapy, MAO-B inhibitors provide a modest, but significant improvement of motor function and delay the need for levodopa. Rasagiline and safinamide were proven safe and effective when added to a dopamine agonist in early PD. As add-on to levodopa, MAO-B inhibitors significantly reduced off-time and were comparable in efficacy to COMT inhibitors. Improvements were achieved as regards certain non-motor symptoms as well. Due to the efficacy shown in clinical trials and their favorable side-effect profile, MAO-B inhibitors are valuable drugs in the treatment of PD. They are recommended as monotherapy in the early stages of the disease and as add-on therapy to levodopa in advanced PD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Update on TNF Inhibitors in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data describe new potential indications for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in dermatology, including pediatric psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa. New biosimilar TNF agents are in late stages of development and may be available in the United States in the near future. Biosimilar agents are similar but not identical to available TNF inhibitors, and approval requires extensive analytic, toxicity, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and clinical testing. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S104-S106. 2016 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  13. Emerging Corrosion Inhibitors for Interfacial Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Taghavikish

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is a deterioration of a metal due to reaction with environment. The use of corrosion inhibitors is one of the most effective ways of protecting metal surfaces against corrosion. Their effectiveness is related to the chemical composition, their molecular structures and affinities for adsorption on the metal surface. This review focuses on the potential of ionic liquid, polyionic liquid (PIL and graphene as promising corrosion inhibitors in emerging coatings due to their remarkable properties and various embedment or fabrication strategies. The review begins with a precise description of the synthesis, characterization and structure-property-performance relationship of such inhibitors for anti-corrosion coatings. It establishes a platform for the formation of new generation of PIL based coatings and shows that PIL corrosion inhibitors with various heteroatoms in different form can be employed for corrosion protection with higher barrier properties and protection of metal surface. However, such study is still in its infancy and there is significant scope to further develop new structures of PIL based corrosion inhibitors and coatings and study their behaviour in protection of metals. Besides, it is identified that the combination of ionic liquid, PIL and graphene could possibly contribute to the development of the ultimate corrosion inhibitor based coating.

  14. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Słopień

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia, pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs. A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body’s oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis.

  15. Influenza in the acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Cassandra D; Farr, Barry M; Hall, Keri K; Hayden, Frederick G

    2002-03-01

    Influenza poses special hazards inside healthcare facilities and can cause explosive outbreaks of illness. Healthcare workers are at risk of acquiring influenza and thus serve as an important reservoir for patients under their care. Annual influenza immunisation of high-risk persons and their contacts, including healthcare workers, is the primary means of preventing nosocomial influenza. Despite influenza vaccine effectiveness, it is substantially underused by healthcare providers. Influenza can be diagnosed by culturing the virus from respiratory secretions and by rapid antigen detection kits; recognition of a nosocomial outbreak is important in order to employ infection-control efforts. Optimal control of influenza in the acute-care setting should focus upon reducing potential influenza reservoirs in the hospital, including: isolating patients with suspected or documented influenza, sending home healthcare providers or staff who exhibit typical symptoms of influenza, and discouraging persons with febrile respiratory illness from visiting the hospital during a known influenza outbreak in the community. (Note: influenza and other respiratory viruses can cause non-febrile illness but are still transmissible.) The antiviral M2 protein inhibitors (amantadine, rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (zanamivir, oseltamivir) have proven efficacy in treating and preventing influenza illness; however, their role in the prevention and control of influenza in the acute hospital setting remains to be more fully studied.

  16. Tuning of influenza A virus neuraminidase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, Meiling

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are zoonotic pathogens that constantly circulate in a wide variety of species, including birds, pigs and humans. In humans, IAVs cause seasonal epidemics and occasional influenza pandemics. Annual epidemics caused by seasonal IAVs usually lead to millions of human

  17. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung-Eun [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Soon [Department of Microbiological Engineering, Kon-Kuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, 143–701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul, E-mail: parkic@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung, E-mail: jklee@kirams.re.kr [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  18. Small molecule HIV entry inhibitors: Part II. Attachment and fusion inhibitors: 2004-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inder Pal; Chauthe, Siddheshwar Kisan

    2011-03-01

    The first US FDA approved HIV entry inhibitor drug Enfuvirdine belongs to the fusion inhibitor category. Earlier efforts in this area were focused on peptides and monoclonal antibodies; recently, the focus has shifted towards the development of small molecule HIV attachment and fusion inhibitors. They can be used for prophylactic purposes and also hold potential for the development of HIV microbicides. In a previous paper ('Small molecule HIV entry inhibitors: Part I'), we reviewed patents and patent applications for small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists from major pharmaceutical companies. In this paper, the development of small molecule HIV attachment and fusion inhibitors is discussed in detail. It covers patents and patent applications for small molecule HIV attachment and fusion inhibitors published between 2004 and 2010 and related literature with a focus on recent developments based on lead generation and lead modification. To augment the potency of currently available antiretroviral drug combinations and to fight drug-resistant virus variants, more effective drugs which target additional steps in the viral replication cycle are urgently needed. HIV attachment and fusion processes are such targets. Inhibitors of these targets will provide additional options for the treatment of HIV drug-resistant strains. Small molecule HIV attachment inhibitors such as BMS-378806 and analogs from Bristol Myers Squibb, N-aryl piperidine derivatives from Propharmacon, and NBD-556 and NBD-557 from New York Blood Center may have potential as vaginal microbicidal agents and can be an economical alternative to monoclonal antibodies.

  19. Polyphenol oxidase inhibitor(s) from German cockroach (Blattella germanica) extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extract from German cockroach appears effective in inhibiting browning on apples and potatoes. Successful identification of inhibitor(s) of PPO from German cockroach would be useful to the fruit and vegetable segments of the food industry, due to the losses they incur from enzymatic browning. Ide...

  20. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  1. Janus kinase inhibitors: jackpot or potluck?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran Keechilat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The reports of a unique mutation in the Janus kinase-2 gene (JAK2 in polycythemia vera by several independent groups in 2005 quickly spurred the development of the Janus kinase inhibitors. In one of the great victories of translational research in recent times, the first smallmolecule Janus kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib entered a phase I trial in 2007. With the approval of ruxolitinib by the US Federal Drug Administration in November 2011 for high-risk and intermediate-2 risk myelofibrosis, a change in paradigm has occurred in the management of a subset of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN: primary myelofibrosis, post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis, and post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis. Whereas the current evidence for ruxolitinib only covers high-risk and intermediate-2 risk myelofibrosis, inhibitors with greater potency are likely to offer better disease control and survival advantage in patients belonging to these categories, and possibly to the low-risk and intermediate-1 risk categories of MPN as well. But use of the Janus kinase inhibitors also probably has certain disadvantages, such as toxicity, resistance, withdrawal phenomenon, non-reversal of histology, and an implausible goal of disease clone eradication, some of which could offset the gains. In spite of this, Janus kinase inhibitors are here to stay, and for use in more than just myeloproliferative neoplasms.

  2. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonkyung Park

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial proteins (peptides are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides. Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins. Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  3. [Interaction between clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsze, Ankie M; de Boer, Anthonius; Boot, Henk; Deneer, Vera H M; Heringa, Mette; Mol, Peter G M; Schalekamp, Tom; Verduijn, Monique M; Verheugt, Freek W A; le Comte, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    The drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel has been the subject of much study in recent years. Contradictory results regarding the effect of proton pump inhibitors on platelet reactivity and on clinical outcome in clopidogrel-treated patients have been reported in literature. Concomitant use of omeprazole and clopidogrel was found to decrease the exposure (AUC) to clopidogrel's active metabolite by 50% and to sharply increase platelet reactivity, as a result of inhibition by omeprazole of CYP2C19, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme. Pantoprazole has a much weaker effect on clopidogrel's pharmacokinetics and on platelet reactivity during concomitant use. The influence of the other proton pump inhibitors when used simultaneously with clopidogrel has not yet been investigated in adequately randomized studies. Regulatory agencies state that the combination of clopidogrel and the CYP2C19 inhibitors omeprazole and esomeprazole should be avoided. To date, there is no conclusive evidence of a clinically-relevant interaction between any of the proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel.

  4. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly......, the disulfide bridge was replaced with amide bonds of various lengths. The novel peptides did not retain their inhibitory activity, but formed the basis for another strategy. Second, bicyclic peptides were obtained by creating head-to-tail cyclized peptides that were made bicyclic by the addition of a covalent...... bond across the ring. The second bridge was made by a disulfide bridge, amide bond formation or via ring-closing metathesis. A, with upain-2 equipotent, bicyclic inhibitor was obtained and its binding to uPA was studied by ITC, NMR and X-ray. The knowledge of how selective inhibitors bind uPA has been...

  5. Human tyrosinase inhibitor in rum distillate wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kensaku; Iwasaki, Hironori; Ujihara, Kunihiro; Wada, Koji

    2008-01-01

    An inhibitor of human tyrosinase activity in rum distillate wastewater was isolated and identified as (S)-(+)-imperanene (1). (S)-(+)-Imperanene significantly inhibited tyrosinase isolated from HMV-II cells (IC(50) 1.85 mM). Inhibition kinetics studies revealed that imperanene is a competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase when L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine is used as the substrate. The inhibitory activities of 1, O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl imperanene (2) and O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-3-methoxyl imperanene (3) were 1>2>3.

  6. Does plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 drive lymphangiogenesis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyère, Françoise; Melen-Lamalle, Laurence; Blacher, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the function of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) during pathological lymphangiogenesis. PAI-1, the main physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activators is involved in pathological angiogenesis at least by controlling extracellular proteolysis...... by mammary carcinoma cell injection or spontaneously appearing in transgenic mice expressing the polyomavirus middle T antigen (PymT) under the control of a mouse mammary tumor virus long-terminal repeat promoter (MMTV-LTR). We also investigated inflammation-related lymphatic vessel recruitment by using two...... as a potential therapeutic target to counteract pathological lymphangiogenesis....

  7. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang

    2014-01-01

    plasminogen activator (uPA). We used X-ray crystal structure analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, liquid state NMR, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and isothermal titration calorimetry and wild type and engineered variants of murine and human uPA. We demonstrate that Arg6 inserts into the S1 specificity......Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase-type...

  8. 2-Aminobenzimidazoles as potent Aurora kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min; Bui, Minna; Shen, Wang; Baskaran, Subramanian; Allen, Darin A; Elling, Robert A; Flanagan, W Michael; Fung, Amy D; Hanan, Emily J; Harris, Shannon O; Heumann, Stacey A; Hoch, Ute; Ivy, Sheryl N; Jacobs, Jeffrey W; Lam, Stuart; Lee, Heman; McDowell, Robert S; Oslob, Johan D; Purkey, Hans E; Romanowski, Michael J; Silverman, Jeffrey A; Tangonan, Bradley T; Taverna, Pietro; Yang, Wenjin; Yoburn, Josh C; Yu, Chul H; Zimmerman, Kristin M; O'Brien, Tom; Lew, Willard

    2009-09-01

    This Letter describes the discovery and key structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a series of 2-aminobenzimidazoles as potent Aurora kinase inhibitors. 2-Aminobenzimidazole serves as a bioisostere of the biaryl urea residue of SNS-314 (1c), which is a potent Aurora kinase inhibitor and entered clinical testing in patients with solid tumors. Compared to SNS-314, this series of compounds offers better aqueous solubility while retaining comparable in vitro potency in biochemical and cell-based assays; in particular, 6m has also demonstrated a comparable mouse iv PK profile to SNS-314.

  9. Rational design of protein kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarmoluk S. M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern methodological approaches to rational design of low molecular weight compounds with specific activity in relation to predetermined biomolecular targets are considered by example of development of high effective protein kinase inhibitors. The application of new computational methods that allow to significantly improve the quality of computational experiments (in, particular, accuracy of low molecular weight compounds activity prediction without increase of computational and time costs are highlighted. The effectiveness of strategy of rational design is demonstrated by examples of several own investigations devoted to development of new inhibitors that are high effective and selective towards protein kinases CK2, FGFR1 and ASK1.

  10. ViroSpot microneutralization assay for antigenic characterization of human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baalen, Carel A; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Penders, Germaine H W M; van Gent, Brenda; van Beek, Ruud; Koopmans, Marion P G; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2017-01-03

    The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay has been used for the antigenic characterization of influenza viruses for decades. However, the majority of recent seasonal influenza A viruses of the H3N2 subtype has lost the capacity to agglutinate erythrocytes of various species. The hemagglutination (HA) activity of other A(H3N2) strains is generally sensitive to the action of the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir, which indicates that the neuraminidase and not the hemagglutinin is responsible for the HA activity. These findings complicate the antigenic characterization and selection of A(H3N2) vaccine strains, calling for alternative antigenic characterization assays. Here we describe the development and use of the ViroSpot microneutralization (MN) assay as a reliable and robust alternative for the HI assay. Serum neutralization of influenza A(H3N2) reference virus strains and epidemic isolates was determined by automated readout of immunostained cell monolayers, in a format designed to minimize the influence of infectious virus doses on serum neutralization titers. Neutralization of infection was largely independent from rates of viral replication and cell-to-cell transmission, facilitating the comparison of different virus isolates. Other advantages of the ViroSpot MN assay include its relative insensitivity to variation in test dose of infectious virus, automated capture and analyses of residual infection patterns, and compatibility with standardized large scale analyses. Using this assay, a number of epidemic influenza A(H3N2) strains that failed to agglutinate erythrocytes, were readily characterized antigenically. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic characterization of the influenza A pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus isolates from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha A Potdar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Influenza A pandemic H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm virus appeared in India in May 2009 and thereafter outbreaks with considerable morbidity and mortality have been reported from many parts of the country. Continuous monitoring of the genetic makeup of the virus is essential to understand its evolution within the country in relation to global diversification and to track the mutations that may affect the behavior of the virus. METHODS: H1N1pdm viruses were isolated from both recovered and fatal cases representing major cities and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of six concatenated whole genomes and the hemagglutinin (HA gene of seven more isolates from May-September 2009 was performed with reference to 685 whole genomes of global isolates available as of November 24, 2009. Molecular characterization of all the 8 segments was carried out for known pathogenic markers. RESULTS: The first isolate of May 2009 belonged to clade 5. Although clade 7 was the dominant H1N1pdm lineage in India, both clades 6 and 7 were found to be co-circulating. The neuraminidase of all the Indian isolates possessed H275, the marker for sensitivity to the neuraminidase inhibitor Oseltamivir. Some of the mutations in HA are at or in the vicinity of antigenic sites and may therefore be of possible antigenic significance. Among these a D222G mutation in the HA receptor binding domain was found in two of the eight Indian isolates obtained from fatal cases. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the 13 Indian isolates grouped in the globally most widely circulating H1N1pdm clade 7. Further, correlations of the mutations specific to clade 7 Indian isolates to viral fitness and adaptability in the country remains to be understood. The D222G mutation in HA from isolates of fatal cases needs to be studied for pathogenicity.

  12. Synergistic apoptosis induction in leukemic cells by the phosphatase inhibitor salubrinal and proteasome inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes C A Drexler

    Full Text Available Cells adapt to endoplasmic reticulum (ER-stress by arresting global protein synthesis while simultaneously activating specific transcription factors and their downstream targets. These processes are mediated in part by the phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha. Following restoration of homeostasis protein synthesis is resumed when the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1 dephosphorylates and reactivates eIF2alpha. Proteasome inhibitors, used to treat multiple myeloma patients evoke ER-stress and apoptosis by blocking the ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins (ERAD, however, the role of eIF2alpha phosphorylation in leukemic cells under conditions of proteasome inhibitor-mediated ER stress is currently unclear.Bcr-Abl-positive and negative leukemic cell lines were used to investigate the functional implications of PP1-related phosphatase activities on eIF2alpha phosphorylation in proteasome inhibitor-mediated ER stress and apoptosis. Rather unexpectedly, salubrinal, a recently identified PP1 inhibitor capable to protect against ER stress in various model systems, strongly synergized with proteasome inhibitors to augment apoptotic death of different leukemic cell lines. Salubrinal treatment did not affect the phosphorlyation status of eIF2alpha. Furthermore, the proapoptotic effect of salubrinal occurred independently from the chemical nature of the proteasome inhibitor, was recapitulated by a second unrelated phosphatase inhibitor and was unaffected by overexpression of a dominant negative eIF2alpha S51A variant that can not be phosphorylated. Salubrinal further aggravated ER-stress and proteotoxicity inflicted by the proteasome inhibitors on the leukemic cells since characteristic ER stress responses, such as ATF4 and CHOP synthesis, XBP1 splicing, activation of MAP kinases and eventually apoptosis were efficiently abrogated by the translational inhibitor cycloheximide.Although PP1

  13. Proton pump inhibitors affect the gut microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imhann, Floris; Bonder, Marc Jan; Vich Vila, Arnau; Fu, Jingyuan; Mujagic, Zlatan; Vork, Lisa; Feenstra, Ettje T.; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Cenit, Maria Carmen; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Dijkstra, Gerard; Franke, Lude; Xavier, Ramnik J; Jonkers, Daisy; Wijmenga, Cisca; Weersma, Rinse K; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the top 10 most widely used drugs in the world. PPI use has been associated with an increased risk of enteric infections, most notably Clostridium difficile. The gut microbiome plays an important role in enteric infections, by resisting or

  14. Thiosemicarbazones as inhibitors of tyrosinase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mariana A; Almeida, Mariana A; Marins-Goulart, Carla; Chaves, Otávio A; Echevarria, Aurea; de Oliveira, Márcia C C

    2017-08-01

    In the search for compounds which may inhibit the development of melanomas, a series of thiosemicarbazones has been investigated as possible inhibitors of the tyrosinase enzyme. The results showed that all the thiosemicarbazones tested exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the enzyme. Thiosemicarbazones Thio-1, Thio-2, Thio-3 and Thio-4 substituted with oxygenate moieties, were better inhibitors (IC50 0.42, 0.35, 0.36 and 0.44mM, respectively) than Thio-5, Thio-6, Thio-7 and Thio-8. For the better inhibitors, molecular docking results suggested that the oxygen present in the para position of the aromatic ring is essential for the tyrosinase inhibition, due its high ability for complexation with Cu2+ ions. Inside the active protein pocket, Thio-2 - the best studied inhibitor - is able to interact with the amino acid residues His-155, Gly-170 and Val-172 via hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic force. Thio-2, containing a substituent on the aromatic ring similar to the substrate l-DOPA, showed a competitive inhibition mechanism as viewed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot. The same results were observed in the UV-Vis curves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vildagliptin: the first innovative DDP-4 inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Edvin Villkhauer

    2010-01-01

    A review of the main stages of investigation undertaken by Novartis Pharmaceuticals in search of a new molecule for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor (Vildaglyptin). The data on specificity and selectivity of the action of this molecule are presented along with the results of its comparison with another agent of this group (sitagliptin).

  16. TLC bioautographic method for detecting lipase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Abdel Moniem Sadek

    2012-01-01

    Bioautographic assays using TLC play an important role in the search for active compounds from plants. A TLC bioautographic assay has previously been established for the detection of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors but not for lipases. Development of a TLC bioautographic method for detecting lipase inhibitors in plant extracts. After migration of the plant extracts, the TLC plate was sprayed with α-naphtyl acetate and enzyme solutions before incubation at 37°C for 20 min. Finally, the solution of Fast Blue B salt was sprayed onto the TLC plate giving a purple background colouration. Lipase inhibitors were visualised as white spots on the TLC plates. Orlistat (a known lipase inhibitor) inhibited lipase down to 0.01 µg. Methanolic extracts of Camellia sinensis (L.) kuntz and Rosmarinus officinalis L after migration on TLC gave enzymatic inhibition when applied in amounts of 82 and 56 µg, respectively. On the other hand the methanolic extract of Morus alba leaves did not exhibit any lipase inhibitory activity. The screening test was able to detect lipase inhibition by pure reference substances and by compounds present in complex matrices, such as plant extracts. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based

  18. Are phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors just more theophylline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell-Smith, Victoria; Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P

    2006-06-01

    Theophylline has been relegated to a second- or even third-line therapy in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), behind glucocorticosteroids and beta2-agonists, although recent findings have suggested that theophylline possesses anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in addition to its well-recognized effects as a bronchodilator. In part, theophylline has fallen out of favor because of its adverse side-effect profile, and this has led to the search for more effective and safer drugs based on the knowledge that theophylline is orally active and that it is a nonselective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor. This has led to the development of selective PDE4 inhibitors, originally designed for depression, for the treatment of both COPD and asthma. Such drugs have shown clinical efficacy in the treatment of respiratory disease while having a considerably safer side-effect profile in comparison with theophylline, particularly because there are no reported drug interactions with PDE4 inhibitors, a feature that complicates the use of theophylline. In addition, it is also becoming increasingly apparent that theophylline is not working solely through PDE inhibition, as formerly assumed, and that this drug has other relevant pharmacologic activities that are likely to contribute to its efficacy, such as adenosine receptor antagonism and induction of histone deacetylase. Thus, the introduction of PDE4 inhibitors represents an entirely new class of drugs for the treatment of respiratory disease.

  19. Viral safety of C1-inhibitor NF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, F. G.; Kleijn, M.; Koenderman, A. H. L.; Over, J.; van Engelenburg, F. A. C.; Schuitemaker, H.; van 't Wout, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of virus reduction by three process steps (polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) precipitation, pasteurization, and 15nm virus filtration) in the manufacturing of C1-inhibitor NF. The potential prion removing capacity in this process was estimated based on data from the literature.

  20. Developing ER Stress Inhibitors for Treating ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    in response to thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase ( SERCA ) channels which initiates ER stress by preventing...O’Regan, J. P., Deng, H. X., and et al. (1993) Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene are associated with familial amyotrophic lateral

  1. Deconstructing Lipid Kinase Inhibitors by Chemical Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Rebecca L; Franks, Caroline E; Campbell, Sean T; Purow, Benjamin W; Harris, Thurl E; Hsu, Ku-Lung

    2018-01-16

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) regulate lipid metabolism and cell signaling through ATP-dependent phosphorylation of diacylglycerol to biosynthesize phosphatidic acid. Selective chemical probes for studying DGKs are currently lacking and are needed to annotate isoform-specific functions of these elusive lipid kinases. Previously, we explored fragment-based approaches to discover a core fragment of DGK-α (DGKα) inhibitors responsible for selective binding to the DGKα active site. Here, we utilize quantitative chemical proteomics to deconstruct widely used DGKα inhibitors to identify structural regions mediating off-target activity. We tested the activity of a fragment (RLM001) derived from a nucleotide-like region found in the DGKα inhibitors R59022 and ritanserin and discovered that RLM001 mimics ATP in its ability to broadly compete at ATP-binding sites of DGKα as well as >60 native ATP-binding proteins (kinases and ATPases) detected in cell proteomes. Equipotent inhibition of activity-based probe labeling by RLM001 supports a contiguous ligand-binding site composed of C1, DAGKc, and DAGKa domains in the DGKα active site. Given the lack of available crystal structures of DGKs, our studies highlight the utility of chemical proteomics in revealing active-site features of lipid kinases to enable development of inhibitors with enhanced selectivity against the human proteome.

  2. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  3. Safety aspects of HIV-protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe objectives of this thesis were to provide more insight into the risk and risk factors of adverse drug reactions associated with HIV-protease inhibitor treatment under non-experimental everyday circumstances. By recognition of risk factors, patients at risk can be identified

  4. Curbing indoor mold growth with mold inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2004-01-01

    Environmentally acceptable mold inhibitors are needed to curb the growth of mold fungi in woodframe housing when moisture management measures fail. Excess indoor moisture can lead to rapid mold establishment which, in turn, can have deleterious affects on indoor air quality. Compounds with known mold inhibitory properties and low mammalian toxicity, such as food...

  5. Natural peptides and proteins: potent tyrosinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hariri*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Tyrosinase is a copper containing oxidase which is crucial for controlling the production of melanin in creatures such as bacteria, fungi, plants and mammals. It is involved in the first two steps of melanin biosynthesis and leads to pigmentation and different types of cancer such as melanoma. Also, it is responsible for browning of fruits and vegetables. Therefore, safe and efficient tyrosinase inhibitors are useful in the field of clinical medicine, cosmetics, agricultural and food industries. Conventional tyrosinase inhibitors such as hydroquinone, kojic acid, and arbutin have suffered from several problems such as melanocytes cytotoxicity, irritation, low permeability through the skin, contact allergy and low stability. Considering these difficulties, researchers have developed various naturally occurring anti-tyrosinase agents and in this regard, peptides and proteins have attracted lots of attention. Methods: In this work, anti-tyrosinase peptides and proteins obtained from natural resources were reviewed using credible databases. Results: Literature survey revealed that development of anti-tyrosinase activity of naturally occurring peptides and proteins started from 1974. Mushrooms (e.g. Agaricushortensis, bacteria (e.g. Lactobacillus helveticus and Oscillatoria agardhii, plants (e.g. Pseudostellaria heterophylla, rice bran,silk and egg yolk have been found as the most potent inhibitors. Conclusion: Literature review depicted that natural peptides and proteins can be consumed efficiently as tyrosinase inhibitors with much lower side effects. In this respect, new horizon will be opened to safe anti-tyrosinase agents.

  6. Structure-Based Design of Ricin Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon D. Robertus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potent cytotoxin easily purified in large quantities. It presents a significant public health concern due to its potential use as a bioterrorism agent. For this reason, extensive efforts have been underway to develop antidotes against this deadly poison. The catalytic A subunit of the heterodimeric toxin has been biochemically and structurally well characterized, and is an attractive target for structure-based drug design. Aided by computer docking simulations, several ricin toxin A chain (RTA inhibitors have been identified; the most promising leads belonging to the pterin family. Development of these lead compounds into potent drug candidates is a challenging prospect for numerous reasons, including poor solubility of pterins, the large and highly polar secondary binding pocket of RTA, as well as the enzyme’s near perfect catalytic efficiency and tight binding affinity for its natural substrate, the eukaryotic ribosome. To date, the most potent RTA inhibitors developed using this approach are only modest inhibitors with apparent IC50 values in the 10−4 M range, leaving significant room for improvement. This review highlights the variety of techniques routinely employed in structure-based drug design projects, as well as the challenges faced in the design of RTA inhibitors.

  7. Protease inhibitor mediated resistance to insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Outchkourov, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the defensive molecules that plants produce in order to defend themselves against herbivores. A major aim of this thesis is to develop novel insect resistance traits usingheterologous, non-plant PIs. Prerequisite for the success of the

  8. TNF-Alpha Inhibitors for Chronic Urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Freja Lærke; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2013-01-01

    had a durable response with a mean of 11 months. Six patients (30%) experienced side effects and five patients had mild recurrent upper respiratory infections, whereas one patient experienced severe CNS toxicity that could be related to treatment with TNF-alpha inhibitor. Adalimumab and etanercept may...

  9. Aromatase inhibitors in stimulated IVF cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papanikolaou, Evangelos G; Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been introduced as a new treatment modality that could challenge clomiphene citrate as an ovulation induction regiment in patients with PCOS. Although several randomized trials have been conducted regarding their use as ovulation induction agents, only few trials are ava...

  10. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has three potential sites for N-linked glycosylation, including Asn209Tyr210Thr211, Asn265Met266Thr267, and Asn329Glu330Ser331. Using a HEK293 expression system, we have made mutants with Asp or Gln substitutions of the Asn residue in each of these s...

  11. Therapeutic substitution post-patent expiry: the cases of ACE inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoros, Sotiris

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines whether there is a switch in total (originator and generic) consumption after generic entry from molecules that face generic competition towards other molecules of the same class, which are still in-patent. Data from six European countries for the time period 1991 to 2006 are used to study the cases of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors. Empirical evidence shows that patent expiry of captopril and enalapril led to a switch in total (off-patent originator and generic) consumption towards other in-patent angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, whereas patent expiry of omeprazole led to a switch in consumption towards other proton pump inhibitors. This phenomenon makes generic policies ineffective and results in an increase in pharmaceutical expenditure due to the absence of generic alternatives in the market of in-patent molecules. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-l-cysteine antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasi, Marianna; Wang, Ming; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Gaponenko, Vadim; Hay, Nissim; Gartel, Andrei L.

    2015-01-01

    NAC (N-acetyl-l-cysteine) is commonly used to identify and test ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducers, and to inhibit ROS. In the present study, we identified inhibition of proteasome inhibitors as a novel activity of NAC. Both NAC and catalase, another known scavenger of ROS, similarly inhibited ROS levels and apoptosis associated with H2O2. However, only NAC, and not catalase or another ROS scavenger Trolox, was able to prevent effects linked to proteasome inhibition, such as protein stabilization, apoptosis and accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. These observations suggest that NAC has a dual activity as an inhibitor of ROS and proteasome inhibitors. Recently, NAC was used as a ROS inhibitor to functionally characterize a novel anticancer compound, piperlongumine, leading to its description as a ROS inducer. In contrast, our own experiments showed that this compound depicts features of proteasome inhibitors including suppression of FOXM1 (Forkhead box protein M1), stabilization of cellular proteins, induction of ROS-independent apoptosis and enhanced accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. In addition, NAC, but not catalase or Trolox, interfered with the activity of piperlongumine, further supporting that piperlongumine is a proteasome inhibitor. Most importantly, we showed that NAC, but not other ROS scavengers, directly binds to proteasome inhibitors. To our knowledge, NAC is the first known compound that directly interacts with and antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that, as a result of the dual nature of NAC, data interpretation might not be straightforward when NAC is utilized as an antioxidant to demonstrate ROS involvement in drug-induced apoptosis. PMID:23772801

  13. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alter...

  14. Occurrence and characterization of oseltamivirresistant influenza virus in children between 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoung Geun Kim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available &lt;b&gt;Purpose:&lt;/b&gt; There was a global increase in the prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses during the 2007&#8211;2008 influenza season. This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence and characteristics of oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses during the 2007&#8211;2008 and 2008&#8211;2009 influenza seasons among patients who were treated with oseltamivir (group A and those that did not receive oseltamivir (group B. &lt;b&gt;Methods:&lt;/b&gt; A prospective study was conducted on 321 pediatric patients who were hospitalized because of influenza during the 2007&#8211;2008 and 2008&#8211;2009 influenza seasons. Drug resistance tests were conducted on influenza viruses isolated from 91 patients. &lt;b&gt;Results:&lt;/b&gt; There was no significant difference between the clinical characteristics of groups A and B during both seasons. Influenza A/H1N1, isolated from both groups A and B during the 2007&#8211;2008 and 2008&#8211;2009 periods, was not resistant to zanamivir. However, phenotypic analysis of the virus revealed a high oseltamivir IC50 range and that H275Y substitution of the neuraminidase (NA gene and partial variation of the hemagglutinin (HA gene did not affect its antigenicity to the HA vaccine even though group A had a shorter hospitalization duration and fewer lower respiratory tract complications than group B. In addition, there was no significant difference in the clinical manifestations between oseltamivir-susceptible and oseltamivir-resistant strains of influenza A/H1N1. &lt;b&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/b&gt; Establishment of guidelines to efficiently treat influenza with oseltamivir, a commonly used drug for treating influenza in Korean pediatric patients, and a treatment strategy with a new therapeutic agent is required.

  15. Environmental life cycle analysis of potato sprout inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstholt, R.P.V.; Ree, C.M.; Moll, H.C.

    Potato sprout inhibitors are generally applied to suppress sprouting during winter storage. This study presents the compared environmental profiles of the two sprout inhibitors available on the Dutch market: A traditional chemical product with isopropyl-3-chlorophenylcarbamate (CIPC) and

  16. Glycosidase inhibitors: update and perspectives on practical use

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asano, Naoki

    2003-01-01

    .... Since then, over 100 glycosidase inhibitors have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. Modifying or blocking biological processes by specific glycosidase inhibitors has revealed the vital functions of glycosidases in living systems...

  17. Extraction and Characterization of Cathepsin Inhibitor from Milkfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Nurhayati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzyme is distributed acros all organism including fish. Cysteine proteases are the largest group of proteolytic enzyme. Lysosomal cathepsin, one of cysteine protease enzyme, cause softening and degradation of myofibril protein and it’s activity is regulated by endogenous inhibitors. The purposes of this study were to optimize the extraction cathepsin inhibitors from the skin, muscles, and viscera of fish, to partially purify the cathepsin inhibitors of selected sources, and to study the characteristics of the cathepsin inhibitor. The cathepsin inhibitor could be extracted from muscle fish and partially purified using ammonium sulfate of 70%. The purified cathepsin inhibitor had optimum temperature at 40°C and the optimum at pH 8. Metal ions decreased the activity of the protease inhibitor, except 1 mM of metal ion Mn2+ and Na+. Keywords: Cathepsin, characterization, partial purification, protease inhibitor

  18. Treating and Preventing Influenza in Aged Care Facilities: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booy, Robert; Lindley, Richard I.; Dwyer, Dominic E.; Yin, Jiehui K.; Heron, Leon G.; Moffatt, Cameron R. M.; Chiu, Clayton K.; Rosewell, Alexander E.; Dean, Anna S.; Dobbins, Timothy; Philp, David J.; Gao, Zhanhai; MacIntyre, C. Raina

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza is an important cause of morbidity and mortality for frail older people. Whilst the antiviral drug oseltamivir (a neuraminidase inhibitor) is approved for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza during outbreaks, there have been no trials comparing treatment only (T) versus treatment and prophylaxis (T&P) in Aged Care Facilities (ACFs). Our objective was to compare a policy of T versus T&P for influenza outbreaks in ACFs. Methods and Findings We performed a cluster randomised controlled trial in 16 ACFs, that followed a policy of either “T”—oseltamivir treatment (75 mg twice a day for 5 days)—or “T&P”—treatment and prophylaxis (75 mg once a day for 10 days) for influenza outbreaks over three years, in addition to enhanced surveillance. The primary outcome measure was the attack rate of influenza. Secondary outcomes measures were deaths, hospitalisation, pneumonia and adverse events. Laboratory testing was performed to identify the viral cause of influenza-like illness (ILI) outbreaks. The study period 30 June 2006 to 23 December 2008 included three southern hemisphere winters. During that time, influenza was confirmed as the cause of nine of the 23 ILI outbreaks that occurred amongst the 16 ACFs. The policy of T&P resulted in a significant reduction in the influenza attack rate amongst residents: 93/255 (36%) in residents in T facilities versus 91/397 (23%) in T&P facilities (p = 0.002). We observed a non-significant reduction in staff: 46/216 (21%) in T facilities versus 47/350 (13%) in T&P facilities (p = 0.5). There was a significant reduction in mean duration of outbreaks (T = 24 days, T&P = 11 days, p = 0.04). Deaths, hospitalisations and pneumonia were non-significantly reduced in the T&P allocated facilities. Drug adverse events were common but tolerated. Conclusion Our trial lacked power but these results provide some support for a policy of “treatment and prophylaxis” with oseltamivir in controlling

  19. Antiviral drug profile of human influenza A & B viruses circulating in India: 2004-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V A Potdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Recent influenza antiviral resistance studies in South East Asia, Europe and the United States reveal adamantane and neuraminidase inhibitor (NAIs resistance. This study was undertaken to evaluate antiviral resistance in influenza viruses isolated from various parts of India, during 2004 to 2011. Methods: Influenza viruses were analyzed genetically for known resistance markers by M2 and NA gene sequencing. Influenza A/H1N1 (n=206, A/H3N2 (n=371 viruses for amantadine resistance and A/H1N1 (n=206, A/H3N2 (n=272 and type B (n=326 for oseltamivir resistance were sequenced. Pandemic (H1N1 (n= 493 isolates were tested for H274Y mutation by real time reverse transcription (rRT-PCR. Randomly selected resistant and sensitive influenza A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 viruses were confirmed by phenotypic assay. Results: Serine to asparagine (S3IN mutation was detected in six isolates of 2007-2008.One dual-resistant A/H1N1 was detected for the first time in India with leucine to phenylalanine (L26F mutation in M2 gene and H274Y mutation in NA gene. A/H3N2 viruses showed an increase in resistance to amantadine from 22.5 per cent in 2005 to 100 per cent in 2008 onwards with S3IN mutation. Fifty of the 61 (82% A/H1N1 viruses tested in 2008-2009 were oseltamivir resistant with H274Y mutation, while all A/H3N2, pandemic A/H1N1 and type B isolates remained sensitive. Genetic results were also confirmed by phenotypic analysis of randomly selected 50 resistant A/H1N1 and 40 sensitive A/H3N2 isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: Emergence of influenza viruses resistant to amantadine and oseltamivir in spite of negligible usage of antivirals emphasizes the need for continuous monitoring of antiviral resistance.

  20. Cellular growth kinetics distinguish a cyclophilin inhibitor from an HSP90 inhibitor as a selective inhibitor of hepatitis C virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf K F Beran

    Full Text Available During antiviral drug discovery, it is critical to distinguish molecules that selectively interrupt viral replication from those that reduce virus replication by adversely affecting host cell viability. In this report we investigate the selectivity of inhibitors of the host chaperone proteins cyclophilin A (CypA and heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90 which have each been reported to inhibit replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV. By comparing the toxicity of the HSP90 inhibitor, 17-(Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG to two known cytostatic compounds, colchicine and gemcitabine, we provide evidence that 17-AAG exerts its antiviral effects indirectly through slowing cell growth. In contrast, a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, exhibited selective antiviral activity without slowing cell proliferation. Furthermore, we observed that 17-AAG had little antiviral effect in a non-dividing cell-culture model of HCV replication, while CsA reduced HCV titer by more than two orders of magnitude in the same model. The assays we describe here are useful for discriminating selective antivirals from compounds that indirectly affect virus replication by reducing host cell viability or slowing cell growth.

  1. Role of inhibitors and biodegradable material in mitigation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uku

    2011-05-02

    May 2, 2011 ... reduce ammonia volatilization loss from urea fertilizer. Coating with urease inhibitors can improve the bioavailability of N, resulting in increased dry matter yield and N uptake. Such increases result from delayed urea hydrolysis by urease inhibitors and coating materials. The value of inhibitors in mitigating.

  2. Enzyme inhibitors of marine microbial origin with pharmaceutical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Chiaki

    2004-01-01

    Several enzyme inhibitors with various industrial uses were isolated from bacteria and actinomycetes living in the marine environment. These inhibitors are useful in medicine and agriculture. All the compounds, except the monoamine oxidase inhibitors, are novel, and their activities have been characterized.

  3. Protein C inhibitor may modulate human sperm-oocyte interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elisen, M. G.; van Kooij, R. J.; Nolte, M. A.; Marquart, J. A.; Lock, T. M.; Bouma, B. N.; Meijers, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a heparin-binding plasma serine protease inhibitor that was originally identified as an inhibitor of activated protein C. PCI has a broad protease specificity, inhibiting several proteases in hemostasis and fibrinolysis by acting as a suicide substrate. Recently it has

  4. The Tamiflu fiasco and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Meenu, Meenakshi; Mohan, Prafull

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), a neuraminidase inhibitor, was approved for seasonal flu by US Food and Drug Administration in 1999. A number of randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis emphasized a favorable efficacy and safety profile. Majority of them were funded by Roche, which also first marketed and promoted this drug. In 2005 and 2009, the looming fear of pandemic flu led to recommendation by prominent regulatory bodies such as World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Medicines Agency and others for its use in treatment and prophylaxis of influenza, and it's stockpiling as a measure to tide over the crisis. Serious Adverse Events, especially neuropsychiatric events associated with Tamiflu started getting reported leading to a cascade of questions on clinical utility of this drug. A recent Cochrane review and related articles have questioned the risk-benefit ratio of the drug, besides raising doubts about the regulatory decision of approving it. The recommendations for stockpiling the said drug as given by various international organizations viz WHO have also been put to scrutiny. Although many reviewers have labeled the Tamiflu saga as a "costly mistake," the episode leaves us with some important lessons. This article takes a comprehensive relook on the subject, and we proceed to suggest some ways and means to avoid a similar situation in the future.

  5. Single Dose IV Peramivir is Safe and Effective in the Treatment of Pediatric Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanchiere, John; Plunkett, Stephanie; Annamalai, Rajasekaran; Julien, Katie; Peterson, James; Goisse, Marcy; Christensen, Shane; Mehta, Priyesh; Coleman, Stephen; Munoz, Flor; Flynt, Amy; Dobo, Sylvia; Nagy, Eniko; Kargl, Deborah; Mathis, Amanda; Collis, Phil; Sheridan, William

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Peramivir (PVR) is a potent neuraminidase inhibitor with in vitro activity against all influenza virus subtypes. Previous studies demonstrated the efficacy and safety of PVR as a single dose intravenous (IV) treatment for acute uncomplicated influenza in adults. Methods A phase 3 study compared age-appropriate doses of single dose IV PVR to 5 days of oral oseltamivir (OSE) (4:1 randomization, stratified by age) in pediatric subjects age 0 -17 years within 48 hours of onset of acute uncomplicated influenza. Plasma concentrations of PVR were measured up to 6 hours post dose. Serial viral titers were measured from nasopharyngeal swabs. Severity of influenza signs and symptoms were recorded in a diary. Results 122 subjects were enrolled up to a data cutoff of March 31, 2017 (Coleman, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Investigator, Research support; F. Munoz, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Investigator, Research support; A. Flynt, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Consultant, Consulting fee; S. Dobo, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Employee, Salary; E. Nagy, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Employee, Salary; D. Kargl, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Consultant, Consulting fee; A. Mathis, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Employee, Salary; P. Collis, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Employee, Salary; W. Sheridan, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals: Employee, Salary

  6. Influenza viruses received and tested by the Melbourne WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza annual report, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sheena G; Chow, Michelle K; Barr, Ian G; Kelso, Anne

    2015-12-31

    The WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne is part of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System. In 2014 the Centre received a total of 5,374 influenza samples from laboratories primarily in the Asia-Pacific region. Viruses were characterised by their antigenic, genetic and antiviral drug resistance properties. Of the viruses successfully analysed 52% were A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. The majority of these were antigenically and genetically similar to the WHO recommended reference strain for the 2014 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine. Results for A(H3N2) and B/Yamagata viruses suggested that circulating viruses of this subtype and lineage, respectively, had undergone antigenic and/or genetic changes, consistent with the decision by WHO to change recommended strains for the 2015 Southern Hemisphere vaccine. A small number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and B/Victoria viruses had highly reduced inhibition to the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir. The Centre also undertook primary isolation of vaccine candidate viruses directly into eggs. A total of 38 viruses were successfully isolated in eggs, of which 1 (B/Phuket/3073/2013) was included in the 2015 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine.

  7. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target.

  8. Raltegravir: first in class HIV integrase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelalem Temesgen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Zelalem Temesgen1, Dawd S Siraj21Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2East Carolina University Greenville, NC, USAAbstract: On October 16, 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved raltegravir for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents in treatment-experienced adult patients who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple antiretroviral agents. Raltegravir is first in a novel class of antiretroviral drugs known as integrase inhibitors. It has demonstrated potent anti HIV activity in both antiretroviral treatment-naïve and experienced patients. The most common adverse events reported with raltegravir during phase 2 and 3 clinical trials were diarrhea, nausea, and headache. Laboratory abnormalities include mild elevations in liver transaminases and creatine phosphokinase.Keywords: raltegravir, HIV, antiretroviral agents, integrase inhibitors

  9. Are leukotriene inhibitors useful for bronchiolitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Fernanda; Otárola-Escobar, Isidora; Arenas, Deidyland

    2016-12-16

    Bronchiolitis is a prevalent disease in children under two years of age, which carries significant morbidity and mortality. However, there is controversy regarding the optimal therapeutic management. Leukotriene inhibitors have been proposed as an alternative, although its efficacy is not clear yet. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified two systematic reviews comprising six trials addressing the question of this article. We extracted data, combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded leukotriene inhibitors might not decrease mortality levels on bronchiolitis patients and it is not clear whether they decrease length of hospital stay. They might reduce recurrent wheezing, but the certainty of the evidence is low, and they increase adverse effects.

  10. Potent peptidic fusion inhibitors of influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Juraszek, Jarek; Brandenburg, Boerries; Buyck, Christophe; Schepens, Wim B. G.; Kesteleyn, Bart; Stoops, Bart; Vreeken, Rob J.; Vermond, Jan; Goutier, Wouter; Tang, Chan; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Goudsmit, Jaap; van Dongen, Maria J. P.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2017-09-28

    Influenza therapeutics with new targets and mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat potential pandemics, emerging viruses, and constantly mutating strains in circulation. We report here on the design and structural characterization of potent peptidic inhibitors of influenza hemagglutinin. The peptide design was based on complementarity-determining region loops of human broadly neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (FI6v3 and CR9114). The optimized peptides exhibit nanomolar affinity and neutralization against influenza A group 1 viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and avian H5N1 strains. The peptide inhibitors bind to the highly conserved stem epitope and block the low pH–induced conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. These peptidic compounds and their advantageous biological properties should accelerate the development of new small molecule– and peptide-based therapeutics against influenza virus.

  11. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Benefit/Risk Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. They have been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with diet/exercise, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin. Three agents are available in Europe and the USA (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin) and others are commercialized in Japan or in clinical development. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin, with a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. They exert favorable effects beyond glucose control with consistent body weight, blood pressure, and serum uric acid reductions. Empagliflozin showed remarkable reductions in cardiovascular/all-cause mortality and in hospitalization for heart failure in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Positive renal outcomes were also shown with empagliflozin. Mostly reported adverse events are genital mycotic infections, while urinary tract infections and events linked to volume depletion are rather rare. Concern about a risk of ketoacidosis and bone fractures has been recently raised, which deserves caution and further evaluation.

  12. Rho-kinase inhibitors from adlay seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Yhiya; Zhu, Qinchang; Tran, Hai-Bang; Afifi, Mohamed S; Halim, Ahmed F; Ashour, Ahmed; Fujimoto, Ryoji; Goto, Takahiro; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2017-07-19

    Rho-kinase enzymes are one of the most important targets recently identified in our bodies. Several lines of evidence indicate that these enzymes are involved in many diseases and cellular disorders. ROCK inhibitors may have clinical applications for cancer, hypertension, glaucoma, etc. Our study aims to identify the possible involvement of Rho-kinase inhibition to the multiple biological activities of adlay seeds and provide a rationale for their folkloric medicines. Hence, we evaluated Rho-kinase I and II inhibitory activity of the ethanol extract and 28 compounds derived from the seeds. A molecular docking assay was designed to estimate the binding affinity of the tested compounds with the target enzymes. The results of our study suggest a possible involvement of Rho-kinase inhibition to the multiple biological activities of the seeds. Furthermore, the results obtained with the tested compounds revealed some interesting skeletons as a scaffold for design and development of natural Rho-kinase inhibitors.

  13. Caffeine as a Potential Quorum Sensing Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing enables bacteria to control the gene expression in response to the cell density. It regulates a variety of bacterial physiological functions such as biofilm formation, bioluminescence, virulence factors and swarming which has been shown contribute to bacterial pathogenesis. The use of quorum sensing inhibitor would be of particular interest in treating bacterial pathogenicity and infections. In this work, we have tested caffeine as quorum sensing inhibitor by using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as a biosensor. We verified that caffeine did not degrade the N-acyl homoserine lactones tested. In this work, it is shown that caffeine could inhibit N-acyl homoserine lactone production and swarming of a human opportunistic pathogen, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation providing evidence on the presence of anti-quorum sensing activity in caffeine. Our work will allow caffeine to be explored as anti-infective drugs.

  14. Natural products inhibitors of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Barbosa Filho

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive, neurodegenerative pathology that primarily affects the elderly population, and is estimated to account for 50-60% of dementia cases in persons over 65 years of age. The main symptoms associated with AD involve cognitive dysfunction, primarily memory loss. Other features associated with the later stages of AD include language deficits, depression, behavioural problems including agitation, mood disturbances and psychosis. One of the most promising approaches for treating this disease is to enhance the acetylcholine level in the brain using acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitors. The present work reviews the literature on plants and plant-derived compounds inhibitors of enzyme acetylcholinesterase. The review refers to 309 plant extracts and 260 compounds isolated from plants, which are classified in appropriate chemical groups and model tested, and cites their activity. For this purpose 175 references were consulted.

  15. Inhibitors of the Cellular Trafficking of Ricin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gillet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the last decade, efforts to identify and develop effective inhibitors of the ricin toxin have focused on targeting its N-glycosidase activity. Alternatively, molecules disrupting intracellular trafficking have been shown to block ricin toxicity. Several research teams have recently developed high-throughput phenotypic screens for small molecules acting on the intracellular targets required for entry of ricin into cells. These screens have identified inhibitory compounds that can protect cells, and sometimes even animals against ricin. We review these newly discovered cellular inhibitors of ricin intoxication, discuss the advantages and drawbacks of chemical-genetics approaches, and address the issues to be resolved so that the therapeutic development of these small-molecule compounds can progress.

  16. Cathepsin D inactivates cysteine proteinase inhibitors, cystatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarcic, B; Kos, J; Dolenc, I; Lucovnik, P; Krizaj, I; Turk, V

    1988-07-29

    The formation of inactive complexes in excess molar amounts of human cathepsins H and L with their protein inhibitors human stefin A, human stefin B and chicken cystatin at pH 5.6 has been shown by measurement of enzyme activity coupled with reverse-phase HPLC not to involve covalent cleavage of the inhibitors. Inhibition must be the direct result of binding. On the contrary the interaction of cystatins with aspartic proteinase cathepsin D at pH 3.5 for 60 min followed by HPLC resulted in their inactivation accompanied by peptide bond cleavage at several sites, preferentially those involving hydrophobic amino acid residues. The released peptides do not inhibit papain and cathepsin L. These results explain reported elevated levels of cysteine proteinases and lead to the proposal that cathepsin D exerts an important function, through inactivation of cystatins, in the increased activities of cysteine proteinases in human diseases including muscular distrophy.

  17. Classification of Cytochrome P450 1A2 Inhibitors and Non-Inhibitors by Machine Learning Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasanthanathan, Poongavanam; Taboureau, Olivier; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2009-01-01

    of CYP1A2 inhibitors and non-inhibitors. Training and test sets consisted of about 400 and 7000 compounds, respectively. Various machine learning techniques, like binary QSAR, support vector machine (SVM), random forest, kappa nearest neighbors (kNN), and decision tree methods were used to develop...... to be applicable for virtual screening of CYP1A2 inhibitors or non-inhibitors, or can be used as simple filters in the drug discovery process....

  18. Immune checkpoint inhibitor-related myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Kazuko; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sekine, Ikuo

    2017-10-17

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors have demonstrated significant clinical benefit in many cancers. The clinical benefit afforded by these treatments can be accompanied by a unique and distinct spectrum of adverse events. Recently, several fatal cases of immune checkpoint inhibitor-related myocarditis were reported. Although its frequency is comparatively lower than that of other immune-related adverse events, myocarditis can lead to circulatory collapse and lethal ventricular arrhythmia. Immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), play important roles in establishing peripheral tolerance to the heart. Evidence from studies using genetically engineered mouse models suggests that CTLA-4 signaling terminates proliferation and promotes anergy during the primary response to cardiac self-peptide recognition. PD-1 signaling restrains autoreactive T cells that enter the peripheral tissues and recognize cardiac-peptide, maintaining them in an anergic state. Patients affected by immune checkpoint inhibitor-related myocarditis often experience rapid onset of profound hemodynamic compromise progressing to cardiogenic shock. Early diagnosis is mandatory to address specific therapy and correct the timing of circulatory support. However, the diagnosis of myocarditis is challenging due to the heterogeneity of clinical presentations. Owing to its early onset, nonspecific symptomatology and fulminant progression, especially when these drugs are used in combination, oncologists should be vigilant for immune checkpoint inhibitor-related myocarditis. With many questions yet to be answered, from basic immune biology to clinical management, future research should aim to optimize the use of these drugs by identifying predictive biomarkers of either a response to therapy or the risks of myocarditis development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Acrosin inhibitor detecting along the boar epididymis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maňásková-Postlerová, Pavla; Cozlová, Nina; Dorosh, Andriy; Šulc, Miroslav; Guyonet, B.; Jonáková, Věra

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, Jan 2016 (2016), s. 733-739 ISSN 0141-8130 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR GA14-05547S Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Acrosin inhibitor * Boar epididymis * Spermatozoa Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.671, year: 2016

  20. BCR ABL Kinase Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dhara Patel; Maulik P. Suthar; Vipul Patel; Rajesh Singh

    2010-01-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors have started era of molecular targeted therapy and marked a greatest milestone in cancer drug discovery. Despite of impressive cytogenetic response rates achieved with several agents in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in chronic phase, those with advanced stage CML frequently obtain more modest responses that are in many instances of short duration. Several mechanisms of resistance to imatinib are also observed among patients that develop cl...

  1. Adverse Effects of COX-2 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish N. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors (COXIBs were developed with the prime object of minimizing gastrointestinal adverse effects, which are seen with the use of traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Their long-term use is limited by the development of hypertension, edema, and congestive heart failure in a significant proportion of patients. NSAIDs block the activity of both COX isozymes, COX-1 and COX-2, which mediate the enzymatic conversion of arachidonate to prostaglandin H2 (PGH2 and other prostaglandin (PG metabolites. It is well established that the cardiovascular profile of COX-2 inhibitors can be accounted for by inhibition of COX-dependent PG synthesis. Following the COX-mediated synthesis of PGH2 from arachidonate, PGH2 is metabolized to one of at least five bioactive PGs, including PGE2, PGI2, PGF2, PGD2, or thromboxane A2 (TXA2. These prostanoids have pleiotropic cardiovascular effects, altering platelet function and renal function, and they are acting either as vasodilators or vasoconstrictors. Although COX-1 and COX-2 exhibit similar biochemical activity in converting arachidonate to PGH2in vitro, the ultimate prostanoids they produce in vivo may be different due to differential regulation of COX-1 and COX-2, tissue distribution, and availability of the prostanoid synthases. PGs have been established as being critically involved in mitigating hypertension, helping to maintain medullary blood flow (MBF, promoting urinary salt excretion, and preserving the normal homeostasis of thrombosis, and the researchers found that the use of COX-2 inhibitors caused many serious complications in altering the normal body homeostasis. The purpose of the present research is to explain briefly the side effects of COX-2 inhibitors on the renal and cardiovascular system.

  2. Morphology and Mechanism of Benign Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    University of Cincinnati. Samples were mounted and coated with 2–3 nm of tungsten using a dual ion beam sputter coater (South Bay Technologies, Inc.) to...inhibitor precursor solution on the metal surface for 30 s, the wafer is accelerated to 2000 rpm and held for 1 minute to spin off the excess solution. To...24 hours before further characterization. The coating procedure was carried out using a Laurell single-wafer spin processor (WS-400A-6NPP-Lite

  3. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3-2 and NO-3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10-4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  4. FAITH - Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 486, Dec (2015), s. 78-87 ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-15326S; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : retrovirus * HIV * assembly * assay * inhibitor Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.200, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0042682215003864

  5. Identification of Neutrophil Exocytosis Inhibitors (Nexinhibs), Small Molecule Inhibitors of Neutrophil Exocytosis and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; He, Jing; Brown, Steven J.; Zhang, Jinzhong; Abgaryan, Lusine; Biris, Nikolaos; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Rosen, Hugh; Catz, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the first line of cellular defense in response to bacterial and fungal infections and rely on granular proteins to kill microorganisms, but uncontrolled secretion of neutrophil cargos is injurious to the host and should be closely regulated. Thus, increased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins, including myeloperoxidase and elastase, are associated with tissue damage and are hallmarks of systemic inflammation. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput screening approach to identify small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between the small GTPase Rab27a and its effector JFC1, two central regulators of neutrophil exocytosis. Using this assay, we have identified small molecule inhibitors of Rab27a-JFC1 binding that were also active in cell-based neutrophil-specific exocytosis assays, demonstrating the druggability of Rab GTPases and their effectors. These compounds, named Nexinhibs (neutrophil exocytosis inhibitors), inhibit exocytosis of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils without affecting other important innate immune responses, including phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap production. Furthermore, the compounds are reversible and potent inhibitors of the extracellular production of superoxide anion by preventing the up-regulation of the granule membrane-associated subunit of the NADPH oxidase at the plasma membrane. Nexinhibs also inhibit the up-regulation of activation signature molecules, including the adhesion molecules CD11b and CD66b. Importantly, by using a mouse model of endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation, we show that these inhibitors have significant activity in vivo manifested by decreased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins and significantly decreased tissue infiltration by inflammatory neutrophils. Altogether, our data present the first neutrophil exocytosis-specific inhibitor with in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, supporting its potential use as an inhibitor of systemic

  6. Emicizumab Prophylaxis in Hemophilia A with Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Johannes; Mahlangu, Johnny N; Kim, Benjamin; Schmitt, Christophe; Callaghan, Michael U; Young, Guy; Santagostino, Elena; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Negrier, Claude; Kessler, Craig; Valente, Nancy; Asikanius, Elina; Levy, Gallia G; Windyga, Jerzy; Shima, Midori

    2017-08-31

    Emicizumab (ACE910) bridges activated factor IX and factor X to restore the function of activated factor VIII, which is deficient in persons with hemophilia A. This phase 3, multicenter trial assessed once-weekly subcutaneous emicizumab prophylaxis in persons with hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitors. We enrolled participants who were 12 years of age or older. Those who had previously received episodic treatment with bypassing agents were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to emicizumab prophylaxis (group A) or no prophylaxis (group B). The primary end point was the difference in bleeding rates between group A and group B. Participants who had previously received prophylactic treatment with bypassing agents received emicizumab prophylaxis in group C. A total of 109 male participants with hemophilia A with inhibitors were enrolled. The annualized bleeding rate was 2.9 events (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7 to 5.0) among participants who were randomly assigned to emicizumab prophylaxis (group A, 35 participants) versus 23.3 events (95% CI, 12.3 to 43.9) among those assigned to no prophylaxis (group B, 18 participants), representing a significant difference of 87% in favor of emicizumab prophylaxis (Phemophilia A with inhibitors. (Funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche and Chugai Pharmaceutical; HAVEN 1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02622321 .).

  7. Therapeutic Innovations: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Dervisis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy involving DNA-interacting agents and indiscriminate cell death is no longer the future of cancer management. While chemotherapy is not likely to completely disappear from the armamentarium; the use of targeted therapies in combination with conventional treatment is becoming the standard of care in human medicine. Tyrosine kinases are pivotal points of functional cellular pathways and have been implicated in malignancy, inflammatory, and immune-mediated diseases. Pharmaceutical interventions targeting aberrant tyrosine kinase signaling has exploded and is the second most important area of drug development. The “Valley of Death” between drug discovery and approval threatens to blunt the enormous strides in cancer management seen thus far. Kinase inhibitors, as targeted small molecules, hold promise in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer. However, there are still many unanswered questions regarding the use of kinase inhibitors in the interpretation and management of cancer. Comparative oncology has the potential to address restrictions and limitations in the advancement in kinase inhibitor therapy.

  8. Modelling of potentially promising SARS protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Hoffmann, Marcin [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Grotthuss, Marcin von [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Knizewski, Lukasz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Rychewski, Leszek [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Eitner, Krystian [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Ginalski, Krzysztof [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-18

    In many cases, at the beginning of a high throughput screening experiment some information about active molecules is already available. Active compounds (such as substrate analogues, natural products and inhibitors of related proteins) are often identified in low throughput validation studies on a biochemical target. Sometimes the additional structural information is also available from crystallographic studies on protein and ligand complexes. In addition, the structural or sequence similarity of various protein targets yields a novel possibility for drug discovery. Co-crystallized compounds from homologous proteins can be used to design leads for a new target without co-crystallized ligands. In this paper we evaluate how far such an approach can be used in a real drug campaign, with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus providing an example. Our method is able to construct small molecules as plausible inhibitors solely on the basis of the set of ligands from crystallized complexes of a protein target, and other proteins from its structurally homologous family. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method are estimated here by the subsequent use of an electronic high throughput screening flexible docking algorithm. The best performing ligands are then used for a very restrictive similarity search for potential inhibitors of the SARS protease within the million compounds from the Ligand.Info small molecule meta-database. The selected molecules can be passed on for further experimental validation.

  9. Model for metabolic resistance against ALS inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter, Otto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to herbicide selection pressure metabolic resistance has evolved in many weed species. In this paper we analyse the interaction between the branched chain amino acid (BBC pathway and detoxifying pathways for herbicide breakdown. The four phase detoxification pathway of herbicides comprising the action of P450, GST, glycosyltransferase and ABC transporter is modelled by a system of coupled enzyme kinetic reactions represented by nonlinear differential equations. The herbicide under consideration inhibits the enzyme ALS, which is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of branched amino acids. For the kinetics of ALS a Monod approach is employed with a binding site for the inhibitor. Synthetic and detoxification pathways are coupled. The model is used to study the production of branched amino acids under the action of ALS inhibitors for different structures and modes of action of the detoxification pathway. The model is capable of generating typical dose response curves and their shift in dependence of the activity pattern of the enzymes of the detoxification pathway of the inhibitor.

  10. The most abundant protease inhibitor in potato tuber (Cv. Elkana) is a serine protease inhibitor from the Kunitz Family.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouvreau, L.A.M.; Gruppen, H.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The gene of the most abundant protease inhibitor in potato cv. Elkana was isolated and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of this gene showed 98% identity with potato serine protease inhibitor (PSPI), a member of the Kunitz family. Therefore, the most abundant protease inhibitor was

  11. Structure-Based Search for New Inhibitors of Cholinesterases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Malawska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholinesterases are important biological targets responsible for regulation of cholinergic transmission, and their inhibitors are used for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. To design new cholinesterase inhibitors, of different structure-based design strategies was followed, including the modification of compounds from a previously developed library and a fragment-based design approach. This led to the selection of heterodimeric structures as potential inhibitors. Synthesis and biological evaluation of selected candidates confirmed that the designed compounds were acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with IC50 values in the mid-nanomolar to low micromolar range, and some of them were also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors.

  12. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic applications of snake venom protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rupamoni; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2017-06-01

    Protease inhibitors are important constituents of snake venom and play important roles in the pathophysiology of snakebite. Recently, research on snake venom protease inhibitors has provided valuable information to decipher the molecular details of various biological processes and offer insight for the development of some therapeutically important molecules from snake venom. The process of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis, in addition to affecting platelet function, are well known as the major targets of several snake venom protease inhibitors. This review summarizes the structure-functional aspects of snake venom protease inhibitors that have been described to date. Because diverse biological functions have been demonstrated by protease inhibitors, a comparative overview of their pharmacological and pathophysiological properties is also highlighted. In addition, since most snake venom protease inhibitors are non-toxic on their own, this review evaluates the different roles of individual protease inhibitors that could lead to the identification of drug candidates and diagnostic molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. xtraction and Characterization of Cathepsin Inhibitor from Milkfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Nurhayati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Proteolytic enzyme is distributed acros all organism including fish. Cysteine proteases are the largest group of proteolytic enzyme. Lysosomal cathepsin, one of cysteine protease enzyme, cause softening and degradation of myofibril protein and it’s activity is regulated by endogenous inhibitors. The purposes of this study were to optimize the extraction cathepsin inhibitors from the skin, muscles, and viscera of fish, to partially purify the cathepsin inhibitors of selected sources, and to study the characteristics of the cathepsin inhibitor. The cathepsin inhibitor could be extracted from muscle fish and partially purified using ammonium sulfate of 70%. The purified cathepsin inhibitor had optimum temperature at 40°C and the optimum at pH 8. Metal ions decreased the activity of the protease inhibitor, except 1 mM of metal ion Mn2+ and Na+.

  14. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  15. The "SWOT" of BRAF inhibition in melanoma: RAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, Moriah H; Solit, David B

    2011-12-01

    Activating mutations in the BRAF gene are among the most prevalent kinase mutations in human cancer. BRAF mutations are most frequent in patients with melanoma where they occur in approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease. Remarkable clinical activity has recently been reported with highly selective RAF inhibitors in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor V600E BRAF mutations. The response rates of RAF inhibitors in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas far exceed the activity level of any prior therapy studied in this disease. The results suggest that we have entered an era of personalized therapy for patients with metastatic melanoma in which treatment selection will be guided by BRAF mutational status. This review will discuss the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats ("SWOT") of developing RAF and MEK selective inhibitors as anti-cancer therapies, recent insights into the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to these agents, and current efforts to develop mechanism-based combination therapies.

  16. F8 haplotype and inhibitor risk: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, John; Astermark, Jan; Menius, Erika D.; Carrington, Mary; Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Nelson, George W.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pavlova, Anna; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Ancestral background, specifically African descent, confers higher risk for development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) in hemophilia A. It has been suggested that differences in the distribution of factor VIII gene (F8) haplotypes, and mismatch between endogenous F8 haplotypes and those comprising products used for treatment could contribute to risk. Design and Methods Data from the HIGS Combined Cohort were used to determine the association between F8 haplotype 3 (H3) vs. haplotypes 1 and 2 (H1+H2) and inhibitor risk among individuals of genetically-determined African descent. Other variables known to affect inhibitor risk including type of F8 mutation and HLA were included in the analysis. A second research question regarding risk related to mismatch in endogenous F8 haplotype and recombinant FVIII products used for treatment was addressed. Results H3 was associated with higher inhibitor risk among those genetically-identified (N=49) as of African ancestry, but the association did not remain significant after adjustment for F8 mutation type and the HLA variables. Among subjects of all racial ancestries enrolled in HIGS who reported early use of recombinant products (N=223), mismatch in endogenous haplotype and the FVIII proteins constituting the products used did not confer greater risk for inhibitor development. Conclusion H3 was not an independent predictor of inhibitor risk. Further, our findings did not support a higher risk of inhibitors in the presence of a haplotype mismatch between the FVIII molecule infused and that of the individual. PMID:22958194

  17. Corrosion inhibitor and method of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.A.; Holifield, P.K.; Looney, J.R.; McDougall, L.A.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a corrosion inhibitor formulation capable of dispersion in aqueous well treating acids. It comprises from 1 to 25 wt % of a metal salt wherein the metal thereof is selected from the group consisting of Cu{sup +}, Sn, Zn, and a Group IIA metal having an atomic number from 12 to 56, a Group IVA metal having an atomic number of 22 or 40, a Group IIIB metal having an atomic number from 13 to 49, a Group VIA metal having an atomic number from 24 to 74, and a Group VB metal having an atomic number from 33 to 83; and mixtures thereof; from 3 to 50 wt% of a quaternary ammonium compound capable of forming a complex with the metal salt; sufficient amount of a highly polar aprotic solvent to dissolve the metal salt and the quaternary ammonium compounds, the concentration of the polar aprotic solvent being between 20 to 90 wt %; and from 1 to 15% of an organic amine dispersant for dispersing the complex of the quaternary ammonium compound and the metal salt in the sell treating acid, the wt % being based on the formulation. This patent also describes a method of acidizing a subterranean formation by injecting a well treating acid solution down pipe into the well. It comprises preparing the corrosion inhibitor formulation of claim 1; dispersing the formulation in the well treating acid solution to provide the solution with at least 0.08 wt % of the metal salt based on the combined weight of the well treating acid and formulation, and injecting the well treating acid solution containing the corrosion inhibitor formulation through the pipe into the formation.

  18. Kynurenine Aminotransferase Isozyme Inhibitors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Nematollahi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kynurenine aminotransferase isozymes (KATs 1–4 are members of the pyridoxal-5’-phosphate (PLP-dependent enzyme family, which catalyse the permanent conversion of l-kynurenine (l-KYN to kynurenic acid (KYNA, a known neuroactive agent. As KATs are found in the mammalian brain and have key roles in the kynurenine pathway, involved in different categories of central nervous system (CNS diseases, the KATs are prominent targets in the quest to treat neurodegenerative and cognitive impairment disorders. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting these enzymes would produce effects beneficial to patients with these conditions, as abnormally high levels of KYNA are observed. KAT-1 and KAT-3 share the highest sequence similarity of the isozymes in this family, and their active site pockets are also similar. Importantly, KAT-2 has the major role of kynurenic acid production (70% in the human brain, and it is considered therefore that suitable inhibition of this isozyme would be most effective in managing major aspects of CNS diseases. Human KAT-2 inhibitors have been developed, but the most potent of them, chosen for further investigations, did not proceed in clinical studies due to the cross toxicity caused by their irreversible interaction with PLP, the required cofactor of the KAT isozymes, and any other PLP-dependent enzymes. As a consequence of the possibility of extensive undesirable adverse effects, it is also important to pursue KAT inhibitors that reversibly inhibit KATs and to include a strategy that seeks compounds likely to achieve substantial interaction with regions of the active site other than the PLP. The main purpose of this treatise is to review the recent developments with the inhibitors of KAT isozymes. This treatise also includes analyses of their crystallographic structures in complex with this enzyme family, which provides further insight for researchers in this and related studies.

  19. The Epidemiology of FVIII Inhibitors in Indian Haemophilia A Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Patricia; Shelar, Tejashree; Nawadkar, Vidhya; Mirgal, Darshana; Mukaddam, Alfiya; Nair, Preethi; Kasatkar, Priyanka; Gaikwad, Tejasvita; Ali, Shahnaz; Jadli, Anshul; Patil, Rucha; Parihar, Anita; Shanbhag, Sharda; Kulkarni, Bipin; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2014-12-01

    A serious complication of replacement therapy in patients with bleeding disorders is the development of 'inhibitors', particularly FVIII inhibitors in haemophilia A patients. This leads to an increase in the management cost, morbidity and mortality, especially post-operatively. The mechanism of FVIII inhibitor development is quite complex and it is difficult to predict inhibitor development, but a prompt and accurate diagnosis is critical as early therapy can save lives. The aim of this study was to screen patients with bleeding disorders in India for inhibitors, and to analyse and compare the prevalence of inhibitors in different regions in India. Patient details were recorded and blood samples were collected in sodium citrate vacutainers from 1,505 patients with bleeding disorders, in different cities in India. Coagulation and inhibitor screening assays were performed, followed by the Bethesda assay in inhibitor positive samples to quantify the FVIII inhibitor titre. Out of the 1,505 samples analysed, 1,285 were Haemophilia A patients, out of which 78 (6.07 %) were positive for 'FVIII Inhibitors'. The highest incidence of FVIII Inhibitors was seen in South India (13.04 %). The highest incidence of 20.99 % was observed in Chennai, followed by Hyderabad (13.33 %), Jammu (9.90 %) and Guwahati (8.51 %), respectively, with respect to the samples analysed. The other regions showed an inhibitor incidence <8 %. The incidence of inhibitors in haemophilia A patients is different in different regions of India; this may be due to the intensity of treatment, type of product or the genetic characteristics of these patients.

  20. Understanding the mechanisms of aromatase inhibitor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Larionov, Alexey A

    2012-01-19

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have a central role in the treatment of breast cancer; however, resistance is a major obstacle to optimal management. Evidence from endocrine, molecular and pathological measurements in clinical material taken before and after therapy with AIs and data from clinical trials in which AIs have been given as treatment either alone or in combination with other targeted agents suggest diverse causes for resistance. These include inherent tumour insensitivity to oestrogen, ineffective inhibition of aromatase, sources of oestrogenic hormones independent of aromatase, activation of signalling by non-endocrine pathways, enhanced cell survival and selection of hormone-insensitive cellular clones during treatment.

  1. Checkpoint inhibitors: a cutting edge in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, C

    2017-07-01

    The checkpoint inhibitor field, and indeed the whole of immuno-oncology, is fast-paced and fascinating, with huge clinical and commercial potential. The challenge in the coming years will be to define the best type and combination of immunotherapy, and the best target population to receive it. Keytruda's ground-breaking approval for a biomarker-based rather than location-based indication is a solid step in this direction, and is likely to be followed by other such approvals. As the field develops, it is to be hoped that immuno-oncology therapeutics will continue to deliver the significant improvements in patient outcome that have been seen so far.

  2. A New Urease Inhibitor from Viola betonicifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Urease has attracted much attention, as it is directly involved in the formation of infection stones and contributes to the pathogenesis of urolithiasis, pyelonephritis, ammonia and hepatic encephalopathy, hepatic coma and urinary catheter encrustation. Moreover, urease is the major cause of pathologies induced by H. pylori, such as gastritis and peptic ulcer. In the present work, the new natural compound, 3-methoxydalbergione, was isolated from Viola betonicifolia. A mechanistic study of this compound as a natural urease inhibitor was performed by using enzyme kinetics and docking studies. 3-Methoxydalbergione could be considered as a lead molecule for drugs useful in the urease associated diseases.

  3. Protease inhibitors targeting coronavirus and filovirus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H; Renslo, Adam R; Simmons, Graham

    2015-04-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  4. Inhibitors of unactivated p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullington, James; Argentieri, Dennis; Averill, Kristin; Carter, Demetrius; Cavender, Druie; Fahmy, Bohumila; Fan, Xiaodong; Hall, Daniel; Heintzelman, Geoffrey; Jackson, Paul; Leung, Wai-Ping; Li, Xun; Ling, Ping; Olini, Gilbert; Razler, Thomas; Reuman, Michael; Rupert, Kenneth; Russell, Ronald; Siekierka, John; Wadsworth, Scott; Wolff, Russell; Xiang, Bangping; Zhang, Yue-Mei

    2006-12-01

    Inhibition of the p38 map kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The first class of potent p38 kinase inhibitors was the pyridinylimidazole compounds from SKB. Since then several pyridinylimidazole-based compounds have been shown to inhibit activated p38 kinase in vitro and in vivo. We have developed a novel series of pyridinylimidazole-based compounds, which potently inhibit the p38 pathway by binding to unactivated p38 kinase and only weakly inhibiting activated p38 kinase activity in vitro.

  5. Proton pump inhibitors inhibit pancreatic secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Barbuskaite, Dagne; Tozzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    +/K+-ATPases are expressed and functional in human pancreatic ducts and whether proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have effect on those. Here we show that the gastric HKα1 and HKβ subunits (ATP4A; ATP4B) and non-gastric HKα2 subunits (ATP12A) of H+/K+-ATPases are expressed in human pancreatic cells. Pumps have similar...... localizations in duct cell monolayers (Capan-1) and human pancreas, and notably the gastric pumps are localized on the luminal membranes. In Capan-1 cells, PPIs inhibited recovery of intracellular pH from acidosis. Furthermore, in rats treated with PPIs, pancreatic secretion was inhibited but concentrations...

  6. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Proton Pump Inhibitors : An Evaluation of Treatment Options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Roelof W. F.; Jansman, Frank G. A.; Hunfeld, Nicole G.; Peric, Robert; Reyners, Anna K. L.; Imholz, Alex L. T.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Aerts, Joachim G.; van Gelder, Teun; Mathijssen, Ron H. J.

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have rapidly become an established factor in oncology, and have been shown to be effective in a wide variety of solid and hematologic malignancies. Use of the oral administration route of TKIs offers flexibility and is convenient for the patient; however, despite

  7. Aromatase inhibitors in early breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriac, Louis; Smith, Ian

    2003-08-01

    A recent National Institutes of Health consensus guideline recommends the general use of adjuvant hormonal therapy for the treatment of early breast cancer in postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Standard therapy has been 5 years of tamoxifen, but about 30% of those patients fail to survive 10 years, many as a consequence of tamoxifen resistance. Promising results with the third-generation aromatase inhibitors anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane in first- and second-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer has prompted their evaluation as adjuvant therapy in patients progressing on tamoxifen or as alternative first-line treatment. Anastrozole has recently achieved significantly longer disease-free survival than tamoxifen in a first-line adjuvant therapy trial, and letrozole is being investigated in several large adjuvant trials. Aromatase inhibitors appear to be well tolerated for long-term adjuvant treatment. In the neoadjuvant setting, letrozole has been especially effective compared with tamoxifen in downstaging primary tumors in postmenopausal women, permitting significantly more breast-conserving surgery.

  8. Synthesis of Novel Chalcones as Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Dao Tran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new series of benzylaminochalcone derivatives with different substituents on ring B were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase. The study is aimed at identification of novel benzylaminochalcones capable of blocking acetylcholinesterase activity for further development of an approach to Alzheimer’s disease treatment. These compounds were produced in moderate to good yields via Claisen-Schmidt condensation and subjected to an in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay, using Ellman’s method. The in silico docking procedure was also employed to identify molecular interactions between the chalcone compounds and the enzyme. Compounds with ring B bearing pyridin-4-yl, 4-nitrophenyl, 4-chlorophenyl and 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl moieties were discovered to exhibit significant inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase, with IC50 values ranging from 23 to 39 µM. The molecular modeling studies are consistent with the hypothesis that benzylaminochalcones could exert their effects as dual-binding-site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, which might simultaneously enhance cholinergic neurotransmission and inhibit β-amyloid aggregation through binding to both catalytic and peripheral sites of the enzyme. These derivatives could be further developed to provide novel leads for the discovery of new anti-Alzheimer drugs in the future.

  9. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  10. Replication and Inhibitors of Enteroviruses and Parechoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van der Linden

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Enterovirus (EV and Parechovirus genera of the picornavirus family include many important human pathogens, including poliovirus, rhinovirus, EV-A71, EV-D68, and human parechoviruses (HPeV. They cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from a simple common cold to life-threatening diseases such as encephalitis and myocarditis. At the moment, no antiviral therapy is available against these viruses and it is not feasible to develop vaccines against all EVs and HPeVs due to the great number of serotypes. Therefore, a lot of effort is being invested in the development of antiviral drugs. Both viral proteins and host proteins essential for virus replication can be used as targets for virus inhibitors. As such, a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication is pivotal in the design of antiviral strategies goes hand in hand with a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication. In this review, we will give an overview of the current state of knowledge of EV and HPeV replication and how this can be inhibited by small-molecule inhibitors.

  11. Lonafarnib is a potential inhibitor for neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Sun

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular disease that involves the build-up of plaque on the inner walls of the arteries. Intraplaque neovacularization has been shown to be essential in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Previous studies showed that small-molecule compounds targeting farnesyl transferase have the ability to prevent atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, but the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that lonafarnib, a specific inhibitor of farnesyl transferase, elicits inhibitory effect on vascular endothelial capillary assembly in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we showed that lonafarnib treatment led to a dose-dependent decrease in scratch wound closure in vitro, whereas it had little effect on endothelial cell proliferation. These data indicate that lonafarnib inhibits neovascularization via directly targeting endothelial cells and disturbing their motility. Moreover, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of farnesyl transferase by lonafarnib significantly impaired centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge of endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we found that the catalytic β subunit of farnesyl transferase associated with a cytoskeletal protein important for the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity. Additionally, we showed that lonafarnib remarkably inhibited the expression of the cytoskeletal protein and interrupted its interaction with farnesyl transferase. Our findings thus offer novel mechanistic insight into the protective effect of farnesyl transferase inhibitors on atherosclerosis and provide encouraging evidence for the potential use of this group of agents in inhibiting plaque neovascularization.

  12. Phytochemicals as Inhibitors of Candida Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Jayant Shankar; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Candida biofilm and associated infections is a serious threat to the large population of immunocompromised patients. Biofilm growth on prosthetic devices or host tissue shows reduced sensitivity to antifungal agents and persists as a reservoir of infective cells. Options for successful treatment of biofilm associated Candida infections are restricted because most of the available antifungal drugs fail to eradicate biofilms. Various plant actives are known to possess interesting antifungal properties. To explore and review the potential of phytochemicals as a novel strategy against Candida biofilms is the intent of present article. Thorough literature search is performed to identify Candida biofilm inhibitors of plant origin. An account of efficacy of selected phytochemicals is presented taking into consideration their biofilm inhibitory concentrations. This review discusses biofilm formation by Candida species, their involvement in human infections, and associated drug resistance. It gives insight into the biofilm inhibitory potential of various phytochemicals. Based on the available reports including the work done in our laboratory, several plant extracts, essential oils and phytomolecules have been identified as excellent inhibitors of biofilms of C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species (NACS). Selected phytochemicals which exhibit activities at low concentrations without displaying toxicity to host are potential therapeutic agents against biofilm associated Candida infections. In vivo testing in animal models and clinical trials in humans are required to be taken up seriously to propose few of the phytochemicals as candidate drug molecules.

  13. PD-1 Checkpoint Inhibitor Associated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Schneider

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report first-hand narrative experience of autoimmune encephalitis and to briefly review currently available evidence of autoimmune encephalitis in cancer patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Setting: A case study is presented on the management of a patient who developed autoimmune encephalitis during nivolumab monotherapy occurring after 28 weeks on anti-PD-1 monotherapy (nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks for non-small cell lung cancer. Results: No substantial improvement was observed by antiepileptic treatment. After administration of 80 mg methylprednisolone, neurologic symptoms disappeared within 24 h and the patient fully recovered. Conclusions: Immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment can lead to autoimmune encephalitis. Clinical trial data indicate a frequency of autoimmune encephalitis of ≥0.1 to <1% with a higher probability during combined or sequential anti-CTLA-4/anti-PD-1 therapy than during anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 monotherapy. Further collection of evidence and translational research is warranted.

  14. RNA aptamer inhibitors of a restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón, Estefanía; Maher, L James

    2015-09-03

    Restriction endonucleases (REases) recognize and cleave short palindromic DNA sequences, protecting bacterial cells against bacteriophage infection by attacking foreign DNA. We are interested in the potential of folded RNA to mimic DNA, a concept that might be applied to inhibition of DNA-binding proteins. As a model system, we sought RNA aptamers against the REases BamHI, PacI and KpnI using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 20 rounds of selection under different stringent conditions, we identified the 10 most enriched RNA aptamers for each REase. Aptamers were screened for binding and specificity, and assayed for REase inhibition. We obtained eight high-affinity (Kd ∼12-30 nM) selective competitive inhibitors (IC50 ∼20-150 nM) for KpnI. Predicted RNA secondary structures were confirmed by in-line attack assay and a 38-nt derivative of the best anti-KpnI aptamer was sufficient for inhibition. These competitive inhibitors presumably act as KpnI binding site analogs, but lack the primary consensus KpnI cleavage sequence and are not cleaved by KpnI, making their potential mode of DNA mimicry fascinating. Anti-REase RNA aptamers could have value in studies of REase mechanism and may give clues to a code for designing RNAs that competitively inhibit DNA binding proteins including transcription factors. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Structure-based inhibitors of tau aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, P. M.; Boyer, D. R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Sawaya, M. R.; Cascio, D.; Murray, K.; Gonen, T.; Eisenberg, D. S.

    2018-02-01

    Aggregated tau protein is associated with over 20 neurological disorders, which include Alzheimer's disease. Previous work has shown that tau's sequence segments VQIINK and VQIVYK drive its aggregation, but inhibitors based on the structure of the VQIVYK segment only partially inhibit full-length tau aggregation and are ineffective at inhibiting seeding by full-length fibrils. Here we show that the VQIINK segment is the more powerful driver of tau aggregation. Two structures of this segment determined by the cryo-electron microscopy method micro-electron diffraction explain its dominant influence on tau aggregation. Of practical significance, the structures lead to the design of inhibitors that not only inhibit tau aggregation but also inhibit the ability of exogenous full-length tau fibrils to seed intracellular tau in HEK293 biosensor cells into amyloid. We also raise the possibility that the two VQIINK structures represent amyloid polymorphs of tau that may account for a subset of prion-like strains of tau.

  16. Flavonoids as Inhibitors of Human Butyrylcholinesterase Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Katalinić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8 appears to be of interest in treating diseases with symptoms of reduced neurotransmitter levels, such as Alzheimer’s disease. However, BCHE gene polymorphism should not be neglected in research since it could have an effect on the expected outcome. Several well-known cholinergic drugs (e.g. galantamine, huperzine and rivastigmine originating from plants, or synthesised as derivatives of plant compounds, have shown that herbs could serve as a source of novel target-directed compounds. We focused our research on flavonoids, biologically active polyphenolic compounds found in many plants and plant-derived products, as BChE inhibitors. All of the tested flavonoids: galangin, quercetin, fisetin and luteolin reversibly inhibited usual, atypical, and fluoride-resistant variants of human BChE. The inhibition potency increased in the following order, identically for all three BChE variants: luteolininhibitor dissociation constants (Ki ranged from 10 to 170 mmol/L. We showed that no significant change in the inhibition potency of selected flavonoids exists in view of BChE polymorphism. Our results suggested that flavonoids could assist the further development of new BChE-targeted drugs for treating symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases and dementia.

  17. Application of response surface methodology method in designing corrosion inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmara, Y. P.; Athirah; Siregar, J. P.; Kurniawan, T.; Bachtiar, D.

    2017-10-01

    In oil and gas pipelines and offshore structure, inhibitors have been considered to be the first choice to reduce corrosion rate. There are many corrosion inhibitor compositions available in the market. To produce the best corrosion inhibitor requires many experimental data which is not efficient. These experiments used response surface methodology (RSM) to select corrosion inhibitor compositions. The experiments investigated effects of corrosion inhibition on corrosion rate of low carbon steel in 3% NaCl solution with different concentrations of selected main inhibitor compositions which are ethyl acetate (EA), ethylene glycol (EG) and sodium benzoate (SB). Corrosion rate were calculated using linear polarization resistance (LPR). All of the experiments were set in natural conditions at pH 7. MINITAB® version 15 was used for data analysis. It is shown that a quadratic model is a representative model can predict best corrosion inhibitor composition comprehensibly.

  18. Use of Silica Tubes as Nanocontainers for Corrosion Inhibitor Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesia Ávila-Gonzalez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new alkyd paint anticorrosion smart coating was developed by using silica nanoparticles as corrosion inhibitor nanocontainers. Silica particles were mixed with the paint at different concentrations to study their performance and ensure their free transportation to the damaged metal. The filling up of silica particles was done preparing three solutions: distilled water, acetone, and a mixture of both, with Fe(NO33 and silica particles immersed in each of the solutions to adsorb the inhibitor. Acetone solution was the best alternative determined by weight gain analysis made with the inhibitor adsorbed in silica nanocontainers. Steel samples were painted with inhibitor silica nanocontainer coatings and immersed in an aqueous solution of 3% sodium chloride. Polarization curves and electrochemical noise techniques were used to evaluate the corrosion inhibitor system behavior. Good performance was obtained in comparison with samples without inhibitor nanocontainer coating.

  19. GSK-3 inhibitors: preclinical and clinical focus on CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagit eEldar-Finkelman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 activity via pharmacological intervention has become an important target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. The reported GSK-3 inhibitors are of diverse chemotypes and mechanisms of action that include compounds isolated from natural sources, cations, synthetic small-molecule ATP-competitive inhibitors, non-ATP-competitive inhibitors, and substrate-competitive inhibitors. Here we describe the variety of GSK-3 inhibitors with a specific emphasis on their biological activities in neurons and neurological disorders. We further highlight our current progress in the development of non-ATP-competitive inhibitors of GSK-3.The available data raises the hope that one or more of these drug design approaches will prove successful at stabilizing or even reversing the aberrant neuropathology and cognitive deficits of certain CNS disorders.

  20. Internet Selling Expansion Inhibitors: A Mixed Method Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research based on providing five questions has tried to identify and prioritize the main and sub inhibitors of internet selling boosting in Iran. A mixed method research (QUAN has been used in this research. In the qualitative phase, individual in-depth interviews have been done with seven e-shop managers. In this phase, 45 detailed inhibitors have been detected. These 45 inhibitors have been categorized in nine sub categories and four main categories. In the quantitative phase a 51-items questionnaires has been designed including six demographical and 45 specialized questions. Findings of the quantitative phase reveal that the main obstacles include legal, cultural, infrastructural and managerial inhibitors. In addition, sub category inhibitors include legal, governmental, telecommunication, society, human resource, transportation, financial and customer related.     Keywords: e-selling, Iran, Inhibitors, Mixed method.

  1. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  2. Aromatase inhibitors in men: effects and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jong Frank H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatase inhibitors effectively delay epiphysial maturation in boys and improve testosterone levels in adult men Therefore, aromatase inhibitors may be used to increase adult height in boys with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, idiopathic short stature and constitutional delay of puberty. Long-term efficacy and safety of the use of aromatase inhibitors has not yet been established in males, however, and their routine use is therefore not yet recommended.

  3. Towards a unified model of RAF inhibitor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solit, David B; Rosen, Neal

    2014-01-01

    ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors elicit profound but often temporary antitumor responses in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma. Analysis of tumor samples collected at the time of disease progression indicates that alterations within the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway that result in reactivation of ERK signaling are present in most patients. Mutations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway that enhance the adaptive response to RAF inhibitors also contribute to RAF inhibitor resistance in a subset of patients.

  4. Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Maryland 21702-5012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer October...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ovarian cancer , BRCA1, RAD51, PARP inhibitors, platinum, biomarkers, drug resistance 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of

  5. Natural compounds as corrosion inhibitors for highly cycled systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quraishi, M.A.; Farooqi, I.H.; Saini, P.A. [Corrosion Research Lab., Aligarh (India)

    1999-11-01

    Strict environmental legislations have led to the development of green inhibitors in recent years. In continuation of the authors` research work on development of green inhibitors, they have investigated the aqueous extracts of three plants namely: Azadirachta indica, Punica Granatum and Momordica charantia as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 3% NaCl using weight loss and electrochemical methods. All the investigated compounds exhibited excellent corrosion inhibition properties comparable to that of HEDP. Azadirachta showed better scale inhibition effect than HEDP.

  6. Diversity of marine bacteria producing beta-glucosidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sony; Sree, Ayinampudi; Dash, Soumya Suchismita; Sethi, Dipti Priya; Chowdhury, Lipsa

    2013-04-17

    Beta-glucosidase inhibitors are being extensively studied for use as anti-diabetics, anti-obesity and anti-tumour compounds. So far, these compounds have been reported in large numbers from plants, mushrooms, algae and fungi. There are very few reports of such inhibitors from bacteria in the open literature, particularly marine bacteria; although the best known inhibitor deoxynojirimycin was isolated from bacilli and actinomycete. Through this study, we tried to discover the diversity of microbial associates of marine sponge and sediment producing β-glucosidase inhibitors. We found 41 (22.7%) out of 181 bacteria, produced such inhibitors. The inhibitors are abundant in bacterial associates of marine sponge Aka coralliphaga. When these bacteria were phylogenetically analyzed, it was found that marine bacteria producing glucosidase inhibitors belong to the phylum Firmicutes (23), Actinobacteria (9), Proteobacteria (7) and Bacteroidetes (1). A significant number of marine bacteria belonging to a wide range of bacterial taxa were found to produce β-glucosidase inhibitors. These compounds are abundantly present in bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes followed by the phylum Actinobacteria. The results nurture a hope of finding new compounds, which can inhibit glucosidases, in the bacterial domain of marine organisms. Thus, marine microbial cells can be utilized as producers of pharmacologically essential enzyme inhibitors.

  7. Discovery of potent, selective sulfonylfuran urea endothelial lipase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Krista B; Bury, Michael J; Cheung, Mui; Cichy-Knight, Maria A; Dowdell, Sarah E; Dunn, Allison K; Lee, Dennis; Lieby, Jeffrey A; Moore, Michael L; Scherzer, Daryl A; Sha, Deyou; Suarez, Dominic P; Murphy, Dennis J; Harpel, Mark R; Manas, Eric S; McNulty, Dean E; Annan, Roland S; Matico, Rosalie E; Schwartz, Benjamin K; Trill, John J; Sweitzer, Thomas D; Wang, Da-Yuan; Keller, Paul M; Krawiec, John A; Jaye, Michael C

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) activity has been implicated in HDL catabolism, vascular inflammation, and atherogenesis, and inhibitors are therefore expected to be useful for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Sulfonylfuran urea 1 was identified in a high-throughput screening campaign as a potent and non-selective EL inhibitor. A lead optimization effort was undertaken to improve potency and selectivity, and modifications leading to improved LPL selectivity were identified. Radiolabeling studies were undertaken to establish the mechanism of action for these inhibitors, which were ultimately demonstrated to be irreversible inhibitors.

  8. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  9. Inhibitory Effects of Respiration Inhibitors on Aflatoxin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Sakuda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin production inhibitors, which do not inhibit the growth of aflatoxigenic fungi, may be used to control aflatoxin without incurring a rapid spread of resistant strains. A respiration inhibitor that inhibits aflatoxin production was identified during a screening process for natural, aflatoxin-production inhibitors. This prompted us to evaluate respiration inhibitors as potential aflatoxin control agents. The inhibitory activities of four natural inhibitors, seven synthetic miticides, and nine synthetic fungicides were evaluated on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus. All of the natural inhibitors (rotenone, siccanin, aptenin A5, and antimycin A inhibited fungal aflatoxin production with IC50 values around 10 µM. Among the synthetic miticides, pyridaben, fluacrypyrim, and tolfenpyrad exhibited strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values less than 0.2 µM, whereas cyflumetofen did not show significant inhibitory activity. Of the synthetic fungicides, boscalid, pyribencarb, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl demonstrated strong inhibitory activities, with IC50 values less than 0.5 µM. Fungal growth was not significantly affected by any of the inhibitors tested at concentrations used. There was no correlation observed between the targets of respiration inhibitors (complexes I, II, and III and their IC50 values for aflatoxin-production inhibitory activity. This study suggests that respiration inhibitors, including commonly used pesticides, are useful for aflatoxin control.

  10. Inhibitory Effects of Respiration Inhibitors on Aflatoxin Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuda, Shohei; Prabowo, Diyan Febri; Takagi, Keiko; Shiomi, Kazuro; Mori, Mihoko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin production inhibitors, which do not inhibit the growth of aflatoxigenic fungi, may be used to control aflatoxin without incurring a rapid spread of resistant strains. A respiration inhibitor that inhibits aflatoxin production was identified during a screening process for natural, aflatoxin-production inhibitors. This prompted us to evaluate respiration inhibitors as potential aflatoxin control agents. The inhibitory activities of four natural inhibitors, seven synthetic miticides, and nine synthetic fungicides were evaluated on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus. All of the natural inhibitors (rotenone, siccanin, aptenin A5, and antimycin A) inhibited fungal aflatoxin production with IC50 values around 10 µM. Among the synthetic miticides, pyridaben, fluacrypyrim, and tolfenpyrad exhibited strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values less than 0.2 µM, whereas cyflumetofen did not show significant inhibitory activity. Of the synthetic fungicides, boscalid, pyribencarb, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl demonstrated strong inhibitory activities, with IC50 values less than 0.5 µM. Fungal growth was not significantly affected by any of the inhibitors tested at concentrations used. There was no correlation observed between the targets of respiration inhibitors (complexes I, II, and III) and their IC50 values for aflatoxin-production inhibitory activity. This study suggests that respiration inhibitors, including commonly used pesticides, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:24674936

  11. High throughput in vivo protease inhibitor selection platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant microbial cell comprising a selection platform for screening for a protease inhibitor, wherein the platform comprises transgenes encoding a protease having selective peptide bond cleavage activity at a recognition site amino acid sequence; and transgenes...... encoding polypeptides conferring resistance to microbial growth inhibitors; wherein the polypeptides comprise the recognition site amino acid sequence cleavable by the protease. Protease inhibitors are detected by their ability to inhibit protease specific cleavage and inactivation of the polypeptides...... platform for screening for a protease inhibitor....

  12. Solderability preservation through the use of organic inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, N.R.; Hosking, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Organic inhibitors can be used to prevent corrosion of metals and have application in the electronics industry as solderability preservatives. We have developed a model to describe the action of two inhibitors (benzotriazole and imidazole) during the environmental aging and soldering process. The inhibitors bond with the metal surface and form a barrier that prevents or retards oxidation. At soldering temperatures, the metal-organic complex breaks down leaving an oxide-free metal surface that allows excellent wetting by molten solder. The presence of the inhibitor retards the wetting rate relative to clean copper, but provides a vast improvement relative to oxidized copper.

  13. Behaviour of tetramine inhibitors during pickling of hot rolled steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornu, Marie-José, E-mail: marie-jose.cornu@arcelormittal.com [ArcelorMittal Maizières Research, Voie Romaine, 57280 Maizières-lès-Metz (France); Koltsov, Alexey, E-mail: alexey.koltsov@arcelormittal.com [ArcelorMittal Maizières Research, Voie Romaine, 57280 Maizières-lès-Metz (France); Nicolas, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina_nicolas@live.fr [ArcelorMittal Maizières Research, Voie Romaine, 57280 Maizières-lès-Metz (France); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l’Environnement (LCPME) – UMR 7564 CNRS – Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54602 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); Colom, Lydia, E-mail: Lydia.colom@sfr.fr [ArcelorMittal Maizières Research, Voie Romaine, 57280 Maizières-lès-Metz (France); Dossot, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.dossot@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l’Environnement (LCPME) – UMR 7564 CNRS – Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54602 Villers-lès-Nancy (France)

    2014-02-28

    To avoid the dissolution of steel in industrial pickling process, tetramine inhibitors are added to the pickling bath. This study is devoted to the understanding of the action mechanism of these inhibitors in hydrochloric and sulphuric baths on non-alloyed and alloyed steels. Pickling experiments and characterization with XPS, Raman and infrared spectroscopies have shown that inhibitors work only in acid media and leached out from the steel surfaces during the rinsing operation just after pickling. The effectiveness of inhibitors depends on the acid media and the temperature. Experimental data are consistent with a surface mechanism, i.e., the so-called “outer-sphere” adsorption.

  14. The effects of residual platelets in plasma on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlien Pieters

    Full Text Available Due to controversial evidence in the literature pertaining to the activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in platelets, we examined the effects of residual platelets present in plasma (a potential pre-analytical variable on various plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays. Blood samples were collected from 151 individuals and centrifuged at 352 and 1500 g to obtain plasma with varying numbers of platelet. In a follow-up study, blood samples were collected from an additional 23 individuals, from whom platelet-poor (2000 g, platelet-containing (352 g and platelet-rich plasma (200 g were prepared and analysed as fresh-frozen and after five defrost-refreeze cycles (to determine the contribution of in vitro platelet degradation. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen, tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex, plasma clot lysis time, β-thromboglobulin and plasma platelet count were analysed. Platelet α-granule release (plasma β-thromboglobulin showed a significant association with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels but weak associations with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and a functional marker of fibrinolysis, clot lysis time. Upon dividing the study population into quartiles based on β-thromboglobulin levels, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen increased significantly across the quartiles while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and clot lysis time tended to increase in the 4th quartile only. In the follow-up study, plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen was also significantly influenced by platelet count in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasma plasminogen activator