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Sample records for neuralized antagonizes cis-inactivation

  1. The Netrin-related domain of Sfrp1 interacts with Wnt ligands and antagonizes their activity in the anterior neural plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteve Pilar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted frizzled related proteins (SFRPs are multifunctional modulators of Wnt and BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein signalling necessary for the development of most organs and the homeostasis of different adult tissues. SFRPs fold in two independent domains: the cysteine rich domain (SfrpCRD related to the extracellular portion of Frizzled (Fz, Wnt receptors and the Netrin module (SfrpNTR defined by homologies with molecules such as Netrin-1, inhibitors of metalloproteinases and complement proteins. Due to its structural relationship with Fz, it is believed that SfrpCRD interferes with Wnt signalling by binding and sequestering the ligand. In contrast, the functional relevance of the SfrpNTR has been barely addressed. Results Here, we combine biochemical studies, mutational analysis and functional assays in cell culture and medaka-fish embryos to show that the Sfrp1NTR mimics the function of the entire molecule, binds to Wnt8 and antagonizes Wnt canonical signalling. This activity requires intact tertiary structure and is shared by the distantly related Netrin-1NTR. In contrast, the Sfrp1CRD cannot mirror the function of the entire molecule in vivo but interacts with Fz receptors and antagonizes Wnt8-mediated β-catenin transcriptional activity. Conclusion On the basis of these results, we propose that SFRP modulation of Wnt signalling may involve multiple and differential interactions among Wnt, Fz and SFRPs.

  2. The Xenopus Irx genes are essential for neural patterning and define the border between prethalamus and thalamus through mutual antagonism with the anterior repressors Fezf and Arx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Seguel, Elisa; Alarcón, Pilar; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2009-05-15

    The Iroquois (Irx) genes encode homeoproteins conserved during evolution. Vertebrate genomes contain six Irx genes organized in two clusters, IrxA (which harbors Irx1, Irx2 and Irx4) and IrxB (which harbors Irx3, Irx5 and Irx6). To determine the precise role of these genes during development and their putative redundancies, we conducted a comparative expression analysis and a comprehensive loss-of-function study of all the early expressed Irx genes (Irx1-5) using specific morpholinos in Xenopus. We found that the five Irx genes display largely overlapping expression patterns and contribute to neural patterning. All Irx genes are required for proper formation of posterior forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain and, to a lesser an extent, spinal cord. Nevertheless, Irx1 and Irx3 seem to have a predominant role during regionalization of the neural plate. In addition, we find that the common anterior limit of Irx gene expression, which will correspond to the future border between the prethalamus and thalamus, is defined by mutual repression between Fezf and Irx proteins. This mutual repression is likely direct. Finally, we show that Arx, another anteriorly expressed repressor, also contribute to delineate the anterior border of Irx expression.

  3. Uncompetitive antagonism of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Tikhonov, Denis B; Bølcho, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Philanthotoxins are uncompetitive antagonists of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors presumed to bind to the pore-forming region, but a detailed molecular mechanism for this interaction is missing. Here a small library of novel philanthotoxins was designed and synthesized using a solid-phase strategy. ...... polyamine toxins antagonize the AMPA receptor ion channel and provide the basis for rational development of uncompetitive antagonists of AMPA receptors....

  4. The Antagonism Mechanism Of Trichoderma spp. Towards Fusarium solani Mold

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    Utami Sri Hastuti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The antagonism ability of seven Trichoderma isolates towards F.solani have been observed and tested by dual culture technique. The antagonism mechanism observed by microscopic observation with light microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The research result showed seven species of Trichoderma molds have different antagonism ability towards F.solani each other. The antagonism mechanism observed by light microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy were mycoparasitism, antibiosis, and competition.

  5. Triclosan antagonizes fluconazole activity against Candida albicans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgins, J

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg\\/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg\\/L), triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1Δ and cdr2Δ strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total membrane sterol content, but did induce the expression of FAS1 and FAS2, indicating that its mode of action may involve inhibition of fatty acid synthesis, as it does in prokaryotes. However, FAS2 mutants did not exhibit increased susceptibility to triclosan, and overexpression of both FAS1 and FAS2 alleles did not alter triclosan susceptibility. Unexpectedly, the antagonistic effect was specific for C. albicans under hypha-inducing conditions and was absent in the non-filamentous efg1Δ strain. This antagonism may be due to the membranotropic activity of triclosan and the unique composition of hyphal membranes.

  6. Natural Protection of Wood with Antagonism Fungi

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    Alba ZAREMSKI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological environments contain a certain number of microbial populations which, within a givenecological niche, display various relations ranging from symbiosis to parasitism. Researchers have beeninterested in these types of relations for around fifty years, especially in one very particular type ofrelationship: the antagonism exerted between individuals of the same microbial population.Today, the role played by biological agents, bringing into play inhibitive or destructive antibioticsubstances, reveals a certain potential for their use in controlling microorganisms associated with suchdegradation processes.The work undertaken by HydroQuébec and CIRAD involved two types of experiment: 1 in Petri dishes toassess and characterize the antagonistic capacity of Trichoderma against white rot and brown rot fungi; 2on pieces taken from untreated poles in order to study confrontation between the basidiomycete and theantagonistic strain in wood.This study investigated the antagonism of three ascomycetes of the genus Trichoderma against two whiterot basidiomycetes, Pycnoporus sanguineus and Coriolus versicolor, and two brown rot basidiomycetes,Antrodia sp. and Coniophora puteana, through direct confrontation in Petri dishes and in the wood ofHydroQuébec poles.The results obtained seemed to complete each other coherently. They revealed that the Trichodermagroup of fungi was not aggressive to wood and the results obtained after direct confrontation in Petri disheswere confirmed in wood.By directly exposing the different basidiomycetes and antagonists to each other in Petri dishes, two bytwo, we effectively revealed an antagonism effect for a large majority of the pairs. However, there wassubstantial variability in reactions from one pair to the next.

  7. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2010-08-22

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Agonism and antagonism at the insulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Louise; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Insulin can trigger metabolic as well as mitogenic effects, the latter being pharmaceutically undesirable. An understanding of the structure/function relationships between insulin receptor (IR) binding and mitogenic/metabolic signalling would greatly facilitate the preclinical development of new...... insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been...... shown to exhibit antagonistic properties, with the exception of a crosslinked insulin dimer (B29-B'29). However, synthetic monomeric or dimeric peptides targeting sites 1 or 2 of the IR were shown to be either agonists or antagonists. We found here that the S961 peptide, previously described to be an IR...

  9. Does Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonism Prevent Calcineurin Inhibitor-Induced Nephrotoxicity?

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    Line Aas Mortensen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin inhibitors have markedly reduced acute rejection rates in renal transplantation, thus significantly improved short-term outcome. The beneficial effects are, however, tampered by acute and chronic nephrotoxicity leading to interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, which impairs long-term allograft survival. The mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone induces fibrosis in numerous organs, including the kidney. Evidence from animal models suggests a beneficial effect of aldosterone antagonism in reducing calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity. This review summarizes current evidence of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism in animal models of calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity and the results from studies of mineralocorticoid antagonism in renal transplant patients.

  10. Insulin Antagonizes Thrombin-Induced Microvessel Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Xue Lian; Wang, Lei; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Sustained increase in microvessel permeability results in cell and tissue damage. To date, it has not been possible to safely and specifically block increased microvessel permeability in vivo. We showed that insulin stimulates angiogenesis and that the new microvessels are associated with more αSMA-producing cells, suggesting greater stability. In this study, we show that local injection of insulin under the skin of mice significantly inhibits thrombin-induced microvessel permeability and that insulin improves the barrier function of primary human endothelial cells under conditions that mimic endothelium in vivo. These findings indicate that insulin antagonizes thrombin-induced microvessel permeability. At the cell and molecular levels, we show that insulin interferes with thrombin-induced VE-cadherin signaling by decreasing the ability of thrombin to induce VE-cadherin translocation to the cytoskeleton/nuclear compartment, leading to microvessel leakage. Simultaneously, the rapid activation of Src by insulin followed by the activation of Rac1, a small GTPase involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, leads to the maintenance of endothelial barrier, short-circuiting the slower thrombin-induced Src-RhoA signaling that leads to endothelial permeability. This novel mechanism by which insulin inhibits thrombin-induced permeability provides support for the use of insulin treatment in pathological conditions that involve blood-barrier dysfunction, especially as resuscitation treatment methods for extensive burns, sepsis, and other severe pathological conditions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Agonism and antagonism at the insulin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Knudsen

    Full Text Available Insulin can trigger metabolic as well as mitogenic effects, the latter being pharmaceutically undesirable. An understanding of the structure/function relationships between insulin receptor (IR binding and mitogenic/metabolic signalling would greatly facilitate the preclinical development of new insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been shown to exhibit antagonistic properties, with the exception of a crosslinked insulin dimer (B29-B'29. However, synthetic monomeric or dimeric peptides targeting sites 1 or 2 of the IR were shown to be either agonists or antagonists. We found here that the S961 peptide, previously described to be an IR antagonist, exhibited partial agonistic effects in the 1-10 nM range, showing altogether a bell-shaped dose-response curve. Intriguingly, the agonistic effects of S961 were seen only on mitogenic endpoints ((3H-thymidine incorporation, and not on metabolic endpoints ((14C-glucose incorporation in adipocytes and muscle cells. The agonistic effects of S961 were observed in 3 independent cell lines, with complete concordance between mitogenicity ((3H-thymidine incorporation and phosphorylation of the IR and Akt. Together with the B29-B'29 crosslinked dimer, S961 is a rare example of a mixed agonist/antagonist for the human IR. A plausible mechanistic explanation based on the bivalent crosslinking model of IR activation is proposed.

  12. Trichoderma spp. from rhizosphere soil and their antagonism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trichoderma spp. from rhizosphere soil and their antagonism against Fusarium sambucinum. ... Trichoderma virens. Among these isolates, D-3-1 (T. longibrachiatum) showed the strongest inhibition of the growth of Fusarium sambucinum. Key words: Trichoderma, potato, dry rot, biological control, Fusarium sambucinum.

  13. Rhubarb Antagonizes Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-induced Vascular Endothelial Permeability

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    Yun-Liang Cui

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The rhubarb mixture of emodin, 3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid, 1-O-caffeoyl-2-(4-hydroxyl-O-cinnamoyl-β-D-glucose, daucosterol linoleate, and rhein, at a low concentration, antagonized the MMP9-induced HUVEC monolayer permeability by promoting HUVEC proliferation and reducing extracellular VE-cadherin concentrations.

  14. Analysis of Determinants in Filovirus Glycoproteins Required for Tetherin Antagonism

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    Kerstin Gnirß

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The host cell protein tetherin can restrict the release of enveloped viruses from infected cells. The HIV-1 protein Vpu counteracts tetherin by removing it from the site of viral budding, the plasma membrane, and this process depends on specific interactions between the transmembrane domains of Vpu and tetherin. In contrast, the glycoproteins (GPs of two filoviruses, Ebola and Marburg virus, antagonize tetherin without reducing surface expression, and the domains in GP required for tetherin counteraction are unknown. Here, we show that filovirus GPs depend on the presence of their authentic transmembrane domains for virus-cell fusion and tetherin antagonism. However, conserved residues within the transmembrane domain were dispensable for membrane fusion and tetherin counteraction. Moreover, the insertion of the transmembrane domain into a heterologous viral GP, Lassa virus GPC, was not sufficient to confer tetherin antagonism to the recipient. Finally, mutation of conserved residues within the fusion peptide of Ebola virus GP inhibited virus-cell fusion but did not ablate tetherin counteraction, indicating that the fusion peptide and the ability of GP to drive host cell entry are not required for tetherin counteraction. These results suggest that the transmembrane domains of filoviral GPs contribute to tetherin antagonism but are not the sole determinants.

  15. Exploitative and hierarchical antagonism in a cooperative bacterium.

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    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Social organisms that cooperate with some members of their own species, such as close relatives, may fail to cooperate with other genotypes of the same species. Such noncooperation may take the form of outright antagonism or social exploitation. Myxococcus xanthus is a highly social prokaryote that cooperatively develops into spore-bearing, multicellular fruiting bodies in response to starvation. Here we have characterized the nature of social interactions among nine developmentally proficient strains of M. xanthus isolated from spatially distant locations. Strains were competed against one another in all possible pairwise combinations during starvation-induced development. In most pairings, at least one competitor exhibited strong antagonism toward its partner and a majority of mixes showed bidirectional antagonism that decreased total spore production, even to the point of driving whole populations to extinction. Differential response to mixing was the primary determinant of competitive superiority rather than the sporulation efficiencies of unmixed populations. In some competitive pairings, the dominant partner sporulated more efficiently in mixed populations than in clonal isolation. This finding represents a novel form of exploitation in bacteria carried out by socially competent genotypes and is the first documentation of social exploitation among natural bacterial isolates. Patterns of antagonistic superiority among these strains form a highly linear dominance hierarchy. At least some competition pairs construct chimeric, rather than segregated, fruiting bodies. The cooperative prokaryote M. xanthus has diverged into a large number of distinct social types that cooperate with clone-mates but exhibit intense antagonism toward distinct social types of the same species. Most lengthy migration events in nature may thus result in strong antagonism between migratory and resident populations, and this antagonism may have large effects on local

  16. Convergent evolution of escape from hepaciviral antagonism in primates.

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    Maulik R Patel

    Full Text Available The ability to mount an interferon response on sensing viral infection is a critical component of mammalian innate immunity. Several viruses directly antagonize viral sensing pathways to block activation of the host immune response. Here, we show that recurrent viral antagonism has shaped the evolution of the host protein MAVS--a crucial component of the viral-sensing pathway in primates. From sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of MAVS from 21 simian primates, we found that MAVS has evolved under strong positive selection. We focused on how this positive selection has shaped MAVS' susceptibility to Hepatitis C virus (HCV. We functionally tested MAVS proteins from diverse primate species for their ability to resist antagonism by HCV, which uses its protease NS3/4A to cleave human MAVS. We found that MAVS from multiple primates are resistant to inhibition by the HCV protease. This resistance maps to single changes within the protease cleavage site in MAVS, which protect MAVS from getting cleaved by the HCV protease. Remarkably, most of these changes have been independently acquired at a single residue 506 that evolved under positive selection. We show that "escape" mutations lower affinity of the NS3 protease for MAVS and allow it to better restrict HCV replication. We further show that NS3 proteases from all other primate hepaciviruses, including the highly divergent GBV-A and GBV-C viruses, are functionally similar to HCV. We conclude that convergent evolution at residue 506 in multiple primates has resulted in escape from antagonism by hepaciviruses. Our study provides a model whereby insights into the ancient history of viral infections in primates can be gained using extant host and virus genes. Our analyses also provide a means by which primates might clear infections by extant hepaciviruses like HCV.

  17. Interaction, synergy and antagonism in prospective epidemiological studies

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana, Juan J.; Departamento de Salud Pública, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de La Frontera. Temuco, Chile. Centro de Capacitación Investigación y Gestión en Salud para la Medicina Basada en Evidencias (CIGES), Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de La Frontera. Temuco, Chile. Magister en Salud Pública.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University. Quebec, Canada. PhD en Epidemiología.; Pino, Paulina; Escuela de Salud Pública, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile. Santiago de Chile, Chile. doctor en Salud Pública.

    2014-01-01

    In public health there is a growing appreciation for the advantage of the additive scale to better understand the impacts of factors involved in a health event. It is necessary to always remember that the concept of statistical interaction is scale dependent. In the causal relationship between a response and the presence of two or more factors, the concepts interaction, synergy and antagonism are the key ideas. The aim of this note is to show an application of the concepts interaction, sy...

  18. CXCR4 Antagonism Attenuates the Development of Diabetic Cardiac Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yin Chu

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is an increasingly recognized complication of diabetes. Cardiac fibrosis is an important causative mechanism of HF associated with diabetes. Recent data indicate that inflammation may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular fibrosis. We sought to determine the mechanism by which cardiac fibrosis develops and to specifically investigate the role of the CXCR4 axis in this process. Animals with type I diabetes (streptozotocin treated mice or type II diabetes (Israeli Sand-rats and controls were randomized to treatment with a CXCR4 antagonist, candesartan or vehicle control. Additional groups of mice also underwent bone marrow transplantation (GFP+ donor marrow to investigate the potential role of bone marrow derived cell mobilization in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Both type I and II models of diabetes were accompanied by the development of significant cardiac fibrosis. CXCR4 antagonism markedly reduced cardiac fibrosis in both models of diabetes, similar in magnitude to that seen with candesartan. In contrast to candesartan, the anti-fibrotic actions of CXCR4 antagonism occurred in a blood pressure independent manner. Whilst the induction of diabetes did not increase the overall myocardial burden of GFP+ cells, it was accompanied by an increase in GFP+ cells expressing the fibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin and this was attenuated by CXCR4 antagonism. CXCR4 antagonism was also accompanied by increased levels of circulating regulatory T cells. Taken together the current data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of CXCR4 significantly reduces diabetes induced cardiac fibrosis, providing a potentially important therapeutic approach.

  19. Convergent evolution of escape from hepaciviral antagonism in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Maulik R; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Horner, Stacy M; Gale, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2012-01-01

    The ability to mount an interferon response on sensing viral infection is a critical component of mammalian innate immunity. Several viruses directly antagonize viral sensing pathways to block activation of the host immune response. Here, we show that recurrent viral antagonism has shaped the evolution of the host protein MAVS--a crucial component of the viral-sensing pathway in primates. From sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of MAVS from 21 simian primates, we found that MAVS has evolved under strong positive selection. We focused on how this positive selection has shaped MAVS' susceptibility to Hepatitis C virus (HCV). We functionally tested MAVS proteins from diverse primate species for their ability to resist antagonism by HCV, which uses its protease NS3/4A to cleave human MAVS. We found that MAVS from multiple primates are resistant to inhibition by the HCV protease. This resistance maps to single changes within the protease cleavage site in MAVS, which protect MAVS from getting cleaved by the HCV protease. Remarkably, most of these changes have been independently acquired at a single residue 506 that evolved under positive selection. We show that "escape" mutations lower affinity of the NS3 protease for MAVS and allow it to better restrict HCV replication. We further show that NS3 proteases from all other primate hepaciviruses, including the highly divergent GBV-A and GBV-C viruses, are functionally similar to HCV. We conclude that convergent evolution at residue 506 in multiple primates has resulted in escape from antagonism by hepaciviruses. Our study provides a model whereby insights into the ancient history of viral infections in primates can be gained using extant host and virus genes. Our analyses also provide a means by which primates might clear infections by extant hepaciviruses like HCV.

  20. What is pharmacological 'affinity'? Relevance to biased agonism and antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenakin, Terry

    2014-09-01

    The differences between affinity measurements made in binding studies and those relevant to receptor function are described. There are theoretical and practical reasons for not utilizing binding data and, in terms of the quantification of signaling bias, it is unnecessary to do so. Finally, the allosteric control of ligand affinity through receptor-signaling protein interaction is discussed within the context of biased antagonism. In this regard, it is shown that both the bias and relative efficacy of a ligand are essential data for fully predicting biased effects in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Building a new research framework for social evolution: intralocus caste antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Tanya M; Holman, Luke; Morrow, Edward H; Field, Jeremy

    2018-01-16

    The breeding and non-breeding 'castes' of eusocial insects provide a striking example of role-specific selection, where each caste maximises fitness through different morphological, behavioural and physiological trait values. Typically, queens are long-lived egg-layers, while workers are short-lived, largely sterile foragers. Remarkably, the two castes are nevertheless produced by the same genome. The existence of inter-caste genetic correlations is a neglected consequence of this shared genome, potentially hindering the evolution of caste dimorphism: alleles that increase the productivity of queens may decrease the productivity of workers and vice versa, such that each caste is prevented from reaching optimal trait values. A likely consequence of this 'intralocus caste antagonism' should be the maintenance of genetic variation for fitness and maladaptation within castes (termed 'caste load'), analogous to the result of intralocus sexual antagonism. The aim of this review is to create a research framework for understanding caste antagonism, drawing in part upon conceptual similarities with sexual antagonism. By reviewing both the social insect and sexual antagonism literature, we highlight the current empirical evidence for caste antagonism, discuss social systems of interest, how antagonism might be resolved, and challenges for future research. We also introduce the idea that sexual and caste antagonism could interact, creating a three-way antagonism over gene expression. This includes unpacking the implications of haplodiploidy for the outcome of this complex interaction. © 2018 The Authors. Biological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  2. Alcohol, TLR4-TGF-β Antagonism, and Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Mishra, Lopa; Machida, Keigo

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and obesity are two known risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that also synergistically promote HBV/HCV-related carcinogenesis. TLR4, the PAMP for endotoxin participates in inflammatory processes such as M1 activation of hepatic macrophages in alcoholic liver disease. However its role in liver carcinogenesis via ectopic expression and activation, has only recently been revealed in alcohol/HCV-associated HCC models. Alcohol feeding to mice expressing the HCV Ns5a in a hepatocyte specific manner, aggravates liver inflammation via activation of overexpressed TLR4 in the parenchymal cells. Long-term alcohol feeding produces liver tumors in these transgenic mice in a manner dependent on TLR4. From these mice, CD133+/CD49f+ tumor initiating stem cell-like cells (TICs) have been isolated. These TICs exhibit self-renewal and tumorigenic activities driven by TLR4-dependent upregulation of the stem cell factor NANOG. Defective TGF-β tumor suppressor pathway is identified in the TICs and mediated by NANOG target genes Igf2bp3 and Yap1. This TGF-β pathway antagonism is responsible in part for TIC’s tumorigenic activity and chemoresistance. Conversely, mice with attenuated TGF-β pathway due to haploinsufficiency of β2-Spectrin, spontaneously develop liver tumors and alcohol-feeding increases tumor incidence in a TLR4 dependent manner. This reciprocal antagonism between TLR4 and TGF-β pathways may serve as a novel therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:26201318

  3. Fstl1 Antagonizes BMP Signaling and Regulates Ureter Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianfeng; Yu, Mingyan; Zhang, Fangxiong; Sha, Haibo; Gao, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway plays important roles in urinary tract development although the detailed regulation of its activity in this process remains unclear. Here we report that follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), encoding a secreted extracellular glycoprotein, is expressed in developing ureter and antagonizes BMP signaling activity. Mouse embryos carrying disrupted Fstl1 gene displayed prominent hydroureter arising from proximal segment and ureterovesical junction defects. These defects were associated with significant reduction in ureteric epithelial cell proliferation at E15.5 and E16.5 as well as absence of subepithelial ureteral mesenchymal cells in the urinary tract at E16.5 and E18.5. At the molecular level, increased BMP signaling was found in Fstl1 deficient ureters, indicated by elevated pSmad1/5/8 activity. In vitro study also indicated that Fstl1 can directly bind to ALK6 which is specifically expressed in ureteric epithelial cells in developing ureter. Furthermore, Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, which is crucial for differentiation of ureteral subepithelial cell proliferation, was also impaired in Fstl1-/- ureter. Altogether, our data suggest that Fstl1 is essential in maintaining normal ureter development by antagonizing BMP signaling. PMID:22485132

  4. Antagonism trait facets and comprehensive psychosocial disability: Comparing information across self, informant, and interviewer reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Eunyoe; Nuzum, Hallie; Clark, Lee Anna

    2017-10-01

    It is widely known that personality traits collectively discussed as the Dark Triad are antagonistic and associated with poor interpersonal relationships, but few studies have examined how specific facets of antagonism are associated with psychosocial adjustment or how antagonism relates to psychosocial adjustment other than interpersonal functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine how 6 antagonism facets-manipulativeness, grandiosity, attention-seeking, hostility, callousness, and deceitfulness-relate to comprehensive psychosocial functional domains (i.e., well-being, interpersonal relationships, basic daily functioning) using information about both antagonism and functioning from 3 sources-self, informant, and interviewer. Data were from 318 primary participants and informants. We present 3 main findings: (1) When psychosocial functioning and antagonism traits were both rated by informants, all psychosocial disability domains were consistently positively associated with antagonism traits. (2) We next created a single psychosocial-disability factor score via principal factors analysis of all raters' psychosocial-functioning scores. When all 3 raters' reports of domain-level antagonism were used as independent variables in a simultaneous regression analysis to predict this overall functioning score, informant-reported antagonism most strongly predicted psychosocial functioning, followed by interviewer-rated antagonism. (3) We then created 6 facet scores by summing the 3 raters' scores on each. When we used these scores to predict psychosocial functioning, hostility was the main trait significantly predicting psychosocial functioning. The study provides further insight into associations of psychosocial disability with antagonism facets from different raters' perspectives. The findings thus further our understanding of psychosocial outcomes associated with antagonism, the core of the dark traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonism and cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Håkan; Newman, Lawrence; Ashina, Sait

    2017-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key signaling molecule involved in migraine pathophysiology. Efficacy of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists in migraine treatment has fueled an increasing interest in the prospect of treating cluster headache (CH) with CGRP antagonism. The exact...... role of CGRP and its mechanism of action in CH have not been fully clarified. A search for original studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English was performed in PubMed and in ClinicalTrials.gov . The search term used was "cluster headache and calcitonin gene related peptide......" and "primary headaches and calcitonin gene related peptide." Reference lists of identified articles were also searched for additional relevant papers. Human experimental studies have reported elevated plasma CGRP levels during both spontaneous and glyceryl trinitrate-induced cluster attacks. CGRP may play...

  6. Neuraxial Opioid-Induced Itch and Its Pharmacological Antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Given its profound analgesic nature, neuraxial opioids are frequently used for pain management. Unfortunately, the high incident rate of itch/pruritus after spinal administration of opioid analgesics reported in postoperative and obstetric patients greatly diminishes patient satisfaction and thus the value of the analgesics. Many endeavors to solve the mystery behind neuraxial opioid-induced itch had not been successful, as the pharmacological antagonism other than the blockade of mu opioid receptors remains elusive. Nevertheless, as the characteristics of all opioid receptor subtypes have become more understood, more studies have shed light on the potential effective treatments. This review discusses the mechanisms underlying neuraxial opioid-induced itch and compares pharmacological evidence in nonhuman primates with clinical findings across diverse drugs. Both nonhuman primate and human studies corroborate that mixed mu/kappa opioid partial agonists seem to be the most effective drugs in ameliorating neuraxial opioid-induced itch while retaining neuraxial opioid-induced analgesia. PMID:25861787

  7. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

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    Yuchen Nan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR. Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLR. Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses.

  8. The evolution of reduced antagonism--A role for host-parasite coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, A K; Stoy, K S; Gelarden, I A; Penley, M J; Lively, C M; Morran, L T

    2015-11-01

    Why do some host-parasite interactions become less antagonistic over evolutionary time? Vertical transmission can select for reduced antagonism. Vertical transmission also promotes coevolution between hosts and parasites. Therefore, we hypothesized that coevolution itself may underlie transitions to reduced antagonism. To test the coevolution hypothesis, we selected for reduced antagonism between the host Caenorhabditis elegans and its parasite Serratia marcescens. This parasite is horizontally transmitted, which allowed us to study coevolution independently of vertical transmission. After 20 generations, we observed a response to selection when coevolution was possible: reduced antagonism evolved in the copassaged treatment. Reduced antagonism, however, did not evolve when hosts or parasites were independently selected without coevolution. In addition, we found strong local adaptation for reduced antagonism between replicate host/parasite lines in the copassaged treatment. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that coevolution was critical to the rapid evolution of reduced antagonism. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  10. The imidazobenzodiazepine Ro 15-4513 antagonizes methoxyflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, E J; Skolnick, P

    1988-01-01

    Parenteral administration of the imidazobenzodiazepine Ro 15-4513 (a high affinity ligand of the benzodiazepine receptor with partial inverse agonist qualities) produced a dose dependent reduction in sleep time of mice exposed to the inhalation anesthetic, methoxyflurane. The reductions in methoxyflurane sleep time ranged from approximately 20% at 4 mg/kg to approximately 38% at 32 mg/kg of Ro 15-4513. Co-administration of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist Ro 15-1788 (16 mg/kg) or the inverse agonists DMCM (5-20 mg/kg) and FG 7142 (22.5 mg/kg) blocks this effect which suggests that the reductions in methoxyflurane sleep time produced by Ro 15-4513 are mediated via occupation of benzodiazepine receptors. Moreover, neither DMCM (5-20 mg/kg) nor FG 7142 (22.5 mg/kg) reduced methoxyflurane sleep time which suggests this effect of Ro 15-4513 cannot be attributed solely to its partial inverse agonist properties. These observations support recent findings that inhalation anesthetics may produce their depressant effects via perturbation of the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor chloride channel complex, and suggest that Ro 15-4513 may serve as a prototype of agents capable of antagonizing the depressant effects of inhalation anesthetics such as methoxyflurane.

  11. Kefiran antagonizes cytopathic effects of Bacillus cereus extracellular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Micaela; Pérez, Pablo Fernando; Abraham, Analía Graciela

    2008-02-29

    Kefiran, the polysaccharide produced by microorganisms present in kefir grains, is a water-soluble branched glucogalactan containing equal amounts of D-glucose and D-galactose. In this study, the effect of kefiran on the biological activity of Bacillus cereus strain B10502 extracellular factors was assessed by using cultured human enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) and human erythrocytes. In the presence of kefiran concentrations ranging from 300 to 1000 mg/L, the ability of B. cereus B10502 spent culture supernatants to detach and damage cultured human enterocytes was significantly abrogated. In addition, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was higher when kefiran was present during the cell toxicity assays. Protection was also demonstrated in hemolysis and apoptosis/necrosis assays. Scanning electron microscopy showed the protective effect of kefiran against structural cell damages produced by factors synthesized by B. cereus strain B10502. Protective effect of kefiran depended on strain of B. cereus. Our findings demonstrate the ability of kefiran to antagonize key events of B. cereus B10502 virulence. This property, although strain-specific, gives new perspectives for the role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in functional foods.

  12. Efficacy of Tie2 Receptor Antagonism in Angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R. Hasenstein

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Angiosarcomas are malignant endothelial cell tumors with few effective systemic treatments. Despite a unique endothelial origin, molecular candidates for targeted therapeutic intervention have been elusive. In this study, we explored the tunica internal endothelial cell kinase 2 (Tie2 receptor as a potential therapeutic target in angiosarcoma. Human angiosarcomas from diverse sites were shown to be universally immunoreactive for Tie2. Tie2 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR antagonists inhibited SVR and MS1-VEGF angiosarcoma cell survival in vitro. In the high-grade SVR cell line, Tie2 and VEGF antagonists inhibited cell survival synergistically, whereas effects were largely additive in the low-grade MS1-VEGF cell line. Xenograft modeling using these cell lines closely recapitulated the human disease. In vivo, Tie2 and VEGFR inhibition resulted in significant angiosarcoma growth delay. The combination proved more effective than either agent alone. Tie2 inhibition seemed to elicit tumor growth delay through increased tumor cell apoptosis, whereas VEGFR inhibition reduced tumor growth by lowering tumor cell proliferation. These data identify Tie2 antagonism as a potential novel, targeted therapy for angiosarcomas and provide a foundation for further investigation of Tie2 inhibition, alone and in combinations, in the management of this disease.

  13. Tachykinin receptors antagonism for asthma: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couto Nuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tachykinins substance P, neurokinin A and neurokinin B seem to account for asthma pathophysiology by mediating neurogenic inflammation and several aspects of lung mechanics. These neuropeptides act mainly by their receptors NK1, NK2 and NK3, respectively which may be targets for new asthma therapy. Methods This review systematically examines randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of tachykinins receptors antagonism on asthma. Symptoms, airway inflammation, lung function and airway inflammation were considered as outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialized Register of Asthma Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE. The search is as current as June 2010. Quality rating of included studies followed the Cochrane Collaboration and GRADE Profiler approaches. However, data were not pooled together due to different measures among the studies. Results Our systematic review showed the potential of NK receptor antagonist to decrease airway responsiveness and to improve lung function. However, effects on airway inflammation and asthma symptoms were poorly or not described. Conclusion The limited available evidence suggests that tachykinin receptors antagonists may decrease airway responsiveness and improve lung function in patients with asthma. Further large randomized trials are still required.

  14. Calcineurin Antagonizes AMPK to Regulate Lipolysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Xie, Cangsang; Diao, Zhiqing; Liang, Bin

    2017-06-26

    Calcineurin is a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase, and the target of immunosuppressive agent tacrolimus (TAC). The dysfunction of calcineurin, or clinical applications of tacrolimus, have been reported to be associated with dyslipidemia. The underlying mechanisms of calcineurin and tacrolimus in lipid metabolism are largely unknown. Here, we showed that mutations of tax-6 and cnb-1, which respectively encode the catalytic subunit and the regulatory subunit of calcineurin, together with tacrolimus treatment, consistently led to decreased fat accumulation and delayed growth in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In contrast, disruption of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) encoded by aak-1 and aak-2 reversed the above effects in worms. Moreover, calcineurin deficiency and tacrolimus treatment consistently activated the transcriptional expression of the lipolytic gene atgl-1, encoding triglyceride lipase. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of atgl-1 recovered the decreased fat accumulation in both calcineurin deficient and tacrolimus treated worms. Collectively, our results reveal that immunosuppressive agent tacrolimus and their target calcineurin may antagonize AMPK to regulate ATGL and lipolysis, thereby providing potential therapy for the application of immunosuppressive agents.

  15. Calcineurin Antagonizes AMPK to Regulate Lipolysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin is a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase, and the target of immunosuppressive agent tacrolimus (TAC. The dysfunction of calcineurin, or clinical applications of tacrolimus, have been reported to be associated with dyslipidemia. The underlying mechanisms of calcineurin and tacrolimus in lipid metabolism are largely unknown. Here, we showed that mutations of tax-6 and cnb-1, which respectively encode the catalytic subunit and the regulatory subunit of calcineurin, together with tacrolimus treatment, consistently led to decreased fat accumulation and delayed growth in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In contrast, disruption of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK encoded by aak-1 and aak-2 reversed the above effects in worms. Moreover, calcineurin deficiency and tacrolimus treatment consistently activated the transcriptional expression of the lipolytic gene atgl-1, encoding triglyceride lipase. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of atgl-1 recovered the decreased fat accumulation in both calcineurin deficient and tacrolimus treated worms. Collectively, our results reveal that immunosuppressive agent tacrolimus and their target calcineurin may antagonize AMPK to regulate ATGL and lipolysis, thereby providing potential therapy for the application of immunosuppressive agents.

  16. Acute cocaine toxicity: antagonism by agents interacting with adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlet, R W; Albertson, T E

    1990-06-01

    Agents which interact with alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors were evaluated for efficacy in preventing seizures and death from a lethal dose of cocaine. Rats were first pretreated with the test drug(s), then subjected to an intraperitoneal LD86 of cocaine (70 mg/kg). In this model, control vehicle-pretreated animals developed seizures within six minutes, followed by death within 10 minutes. Significant protection against death was afforded by pretreatment with clonidine (0.25 mg/kg), prazocin (5.0 to 20 mg/kg), propranolol (8.0 to 32 mg/kg), or labetalol (40 mg/kg). Surviving animals still experienced seizures as judged through behavior and EEG recordings. Phentolamine did not affect the incidence of seizures or death. Two nonadrenoceptor agents were also studied: hydralazine reduced the incidence of death and seizures at 5.0 and 10 mg/kg, but reserpine did not alter the incidence of death or seizures. A combination of prazocin and propranolol did not provide additional protection compared to single agents. We conclude that the pathogenesis of acute cocaine death is complex, and that this toxicity can be antagonized by agents having either central or peripheral effects.

  17. Antagonism of methoxyflurane-induced anesthesia in rats by benzodiazepine inverse agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D W; Yourick, D L; Tessel, R E

    1989-11-28

    Injection of the partial benzodiazepine inverse agonist Ro15-4513 (1-32 mg/kg i.p.) or nonconvulsant i.v. doses of the full benzodiazepine inverse agonist beta-CCE immediately following cessation of exposure of rats to an anesthetic concentration of methoxyflurane significantly antagonized the duration of methoxyflurane anesthesia as measured by recovery of the righting reflex and/or pain sensitivity. This antagonism was inhibited by the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro15-1788 at doses which alone did not alter the duration of methoxyflurane anesthesia. In addition, high-dose Ro15-4513 pretreatment (32 mg/kg) antagonized the induction and duration of methoxyflurane anesthesia but was unable to prevent methoxyflurane anesthesia or affect the induction or duration of anesthesia induced by the dissociative anesthetic ketamine (100 mg/kg). These findings indicate that methoxyflurane anesthesia can be selectively antagonized by the inverse agonistic action of Ro15-4513 and beta-CCE.

  18. Antagonism of the antibacterial action of some penicillins by other penicillins and cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, J F; Sabath, L D; Ruch, P A

    1975-03-01

    There are many examples of two penicillins acting synergistically, usually by one competitively inhibiting beta-lactamase, thus protecting the other from inactivation. There are few reports on penicillins antagonizing each other. Eight strains of three genera (Proteus, Escherichia, Pseudomonas) isolated at Boston City Hospital or Institut Pasteur, Paris, showed antagonism of carbenicillin or ampicillin by cephaloridine, cloxacillin, or 6-aminopenicillanic acid. Broth dilution tests showed that with seven of the eight strains the minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) of the more active antibiotic was increased by 800-6,400% by low concentrations (often one-tenth the MIC) of the antagonist, whereas higher concentrations of "antagonist" were not as antagonistic, This suggested that two or more receptor sites of action for penicillins were present; the antagonist thus blocks the antibacterial action at the more sensitive site but acts additively with the antagonized antibiotic at the less sensitive site. The possibility that the mechanism of antagonism was induction of inactivating enzymes (beta-lactamase, penicillin acylase) was studied in two strains(one Escherichia coli and one Proteus rettgeri), and two antagonists were studied in detail. With E. coli cephaloridine was a poorer inducer of beta-lactamase than were the antagonized antibiotic and 6-aminopenicillanic acid. From these organisms, the good inducers of a beta-lactamase that acted on benzylpenicillin did not induce enzymes that inactivated carbenicillin. Thus, the mechanism of antagonism was not due to beta-lactamase induction.

  19. Mechanistic understanding of MeHg-Se antagonism in soil-rice systems: the key role of antagonism in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Evans, R. Douglas; Zhong, Huan; Zhao, Jiating; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice has great implications for human health. Here, effects of selenium (Se) on MeHg availability to rice are explored by growing rice under soil or foliar fertilization with Se. Results indicate that soil amendment with Se could reduce MeHg levels in soil and grain (maximally 73%). In contrast, foliar fertilization with Se enhanced plant Se levels (3–12 folds) without affecting grain MeHg concentrations. This evidence, along with the distinct distribution of MeHg and Se within the plant, demonstrate for the first time that Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels (i.e., MeHg-Se antagonism in soil) rather than MeHg-Se interactions within the plant might be the key process triggering the decreased grain MeHg levels under Se amendment. The reduction in soil MeHg concentrations could be mainly attributed to the formation of Hg-Se complexes (detected by TEM-EDX and XANES) and thus reduced microbial MeHg production. Moreover, selenite and selenate were equally effective in reducing soil MeHg concentrations, possibly because of rapid changes in Se speciation. The dominant role of Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels, which has been largely underestimated previously, together with the possible mechanisms advance our mechanistic understanding about MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems. PMID:26778218

  20. Mechanistic understanding of MeHg-Se antagonism in soil-rice systems: the key role of antagonism in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Evans, R. Douglas; Zhong, Huan; Zhao, Jiating; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice has great implications for human health. Here, effects of selenium (Se) on MeHg availability to rice are explored by growing rice under soil or foliar fertilization with Se. Results indicate that soil amendment with Se could reduce MeHg levels in soil and grain (maximally 73%). In contrast, foliar fertilization with Se enhanced plant Se levels (3-12 folds) without affecting grain MeHg concentrations. This evidence, along with the distinct distribution of MeHg and Se within the plant, demonstrate for the first time that Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels (i.e., MeHg-Se antagonism in soil) rather than MeHg-Se interactions within the plant might be the key process triggering the decreased grain MeHg levels under Se amendment. The reduction in soil MeHg concentrations could be mainly attributed to the formation of Hg-Se complexes (detected by TEM-EDX and XANES) and thus reduced microbial MeHg production. Moreover, selenite and selenate were equally effective in reducing soil MeHg concentrations, possibly because of rapid changes in Se speciation. The dominant role of Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels, which has been largely underestimated previously, together with the possible mechanisms advance our mechanistic understanding about MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems.

  1. Intracellular allosteric antagonism of the CCR9 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Christine; Rappas, Mathieu; Kean, James; Doré, Andrew S; Errey, James C; Bennett, Kirstie; Deflorian, Francesca; Christopher, John A; Jazayeri, Ali; Mason, Jonathan S; Congreve, Miles; Cooke, Robert M; Marshall, Fiona H

    2016-12-15

    Chemokines and their G-protein-coupled receptors play a diverse role in immune defence by controlling the migration, activation and survival of immune cells. They are also involved in viral entry, tumour growth and metastasis and hence are important drug targets in a wide range of diseases. Despite very significant efforts by the pharmaceutical industry to develop drugs, with over 50 small-molecule drugs directed at the family entering clinical development, only two compounds have reached the market: maraviroc (CCR5) for HIV infection and plerixafor (CXCR4) for stem-cell mobilization. The high failure rate may in part be due to limited understanding of the mechanism of action of chemokine antagonists and an inability to optimize compounds in the absence of structural information. CC chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9) activation by CCL25 plays a key role in leukocyte recruitment to the gut and represents a therapeutic target in inflammatory bowel disease. The selective CCR9 antagonist vercirnon progressed to phase 3 clinical trials in Crohn's disease but efficacy was limited, with the need for very high doses to block receptor activation. Here we report the crystal structure of the CCR9 receptor in complex with vercirnon at 2.8 Å resolution. Remarkably, vercirnon binds to the intracellular side of the receptor, exerting allosteric antagonism and preventing G-protein coupling. This binding site explains the need for relatively lipophilic ligands and describes another example of an allosteric site on G-protein-coupled receptors that can be targeted for drug design, not only at CCR9, but potentially extending to other chemokine receptors.

  2. Concentration-Dependent Antagonism and Culture Conversion in Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Neesha; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Denti, Paolo; Sirgel, Frederick; Lesosky, Maia; Gumbo, Tawanda; Meintjes, Graeme; McIlleron, Helen; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2017-05-15

    There is scant evidence to support target drug exposures for optimal tuberculosis outcomes. We therefore assessed whether pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters could predict 2-month culture conversion. One hundred patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (65% human immunodeficiency virus coinfected) were intensively sampled to determine rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide plasma concentrations after 7-8 weeks of therapy, and PK parameters determined using nonlinear mixed-effects models. Detailed clinical data and sputum for culture were collected at baseline, 2 months, and 5-6 months. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined on baseline isolates. Multivariate logistic regression and the assumption-free multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) were used to identify clinical and PK/PD predictors of 2-month culture conversion. Potential PK/PD predictors included 0- to 24-hour area under the curve (AUC0-24), maximum concentration (Cmax), AUC0-24/MIC, Cmax/MIC, and percentage of time that concentrations persisted above the MIC (%TMIC). Twenty-six percent of patients had Cmax of rifampicin conversion using multivariate logistic regression after adjusting for MIC. However, MARS identified negative interactions between isoniazid Cmax and rifampicin Cmax/MIC ratio on 2-month culture conversion. If isoniazid Cmax was conversion. For patients with isoniazid Cmax >4.6 mg/L, higher isoniazid exposures were associated with improved rates of culture conversion. PK/PD analyses using MARS identified isoniazid Cmax and rifampicin Cmax/MIC thresholds below which there is concentration-dependent antagonism that reduces 2-month sputum culture conversion.

  3. Antagonism of Bacillus spp. against Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Monteiro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The antagonism of eight Bacillus isolates was investigated against nine strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (causal agent of crucifers black rot to assess the role of lipopeptides in this process. Antimicrobial and hemolytic (surfactant activity tests were performed in vitro using agar diffusion methods. Antibiosis and hemolysis were positive for four Bacillus isolates against all X. campestris pv. campestris strains. The correlation observed between antimicrobial and hemolytic activities indicated that lipopeptides were involved in the antibiosis mechanism of the studied antagonists. Fermentation studies were carried out with the isolates that showed highest antimicrobial and hemolytic activities, to follow up growth and production of bioactive and surfactant compounds. Production of bioactive and surfactant compounds was observed during the late growth phase of the Bacillus isolates.Investigação sobre o antagonismo de oito isolados de Bacillus: B. subtilis R14, B. megaterium pv. cerealis RAB7, B. megaterium pv. cerealis C211, B. megaterium C116, Bacillus sp. RAB9, B. cereus C240, Bacillus sp. C11 e B. cereus C210, contra nove linhagens de X. campestris pv. campestris (bactéria responsável pela podridão negra das crucíferas foi realizada para se verificar a participação de lipopeptídeos neste mecanismo. Testes de atividades antimicrobiana e hemolítica (surfactante foram realizados, utilizando-se o método de difusão em ágar. Antibiose e hemólise foram positivas para quatro isolados de Bacillus: R14, RAB7, C116 e C210. A correlação observada entre as atividades antimicrobiana e a hemolítica indica que lipopeptídeos estão envolvidos no mecanismo de antibiose dos isolados investigados. As fermentações foram realizadas com os isolados que demonstraram melhores resultados nos testes de atividades antimicrobiana e hemolítica: R14, RAB7 e C116, para acompanhar o crescimento e a produção de compostos bioativos e

  4. Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwindling Jerome

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p. corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  5. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin, before and during pregnancy prevents most neural tube defects. Neural tube defects are usually diagnosed before the infant is ... or imaging tests. There is no cure for neural tube defects. The nerve damage and loss of function ...

  6. Online Antagonism of the Alt-Right in the 2016 Election

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heikkilä, Niko

    2017-01-01

    .... In particular, the alt-right’s unique style and internal jargon created notable confusion and also attracted interest by the media, while its promotional tactics included the use of social media and Internet memes, through which the movement came to epitomize online antagonism in the 2016 election.

  7. Design and development of benzoxazole derivatives with toll-like receptor 9 antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Swarnali; Mukherjee, Ayan; Paul, Barnali; Rahaman, Oindrila; Roy, Shounak; Maithri, Gundaram; Ramya, Bandaru; Pal, Sourav; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Talukdar, Arindam

    2017-07-07

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is a major therapeutic target for numerous inflammatory disorders. Development of small molecule inhibitors for TLR9 remains largely empirical due to lack of structural understanding of potential TLR9 antagonism by small molecules and due to the unusual topology of the ligand binding surface of the receptor. To develop a structural model for rational design of small molecule TLR9 antagonists, an enhanced homology model of human TLR9 (hTLR9) was constructed. Binding mode analysis of a series of molecules having characteristic molecular geometry, flexibility and basicity was conducted based on crystal structure of the inhibitory DNA (iDNA) bound to horse and bovine TLR9. Interaction with specific amino acid residues in four leucine rich repeat (LRR) regions of TLR9 was identified to be critical for antagonism by small molecules. The biological validation of TLR9 antagonism and its correlation with probe-receptor interactions led to a reliable model that could be used for development of novel small molecules with potent TLR9 antagonism (IC 50 30-100 nM) with excellent selectivity against TLR7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The mechanism of the antagonism by naloxone of acute alcohol intoxication.

    OpenAIRE

    Badawy, A A; Evans, M

    1981-01-01

    Naloxone lowers blood-ethanol concentration and causes a simultaneous reversal of the disturbances in the redox states of the hepatic nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) couples in acutely-ethanol-intoxicated rats. It is suggested that these effects of naloxone form the basis of its antagonism of acute alcohol intoxication.

  9. NO EVIDENCE FOR A ROLE OF MUSCARINIC M(2) RECEPTORS IN FUNCTIONAL ANTAGONISM IN BOVINE TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; MEURS, H; ELZINGA, CRS; ZAAGSMA, J

    1 The functional antagonism between methacholine- or histamine-induced contraction and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation was evaluated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle in vitro. In addition, the putative contribution of muscarinic M(2) receptors mediating inhibition of beta-adrenoceptor-induced

  10. Mutualism and Antagonism: Ecological Interactions Among Bark Beetles, Mite and Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.D. Klepzig; J.C. Moser; M.J. Lombardero; M.P. Ayres; R.W. Hofstetter; C.J. Walkinshaw

    2001-01-01

    Insect-fungal complexes provide challenging and fascinating systems for the study of biotic interactions between plants. plant pathogens, insect vectors and other associated organisms. The types of interactions among these organisms (mutualism. antagonism. parasitism. phoresy. etc.) are as variable as the range of organisms involved (plants, fungi, insects. mites. etc...

  11. Functional antagonism of different angiotensin II type I receptor blockers in human arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, AA; Buikema, H; van Buiten, A; Lubeck, RH; Boonstra, PW; van Veldhuisen, DJ; van Gilst, WH

    Objectives. To evaluate and compare the functional type and the degree of antagonism of the selective angiotensin II type I receptor blockers (ARB) losartan, EXP 3174 (the active metabolite of losartan), valsartan and candesartan in human internal mammary arteries. Methods. Human internal mammary

  12. ORE1 balances leaf senescence against maintenance by antagonizing G2-like-mediated transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Rauf, Mamoona; Arif, Muhammad; Dortay, Hakan; Matallana-Ramírez, Lilian P; Waters, Mark T.; Gil Nam, Hong; Lim, Pyung-Ok; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Balazadeh, Salma

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor ORE1 is a key regulator of senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, it is shown to also inhibit the function of Golden2-like transcription factors, which antagonize senescence, revealing a new mechanism of ORE1-mediated senescence control.

  13. [Neural repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2008-05-01

    Recent progress of stem cell biology gives us the hope for neural repair. We have established methods to specifically induce functional Schwann cells and neurons from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The effectiveness of these induced cells was evaluated by grafting them either into peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, or Parkinson' s disease animal models. MSCs-derived Schwann cells supported axonal regeneration and re-constructed myelin to facilitate the functional recovery in peripheral and spinal cord injury. MSCs-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into host striatum and contributed to behavioral repair. In this review, we introduce the differentiation potential of MSCs and finally discuss about their benefits and drawbacks of these induction systems for cell-based therapy in neuro-traumatic and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  14. β-Endorphin Antagonizes the Effects of α-MSH on Food Intake and Body Weight

    OpenAIRE

    Dutia, Roxanne; Meece, Kana; Dighe, Shveta; Andrea J. Kim; Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is posttranslationally processed to several peptides including α-MSH, a primary regulator of energy balance that inhibits food intake and stimulates energy expenditure. However, another POMC-derived peptide, β-endorphin (β-EP), has been shown to stimulate food intake. In this study we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) β-EP on food intake and its ability to antagonize the negative effects of α-MSH on energy balance in male rats. A single icv injec...

  15. Antipsychotic agents antagonize non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist-induced behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, R; Camacho, F; Woods, A T; Kerman, L L; Fishkin, R J; Brooks, K; Dunn, R W

    1995-07-01

    Antipsychotic agents were tested for their ability to antagonize both dopaminergic-induced and non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist-induced behaviors. All of the agents dose-dependently antagonized the apomorphine-induced climbing mouse assay (CMA) and dizocilpine (MK-801)-induced locomotion and falling assay (MK-801-LF) with a CMA/MK-801-LF ratio of less than or equal to 1.6. However, clozapine and its structural analog olanzapine more potently antagonized MK-801-LF (1.1 and 0.05 mg/kg) than the CMA (12.3 and 0.45 mg/kg) and as a result had a CMA/MK-801-LF ratio of 11.2 and 9, respectively. Furthermore, phencyclidine (PCP) (2 mg/kg) can selectively induce social withdrawal in naive rats that were housed in pairs (familiar) for 10 days prior to testing without affecting motor activity. SCH 23390, raclopride, haloperidol, chlorpromazine and risperidone failed to reverse the social withdrawal induced by PCP up to doses which produced significant motor impairment. However, clozapine (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) and olanzapine (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg) significantly reversed this social withdrawal in rats. Therefore, the non-competitive NMDA antagonists PCP and MK-801 can induce behaviors in Rodents which are selectively antagonized by clozapine and olanzapine. Furthermore, assessment of the effects of antipsychotic agents in the CMA, MK-801-LF and PCP-induced social withdrawal assays may provide a preclinical approach to identify novel agents for negative symptoms and treatment resistant schizophrenia.

  16. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L.; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W.; Bukiya, Anna N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from “energy drinks”) continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40–70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS−/−) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  17. Caffeine intake antagonizes salt sensitive hypertension through improvement of renal sodium handling

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Yu; Tao Yang; Peng Gao; Xing Wei; Hexuan Zhang; Shiqiang Xiong; Zongshi Lu; Li Li; Xiao Wei; Jing Chen; Yu Zhao; Arendshorst, William J.; Qianhui Shang; Daoyan Liu; Zhiming Zhu

    2016-01-01

    High salt intake is a major risk factor for hypertension. Although acute caffeine intake produces moderate diuresis and natriuresis, caffeine increases the blood pressure (BP) through activating sympathetic activity. However, the long-term effects of caffeine on urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure are rarely investigated. Here, we investigated whether chronic caffeine administration antagonizes salt sensitive hypertension by promoting urinary sodium excretion. Dahl salt-sensitive (Dah...

  18. Parental antagonism and parent-offspring co-adaptation interact to shape family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Joël; Kölliker, Mathias

    2012-10-07

    The family is an arena for conflicts between offspring, mothers and fathers that need resolving to promote the evolution of parental care and the maintenance of family life. Co-adaptation is known to contribute to the resolution of parent-offspring conflict over parental care by selecting for combinations of offspring demand and parental supply that match to maximize the fitness of family members. However, multiple paternity and differences in the level of care provided by mothers and fathers can generate antagonistic selection on offspring demand (mediated, for example, by genomic imprinting) and possibly hamper co-adaptation. While parent-offspring co-adaptation and parental antagonism are commonly considered two major processes in the evolution of family life, their co-occurrence and the evolutionary consequences of their joint action are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the simultaneous and entangled effects of these two processes on outcomes of family interactions, using a series of breeding experiments in the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, an insect species with uniparental female care. As predicted from parental antagonism, we show that paternally inherited effects expressed in offspring influence both maternal care and maternal investment in future reproduction. However, and as expected from the entangled effects of parental antagonism and co-adaptation, these effects critically depended on postnatal interactions with caring females and maternally inherited effects expressed in offspring. Our results demonstrate that parent-offspring co-adaptation and parental antagonism are entangled key drivers in the evolution of family life that cannot be fully understood in isolation.

  19. ACE2 Antagonizes VEGFa to Reduce Vascular Permeability During Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 treatment suppresses the severity of acute lung injury (ALI, through antagonizing hydrolyzing angiotensin II (AngII and the ALI-induced apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the effects of ACE2 on vessel permeability and its relationship with vascular endothelial growth factor a (VEGFa remain ill-defined. In the current study, we examined the relationship between ACE2 and VEGFa in ALI model in mice. Methods: Here, we used a previously published bleomycin method to induce ALI in mice, and treated the mice with ACE2. We analyzed the levels of VEGFa in these mice. The mouse lung vessel permeability was determined by a fluorescence pharmacokinetic assay following i.v. injection of 62.5µg/kg Visudyne. VEGFa pump or SU5416 pump was given to increase or decrease VEGFa effects, respectively. The long-term effects on lung function were determined by measurement of lung resistance using methacholine. Results: ACE2 treatment did not alter VEGFa levels in lung, but antagonized the effects of VEGFa on increases of lung vessel permeability. Ectogenic VEGFa abolished the antagonizing effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against VEGFa. On the other hand, suppression of VEGF signaling mimicked the effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against VEGFa. The suppression of vessel permeability resulted in improvement of lung function after ALI. Conclusion: ACE2 may antagonize the VEGFa-mediated increases in lung vessel permeability during ALI, resulting in improvement of lung function after ALI.

  20. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  1. H3K36 Methylation Antagonizes PRC2-mediated H3K27 Methylation*

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Wen; Xu, Mo; Huang, Chang; Liu, Nan; Chen, She; Zhu, Bing

    2011-01-01

    H3K27 methylation mediated by the histone methyltransferase complex PRC2 is critical for transcriptional regulation, Polycomb silencing, Drosophila segmentation, mammalian X chromosome inactivation, and cancer. PRC2-mediated H3K27 methylation can spread along the chromatin and propagate the repressive chromatin environment; thus, chromatin components that antagonize the activity of PRC2 are important for restraining Polycomb silencing. Here we report that in HeLa cells, H3 histones unmethylat...

  2. Arctigenin antagonizes mineralocorticoid receptor to inhibit the transcription of Na/K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ye; Zhou, Meili; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors in cardiovascular disease and is the most common chronic disease. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have been successfully used in clinic for the treatment of hypertension. Our study aims to investigate whether Arctigenin can antagonize MR and inhibit the transcription of Na/K-ATPase. The yeast two-hybrid assay was used to screen natural products and Arctigenin was identified as an MR antagonist. The direct binding of Arctigenin to MR was determined using assays based on surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence quenching. Furthermore, results from mammalian one-hybrid and transcriptional activation experiments also confirmed that Arctigenin can potently antagonize MR in cells. We demonstrated that Arctigenin can decrease the level of Na/K-ATPase mRNA by antagonizing MR in HK-2 cells. Our findings show that Arctigenin can effectively decrease Na/K-ATPase transcription; thus highlight its potential as an anti-hypertensive drug lead compound. Our current findings demonstrate that Arctigenin is an antagonist of MR and effectively decreases the Na/K-ATPase 1 gene expression. Our work provides a hint for the drug discovery against cardiovascular disease.

  3. In vitro antagonism of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai against Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Acosta-Suárez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro antagonism of Trichoderma harzianum against Mycosphaerella fijiensis, foliar pathogen of banana and plantain, was evaluated. The assays were performed using the dual culture method. Competition for space and nutrients, the antagonistic capacity and forms and intensity of antagonism were determined considering the invasion of the surface of the colony, colonization and sporulation of T. harzianum on M. fijiensis after seven days of inoculation. Finally, the effect of volatile metabolites of T. harzianum was evaluated. The results showed in vitro antagonism of T. harzianum against M. fijiensis by competition for space and nutrients of the culture medium. Trichoderma grew over the pathogen colony with hyperparasitism and high intensity. Also, it completely covered the surface of the culture medium. T. harzianum not inhibited the growth of M. fijiensis by volatile metabolites. Damage was observed in the integrity of the cell wall of M. fijiensis hyphae and the cell content exit. The use of antagonistic fungi, could contribute to the design of strategies for integrated management of this disease. Key words: banana and plantain, biocontrol, mechanisms of action

  4. Ancient antagonism between CELF and RBFOX families tunes mRNA splicing outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzara, Matthew R; Mallory, Michael J; Roytenberg, Renat; Lindberg, John P; Jha, Anupama; Lynch, Kristen W; Barash, Yoseph

    2017-08-01

    Over 95% of human multi-exon genes undergo alternative splicing, a process important in normal development and often dysregulated in disease. We sought to analyze the global splicing regulatory network of CELF2 in human T cells, a well-studied splicing regulator critical to T cell development and function. By integrating high-throughput sequencing data for binding and splicing quantification with sequence features and probabilistic splicing code models, we find evidence of splicing antagonism between CELF2 and the RBFOX family of splicing factors. We validate this functional antagonism through knockdown and overexpression experiments in human cells and find CELF2 represses RBFOX2 mRNA and protein levels. Because both families of proteins have been implicated in the development and maintenance of neuronal, muscle, and heart tissues, we analyzed publicly available data in these systems. Our analysis suggests global, antagonistic coregulation of splicing by the CELF and RBFOX proteins in mouse muscle and heart in several physiologically relevant targets, including proteins involved in calcium signaling and members of the MEF2 family of transcription factors. Importantly, a number of these coregulated events are aberrantly spliced in mouse models and human patients with diseases that affect these tissues, including heart failure, diabetes, or myotonic dystrophy. Finally, analysis of exons regulated by ancient CELF family homologs in chicken, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans suggests this antagonism is conserved throughout evolution. © 2017 Gazzara et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Introduction to neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    James, Frederick E

    1994-02-02

    1. Introduction and overview of Artificial Neural Networks. 2,3. The Feed-forward Network as an inverse Problem, and results on the computational complexity of network training. 4.Physics applications of neural networks.

  6. Morphological neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.X.; Sussner, P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we introduce a novel class of neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. In this paper we consider some of these differences and provide some particular examples of morphological neural network.

  7. Small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors increase neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian; Mix, Eilhard; Frahm, Jana; Glass, Anne; Müller, Jana; Schmitt, Oliver; Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Klemm, Kristin; Ortinau, Stefanie; Hübner, Rayk; Frech, Moritz J; Wree, Andreas; Rolfs, Arndt

    2011-01-13

    Human neural progenitor cells provide a source for cell replacement therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, there is great interest in mechanisms and tools to direct the fate of multipotent progenitor cells during their differentiation to increase the yield of a desired cell type. We tested small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) for their functionality and their influence on neurogenesis using the human neural progenitor cell line ReNcell VM. Here we report the enhancement of neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells by treatment with GSK-3 inhibitors. We tested different small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 i.e. LiCl, sodium-valproate, kenpaullone, indirubin-3-monoxime and SB-216763 for their ability to inhibit GSK-3 in human neural progenitor cells. The highest in situ GSK-3 inhibitory effect of the drugs was found for kenpaullone and SB-216763. Accordingly, kenpaullone and SB-216763 were the only drugs tested in this study to stimulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is antagonized by GSK-3. Analysis of human neural progenitor differentiation revealed an augmentation of neurogenesis by SB-216763 and kenpaullone, without changing cell cycle exit or cell survival. Small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 enhance neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells and may be used to direct the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antagonism of the 5-HT6 receptor - Preclinical rationale for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Inge E M; Mørk, Arne

    2017-10-01

    Antagonism of the 5-HT6 receptor is a promising approach for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is compelling preclinical evidence for the procognitive potential of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists and several compounds are in clinical development, as adjunct therapy to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs). This manuscript summarizes the scientific rationale for the use of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists as AD treatment, with some focus on the selective and high-affinity 5-HT6 receptor antagonist idalopirdine (Lu AE58054). The 5-HT6 receptor is enriched in brain regions that mediate cognition, where expression predominates on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and subsets of GABAergic interneurons. It is proposed that 5-HT6 receptor antagonism modulates the balance between neuronal excitation (glutamate) and inhibition (GABA), which may have widespread implications for neurotransmission and neuronal activity. This is supported by preclinical studies showing that 5-HT6 receptor antagonists increase concentrations of multiple neurotransmitters, and strengthened by recent evidence that idalopirdine facilitates neuronal oscillations and contributes to the recruitment of several neuronal networks relevant in cognition. Some of these effects are observed with idalopirdine monotherapy, whereas others require concomitant treatment with an AChEI. Several hypotheses for the mechanism underlying the synergistic actions between 5-HT6 receptor antagonists and AChEIs are discussed. Collectively, the current evidence suggests that 5-HT6 receptor antagonism adds a unique, complementary mechanism of action to that of AChEIs. The facilitation of multiple neurotransmitters and neuronal activity in brain regions that mediate cognition, and the synergy with AChEIs, are proposed to mediate the procognitive effects of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists in AD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Azithromycin May Antagonize Inhaled Tobramycin When Targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Jerry A.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Chmiel, James F.; Forssén, Anna V.; Kim, Sun Ho; Saavedra, Milene T.; Saiman, Lisa; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Recent studies of inhaled tobramycin in subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) find less clinical improvement than previously observed. Nonhuman data suggest that in some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, azithromycin can antagonize tobramycin. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that concomitant azithromycin use correlates with less improvement in key outcome measures in subjects receiving inhaled tobramycin while not affecting those receiving a comparative, nonaminoglycoside inhaled antibiotic. Methods: We studied a cohort of 263 subjects with CF enrolled in a recent clinical trial comparing inhaled tobramycin with aztreonam lysine. We performed a secondary analysis to examine key clinical and microbiologic outcomes based on concomitant, chronic azithromycin use at enrollment. Measurements and Main Results: The cohort randomized to inhaled tobramycin and reporting azithromycin use showed a significant decrease in the percent predicted FEV1 after one and three courses of inhaled tobramycin when compared with those not reporting azithromycin use (28 d: −0.51 vs. 3.43%, P azithromycin and inhaled tobramycin use was also associated with earlier need for additional antibiotics, lesser improvement in disease-related quality of life, and a trend toward less reduction in sputum P. aeruginosa density. Subjects randomized to inhaled aztreonam lysine had significantly greater improvement in these outcome measures, which were unaffected by concomitant azithromycin use. Outcomes in those not using azithromycin who received inhaled tobramycin were not significantly different from subjects receiving aztreonam lysine. Azithromycin also antagonized tobramycin but not aztreonam lysine in 40% of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates tested in vitro. Conclusions: Oral azithromycin may antagonize the therapeutic benefits of inhaled tobramycin in subjects with CF with P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:24476418

  10. Alcohol-Induced Impairment of Balance is Antagonized by Energy Drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczinski, Cecile A; Fillmore, Mark T; Stamates, Amy L; Maloney, Sarah F

    2018-01-01

    The acute administration of alcohol reliably impairs balance and motor coordination. While it is common for consumers to ingest alcohol with other stimulant drugs (e.g., caffeine, nicotine), little is known whether prototypical alcohol-induced balance impairments are altered by stimulant drugs. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the coadministration of a high-caffeine energy drink with alcohol can antagonize expected alcohol-induced increases in body sway. Sixteen social drinkers (of equal gender) participated in 4 separate double-blind dose administration sessions that involved consumption of alcohol and energy drinks, alone and in combination. Following dose administration, participants completed automated assessments of balance stability (both eyes open and eyes closed) measured using the Biosway Portable Balance System. Participants completed several subjective measures including self-reported ratings of sedation, stimulation, fatigue, and impairment. Blood pressure and pulse rate were recorded repeatedly. The acute administration of alcohol increased body sway, and the coadministration of energy drinks antagonized this impairment. When participants closed their eyes, alcohol-induced body sway was similar whether or not energy drinks were ingested. While alcohol administration increased ratings of sedation and fatigue, energy drink administration increased ratings of stimulation and reduced ratings of fatigue. Modest increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure following energy drink administration were also observed. Visual assessment of balance impairment is frequently used to indicate that an individual has consumed too much alcohol (e.g., as part of police-standardized field sobriety testing or by a bartender assessing when someone should no longer be served more alcohol). The current findings suggest that energy drinks can antagonize alcohol-induced increases in body sway, indicating that future work is needed to determine whether this

  11. Naltrexone antagonizes the analgesic and immunosuppressive effects of morphine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, D J; Gerak, L R; France, C P

    1994-05-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between morphine-induced analgesia and immunosuppression after acute administration. In male CD1 mice, morphine (10.0-100.0 mg/kg s.c.) produced a U-shaped immunosuppressive dose-effect curve on splenic natural killer (NK) activity. Morphine also induced dose-related analgesia, as measured by an increase in tail-flick latency during thermal application; these analgesic effects were antagonized by naltrexone (1.0-10.0 mg/kg). In addition, morphine-induced suppression of splenic NK activity was antagonized in a dose-dependent manner and, at one dose of naltrexone (10.0 mg/kg), splenic NK activity was augmented. To investigate further the relationship between naltrexone antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia and immunomodulation, single doses of morphine (10.0-100.0 mg/kg) were administered to mice pretreated with naltrexone (0.01-10.0 mg/kg) or saline. A dose of 10.0 mg/kg of morphine produced 35% of the maximal possible effect in the analgesia study and no immunosuppression, whereas a dose of 32.0 mg/kg produced a maximal analgesic effect and significant suppression of NK activity. Naltrexone blocked morphine-induced analgesia and immunosuppression in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, the combination of 1.0 mg/kg of naltrexone and 32.0 mg/kg of morphine elevated splenic NK activity. A large dose of morphine (100.0 mg/kg) elicited full analgesia and had no effect on splenic NK activity in saline- or naltrexone-pretreated mice. Collectively, these results support the view that, in mice, morphine-induced analgesia and immunosuppression are mediated through a common opioid receptor type.

  12. What rules of thumb do clinicians use to decide whether to antagonize nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videira, Rogerio L R; Vieira, Joaquim E

    2011-11-01

    In anesthesia practice, inadequate antagonism of neuromuscular blocking drugs (NMBD) may lead to frequent prevalence of residual neuromuscular block that is associated with morbidity and death. In this study we analyzed the clinical decision on antagonizing NMBD to generate hypotheses about barriers to the introduction of experts' recommendations into clinical practice. Sequential surveys were conducted among 108 clinical anesthesiologists to elicit the rules of thumb (heuristics) that support their decisions and provide a measurement of the confidence the clinicians have in their own decisions in comparison with their peers' decisions. The 2 most frequently used heuristics for administering reversal were "the interval since the last NMBD dose was short" and "the breathing pattern is inadequate," chosen by 73% and 71% of the clinicians, respectively. Clinicians considered that the prevalence of clinically significant residual block is higher in their colleagues' practices than in their own practice (60% vs 16%, odds ratio=7.8, 95% confidence interval, 3.8 to 16.2, P=0.0001). The clinicians were less likely to use antagonists if >60 minutes had elapsed after a single dose of atracurium (0.5 mg/kg) (31%) in comparison with after rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg (53%) (P=0.0035). In our institution, the clinical decision to antagonize NMBD is mainly based on the pharmacological forecast and a qualitative judgment of the adequacy of the breathing pattern. Clinicians judge themselves as better skilled at avoiding residual block than they do their colleagues, making them overconfident in their capacity to estimate the duration of action of intermediate-acting NMBD. Awareness of these systematic errors related to clinical intuition may facilitate the adoption of experts' recommendations into clinical practice.

  13. Antagonism of Bacillus subtilis strain AG1 against vine wood fungal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alfonzo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic substances produced by a Bacillus subtilis strain (AG1, which were previously found to slow down the growth of esca fungi in vitro, were produced in an artificial medium, isolated from the cell-free medium by precipitation and acidification (to less than pH 2.5 and extracted from the precipitate with 96% ethanol. The crude extract employed in antibiotic assays confirmed, in vitro, the antagonism of B. subtilis against Phaeoacremonium aleophilum and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, and also showed an antifungal activity toward Verticillium dahliae and Botryosphaeria rhodina.

  14. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis: what can we conclude about IL-17 antagonism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veverka, Kevin K; Feldman, Steven R

    2017-11-21

    IL-17 antagonists are effective for psoriasis in clinical trials, but long-term safety is not fully characterized. Since chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is caused by defects in the IL-17 pathway, CMC risk data have been touted as providing reassurance about the safety of IL-17 antagonism. We performed a literature review to identify patients with CMC and compared the prevalence of cancer in these patients to the reported 5-year prevalence. There was a higher prevalence of oropharyngeal (2.5% vs. 0.028%; p esophageal cancer (1.9% vs. 0.013%; p candidiasis in patients taking these medications.

  15. An effector of the Irish potato famine pathogen antagonizes a host autophagy cargo receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdas, Yasin F; Belhaj, Khaoula; Maqbool, Abbas; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Pandey, Pooja; Petre, Benjamin; Tabassum, Nadra; Cruz-Mireles, Neftaly; Hughes, Richard K; Sklenar, Jan; Win, Joe; Menke, Frank; Findlay, Kim; Banfield, Mark J; Kamoun, Sophien; Bozkurt, Tolga O

    2016-01-01

    Plants use autophagy to safeguard against infectious diseases. However, how plant pathogens interfere with autophagy-related processes is unknown. Here, we show that PexRD54, an effector from the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, binds host autophagy protein ATG8CL to stimulate autophagosome formation. PexRD54 depletes the autophagy cargo receptor Joka2 out of ATG8CL complexes and interferes with Joka2's positive effect on pathogen defense. Thus, a plant pathogen effector has evolved to antagonize a host autophagy cargo receptor to counteract host defenses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10856.001 PMID:26765567

  16. Bacterial Seed Endophytes of Domesticated Cucurbits Antagonize Fungal and Oomycete Pathogens Including Powdery Mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Khalaf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cucurbit vegetables, including cucumbers, melons and pumpkins, have been cultivated for thousands of years without fungicides. However, their seed germination stage is prone to be infected by soil-borne fungal and oomycete pathogens. Endophytes are symbionts that reside inside plant tissues including seeds. Seed endophytes are founders of the juvenile plant microbiome and can promote host defense at seed germination and later stages. We previously isolated 169 bacterial endophytes associated with seeds of diverse cultivated cucurbits. We hypothesized that these endophytes can antagonize major fungal and oomycete pathogens. Here we tested the endophytes for in vitro antagonism (dual culture assays against important soil-borne pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium aphanideratum. The endophytes were also assayed in planta (leaf disk and detached leaf bioassays for antagonism against a foliar pathogen of global importance, Podosphaera fuliginea, the causative agent of cucurbit powdery mildew. The endophytes were further tested in vitro for secretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs known to induce plant defense. Extracellular ribonuclease activity was also tested, as a subset of pathogenesis-related (PR proteins of plant hosts implicated in suppression of fungal pathogens, displays ribonuclease activity. An unexpected majority of the endophytes (70%, 118/169 exhibited antagonism to the five phytopathogens, of which 68% (50/73 of in vitro antagonists belong to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. All Lactococcus and Pantoea endophytes exhibited anti-oomycete activity. However, amongst the most effective inoculants against Podosphaera fuliginea were Pediococcus and Pantoea endophytes. Interestingly, 67% (113/169 of endophytes emitted host defense inducing VOCs (acetoin/diacetyl and 62% (104/169 secreted extracellular ribonucleases in vitro, respectively. These results show that seeds of cultivated

  17. Disruption of Cell-to-Cell Signaling Does Not Abolish the Antagonism of Phaeobacter gallaeciensis toward the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum in Algal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prol García, María Jesús; D'Alvise, Paul; Gram, Lone

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates Phaeobacter gallaeciensis antagonism in broth systems; however, we demonstrate here that QS is not important for antagonism in algal cultures. QS mutants reduced Vibrio anguillarum to the same extent as the wild type. Consequently, a combination of probiotic Phaeobac......Quorum sensing (QS) regulates Phaeobacter gallaeciensis antagonism in broth systems; however, we demonstrate here that QS is not important for antagonism in algal cultures. QS mutants reduced Vibrio anguillarum to the same extent as the wild type. Consequently, a combination of probiotic...

  18. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  19. Evolutionary strata on young mating-type chromosomes despite the lack of sexual antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Sara; Badouin, Hélène; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Gouzy, Jérôme; Carpentier, Fantin; Aguileta, Gabriela; Siguenza, Sophie; Brandenburg, Jean-Tristan; Coelho, Marco A; Hood, Michael E; Giraud, Tatiana

    2017-07-03

    Sex chromosomes can display successive steps of recombination suppression known as "evolutionary strata," which are thought to result from the successive linkage of sexually antagonistic genes to sex-determining genes. However, there is little evidence to support this explanation. Here we investigate whether evolutionary strata can evolve without sexual antagonism using fungi that display suppressed recombination extending beyond loci determining mating compatibility despite lack of male/female roles associated with their mating types. By comparing full-length chromosome assemblies from five anther-smut fungi with or without recombination suppression in their mating-type chromosomes, we inferred the ancestral gene order and derived chromosomal arrangements in this group. This approach shed light on the chromosomal fusion underlying the linkage of mating-type loci in fungi and provided evidence for multiple clearly resolved evolutionary strata over a range of ages (0.9-2.1 million years) in mating-type chromosomes. Several evolutionary strata did not include genes involved in mating-type determination. The existence of strata devoid of mating-type genes, despite the lack of sexual antagonism, calls for a unified theory of sex-related chromosome evolution, incorporating, for example, the influence of partially linked deleterious mutations and the maintenance of neutral rearrangement polymorphism due to balancing selection on sexes and mating types.

  20. Astaxanthin from psychrotrophic Sphingomonas faeni exhibits antagonism against food-spoilage bacteria at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageswari, Anbazhagan; Subramanian, Parthiban; Srinivasan, Ramachandran; Karthikeyan, Sivashanmugam; Gothandam, Kodiveri Muthukaliannan

    2015-10-01

    Food production and processing industry holds a perpetual relationship with microorganisms and their by-products. In the present study, we aimed to identify beneficial cold-adapted bacteria devoid of any food spoilage properties and study their antagonism against common food-borne pathogens at low temperature conditions. Ten isolates were obtained on selective isolation at 5 °C, which were spread across genera Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Psychrobacter, Leuconostoc, Rhodococcus, and Arthrobacter. Methanol extracts of strains were found to contain several bioactive metabolites. Among the studied isolates, methanol extracts of S. faeni ISY and Rhodococcus fascians CS4 were found to show antagonism against growth of Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Listeria monocytogenes and Vibrio fischeri at refrigeration temperatures. Characterization of the abundant yellow pigment in methanol extracts of S. faeni ISY through UV-Vis spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (LC-MS) revealed the presence of astaxanthin, which, owing to its presence in very large amounts and evidenced to be responsible for antagonistic activity of the solvent extract. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis Silences Erwinia carotovora Virulence by a New Form of Microbial Antagonism, Signal Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi-Hu; Zhang, Xi-Fen; Xu, Jin-Ling; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2004-01-01

    It is commonly known that bacteria may produce antibiotics to interfere with the normal biological functions of their competitors in order to gain competitive advantages. Here we report that Bacillus thuringiensis suppressed the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence of plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora through a new form of microbial antagonism, signal interference. E. carotovora produces and responds to acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals to regulate antibiotic production and expression of virulence genes, whereas B. thuringiensis strains possess AHL-lactonase, which is a potent AHL-degrading enzyme. B. thuringiensis did not seem to interfere with the normal growth of E. carotovora; rather, it abolished the accumulation of AHL signal when they were cocultured. In planta, B. thuringiensis significantly decreased the incidence of E. carotovora infection and symptom development of potato soft rot caused by the pathogen. The biocontrol efficiency is correlated with the ability of bacterial strains to produce AHL-lactonase. While all the seven AHL-lactonase-producing B. thuringiensis strains provided significant protection against E. carotovora infection, Bacillus fusiformis and Escherichia coli strains that do not process AHL-degradation enzyme showed little effect in biocontrol. Mutation of aiiA, the gene encoding AHL-lactonase in B. thuringiensis, resulted in a substantial decrease in biocontrol efficacy. These results suggest that signal interference mechanisms existing in natural ecosystems could be explored as a new version of antagonism for prevention of bacterial infections. PMID:14766576

  2. CCR1 antagonism attenuates T cell trafficking to omentum and liver in obesity-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Melissa J; Galvin, Karen C; Kavanagh, Maria E; Mongan, Ann Marie; Doyle, Suzanne L; Gilmartin, Niamh; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Reynolds, John V; Lysaght, Joanne

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a global health problem presenting serious risk of disease fuelled by chronic inflammation, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, liver disease and cancer. Visceral fat, in particular the omentum and liver of obese individuals are sites of excessive inflammation. We propose that chemokine-mediated trafficking of pro-inflammatory cells to the omentum and liver contributes to local and subsequent systemic inflammation. Oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma (OAC) is an exemplar model of obesity and inflammation driven cancer. We have demonstrated that T cells actively migrate to the secreted factors from the omentum and liver of OAC patients and that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells bearing the chemokine receptor CCR5 are significantly more prevalent in these tissues compared to matched blood. The CCR5 ligand and inflammatory chemokine MIP-1α is also secreted at significantly higher concentrations in the omentum and liver of our OAC patient cohort compared to matched serum. Furthermore, we report that MIP-1α receptor antagonism can significantly reduce T cell migration to the secreted factors from OAC omentum and liver. These novel data suggest that chemokine receptor antagonism may have therapeutic potential to reduce inflammatory T cell infiltration to the omentum and liver and in doing so, may ameliorate pathological inflammation in obesity and obesity-associated cancer.

  3. FCJ-156 Hacking the Social: Internet Memes, Identity Antagonism, and the Logic of Lulz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Milner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 4chan and reddit are participatory media collectives undergirded by a “logic of lulz” that favours distanced irony and critique. It often works at the expense of core identity categories like race and gender. However, the logic need not be entirely counterproductive to public discourse. Provided that diverse identities find voice instead of exclusion, these sites may facilitate vibrant, agonistic discussion instead of disenfranchising antagonism. In order to assess this potential for productive agonism, I undertook a critical discourse analysis of these collectives. Emphasising the image memes they produce, I evaluated discourses on race and gender. Both race and gender representations were dominated by familiar stereotypes and partial representations. However, while dissenting perspectives on race were repressed or excluded, dissenting perspectives on gender were vocalised and contested. The ‘logic of lulz’ facilitated both dominance and counter, each articulated with heavy reliance on irony and critique. This logic ambiguously balanced agonism and antagonism, but contestation provided sharper engagement than repression.

  4. Cotinine antagonizes the behavioral effects of nicotine exposure in the planarian Girardia tigrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Daniel J; Tenaglia, Matthew; Baker, Debra L; Deats, Sean; Montgomery, Erica; Pagán, Oné R

    2016-10-06

    Nicotine is one of the most addictive drugs abused by humans. Our laboratory and others have demonstrated that nicotine decreases motility and induces seizure-like behavior in planarians (pSLM, which are vigorous writhing and bending of the body) in a concentration-dependent manner. Nicotine also induces withdrawal-like behaviors in these worms. Cotinine is the major nicotine metabolite in humans, although it is not the final product of nicotine metabolism. Cotinine is mostly inactive in vertebrate nervous systems and is currently being explored as a molecule which possess most of nicotine's beneficial effects and few of its undesirable ones. It is not known whether cotinine is a product of nicotine metabolism in planarians. We found that cotinine by itself does not seem to elicit any behavioral effects in planarians up to a concentration of 1mM. We also show that cotinine antagonizes the aforementioned nicotine-induced motility decrease and also decreases the expression of nicotine-induced pSLMs in a concentration-dependent manner. Also cotinine prevents the manifestation of some of the withdrawal-like behaviors induced by nicotine in our experimental organism. Thus, we obtained evidence supporting that cotinine antagonizes nicotine in this planarian species. Possible explanations include competitive binding of both compounds at overlapping binding sites, at different nicotinic receptor subtypes, or maybe allosteric interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamical transitions in a pollination-herbivory interaction: a conflict between mutualism and antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás A Revilla

    Full Text Available Plant-pollinator associations are often seen as purely mutualistic, while in reality they can be more complex. Indeed they may also display a diverse array of antagonistic interactions, such as competition and victim-exploiter interactions. In some cases mutualistic and antagonistic interactions are carried-out by the same species but at different life-stages. As a consequence, population structure affects the balance of inter-specific associations, a topic that is receiving increased attention. In this paper, we developed a model that captures the basic features of the interaction between a flowering plant and an insect with a larval stage that feeds on the plant's vegetative tissues (e.g. leaves and an adult pollinator stage. Our model is able to display a rich set of dynamics, the most remarkable of which involves victim-exploiter oscillations that allow plants to attain abundances above their carrying capacities and the periodic alternation between states dominated by mutualism or antagonism. Our study indicates that changes in the insect's life cycle can modify the balance between mutualism and antagonism, causing important qualitative changes in the interaction dynamics. These changes in the life cycle could be caused by a variety of external drivers, such as temperature, plant nutrients, pesticides and changes in the diet of adult pollinators.

  6. IFITM Proteins Restrict HIV-1 Infection by Antagonizing the Envelope Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyou Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM proteins have been recently shown to restrict HIV-1 and other viruses. Here, we provide evidence that IFITM proteins, particularly IFITM2 and IFITM3, specifically antagonize the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env, thereby inhibiting viral infection. IFITM proteins interact with HIV-1 Env in viral producer cells, leading to impaired Env processing and virion incorporation. Notably, the level of IFITM incorporation into HIV-1 virions does not strictly correlate with the extent of inhibition. Prolonged passage of HIV-1 in IFITM-expressing T lymphocytes leads to emergence of Env mutants that overcome IFITM restriction. The ability of IFITMs to inhibit cell-to-cell infection can be extended to HIV-1 primary isolates, HIV-2 and SIVs; however, the extent of inhibition appears to be virus-strain dependent. Overall, our study uncovers a mechanism by which IFITM proteins specifically antagonize HIV-1 Env to restrict HIV-1 infection and provides insight into the specialized role of IFITMs in HIV infection.

  7. Consciousness and neural plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In contemporary consciousness studies the phenomenon of neural plasticity has received little attention despite the fact that neural plasticity is of still increased interest in neuroscience. We will, however, argue that neural plasticity could be of great importance to consciousness studies....... If consciousness is related to neural processes it seems, at least prima facie, that the ability of the neural structures to change should be reflected in a theory of this relationship "Neural plasticity" refers to the fact that the brain can change due to its own activity. The brain is not static but rather...... a dynamic entity, which physical structure changes according to its use and environment. This change may take the form of growth of new neurons, the creation of new networks and structures, and change within network structures, that is, changes in synaptic strengths. Plasticity raises questions about...

  8. Fuzzy and neural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic and neural networks provide new methods for designing control systems. Fuzzy logic controllers do not require a complete analytical model of a dynamic system and can provide knowledge-based heuristic controllers for ill-defined and complex systems. Neural networks can be used for learning control. In this chapter, we discuss hybrid methods using fuzzy logic and neural networks which can start with an approximate control knowledge base and refine it through reinforcement learning.

  9. What Is Neural Plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bernhardi, Rommy; Bernhardi, Laura Eugenín-von; Eugenín, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    "Neural plasticity" refers to the capacity of the nervous system to modify itself, functionally and structurally, in response to experience and injury. As the various chapters in this volume show, plasticity is a key component of neural development and normal functioning of the nervous system, as well as a response to the changing environment, aging, or pathological insult. This chapter discusses how plasticity is necessary not only for neural networks to acquire new functional properties, but also for them to remain robust and stable. The article also reviews the seminal proposals developed over the years that have driven experiments and strongly influenced concepts of neural plasticity.

  10. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  11. A neural flow estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur; Bruun, Erik

    1995-01-01

    is implemented using switched-current technique and is capable of estimating flow in the μl/s range. The neural estimator is built around a multiplierless neural network, containing 96 synaptic weights which are updated using the LMS1-algorithm. An experimental chip has been designed that operates at 5 V......This paper proposes a new way to estimate the flow in a micromechanical flow channel. A neural network is used to estimate the delay of random temperature fluctuations induced in a fluid. The design and implementation of a hardware efficient neural flow estimator is described. The system...

  12. Neural Networks: Implementations and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, E.; Veelenturf, L.P.J.; Jain, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    Artificial neural networks, also called neural networks, have been used successfully in many fields including engineering, science and business. This paper presents the implementation of several neural network simulators and their applications in character recognition and other engineering areas

  13. Differential Antagonism of Human Innate Immune Responses by Tick-Borne Phlebovirus Nonstructural Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezelj, Veronica V; Li, Ping; Chaudhary, Vidyanath; Elliott, Richard M; Jin, Dong-Yan; Brennan, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, several newly discovered tick-borne viruses causing a wide spectrum of diseases in humans have been ascribed to the Phlebovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. The nonstructural protein (NSs) of bunyaviruses is the main virulence factor and interferon (IFN) antagonist. We studied the molecular mechanisms of IFN antagonism employed by the NSs proteins of human apathogenic Uukuniemi virus (UUKV) and those of Heartland virus (HRTV) and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), both of which cause severe disease. Using reporter assays, we found that UUKV NSs weakly inhibited the activation of the beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter and response elements. UUKV NSs weakly antagonized human IFN-β promoter activation through a novel interaction with mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. HRTV NSs efficiently antagonized both IFN-β promoter activation and type I IFN signaling pathways through interactions with TBK1, preventing its phosphorylation. HRTV NSs exhibited diffused cytoplasmic localization. This is in comparison to the inclusion bodies formed by SFTSV NSs. HRTV NSs also efficiently interacted with STAT2 and impaired IFN-β-induced phosphorylation but did not affect STAT1 or its translocation to the nucleus. Our results suggest that a weak interaction between STAT1 and HRTV or SFTSV NSs may explain their inability to block type II IFN signaling efficiently, thus enabling the activation of proinflammatory responses that lead to severe disease. Our findings offer insights into how pathogenicity may be linked to the capacity of NSs proteins to block the innate immune system and illustrate the plethora of viral immune evasion strategies utilized by emerging phleboviruses. IMPORTANCE Since 2011, there has been a large expansion in the number of emerging tick-borne viruses that have been assigned to the Phlebovirus genus. Heartland virus (HRTV) and SFTS

  14. HIV-1 Group P is unable to antagonize human tetherin by Vpu, Env or Nef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauter Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new subgroup of HIV-1, designated Group P, was recently detected in two unrelated patients of Cameroonian origin. HIV-1 Group P phylogenetically clusters with SIVgor suggesting that it is the result of a cross-species transmission from gorillas. Until today, HIV-1 Group P has only been detected in two patients, and its degree of adaptation to the human host is largely unknown. Previous data have shown that pandemic HIV-1 Group M, but not non-pandemic Group O or rare Group N viruses, efficiently antagonize the human orthologue of the restriction factor tetherin (BST-2, HM1.24, CD317 suggesting that primate lentiviruses may have to gain anti-tetherin activity for efficient spread in the human population. Thus far, three SIV/HIV gene products (vpu, nef and env are known to have the potential to counteract primate tetherin proteins, often in a species-specific manner. Here, we examined how long Group P may have been circulating in humans and determined its capability to antagonize human tetherin as an indicator of adaptation to humans. Results Our data suggest that HIV-1 Group P entered the human population between 1845 and 1989. Vpu, Env and Nef proteins from both Group P viruses failed to counteract human or gorilla tetherin to promote efficient release of HIV-1 virions, although both Group P Nef proteins moderately downmodulated gorilla tetherin from the cell surface. Notably, Vpu, Env and Nef alleles from the two HIV-1 P strains were all able to reduce CD4 cell surface expression. Conclusions Our analyses of the two reported HIV-1 Group P viruses suggest that zoonosis occurred in the last 170 years and further support that pandemic HIV-1 Group M strains are better adapted to humans than non-pandemic or rare Group O, N and P viruses. The inability to antagonize human tetherin may potentially explain the limited spread of HIV-1 Group P in the human population.

  15. Estradiol and striatal dopamine receptor antagonism influence memory system bias in the female rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Matthew G; Almey, Anne; Caissie, Meghen; LaChappelle, Ivonne; Radiotis, George; Brake, Wayne G

    2013-11-01

    Estradiol (E2) has been shown to influence learning and memory systems used by female rats to find a reward. Rats with high levels of E2 tend to use allocentric, or place, memory while rats with low levels of E2 use egocentric, or response, memory. It has been shown that systemic dopamine receptor antagonism interacts with E2 to affect which memory system is used. Here, dopamine antagonists were administered directly into either the dorsal striatum or nucleus accumbens to determine where in the brain this interaction takes place. Seventy-four young adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in a modified plus-maze. All rats were ovariectomized, received a subcutaneous low E2 implant, and were implanted with bilateral cannulae into either the dorsal striatum or the nucleus accumbens. Additionally, high E2 rats received daily injections of E2 in a sesame oil solution while low E2 rats received daily injections of vehicle. After reaching criterion levels of performance in a plus-maze task, rats were administered microinjections of either a dopamine D1 receptor (SCH 23390; 0.1 μg/ml and 0.01 μg/ml) or D2 receptor (raclopride; 2 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml) antagonist or a vehicle control (saline) in a counterbalanced manner. High E2 rats exhibited a trend towards a place memory bias while low E2 rats showed a response memory bias. Dorsal striatal administration of a D1, but not D2, dopamine receptor antagonist caused a switch in the memory system used by both high and low E rats. There was no significant effect of dopamine receptor antagonism in the nucleus accumbens group. Thus, E2 determined which memory system controlled behavior in a plus-maze task. Moreover, this effect was modulated by dopamine D1R antagonism in the dorsal but not ventral striatum suggesting that memory systems are, in part, mediated by E2 and dopamine in this region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient Vpu-Mediated Tetherin Antagonism by an HIV-1 Group O Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Katharina; Starz, Kathrin; Sauter, Daniel; Langer, Simon; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Learn, Gerald H; Stürzel, Christina M; Leoz, Marie; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Geyer, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-03-15

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) use their Nef proteins to counteract the restriction factor tetherin. However, a deletion in human tetherin prevents antagonism by the Nef proteins of SIVcpz and SIVgor, which represent the ape precursors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To promote virus release from infected cells, pandemic HIV-1 group M strains evolved Vpu as a tetherin antagonist, while the Nef protein of less widespread HIV-1 group O strains acquired the ability to target a region adjacent to this deletion. In this study, we identified an unusual HIV-1 group O strain (RBF206) that evolved Vpu as an effective antagonist of human tetherin. While both RBF206 Vpu and Nef exert anti-tetherin activity in transient-transfection assays, mainly Vpu promotes RBF206 release in infected CD4(+) T cells. Although mutations distinct from the adaptive changes observed in group M Vpus (M-Vpus) were critical for the acquisition of its anti-tetherin activity, RBF206 O-Vpu potently suppresses NF-κB activation and reduces CD4 cell surface expression. Interestingly, RBF206 Vpu counteracts tetherin in a largely species-independent manner, degrading both the long and short isoforms of human tetherin. Downmodulation of CD4, but not counteraction of tetherin, by RBF206 Vpu was dependent on the cellular ubiquitin ligase machinery. Our data present the first example of an HIV-1 group O Vpu that efficiently antagonizes human tetherin and suggest that counteraction by O-Nefs may be suboptimal.IMPORTANCE Previous studies showed that HIV-1 groups M and O evolved two alternative strategies to counteract the human ortholog of the restriction factor tetherin. While HIV-1 group M switched from Nef to Vpu due to a deletion in the cytoplasmic domain of human tetherin, HIV-1 group O, which lacks Vpu-mediated anti-tetherin activity, acquired a Nef protein that is able to target a region adjacent to the deletion. Here we report an unusual exception, identifying a strain of HIV-1

  17. Critical Branching Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical…

  18. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  19. Structural Basis for Agonism and Antagonism for a Set of Chemically Related Progesterone Receptor Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusher, Scott J.; Raaijmakers, Hans C. A.; Vu-Pham, Diep; Dechering, Koen; Lam, Tsang Wai; Brown, Angus R.; Hamilton, Niall M.; Nimz, Olaf; Bosch, Rolien; McGuire, Ross; Oubrie, Arthur; de Vlieg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The progesterone receptor is able to bind to a large number and variety of ligands that elicit a broad range of transcriptional responses ranging from full agonism to full antagonism and numerous mixed profiles inbetween. We describe here two new progesterone receptor ligand binding domain x-ray structures bound to compounds from a structurally related but functionally divergent series, which show different binding modes corresponding to their agonistic or antagonistic nature. In addition, we present a third progesterone receptor ligand binding domain dimer bound to an agonist in monomer A and an antagonist in monomer B, which display binding modes in agreement with the earlier observation that agonists and antagonists from this series adopt different binding modes. PMID:21849509

  20. What Do Structures Tell Us About Chemokine Receptor Function and Antagonism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Zheng, Yi; Stephens, Bryan S.; Handel, Tracy M. (UCSD)

    2017-05-22

    Chemokines and their cell surface G protein–coupled receptors are critical for cell migration, not only in many fundamental biological processes but also in inflammatory diseases and cancer. Recent X-ray structures of two chemokines complexed with full-length receptors provided unprecedented insight into the atomic details of chemokine recognition and receptor activation, and computational modeling informed by new experiments leverages these insights to gain understanding of many more receptor:chemokine pairs. In parallel, chemokine receptor structures with small molecules reveal the complicated and diverse structural foundations of small molecule antagonism and allostery, highlight the inherent physicochemical challenges of receptor:chemokine interfaces, and suggest novel epitopes that can be exploited to overcome these challenges. The structures and models promote unique understanding of chemokine receptor biology, including the interpretation of two decades of experimental studies, and will undoubtedly assist future drug discovery endeavors.

  1. SARS coronavirus pathogenesis: host innate immune responses and viral antagonism of interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totura, Allison L; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-06-01

    SARS-CoV is a pathogenic coronavirus that emerged from a zoonotic reservoir, leading to global dissemination of the virus. The association SARS-CoV with aberrant cytokine, chemokine, and Interferon Stimulated Gene (ISG) responses in patients provided evidence that SARS-CoV pathogenesis is at least partially controlled by innate immune signaling. Utilizing models for SARS-CoV infection, key components of innate immune signaling pathways have been identified as protective factors against SARS-CoV disease, including STAT1 and MyD88. Gene transcription signatures unique to SARS-CoV disease states have been identified, but host factors that regulate exacerbated disease phenotypes still remain largely undetermined. SARS-CoV encodes several proteins that modulate innate immune signaling through the antagonism of the induction of Interferon and by avoidance of ISG effector functions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Mechanism of memantine block of NMDA-activated channels in rat retinal ganglion cells: uncompetitive antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H S; Lipton, S A

    1997-01-01

    1. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-activated currents were recorded from dissociated rat retinal ganglion cells using whole-cell recording. The NMDA open-channel blocking drug memantine was evaluated for non-competitive and/or uncompetitive components of antagonism. A rapid superfusion system was used to apply various drugs for kinetic analysis. 2. Dose-response data revealed that memantine blocked 200 microM NMDA-evoked responses with a 50% inhibition constant (IC50) of approximately 1 microM at -60 mV and an empirical Hill coefficient of approximately 1. The antagonism followed a bimolecular reaction process. This 1:1 stoichiometry is supported by the fact that the macroscopic blocking rate of memantine (kon) increased linearly with memantine concentration and the macroscopic unblocking rate (koff) was independent of it. The estimated pseudo-first order rate constant for macroscopic blockade was 4 x 10(5) M-1 S-1 and the rate constant for unblocking was 0.44 s-1. Both the blocking and unblocking actions of memantine were well fitted by a single exponential process. 3. The kon for 2 microM memantine decreased with decreasing concentrations of NMDA. By analysing kon behaviour, we estimate that memantine has minimal interaction with the closed-unliganded state of the channel. As channel open probability (Po) approached zero, a small residual action of memantine may be explained by the presence of endogenous glutamate and glycine. 4. Memantine could be trapped within the NMDA-gated channel if it was suddenly closed by fast washout of agonist. The measured gating process of channel activation and deactivation appeared at least 10-20-fold faster than the kinetics of memantine action. By combining the agonist and voltage dependence of antagonism, a trapping scheme was established for further kinetic analysis. 5. With low agonist concentrations, NMDA-gated channels recovered slowly from memantine blockade. By analysing the probability of a channel remaining blocked, we

  3. Impairments of exploration and memory after systemic or prelimbic D1-receptor antagonism in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bettina; Schachtman, Todd R.; Mark, Louise T.

    2011-01-01

    to examine the effects on memory: cross-maze and object recognition task. Systemic administration reduced spatial exploration in cross-maze as well as in an open field test, and also reduced object exploration. Spatial (hippocampus-dependent) short-term memory was inhibited in the cross-maze and non......-spatial short-term object retention was also impaired. In contrast to these systemic effects, bilateral injections of SCH23390 into the prelimbic cortices altered neither spatial nor object exploration, but did inhibit short-term memory in both cross-maze and object recognition task. Therefore, the inhibiting......D1-receptor antagonism is known to impair rodent memory but also inhibits spontaneous exploration of stimuli to be remembered. Hypo-exploration could contribute to impaired memory by influencing event processing. In order to explore this effect, the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390...

  4. Transcription Factor Antagonism Controls Enteroendocrine Cell Specification from Intestinal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Pang, Zhimin; Huang, Huanwei; Wang, Chenhui; Cai, Tao; Xi, Rongwen

    2017-04-20

    The balanced maintenance and differentiation of local stem cells is required for Homeostatic renewal of tissues. In the Drosophila midgut, the transcription factor Escargot (Esg) maintains undifferentiated states in intestinal stem cells, whereas the transcription factors Scute (Sc) and Prospero (Pros) promote enteroendocrine cell specification. However, the mechanism through which Esg and Sc/Pros coordinately regulate stem cell differentiation is unknown. Here, by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis with genetic studies, we show that both Esg and Sc bind to a common promoter region of pros. Moreover, antagonistic activity between Esg and Sc controls the expression status of Pros in stem cells, thereby, specifying whether stem cells remain undifferentiated or commit to enteroendocrine cell differentiation. Our study therefore reveals transcription factor antagonism between Esg and Sc as a novel mechanism that underlies fate specification from intestinal stem cells in Drosophila.

  5. Numb/Numbl-Opo antagonism controls retinal epithelium morphogenesis by regulating integrin endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanović, Ozren; Delfino-Machín, Mariana; Nicolás-Pérez, María; Gavilán, María P; Gago-Rodrigues, Inês; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Lillo, Concepción; Ríos, Rosa M; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Martínez-Morales, Juan R

    2012-10-16

    Polarized trafficking of adhesion receptors plays a pivotal role in controlling cellular behavior during morphogenesis. Particularly, clathrin-dependent endocytosis of integrins has long been acknowledged as essential for cell migration. However, little is known about the contribution of integrin trafficking to epithelial tissue morphogenesis. Here we show how the transmembrane protein Opo, previously described for its essential role during optic cup folding, plays a fundamental role in this process. Through interaction with the PTB domain of the clathrin adaptors Numb and Numbl via an integrin-like NPxF motif, Opo antagonizes Numb/Numbl function and acts as a negative regulator of integrin endocytosis in vivo. Accordingly, numb/numbl gain-of-function experiments in teleost embryos mimic the retinal malformations observed in opo mutants. We propose that developmental regulator Opo enables polarized integrin localization by modulating Numb/Numbl, thus directing the basal constriction that shapes the vertebrate retina epithelium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. USP10 Antagonizes c-Myc Transcriptional Activation through SIRT6 Stabilization to Suppress Tumor Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghong Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduced protein expression of SIRT6 tumor suppressor is involved in tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT6 protein downregulation in human cancers remain unknown. Using a proteomic approach, we have identified the ubiquitin-specific peptidase USP10, another tumor suppressor, as one of the SIRT6-interacting proteins. USP10 suppresses SIRT6 ubiquitination to protect SIRT6 from proteasomal degradation. USP10 antagonizes the transcriptional activity of the c-Myc oncogene through SIRT6, as well as p53, to inhibit cell-cycle progression, cancer cell growth, and tumor formation. To support this conclusion, we detected significant reductions in both USP10 and SIRT6 protein expression in human colon cancers. Our study discovered crosstalk between two tumor-suppressive genes in regulating cell-cycle progression and proliferation and showed that dysregulated USP10 function promotes tumorigenesis through SIRT6 degradation.

  7. Antagonism of nerve growth factor-TrkA signaling and the relief of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyh, Patrick W; Koltzenburg, Martin; Mendell, Lorne M; Tive, Leslie; Shelton, David L

    2011-07-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally discovered as a neurotrophic factor essential for the survival of sensory and sympathetic neurons during development. However, in the adult NGF has been found to play an important role in nociceptor sensitization after tissue injury. The authors outline mechanisms by which NGF activation of its cognate receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase A receptor, regulates a host of ion channels, receptors, and signaling molecules to enhance acute and chronic pain. The authors also document that peripherally restricted antagonism of NGF-tropomyosin-related kinase A receptor signaling is effective for controlling human pain while appearing to maintain normal nociceptor function. Understanding whether there are any unexpected adverse events and how humans may change their behavior and use of the injured/degenerating tissue after significant pain relief without sedation will be required to fully appreciate the patient populations that may benefit from these therapies targeting NGF.

  8. Antagonism between penicillin and erythromycin against Streptococcus pneumoniae in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Jensen, T G; Dessau, Ram

    2000-01-01

    the effect of the bactericidal agent. In this study, the possible interaction between penicillin and erythromycin was investigated in vitro and in vivo against four clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae with MICs of penicillin ranging from 0.016 to 0.5 mg/L and of erythromycin from 0. 25 to >128 mg....../L. In vitro time-kill curves were generated with clinically relevant concentrations of penicillin (10 mg/L) and erythromycin (1 mg/L), either individually or in combination. Antagonism between penicillin and erythromycin was observed for the four isolates. In vivo interaction was investigated in the mouse...... peritonitis model. After intraperitoneal inoculation, penicillin and erythromycin were given either individually or in combination. For two of the four isolates, mortality was significantly higher in the groups treated with the combination of penicillin and erythromycin than in the groups treated...

  9. Convergent evolution of argonaute-2 slicer antagonism in two distinct insect RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël T van Mierlo

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a major antiviral pathway that shapes evolution of RNA viruses. We show here that Nora virus, a natural Drosophila pathogen, is both a target and suppressor of RNAi. We detected viral small RNAs with a signature of Dicer-2 dependent small interfering RNAs in Nora virus infected Drosophila. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Nora virus VP1 protein contains RNAi suppressive activity in vitro and in vivo that enhances pathogenicity of recombinant Sindbis virus in an RNAi dependent manner. Nora virus VP1 and the viral suppressor of RNAi of Cricket paralysis virus (1A antagonized Argonaute-2 (AGO2 Slicer activity of RNA induced silencing complexes pre-loaded with a methylated single-stranded guide strand. The convergent evolution of AGO2 suppression in two unrelated insect RNA viruses highlights the importance of AGO2 in antiviral defense.

  10. Neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor antagonism attenuates cocaine-induced effects in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Jensen, Morten; Weikop, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Several studies suggest a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in addiction to drugs of abuse, including cocaine. However, the NPY receptors mediating addiction-related effects remain to be determined. Objectives To explore the potential role of Y5 NPY receptors in cocaine-induced behavioural...... effects. Methods The Y5 antagonist L-152,804 and Y5-knockout (Y5-KO) mice were tested in two models of cocaine addiction-related behaviour: acute self-administration and cocaine-induced hyperactivity. We also studied effects of Y5 receptor antagonism on cocaine-induced c-fos expression and extracellular...... effects, suggesting that Y5 receptors could be a potential therapeutic target in cocaine addiction....

  11. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maëlle Lempereur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L. which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box. In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif.

  12. Small molecule antagonism of oxysterol-induced Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Madsen, Christian M; Arfelt, Kristine N

    2013-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) was recently identified as the first oxysterol-activated 7TM receptor. EBI2 is essential for B cell trafficking within lymphoid tissues and thus the humoral immune response in general. Here we characterize the antagonism of the non-peptide molecule GSK...

  13. Comparison of vascular alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonism of tamsulosin in oral controlled absorption system (OCAS) and modified release (MR) formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Korstanje, C.; Krauwinkel, W.; Shear, M.; Davies, J.; Quartel, A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The cardiovascular a-l-adrenoceptor (AR) antagonism of the new oral controlled absorption system (OCAS) 0.4 mg tablet formulation of tamsulosin was compared with that of the modified release (MR) 0.4 mg capsule formulation in healthy male volunteers after a single dose in the fasted

  14. Social antagonism and socio-environmental struggles in Mexico: Body, emotions and subjectivity as a combat ground against affectation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Lorena Navarro Trujillo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Infront of the dispossession of common, tangible and intangible assets, is emerging a new social antagonism against extractive paradigm and the commodification of life. The relationship of body and emotions emerges as a field of fight against environmental impairment, at the same time that enables an autonomous time and space for the prefiguration of a future society.

  15. Self-Regulation in Early Adolescence: Relations with Mother-Son Relationship Quality and Maternal Regulatory Support and Antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Kristin L.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Fitzpatrick, Amber

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine relations among maternal regulatory support, maternal antagonism, and mother-son relationship quality in relation to boys' self-regulation during early adolescence. As part of a larger longitudinal study on 263 low-income, ethnically diverse boys, multiple informants and methods were used to…

  16. Competitive androgen receptor antagonism as a factor determining the predictability of cumulative antiandrogenic effects of widely used pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Frances; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Many pesticides in current use have recently been revealed as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their combined effects is lacking. We investigated the combined effects and the competitive AR antagonism of pesticide mixtures. We used the MDA-kb2 assay to test a combination of eight AR antagonists that did not also possess AR agonist properties ("pure" antagonists; 8 mix: fludioxonil, fenhexamid, ortho-phenylphenol, imazalil, tebuconazole, dimethomorph, methiocarb, pirimiphos-methyl), a combination of five AR antagonists that also showed agonist activity (5 mix: cyprodinil, pyrimethanil, vinclozolin, chlorpropham, linuron), and all pesticides combined (13 mix). We used concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) to formulate additivity expectations, and Schild plot analyses to investigate competitive AR antagonism. A good agreement between the effects of the mixture of eight "pure" AR antagonists and the responses predicted by CA was observed. Schild plot analysis revealed that the 8 mix acted by competitive AR antagonism. However, the observed responses of the 5 mix and the 13 mix fell within the "prediction window" boundaries defined by the predicted regression curves of CA and IA. Schild plot analysis with these mixtures yielded anomalous responses incompatible with competitive receptor antagonism. A mixture of widely used pesticides can, in a predictable manner, produce combined AR antagonist effects that exceed the responses elicited by the most potent component alone. Inasmuch as large populations are regularly exposed to mixtures of antiandrogenic pesticides, our results underline the need for considering combination effects for these substances in regulatory practice.

  17. SSX2 is a novel DNA-binding protein that antagonizes polycomb group body formation and gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Møller, Jesper Bonnet

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes regulate cellular identity through epigenetic programming of chromatin. Here, we show that SSX2, a germline-specific protein ectopically expressed in melanoma, is a chromatin-associated protein that antagonizes BMI1 and EZH2 PcG body formation and derepresses PcG ta...

  18. SSX2 is a novel DNA-binding protein that antagonizes polycomb group body formation and gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Relster, Mette Marie; Greve, Katrine Buch Viden

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes regulate cellular identity through epigenetic programming of chromatin. Here, we show that SSX2, a germline-specific protein ectopically expressed in melanoma and other types of human cancers, is a chromatin-associated protein that antagonizes BMI1 and EZH2 PcG body...

  19. The effects of conformational constraints and steric bulk in the amino acid moiety of philanthotoxins on AMPAR antagonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Olsen, Christian A; Mellor, Ian R

    2005-01-01

    , establishing general protocols for philanthotoxin solution- and solid-phase synthesis (39-90% and 42-54% overall yields, respectively). The analogues were tested for their ability to antagonize kainate-induced currents of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoyl)propanoic acid receptors (AMPAR) expressed...

  20. Kinin B1 receptor antagonism is equally efficient as angiotensin receptor 1 antagonism in reducing renal fibrosis in experimental obstructive nephropathy, but is not additive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine eHuart

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the pathological hallmark of chronic kidney disease. Currently, inhibitors of the renin angiotensin system (RAS remain the sole therapy in human displaying antifibrotic properties. Further antifibrotic molecules are needed. We have recently reported that the delayed blockade of the bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R reduced the development of fibrosis in two animal models of renal fibrosis. The usefulness of new drugs also resides in outperforming the gold standards and eventually being additive or complementary to existing therapies. Methods: In this study we compared the efficacy of a B1R antagonist (B1Ra with that of an angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist (AT1a in the unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO model of renal fibrosis and determined whether bi-therapy presented higher efficacy than any of the drugs alone. Results: B1R antagonism was as efficient as the gold-standard AT1a treatment. However bitherapy did not improve the antifibrotic effects at the protein level. We sought for the reason of the absence of this additive effect by studying the expression of a panel of genes involved in the fibrotic process. Interestingly, at the molecular level the different drugs targeted different players of fibrosis that, however, in this severe model did not result in improved reduction of fibrosis at the protein level. Conclusions: As the B1R is induced specifically in the diseased organ and thus potentially displays low side effects it might be an interesting alternative in cases of poor tolerability to RAS inhibitors.

  1. Kinin B1 receptor antagonism is equally efficient as angiotensin receptor 1 antagonism in reducing renal fibrosis in experimental obstructive nephropathy, but is not additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huart, Antoine; Klein, Julie; Gonzalez, Julien; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Neau, Eric; Delage, Christine; Calise, Denis; Ribes, David; Schanstra, Joost P.; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the pathological hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Currently, inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) remain the sole therapy in human displaying antifibrotic properties. Further antifibrotic molecules are needed. We have recently reported that the delayed blockade of the bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) reduced the development of fibrosis in two animal models of renal fibrosis. The usefulness of new drugs also resides in outperforming the gold standards and eventually being additive or complementary to existing therapies. Methods: In this study we compared the efficacy of a B1R antagonist (B1Ra) with that of an angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist (AT1a) in the unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model of renal fibrosis and determined whether bi-therapy presented higher efficacy than any of the drugs alone. Results: B1R antagonism was as efficient as the gold-standard AT1a treatment. However, bitherapy did not improve the antifibrotic effects at the protein level. We sought for the reason of the absence of this additive effect by studying the expression of a panel of genes involved in the fibrotic process. Interestingly, at the molecular level the different drugs targeted different players of fibrosis that, however, in this severe model did not result in improved reduction of fibrosis at the protein level. Conclusions: As the B1R is induced specifically in the diseased organ and thus potentially displays low side effects it might be an interesting alternative in cases of poor tolerability to RAS inhibitors. PMID:25698969

  2. Genomic agonism and phenotypic antagonism between estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E; Tarulli, Gerard; Zarnke, Allison L; Bourgo, Ryan J; Laine, Muriel; Chang, Ya-Fang; Ma, Shihong; Dembo, Anna G; Raj, Ganesh V; Hickey, Theresa E; Tilley, Wayne D; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-06-01

    The functional role of progesterone receptor (PR) and its impact on estrogen signaling in breast cancer remain controversial. In primary ER(+) (estrogen receptor-positive)/PR(+) human tumors, we report that PR reprograms estrogen signaling as a genomic agonist and a phenotypic antagonist. In isolation, estrogen and progestin act as genomic agonists by regulating the expression of common target genes in similar directions, but at different levels. Similarly, in isolation, progestin is also a weak phenotypic agonist of estrogen action. However, in the presence of both hormones, progestin behaves as a phenotypic estrogen antagonist. PR remodels nucleosomes to noncompetitively redirect ER genomic binding to distal enhancers enriched for BRCA1 binding motifs and sites that link PR and ER/PR complexes. When both hormones are present, progestin modulates estrogen action, such that responsive transcriptomes, cellular processes, and ER/PR recruitment to genomic sites correlate with those observed with PR alone, but not ER alone. Despite this overall correlation, the transcriptome patterns modulated by dual treatment are sufficiently different from individual treatments, such that antagonism of oncogenic processes is both predicted and observed. Combination therapies using the selective PR modulator/antagonist (SPRM) CDB4124 in combination with tamoxifen elicited 70% cytotoxic tumor regression of T47D tumor xenografts, whereas individual therapies inhibited tumor growth without net regression. Our findings demonstrate that PR redirects ER chromatin binding to antagonize estrogen signaling and that SPRMs can potentiate responses to antiestrogens, suggesting that cotargeting of ER and PR in ER(+)/PR(+) breast cancers should be explored.

  3. Long-term NMDAR antagonism correlates reduced astrocytic glutamate uptake with anxiety-like phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo R Zimmer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of glutamate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR hypofunction has been extensively studied in schizophrenia; however, less is known about its role in anxiety disorders. Recently, it was demonstrated that astrocytic GLT-1 blockade leads to an anxiety-like phenotype. Although astrocytes are capable of modulating NMDAR activity through glutamate uptake transporters, the relationship between astrocytic glutamate uptake and the development of an anxiety phenotype remains poorly explored. Here, we aimed to investigative whether long-term antagonism of NMDAR impacts anxiety-related behaviors and astrocytic glutamate uptake. Memantine, an NMDAR antagonist, was administered daily for 24 days to healthy adult CF-1 mice by oral gavage at doses of 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg. The mice were submitted to a sequential battery of behavioral tests (open field, light-dark box and elevated plus-maze tests. We then evaluated glutamate uptake activity and the immunocontents of glutamate transporters in the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that long-term administration of memantine induces anxiety-like behavior in mice in the light-dark box and elevated plus-maze paradigms. Additionally, the administration of memantine decreased glutamate uptake activity in both the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus without altering the immunocontent of either GLT-1 or GLAST. Remarkably, the memantine-induced reduction in glutamate uptake was correlated with enhancement of an anxiety-like phenotype. In conclusion, long-term NMDAR antagonism with memantine induces anxiety-like behavior that is associated with reduced glutamate uptake activity but that is not dependent on GLT-1 or GLAST protein expression. Our study suggests that NMDAR and glutamate uptake hypofunction may contribute to the development of conditions that fall within the category of anxiety disorders.

  4. Dopamine Receptor D1 Agonism and Antagonism Using a Field-Effect Transistor Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon Joo; Yang, Heehong; Lee, Seung Hwan; Song, Hyun Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Bae, Joonwon; Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Tai Hyun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2017-06-27

    The field-effect transistor (FET) has been used in the development of diagnostic tools for several decades, leading to high-performance biosensors. Therefore, the FET platform can provide the foundation for the next generation of analytical methods. A major role of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is in the transfer of external signals into the cell and promoting human body functions; thus, their principle application is in the screening of new drugs. The research community uses efficient systems to screen potential GPCR drugs; nevertheless, the need to develop GPCR-conjugated analytical devices remains for next-generation new drug screening. In this study, we proposed an approach for studying receptor agonism and antagonism by combining the roles of FETs and GPCRs in a dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1)-conjugated FET system, which is a suitable substitute for conventional cell-based receptor assays. DRD1 was reconstituted and purified to mimic native binding pockets that have highly discriminative interactions with DRD1 agonists/antagonists. The real-time responses from the DRD1-nanohybrid FET were highly sensitive and selective for dopamine agonists/antagonists, and their maximal response levels were clearly different depending on their DRD1 affinities. Moreover, the equilibrium constants (K) were estimated by fitting the response levels. Each K value indicates the variation in the affinity between DRD1 and the agonists/antagonists; a greater K value corresponds to a stronger DRD1 affinity in agonism, whereas a lower K value in antagonism indicates a stronger dopamine-blocking effect.

  5. RAB-7 antagonizes LET-23 EGFR signaling during vulva development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Skorobogata

    Full Text Available The Rab7 GTPase regulates late endosome trafficking of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR to the lysosome for degradation. However, less is known about how Rab7 activity, functioning late in the endocytic pathway, affects EGFR signaling. Here we used Caenorhabditis elegans vulva cell fate induction, a paradigm for genetic analysis of EGFR/Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK signaling, to assess the genetic requirements for rab-7. Using a rab-7 deletion mutant, we demonstrate that rab-7 antagonizes LET-23 EGFR signaling to a similar extent, but in a distinct manner, as previously described negative regulators such as sli-1 c-Cbl. Epistasis analysis places rab-7 upstream of or in parallel to lin-3 EGF and let-23 EGFR. However, expression of gfp::rab-7 in the Vulva Presursor Cells (VPCs is sufficient to rescue the rab-7(- VPC induction phenotypes indicating that RAB-7 functions in the signal receiving cell. We show that components of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT-0, and -I, complexes, hgrs-1 Hrs, and vps-28, also antagonize signaling, suggesting that LET-23 EGFR likely transits through Multivesicular Bodies (MVBs en route to the lysosome. Consistent with RAB-7 regulating LET-23 EGFR trafficking, rab-7 mutants have increased number of LET-23::GFP-positive endosomes. Our data imply that Rab7, by mediating EGFR trafficking and degradation, plays an important role in downregulation of EGFR signaling. Failure to downregulate EGFR signaling contributes to oncogenesis, and thus Rab7 could possess tumor suppressor activity in humans.

  6. Anthranilate deteriorates the structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and antagonizes the biofilm-enhancing indole effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Park, Ha-Young; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2015-04-01

    Anthranilate and indole are alternative degradation products of tryptophan, depending on the bacterial species. While indole enhances the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we found that anthranilate, the tryptophan degradation product of P. aeruginosa, had an opposite effect on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, in which anthranilate deteriorated the mushroom structure of biofilm. The anthranilate effect on biofilm formation was differentially exerted depending on the developmental stage and the presence of shear force. Anthranilate slightly accelerated the initial attachment of P. aeruginosa at the early stage of biofilm development and appeared to build more biofilm without shear force. But anthranilate weakened the biofilm structure in the late stage, deteriorating the mushroom structure of biofilms with shear force to make a flat biofilm. To investigate the interplay of anthranilate with indole in biofilm formation, biofilms were cotreated with anthranilate and indole, and the results showed that anthranilate antagonized the biofilm-enhancing effect of indole. Anthranilate was able to deteriorate the preformed biofilm. The effect of anthranilate and indole on biofilm formation was quorum sensing independent. AntR, a regulator of anthranilate-degrading metabolism was synergistically activated by cotreatment with anthranilate and indole, suggesting that indole might enhance biofilm formation by facilitating the degradation of anthranilate. Anthranilate slightly but significantly affected the cyclic diguaniylate (c-di-GMP) level and transcription of major extracellular polysaccharide (Psl, Pel, and alginate) operons. These results suggest that anthranilate may be a promising antibiofilm agent and antagonize the effect of indole on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Des-Gamma-Carboxy Prothrombin (DCP Antagonizes the Effects of Gefitinib on Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP, an aberrant prothrombin produced by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells, is known as a marker for HCC. Recent studies indicated that high levels of DCP are associated with the malignant potential of HCC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association of DCP with gefitinib treatment failure in HCC and whether DCP counteracts gefitinib-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of HCC. Methods: The experiments were performed in HCC cell lines HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5. The effects of gefitinib on HCC in the presence or absence of DCP were evaluated by the 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were identified by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. Western blotting was performed to analyze the expressions of molecules related to the apoptotic caspase-dependent pathway and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway. Results: Gefitinib inhibited HCC cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. The effects of gefitinib on HCC cells were antagonized by DCP. In the presence of DCP, HCC cells were resistant to the gefitinib-induced inhibition of proliferation and stimulation of apoptosis. DCP prevented the activation of the apoptotic caspase-dependent pathway induced by gefitinib. These antagonistic effects of DCP also arose from its ability to up-regulate EGFR, c-Met and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF in HCC cells. Conclusion: DCP antagonized gefitinib-induced HCC cell growth inhibition by counteracting apoptosis and up-regulating the EGFR pathway. High levels of DCP might thus lead to low response rates or possibly no response to gefitinib in patients with HCC.

  8. Targeting chromatin defects in selected solid tumors based on oncogene addiction, synthetic lethality and epigenetic antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, D; Almouzni, G; Soria, J-C; Postel-Vinay, S

    2017-02-01

    Although the role of epigenetic abnormalities has been studied for several years in cancer genesis and development, epigenetic-targeting drugs have historically failed to demonstrate efficacy in solid malignancies. However, successful targeting of chromatin remodeling deficiencies, histone writers and histone reader alterations has been achieved very recently using biomarker-driven and mechanism-based approaches. Epigenetic targeting is now one of the most active areas in drug development and could represent novel therapeutic opportunity for up to 25% of all solid tumors. We reviewed preclinical and clinical studies that described epigenetic oncogenic addictions, synthetic lethal relationships or epigenetic antagonisms in chromatin regulators. Experimental approaches, their clinical relevance and applicability, as well as corresponding on-going studies are described. The most successful approaches that have been clinically validated so far include the targeting of the BRD4-NUT fusion transcript in NUT-midline carcinoma by BET (Bromodomain Extra-Terminal) inhibitors, and the use of EZH2 (Enhancer of Zest Homolog 2) inhibitors in SMARCB1-deficient malignant rhabdoid tumors and SMARCA4-deficient ovarian small cell carcinomas. Clinical validation is still required for other synthetic lethal relationships or epigenetic antagonisms, including those described between EZH2 inhibitors and deficiencies in components of the Polycomb or SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 subunits), as well as between the CREBBP and EP300 histone acetylases. Further, interplays between epigenetic modifiers and non-epigenetic cellular processes might be therapeutically exploited, and combinatorial strategies could be envisioned to overcome resistance or to sensitize cells to already approved drugs. Epigenetic-targeting drugs have historically failed proving efficacy in solid malignancies when used broadly, but novel mechanism-based approaches in molecularly

  9. Antagonism pattern detection between microRNA and target expression in Ewing's sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Martignetti

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as fundamental regulators that silence gene expression at the post-transcriptional and translational levels. The identification of their targets is a major challenge to elucidate the regulated biological processes. The overall effect of miRNA is reflected on target mRNA expression, suggesting the design of new investigative methods based on high-throughput experimental data such as miRNA and transcriptome profiles. We propose a novel statistical measure of non-linear dependence between miRNA and mRNA expression, in order to infer miRNA-target interactions. This approach, which we name antagonism pattern detection, is based on the statistical recognition of a triangular-shaped pattern in miRNA-target expression profiles. This pattern is observed in miRNA-target expression measurements since their simultaneously elevated expression is statistically under-represented in the case of miRNA silencing effect. The proposed method enables miRNA target prediction to strongly rely on cellular context and physiological conditions reflected by expression data. The procedure has been assessed on synthetic datasets and tested on a set of real positive controls. Then it has been applied to analyze expression data from Ewing's sarcoma patients. The antagonism relationship is evaluated as a good indicator of real miRNA-target biological interaction. The predicted targets are consistently enriched for miRNA binding site motifs in their 3'UTR. Moreover, we reveal sets of predicted targets for each miRNA sharing important biological function. The procedure allows us to infer crucial miRNA regulators and their potential targets in Ewing's sarcoma disease. It can be considered as a valid statistical approach to discover new insights in the miRNA regulatory mechanisms.

  10. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  11. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs.

  12. Hidden neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1999-01-01

    A general framework for hybrids of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and neural networks (NNs) called hidden neural networks (HNNs) is described. The article begins by reviewing standard HMMs and estimation by conditional maximum likelihood, which is used by the HNN. In the HNN, the usual HMM probability...... parameters are replaced by the outputs of state-specific neural networks. As opposed to many other hybrids, the HNN is normalized globally and therefore has a valid probabilistic interpretation. All parameters in the HNN are estimated simultaneously according to the discriminative conditional maximum...... likelihood criterion. The HNN can be viewed as an undirected probabilistic independence network (a graphical model), where the neural networks provide a compact representation of the clique functions. An evaluation of the HNN on the task of recognizing broad phoneme classes in the TIMIT database shows clear...

  13. [Neural codes for perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, R; Salinas, E; Hernández, A; Zainos, A; Lemus, L; de Lafuente, V; Luna, R

    This article describes experiments designed to show the neural codes associated with the perception and processing of tactile information. The results of these experiments have shown the neural activity correlated with tactile perception. The neurones of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) represent the physical attributes of tactile perception. We found that these representations correlated with tactile perception. By means of intracortical microstimulation we demonstrated the causal relationship between S1 activity and tactile perception. In the motor areas of the frontal lobe is to be found the connection between sensorial and motor representation whilst decisions are being taken. S1 generates neural representations of the somatosensory stimuli which seen to be sufficient for tactile perception. These neural representations are subsequently processed by central areas to S1 and seem useful in perception, memory and decision making.

  14. Neural Oscillators Programming Simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McDowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological mechanism used for generating rhythmic patterns for functions such as swallowing, walking, and chewing has been modeled computationally by the neural oscillator. It has been widely studied by biologists to model various aspects of organisms and by computer scientists and robotics engineers as a method for controlling and coordinating the gaits of walking robots. Although there has been significant study in this area, it is difficult to find basic guidelines for programming neural oscillators. In this paper, the authors approach neural oscillators from a programmer’s point of view, providing background and examples for developing neural oscillators to generate rhythmic patterns that can be used in biological modeling and robotics applications.

  15. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  16. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  17. Neural network applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Mary L.; Desai, Utpal; Roppel, T.A.; White, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    A design procedure is suggested for neural networks which accommodates the inclusion of such knowledge-based systems techniques as fuzzy logic and pairwise comparisons. The use of these procedures in the design of applications combines qualitative and quantitative factors with empirical data to yield a model with justifiable design and parameter selection procedures. The procedure is especially relevant to areas of back-propagation neural network design which are highly responsive to the use of precisely recorded expert knowledge.

  18. Building Neural Net Software

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Costa, José Félix

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper [Neto et al. 97] we showed that programming languages can be translated on recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. The goal was not efficiency but simplicity. Indeed we used a number-theoretic approach to machine programming, where (integer) numbers were coded in a unary fashion, introducing a exponential slow down in the computations, with respect to a two-symbol tape Turing machine. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theo...

  19. NEMEFO: NEural MEteorological FOrecast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasero, E.; Moniaci, W.; Meindl, T.; Montuori, A. [Polytechnic of Turin (Italy). Dept. of Electronics

    2004-07-01

    Artificial Neural Systems are a well-known technique used to classify and recognize objects. Introducing the time dimension they can be used to forecast numerical series. NEMEFO is a ''nowcasting'' tool, which uses both statistical and neural systems to forecast meteorological data in a restricted area close to a meteorological weather station in a short time range (3 hours). Ice, fog, rain are typical events which can be anticipated by NEMEFO. (orig.)

  20. The versatility of RhoA activities in neural differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Arie; Yang, Junning; Cai, Jingli; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2017-01-26

    In this commentary we discuss a paper we published recently on the activities of the GTPase RhoA during neural differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells, and relate our findings to previous studies. We narrate how we found that RhoA impedes neural differentiation by inhibiting the production as well as the secretion of noggin, a soluble factor that antagonizes bone morphogenetic protein. We discuss how the questions we tried to address shaped the study, and how embryonic stem cells isolated from a genetically modified mouse model devoid of Syx, a RhoA-specific guanine exchange factor, were used to address them. We detail several signaling pathways downstream of RhoA that are hindered by the absence of Syx, and obstructed by retinoic acid, resulting in an increase of noggin production; we explain how the lower RhoA activity and, consequently, the sparser peri-junctional stress fibers in Syx -/- cells facilitated noggin secretion; and we report unpublished results showing that pharmacological inhibition of RhoA accelerates the neuronal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. Finally, we identify signaling mechanisms in our recent study that warrant further study, and speculate on the possibility of manipulating RhoA signaling in combination with other pathways to drive the differentiation of neuronal subtypes.

  1. Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA of Trichoderma isolates and antagonism against Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Brandão Góes

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD procedure was used to examine the genetic variability among fourteen isolates of Trichoderma and their ability to antagonize Rhizoctonia solani using a dual-culture assay for correlation among RAPD products and their hardness to R. solani. Seven oligodeoxynucleotide primers were selected for the RAPD assays which resulted in 197 bands for 14 isolates of Trichoderma. The data were entered into a binary matrix and a similarity matrix was constructed using DICE similarity (SD index. A UPGMA cluster based on SD values was generated using NTSYS (Numerical Taxonomy System, Applied Biostatistics computer program. A mean coefficient of similarity obtained for pairwise comparisons among the most antagonics isolates was around 40%. The results presented here showed that the variability among the isolates of Trichoderma was very high. No relationship was found between the polymorphism showed by the isolates and their hardness, origin and substrata.A técnica de RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA foi utilizada para examinar a variabilidade genética em quatorze isolados de Trichoderma além de sua capacidade de antagonizar o fungo fitopatogênico Rhizoctonia solani usando pareamento in vitro, e a possível relação entre perfís de RAPD e agressividade dos isolados de Trichoderma a R. solani. Foram selecionados sete primers para os ensaios de RAPD, os quais produziram 197 bandas. Os dados foram introduzidos no programa de computador NTSYS (Numerical Taxonomy System, Applied Biostatisticsna forma de uma matrix binária, sendo construída uma matriz de similaridade utilizando-se o coeficiente de similaridade de DICE (SD e baseado nos valores SD, pelo método de agrupamento UPGMA um dendrograma. Observou-se que o grau de similaridade das amostras que apresentaram melhor desempenho antagônico foi bastante baixo, em torno de 40%. Os resultados demonstraram que a variabilidade entre os isolados de Trichoderma é muito

  2. The parental antagonism theory of language evolution: preliminary evidence for the proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M

    2011-04-01

    not maternally silenced Alu elements are positively correlated with language diversity. Furthermore, there is a much higher than expected frequency of Alu elements inserted into the protein-coding machinery of imprinted and X-chromosomal language loci compared with nonimprinted language loci. Taken together these findings provide some support for parental antagonism theory. Unlike previous theories for language evolution, parental antagonism theory generates testable predictions at the proximate (e.g., neurocognitive areas important for social transmission and language capacities), ontogenetic (e.g., the function of language at different points of development), ultimate (e.g., inclusive fitness), and phylogenetic levels (e.g., the spread of maternally derived brain components in mammals, particularly in the hominin lineage), thus making human capacities for culture more tractable than previously thought.

  3. Neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor antagonism causes faster extinction and attenuates reinstatement in cocaine-induced place preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    , and reinstatement of cocaine-induced CPP was absent. The development of CPP for cocaine was similar between Y5-KO and WT mice. Taken together, the present data show that Y5 antagonism attenuates relapse to cocaine addiction-related behavior. Prevention of relapse is considered to be of pivotal importance......Several studies have suggested a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in addiction to drugs of abuse, including cocaine. Recently, our group showed a role for the NPY Y5 receptor in the modulation of acute reinforcing effects of cocaine using self-administration and hyperlocomotion paradigms....... In the present study, we further explored potential anti-addiction-related effects of Y5 antagonism in another murine model of cocaine addiction-related behavior: conditioned place-preference (CPP). Using this model, it was tested whether blockade or deficiency of the NPY Y5 receptor could influence...

  4. Innate immune activation of NFκB and its antagonism by poxviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Gareth; Bowie, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    In recent years there has been an acceleration of discovery in the field of innate anti-viral immunity to the point that many of the key events in early virus sensing and the discrete anti-viral responses they trigger have been elucidated in detail. In particular, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that detect viruses at the plasma membrane, in endosomes, and within the cytosol have been characterized. Upon stimulation by viruses, most of these PRRs trigger signal transduction pathways culminating in NFκB activation. NFκB contributes both to type I interferon induction, and to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from infected cells. Our understanding of host anti-viral innate immunity has been greatly aided by an appreciation of the ways in which poxviruses have evolved strategies to inhibit both innate sensing and effector responses. A recurring feature of poxviral immunomodulation is the apparent necessity for poxviruses to evolve multiple, non-redundant inhibitors of NFκB activation which often appear to act on the same innate signalling pathway. The reason for such apparent over-targeting of one transcription factor is not clear. Here we describe the current understanding of how host cells sense poxvirus infection to trigger signalling pathways leading to NFκB activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine induction, and the ways in which poxviruses have evolved to concisely antagonize these systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. TRPV1 Antagonism by Capsazepine Modulates Innate Immune Response in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S. Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of people suffer from severe malaria every year. The innate immune response plays a determinant role in host’s defence to malaria. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 modulates macrophage-mediated responses in sepsis, but its role in other pathogenic diseases has never been addressed. We investigated the effects of capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist, in malaria. C57BL/6 mice received 105 red blood cells infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA intraperitoneally. Noninfected mice were used as controls. Capsazepine or vehicle was given intraperitoneally for 6 days. Mice were culled on day 7 after infection and blood and spleen cell phenotype and activation were evaluated. Capsazepine decreased circulating but not spleen F4/80+Ly6G+ cell numbers as well as activation of both F4/80+and F4/80+Ly6G+ cells in infected animals. In addition, capsazepine increased circulating but not spleen GR1+ and natural killer (NK population, without interfering with natural killer T (NKT cell numbers and blood NK and NKT activation. However, capsazepine diminished CD69 expression in spleen NKT but not NK cells. Infection increased lipid peroxidation and the release of TNFα and IFNγ, although capsazepine-treated group exhibited lower levels of lipid peroxidation and TNFα. Capsazepine treatment did not affect parasitaemia. Overall, TRPV1 antagonism modulates the innate immune response to malaria.

  6. Evidence of pomegranate methanolic extract in antagonizing the endogenous SERM, 27-hydroxycholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vini, Ravindran; Juberiya, Azeez M; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2016-02-01

    The direct relationship between obesity and breast cancer has been elucidated recently with the identification of a cholesterol derivative 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), an endogenous SERM that can act through estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated mechanisms. Our recent research shed light on the possible SERM-like property of methanol extract of pericarp of pomegranate (PME) by using human breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231), endometrial (HEC-1A), cervical (SiHa, HeLa), ovarian (SKOV3) cancer cell lines, normal breast fibroblasts (MCF-10A) and also by in vivo models (ovariectomized Swiss albino mice). Our findings demonstrated that PME binds to ER and downregulates the Estrogen response elements (ERE)-mediated transcription in breast cancer cells without being agonistic in the uterine endometrium and has cardioprotective effects comparable to that of 17-β-estradiol. This preliminary work indicates the ability of PME to antagonize the activity of 27HC. We hypothesize that PME can compete with 27HC for ERα and reduce 27HC-induced proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Relevant estrogen-regulated genes such as pS2, PR and ERα were checked to evaluate the ability of PME to abrogate 27HC-induced genes. This study is significant, being the first report describing that bioactive components of the methanolic extract of pericarp of PME, a proven SERM could plausibly compete for 27HC. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Biological activity of the non-microbial fraction of kefir: antagonism against intestinal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraporda, Carolina; Abatemarco Júnior, Mário; Neumann, Elisabeth; Nunes, Álvaro Cantini; Nicoli, Jacques R; Abraham, Analía G; Garrote, Graciela L

    2017-08-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk obtained by the activity of kefir grains which are composed of lactic and acetic acid bacteria, and yeasts. Many beneficial health effects have been associated with kefir consumption such as stimulation of the immune system and inhibition of pathogenic microorganisms. The biological activity of kefir may be attributed to the presence of a complex microbiota as well as the microbial metabolites that are released during fermentation. The aim of this work was to characterise the non-microbial fraction of kefir and to study its antagonism against Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Bacillus cereus. During milk fermentation there was a production of organic acids, mainly lactic and acetic acid, with a consequent decrease in pH and lactose content. The non-microbial fraction of kefir added to nutrient broth at concentrations above 75% v/v induced a complete inhibition of pathogenic growth that could be ascribed to the presence of un-dissociated lactic acid. In vitro assays using an intestinal epithelial cell model indicated that pre-incubation of cells with the non-microbial fraction of kefir did not modify the association/invasion of Salmonella whereas pre-incubation of Salmonella with this fraction under conditions that did not affect their viability significantly decreased the pathogen's ability to invade epithelial cells. Lactate exerted a protective effect against Salmonella in a mouse model, demonstrating the relevance of metabolites present in the non-microbial fraction of kefir produced during milk fermentation.

  8. Metformin Antagonizes Cancer Cell Proliferation by Suppressing Mitochondrial-Dependent Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griss, Takla; Vincent, Emma E.; Egnatchik, Robert; Chen, Jocelyn; Ma, Eric H.; Faubert, Brandon; Viollet, Benoit; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Jones, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is a biguanide widely prescribed to treat Type II diabetes that has gained interest as an antineoplastic agent. Recent work suggests that metformin directly antagonizes cancer cell growth through its actions on complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). However, the mechanisms by which metformin arrests cancer cell proliferation remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the metabolic checkpoint kinases AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and LKB1 are not required for the antiproliferative effects of metformin. Rather, metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation by suppressing mitochondrial-dependent biosynthetic activity. We show that in vitro metformin decreases the flow of glucose- and glutamine-derived metabolic intermediates into the Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA) cycle, leading to reduced citrate production and de novo lipid biosynthesis. Tumor cells lacking functional mitochondria maintain lipid biosynthesis in the presence of metformin via glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation, and display reduced sensitivity to metformin-induced proliferative arrest. Our data indicate that metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation by suppressing the production of mitochondrial-dependent metabolic intermediates required for cell growth, and that metabolic adaptations that bypass mitochondrial-dependent biosynthesis may provide a mechanism of tumor cell resistance to biguanide activity. PMID:26625127

  9. Streptococcus oralis maintains homeostasis in supragingival biofilms by antagonizing cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2018-01-11

    Bacteria residing in oral biofilms live in a state of dynamic equilibrium with one another. The intricate synergistic or antagonistic interactions between them are crucial for determining this balance. Using the 6-species Zürich "supragingival" biofilm model, this study aimed to investigate interactions regarding growth and localization of the constituent species. As control, an inoculum containing all six strains was used, whereas in each of the further five inocula one of the bacterial species was absent, and in the last both streptococci were absent. Biofilms were grown anaerobically on hydroxyapatite discs, and after 64 h they were harvested and quantified by culture analyses. For visualization, fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy was used. Compared to the control, no statistically significant difference of total CFU was observed in the absence of any of the biofilm species, except for F. nucleatum whose absence caused a significant decrease in total bacterial numbers. Absence of S. oralis resulted in a significant decrease in A. oris, and increase in S. mutans (pbiofilm with regards to the localization of the species did not result in observable changes. In summary, the most striking observation was that absence of S. oralis resulted in limited growth of commensal A. oris and overgrowth of S. mutans. This data establishes S. oralis as commensal keeper of homeostasis in the biofilm by antagonizing S. mutans, thus preventing a caries-favoring dysbiotic state. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Tamoxifen Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide/Galactosamine-induced Acute Liver Failure by Antagonizing Hepatic Inflammation and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Meisheng; Wan, Mengqi; Huang, Xiaoliu; Jiang, Yan; Xu, Siying; Luo, Mansheng

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) is a common severe clinical syndrome in intensive care unit. No other methods are available for its prevention apart from supportive treatment and liver transplantation. Tamoxifen (TAM) was reported to attenuate ALF induced by excessive acetaminophen, while its effect on LPS-induced ALF remained unknown. For this, in the present study, we comprehensively assessed whether TAM can attenuate ALF induced by LPS/galactosamine (GaIN). Mice were given TAM once a day for three times. Twelve hours after the last treatment, mice were given LPS/GaIN (intraperitoneally [i.p.]). Survival, plasma transaminases, and histopathology were examined. Serum TNF-α and IL-1β were analyzed by ELISA. Hepatic apoptosis was analyzed by TUNEL and caspase-3 Western blotting, respectively. Compared to the model group, ALF induced by LPS/GaIN was alleviated remarkably following TAM administration, as evidenced by the improvement of survival (87.5% vs. 37.5%), hepatic swell, moderate transaminases, slightly increased serum TNF-α, IL-1β (P < 0.05), and moderate histopathology. In respect of apoptosis, severe hepatocellular apoptosis was reduced notably by TAM treatment confirmed by less TUNEL-positive hepatocytes and decreased caspase-3 cleavage. The results demonstrated that TAM could attenuate LPS/GaIN-induced ALF effectively, probably due to hepatic inflammation and apoptosis antagonism. Furthermore, it was the first report about the effect of TAM on LPS/GaIN-induced ALF.

  11. Bazooka inhibits aPKC to limit antagonism of actomyosin networks during amnioserosa apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Daryl J V; Wang, Qiming; Feng, James J; Harris, Tony J C

    2013-12-01

    Cell shape changes drive tissue morphogenesis during animal development. An important example is the apical cell constriction that initiates tissue internalisation. Apical constriction can occur through a phase of cyclic assembly and disassembly of apicomedial actomyosin networks, followed by stabilisation of these networks. Delayed negative-feedback mechanisms typically underlie cyclic behaviour, but the mechanisms regulating cyclic actomyosin networks remain obscure, as do mechanisms that transform overall network behaviour. Here, we show that a known inhibitor of apicomedial actomyosin networks in Drosophila amnioserosa cells, the Par-6-aPKC complex, is recruited to the apicomedial domain by actomyosin networks during dorsal closure of the embryo. This finding establishes an actomyosin-aPKC negative-feedback loop in the system. Additionally, we find that aPKC recruits Bazooka to the apicomedial domain, and phosphorylates Bazooka for a dynamic interaction. Remarkably, stabilising aPKC-Bazooka interactions can inhibit the antagonism of actomyosin by aPKC, suggesting that Bazooka acts as an aPKC inhibitor, and providing a possible mechanism for delaying the actomyosin-aPKC negative-feedback loop. Our data also implicate an increasing degree of Par-6-aPKC-Bazooka interactions as dorsal closure progresses, potentially explaining a developmental transition in actomyosin behaviour from cyclic to persistent networks. This later impact of aPKC inhibition is supported by mathematical modelling of the system. Overall, this work illustrates how shifting chemical signals can tune actomyosin network behaviour during development.

  12. Antagonism of miR-33 in mice promotes reverse cholesterol transport and regression of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Katey J; Sheedy, Frederick J; Esau, Christine C; Hussain, Farah N; Temel, Ryan E; Parathath, Saj; van Gils, Janine M; Rayner, Alistair J; Chang, Aaron N; Suarez, Yajaira; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J

    2011-07-01

    Plasma HDL levels have a protective role in atherosclerosis, yet clinical therapies to raise HDL levels have remained elusive. Recent advances in the understanding of lipid metabolism have revealed that miR-33, an intronic microRNA located within the SREBF2 gene, suppresses expression of the cholesterol transporter ABC transporter A1 (ABCA1) and lowers HDL levels. Conversely, mechanisms that inhibit miR-33 increase ABCA1 and circulating HDL levels, suggesting that antagonism of miR-33 may be atheroprotective. As the regression of atherosclerosis is clinically desirable, we assessed the impact of miR-33 inhibition in mice deficient for the LDL receptor (Ldlr-/- mice), with established atherosclerotic plaques. Mice treated with anti-miR33 for 4 weeks showed an increase in circulating HDL levels and enhanced reverse cholesterol transport to the plasma, liver, and feces. Consistent with this, anti-miR33-treated mice showed reductions in plaque size and lipid content, increased markers of plaque stability, and decreased inflammatory gene expression. Notably, in addition to raising ABCA1 levels in the liver, anti-miR33 oligonucleotides directly targeted the plaque macrophages, in which they enhanced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol removal. These studies establish that raising HDL levels by anti-miR33 oligonucleotide treatment promotes reverse cholesterol transport and atherosclerosis regression and suggest that it may be a promising strategy to treat atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  13. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Zhen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Gan, Ye-Hua, E-mail: kqyehuagan@bjmu.edu.cn [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  14. Antagonic-stress. A new treatment in gerontopsychiatry and for a healthy productive life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predescu, V; Riga, D; Riga, S; Turlea, J; Bărbat, I M; Botezat-Antonescu, L

    1994-06-30

    A complex antiaging formula--Antagonic-Stress--was investigated vs. placebo (PL), meclofenoxate (MF)--neurometabolic nootropic and vs. nicergoline (NE)--cerebral vasodilator by comparative multiple trials (double-blind, randomized, and parallel) in gerontopsychiatry (DSM-III-R, 1987 and ICD-10, 1992 criteria). AS vs. PL studies in organic mental disorders--amnestic, depressive, anxiety, associated with axis III physical disorders or conditions, and in multiinfarct dementia were followed by AS vs. MF or NE investigations in senile dementia of Alzheimer's type. A total of 343 old people, distributed in 4 PL groups, 1 MF group, 1 NE group, and 5 AS groups were studied. Multiple investigations, before and after three-month treatments were made: psychometric evaluation by Sandoz Clinical Assessment-Geriatric, Self-Assessment Scale-Geriatric and their 5 subscales; psychopathological rating by Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales; as well as psychometric testing by digit symbol of WAIS, Wechsler Memory Scale and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). Except PL, prolonged and large dose treatments with these cerebral activators (MF, NE and especially AS) reduced the psychogeriatric-psychopathological scores and the deterioration index, and improved cognitive performance. The therapeutical effectiveness of AS multiple formula in gerontopsychiatry and its superiority vs. monotherapy (MF or NE) are discussed in connection with its complex neurometabolic and synergetic composition, multiple antioxidative combinations, free radical scavengers, lipofuscinolytic agents, the antiischemic action of antioxidants, multivitamin and multimineral supplementation, and with the better efficacy of multitherapy vs. monotherapy in geriatrics.

  15. Antagonic-stress superiority versus meclofenoxate in gerontopsychiatry (alzheimer type dementia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, R; Schneider, F; Mihalas, G; Stefaniga, P; Mihalas, I G; Maties, R; Mateescu, R

    1994-01-01

    A double blind, comparative, parallel and randomized clinical trial was used for evaluation of two nootropics with anti-aging actions: Meclofenoxate (MF) and Antagonic-Stress (AS). Sixty-three old persons divided into 2 groups (average age: 68.6 and 70.8 years, respectively) with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), of mild to moderate intensity (criteria of DSM-III-R, APA, 1987; and ICD-10, WHO, 1990) were treated with one of these nootropica. Baseline and final psychogeriatric symptomatology after three months of treatments were multiply assessed: psychogeriatric by Sandoz Clinical Assessment-Geriatric scale, Self-Assessment Scale-Geriatric and their subscales; psychometric by Wechsler Memory Scale and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. Prolonged treatments with MF and AS significantly decreased the psychogeriatric scores in scales and subscales, improved the cognitive performance (attention, concentration, memory, performance IQ, full IQ) and diminshed the deterioration index (ANOVA). Therapeutical effects of AS (a neurometabolic complex containing MF) were significantly superior against MF alone (ANCOVA). MF and AS actions are discussed in connection with the brain cholinergic system, lipid peroxidation and free radical scavengers, deceleration of the aging rate, brain and erythrocyte lipofuscinolysis, multiple anti-oxidant formula, multivitamin and multimineral supplementation and with the superiority of multitherapy versus monotherapy in senile dementia and for improving the IQ and the maladaptative behavior.

  16. A Soluble Fluorescent Binding Assay Reveals PIP2 Antagonism of TREK-1 Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanos, Cerrone; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Hansen, Scott B

    2017-08-08

    Lipid regulation of ion channels by low-abundance signaling lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidic acid (PA) has emerged as a central cellular mechanism for controlling ion channels and the excitability of nerves. A lack of robust assays suitable for facile detection of a lipid bound to a channel has hampered the probing of the lipid binding sites and measuring the pharmacology of putative lipid agonists for ion channels. Here, we show a fluorescent PIP2 competition assay for detergent-purified potassium channels, including TWIK-1-related K+-channel (TREK-1). Anionic lipids PA and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) bind dose dependently (9.1 and 96 μM, respectively) and agonize the channel. Our assay shows PIP2 binds with high affinity (0.87 μM) but surprisingly can directly antagonize TREK-1 in liposomes. We propose a model for TREK-1 lipid regulation where PIP2 can compete with PA and PG agonism based on the affinity of the lipid for a site within the channel. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Conditions that Stabilize Membrane Domains Also Antagonize n-Alcohol Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Benjamin B.; Gray, Ellyn; Nouri, Mariam; McCarthy, Nicola L. C.; Gray, Erin M.; Miller, Ann L.; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2016-08-01

    Diverse molecules induce general anesthesia with potency strongly correlated both with their hydrophobicity and their effects on certain ion channels. We recently observed that several n-alcohol anesthetics inhibit heterogeneity in plasma membrane derived vesicles by lowering the critical temperature ($T_c$) for phase separation. Here we exploit conditions that stabilize membrane heterogeneity to further test the correlation between the anesthetic potency of n-alcohols and effects on $T_c$. First we show that hexadecanol acts oppositely to n-alcohol anesthetics on membrane mixing and antagonizes ethanol induced anesthesia in a tadpole behavioral assay. Second, we show that two previously described `intoxication reversers' raise $T_c$ and counter ethanol's effects in vesicles, mimicking the findings of previous electrophysiological and behavioral measurements. Third, we find that hydrostatic pressure, long known to reverse anesthesia, also raises $T_c$ in vesicles with a magnitude that counters the effect of butanol at relevant concentrations and pressures. Taken together, these results demonstrate that $\\Delta T_c$ predicts anesthetic potency for n-alcohols better than hydrophobicity in a range of contexts, supporting a mechanistic role for membrane heterogeneity in general anesthesia.

  18. Prolongevity medicine: Antagonic-Stress drug in distress, geriatrics, and related diseases. II. Clinical review--2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, S; Riga, D; Schneider, F

    2004-06-01

    Distress and senescence, their reciprocal aggravating-quickening connections, and their related pathologies have a large worldwide impact on healthcare systems in this new millennium. For this reason, Antagonic-Stress (AS)--an advanced integrative therapy, with specific synergistic composition, and patented internationally--represents a significant strategy in health, aging, and longevity. Clinical research with AS proves the drug's efficacy in the management of distress (neurotic, stress-related, and affective disorders; behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors; mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance uses) and psychogeriatrics [organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders (OMD)]. Specific multiaxial psychopathological instruments and psychometric tests in multiple assessments used for gerontopsychiatry demonstrated strong improvements after AS administration in early-moderate stages of Alzheimer or vascular dementia, as well as in other OMD. In addition, comparative clinical studies evinced the superiority of AS (synergistic multitherapy) versus monotherapy [meclofenoxate (MF), piracetam (PA), pyritinol (PT), and nicergoline (NE), respectively]. These comparative clinical trials agreed closely with comparative preclinical research and confirmed AS synergistic homeostatic, adaptogenic, antioxidative, cerebrovascular, neurometabolic, and nootropic actions. Also, the AS protective actions against oxidative stress recommend this orthomolecular therapy in stress, aging, and free radical pathology.

  19. E1B and E4 oncoproteins of adenovirus antagonize the effect of apoptosis inducing factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Roberta L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Wilkinson, John C., E-mail: john.wilkinson@ndsu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Ornelles, David A., E-mail: ornelles@wakehealth.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Adenovirus inundates the productively infected cell with linear, double-stranded DNA and an abundance of single-stranded DNA. The cellular response to this stimulus is antagonized by the adenoviral E1B and E4 early genes. A mutant group C adenovirus that fails to express the E1B-55K and E4ORF3 genes is unable to suppress the DNA-damage response. Cells infected with this double-mutant virus display significant morphological heterogeneity at late times of infection and frequently contain fragmented nuclei. Nuclear fragmentation was due to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria into the nucleus. The release of AIF was dependent on active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which appeared to be activated by viral DNA replication. Nuclear fragmentation did not occur in AIF-deficient cells or in cells treated with a PARP-1 inhibitor. The E1B-55K or E4ORF3 proteins independently prevented nuclear fragmentation subsequent to PARP-1 activation, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of PAR-modified proteins. - Highlights: • E1B-55K or E4orf3 prevents nuclear fragmentation. • Nuclear fragmentation requires AIF and PARP-1 activity. • Adenovirus DNA replication activates PARP-1. • E1B-55K or E4orf3 proteins alter the distribution of PAR.

  20. Plant Essential Oils Synergize and Antagonize Toxicity of Different Conventional Insecticides against Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Nicoletta; Hillier, N Kirk; Cutler, G Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived products can play an important role in pest management programs. Essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) and Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and their main constituents, linalool and thymol, respectively, were evaluated for insecticidal activity and synergistic action in combination with insecticides against green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). The essential oils and their main constituents exerted similar insecticidal activity when aphids were exposed by direct sprays, but were non-toxic by exposure to treated leaf discs. In synergism experiments, the toxicity of imidacloprid was synergized 16- to 20-fold by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, but far less synergism occurred with linalool and thymol, indicating that secondary constituents of the oils were probably responsible for the observed synergism. In contrast to results with imidacloprid, the insecticidal activity of spirotetramat was antagonized by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, and linalool and thymol. Our results demonstrate the potential of plant essential oils as synergists of insecticides, but show that antagonistic action against certain insecticides may occur.

  1. Innate immune restriction and antagonism of viral RNA lacking 2'-O methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Jennifer L. [Departments of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Diamond, Michael S., E-mail: diamond@borcim.wustl.edu [Departments of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Pathology & Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); The Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    N-7 and 2′-O methylation of host cell mRNA occurs in the nucleus and results in the generation of cap structures (cap 0, m{sup 7}GpppN; cap 1, m{sup 7}GpppNm) that control gene expression by modulating nuclear export, splicing, turnover, and protein synthesis. Remarkably, RNA cap modification also contributes to mammalian cell host defense as viral RNA lacking 2′-O methylation is sensed and inhibited by IFIT1, an interferon (IFN) stimulated gene (ISG). Accordingly, pathogenic viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm have evolved mechanisms to circumvent IFIT1 restriction and facilitate infection of mammalian cells. These include: (a) generating cap 1 structures on their RNA through cap-snatching or virally-encoded 2′-O methyltransferases, (b) using cap-independent means of translation, or (c) using RNA secondary structural motifs to antagonize IFIT1 binding. This review will discuss new insights as to how specific modifications at the 5′-end of viral RNA modulate host pathogen recognition responses to promote infection and disease.

  2. Antagonism and synergism in Gardnerella vaginalis strains isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, G S; Soares-Brandão, K L K; Branco, K M G R; Sampaio, J L M; Nardi, R M D; Mendonça, M; Almeida, R B; Farias, L M; Carvalho, M A R; Nicoli, J R

    2010-08-01

    Antagonistic and synergistic substances are important for interactions between micro-organisms associated with human body surfaces, either in healthy or in diseased conditions. In the present study, such compounds produced by Gardnerella vaginalis strains isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) were detected in vitro and the antagonistic ones were partially characterized. Among 11 G. vaginalis strains tested, all showed antagonistic activity against at least one of the 22 indicator bacteria assayed. Interestingly, for some of these strains, antagonism reverted to synergism, favouring one of the indicator strains (Peptostreptococcus anaerobius) when the growth medium was changed. Partial characterization of antagonistic substances suggested a bacteriocin-like chemical nature. Depending on growth conditions, G. vaginalis isolated from women with BV produced antagonistic or synergistic compounds for other bacterial components of the vaginal ecosystem. This is the first report to our knowledge of the production of antagonistic and/or synergistic substances by G. vaginalis. This ability may be a pivotal factor in understanding BV and the ecological role of this bacterium in the vaginal environment.

  3. Metformin Antagonizes Cancer Cell Proliferation by Suppressing Mitochondrial-Dependent Biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takla Griss

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is a biguanide widely prescribed to treat Type II diabetes that has gained interest as an antineoplastic agent. Recent work suggests that metformin directly antagonizes cancer cell growth through its actions on complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC. However, the mechanisms by which metformin arrests cancer cell proliferation remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the metabolic checkpoint kinases AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and LKB1 are not required for the antiproliferative effects of metformin. Rather, metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation by suppressing mitochondrial-dependent biosynthetic activity. We show that in vitro metformin decreases the flow of glucose- and glutamine-derived metabolic intermediates into the Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA cycle, leading to reduced citrate production and de novo lipid biosynthesis. Tumor cells lacking functional mitochondria maintain lipid biosynthesis in the presence of metformin via glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation, and display reduced sensitivity to metformin-induced proliferative arrest. Our data indicate that metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation by suppressing the production of mitochondrial-dependent metabolic intermediates required for cell growth, and that metabolic adaptations that bypass mitochondrial-dependent biosynthesis may provide a mechanism of tumor cell resistance to biguanide activity.

  4. A Soluble Fluorescent Binding Assay Reveals PIP2 Antagonism of TREK-1 Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerrone Cabanos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipid regulation of ion channels by low-abundance signaling lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 and phosphatidic acid (PA has emerged as a central cellular mechanism for controlling ion channels and the excitability of nerves. A lack of robust assays suitable for facile detection of a lipid bound to a channel has hampered the probing of the lipid binding sites and measuring the pharmacology of putative lipid agonists for ion channels. Here, we show a fluorescent PIP2 competition assay for detergent-purified potassium channels, including TWIK-1-related K+-channel (TREK-1. Anionic lipids PA and phosphatidylglycerol (PG bind dose dependently (9.1 and 96 μM, respectively and agonize the channel. Our assay shows PIP2 binds with high affinity (0.87 μM but surprisingly can directly antagonize TREK-1 in liposomes. We propose a model for TREK-1 lipid regulation where PIP2 can compete with PA and PG agonism based on the affinity of the lipid for a site within the channel.

  5. Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia in red-tailed hawks with antagonism by yohimbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degernes, L A; Kreeger, T J; Mandsager, R; Redig, P T

    1988-04-01

    Five red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) were anesthetized at weekly intervals with intravenous ketamine hydrochloride (KET, 4.4 mg/kg) and xylazine hydrochloride (XYL, 2.2 mg/kg). Twenty min after anesthesia, yohimbine hydrochloride (YOH, 0.05, 0.10, 0.20 and 0.40 mg/kg) or a control was administered. All doses of YOH significantly reduced the head-up times (F = 20.84, df = 1,24, P less than 0.0001) and the standing times (F = 12.30, df = 1,24, P less than 0.0001), compared to the control group. The heart and respiratory rates following YOH (all doses) were significantly greater (P less than 0.01) than the anesthetized rates, but were comparable to the rates observed in restrained, unanesthetized hawks. Yohimbine did not appear to have any significant effect on body temperature. Based upon administration of 4.4 mg/kg KET and 2.2 mg/kg XYL, a dose of 0.10 mg/kg YOH was recommended to achieve antagonism without causing profound cardiovascular or respiratory changes.

  6. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids antagonize macrophage inflammation via activation of AMPK/SIRT1 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingzhong Xue

    Full Text Available Macrophages play a key role in obesity-induced inflammation. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA exert anti-inflammatory functions in both humans and animal models, but the exact cellular signals mediating the beneficial effects are not completely understood. We previously found that two nutrient sensors AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and SIRT1 interact to regulate macrophage inflammation. Here we aim to determine whether ω-3 PUFAs antagonize macrophage inflammation via activation of AMPK/SIRT1 pathway. Treatment of ω-3 PUFAs suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced cytokine expression in macrophages. Luciferase reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays show that treatment of macrophages with ω-3 PUFAs significantly inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB signaling. Interestingly, DHA also increases expression, phosphorylation and activity of the major isoform α1AMPK, which further leads to SIRT1 over-expression. More importantly, DHA mimics the effect of SIRT1 on deacetylation of the NF-κB subunit p65, and the ability of DHA to deacetylate p65 and inhibit its signaling and downstream cytokine expression require SIRT1. In conclusion, ω-3 PUFAs negatively regulate macrophage inflammation by deacetylating NF-κB, which acts through activation of AMPK/SIRT1 pathway. Our study defines AMPK/SIRT1 as a novel cellular mediator for the anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 PUFAs.

  7. NRPS-Derived Isoquinolines and Lipopetides Mediate Antagonism between Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Saima; Baccile, Joshua A; Spraker, Joseph E; Tannous, Joanna; Imran, Muhammad; Schroeder, Frank C; Keller, Nancy P

    2018-01-19

    Bacterial-fungal interactions are presumed to be mediated chiefly by small-molecule signals; however, little is known about the signaling networks that regulate antagonistic relationships between pathogens. Here, we show that the ralstonins, lipopeptides produced by the plant pathogenic bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum, interfere with germination of the plant-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus flavus by down-regulating expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC), named imq. Comparative metabolomic analysis of overexpression strains of the transcription factor ImqK revealed imq-dependent production of a family of tripeptide-derived alkaloids, the imizoquins. These alkaloids are produced via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase- (NRPS-)derived tripeptide and contain an unprecedented tricyclic imidazo[2,1-a]isoquinoline ring system. We show that the imizoquins serve a protective role against oxidative stress that is essential for normal A. flavus germination. Supplementation of purified imizoquins restored wildtype germination to a ΔimqK A. flavus strain and protected the fungus from ROS damage. Whereas the bacterial ralstonins retarded A. flavus germination and suppressed expression of the imq cluster, the fungal imizoquins in turn suppressed growth of R. solanacearum. We suggest such reciprocal small-molecule-mediated antagonism is a common feature in microbial encounters affecting pathogenicity and survival of the involved species.

  8. ToxR Antagonizes H-NS Regulation of Horizontally Acquired Genes to Drive Host Colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha I Kazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The virulence regulator ToxR initiates and coordinates gene expression needed by Vibrio cholerae to colonize the small intestine and cause disease. Despite its prominence in V. cholerae virulence, our understanding of the direct ToxR regulon is limited to four genes: toxT, ompT, ompU and ctxA. Here, we determine ToxR's genome-wide DNA-binding profile and demonstrate that ToxR is a global regulator of both progenitor genome-encoded genes and horizontally acquired islands that encode V. cholerae's major virulence factors and define pandemic lineages. We show that ToxR shares more than a third of its regulon with the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein H-NS, and antagonizes H-NS binding at shared binding locations. Importantly, we demonstrate that this regulatory interaction is the critical function of ToxR in V. cholerae colonization and biofilm formation. In the absence of H-NS, ToxR is no longer required for V. cholerae to colonize the infant mouse intestine or for robust biofilm formation. We further illustrate a dramatic difference in regulatory scope between ToxR and other prominent virulence regulators, despite similar predicted requirements for DNA binding. Our results suggest that factors in addition to primary DNA structure influence the ability of ToxR to recognize its target promoters.

  9. Selective histamine H1 antagonism: novel hypnotic and pharmacologic actions challenge classical notions of antihistamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2008-12-01

    Numerous "antihistamines" as well as various psychotropic medications with antihistamine properties are widely utilized to treat insomnia. Over-the-counter sleep aids usually contain an antihistamine and various antidepressants and antipsychotics with antihistamine properties have sedative-hypnotic actions. Although widely used for the treatment of insomnia, many agents that block the histamine H1 receptor are also widely considered to have therapeutic limitations, including the development of next-day carryover sedation, as well as problems with chronic use, such as the development of tolerance to sedative-hypnotic actions and weight gain. Although these clinical actions are classically attributed to blockade of the H1 receptor, recent findings with H1 selective agents and H1 selective dosing of older agents are challenging these notions and suggest that some of the clinical limitations of current H1-blocking agents at their currently utilized doses could be attributable to other properties of these drugs, especially to their simultaneous actions on muscarinic, cholinergic, and adrenergic receptors. Selective H1 antagonism is emerging as a novel approach to the treatment of insomnia, without tolerance, weight gain, or the need for the restrictive prescription scheduling required of other hypnotics.

  10. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  11. A kinase-dependent role for Haspin in antagonizing Wapl and protecting mitotic centromere cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Cai; Chen, Qinfu; Yi, Qi; Zhang, Miao; Yan, Haiyan; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Linli; Zhang, Zhenlei; Qi, Feifei; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Fangwei

    2017-11-14

    Sister-chromatid cohesion mediated by the cohesin complex is fundamental for precise chromosome segregation in mitosis. Through binding the cohesin subunit Pds5, Wapl releases the bulk of cohesin from chromosome arms in prophase, whereas centromeric cohesin is protected from Wapl until anaphase onset. Strong centromere cohesion requires centromeric localization of the mitotic histone kinase Haspin, which is dependent on the interaction of its non-catalytic N-terminus with Pds5B. It remains unclear how Haspin fully blocks the Wapl-Pds5B interaction at centromeres. Here, we show that the C-terminal kinase domain of Haspin (Haspin-KD) binds and phosphorylates the YSR motif of Wapl (Wapl-YSR), thereby directly inhibiting the YSR motif-dependent interaction of Wapl with Pds5B. Cells expressing a Wapl-binding-deficient mutant of Haspin or treated with Haspin inhibitors show centromeric cohesion defects. Phospho-mimetic mutation in Wapl-YSR prevents Wapl from binding Pds5B and releasing cohesin. Forced targeting Haspin-KD to centromeres partly bypasses the need for Haspin-Pds5B interaction in cohesion protection. Taken together, these results indicate a kinase-dependent role for Haspin in antagonizing Wapl and protecting centromeric cohesion in mitosis. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Glucocorticoid Antagonism Reduces Insulin Resistance and Associated Lipid Abnormalities in High-Fructose-Fed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Emayavaramban; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2017-02-01

    High intake of dietary fructose causes perturbation in lipid metabolism and provokes lipid-induced insulin resistance. A rise in glucocorticoids (GCs) has recently been suggested to be involved in fructose-induced insulin resistance. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of GC blockade on lipid abnormalities in insulin-resistant mice. Insulin resistance was induced in mice by administering a high-fructose diet (HFrD) for 60 days. Mifepristone (RU486), a GC antagonist, was administered to HFrD-fed mice for the last 18 days, and the intracellular and extracellular GC levels, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation and the expression of GC-regulated genes involved in lipid metabolism were examined. HFrD elevated the intracellular GC content in both liver and adipose tissue and enhanced the GR nuclear translocation. The plasma GC level remained unchanged. The levels of free fatty acids and triglycerides in plasma were elevated, accompanied by increased plasma insulin and glucose levels and decreased hepatic glycogen content. Treatment with RU486 reduced plasma lipid levels, tissue GC levels and the expression of GC-targeted genes involved in lipid accumulation, and it improved insulin sensitivity. This study demonstrated that HFrD-induced lipid accumulation and insulin resistance are mediated by enhanced GC in liver and adipose tissue and that GC antagonism might reduce fructose-induced lipid abnormalities and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes as Carriers of Ruthenium Complexes to Antagonize Cancer Multidrug Resistance and Radioresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ni; Feng, Yanxian; Zeng, Lilan; Zhao, Zhennan; Chen, Tianfeng

    2015-07-15

    Multidrug resistance and radioresistance are major obstacles for successful cancer therapy. Due to the unique characteristics of high surface area, improved cellular uptake, and the possibility to be easily bound with therapeutics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted increasing attention as potential nanodrug delivery systems. In this study, a CNT-based radiosensitive nanodrug delivery system was rationally designed to antagonize the multidrug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma. The nanosystem was loaded with a potent anticancer ruthenium polypyridyl complex (RuPOP) via π-π interaction and formation of a hydrogen bond. The functionalized nanosystem (RuPOP@MWCNTs) enhanced the cellular uptake of RuPOP in liver cancer cells, especially drug-resistant R-HepG2 cells, through endocytosis. Consistently, the selective cellular uptake endowed the nanosystem amplified anticancer efficacy against R-HepG2 cells but not in normal cells. Interestingly, RuPOP@MWCNTs significantly enhanced the anticancer efficacy of clinically used X-ray against R-HepG2 cells through induction of apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, with the involvement of ROS overproduction, which activated several downstream signaling pathways, including DNA damage-mediated p53 phosphorylation, activation of p38, and inactivation of AKT and ERK. Moreover, the nanosystem also effectively reduces the toxic side effects of loaded drugs and prolongs the blood circulation in vivo. Taken together, the results demonstrate the rational design of functionalized carbon nanotubes and their application as effective nanomedicine to overcome cancer multidrug resistance.

  14. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  15. Bam and Bgcn antagonize Nanos-dependent germ-line stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Minor, Nicole T; Park, Joseph K; McKearin, Dennis M; Maines, Jean Z

    2009-06-09

    The balance between germ-line stem cell (GSC) self-renewal and differentiation in Drosophila ovaries is mediated by the antagonistic relationship between the Nanos (Nos)-Pumilio translational repressor complex, which promotes GSC self-renewal, and expression of Bam, a key differentiation factor. Here, we find that Bam and Nos proteins are expressed in reciprocal patterns in young germ cells. Repression of Nos in Bam-expressing cells depends on sequences in the nos 3'-UTR, suggesting that Nos is regulated by translational repression. Ectopic Bam causes differentiation of GSCs, and this activity depends on the endogenous nos 3'-UTR sequence. Previous evidence showed that Bgcn is an obligate factor for the ability of Bam to drive differentiation, and we now report that Bam forms a complex with Bgcn, a protein related to the RNA-interacting DExH-box polypeptides. Together, these observations suggest that Bam-Bgcn act together to antagonize Nos expression; thus, derepressing cystoblast-promoting factors. These findings emphasize the importance of translational repression in balancing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.

  16. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  17. (-)-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol antagonizes the peripheral cannabinoid receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayewitch, M; Rhee, M H; Avidor-Reiss, T; Breuer, A; Mechoulam, R; Vogel, Z

    1996-04-26

    (-)-Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol ((-)-Delta9-THC) is the major active psychotropic component of the marijuana plant, Cannabis sativa. The membrane proteins that have been found to bind this material or its derivatives have been called the cannabinoid receptors. Two GTP-binding protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors have been cloned. CB1 or the neuronal cannabinoid receptor is found mostly in neuronal cells and tissues while CB2 or the peripheral cannabinoid receptor has been detected in spleen and in several cells of the immune system. It has previously been shown that activation of CB1 or CB2 receptors by cannabinoid agonists inhibits adenylyl cyclase activity. Utilizing Chinese hamster ovary cells and COS cells transfected with the cannabinoid receptors we report that (-)-Delta9-THC binds to both receptors with similar affinity. However, in contrast to its capacity to serve as an agonist for the CB1 receptor, (-)-Delta9-THC was only able to induce a very slight inhibition of adenylyl cyclase at the CB2 receptor. Morever, (-)-Delta9-THC antagonizes the agonist-induced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase mediated by CB2. Therefore, we conclude that (-)-Delta9-THC constitutes a weak antagonist for the CB2 receptor.

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonism and cluster headache: an emerging new treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashina, Håkan; Newman, Lawrence; Ashina, Sait

    2017-08-30

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key signaling molecule involved in migraine pathophysiology. Efficacy of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists in migraine treatment has fueled an increasing interest in the prospect of treating cluster headache (CH) with CGRP antagonism. The exact role of CGRP and its mechanism of action in CH have not been fully clarified. A search for original studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English was performed in PubMed and in ClinicalTrials.gov . The search term used was "cluster headache and calcitonin gene related peptide" and "primary headaches and calcitonin gene related peptide." Reference lists of identified articles were also searched for additional relevant papers. Human experimental studies have reported elevated plasma CGRP levels during both spontaneous and glyceryl trinitrate-induced cluster attacks. CGRP may play an important role in cluster headache pathophysiology. More refined human studies are warranted with regard to assay validation and using larger sample sizes. The results from RCTs may reveal the therapeutic potential of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists for cluster headache treatment.

  19. Competitive Androgen Receptor Antagonism as a Factor Determining the Predictability of Cumulative Antiandrogenic Effects of Widely Used Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many pesticides in current use have recently been revealed as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their combined effects is lacking. Objective: We investigated the combined effects and the competitive AR antagonism of pesticide mixtures. Methods: We used the MDA-kb2 assay to test a combination of eight AR antagonists that did not also possess AR agonist properties (“pure” antagonists; 8 mix: fludioxonil, fenhexamid, ortho-phenylphenol, imazalil, tebuconazole, dimethomorph, methiocarb, pirimiphos-methyl), a combination of five AR antagonists that also showed agonist activity (5 mix: cyprodinil, pyrimethanil, vinclozolin, chlorpropham, linuron), and all pesticides combined (13 mix). We used concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) to formulate additivity expectations, and Schild plot analyses to investigate competitive AR antagonism. Results: A good agreement between the effects of the mixture of eight “pure” AR antagonists and the responses predicted by CA was observed. Schild plot analysis revealed that the 8 mix acted by competitive AR antagonism. However, the observed responses of the 5 mix and the 13 mix fell within the “prediction window” boundaries defined by the predicted regression curves of CA and IA. Schild plot analysis with these mixtures yielded anomalous responses incompatible with competitive receptor antagonism. Conclusions: A mixture of widely used pesticides can, in a predictable manner, produce combined AR antagonist effects that exceed the responses elicited by the most potent component alone. Inasmuch as large populations are regularly exposed to mixtures of antiandrogenic pesticides, our results underline the need for considering combination effects for these substances in regulatory practice. PMID:23008280

  20. Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 Antagonize N-Myc Function and Independently Mediate Apoptosis in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsen, David A.; Armstrong, Michael B.; Wechsler, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the third most common malignancy of childhood, and outcomes for children with advanced disease remain poor; amplification of the MYCN gene portends a particularly poor prognosis. Mxi1 antagonizes N-Myc by competing for binding to Max and E-boxes. Unlike N-Myc, Mxi1 mediates transcriptional repression and suppresses cell proliferation. Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 (an alternatively transcribed Mxi1 isoform) share identical Max and DNA binding domains but differ in amino-terminal sequences. Because of the conservation of these critical binding domains, we hypothesized that Mxi1-0 antagonizes N-Myc activity similar to Mxi1. SHEP NB cells and SHEP cells stably transfected with MYCN (SHEP/MYCN) were transiently transfected with vectors containing full-length Mxi1, full-length Mxi1-0, or the common Mxi domain encoded by exons 2 to 6 (ex2-6). After incubation in low serum, parental SHEP/MYCN cell numbers were reduced compared with SHEP cells. Activated caspase-3 staining and DNA fragmentation ELISA confirmed that SHEP/MYCN cells undergo apoptosis in low serum, while SHEP/MYCN cells transfected with Mxi1 or Mxi1-0 do not. However, SHEP/MYCN cells transfected with Mxi1 or Mxi1-0 and grown in normal serum showed proliferation rates similar to SHEP cells. Mxi ex2-6 did not affect cell number in low or normal serum, suggesting that amino terminal domains of Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 are critical for antagonism. In the absence of N-Myc, Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 induce apoptosis independently through the caspase-8–dependent extrinsic pathway, while N-Myc activates the caspase-9–dependent intrinsic pathway. Together, these data indicate that Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 antagonize N-Myc but also independently impact NB cell survival. PMID:25749179

  1. Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 Antagonize N-Myc Function and Independently Mediate Apoptosis in Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Erichsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is the third most common malignancy of childhood, and outcomes for children with advanced disease remain poor; amplification of the MYCN gene portends a particularly poor prognosis. Mxi1 antagonizes N-Myc by competing for binding to Max and E-boxes. Unlike N-Myc, Mxi1 mediates transcriptional repression and suppresses cell proliferation. Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 (an alternatively transcribed Mxi1 isoform share identical Max and DNA binding domains but differ in amino-terminal sequences. Because of the conservation of these critical binding domains, we hypothesized that Mxi1-0 antagonizes N-Myc activity similar to Mxi1. SHEP NB cells and SHEP cells stably transfected with MYCN (SHEP/MYCN were transiently transfected with vectors containing full-length Mxi1, full-length Mxi1-0, or the common Mxi domain encoded by exons 2 to 6 (ex2-6. After incubation in low serum, parental SHEP/MYCN cell numbers were reduced compared with SHEP cells. Activated caspase-3 staining and DNA fragmentation ELISA confirmed that SHEP/MYCN cells undergo apoptosis in low serum, while SHEP/MYCN cells transfected with Mxi1 or Mxi1-0 do not. However, SHEP/MYCN cells transfected with Mxi1 or Mxi1-0 and grown in normal serum showed proliferation rates similar to SHEP cells. Mxi ex2-6 did not affect cell number in low or normal serum, suggesting that amino terminal domains of Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 are critical for antagonism. In the absence of N-Myc, Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 induce apoptosis independently through the caspase-8–dependent extrinsic pathway, while N-Myc activates the caspase-9–dependent intrinsic pathway. Together, these data indicate that Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 antagonize N-Myc but also independently impact NB cell survival.

  2. Rac1/RhoA antagonism defines cell-to-cell heterogeneity during epidermal morphogenesis in nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emmanuel; Ouellette, Marie-Hélène; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-11-21

    The antagonism between the GTPases Rac1 and RhoA controls cell-to-cell heterogeneity in isogenic populations of cells in vitro and epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Its involvement in the regulation of cell-to-cell heterogeneity during epidermal morphogenesis has, however, never been addressed. We used a quantitative cell imaging approach to characterize epidermal morphogenesis at a single-cell level during early elongation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. This study reveals that a Rac1-like pathway, involving the Rac/Cdc42 guanine-exchange factor β-PIX/PIX-1 and effector PAK1/PAK-1, and a RhoA-like pathway, involving ROCK/LET-502, control the remodeling of apical junctions and the formation of basolateral protrusions in distinct subsets of hypodermal cells. In these contexts, protrusions adopt lamellipodia or an amoeboid morphology. We propose that lamella formation may reduce tension building at cell-cell junctions during morphogenesis. Cell-autonomous antagonism between these pathways enables cells to switch between Rac1- and RhoA-like morphogenetic programs. This study identifies the first case of cell-to-cell heterogeneity controlled by Rac1/RhoA antagonism during epidermal morphogenesis. © 2016 Martin et al.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-I provokes functional antagonism and internalization of beta1-adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavi, Shai; Yin, Dezhong; Shumay, Elena; Wang, Hsien-yu; Malbon, Craig C

    2007-06-01

    Hormones that activate receptor tyrosine kinases have been shown to regulate G protein-coupled receptors, and herein we investigate the ability of IGF-I to regulate the beta(1)-adrenergic receptor. Treating Chinese hamster ovary cells in culture with IGF-I is shown to functionally antagonize the ability of expressed beta(1)-adrenergic receptors to accumulate intracellular cAMP in response to stimulation by the beta-adrenergic agonist Iso. The attenuation of beta(1)-adrenergic action was accompanied by internalization of beta(1)-adrenergic receptors in response to IGF-I. Inhibiting either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or the serine/threonine protein kinase Akt blocks the ability of IGF-I to antagonize and to internalize beta(1)-adrenergic receptors. Mutation of one potential Akt substrate site Ser412Ala, but not another Ser312Ala, of the beta(1)-adrenergic receptor abolishes the ability of IGF-I to functionally antagonize and to sequester the beta(1)-adrenergic receptor. We also tested the ability of IGF-I to regulate beta(1)-adrenergic receptors and their signaling in adult canine cardiac myocytes. IGF-I attenuates the ability of beta(1)-adrenergic receptors to accumulate intracellular cAMP in response to Iso and promotes internalization of beta(1)-adrenergic receptors in these cardiac myocytes.

  4. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices are discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:26414302

  5. Hyperbolic Hopfield neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, several neural networks using Clifford algebra have been studied. Clifford algebra is also called geometric algebra. Complex-valued Hopfield neural networks (CHNNs) are the most popular neural networks using Clifford algebra. The aim of this brief is to construct hyperbolic HNNs (HHNNs) as an analog of CHNNs. Hyperbolic algebra is a Clifford algebra based on Lorentzian geometry. In this brief, a hyperbolic neuron is defined in a manner analogous to a phasor neuron, which is a typical complex-valued neuron model. HHNNs share common concepts with CHNNs, such as the angle and energy. However, HHNNs and CHNNs are different in several aspects. The states of hyperbolic neurons do not form a circle, and, therefore, the start and end states are not identical. In the quantized version, unlike complex-valued neurons, hyperbolic neurons have an infinite number of states.

  6. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read, compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  7. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  8. ANTAGONISM OF A. VIRIDANS TO CONDITIONALLY - PATHOGENIC MICROFLORA OF THE NOSE AND OROPHARYNX OF CHILDREN WITH CARDIAC PATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepansky D.O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Search for harmless and simultaneously effective probiotics, which could be successfully used for treatment and prevention of infectious deseases, is currently important. A. viridans is of particular interest, as it is representative of the normal microflora of human with broad spectrum of antibacterial action. The use of this microorganism has a number of advantages: the absence of side effects on the body; high adhesive abilities; resistance to lysozyme in saliva; the ability of use in patients, sensitized to antibiotics and chemotherapeutic drugs; stimulation effects on the human immune system. Material and methods. The purpose of the study was to investigate the antagonism of A. viridans № 167 and autostrains of aerococcuses, isolated at patients, to conditionally - pathogenic microflora of the nose and oropharynx of children with cardiac patology. At the first stage of the study the microflora of the of the nose and oropharynx of 2 investigated categories was examined – 40 children 4-14 years with cardiac patology and 40 healthy children 4-5 years old. The second stage of work was to study the effect of A. viridans on the explored strains. Results and discussion. A. viridans manifests the antagonism to all studied strains of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms, except C. albisans. A. viridans antagonistic activity to staphylococci (10 + 3 mm and streptococci (10 + 2mm is at the approximately same level. It is interesting to compare the antagonism of aerococcuses to clinical isolates of S. pyogenes and similar strains from carriers (healthy children category. Impact of aerococcuses on P. mirabilis strain appeared at the highest level. Autosimbionts of A. viridans, isolated from healthy children, are more antagonistic to CPM strains, isolated from these children, than autostrains of A. viridans, isolated from children with with cardiac patology, and higher than the museum strain of A. viridans № 167 antagonism

  9. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  10. Deconvolution using a neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S.K.

    1990-11-15

    Viewing one dimensional deconvolution as a matrix inversion problem, we compare a neural network backpropagation matrix inverse with LMS, and pseudo-inverse. This is a largely an exercise in understanding how our neural network code works. 1 ref.

  11. Agonism, Antagonism, and Inverse Agonism Bias at the Ghrelin Receptor Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Kadmi, Céline; Leyris, Jean-Philippe; Onfroy, Lauriane; Galés, Céline; Saulière, Aude; Gagne, Didier; Damian, Marjorie; Mary, Sophie; Maingot, Mathieu; Denoyelle, Séverine; Verdié, Pascal; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Banères, Jean-Louis; Marie, Jacky

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GHS-R1a mediates ghrelin-induced growth hormone secretion, food intake, and reward-seeking behaviors. GHS-R1a signals through Gq, Gi/o, G13, and arrestin. Biasing GHS-R1a signaling with specific ligands may lead to the development of more selective drugs to treat obesity or addiction with minimal side effects. To delineate ligand selectivity at GHS-R1a signaling, we analyzed in detail the efficacy of a panel of synthetic ligands activating the different pathways associated with GHS-R1a in HEK293T cells. Besides β-arrestin2 recruitment and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, we monitored activation of a large panel of G protein subtypes using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay with G protein-activation biosensors. We first found that unlike full agonists, Gq partial agonists were unable to trigger β-arrestin2 recruitment and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Using G protein-activation biosensors, we then demonstrated that ghrelin promoted activation of Gq, Gi1, Gi2, Gi3, Goa, Gob, and G13 but not Gs and G12. Besides, we identified some GHS-R1a ligands that preferentially activated Gq and antagonized ghrelin-mediated Gi/Go activation. Finally, we unambiguously demonstrated that in addition to Gq, GHS-R1a also promoted constitutive activation of G13. Importantly, we identified some ligands that were selective inverse agonists toward Gq but not of G13. This demonstrates that bias at GHS-R1a signaling can occur not only with regard to agonism but also to inverse agonism. Our data, combined with other in vivo studies, may facilitate the design of drugs selectively targeting individual signaling pathways to treat only the therapeutically relevant function. PMID:26363071

  12. Agonism, Antagonism, and Inverse Agonism Bias at the Ghrelin Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Kadmi, Céline; Leyris, Jean-Philippe; Onfroy, Lauriane; Galés, Céline; Saulière, Aude; Gagne, Didier; Damian, Marjorie; Mary, Sophie; Maingot, Mathieu; Denoyelle, Séverine; Verdié, Pascal; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Banères, Jean-Louis; Marie, Jacky

    2015-11-06

    The G protein-coupled receptor GHS-R1a mediates ghrelin-induced growth hormone secretion, food intake, and reward-seeking behaviors. GHS-R1a signals through Gq, Gi/o, G13, and arrestin. Biasing GHS-R1a signaling with specific ligands may lead to the development of more selective drugs to treat obesity or addiction with minimal side effects. To delineate ligand selectivity at GHS-R1a signaling, we analyzed in detail the efficacy of a panel of synthetic ligands activating the different pathways associated with GHS-R1a in HEK293T cells. Besides β-arrestin2 recruitment and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, we monitored activation of a large panel of G protein subtypes using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay with G protein-activation biosensors. We first found that unlike full agonists, Gq partial agonists were unable to trigger β-arrestin2 recruitment and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Using G protein-activation biosensors, we then demonstrated that ghrelin promoted activation of Gq, Gi1, Gi2, Gi3, Goa, Gob, and G13 but not Gs and G12. Besides, we identified some GHS-R1a ligands that preferentially activated Gq and antagonized ghrelin-mediated Gi/Go activation. Finally, we unambiguously demonstrated that in addition to Gq, GHS-R1a also promoted constitutive activation of G13. Importantly, we identified some ligands that were selective inverse agonists toward Gq but not of G13. This demonstrates that bias at GHS-R1a signaling can occur not only with regard to agonism but also to inverse agonism. Our data, combined with other in vivo studies, may facilitate the design of drugs selectively targeting individual signaling pathways to treat only the therapeutically relevant function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. HPr antagonizes the anti-σ70 activity of Rsd in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Ha; Lee, Chang-Ro; Choe, Mangyu; Seok, Yeong-Jae

    2013-12-24

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) is a multicomponent system that participates in a variety of physiological processes in addition to the phosphorylation-coupled transport of numerous sugars. In Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria, enzyme IIA(Glc) (EIIA(Glc)) is known as the central processing unit of carbon metabolism and plays multiple roles, including regulation of adenylyl cyclase, the fermentation/respiration switch protein FrsA, glycerol kinase, and several non-PTS transporters, whereas the only known regulatory role of the E. coli histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein HPr is in the activation of glycogen phosphorylase. Because HPr is known to be more abundant than EIIA(Glc) in enteric bacteria, we assumed that there might be more regulatory mechanisms connected with HPr. The ligand fishing experiment in this study identified Rsd, an anti-sigma factor known to complex with σ(70) in stationary-phase cells, as an HPr-binding protein in E. coli. Only the dephosphorylated form of HPr formed a tight complex with Rsd and thereby inhibited complex formation between Rsd and σ(70). Dephosphorylated HPr, but not phosphorylated HPr, antagonized the inhibitory effect of Rsd on σ(70)-dependent transcriptions both in vivo and in vitro, and also influenced the competition between σ(70) and σ(S) for core RNA polymerase in the presence of Rsd. Based on these data, we propose that the anti-σ(70) activity of Rsd is regulated by the phosphorylation state-dependent interaction of HPr with Rsd.

  14. Antagonism of CD11b with neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF) inhibits vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Alexander A; Tang, Jie; Kern, Timothy S

    2013-01-01

    Leukocytes and proteins that govern leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells play a causal role in retinal abnormalities characteristic of the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries. Leukocyte integrin αmβ2 (CD11b/CD18, MAC1), a protein mediating adhesion, has been shown to mediate damage to endothelial cells by activated leukocytes in vitro. We hypothesized that Neutrophil Inhibitory Factor (NIF), a selective antagonist of integrin αmβ2, would inhibit the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries by inhibiting the excessive interaction between leukocytes and retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Wild type animals and transgenic animals expressing NIF were made diabetic with streptozotocin and assessed for diabetes-induced retinal vascular abnormalities and leukocyte activation. To assess if the leukocyte blocking therapy compromised the immune system, animals were challenged with bacteria. Retinal superoxide production, leukostasis and leukocyte superoxide production were increased in wild type mice diabetic for 10 weeks, as was the ability of leukocytes isolated from diabetic animals to kill retinal endothelial cells in vitro. Retinal capillary degeneration was significantly increased in wild type mice diabetic 40 weeks. In contrast, mice expressing NIF did not develop any of these abnormalities, with the exception that non-diabetic and diabetic mice expressing NIF generated greater amounts of superoxide than did similar mice not expressing NIF. Importantly, NIF did not significantly impair the ability of mice to clear an opportunistic bacterial challenge, suggesting that NIF did not compromise immune surveillance. We conclude that antagonism of CD11b (integrin αmβ2) by NIF is sufficient to inhibit early stages of diabetic retinopathy, while not compromising the basic immune response.

  15. Antagonism of CD11b with neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF inhibits vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A Veenstra

    Full Text Available Leukocytes and proteins that govern leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells play a causal role in retinal abnormalities characteristic of the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries. Leukocyte integrin αmβ2 (CD11b/CD18, MAC1, a protein mediating adhesion, has been shown to mediate damage to endothelial cells by activated leukocytes in vitro. We hypothesized that Neutrophil Inhibitory Factor (NIF, a selective antagonist of integrin αmβ2, would inhibit the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries by inhibiting the excessive interaction between leukocytes and retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Wild type animals and transgenic animals expressing NIF were made diabetic with streptozotocin and assessed for diabetes-induced retinal vascular abnormalities and leukocyte activation. To assess if the leukocyte blocking therapy compromised the immune system, animals were challenged with bacteria. Retinal superoxide production, leukostasis and leukocyte superoxide production were increased in wild type mice diabetic for 10 weeks, as was the ability of leukocytes isolated from diabetic animals to kill retinal endothelial cells in vitro. Retinal capillary degeneration was significantly increased in wild type mice diabetic 40 weeks. In contrast, mice expressing NIF did not develop any of these abnormalities, with the exception that non-diabetic and diabetic mice expressing NIF generated greater amounts of superoxide than did similar mice not expressing NIF. Importantly, NIF did not significantly impair the ability of mice to clear an opportunistic bacterial challenge, suggesting that NIF did not compromise immune surveillance. We conclude that antagonism of CD11b (integrin αmβ2 by NIF is sufficient to inhibit early stages of diabetic retinopathy, while not compromising the basic immune response.

  16. ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-l-cysteine antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasi, Marianna; Wang, Ming; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Gaponenko, Vadim; Hay, Nissim; Gartel, Andrei L.

    2015-01-01

    NAC (N-acetyl-l-cysteine) is commonly used to identify and test ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducers, and to inhibit ROS. In the present study, we identified inhibition of proteasome inhibitors as a novel activity of NAC. Both NAC and catalase, another known scavenger of ROS, similarly inhibited ROS levels and apoptosis associated with H2O2. However, only NAC, and not catalase or another ROS scavenger Trolox, was able to prevent effects linked to proteasome inhibition, such as protein stabilization, apoptosis and accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. These observations suggest that NAC has a dual activity as an inhibitor of ROS and proteasome inhibitors. Recently, NAC was used as a ROS inhibitor to functionally characterize a novel anticancer compound, piperlongumine, leading to its description as a ROS inducer. In contrast, our own experiments showed that this compound depicts features of proteasome inhibitors including suppression of FOXM1 (Forkhead box protein M1), stabilization of cellular proteins, induction of ROS-independent apoptosis and enhanced accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. In addition, NAC, but not catalase or Trolox, interfered with the activity of piperlongumine, further supporting that piperlongumine is a proteasome inhibitor. Most importantly, we showed that NAC, but not other ROS scavengers, directly binds to proteasome inhibitors. To our knowledge, NAC is the first known compound that directly interacts with and antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that, as a result of the dual nature of NAC, data interpretation might not be straightforward when NAC is utilized as an antioxidant to demonstrate ROS involvement in drug-induced apoptosis. PMID:23772801

  17. PI3K-dependent antagonism in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Brunert, Daniela; Corey, Elizabeth; Ache, Barry W.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoinositide (PI) signaling, in particular PI3Kinase (PI3K) signaling, has been implicated in mediating inhibitory odorant input to mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). To better understand this phenomenon we investigated PI3K-dependent inhibition between single odorant pairs. The concentration-dependent inhibition of the response of native rat ORNs to octanol by citral is PI3K-dependent; blocking PI3K activity with the β and γ isoform-specific inhibitors AS252424 and TGX221 eliminated or strongly reduced the inhibition. Interestingly, blocking PI3K also changed the apparent agonist strength of the otherwise non-competitive antagonist citral. The excitation evoked by citral after blocking PI3K, could be suppressed by the adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) blockers MDL12330A and SQ22536, indicating that citral could also activate ACIII, presumably through the canonical OR. The G protein Gβγ subunit blockers suramin, gallein and M119 suppressed citral’s inhibition of the response to octanol, indicating that the activation of PI3K by citral was G protein dependent, consistent with the idea that inhibition acts through the canonical OR. Lilial similarly antagonized the response to isoamyl acetate in other ORNs, indicating the effect generalizes to at least one other odorant pair. The ability of methyl-isoeugenol, limonene, α-pinene, isovaleric acid and isosafrole to inhibit the response of other ORNs to IBMX/forskolin in a PI3K-dependent manner argues the effect generalizes to yet other structurally dissimilar odorants. Our findings collectively raise the interesting possibility that the OR serves as a molecular logic gate when mammalian ORNs are activated by natural, complex mixtures containing both excitatory and inhibitory odorants. PMID:21209212

  18. Copper Induces Vasorelaxation and Antagonizes Noradrenaline -Induced Vasoconstriction in Rat Mesenteric Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Copper is an essential trace element for normal cellular function and contributes to critical physiological or pathological processes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of copper on vascular tone of rat mesenteric artery and compare the effects of copper on noradrenaline (NA and high K+ induced vasoconstriction. Methods: The rat mesenteric arteries were isolated and the vessel tone was measured by using multi wire myograph system in vitro. Blood pressure of carotid artery in rabbits was measured by using physiological data acquisition and analysis system in vivo. Results: Copper dose-dependently blunted NA-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. Copper-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited when the vessels were pretreated with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. Copper did not blunt high K+-induced vasoconstriction. Copper preincubation inhibited NA-evoked vasoconstriction and the inhibition was not affected by the presence of L-NAME. Copper preincubation showed no effect on high K+-evoked vasoconstriction. Copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (DTC antagonized the vasoactivity induced by copper in rat mesenteric artery. In vivo experiments showed that copper injection (iv significantly decreased blood pressure of rabbits and NA or DTC injection (iv did not rescue the copper-induced hypotension and animal death. Conclusion: Copper blunted NA but not high K+-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. The acute effect of copper on NA-induced vasoconstriction was depended on nitric oxide (NO, but the effect of copper pretreatment on NA-induced vasoconstriction was independed on NO, suggesting that copper affected NA-induced vasoconstriction by two distinct mechanisms.

  19. Antagonism of host antiviral responses by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus tegument protein ORF45.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xiu Zhu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Virus infection of a cell generally evokes an immune response by the host to defeat the intruder in its effort. Many viruses have developed an array of strategies to evade or antagonize host antiviral responses. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is demonstrated in this report to be able to prevent activation of host antiviral defense mechanisms upon infection. Cells infected with wild-type KSHV were permissive for superinfection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, suggesting that KSHV virions fail to induce host antiviral responses. We previously showed that ORF45, a KSHV immediate-early protein as well as a tegument protein of virions, interacts with IRF-7 and inhibits virus-mediated type I interferon induction by blocking IRF-7 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (Zhu et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 99:5573-5578, 2002. Here, using an ORF45-null recombinant virus, we demonstrate a profound role of ORF45 in inhibiting host antiviral responses. Infection of cells with an ORF45-null mutant recombinant KSHV (BAC-stop45 triggered an immune response that resisted VSV super-infection, concomitantly associated with appreciable increases in transcription of type I IFN and downstream anti-viral effector genes. Gain-of-function analysis showed that ectopic expression of ORF45 in human fibroblast cells by a lentivirus vector decreased the antiviral responses of the cells. shRNA-mediated silencing of IRF-7, that predominantly regulates both the early and late phase induction of type I IFNs, clearly indicated its critical contribution to the innate antiviral responses generated against incoming KSHV particles. Thus ORF45 through its targeting of the crucial IRF-7 regulated type I IFN antiviral responses significantly contributes to the KSHV survival immediately following a primary infection allowing for progression onto subsequent stages in its life-cycle.

  20. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) Receptor Deletion or Antagonism Attenuates Severe HSV-1 Meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Rodrigues, David Henrique; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Pedroso, Vinicius Sousa Pietra; de Miranda, Aline Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen that may cause severe encephalitis. The exacerbated immune response against the virus contributes to the disease severity and death. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a mediator capable of inducing increase in vascular permeability, production of cytokines on endothelial cells and leukocytes. We aimed to investigate the activation of PAF receptor (PAFR) and its contribution to the severity of the inflammatory response in the brain following HSV-1 infection. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and PAFR deficient (PAFR-/-) mice were inoculated intracranially with 104 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1. Visualization of leukocyte recruitment was performed using intravital microscopy. Cells infiltration in the brain tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. Brain was removed for chemokine assessment by ELISA and for histopathological analysis. The pharmacological inhibition by the PAFR antagonist UK-74,505 was also analyzed. In PAFR-/- mice, there was delayed lethality but no difference in viral load. Histopathological analysis of infected PAFR-/- mice showed that brain lesions were less severe when compared to their WT counterparts. Moreover, PAFR-/- mice showed less TCD4+, TCD8+ and macrophages in brain tissue. This reduction of the presence of leukocytes in parenchyma may be mechanistically explained by a decrease in leukocytes rolling and adhesion. PAFR-/- mice also presented a reduction of the chemokine CXCL9 in the brain. In addition, by antagonizing PAFR, survival of C57BL/6 infected mice increased. Altogether, our data suggest that PAFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of experimental HSV-1 meningoencephalitis, and its blockade prevents severe disease manifestation.

  1. ANTAGONISM AGAINST VIBRIO CHOLERAE BY BACTERIAL DIFFUSIBLE COMPOUND IN THE FECAL MICROBIOTA OF RODENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Simone Helena da

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In an ex vivo agar plate assay, we monitored the appearance of an inhibitory halo against Vibrio cholerae from the feces of Wistar and Fischer rats aged 10 to 42 days. The frequency of Wistar rats showing halo increased from 0% (10 days to a maximum of 80.0% (29 days and then decreased to 53.3% (42 days. A similar pattern was obtained with Fischer rats but with a lower intensity (maximum frequency of 50.0% by day 36. In a separate experiment, when Wistar rats were fed a low-protein diet for 7 days, the inhibitory halo decreased drastically. Three apparently different colony morphologies were isolated from the dominant fecal microbiota: a facultative anaerobe (FAN and two strict anaerobes (SAN. The ex vivo inhibitory test showed a halo around the feces of germfree mice monoassociated with the FAN bacterium or one of the SAN bacterium but not of the germfree ones. After oral challenge of all groups with V. cholerae, a permissive and a drastic barrier effects were observed in mice with FAN and SAN associated bacteria, respectively. The FAN and one SAN bacteria used in the in vivo challenges were identified as Escherichia coli and Streptococcus intermedius, respectively. The potent antagonism developed by the rat intestinal microbiota against V. cholerae seems to be due, in part, to diffusible compounds and this phenomenon depends apparently on age, strain and nutrition of the animals. These preliminary results also suggest that this effect was due to more than one bacterial component at any given moment.

  2. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James R; Quicke, Kendra M; Maddur, Mohan S; O'Neal, Justin T; McDonald, Circe E; Fedorova, Nadia B; Puri, Vinita; Shabman, Reed S; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S

    2017-02-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  3. Diverse chromatin remodeling genes antagonize the Rb-involved SynMuv pathways in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Cui

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In Caenorhabditis elegans, vulval cell-fate specification involves the activities of multiple signal transduction and regulatory pathways that include a receptor tyrosine kinase/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and synthetic multivulva (SynMuv pathways. Many genes in the SynMuv pathways encode transcription factors including the homologs of mammalian Rb, E2F, and components of the nucleosome-remodeling deacetylase complex. To further elucidate the functions of the SynMuv genes, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen to search for genes that antagonize the SynMuv gene activities. Among those that displayed a varying degree of suppression of the SynMuv phenotype, 32 genes are potentially involved in chromatin remodeling (called SynMuv suppressor genes herein. Genetic mutations of two representative genes (zfp-1 and mes-4 were used to further characterize their positive roles in vulval induction and relationships with Ras function. Our analysis revealed antagonistic roles of the SynMuv suppressor genes and the SynMuv B genes in germline-soma distinction, RNAi, somatic transgene silencing, and tissue specific expression of pgl-1 and the lag-2/Delta genes. The opposite roles of these SynMuv B and SynMuv suppressor genes on transcriptional regulation were confirmed in somatic transgene silencing. We also report the identifications of ten new genes in the RNAi pathway and six new genes in germline silencing. Among the ten new RNAi genes, three encode homologs of proteins involved in both protein degradation and chromatin remodeling. Our findings suggest that multiple chromatin remodeling complexes are involved in regulating the expression of specific genes that play critical roles in developmental decisions.

  4. Tailoring Particle Size of Mesoporous Silica Nanosystem To Antagonize Glioblastoma and Overcome Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianbin; He, Lizhen; Ma, Bin; Chen, Tianfeng

    2016-03-23

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main bottleneck to prevent some macromolecular substance entering the cerebral circulation, resulting the failure of chemotherapy in the treatment of glioma. Cancer nanotechnology displays potent applications in glioma therapy owing to their penetration across BBB and accumulation into the tumor core. In this study, we have tailored the particle size of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) through controlling the hydrolysis rate and polycondensation degree of reactants, and optimized the nanosystem that could effectively penetrate BBB and target the tumor tissue to achieve enhanced antiglioma efficacy. The nanoparticle was conjugated with cRGD peptide to enhance its cancer targeting effect, and then used to load antineoplastic doxorubicin. Therefore, the functionalized nanosystem (DOX@MSNs) selectively recognizes and binds to the U87 cells with higher expression level of ανβ3 integrin, sequentially enhancing the cellular uptake and inhibition to glioma cells, especially the particle size at 40 nm. This particle could rapidly enter cancer cells and was difficult to excrete outside the cells, thus leading to high drug accumulation. Furthermore, DOX@MSNs exhibited much higher selectivity and anticancer activity than free DOX and induced the glioma cells apoptosis through triggering ROS overproduction. Interestingly, DOX@MSNs at about 40 nm exhibited stronger permeability across the BBB, and could disrupt the VM-capability of glioma cells by regulating the expression of E-cadherin, FAK, and MMP-2, thus achieving satisfactory antiglioblastoma efficacy and avoiding the unwanted toxic side effects to normal brain tissue. Taken together, these results suggest that tailoring the particle size of MSNs nanosystem could be an effective strategy to antagonize glioblastoma and overcome BBB.

  5. Dynamics of bounded confidence opinion in heterogeneous social networks: Concord against partial antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmyshev, Evguenii; Juárez, Héctor A.; González-Silva, Ricardo A.

    2011-08-01

    Bounded confidence models of opinion dynamics in social networks have been actively studied in recent years, in particular, opinion formation and extremism propagation along with other aspects of social dynamics. In this work, after an analysis of limitations of the Deffuant-Weisbuch (DW) bounded confidence, relative agreement model, we propose the mixed model that takes into account two psychological types of individuals. Concord agents (C-agents) are friendly people; they interact in a way that their opinions always get closer. Agents of the other psychological type show partial antagonism in their interaction (PA-agents). Opinion dynamics in heterogeneous social groups, consisting of agents of the two types, was studied on different social networks: Erdös-Rényi random graphs, small-world networks and complete graphs. Limit cases of the mixed model, pure C- and PA-societies, were also studied. We found that group opinion formation is, qualitatively, almost independent of the topology of networks used in this work. Opinion fragmentation, polarization and consensus are observed in the mixed model at different proportions of PA- and C-agents, depending on the value of initial opinion tolerance of agents. As for the opinion formation and arising of “dissidents”, the opinion dynamics of the C-agents society was found to be similar to that of the DW model, except for the rate of opinion convergence. Nevertheless, mixed societies showed dynamics and bifurcation patterns notably different to those of the DW model. The influence of biased initial conditions over opinion formation in heterogeneous social groups was also studied versus the initial value of opinion uncertainty, varying the proportion of the PA- to C-agents. Bifurcation diagrams showed an impressive evolution of collective opinion, in particular, radical changes of left to right consensus or vice versa at an opinion uncertainty value equal to 0.7 in the model with the PA/C mixture of population near 50/50.

  6. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Mohan S.; O’Neal, Justin T.; Fedorova, Nadia B.; Puri, Vinita; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target. PMID:28152048

  7. Metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor antagonism is associated with antidepressant-like effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Need, Anne B; Baez, Melvyn; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2006-10-01

    Antidepressant-like effects of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu)5 receptor antagonists have been reported previously. We now provide definitive identification of mGlu5 receptors as a target for these effects through the combined use of selective antagonists and mice with targeted deletion of the mGlu5 protein. In these experiments, the mGlu5 receptor antagonists 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) and the more selective and metabolically stable analog 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]-pyridine (MTEP) decreased immobility in the mouse forced swim test, a test predictive of antidepressant efficacy in humans. mGlu5 receptor knockout mice had a phenotype in the forced swim test that was congruent with the effects of receptor blockade; mGlu5 receptor knockout mice were significantly less immobile than their wild-type counterparts. Consistent with mGlu5 receptor mediation of the antidepressant-like effects of MPEP, the effects of MPEP were not observed in mGlu5 receptor knockout mice, whereas comparable effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imiprimine remained active in the mutant mice. MPEP and imiprimine resulted in a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test. The drug interaction was not likely because of increased levels of drugs in the brain, suggesting a pharmacodynamic interaction of mGlu5 and monoaminergic systems in this effect. Thus, the present findings substantiate the hypothesis that mGlu5 receptor antagonism is associated with antidepressant-like effects. This mechanism may not only provide a novel approach to the therapeutic management of depressive disorders but also may be useful in the augmentation of effects of traditional antidepressant agents.

  8. Exploring the structural basis for selenium/mercury antagonism in Allium fistulosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNear, Jr., David H.; Afton, Scott E.; Caruso, Joseph A. (UCIN); (Kentucky)

    2012-12-10

    While continuing efforts are devoted to studying the mutually protective effect of mercury and selenium in mammals, few studies have investigated the mercury-selenium antagonism in plants. In this study, we report the metabolic fate of mercury and selenium in Allium fistulosum (green onion) after supplementation with sodium selenite and mercuric chloride. Analysis of homogenized root extracts via capillary reversed phase chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (capRPLC-ICP-MS) suggests the formation of a mercury-selenium containing compound. Micro-focused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of freshly excised roots show Hg sequestered on the root surface and outlining individual root cells, while Se is more evenly distributed throughout the root. There are also discrete Hg-only, Se-only regions and an overall strong correlation between Hg and Se throughout the root. Analysis of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra show a 'background' of methylselenocysteine within the root with discrete spots of SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, Se{sup 0} and solid HgSe on the root surface. Mercury outlining individual root cells is possibly binding to sulfhydryl groups or plasma membrane or cell wall proteins, and in some places reacting with reduced selenium in the rhizosphere to form a mercury(II) selenide species. Together with the formation of the root-bound mercury(II) selenide species, we also report on the formation of cinnabar (HgS) and Hg{sup 0} in the rhizosphere. The results presented herein shed light on the intricate chemical and biological processes occurring within the rhizosphere that influence Hg and Se bioavailability and will be instrumental in predicting the fate and assisting in the remediation of these metals in the environment and informing whether or not fruit and vegetable food selection from aerial plant compartments or roots from plants grown in Hg contaminated soils, are safe for consumption.

  9. Homologous 2',5'-phosphodiesterases from disparate RNA viruses antagonize antiviral innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Jha, Babal K; Ogden, Kristen M; Dong, Beihua; Zhao, Ling; Elliott, Ruth; Patton, John T; Silverman, Robert H; Weiss, Susan R

    2013-08-06

    Efficient and productive virus infection often requires viral countermeasures that block innate immunity. The IFN-inducible 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetases (OASs) and ribonuclease (RNase) L are components of a potent host antiviral pathway. We previously showed that murine coronavirus (MHV) accessory protein ns2, a 2H phosphoesterase superfamily member, is a phosphodiesterase (PDE) that cleaves 2-5A, thereby preventing activation of RNase L. The PDE activity of ns2 is required for MHV replication in macrophages and for hepatitis. Here, we show that group A rotavirus (RVA), an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide, encodes a similar PDE. The RVA PDE forms the carboxy-terminal domain of the minor core protein VP3 (VP3-CTD) and shares sequence and predicted structural homology with ns2, including two catalytic HxT/S motifs. Bacterially expressed VP3-CTD exhibited 2',5'-PDE activity, which cleaved 2-5A in vitro. In addition, VP3-CTD expressed transiently in mammalian cells depleted 2-5A levels induced by OAS activation with poly(rI):poly(rC), preventing RNase L activation. In the context of recombinant chimeric MHV expressing inactive ns2, VP3-CTD restored the ability of the virus to replicate efficiently in macrophages or in the livers of infected mice, whereas mutant viruses expressing inactive VP3-CTD (H718A or H798R) were attenuated. In addition, chimeric viruses expressing either active ns2 or VP3-CTD, but not nonfunctional equivalents, were able to protect ribosomal RNA from RNase L-mediated degradation. Thus, VP3-CTD is a 2',5'-PDE able to functionally substitute for ns2 in MHV infection. Remarkably, therefore, two disparate RNA viruses encode proteins with homologous 2',5'-PDEs that antagonize activation of innate immunity.

  10. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Bowen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  11. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  12. Genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles in nasal mucosa cells are antagonized by titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Stephan; Scherzed, Agmal; Zapp, Angela; Radeloff, Katrin; Ginzkey, Christian; Gehrke, Thomas; Ickrath, Pascal; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 -NPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) are often used in sunscreens and other consumer products due to their photoprotective properties. However, concern exists regarding them possibly causing cyto- and genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to assess cyto- and genotoxicity of these nanomaterials after single or combined exposure. For this purpose, a battery of cell culture test systems for human nasal mucosa (monolayer, air-liquid interface and mini organ culture) were exposed to 0.1-20μg/ml of TiO 2 - and ZnO-NPs alone and in combination. Cytotoxicity was measured by the MTT assay, and DNA damage and repair capacity were investigated using the comet assay. TiO 2 -NPs did not exhibit any cyto- or genotoxic potential within the tested concentrations. However, results of the study indicated cyto- and genotoxicity resulting from ZnO-NPs. The genotoxicity could be antagonized by TiO 2 -NPs. Furthermore, the DNA repair capacity after ZnO-NP-induced DNA damage was enhanced by TiO 2 -NPs. The adsorption of dissolved zinc ions onto TiO 2 -NPs is discussed as the major antagonistic mechanism. The combination of both metal oxide nanoparticles interferes with the genotoxicity of ZnO-NPs and should be discussed as a reasonable and safe alternative to the sole use of ZnO-NPs in consumer products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 4-Aminopyridine antagonizes saxitoxin-and tetrodotoxin-induced cardiorespiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, F C; Bauer, R M; Benton, B J; Keller, S A; Capacio, B R

    1996-06-01

    Antagonism of saxitoxin-and tetrodotoxin-induced lethality by 4-aminopyridine was studied in urethane-anesthetized guinea pigs instrumented for the concurrent recordings of medullary respiratory-related unit activities (Bötzinger complex and Nu. para-Ambiguus), diaphragmatic electromyogram, electrocorticogram, Lead II electrocardiogram, blood pressure, end-tidal CO2 and arterial O2/CO2/pH. The toxin (either saxitoxin or tetrodotoxin) was infused at a dose rate of 0.3 microgram/kg/min (i.v.) to produce a state of progressive cardiorespiratory depression. The animals were artificially ventilated when the magnitude of integrated diaphragm activities was reduced to 50% of control. Immediately after the disappearance of the diaphragm electromyogram, the toxin infusion was terminated, and 4-aminopyridine (2 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered. The therapeutic effect of 4-aminopyridine was striking in that the toxin-induced blockade of diaphragmatic neurotransmission, vascular hypotension, myocardial anomalies, bradycardia and aberrant discharge patterns of medullary respiratory-related neurons could all be promptly restored to a level comparable to that of control condition. The animals were typically able to breathe spontaneously within minutes after 4-aminopyridine. At the dose level used to achieve the desired therapeutic responses, 4-aminopyridine produced no sign of seizure and convulsion. Although less serious side-effects such as cortical excitant/arousal and transient periods of fascicular twitch could be observed, these events were of minor concern, in our opinion, particularly in view of the remarkable therapeutic effects of 4-aminopyridine.

  14. Separating the Anti-Inflammatory and Diabetogenic Effects of Glucocorticoids Through LXRβ Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rucha; Magomedova, Lilia; Tsai, Ricky; Angers, Stéphane; Orellana, Arturo; Cummins, Carolyn L

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs), including dexamethasone (DEX), are powerful anti-inflammatory drugs. Long-term use of GCs, however, can result in metabolic side effects such as hyperglycemia, hepatosteatosis, and insulin resistance. The GC receptor (GR) and liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ) regulate overlapping genes involved in gluconeogenesis and inflammation. We have previously shown that Lxrβ-/- mice are resistant to the diabetogenic effects of DEX but still sensitive to its immunosuppressive actions. To determine whether this finding could be exploited for therapeutic intervention, we treated mice with GSK2033, a pan-LXR antagonist, alone or combined with DEX. GSK2033 suppressed GC-induced gluconeogenic gene expression without affecting immune-responsive GR target genes. The suppressive effect of GSK2033 on DEX-induced gluconeogenic genes was specific to LXRβ, was liver cell autonomous, and occurred in a target gene-specific manner. Compared with DEX treatment alone, the coadministration of GSK2033 with DEX decreased the recruitment of GR and its accessory factors MED1 and C/EBPβ to the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter. However, GSK2033 had no effect on DEX-mediated suppression of inflammatory genes expressed in the liver or in mouse primary macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharides. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that the gluconeogenic and immunosuppressive actions of GR activation can be mechanistically dissociated by pharmacological antagonism of LXRβ. Treatment with an LXRβ antagonist could allow the safer use of existing GC drugs in patients requiring chronic dosing of anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  15. Intrarenal ghrelin receptor antagonism prevents high-fat diet-induced hypertension in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brandon A; Howell, Nancy L; Gildea, John J; Padia, Shetal H

    2014-07-01

    Excess weight gain contributes up to 65% of the risk of primary hypertension, and the increase in blood pressure in response to high-fat diet (HFD) is preceded by significant increases in renal tubular sodium (Na(+)) reabsorption. In normal rats, intrarenal ghrelin infusion increases distal nephron-dependent Na(+) reabsorption via activation of the intrarenal ghrelin receptor (GHSR). This study focusses on the role of intrarenal GHSR-mediated Na(+) reabsorption in HFD-induced hypertension. Dahl salt-sensitive rats received standard diet or HFD for 6 weeks. Rats underwent uninephrectomy and osmotic minipump implantation for chronic intrarenal delivery of vehicle (0.25 μL/h × 28 d), selective GHSR antagonist [D-Lys-3]-growth hormone releasing peptide-6 (0.2μM/d), or GHSR inverse agonist [D-Arg(1), D-Phe(5), D-Trp(7,9), Leu(11)]-substance P (SUB-P) (3.6μM/d). HFD rats with vehicle pumps had significantly increased renal GHSR expression compared with standard diet (0.092 ± 0.005 vs 0.065 ± 0.004 arbitrary units; P ghrelin levels were similar (16.3±6.2 vs 15.7±8.7 pg/g tissue). HFD rats with vehicle pumps became hypertensive after 2 weeks (P ghrelin-dependent, activity of the GHSR, and HFD-induced α-epithelial Na(+) channel up-regulation was abolished during GHSR antagonism, these data suggest that HFD increases the constitutive activity of renal GHSR to increase Na(+) reabsorption and induce hypertension in rats.

  16. Membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease, antagonizes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Le; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Engström, Peter; Song, Ze-Ting; Lu, Sun-Jie; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid plays important roles in maintaining seed dormancy while gibberellins (GA) and other phytohormones antagonize ABA to promote germination. However, how ABA signaling is desensitized during the transition from dormancy to germination is still poorly understood. We functionally characterized the role of membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease (S2P), in ABA signaling during seed germination in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that loss-of-function of S2P conferred high ABA sensitivity during seed germination, and expression of the activated form of membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17, in which the transmembrane domain and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen-facing C-terminus were deleted, in the S2P mutant rescued its ABA-sensitive phenotype. MYC and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bZIP17 were processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus in response to ABA treatment. Furthermore, genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling, such as the transcription factor ATHB7 and its target genes HAB1, HAB2, HAI1 and AHG3, were up-regulated in seeds of the wild-type upon ABA treatment; this up-regulation was impaired in seeds of S2P mutants. Our results suggest that S2P desensitizes ABA signaling during seed germination through regulating the activation of the membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17 and therefore controlling the expression level of genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Cardiac sodium channel antagonism - Translation of preclinical in vitro assays to clinical QRS prolongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Stephen; Bassyouni, Asser; Cordes, Jason; Fermini, Bernard; Guo, Donglin; Potter, David M; Ramirez, David S; Steidl-Nichols, Jill; Sun, Sunny; Wisialowski, Todd

    Cardiac sodium channel antagonists have historically been used to treat cardiac arrhythmias by preventing the reentry of the electrical impulse that could occur following myocardial damage. However, clinical studies have highlighted a significant increase in mortality associated with such treatment. Cardiac sodium channel antagonist activity is now seen as an off-target pharmacology that should be mitigated during the drug development process. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between in vitro/ex vivo assays that are routinely used to measure Nav1.5 activity and determine the translatability of the individual assays to QRS prolongation in the clinic. A set of clinical compounds with known Nav1.5 activity was profiled in several in vitro/ex vivo assays (binding, membrane potential, patch clamp and the Langendorff isolated heart). Clinical data comprising compound exposure levels and changes in QRS interval were obtained from the literature. Sensitivity/specificity analysis was performed with respect to the clinical outcome. The in vitro assays showed utility in predicting QRS prolongation in the clinic. Optimal thresholds were defined for each assay (binding: IC 20 ; membrane potential: IC 10 ; patch clamp: IC 20 ) and sensitivity (69-88%) and specificity (53-84%) values were shown to be similar between assay formats. The data provide clear statistical insight into the translatability of Nav1.5 antagonism data generated in vitro to potential clinical outcomes. These results improve our ability to understand the liability posed by such activity in novel development compounds at an early stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural Network Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Salamon, Peter

    1990-01-01

    We propose several means for improving the performance an training of neural networks for classification. We use crossvalidation as a tool for optimizing network parameters and architecture. We show further that the remaining generalization error can be reduced by invoking ensembles of similar...... networks....

  19. Neural systems for control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omidvar, Omid; Elliott, David L

    1997-01-01

    ... is reprinted with permission from A. Barto, "Reinforcement Learning," Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks, M.A. Arbib, ed.. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 804-809, 1995. Chapter 4, Figures 4-5 and 7-9 and Tables 2-5, are reprinted with permission, from S. Cho, "Map Formation in Proprioceptive Cortex," International Jour...

  20. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancies each year in the United States. A baby’s neural tube normally develops into the brain and spinal cord. ... fluid in the brain. This is called hydrocephalus. Babies with this condition are treated with surgery to insert a tube (called a shunt) into the brain. The shunt ...

  1. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetics of human cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists: Structure-kinetics relationships (SKR) and implications for insurmountable antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lizi; de Vries, Henk; Yang, Xue; Lenselink, Eelke B; Kyrizaki, Athina; Barth, Francis; Louvel, Julien; Dreyer, Matthias K; van der Es, Daan; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2017-11-02

    While equilibrium binding affinities and in vitro functional antagonism of CB1 receptor antagonists have been studied in detail, little is known on the kinetics of their receptor interaction. In this study, we therefore conducted kinetic assays for nine 1-(4,5-diarylthiophene-2-carbonyl)-4-phenylpiperidine-4-carboxamide derivatives and included the CB1 antagonist rimonabant as a comparison. For this we newly developed a dual-point competition association assay with [3H]CP55940 as the radioligand. This assay yielded Kinetic Rate Index (KRI) values from which structure-kinetics relationships (SKR) of hCB1 receptor antagonists could be established. The fast dissociating antagonist 6 had a similar receptor residence time (RT) as rimonabant, i.e. 19 and 14 min, respectively, while the slowest dissociating antagonist (9) had a very long RT of 2222 min, i.e. pseudo-irreversible dissociation kinetics. In functional assays, 9 displayed insurmountable antagonism, while the effects of the shortest RT antagonist 6 and rimonabant were surmountable. Taken together, this study shows that hCB1 receptor antagonists can have very divergent RTs, which are not correlated to their equilibrium affinities. Furthermore, their RTs appear to define their mode of functional antagonism, i.e. surmountable vs. insurmountable. Finally, based on the recently resolved hCB1 receptor crystal structure, we propose that the differences in RT can be explained by a different binding mode of antagonist 9 from short RT antagonists that is able to displace unfavorable water molecules. Taken together, these findings are of importance for future design and evaluation of potent and safe hCB1 receptor antagonists. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative analyses of antagonism: combinations of midazolam and either flunitrazepam or pregnanolone in rhesus monkeys discriminating midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, Lisa R; France, Charles P

    2012-03-01

    Adverse effects of benzodiazepines limit their clinical use; these effects might be reduced without altering therapeutic effects by administering other positive GABA(A) modulators (i.e., neuroactive steroids) with benzodiazepines. One concern with this strategy involves reversing these combined effects in case of overdose. The current study examined whether flumazenil can attenuate the combined effects of two benzodiazepines, midazolam and flunitrazepam, and the combined effects of midazolam and the neuroactive steroid pregnanolone, in four monkeys discriminating midazolam. Each positive modulator produced ≥80% midazolam-lever responding. Interactions between midazolam and either flunitrazepam or pregnanolone were additive. Flumazenil antagonized the benzodiazepines when they were administered alone or in combination. Schild analyses yielded slopes that did not deviate from unity, regardless of whether benzodiazepines were administered alone or together; the pA(2) value for flumazenil was 7.58. In contrast, flumazenil enhanced the effects of pregnanolone with 0.32 mg/kg flumazenil shifting the pregnanolone dose-effect curve 2-fold leftward. Flumazenil attenuated the combined effects of midazolam and pregnanolone, although antagonism was not dose-dependent. Thus, the interaction between two benzodiazepines was similar to that of a benzodiazepine and a neuroactive steroid; however, flumazenil more efficiently attenuated a combination of two benzodiazepines compared with a combination of a benzodiazepine and a neuroactive steroid. Although the magnitude of antagonism of a benzodiazepine combined with a neuroactive steroid was reduced, these results support continued exploration of the use of combinations of positive modulators to enhance therapeutic effects while reducing adverse effects.

  4. Antagonism of d-tubocurarine-induced neuromuscular blockade with a mixture of 4-aminopyridine and neostigmine in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtavuori, K; Salmenperä, M; Tammisto, T

    1984-11-01

    The antagonistic properties of a mixture of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) 3 mg X ml-1 and neostigmine 0.2 mg X ml-1 (in three patient groups) administered at 90 per cent d-tubocurarine block were compared with those of plain neostigmine (in three patient groups) in thirty-six patients during thiopentone-fentanyl-nitrous oxide-oxygen anaesthesia. The recovery variables included thumb twitch height, thenar e.m.g. peak-to-peak amplitude, and train-of-four ratio in response to supramaximal ulnar nerve stimulation. In addition, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, apnoea time and time to responsiveness to verbal command after nitrous oxide was turned off at 20 minutes of recovery were examined as circulatory and central nervous system responses to antagonism. The addition of 4-AP 30 mg to neostigmine 2 mg enhanced the recovery of train-of-four ratio from 54.2 +/- 5.2 to 80.2 +/- 5.2 per cent at 20 mins of antagonism (mean +/- SEM; p less than 0.01) while adding 4-AP 45 mg to neostigmine 3 mg increased the train-of-four ratio from 67.7 +/- 2.3 to 92.3 +/- 2.4 per cent (p less than 0.01) when compared with plain neostigmine. No statistically significant difference could be found between the groups in the recovery of twitch height or e.m.g. amplitude. The antagonism of d-tubocurarine block with 4-AP 30 mg plus neostigmine 2 mg was at least as effective as with neostigmine 3-4 mg. Mean arterial pressure increased in the group receiving 45 mg 4-AP plus 3 mg neostigmine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. [Population dynamics and antagonism toward Fusarium oxysporium f. sp. Vasinfectum. and Verticillium dahliae Kleb of endophytic bacteria from cotton].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhong; Deng, Yuanyu; Zhao, Mingwen; Tang, Canming; Li, Shunpeng; Lv, Haiwei

    2009-09-01

    To explore population dynamics of endophytic bacteria and obtain antagonistic endophytic bacteria toward Verticillium dahliae Kleb (Vd), Fusarium oxysporium f. sp. Vasinfectum (Fov) from cotton. Root, stem and leaf samples were surface-disinfested, and subsequently used to isolate endophytic bacteria by diluting plate counting method. We assayed antagonism of the isolated endophytic bacteria toward three pathogens: Vd (V107, which is a highly virulent defoliating isolate and V396, which is a mildly virulent non-defoliating isolate), Fov (F108) using a dual culture method, and analyzed the 16S rDNA sequence of doubly antagonistic endophytic bacteria (DAEB) isolates toward both Vd and Fov. The population size of endophytic bacteria in root was significantly larger than that in leaf and stem. The populations at seedling stage were generally lower than those at the flowering/maturing stage in root, the populations in stem and leaf were fluctuant at different development stages, but variation law was not observed obviously. Furthermore, although no significant differences of the population densities in root were found among 6 cotton cultivars, the population densities in stem and leaf showed cultivar differences. The proportion of endophytic bacteria antagonizing Vd (V107, V396) and Fov (F108) in root was higher than that in stem/leaf, moreover, the amount of endophytic bacteria antagonizing toward V107 was less than that toward V396/F108. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, all 44 DAEB isolates consisted of two phyla, i.e., Bacteroidetes (1 out of 44) and Proteobacteria (43 out of 44), and fell into 8 genera. The genus enterobacter (18 out of 44) and Pantoea (15 out of 44) were predominant. Notably, ten DAEB isolates demonstrated cotton. Endophytic bacteria in cotton could serve as a pool for discovering biocontrol agent toward cotton pathogens.

  6. SlmA antagonism of FtsZ assembly employs a two-pronged mechanism like MinCD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishen Du

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of the Z-ring over unsegregated nucleoids is prevented by a process called nucleoid occlusion (NO, which in Escherichia coli is partially mediated by SlmA. SlmA is a Z ring antagonist that is spatially regulated and activated by binding to specific DNA sequences (SlmA binding sites, SBSs more abundant in the origin proximal region of the chromosome. However, the mechanism by which SBS bound SlmA (activated form antagonizes Z ring assembly is controversial. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two FtsZ mutants, FtsZ-K190V and FtsZ-D86N that confer resistance to activated SlmA. In trying to understand the basis of resistance of these mutants, we confirmed that activated SlmA antagonizes FtsZ polymerization and determined these mutants were resistant, even though they still bind SlmA. Investigation of SlmA binding to FtsZ revealed activated SlmA binds to the conserved C-terminal tail of FtsZ and that the ability of activated SlmA to antagonize FtsZ assembly required the presence of the tail. Together, these results lead to a model in which SlmA binding to an SBS is activated to bind the tail of FtsZ resulting in further interaction with FtsZ leading to depolymerization of FtsZ polymers. This model is strikingly similar to the model for the inhibitory mechanism of the spatial inhibitor MinCD.

  7. Design of a PROTAC that antagonizes and destroys the cancer-forming X-protein of the hepatitis B virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montrose, Kristopher; Krissansen, Geoffrey W., E-mail: gw.krissansen@auckland.ac.nz

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • A novel proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule (PROTAC) to treat hepatitis B. • The PROTAC antagonizes and destroys the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. • The PROTAC is a fusion of the X-protein oligomerization and instability domains. • The oligomerization domain is a dominant-negative inhibitor of X-protein function. • X-protein-targeting PROTACs have potential to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma. - Abstract: The X-protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is essential for virus infection and contributes to the development of HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a disease which causes more than one million deaths each year. Here we describe the design of a novel PROTAC (proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule) capable of simultaneously inducing the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizing its function. The PROTAC was constructed by fusing the N-terminal oligomerization and C-terminal instability domains of the X-protein to each other, and rendering them cell-permeable by the inclusion of a polyarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was predicted that the oligomerization domain would bind the X-protein, and that the instability domain would cause the X-protein to be targeted for proteasomal degradation. Addition of the PROTAC to HepG2 liver cancer cells, engineered to express full-length and C-terminally truncated forms of the X-protein, resulted in the degradation of both forms of the X-protein. A cell-permeable stand-alone form of the oligomerization domain was taken up by HepG2 cells, and acted as a dominant-negative inhibitor, causing inhibition of X-protein-induced apoptosis. In summary, the PROTAC described here induces the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizes its function, and warrants investigation in a preclinical study for its ability to prevent or treat HBV infection and/or the development of HCC.

  8. Biocontrol bacteria selected by a direct plant protection strategy against avocado white root rot show antagonism as a prevalent trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, M Á; Pérez-Jiménez, R M; Pliego, C; Ramos, C; de Vicente, A; Cazorla, F M

    2010-07-01

    This study was undertaken to study bacterial strains obtained directly for their efficient direct control of the avocado white root rot, thus avoiding prescreening by any other possible mechanism of biocontrol which could bias the selection. A collection of 330 bacterial isolates was obtained from the roots and soil of healthy avocado trees. One hundred and forty-three representative bacterial isolates were tested in an avocado/Rosellinia test system, resulting in 22 presumptive protective strains, all of them identified mainly as Pseudomonas and Bacillus species. These 22 candidate strains were screened in a more accurate biocontrol trial, confirming protection of some strains (4 out of the 22). Analyses of the potential bacterial traits involved in the biocontrol activity suggest that different traits could act jointly in the final biocontrol response, but any of these traits were neither sufficient nor generalized for all the active bacteria. All the protective strains selected were antagonistic against some fungal root pathogens. Diverse bacteria with biocontrol activity could be obtained by a direct plant protection strategy of selection. All the biocontrol strains finally selected in this work were antagonistic, showing that antagonism is a prevalent trait in the biocontrol bacteria selected by a direct plant protection strategy. This is the first report on the isolation of biocontrol bacterial strains using direct plant protection strategy in the system avocado/Rosellinia. Characterization of selected biocontrol bacterial strains obtained by a direct plant protection strategy showed that antagonism is a prevalent trait in the selected strains in this experimental system. This suggests that antagonism could be used as useful strategy to select biocontrol strains. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies: synergy and antagonism with tumor necrosis factor-α

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    -474 cells. A representative anti-HER2 antibody inhibited Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation leading to cyclin D1 accumulation and growth arrest in SK-BR-3 cells, independently from TNF-α. Conclusions Novel antibodies against extracellular domain of HER2 may serve as potent anti-cancer bioactive molecules. Cell-dependent synergy and antagonism between anti-HER2 antibodies and TNF-α provide evidence for a complex interplay between HER2 and TNF-α signaling pathways. Such complexity may drastically affect the outcome of HER2-directed therapeutic interventions. PMID:23033967

  10. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates postharvest ripening and senescence of banana by antagonizing the effect of ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yun; Hu, Kang-Di; Wang, Sha-Sha; Hu, Lan-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Li, Yan-Hong; Yang, Ying; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a multifunctional signaling molecule in plants, whereas the interaction between H2S and ethylene is still unclear. In the present study we investigated the role of H2S in ethylene-promoted banana ripening and senescence by the application of ethylene released from 1.0 g·L-1 ethephon solution or H2S with 1 mM sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) as the donor or in combination. Fumigation with ethylene was found to accelerate banana ripening and H2S treatment effectively alleviated ethylene-induced banana peel yellowing and fruit softening in parallel with decreased activity of polygalacturonase (PG). Ethylene+H2S treatment also delayed the decreases in chlorophyll and total phenolics, and increased the accumulation of flavonoid, whereas decreased the contents of carotenoid, soluble protein in banana peel and reducing sugar in pulp compared with ethylene treatment alone. Besides, ethylene+H2S treatment suppressed the accumulation of superoxide radicals (·O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) which accumulated highly in ethylene-treated banana peels. Furthermore H2S enhanced total antioxidant capacity in ethylene-treated banana peels with the 2,2'-azobis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) assay. The result of quantitative real-time PCR showed that the combined treatment of ethylene with H2S down-regulated the expression of ethylene synthesis genes MaACS1, MaACS2 and MaACO1 and pectate lyase MaPL compared with ethylene treatment, while the expression of ethylene receptor genes MaETR, MaERS1 and MaERS2 was enhanced in combination treatment compared with ethylene alone. In all, it can be concluded that H2S alleviates banana fruit ripening and senescence by antagonizing the effect of ethylene through reduction of oxidative stress and inhibition of ethylene signaling pathway.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates postharvest ripening and senescence of banana by antagonizing the effect of ethylene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ge

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows that hydrogen sulfide (H2S acts as a multifunctional signaling molecule in plants, whereas the interaction between H2S and ethylene is still unclear. In the present study we investigated the role of H2S in ethylene-promoted banana ripening and senescence by the application of ethylene released from 1.0 g·L-1 ethephon solution or H2S with 1 mM sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS as the donor or in combination. Fumigation with ethylene was found to accelerate banana ripening and H2S treatment effectively alleviated ethylene-induced banana peel yellowing and fruit softening in parallel with decreased activity of polygalacturonase (PG. Ethylene+H2S treatment also delayed the decreases in chlorophyll and total phenolics, and increased the accumulation of flavonoid, whereas decreased the contents of carotenoid, soluble protein in banana peel and reducing sugar in pulp compared with ethylene treatment alone. Besides, ethylene+H2S treatment suppressed the accumulation of superoxide radicals (·O2-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA which accumulated highly in ethylene-treated banana peels. Furthermore H2S enhanced total antioxidant capacity in ethylene-treated banana peels with the 2,2'-azobis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS assay. The result of quantitative real-time PCR showed that the combined treatment of ethylene with H2S down-regulated the expression of ethylene synthesis genes MaACS1, MaACS2 and MaACO1 and pectate lyase MaPL compared with ethylene treatment, while the expression of ethylene receptor genes MaETR, MaERS1 and MaERS2 was enhanced in combination treatment compared with ethylene alone. In all, it can be concluded that H2S alleviates banana fruit ripening and senescence by antagonizing the effect of ethylene through reduction of oxidative stress and inhibition of ethylene signaling pathway.

  12. Dezocine Antagonizes Morphine Analgesia upon Simultaneous Administration in Rodent Models of Acute Nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na-Na; Huang, Ya-Qin; Huang, Ling-Er; Guo, Shao-Hui; Shen, Maxwell R; Guo, Chen-Ling; Zhu, Sheng-Mei; Yao, Yong-Xing

    2017-03-01

    interaction. Dezocine antagonizes morphine analgesia on acute nociception upon simultaneous administration.Key words: Dezocine, morphine, acute nociception, analgesia.

  13. Novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies: synergy and antagonism with tumor necrosis factor-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceran Ceyhan

    2012-10-01

    , but antagonistically on BT-474 cells. A representative anti-HER2 antibody inhibited Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation leading to cyclin D1 accumulation and growth arrest in SK-BR-3 cells, independently from TNF-α. Conclusions Novel antibodies against extracellular domain of HER2 may serve as potent anti-cancer bioactive molecules. Cell-dependent synergy and antagonism between anti-HER2 antibodies and TNF-α provide evidence for a complex interplay between HER2 and TNF-α signaling pathways. Such complexity may drastically affect the outcome of HER2-directed therapeutic interventions.

  14. Antihypertensive activity of Salvia elegans Vahl. (Lamiaceae): ACE inhibition and angiotensin II antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Badillo, Fidel Hernández; González-Cortazar, Manases; Tortoriello, Jaime; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel

    2010-07-20

    and phenyl propanoid types, according to UV absorption spectra of the fractions. The experimental results demonstrated the antihypertensive effect of Salvia elegans and it was due to the AG II antagonism and inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SPOC1-mediated antiviral host cell response is antagonized early in human adenovirus type 5 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Schreiner

    Full Text Available Little is known about immediate phases after viral infection and how an incoming viral genome complex counteracts host cell defenses, before the start of viral gene expression. Adenovirus (Ad serves as an ideal model, since entry and onset of gene expression are rapid and highly efficient, and mechanisms used 24-48 hours post infection to counteract host antiviral and DNA repair factors (e.g. p53, Mre11, Daxx are well studied. Here, we identify an even earlier host cell target for Ad, the chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader, SPOC1, recently found recruited to double strand breaks, and playing a role in DNA damage response. SPOC1 co-localized with viral replication centers in the host cell nucleus, interacted with Ad DNA, and repressed viral gene expression at the transcriptional level. We discovered that this SPOC1-mediated restriction imposed upon Ad growth is relieved by its functional association with the Ad major core protein pVII that enters with the viral genome, followed by E1B-55K/E4orf6-dependent proteasomal degradation of SPOC1. Mimicking removal of SPOC1 in the cell, knock down of this cellular restriction factor using RNAi techniques resulted in significantly increased Ad replication, including enhanced viral gene expression. However, depletion of SPOC1 also reduced the efficiency of E1B-55K transcriptional repression of cellular promoters, with possible implications for viral transformation. Intriguingly, not exclusive to Ad infection, other human pathogenic viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, HIV-1, and HCV also depleted SPOC1 in infected cells. Our findings provide a general model for how pathogenic human viruses antagonize intrinsic SPOC1-mediated antiviral responses in their host cells. A better understanding of viral entry and early restrictive functions in host cells should provide new perspectives for developing antiviral agents and therapies. Conversely, for Ad vectors used in gene therapy, counteracting mechanisms

  16. Orexin-1 receptor blockade dysregulates REM sleep in the presence of orexin-2 receptor antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eDugovic

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the prominent role of orexins in the maintenance of wakefulness via activation of orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R receptors, various dual OX1/2R antagonists have been shown to promote sleep in animals and humans. While selective blockade of OX2R seems to be sufficient to initiate and prolong sleep, the beneficial effect of additional inhibition of OX1R remains controversial. The relative contribution of OX1R and OX2R to the sleep effects induced by a dual OX1/2R antagonist was further investigated in the rat, and specifically on rapid eye movement (REM sleep since a deficiency of the orexin system is associated with narcolepsy/cataplexy based on clinical and pre-clinical data. As expected, the dual OX1/2R antagonist SB-649868 was effective in promoting non-REM (NREM and REM sleep following oral dosing (10 and 30 mg/kg at the onset of the dark phase. However, a disruption of REM sleep was evidenced by a more pronounced reduction in the onset of REM as compared to NREM sleep, a marked enhancement of the REM/total sleep ratio, and the occurrence of a few episodes of direct wake to REM sleep transitions (REM intrusion. When administered subcutaneously, the OX2R antagonist JNJ-10397049 (10 mg/kg increased NREM duration whereas the OX1R antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg did not alter sleep. REM sleep was not affected either by OX2R or OX1R blockade alone, but administration of the OX1R antagonist in combination with the OX2R antagonist induced a significant reduction in REM sleep latency and an increase in REM sleep duration at the expense of the time spent in NREM sleep. These results indicate that additional blockade of OX1R to OX2R antagonism elicits a dysregulation of REM sleep by shifting the balance in favor of REM sleep at the expense of NREM sleep that may increase the risk of adverse events. Translation of this hypothesis remains to be tested in the clinic.

  17. Antagonism between Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes and its genomic basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gitte J M; Scholz, Christian F P; Enghild, Jan; Rohde, Holger; Kilian, Mogens; Thürmer, Andrea; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Lomholt, Hans B; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-02-29

    Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis live in close proximity on human skin, and both bacterial species can be isolated from normal and acne vulgaris-affected skin sites. The antagonistic interactions between the two species are poorly understood, as well as the potential significance of bacterial interferences for the skin microbiota. Here, we performed simultaneous antagonism assays to detect inhibitory activities between multiple isolates of the two species. Selected strains were sequenced to identify the genomic basis of their antimicrobial phenotypes. First, we screened 77 P. acnes strains isolated from healthy and acne-affected skin, and representing all known phylogenetic clades (I, II, and III), for their antimicrobial activities against 12 S. epidermidis isolates. One particular phylogroup (I-2) exhibited a higher antimicrobial activity than other P. acnes phylogroups. All genomes of type I-2 strains carry an island encoding the biosynthesis of a thiopeptide with possible antimicrobial activity against S. epidermidis. Second, 20 S. epidermidis isolates were examined for inhibitory activity against 25 P. acnes strains. The majority of S. epidermidis strains were able to inhibit P. acnes. Genomes of S. epidermidis strains with strong, medium and no inhibitory activities against P. acnes were sequenced. Genome comparison underlined the diversity of S. epidermidis and detected multiple clade- or strain-specific mobile genetic elements encoding a variety of functions important in antibiotic and stress resistance, biofilm formation and interbacterial competition, including bacteriocins such as epidermin. One isolate with an extraordinary antimicrobial activity against P. acnes harbors a functional ESAT-6 secretion system that might be involved in the antimicrobial activity against P. acnes via the secretion of polymorphic toxins. Taken together, our study suggests that interspecies interactions could potentially jeopardize balances in the skin

  18. Neural network technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, James A.

    1991-01-01

    A whole new arena of computer technologies is now beginning to form. Still in its infancy, neural network technology is a biologically inspired methodology which draws on nature's own cognitive processes. The Software Technology Branch has provided a software tool, Neural Execution and Training System (NETS), to industry, government, and academia to facilitate and expedite the use of this technology. NETS is written in the C programming language and can be executed on a variety of machines. Once a network has been debugged, NETS can produce a C source code which implements the network. This code can then be incorporated into other software systems. Described here are various software projects currently under development with NETS and the anticipated future enhancements to NETS and the technology.

  19. Analysis of neural data

    CERN Document Server

    Kass, Robert E; Brown, Emery N

    2014-01-01

    Continual improvements in data collection and processing have had a huge impact on brain research, producing data sets that are often large and complicated. By emphasizing a few fundamental principles, and a handful of ubiquitous techniques, Analysis of Neural Data provides a unified treatment of analytical methods that have become essential for contemporary researchers. Throughout the book ideas are illustrated with more than 100 examples drawn from the literature, ranging from electrophysiology, to neuroimaging, to behavior. By demonstrating the commonality among various statistical approaches the authors provide the crucial tools for gaining knowledge from diverse types of data. Aimed at experimentalists with only high-school level mathematics, as well as computationally-oriented neuroscientists who have limited familiarity with statistics, Analysis of Neural Data serves as both a self-contained introduction and a reference work.

  20. Neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have been used to describe this defect, but spina bifida remains the most useful general term, as it describes the separation of the vertebral elements in the midline.

  1. Novel Bat Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins Bind Double-Stranded RNA and Antagonize Host Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Hannah L; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Kerry, Philip S; Aydillo, Teresa; Ayllon, Juan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Schwemmle, Martin; Hale, Benjamin G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that novel bat HL17NL10 and HL18NL11 influenza virus NS1 proteins are effective interferon antagonists but do not block general host gene expression. Solving the RNA-binding domain structures revealed the canonical NS1 symmetrical homodimer, and RNA binding required conserved basic residues in this domain. Interferon antagonism was strictly dependent on RNA binding, and chimeric bat influenza viruses expressing NS1s defective in this activity were highly attenuated in interferon-competent cells but not in cells unable to establish antiviral immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Interleukin-1 antagonism moderates the inflammatory state associated with Type 1 diabetes during clinical trials conducted at disease onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera, Susanne M; Wang, Xujing; Chen, Yi-Guang

    2016-01-01

    It was hypothesized that IL-1 antagonism would preserve β-cell function in new onset Type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the Anti-Interleukin-1 in Diabetes Action (AIDA) and TrialNet Canakinumab (TN-14) trials failed to show efficacy of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or canakinumab, as measured...... a gene ontology-based inflammatory index, and an inverse relationship was observed between measured inflammation and stimulated C-peptide response in IL-1Ra- and canakinumab-treated patients. Cytokine neutralization studies showed that IL-1α and IL-1β additively contribute to the T1D inflammatory state...

  3. The use of plasma aldosterone and urinary sodium to potassium ratio as translatable quantitative biomarkers of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudy, Rena J; Sahasrabudhe, Vaishali; Sweeney, Kevin; Tugnait, Meera; King-Ahmad, Amanda; Near, Kristen; Loria, Paula; Banker, Mary Ellen; Piotrowski, David W; Boustany-Kari, Carine M

    2011-10-21

    Accumulating evidence supports the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. These findings have generated renewed interest in novel MR antagonists with improved selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors and a potentially reduced risk of hyperkalemia. Characterization of novel MR antagonists warrants establishing translatable biomarkers of activity at the MR receptor. We assessed the translatability of urinary sodium to potassium ratio (Na+/K+) and plasma aldosterone as biomarkers of MR antagonism using eplerenone (Inspra®), a commercially available MR antagonist. Further we utilized these biomarkers to demonstrate antagonism of MR by PF-03882845, a novel compound. The effect of eplerenone and PF-03882845 on urinary Na+/K+ and plasma aldosterone were characterized in Sprague-Dawley rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Additionally, the effect of eplerenone on these biomarkers was determined in healthy volunteers. Drug exposure-response data were modeled to evaluate the translatability of these biomarkers from rats to humans. In Sprague-Dawley rats, eplerenone elicited a rapid effect on urinary Na+/K+ yielding an EC50 that was within 5-fold of the functional in vitro IC50. More importantly, the effect of eplerenone on urinary Na+/K+ in healthy volunteers yielded an EC50 that was within 2-fold of the EC50 generated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Similarly, the potency of PF-03882845 in elevating urinary Na+/K+ in Sprague-Dawley rats was within 3-fold of its in vitro functional potency. The effect of MR antagonism on urinary Na+/K+ was not sustained chronically; thus we studied the effect of the compounds on plasma aldosterone following chronic dosing in SHR. Modeling of drug exposure-response data for both eplerenone and PF-03882845 yielded EC50 values that were within 2-fold of that estimated from modeling of drug exposure with changes in urinary sodium and potassium excretion. Importantly, similar

  4. The use of plasma aldosterone and urinary sodium to potassium ratio as translatable quantitative biomarkers of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eudy Rena J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating evidence supports the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. These findings have generated renewed interest in novel MR antagonists with improved selectivity against other nuclear hormone receptors and a potentially reduced risk of hyperkalemia. Characterization of novel MR antagonists warrants establishing translatable biomarkers of activity at the MR receptor. We assessed the translatability of urinary sodium to potassium ratio (Na+/K+ and plasma aldosterone as biomarkers of MR antagonism using eplerenone (Inspra®, a commercially available MR antagonist. Further we utilized these biomarkers to demonstrate antagonism of MR by PF-03882845, a novel compound. Methods The effect of eplerenone and PF-03882845 on urinary Na+/K+ and plasma aldosterone were characterized in Sprague-Dawley rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Additionally, the effect of eplerenone on these biomarkers was determined in healthy volunteers. Drug exposure-response data were modeled to evaluate the translatability of these biomarkers from rats to humans. Results In Sprague-Dawley rats, eplerenone elicited a rapid effect on urinary Na+/K+ yielding an EC50 that was within 5-fold of the functional in vitro IC50. More importantly, the effect of eplerenone on urinary Na+/K+ in healthy volunteers yielded an EC50 that was within 2-fold of the EC50 generated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Similarly, the potency of PF-03882845 in elevating urinary Na+/K+ in Sprague-Dawley rats was within 3-fold of its in vitro functional potency. The effect of MR antagonism on urinary Na+/K+ was not sustained chronically; thus we studied the effect of the compounds on plasma aldosterone following chronic dosing in SHR. Modeling of drug exposure-response data for both eplerenone and PF-03882845 yielded EC50 values that were within 2-fold of that estimated from modeling of drug exposure with changes in urinary sodium

  5. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  7. Neurally-mediated sincope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, I; Cytron, J; Jhanjee, R; Nguyen, J; Benditt, D G

    2009-08-01

    Syncope is a syndrome characterized by a relatively sudden, temporary and self-terminating loss of consciousness; the causes may vary, but they have in common a temporary inadequacy of cerebral nutrient flow, usually due to a fall in systemic arterial pressure. However, while syncope is a common problem, it is only one explanation for episodic transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). Consequently, diagnostic evaluation should start with a broad consideration of real or seemingly real TLOC. Among those patients in whom TLOC is deemed to be due to ''true syncope'', the focus may then reasonably turn to assessing the various possible causes; in this regard, the neurally-mediated syncope syndromes are among the most frequently encountered. There are three common variations: vasovagal syncope (often termed the ''common'' faint), carotid sinus syndrome, and the so-called ''situational faints''. Defining whether the cause is due to a neurally-mediated reflex relies heavily on careful history taking and selected testing (e.g., tilt-test, carotid massage). These steps are important. Despite the fact that neurally-mediated faints are usually relatively benign from a mortality perspective, they are nevertheless only infrequently an isolated event; neurally-mediated syncope tends to recur, and physical injury resulting from falls or accidents, diminished quality-of-life, and possible restriction from employment or avocation are real concerns. Consequently, defining the specific form and developing an effective treatment strategy are crucial. In every case the goal should be to determine the cause of syncope with sufficient confidence to provide patients and family members with a reliable assessment of prognosis, recurrence risk, and treatment options.

  8. The Neural Noisy Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lei; Blunsom, Phil; Dyer, Chris; Grefenstette, Edward; Kocisky, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    We formulate sequence to sequence transduction as a noisy channel decoding problem and use recurrent neural networks to parameterise the source and channel models. Unlike direct models which can suffer from explaining-away effects during training, noisy channel models must produce outputs that explain their inputs, and their component models can be trained with not only paired training samples but also unpaired samples from the marginal output distribution. Using a latent variable to control ...

  9. Neural Based Orthogonal Data Fitting The EXIN Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cirrincione, Giansalvo

    2008-01-01

    Written by three leaders in the field of neural based algorithms, Neural Based Orthogonal Data Fitting proposes several neural networks, all endowed with a complete theory which not only explains their behavior, but also compares them with the existing neural and traditional algorithms. The algorithms are studied from different points of view, including: as a differential geometry problem, as a dynamic problem, as a stochastic problem, and as a numerical problem. All algorithms have also been analyzed on real time problems (large dimensional data matrices) and have shown accurate solutions. Wh

  10. A CREB-Sirt1-Hes1 Circuitry Mediates Neural Stem Cell Response to Glucose Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Fusco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis plays increasingly recognized roles in brain homeostasis and repair and is profoundly affected by energy balance and nutrients. We found that the expression of Hes-1 (hairy and enhancer of split 1 is modulated in neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs by extracellular glucose through the coordinated action of CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein and Sirt-1 (Sirtuin 1, two cellular nutrient sensors. Excess glucose reduced CREB-activated Hes-1 expression and results in impaired cell proliferation. CREB-deficient NSCs expanded poorly in vitro and did not respond to glucose availability. Elevated glucose also promoted Sirt-1-dependent repression of the Hes-1 promoter. Conversely, in low glucose, CREB replaced Sirt-1 on the chromatin associated with the Hes-1 promoter enhancing Hes-1 expression and cell proliferation. Thus, the glucose-regulated antagonism between CREB and Sirt-1 for Hes-1 transcription participates in the metabolic regulation of neurogenesis.

  11. Lithium promotes neural precursor cell proliferation: evidence for the involvement of the non-canonical GSK-3β-NF-AT signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Zhaoxia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lithium, a drug that has long been used to treat bipolar disorder and some other human pathogenesis, has recently been shown to stimulate neural precursor growth. However, the involved mechanism is not clear. Here, we show that lithium induces proliferation but not survival of neural precursor cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that the effect of lithium mainly involved activation of the transcription factor NF-AT and specific induction of a subset of proliferation-related genes. While NF-AT inactivation by specific inhibition of its upstream activator calcineurin antagonized the effect of lithium on the proliferation of neural precursor cells, specific inhibition of the NF-AT inhibitor GSK-3β, similar to lithium treatment, promoted neural precursor cell proliferation. One important function of lithium appeared to increase inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β, leading to GSK-3β suppression and subsequent NF-AT activation. Moreover, lithium-induced proliferation of neural precursor cells was independent of its role in inositol depletion. These findings not only provide mechanistic insights into the clinical effects of lithium, but also suggest an alternative therapeutic strategy for bipolar disorder and other neural diseases by targeting the non-canonical GSK-3β-NF-AT signaling.

  12. Neural Correlates of Stimulus Reportability

    OpenAIRE

    Hulme, Oliver J.; Friston, Karl F.; Zeki, Semir

    2009-01-01

    Most experiments on the “neural correlates of consciousness” employ stimulus reportability as an operational definition of what is consciously perceived. The interpretation of such experiments therefore depends critically on understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability. Using a high volume of fMRI data, we investigated the neural correlates of stimulus reportability using a partial report object detection paradigm. Subjects were presented with a random array of circularly arranged...

  13. Symbolic processing in neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Hava T Siegelmann; Costa,J.Félix

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we show that programming languages can be translated into recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theoretical exciting, but has also some practical implications in the recent efforts to merge symbolic and sub symbolic computation. To be of some use, it should be carried in a context of bounded resources. Herein, we show how to use resource bounds to speed up computations over neural nets, thro...

  14. Secretory pathway antagonism by calicivirus homologues of Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 is restricted to noroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Tyler M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous report that the Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 is an antagonist of the cellular secretory pathway suggests a new aspect of norovirus/host interaction. To explore conservation of function of this highly divergent calicivirus protein, we examined the effects of p22 homologues from four human and two murine noroviruses, and feline calicivirus on the secretory pathway. Findings All human noroviruses examined induced Golgi disruption and inhibited protein secretion, with the genogroup II.4 Houston virus being the most potent antagonist. Genogroup II.6 viruses have a conserved mutation in the mimic of an Endoplasmic Reticulum export signal (MERES motif that is highly conserved in human norovirus homologues of p22 and is critical for secretory pathway antagonism, and these viruses had reduced levels of Golgi disruption and inhibition of protein secretion. p22 homologues from both persistent and nonpersistent strains of murine norovirus induced Golgi disruption, but only mildly inhibited cellular protein secretion. Feline calicivirus p30 did not induce Golgi disruption or inhibit cellular protein secretion. Conclusions These differences confirm a norovirus-specific effect on host cell secretory pathway antagonism by homologues of p22, which may affect viral replication and/or cellular pathogenesis.

  15. MERS-CoV and H5N1 influenza virus antagonize antigen presentation by altering the epigenetic landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Schäfer, Alexandra; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Walters, Kevin B.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Casey, Cameron P.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Weitz, Karl K.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sims, Amy C.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph S.

    2018-01-16

    Convergent evolution dictates that diverse groups of viruses will target both similar and distinct host pathways in order to manipulate the immune response and improve infection. In this study, we sought to leverage this uneven viral antagonism to identify critical host factors that govern disease outcome. Utilizing a systems based approach, we examined differential regulation of IFNγ dependent genes following infection with highly pathogenic viruses including influenza (H5N1-VN1203, H1N1-CA04) and coronaviruses (SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV). Categorizing by function, we observed down regulation of genes associated with antigen presentation following both H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV infection. Further examination revealed global down regulation of antigen presentation genes and was confirmed by proteomics for both H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV infection. Importantly, epigenetic analysis suggested that DNA methylation rather than histone modification plays a crucial role in MERS-CoV mediated antagonism of antigen presentation genes; in contrast, H5N1-VN1203 likely utilizes a combination of epigenetic mechanisms to target antigen presentation. Together, the results indicate a common approach utilized by H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV to modulate antigen presentation and the host adaptive immune response.

  16. Flavivirus Antagonism of Type I Interferon Signaling Reveals Prolidase as a Regulator of IFNAR1 Surface Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubick, Kirk J; Robertson, Shelly J; McNally, Kristin L; Freedman, Brett A; Rasmussen, Angela L; Taylor, R Travis; Walts, Avram D; Tsuruda, Seitaro; Sakai, Mizuki; Ishizuka, Mariko; Boer, Elena F; Foster, Erin C; Chiramel, Abhilash I; Addison, Conrad B; Green, Richard; Kastner, Daniel L; Katze, Michael G; Holland, Steven M; Forlino, Antonella; Freeman, Alexandra F; Boehm, Manfred; Yoshii, Kentaro; Best, Sonja M

    2015-07-08

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β or IFN-I) signals through two receptor subunits, IFNAR1 and IFNAR2, to orchestrate sterile and infectious immunity. Cellular pathways that regulate IFNAR1 are often targeted by viruses to suppress the antiviral effects of IFN-I. Here we report that encephalitic flaviviruses, including tick-borne encephalitis virus and West Nile virus, antagonize IFN-I signaling by inhibiting IFNAR1 surface expression. Loss of IFNAR1 was associated with binding of the viral IFN-I antagonist, NS5, to prolidase (PEPD), a cellular dipeptidase implicated in primary immune deficiencies in humans. Prolidase was required for IFNAR1 maturation and accumulation, activation of IFNβ-stimulated gene induction, and IFN-I-dependent viral control. Human fibroblasts derived from patients with genetic prolidase deficiency exhibited decreased IFNAR1 surface expression and reduced IFNβ-stimulated signaling. Thus, by understanding flavivirus IFN-I antagonism, prolidase is revealed as a central regulator of IFN-I responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fungal Antagonism Assessment of Predatory Species and Producers Metabolites and Their Effectiveness on Haemonchus contortus Infective Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Manoel Eduardo; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; de Gives, Pedro Mendoza; Millán-Orozco, Jair; Uriostegui, Miguel Angel Mercado; Marcelino, Liliana Aguilar; Soares, Filippe Elias de Freitas; Araújo, Andréia Luiza; Vargas, Thainá Souza; Aguiar, Anderson Rocha; Senna, Thiago; Rodrigues, Maria Gorete; Froes, Frederico Vieira; de Araújo, Jackson Victor

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess antagonism of nematophagous fungi and species producers metabolites and their effectiveness on Haemonchus contortus infective larvae (L3). Assay A assesses the synergistic, additive, or antagonistic effect on the production of spores of fungal isolates of the species Duddingtonia flagrans, Clonostachys rosea, Trichoderma esau, and Arthrobotrys musiformis; Assay B evaluates in vitro the effect of intercropping of these isolates grown in 2% water-agar (2% WA) on L3 of H. contortus. D. flagrans (Assay A) produced 5.3 × 10(6) spores and associated with T. esau, A. musiformis, or C. rosea reduced its production by 60.37, 45.28, and 49.05%, respectively. T. esau produced 7.9 × 10(7) conidia and associated with D. flagrans, A. musiformis, or C. rosea reduced its production by 39.24, 82.27, and 96.96%, respectively. A. musiformis produced 7.3 × 10(9) spores and associated with D. flagrans, T. esau, or C. rosea reduced its production by 99.98, 99.99, and 99.98%, respectively. C. rosea produced 7.3 × 10(8) conidia and associated with D. flagrans, T. esau, or A. musiformis reduced its production by 95.20, 96.84, and 93.56%, respectively. These results show evidence of antagonism in the production of spores between predators fungi.

  18. Fungal Antagonism Assessment of Predatory Species and Producers Metabolites and Their Effectiveness on Haemonchus contortus Infective Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Eduardo Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess antagonism of nematophagous fungi and species producers metabolites and their effectiveness on Haemonchus contortus infective larvae (L3. Assay A assesses the synergistic, additive, or antagonistic effect on the production of spores of fungal isolates of the species Duddingtonia flagrans, Clonostachys rosea, Trichoderma esau, and Arthrobotrys musiformis; Assay B evaluates in vitro the effect of intercropping of these isolates grown in 2% water-agar (2% WA on L3 of H. contortus. D. flagrans (Assay A produced 5.3 × 106 spores and associated with T. esau, A. musiformis, or C. rosea reduced its production by 60.37, 45.28, and 49.05%, respectively. T. esau produced 7.9 × 107 conidia and associated with D. flagrans, A. musiformis, or C. rosea reduced its production by 39.24, 82.27, and 96.96%, respectively. A. musiformis produced 7.3 × 109 spores and associated with D. flagrans, T. esau, or C. rosea reduced its production by 99.98, 99.99, and 99.98%, respectively. C. rosea produced 7.3 × 108 conidia and associated with D. flagrans, T. esau, or A. musiformis reduced its production by 95.20, 96.84, and 93.56%, respectively. These results show evidence of antagonism in the production of spores between predators fungi.

  19. System-level study on synergism and antagonism of active ingredients in traditional Chinese medicine by using molecular imprinting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tengfei; Gu, Jiangyong; Zhang, Xinzhuang; Ma, Yimin; Cao, Liang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Chen, Lirong; Xu, Xiaojie; Xiao, Wei

    2014-11-24

    In this work, synergism and antagonism among active ingredients of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) were studied at system-level by using molecular imprinting technology. Reduning Injection (RDNI), a TCM injection, was widely used to relieve fever caused by viral infection diseases in China. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) synthesized by sol-gel method were used to separate caffeic acid (CA) and analogues from RDNI without affecting other compounds. It can realize the preparative scale separation. The inhibitory effects of separated samples of RDNI and sample combinations in prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cells were studied. The combination index was calculated to evaluate the synergism and antagonism. We found that components which had different scaffolds can produce synergistic anti-inflammatory effect inside and outside the RDNI. Components which had similar scaffolds exhibited the antagonistic effect, and the antagonistic effects among components could be reduced to some extent in RDNI system. The results indicated MIPs with the characteristics of specific adsorption ability and large scale preparation can be an effective approach to study the interaction mechanism among active ingredients of complex system such as TCM at system-level. And this work would provide a new idea to study the interactions among active ingredients of TCM.

  20. Src phosphorylation of Alix/AIP1 modulates its interaction with binding partners and antagonizes its activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko H H; Dikic, Ivan; Bögler, Oliver

    2005-02-04

    Alix/AIP1 is an adaptor protein involved in regulating the function of receptor and cytoskeleton-associated tyrosine kinases. Here, we investigated its interaction with and regulation by Src. Tyr319 of Alix bound the isolated Src homology-2 (SH2) domain and was necessary for interaction with intact Src. A proline-rich region in the C terminus of Alix bound the Src SH3 domain, but this interaction was dependent on the release of the Src SH2 domain from its Src internal ligand either by interaction with Alix Tyr319 or by mutation of Src Tyr527. Src phosphorylated Alix at a C-terminal region rich in tyrosines, an activity that was stimulated by the presence of the Alix binding partner SETA/CIN85. Phosphorylation of Alix by Src caused it to translocate from the membrane and cytoskeleton to the cytoplasm and reduced its interaction with binding partners SETA/CIN85, epidermal growth factor receptor, and Pyk2. As a consequence of this, Src antagonized the negative regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase internalization and cell adhesion by Alix. We propose a model whereby Src antagonizes the effects of Alix by phosphorylation of its C terminus, leading to the disruption of interactions with target proteins.

  1. Cardiac Metabolic Deregulation Induced by the Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Inhibitor Sunitinib is rescued by Endothelin Receptor Antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourdon, Joevin; Lager, Franck; Viel, Thomas; Balvay, Daniel; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Bennana, Evangeline; Renault, Gilles; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Dhaun, Neeraj; Tavitian, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    The growing field of cardio-oncology addresses the side effects of cancer treatment on the cardiovascular system. Here, we explored the cardiotoxicity of the antiangiogenic therapy, sunitinib, in the mouse heart from a diagnostic and therapeutic perspective. We showed that sunitinib induces an anaerobic switch of cellular metabolism within the myocardium which is associated with the development of myocardial fibrosis and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction as demonstrated by echocardiography. The capacity of positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose to detect the changes in cardiac metabolism caused by sunitinib was dependent on fasting status and duration of treatment. Pan proteomic analysis in the myocardium showed that sunitinib induced (i) an early metabolic switch with enhanced glycolysis and reduced oxidative phosphorylation, and (ii) a metabolic failure to use glucose as energy substrate, similar to the insulin resistance found in type 2 diabetes. Co-administration of the endothelin receptor antagonist, macitentan, to sunitinib-treated animals prevented both metabolic defects, restored glucose uptake and cardiac function, and prevented myocardial fibrosis. These results support the endothelin system in mediating the cardiotoxic effects of sunitinib and endothelin receptor antagonism as a potential therapeutic approach to prevent cardiotoxicity. Furthermore, metabolic and functional imaging can monitor the cardiotoxic effects and the benefits of endothelin antagonism in a theranostic approach. PMID:28824714

  2. Antagonism between lipid-derived reactive carbonyls and phenolic compounds in the Strecker degradation of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rosa M; Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    The Strecker-type degradation of phenylalanine in the presence of 2-pentanal and phenolic compounds was studied to investigate possible interactions that either promote or inhibit the formation of Strecker aldehydes in food products. Phenylacetaldehyde formation was promoted by 2-pentenal and also by o- and p-diphenols, but not by m-diphenols. This is consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to be converted into reactive carbonyls and produce the Strecker degradation of the amino acid. When 2-pentenal and phenolic compounds were simultaneously present, an antagonism among them was observed. This antagonism is suggested to be a consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to either react with both 2-pentenal and phenylacetaldehyde, or compete with other carbonyl compounds for the amino acids, a function that is determined by their structure. All these results suggest that carbonyl-phenol reactions may be used to modulate flavor formation produced in food products by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prediction of toxicity of zinc and nickel mixtures to Artemia sp. at various salinities: From additivity to antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Évila Pinheiro; de Figuerêdo, Lívia Pitombeira; Pimentel, Marcionília Fernandes; Loureiro, Susana; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras

    2017-08-01

    Few studies have examined the toxicity of metal mixtures to marine organisms exposed to different salinities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute toxicity of zinc and nickel exposures singly and in combination to Artemia sp. under salinities of 10, 17, and 35 psu. The mixture concentrations were determined according to individual toxic units (TUs) to follow a fixed ratio design. Zinc was more toxic than nickel, and both their individual toxicities were higher at lower salinities. These changes in toxicity can be attributed to the Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) rather than to metal speciation. To analyze the mixture effect, the observed data were compared with the expected mixture effects predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model and by deviations for synergistic/antagonistic interactions and dose-level and dose-ratio dependencies. For a salinity of 35 psu, the mixture had no deviations; therefore, the effects were additive. After decreasing the salinity to 17 psu, the toxicity pattern changed to antagonism at low concentrations and synergism at higher equivalent LC50 levels. For the lowest salinity tested (10 psu), antagonism was observed. The speciations of both metals were similar when in a mixture and when isolated, and changes in toxicity patterns are more related to the organism's physiology than metal speciation. Therefore, besides considering chemical interactions in real-world scenarios, where several chemicals can be present, the influence of abiotic factors, such as salinity, should also be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Serotonin Antagonism Improves Platelet Inhibition in Clopidogrel Low-Responders after Coronary Stent Placement: An In Vitro Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerschmied, Daniel; Ahrens, Ingo; Mauler, Maximilian; Brandt, Christoph; Weidner, Stefanie; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Increased residual platelet reactivity remains a burden for coronary artery disease (CAD) patients who received a coronary stent and do not respond sufficiently to treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. We hypothesized that serotonin antagonism reduces high on-treatment platelet reactivity. Whole blood impedance aggregometry was performed with arachidonic acid (AA, 0.5 mM) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 6.5 µM) in addition to different concentrations of serotonin (1–100 µM) in whole blood from 42 CAD patients after coronary stent placement and 10 healthy subjects. Serotonin increased aggregation dose-dependently in CAD patients who responded to clopidogrel treatment: After activation with ADP, aggregation increased from 33.7±1.3% to 40.9±2.0% in the presence of 50 µM serotonin (pclopidogrel low-responders (from 59.9±3.1% to 37.4±3.5, pclopidogrel responders. These results were confirmed with light transmission aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma in a subset of patients. Serotonin hence increased residual platelet reactivity in patients who respond to clopidogrel after coronary stent placement. In clopidogrel low-responders, serotonin receptor antagonism improved platelet inhibition, almost reaching responder levels. This may justify further investigation of triple antiplatelet therapy with anti-serotonergic agents. PMID:22384279

  5. [Artificial neural networks in Neurosciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras Chavarino, Carmen; Salinas Martínez de Lecea, José María

    2011-11-01

    This article shows that artificial neural networks are used for confirming the relationships between physiological and cognitive changes. Specifically, we explore the influence of a decrease of neurotransmitters on the behaviour of old people in recognition tasks. This artificial neural network recognizes learned patterns. When we change the threshold of activation in some units, the artificial neural network simulates the experimental results of old people in recognition tasks. However, the main contributions of this paper are the design of an artificial neural network and its operation inspired by the nervous system and the way the inputs are coded and the process of orthogonalization of patterns.

  6. Neural Correlates of Face Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Xiaokun; Biederman, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Although face detection likely played an essential adaptive role in our evolutionary past and in contemporary social interactions, there have been few rigorous studies investigating its neural correlates...

  7. Edrophonium antagonism of intense mivacurium-induced neuromuscular block in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulatif, M; Al-Ghamdi, A; Al-Sanabary, M; Abdel-Gaffar, M E

    1996-02-01

    .0), 4.8 (2.1) and 5.7 (1.4) min respectively). Ten minutes after development of maximum block, the numbers of patients who recovered adequately (TOF ratio 70% or more) were, respectively, 12 (80%), 8 (53%) and 1 (8%) in groups 1-3. We conclude that edrophonium antagonized intense (no response to TOF stimulation) mivacurium-induced block in children, with significant reduction in the recovery times of T1 and TOF ratio compared with conventional reversal and spontaneous recovery.

  8. Optics in neural computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Michael John

    In all attempts to emulate the considerable powers of the brain, one is struck by both its immense size, parallelism, and complexity. While the fields of neural networks, artificial intelligence, and neuromorphic engineering have all attempted oversimplifications on the considerable complexity, all three can benefit from the inherent scalability and parallelism of optics. This thesis looks at specific aspects of three modes in which optics, and particularly volume holography, can play a part in neural computation. First, holography serves as the basis of highly-parallel correlators, which are the foundation of optical neural networks. The huge input capability of optical neural networks make them most useful for image processing and image recognition and tracking. These tasks benefit from the shift invariance of optical correlators. In this thesis, I analyze the capacity of correlators, and then present several techniques for controlling the amount of shift invariance. Of particular interest is the Fresnel correlator, in which the hologram is displaced from the Fourier plane. In this case, the amount of shift invariance is limited not just by the thickness of the hologram, but by the distance of the hologram from the Fourier plane. Second, volume holography can provide the huge storage capacity and high speed, parallel read-out necessary to support large artificial intelligence systems. However, previous methods for storing data in volume holograms have relied on awkward beam-steering or on as-yet non- existent cheap, wide-bandwidth, tunable laser sources. This thesis presents a new technique, shift multiplexing, which is capable of very high densities, but which has the advantage of a very simple implementation. In shift multiplexing, the reference wave consists of a focused spot a few millimeters in front of the hologram. Multiplexing is achieved by simply translating the hologram a few tens of microns or less. This thesis describes the theory for how shift

  9. Analysis of neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Heiden, Uwe

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is a unified and general treatment of activity in neural networks from a mathematical pOint of view. Possible applications of the theory presented are indica­ ted throughout the text. However, they are not explored in de­ tail for two reasons : first, the universal character of n- ral activity in nearly all animals requires some type of a general approach~ secondly, the mathematical perspicuity would suffer if too many experimental details and empirical peculiarities were interspersed among the mathematical investigation. A guide to many applications is supplied by the references concerning a variety of specific issues. Of course the theory does not aim at covering all individual problems. Moreover there are other approaches to neural network theory (see e.g. Poggio-Torre, 1978) based on the different lev­ els at which the nervous system may be viewed. The theory is a deterministic one reflecting the average be­ havior of neurons or neuron pools. In this respect the essay is writt...

  10. Artificial Neural Networks·

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    differences between biological neural networks (BNNs) of the brain and ANN s. A thorough understanding of ... neurons. Artificial neural models are loosely based on biology since a complete understanding of the .... A learning scheme for updating a neuron's connections (weights) was proposed by Donald Hebb in 1949.

  11. Neural Networks for Optimal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process.......Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process....

  12. The Neural Support Vector Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; van der Ree, Michiel; Embrechts, Mark; Stollenga, Marijn; Meijster, Arnold; Nolte, A; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new machine learning algorithm for regression and dimensionality reduction tasks. The Neural Support Vector Machine (NSVM) is a hybrid learning algorithm consisting of neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The output of the NSVM is given by SVMs that take a

  13. Neural fields theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Graben, Peter; Potthast, Roland; Wright, James

    2014-01-01

    With this book, the editors present the first comprehensive collection in neural field studies, authored by leading scientists in the field - among them are two of the founding-fathers of neural field theory. Up to now, research results in the field have been disseminated across a number of distinct journals from mathematics, computational neuroscience, biophysics, cognitive science and others. Starting with a tutorial for novices in neural field studies, the book comprises chapters on emergent patterns, their phase transitions and evolution, on stochastic approaches, cortical development, cognition, robotics and computation, large-scale numerical simulations, the coupling of neural fields to the electroencephalogram and phase transitions in anesthesia. The intended readership are students and scientists in applied mathematics, theoretical physics, theoretical biology, and computational neuroscience. Neural field theory and its applications have a long-standing tradition in the mathematical and computational ...

  14. The Neural Correlates of Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tiffany A.; Bartholow, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral analyses are a natural choice for understanding the wide-ranging behavioral consequences of racial stereotyping and prejudice. However, neuroimaging and electrophysiological research has recently considered the neural mechanisms that underlie racial categorization and the activation and application of racial stereotypes and prejudice, revealing exciting new insights. Work reviewed here points to the importance of neural structures previously associated with face processing, semantic knowledge activation, evaluation, and self-regulatory behavioral control, allowing for the specification of a neural model of race processing. We show how research on the neural correlates of race can serve to link otherwise disparate lines of evidence on the neural underpinnings of a broad array of social-cognitive phenomena, and consider implications for effecting change in race relations. PMID:19896410

  15. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... examined, and it appears that considering 'normal' neural network models with, say, 500 samples, the problem of over-fitting is neglible, and therefore it is not taken into consideration afterwards. Numerous model types, often met in control applications, are implemented as neural network models...... Kalmann filter) representing state space description. The potentials of neural networks for control of non-linear processes are also examined, focusing on three different groups of control concepts, all considered as generalizations of known linear control concepts to handle also non-linear processes...

  16. Antagonism by supidimide of haloperidol-induced augmentation of (/sup 3/H)-spiperone binding in rat striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennies, H.H.; Hess, V.; Flohe, L.

    1984-01-01

    Rats were treated for two weeks with haloperidol alone or with additional test drugs and the D/sub 2/ receptor density in the striatum was investigated after a drug-free period of five days. The D/sub 2/ receptor system as analysed by (/sup 3/H)-spinerone binding was best characterized by a model with two binding sites of different affinity. Chronic haloperidol treatment substantially augmented the total binding capacity 2-(2-Oxo-3-piperidyl)-1,2-benzisothiazoline-3-one-1,1-dioxide (supidimide), a functional synergist of neuroleptics in acute experiments, surprisingly antagonized the haloperidol-induced receptor augmentation, whereas other CNS depressants (diazepam and phenobarbital) were ineffective.

  17. Baseline characteristics in PRIORITY study: Proteomics and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism for prevention of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofte, Nete

    into high-or low risk groups based on CKD273. Patients in the high risk group are assigned to spironolactone 25 mg once daily or placebo, whereas the low-risk group is followed on standard care. The trial continues until September 2018, following patients for up to 4.5 years. The primary endpoint......Background and aims The urinary proteomics based classifier CKD273 has been shown to retrospectively identify normoalbuminuric diabetic patients who progress to overt kidney disease. In the PRIORITY (Proteomic prediction and Renin angiotensin aldosterone system Inhibition prevention Of early...... diabetic nephRopathy In TYpe 2 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria) trial, the aim is to confirm that CKD273 can predict microalbuminuria prospectively, and to test whether mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism (MRA) delays progression to microalbuminuria. Here we report the association between CKD273...

  18. Hobbes e o antagonismo como o real da política Hobbes and antagonism as the real of politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Rinesi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Por que no estado de natureza hobbesiano os homens lutam entre si? A questão está mal posta, sustenta o autor, após passar em revista interpretações importantes de Hobbes. Se tormos além de buscar as razões dos homens no estado de natureza (essa sombra da sociedade civil e examinarmos o próprio antagonismo penetraremos mais fundo no dominio da política, argumenta ele.Why do men fight each other in the Hobbesian state of nature? The question is badly put, holds the author, after reviewing important interpretations of Hobbes. If we go farther than searching men's reasons in the state of nature (this shadow of civil society and examine antagonism as such we will penetrate deeper in the domain of politics, he argues.

  19. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-08-09

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans.

  20. Non-canonical wnt signals antagonize and canonical wnt signals promote cell proliferation in early kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kyle E; Zhou, Xiaolan; Vize, Peter D

    2011-06-01

    Canonical and non-canonical wnt signals often have opposed roles. In this report, we use developing Xenopus embryos to demonstrate a novel anti-proliferative role for non-canonical wnt signals in the very earliest stages of kidney development. Non-canonical wnt signals were down-regulated using PDZ domain mutants of dishevelled 2 and up-regulated using wild-type vang-like 2, while canonical signals were manipulated using dominant-negative forms of lef1 or treatment with lithium. When non-canonical signals are down-regulated in the developing Xenopus pronephros, cell proliferation rates increased and when canonical signals were shutdown the opposite occurred. Treatment with lithium chloride has a powerful pro-proliferative effect on the forming nephric primordium. Together these data show that in addition to previously documented antagonisms between these distinct wnt signaling pathways, they also have opposing effects on cell division. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Failure of enhancement by labetalol of bronchopulmonary effects of histamine in guinea-pigs: independence of alpha-adrenoceptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, C.; Harf, A.; Macquin-Mavier, I.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of labetalol on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction was studied in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Unlike propranolol (1 mg kg-1), the same dose of labetalol did not enhance histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. To determine whether the absence of enhancement of the respiratory effects of histamine by labetalol was due to its alpha 1-blocking properties or to its partial agonist activity at beta 2-adrenoceptors, the effects of propranolol plus prazosin and of propranolol plus labetalol on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction were examined. In both cases, the bronchoconstrictor effects of histamine were enhanced to the same extent as with propranolol alone. These data support the hypothesis that the non impairment of respiratory mechanics by labetalol is not due to antagonism at alpha-adrenoceptors and may be mediated by its partial agonist activity at beta 2-adrenoceptors. PMID:2886173

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes. The 8.2 Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  3. Psychosocial stress enhances IgE-mediated triphasic cutaneous reaction in mice: Antagonism by Yokukan-san (a Kampo medicine and diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi Tahara

    2001-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate that IgE-mediated triphasic cutaneous reactions were exacerbated by social isolation stress and suggest that Yokukan-san and diazepam antagonize isolation stress-induced cutaneous reactions partly through their sedative action on social isolation stress.

  4. Differences between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and angiotensin II-AT(1) antagonism on angiotensin-mediated responses in human internal mammary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, AA; Oosterga, M; Buikema, H; Mariani, M; Grandjean, JG; van Glist, WH

    The cur-rent study aimed to demonstrate differences between angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and Ang II-AT(1) receptor antagonism on full concentration-contraction responses to Ang I. Contraction responses to increasing concentrations of Ang I (1 nM-1 muM) were evaluated in organ

  5. SIRT1 overexpression antagonizes cellular senescence with activated ERK/S6k1 signaling in human diploid fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    Full Text Available Sir2, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, modulates lifespan in yeasts, worms and flies. The SIRT1, mammalian homologue of Sir2, regulates signaling for favoring survival in stress. But whether SIRT1 has the function to influence cell viability and senescence under non-stressed conditions in human diploid fibroblasts is far from unknown. Our data showed that enforced SIRT1 expression promoted cell proliferation and antagonized cellular senescence with the characteristic features of delayed Senescence-Associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal staining, reduced Senescence-Associated Heterochromatic Foci (SAHF formation and G1 phase arrest, increased cell growth rate and extended cellular lifespan in human fibroblasts, while dominant-negative SIRT1 allele (H363Y did not significantly affect cell growth and senescence but displayed a bit decreased lifespan. Western blot results showed that SIRT1 reduced the expression of p16(INK4A and promoted phosphorylation of Rb. Our data also exposed that overexpression of SIRT1 was accompanied by enhanced activation of ERK and S6K1 signaling. These effects were mimicked in both WI38 cells and 2BS cells by concentration-dependent resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator. It was noted that treatment of SIRT1-.transfected cells with Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, reduced the phosphorylation of S6K1 and the expression of Id1, implying that SIRT1-induced phosphorylation of S6K1 may be partly for the decreased expression of p16(INK4A and promoted phosphorylation of Rb in 2BS. It was also observed that the expression of SIRT1 and phosphorylation of ERK and S6K1 was declined in senescent 2BS. These findings suggested that SIRT1-promoted cell proliferation and antagonized cellular senescence in human diploid fibroblasts may be, in part, via the activation of ERK/ S6K1 signaling.

  6. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Högberg Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2, may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2, a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist ramatroban, and compares the ability of ramatroban and TM30089 to inhibit asthma-like pathology. Methods Affinity for and antagonistic potency of TM30089 on many mouse receptors including thromboxane A2 receptor mTP, CRTH2 receptor, and selected anaphylatoxin and chemokines receptors were determined in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. Results TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other receptors including the related anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors, selected chemokine receptors and the cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 which are all recognized players in allergic diseases. Furthermore, TM30089 and ramatroban, the latter used as a reference herein, similarly inhibited asthma pathology in vivo by reducing peribronchial eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia. Conclusion This is the first report to demonstrate anti-allergic efficacy in vivo of a highly selective small molecule CRTH2 antagonist. Our data suggest that CRTH2 antagonism alone is effective in mouse allergic airway inflammation even to the extent that this mechanism can explain the efficacy of ramatroban.

  7. The Effect of Active Principles of Cilantro and Spirulina Powder on Lead Antagonism to Copper and Chromium in Carassius gibelio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mărioara Nicula

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our work was to highlight the detoxifying potential of the active principles from lyophilized cilantro and spirulina in experimental contamination with lead, to Carassius gibelio, and their effect on lead antagonism to copper and chromium. 120 Prussian carps, weighing 22-25 g each were divided according to the following treatments for 21 days: C group (without treatment, E1 group (75 ppm Pb into water as Pb(NO32x ½H2O, E2 group (75 ppm Pb into water+2% lyophilized cilantro in feed, E3 group (75 ppm Pb into water+2% lyophilized spirulina in feed. At the end of the experimental period, tissue samples (gills, muscles myotome– epaxial, heart, skin and scales, intestine, liver, brain, gonads, kidney were collected after a starving for 12 hours, and fish euthanasia with clove oil. Determination of Cu and Cr concentration in biological samples was performed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer AAS-VARIAN. Pb addition into water in dose of 75 ppm, has resulted in Cu and Cr mobilization from fish tissues. Decreasing of Cu tissue level occurred less intensive in tissues sampled from groups receiving cilantro and spiriulina powder in feed, maximum efficiency in the counteracting the antagonism against Pb showing spirulina on the heart, liver, and kidney. Cr was maintained at relatively low values, although, cilantro powder has induced in some wise the Pb complexing. In contrast, the freeze-dried spirulina brought the tissue level of Cr close to that of the control group or even has determined its more efficient takeover from the feed.

  8. Antagonism of botulinum toxin A-mediated muscle paralysis by 3, 4-diaminopyridine delivered via osmotic minipumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, M; Capacio, B; Deshpande, S S

    2000-10-01

    The ability of 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP) to antagonize muscle paralysis following local injection of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) complex was evaluated in the in situ rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) preparation. The minipumps were implanted 6 h prior to BoNT/A administration and delivered their contents over a 7-day period producing a steady plasma 3,4-DAP concentration of 27-29 microM. In the absence of 3,4-DAP, a local injection of five mouse LD(50) units of BoNT/A led to total paralysis of EDL muscles within 24 h of application. Recovery from paralysis was slow, remaining at <30% of control 14 days after toxin injection. 3,4-DAP delivery by osmotic minipumps antagonized the actions of BoNT/A on neuromuscular transmission. Seven days after the onset of 3,4-DAP infusion, indirectly elicited twitch and tetanic tensions in BoNT/A-injected EDL muscles were 72.4 and 46.9% of control, respectively. In the absence of 3,4-DAP, twitch and tetanic tensions were only 5.4 and 15. 1% of control. The benefits conferred by 3,4-DAP treatment were not maintained after minipumps were removed. Seven days after cessation of 3,4-DAP infusion, twitch and tetanic tensions were not significantly different from those observed in muscles receiving BoNT/A alone. It is concluded that 3,4-DAP may be useful for treatment of BoNT/A-induced muscle paralysis, but sustained delivery of the drug would be required for the entire period of BoNT intoxication to maintain muscle function.

  9. Detection of Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. and antagonism of Trichoderma sp. in soybean under no-tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Mendes Milanesi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed i to quantify the occurrence of Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. in rhizospheric soil, with and without symptoms of Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS in eight soybean genotypes; ii morphologically identify isolates of Fusarium spp. from roots with SDS; iii evaluate the antagonism between Trichoderma spp. and Fusarium spp. isolates from rhizospheric soil and roots from with and without SDS, respectively; and iv characterize through the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of rDNA the isolates of Trichoderma spp. with better performance in the direct confrontation. The sampling of soil and roots was performed in an experimental area located in Cruz Alta, RS, Brazil. In the laboratory, serial dilutions of soil samples, counting of the number of Colony Forming Units (UFCs/g-1 of rhizospheric soil were performed as well as isolation for identification of isolates of Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. and testing of direct confrontation. There were significant differences between the population of Trichoderma spp. in the rhizosphere of plants with and without symptoms of SDS. For the population of Fusarium spp., significant difference was observed only in the rhizosphere of plants without symptoms of SDS. In diseased roots the following species were identified: F. solani, F. avenaceum, F. graminearum, F. oxysporum and F. verticillioides. In the test of direct confrontation, eight isolates of Trichoderma spp. achieved the best performance in the antagonism to Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. from areas with symptoms of SDS had a higher control efficiency in vitro. These isolates showed high similarity to the species of T. koningii agregate.

  10. Naloxone--does over-antagonism matter? Evidence of iatrogenic harm after emergency treatment of heroin/opioid overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Joanne; Strang, John

    2015-10-01

    To analyse drug users' views and experiences of naloxone during emergency resuscitation after illicit opiate overdose to identify (i) any evidence of harm caused by excessive naloxone dosing ('over-antagonism'); and (ii) implications for the medical administration of naloxone within contemporary emergency settings. Re-analysis of a large qualitative data set comprising 70 face-to-face interviews conducted within a few hours of heroin/opioid overdose occurring, observations from hospital settings and a further 130 interviews with illicit opiate users. Data were generated between 1997 and 1999. Emergency departments, drug services and pharmacies in two Scottish cities. Two hundred illicit opiate users: 131 males and 69 females. Participants had limited knowledge of naloxone and its pharmacology, yet described it routinely in negative terms and were critical of its medical administration. In particular, they complained that naloxone induced acute withdrawal symptoms, causing patients to refuse treatment, become aggressive, discharge themselves from hospital and take additional street drugs to counter the naloxone effects. Participants believed that hospital staff should administer naloxone selectively and cautiously, and prescribe counter-naloxone medication if dosing precipitated withdrawals. In contrast, observational data indicated that participants did not always know that they had received naloxone and hospital doctors did not necessarily administer it incautiously. Opiate users in urban Scotland repeatedly report harm caused by naloxone over-antagonism, although this is not evident in observational data. The concept of contemporary legend (a form of folklore that can be based on fact and provides a means of communicating and negotiating anxiety) helps to explain why naloxone has such a feared reputation among opiate users. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. An Optoelectronic Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Mark A. A.; White, Ian H.; Carroll, John E.

    1990-02-01

    We describe and present results of an optoelectronic neural network processing system. The system uses an algorithm based on the Hebbian learning rule to memorise a set of associated vector pairs. Recall occurs by the processing of the input vector with these stored associations in an incoherent optical vector multiplier using optical polarisation rotating liquid crystal spatial light modulators to store the vectors and an optical polarisation shadow casting technique to perform multiplications. Results are detected on a photodiode array and thresholded electronically by a controlling microcomputer. The processor is shown to work in autoassociative and heteroassociative modes with up to 10 stored memory vectors of length 64 (equivalent to 64 neurons) and a cycle time of 50ms. We discuss the limiting factors at work in this system, how they affect its scalability and the general applicability of its principles to other systems.

  12. Neural Darwinism and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anil K; Baars, Bernard J

    2005-03-01

    Neural Darwinism (ND) is a large scale selectionist theory of brain development and function that has been hypothesized to relate to consciousness. According to ND, consciousness is entailed by reentrant interactions among neuronal populations in the thalamocortical system (the 'dynamic core'). These interactions, which permit high-order discriminations among possible core states, confer selective advantages on organisms possessing them by linking current perceptual events to a past history of value-dependent learning. Here, we assess the consistency of ND with 16 widely recognized properties of consciousness, both physiological (for example, consciousness is associated with widespread, relatively fast, low amplitude interactions in the thalamocortical system), and phenomenal (for example, consciousness involves the existence of a private flow of events available only to the experiencing subject). While no theory accounts fully for all of these properties at present, we find that ND and its recent extensions fare well.

  13. Cortical neural prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew B

    2004-01-01

    Control of prostheses using cortical signals is based on three elements: chronic microelectrode arrays, extraction algorithms, and prosthetic effectors. Arrays of microelectrodes are permanently implanted in cerebral cortex. These arrays must record populations of single- and multiunit activity indefinitely. Information containing position and velocity correlates of animate movement needs to be extracted continuously in real time from the recorded activity. Prosthetic arms, the current effectors used in this work, need to have the agility and configuration of natural arms. Demonstrations using closed-loop control show that subjects change their neural activity to improve performance with these devices. Adaptive-learning algorithms that capitalize on these improvements show that this technology has the capability of restoring much of the arm movement lost with immobilizing deficits.

  14. GABAergic effect on resting-state functional connectivity: Dynamics under pharmacological antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Singh, Kavita Kaur D/O Ranjit; Yeow, Ling Yun; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2017-04-01

    Resting state functional connectivity MRI measures synchronous activity among brain regions although the mechanisms governing the temporally coherent BOLD signals remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) levels are correlated with functional connectivity. To understand whether changes in GABA transmission alter functional connectivity, we modulated the GABAergic activity by a GABA A receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Resting and evoked electrophysiology and BOLD signals were measured in isoflurane-anesthetized rats under infusion of low-dose bicuculline or vehicle individually. Both somatosensory BOLD activations and evoked potentials induced by forepaw stimulation were increased significantly under bicuculline compared to vehicle, indicating increased excitability. Gradually elevated resting BOLD correlation within and between the somatosensory and visual cortices, as well as between somatosensory and caudate putamen but not within subcortical areas were found with the infusion of bicuculline. Increased cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the cortical and subcortical areas where the receptor density is high, but it didn't correlate with BOLD connectivity except in the primary somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, resting EEG coherence in the alpha and beta bands exhibited consistent change with the BOLD correlation. The increased cortico-cortical and cortico-striatal connectivity without dependence on the receptor distribution indicate that the functional connectivity may be mediated by long-range projection via the cortical and striatal GABAergic inter-neurons. Our results indicate an important role of the GABAergic system on neural and hemodynamic oscillations, which further supports the neuronal basis of functional connectivity MRI and its correlation with neurotransmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cooperating attackers in neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Lanir N; Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2004-06-01

    A successful attack strategy in neural cryptography is presented. The neural cryptosystem, based on synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning, has been recently shown to be secure under different attack strategies. The success of the advanced attacker presented here, called the "majority-flipping attacker," does not decay with the parameters of the model. This attacker's outstanding success is due to its using a group of attackers which cooperate throughout the synchronization process, unlike any other attack strategy known. An analytical description of this attack is also presented, and fits the results of simulations.

  16. Cooperating attackers in neural cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Lanir N.; Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2004-06-01

    A successful attack strategy in neural cryptography is presented. The neural cryptosystem, based on synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning, has been recently shown to be secure under different attack strategies. The success of the advanced attacker presented here, called the “majority-flipping attacker,” does not decay with the parameters of the model. This attacker’s outstanding success is due to its using a group of attackers which cooperate throughout the synchronization process, unlike any other attack strategy known. An analytical description of this attack is also presented, and fits the results of simulations.

  17. Neural Computations in Binaural Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Hermann

    Binaural hearing helps humans and animals to localize and unmask sounds. Here, binaural computations in the barn owl's auditory system are discussed. Barn owls use the interaural time difference (ITD) for azimuthal sound localization, and they use the interaural level difference (ELD) for elevational sound localization. ITD and ILD and their precursors are processed in separate neural pathways, the time pathway and the intensity pathway, respectively. Representation of ITD involves four main computational steps, while the representation of ILD is accomplished in three steps. In the discussion neural processing in the owl's auditory system is compared with neural computations present in mammals.

  18. Neural Manifolds for the Control of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Juan A; Perich, Matthew G; Miller, Lee E; Solla, Sara A

    2017-06-07

    The analysis of neural dynamics in several brain cortices has consistently uncovered low-dimensional manifolds that capture a significant fraction of neural variability. These neural manifolds are spanned by specific patterns of correlated neural activity, the "neural modes." We discuss a model for neural control of movement in which the time-dependent activation of these neural modes is the generator of motor behavior. This manifold-based view of motor cortex may lead to a better understanding of how the brain controls movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidemiology of neural tube defects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; Abdelbasit, Omar B; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M; Alhussein, Khalid A; Miqdad, Abeer M; Khalil, Mohamed I; Al-Enazy, Naif M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2014-01-01

    To find the prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs), and compare the findings with local and international data, and highlight the important role of folic acid supplementation and flour fortification with folic acid in preventing NTDs...

  20. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... study of the networks themselves. With this end in view the following restrictions have been made: - Amongst numerous neural network structures, only the Multi Layer Perceptron (a feed-forward network) is applied. - Amongst numerous training algorithms, only four algorithms are examined, all...... in a recursive form (sample updating). The simplest is the Back Probagation Error Algorithm, and the most complex is the recursive Prediction Error Method using a Gauss-Newton search direction. - Over-fitting is often considered to be a serious problem when training neural networks. This problem is specifically...

  1. Memristor-based neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andy

    2013-03-01

    The synapse is a crucial element in biological neural networks, but a simple electronic equivalent has been absent. This complicates the development of hardware that imitates biological architectures in the nervous system. Now, the recent progress in the experimental realization of memristive devices has renewed interest in artificial neural networks. The resistance of a memristive system depends on its past states and exactly this functionality can be used to mimic the synaptic connections in a (human) brain. After a short introduction to memristors, we present and explain the relevant mechanisms in a biological neural network, such as long-term potentiation and spike time-dependent plasticity, and determine the minimal requirements for an artificial neural network. We review the implementations of these processes using basic electric circuits and more complex mechanisms that either imitate biological systems or could act as a model system for them.

  2. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    simulated process and compared. The closing chapter describes some practical experiments, where the different control concepts and training methods are tested on the same practical process operating in very noisy environments. All tests confirm that neural networks also have the potential to be trained......The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... study of the networks themselves. With this end in view the following restrictions have been made: - Amongst numerous neural network structures, only the Multi Layer Perceptron (a feed-forward network) is applied. - Amongst numerous training algorithms, only four algorithms are examined, all...

  3. Neural components of altruistic punishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eDu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Altruistic punishment, which occurs when an individual incurs a cost to punish in response to unfairness or a norm violation, may play a role in perpetuating cooperation. The neural correlates underlying costly punishment have only recently begun to be explored. Here we review the current state of research on the neural basis of altruism from the perspectives of costly punishment, emphasizing the importance of characterizing elementary neural processes underlying a decision to punish. In particular, we emphasize three cognitive processes that contribute to the decision to altruistically punish in most scenarios: inequity aversion, cost-benefit calculation, and social reference frame to distinguish self from others. Overall, we argue for the importance of understanding the neural correlates of altruistic punishment with respect to the core computations necessary to achieve a decision to punish.

  4. Complex-Valued Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirose, Akira

    2012-01-01

    This book is the second enlarged and revised edition of the first successful monograph on complex-valued neural networks (CVNNs) published in 2006, which lends itself to graduate and undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, informatics, control engineering, mechanics, robotics, bioengineering, and other relevant fields. In the second edition the recent trends in CVNNs research are included, resulting in e.g. almost a doubled number of references. The parametron invented in 1954 is also referred to with discussion on analogy and disparity. Also various additional arguments on the advantages of the complex-valued neural networks enhancing the difference to real-valued neural networks are given in various sections. The book is useful for those beginning their studies, for instance, in adaptive signal processing for highly functional sensing and imaging, control in unknown and changing environment, robotics inspired by human neural systems, and brain-like information processing, as well as interdisciplina...

  5. CHARGEd with neural crest defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Silke; Bajpai, Ruchi; Borchers, Annette

    2017-10-30

    Neural crest cells are highly migratory pluripotent cells that give rise to diverse derivatives including cartilage, bone, smooth muscle, pigment, and endocrine cells as well as neurons and glia. Abnormalities in neural crest-derived tissues contribute to the etiology of CHARGE syndrome, a complex malformation disorder that encompasses clinical symptoms like coloboma, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies, and deafness. Mutations in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) gene are causative of CHARGE syndrome and loss-of-function data in different model systems have firmly established a role of CHD7 in neural crest development. Here, we will summarize our current understanding of the function of CHD7 in neural crest development and discuss possible links of CHARGE syndrome to other developmental disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Neural components of altruistic punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Emily; Chang, Steve W C

    2015-01-01

    Altruistic punishment, which occurs when an individual incurs a cost to punish in response to unfairness or a norm violation, may play a role in perpetuating cooperation. The neural correlates underlying costly punishment have only recently begun to be explored. Here we review the current state of research on the neural basis of altruism from the perspectives of costly punishment, emphasizing the importance of characterizing elementary neural processes underlying a decision to punish. In particular, we emphasize three cognitive processes that contribute to the decision to altruistically punish in most scenarios: inequity aversion, cost-benefit calculation, and social reference frame to distinguish self from others. Overall, we argue for the importance of understanding the neural correlates of altruistic punishment with respect to the core computations necessary to achieve a decision to punish.

  7. Pansharpening by Convolutional Neural Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masi, Giuseppe; Cozzolino, Davide; Verdoliva, Luisa; Scarpa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A new pansharpening method is proposed, based on convolutional neural networks. We adapt a simple and effective three-layer architecture recently proposed for super-resolution to the pansharpening problem...

  8. What are artificial neural networks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been applied to problems ranging from speech recognition to prediction of protein secondary structure, classification of cancers and gene prediction. How do they work and what might they be good for? Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb......Artificial neural networks have been applied to problems ranging from speech recognition to prediction of protein secondary structure, classification of cancers and gene prediction. How do they work and what might they be good for? Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  9. Indices for Testing Neural Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan D. Victor; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    One of the most critical challenges in systems neuroscience is determining the neural code. A principled framework for addressing this can be found in information theory. With this approach, one can determine whether a proposed code can account for the stimulus-response relationship. Specifically, one can compare the transmitted information between the stimulus and the hypothesized neural code with the transmitted information between the stimulus and the behavioral response. If the former is ...

  10. Biologically Inspired Modular Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Azam, Farooq

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation explores the modular learning in artificial neural networks that mainly driven by the inspiration from the neurobiological basis of the human learning. The presented modularization approaches to the neural network design and learning are inspired by the engineering, complexity, psychological and neurobiological aspects. The main theme of this dissertation is to explore the organization and functioning of the brain to discover new structural and learning ...

  11. Neural-like growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchenko, Vitaliy A.

    2000-03-01

    On the basis of the analysis of scientific ideas reflecting the law in the structure and functioning the biological structures of a brain, and analysis and synthesis of knowledge, developed by various directions in Computer Science, also there were developed the bases of the theory of a new class neural-like growing networks, not having the analogue in world practice. In a base of neural-like growing networks the synthesis of knowledge developed by classical theories - semantic and neural of networks is. The first of them enable to form sense, as objects and connections between them in accordance with construction of the network. With thus each sense gets a separate a component of a network as top, connected to other tops. In common it quite corresponds to structure reflected in a brain, where each obvious concept is presented by certain structure and has designating symbol. Secondly, this network gets increased semantic clearness at the expense owing to formation not only connections between neural by elements, but also themselves of elements as such, i.e. here has a place not simply construction of a network by accommodation sense structures in environment neural of elements, and purely creation of most this environment, as of an equivalent of environment of memory. Thus neural-like growing networks are represented by the convenient apparatus for modeling of mechanisms of teleological thinking, as a fulfillment of certain psychophysiological of functions.

  12. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  13. Ginkgo Biloba Extract Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Mouse Cochlear Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congpin; Wang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    In the organ or Corti, oxidative stress could result in damage to the hearing, and neural stem cells (NSCs) hold great therapeutic potential in treating hearing loss. Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) has been widely shown to exhibit anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in treatments of neural damage and disorder. Using hydrogen peroxide to induced oxidative stress as a model, we investigated the anti-oxidative role of GBE in isolated mouse cochlear NSCs. GBE treatment was found to significantly promote viability of NSCs, by markedly attenuating hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress. In addition, this anti-oxidative function of GBE was also able to prevent mitochondrial depolarization and subsequent apoptosis. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic role of GBE was mediated by antagonizing the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, where GBE could reverse the changes in key intrinsic apoptosis pathway factors including Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3. Our data provided the first report on the beneficial role of GBE in protecting cochlear NSCs, by attenuating oxidative stress triggered intrinsic apoptosis, therefore supporting the potential therapeutic value of GBE in preventing oxidative stress-related hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Spiking modular neural networks: A neural network modeling approach for hydrological processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamban Parasuraman; Amin Elshorbagy; Sean K. Carey

    2006-01-01

    .... In this study, a novel neural network model called the spiking modular neural networks (SMNNs) is proposed. An SMNN consists of an input layer, a spiking layer, and an associator neural network layer...

  15. Influence of neural adaptation on dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Ken

    2017-12-01

    How neural adaptation affects neural information processing (i.e. the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities) is a central question in computational neuroscience. In my previous works, I analytically clarified the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring-type neural network model that is widely used to model the visual cortex, motor cortex, and several other brain regions. The neural dynamics and the equilibrium state in the neural network model corresponded to a Bayesian computation and statistically optimal multiple information integration, respectively, under a biologically inspired condition. These results were revealed in an analytically tractable manner; however, adaptation effects were not considered. Here, I analytically reveal how the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network are influenced by spike-frequency adaptation (SFA). SFA is an adaptation that causes gradual inhibition of neural activity when a sustained stimulus is applied, and the strength of this inhibition depends on neural activities. I reveal that SFA plays three roles: (1) SFA amplifies the influence of external input in neural dynamics; (2) SFA allows the history of the external input to affect neural dynamics; and (3) the equilibrium state corresponds to the statistically optimal multiple information integration independent of the existence of SFA. In addition, the equilibrium state in a ring neural network model corresponds to the statistically optimal integration of multiple information sources under biologically inspired conditions, independent of the existence of SFA.

  16. West Nile Virus NS1 Antagonizes Interferon Beta Production by Targeting RIG-I and MDA5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Lei; Ye, Han-Qing; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Li, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Pei-Yong; Zhang, Bo

    2017-09-15

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes epidemics of encephalitis and viscerotropic disease worldwide. This virus has spread rapidly and has posed a significant public health threat since the outbreak in New York City in 1999. The interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral response represents an important component of virus-host interactions and plays an essential role in regulating viral replication. Previous studies have suggested that multifunctional nonstructural proteins encoded by flaviviruses antagonize the host IFN response via various means in order to establish efficient viral replication. In this study, we demonstrated that the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of WNV antagonizes IFN-β production, most likely through suppression of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) activation. In a dual-luciferase reporter assay, WNV NS1 significantly inhibited the activation of the IFN-β promoter after Sendai virus infection or poly(I·C) treatment. NS1 also suppressed the activation of the IFN-β promoter when it was stimulated by interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)/5D or its upstream molecules in the RLR signaling pathway. Furthermore, NS1 blocked the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 upon stimulation by various inducers. Mechanistically, WNV NS1 targets RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) by interacting with them and subsequently causing their degradation by the proteasome. Furthermore, WNV NS1 inhibits the K63-linked polyubiquitination of RIG-I, thereby inhibiting the activation of downstream sensors in the RLR signaling pathway. Taken together, our results reveal a novel mechanism by which WNV NS1 interferes with the host antiviral response. IMPORTANCE WNV Nile virus (WNV) has received increased attention since its introduction to the United States. However, the pathogenesis of this virus is poorly understood. This study demonstrated that the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of WNV

  17. Motor neuron dysfunction in a mouse model of ALS: gender-dependent effect of P2X7 antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetto, Chiara; Frattaroli, Daniela; Maura, Guido; Marcoli, Manuela

    2013-09-06

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative progressive currently untreatable disease, characterized by selective motor neuron degeneration; the incidence and prevalence of ALS are greater in men than in women. Although some important mechanisms that might contribute to the death of motor neurons have been identified, the mechanisms underlying disease pathophysiology are still uncertain. In particular, the mechanisms underlying the role of gender in ALS and whether treatments should take into account sexual dimorphism remain only partially understood. Recently, the P2X7 receptor for ATP was reported to display neurotoxic potential in motor neuron disorders, and antagonism of the receptor has been suggested to be helpful in these disorders. Studying transgenic mice with superoxide dismutase 1 gene mutations, widely used as model for ALS, may provide a better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and of toxicity towards motor neurons, also possibly helping to understand whether treatments for ALS should take into account sexual dimorphism. The aim of the work was (1) investigating on gender-dependence of disease progression in the standard model for ALS - the transgenic mouse bearing superoxide dismutase 1 gene mutations - and (2) assessing if a P2X7 receptor antagonist treatment should take into account sexual dimorphism. We evaluated if gender affect the disease course, the motor performance, the weight loss and the lifespan in mice overexpressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1. We measured motor impairment, motor strength and coordination by rotarod and grip strength testing. Further, we assessed if a treatment with the P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G - a dye that can cross the blood-brain barrier, has low toxicity, and has exhibited therapeutic effects in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases - impact on the disease progression, in male and female ALS mice. We found that (1) the onset and the disease progression, and the survival

  18. Mixed Beam Murine Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Predicted Dose-Effect Relationships if neither Synergism nor Antagonism Occurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranart, Nopphon; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Cheng, Alden; Handa, Naval; Sachs, Rainer K.

    2016-12-01

    Complex mixed radiation fields exist in interplanetary space, and not much is known about their latent effects on space travelers. In silico synergy analysis default predictions are useful when planning relevant mixed-ion-beam experiments and interpreting their results. These predictions are based on individual dose-effect relationships (IDER) for each component of the mixed-ion beam, assuming no synergy or antagonism. For example, a default hypothesis of simple effect additivity has often been used throughout the study of biology. However, for more than a century pharmacologists interested in mixtures of therapeutic drugs have analyzed conceptual, mathematical and practical questions similar to those that arise when analyzing mixed radiation fields, and have shown that simple effect additivity often gives unreasonable predictions when the IDER are curvilinear. Various alternatives to simple effect additivity proposed in radiobiology, pharmacometrics, toxicology and other fields are also known to have important limitations. In this work, we analyze upcoming murine Harderian gland (HG) tumor prevalence mixed-beam experiments, using customized open-source software and published IDER from past single-ion experiments. The upcoming experiments will use acute irradiation and the mixed beam will include components of high atomic number and energy (HZE). We introduce a new alternative to simple effect additivity, "incremental effect additivity", which is more suitable for the HG analysis and perhaps for other end points. We use incremental effect additivity to calculate default predictions for mixture dose-effect relationships, including 95% confidence intervals. We have drawn three main conclusions from this work. 1. It is important to supplement mixed-beam experiments with single-ion experiments, with matching end point(s), shielding and dose timing. 2. For HG tumorigenesis due to a mixed beam, simple effect additivity and incremental effect additivity sometimes give

  19. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2017-10-01

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  20. TRF2-mediated stabilization of hREST4 is critical for the differentiation and maintenance of neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovando-Roche, Patrick; Yu, Jason S L; Testori, Sarah; Ho, Chloe; Cui, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) is a component of the shelterin complex that is known to bind and protect telomeric DNA, yet the detection of TRF2 in extra-telomeric regions of chromosomes suggests other roles for TRF2 besides telomere protection. Here, we demonstrate that TRF2 plays a critical role in antagonizing the repressive function of neuron-restrictive silencer factor, also known as repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST), during the neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) by enhancing the expression of a truncated REST splice isoform we term human REST4 (hREST4) due to its similarity to rodent REST4. We show that TRF2 is specifically upregulated during hESC neural differentiation concordantly with an increase in the expression of hREST4 and that both proteins are highly expressed in NPCs. Overexpression of TRF2 in hESCs increases hREST4 levels and induces their neural differentiation, whereas TRF2 knockdown in hESCs and NPCs reduces hREST4 expression, hindering their ability to differentiate to the neural lineage. Concurrently, we show that TRF2 directly interacts with the C-terminal of hREST4 through its TRF2 core binding motif [F/Y]xL, protecting hREST4 from ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation and consequently furthering neural induction. Thus, the TRF2-mediated counterbalance between hREST4 and REST is vital for both the generation and maintenance of NPCs, suggesting an important role for TRF2 in both neurogenesis and function of the central nervous system. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Myelin plasticity, neural activity, and traumatic neural injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondiles, Bethany R; Horner, Philip J

    2018-02-01

    The possibility that adult organisms exhibit myelin plasticity has recently become a topic of great interest. Many researchers are exploring the role of myelin growth and adaptation in daily functions such as memory and motor learning. Here we consider evidence for three different potential categories of myelin plasticity: the myelination of previously bare axons, remodeling of existing sheaths, and the removal of a sheath with replacement by a new internode. We also review evidence that points to the importance of neural activity as a mechanism by which oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are cued to differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes, which may potentially be an important component of myelin plasticity. Finally, we discuss demyelination in the context of traumatic neural injury and present an argument for altering neural activity as a potential therapeutic target for remyelination following injury. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 78: 108-122, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Multigradient for Neural Networks for Equalizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulhee Lee

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a new training algorithm, multigradient, has been published for neural networks and it is reported that the multigradient outperforms the backpropagation when neural networks are used as a classifier. When neural networks are used as an equalizer in communications, they can be viewed as a classifier. In this paper, we apply the multigradient algorithm to train the neural networks that are used as equalizers. Experiments show that the neural networks trained using the multigradient noticeably outperforms the neural networks trained by the backpropagation.

  3. Understanding perception through neural "codes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Walter J

    2011-07-01

    A major challenge for cognitive scientists is to deduce and explain the neural mechanisms of the rapid transposition between stimulus energy and recalled memory-between the specific (sensation) and the generic (perception)-in both material and mental aspects. Researchers are attempting three explanations in terms of neural codes. The microscopic code: cellular neurobiologists correlate stimulus properties with the rates and frequencies of trains of action potentials induced by stimuli and carried by topologically organized axons. The mesoscopic code: cognitive scientists formulate symbolic codes in trains of action potentials from feature-detector neurons of phonemes, lines, odorants, vibrations, faces, etc., that object-detector neurons bind into representations of stimuli. The macroscopic code: neurodynamicists extract neural correlates of stimuli and associated behaviors in spatial patterns of oscillatory fields of dendritic activity, which self-organize and evolve on trajectories through high-dimensional brain state space. This multivariate code is expressed in landscapes of chaotic attractors. Unlike other scientific codes, such as DNA and the periodic table, these neural codes have no alphabet or syntax. They are epistemological metaphors that experimentalists need to measure neural activity and engineers need to model brain functions. My aim is to describe the main properties of the macroscopic code and the grand challenge it poses: how do very large patterns of textured synchronized oscillations form in cortex so quickly? © 2010 IEEE

  4. Neural correlates of stimulus reportability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Oliver J; Friston, Karl F; Zeki, Semir

    2009-08-01

    Most experiments on the "neural correlates of consciousness" employ stimulus reportability as an operational definition of what is consciously perceived. The interpretation of such experiments therefore depends critically on understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability. Using a high volume of fMRI data, we investigated the neural correlates of stimulus reportability using a partial report object detection paradigm. Subjects were presented with a random array of circularly arranged disc-stimuli and were cued, after variable delays (following stimulus offset), to report the presence or absence of a disc at the cued location, using variable motor actions. By uncoupling stimulus processing, decision, and motor response, we were able to use signal detection theory to deconstruct the neural basis of stimulus reportability. We show that retinotopically specific responses in the early visual cortex correlate with stimulus processing but not decision or report; a network of parietal/temporal regions correlates with decisions but not stimulus presence, whereas classical motor regions correlate with report. These findings provide a basic framework for understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability without the theoretical burden of presupposing a relationship between reportability and consciousness.

  5. Neural Approaches to Machine Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksander, Igor; Eng., F. R.

    2008-10-01

    `Machine Consciousness', which some years ago might have been suppressed as an inappropriate pursuit, has come out of the closet and is now a legitimate area of research concern. This paper briefly surveys the last few years of worldwide research in this area which divides into rule-based and neural approaches and then reviews the work of the author's laboratory during the last ten years. The paper develops a fresh perspective on this work: it is argued that neural approaches, in this case, digital neural systems, can address phenomenological consciousness. Important clarifications of phenomenology and virtuality which enter this modelling are explained in the early parts of the paper. In neural models, phenomenology is a form of depictive inner representation that has five specific axiomatic features: a sense of self-presence in an external world; a sense of imagination of past experience and fiction; a sense of attention; a capacity for planning; a sense of emotion-based volition that influences planning. It is shown that these five features have separate but integrated support in dynamic neural systems.

  6. Neural recording and modulation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ritchie; Canales, Andres; Anikeeva, Polina

    2017-01-01

    In the mammalian nervous system, billions of neurons connected by quadrillions of synapses exchange electrical, chemical and mechanical signals. Disruptions to this network manifest as neurological or psychiatric conditions. Despite decades of neuroscience research, our ability to treat or even to understand these conditions is limited by the capability of tools to probe the signalling complexity of the nervous system. Although orders of magnitude smaller and computationally faster than neurons, conventional substrate-bound electronics do not recapitulate the chemical and mechanical properties of neural tissue. This mismatch results in a foreign-body response and the encapsulation of devices by glial scars, suggesting that the design of an interface between the nervous system and a synthetic sensor requires additional materials innovation. Advances in genetic tools for manipulating neural activity have fuelled the demand for devices that are capable of simultaneously recording and controlling individual neurons at unprecedented scales. Recently, flexible organic electronics and bio- and nanomaterials have been developed for multifunctional and minimally invasive probes for long-term interaction with the nervous system. In this Review, we discuss the design lessons from the quarter-century-old field of neural engineering, highlight recent materials-driven progress in neural probes and look at emergent directions inspired by the principles of neural transduction.

  7. Seeding neural progenitor cells on silicon-based neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Erdrin; Gobbel, Glenn T; Cui, Xinyan Tracy

    2010-09-01

    Chronically implanted neural electrode arrays have the potential to be used as neural prostheses in patients with various neurological disorders. While these electrodes perform well in acute recordings, they often fail to function reliably in clinically relevant chronic settings because of glial encapsulation and the loss of neurons. Surface modification of these implants may provide a means of improving their biocompatibility and integration within host brain tissue. The authors proposed a method of improving the brain-implant interface by seeding the implant's surface with a layer of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from adult murine subependyma. Neural progenitor cells may reduce the foreign body reaction by presenting a tissue-friendly surface and repair implant-induced injury and inflammation by releasing neurotrophic factors. In this study, the authors evaluated the growth and differentiation of NPCs on laminin-immobilized probe surfaces and explored the potential impact on transplant survival of these cells. Laminin protein was successfully immobilized on the silicon surface via covalent binding using silane chemistry. The growth, adhesion, and differentiation of NPCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) on laminin-modified silicon surfaces were characterized in vitro by using immunocytochemical techniques. Shear forces were applied to NPC cultures in growth medium to evaluate their shearing properties. In addition, neural probes seeded with GFP-labeled NPCs cultured in growth medium for 14 days were implanted in murine cortex. The authors assessed the adhesion properties of these cells during implantation conditions. Moreover, the tissue response around NPC-seeded implants was observed after 1 and 7 days postimplantation. Significantly improved NPC attachment and growth was found on the laminin-immobilized surface compared with an unmodified control before and after shear force application. The NPCs grown on the laminin-immobilized surface

  8. Chronic endurance exercise antagonizes the cardiac UCP2 and UCP3 protein up-regulation induced by nandrolone decanoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Gholamreza; Javan, Mohammad; Khalili, Azadeh; Safari, Fatemeh; Shokri, Saeed; Hajizadeh, Sohrab

    2017-11-27

    Several lines of evidence revealed that chronic treatment of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) is accompanied with some cardiovascular side effects and in addition they also negatively mask the beneficial effects of exercise training on cardiac performance. The present study examined whether the nandrolone decanoate (ND)-induced cardiac effects were mediated by changing the cardiac uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) and 3 (UCP3) expression. Five groups of male wistar-albino rats including sedentary control (SC), sedentary vehicle (SV), sedentary nandrolone decanoate (SND), exercise control (EC), and exercise nandrolone decanoate (END) were used. ND was injected (10 mg/kg/week, intramuscular) to the animals in the SND and END groups and endurance exercise training was performed on a treadmill five times per week. The protein expressions of cardiac UCP2 and UCP3 have significantly increased in both the SND and EC groups compared to the SC ones. In contrast to UCP3, no significant differences were found between UCP2 protein expressions of the END and SC groups. Compared with the SND group, the exercise training significantly decreased the UCP2 and UCP3 protein expressions in the END group. The study has indicated that endurance exercise in combination with ND can result in that the exercise effectively antagonizes the effects of ND treatment on UCP2 and UCP3 up-regulation.

  9. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  10. Orchestrated Action of PP2A Antagonizes Atg13 Phosphorylation and Promotes Autophagy after the Inactivation of TORC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akter Mst Yeasmin

    Full Text Available Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1 phosphorylates autophagy-related Atg13 and represses autophagy under nutrient-rich conditions. However, when TORC1 becomes inactive upon nutrient depletion or treatment with the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, Atg13 dephosphorylation occurs rapidly, and autophagy is induced. At present, the phosphatases involved in Atg13 dephosphorylation remain unknown. Here, we show that two protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A phosphatases, PP2A-Cdc55 and PP2A-Rts1, which are activated by inactivation of TORC1, are required for sufficient Atg13 dephosphorylation and autophagy induction after TORC1 inactivation in budding yeast. After rapamycin treatment, dephosphorylation of Atg13, activation of Atg1 kinase, pre-autophagosomal structure (PAS formation and autophagy induction are all impaired in PP2A-deleted cells. Conversely, overexpression of non-phosphorylatable Atg13 suppressed defects in autophagy in PP2A mutant. This study revealed that the orchestrated action of PP2A antagonizes Atg13 phosphorylation and promotes autophagy after the inactivation of TORC1.

  11. Effect of hypocarbia and hypercarbia on the antagonism of pancuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade with neostigmine in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtavuori, K; Salmenperä, M; Tammisto, T

    1982-01-01

    The effects of variations in carbon dioxide concentration on the antagonism of pancuronium-induced neuromuscular block by neostigmine were studied in 21 patients: normocarbia (PE'CO2 5.4%, PaCO2 4.93 kPa, n = 7), hypocarbia (PE'CO2 3.6%, PaCO2 3.30 kPa, n = 7) and hypercarbia (PE'CO2 7.5%, PaCO2 7.13 kPa, n = 7). Mechanical and electromyographic responses to ulnar nerve stimulation (0.1 Hz and 2 Hz) were recorded. A 90% block during nitrous oxide in oxygen anaesthesia was maintained by incremental single injections of pancuronium and reversed with neostigmine 0.35 mg kg-1 with atropine 0.0175 mg kg-1. The recovery of twitch tension up to 50% was similar in all groups but thereafter slower in the hypercarbia group. The recovery times from 25% to 75% twitch tension correlated with PaCO2 (r = 0.55, P less than 0.05). A residual block of about 10% was seen in hypercarbic patients. However, the recovery of e.m.g. amplitude and train-of-four ratios was similar in all groups. Thus, the impaired recovery of twitch tension seems to be the result of depressed contractility rather than failure of neuromuscular transmission.

  12. Sirt1 Regulates DNA Methylation and Differentiation Potential of Embryonic Stem Cells by Antagonizing Dnmt3l

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    Jinbeom Heo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC abnormalities in genome methylation hamper the utility of their therapeutic derivatives; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD-dependent deacetylase, Sirt1, selectively prevents abnormal DNA methylation of some developmental genes in murine ESCs by antagonizing Dnmt3l. Transcriptome and DNA methylome analyses demonstrated that Sirt1-null (Sirt1−/− ESCs repress expression of a subset of imprinted and germline genes concomitant with increased DNA methylation of regulatory elements. Dnmt3l was highly expressed in Sirt1−/− ESCs, and knockdown partially rescued abnormal DNA methylation of the Sirt1 target genes. The Sirt1 protein suppressed transcription of Dnmt3l and physically interacted with the Dnmt3l protein, deacetylating and destabilizing Dnmt3l protein. Sirt1 deficiency delayed neurogenesis and spermatogenesis. These differentiation delays were significantly or partially abolished by reintroduction of Sirt1 cDNA or Dnmt3l knockdown. This study sheds light on mechanisms that restrain DNA methylation of developmentally vital genes operating in ESCs.

  13. Agouti antagonism of melanocortin binding and action in the B16F10 murine melanoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, S G; Harris, C O; Ittoop, O R; Nichols, J S; Parks, D J; Truesdale, A T; Wilkison, W O

    1995-08-22

    Several dominant mutations at the murine agouti locus result in the expression of a number of phenotypic changes, including a predominantly yellow coat color, obesity, and hyperinsulinemia. The mutants exhibit ectopic overexpression of normal agouti protein, suggesting that agouti regulates coat coloration by direct antagonism of the alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor. We have tested this hypothesis by examining agouti inhibition of both melanocortin-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and the binding of a radioactive melanocortin analog in the murine B16F10 melanoma cell line. Inhibition of melanocortin-induced cyclic nucleotide accumulation did not require preincubation of the cells with agouti and was independent of the agonist used. Furthermore, inhibition of both agonist binding to and activation of melanocortin receptor could be described by a simple competitive model with similar inhibition constants of 1.9 and 0.9 nM, respectively. The mutually exclusive binding of agouti and melanocortin was verified by cross-linking experiments using a radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analog. Competitive inhibition of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone binding can account for the effects of agouti on coat coloration and suggests the possibility that the other phenotypic changes observed on agouti overexpression may be due to direct action of agouti at a novel melanocortin receptor(s).

  14. Genetic suppression reveals DNA repair-independent antagonism between BRCA1 and COBRA1 in mammary gland development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sreejith J.; Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Jahid, Md Jamiul; Wang, Yao; Garza, Paula; April, Craig; Salathia, Neeraj; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Alenazi, Fahad S.; Ruan, Jianhua; Fan, Jian-Bing; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Jin, Victor X.; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is well known for its function in double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair. While BRCA1 is also implicated in transcriptional regulation, the physiological significance remains unclear. COBRA1 (also known as NELF-B) is a BRCA1-binding protein that regulates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) pausing and transcription elongation. Here we interrogate functional interaction between BRCA1 and COBRA1 during mouse mammary gland development. Tissue-specific deletion of Cobra1 reduces mammary epithelial compartments and blocks ductal morphogenesis, alveologenesis and lactogenesis, demonstrating a pivotal role of COBRA1 in adult tissue development. Remarkably, these developmental deficiencies due to Cobra1 knockout are largely rescued by additional loss of full-length Brca1. Furthermore, Brca1/Cobra1 double knockout restores developmental transcription at puberty, alters luminal epithelial homoeostasis, yet remains deficient in homologous recombination-based DSB repair. Thus our genetic suppression analysis uncovers a previously unappreciated, DNA repair-independent function of BRCA1 in antagonizing COBRA1-dependent transcription programme during mammary gland development. PMID:26941120

  15. Mapping the fitness landscape of gene expression uncovers the cause of antagonism and sign epistasis between adaptive mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hung Chou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available How do adapting populations navigate the tensions between the costs of gene expression and the benefits of gene products to optimize the levels of many genes at once? Here we combined independently-arising beneficial mutations that altered enzyme levels in the central metabolism of Methylobacterium extorquens to uncover the fitness landscape defined by gene expression levels. We found strong antagonism and sign epistasis between these beneficial mutations. Mutations with the largest individual benefit interacted the most antagonistically with other mutations, a trend we also uncovered through analyses of datasets from other model systems. However, these beneficial mutations interacted multiplicatively (i.e., no epistasis at the level of enzyme expression. By generating a model that predicts fitness from enzyme levels we could explain the observed sign epistasis as a result of overshooting the optimum defined by a balance between enzyme catalysis benefits and fitness costs. Knowledge of the phenotypic landscape also illuminated that, although the fitness peak was phenotypically far from the ancestral state, it was not genetically distant. Single beneficial mutations jumped straight toward the global optimum rather than being constrained to change the expression phenotypes in the correlated fashion expected by the genetic architecture. Given that adaptation in nature often results from optimizing gene expression, these conclusions can be widely applicable to other organisms and selective conditions. Poor interactions between individually beneficial alleles affecting gene expression may thus compromise the benefit of sex during adaptation and promote genetic differentiation.

  16. Mapping the fitness landscape of gene expression uncovers the cause of antagonism and sign epistasis between adaptive mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hsin-Hung; Delaney, Nigel F; Draghi, Jeremy A; Marx, Christopher J

    2014-02-01

    How do adapting populations navigate the tensions between the costs of gene expression and the benefits of gene products to optimize the levels of many genes at once? Here we combined independently-arising beneficial mutations that altered enzyme levels in the central metabolism of Methylobacterium extorquens to uncover the fitness landscape defined by gene expression levels. We found strong antagonism and sign epistasis between these beneficial mutations. Mutations with the largest individual benefit interacted the most antagonistically with other mutations, a trend we also uncovered through analyses of datasets from other model systems. However, these beneficial mutations interacted multiplicatively (i.e., no epistasis) at the level of enzyme expression. By generating a model that predicts fitness from enzyme levels we could explain the observed sign epistasis as a result of overshooting the optimum defined by a balance between enzyme catalysis benefits and fitness costs. Knowledge of the phenotypic landscape also illuminated that, although the fitness peak was phenotypically far from the ancestral state, it was not genetically distant. Single beneficial mutations jumped straight toward the global optimum rather than being constrained to change the expression phenotypes in the correlated fashion expected by the genetic architecture. Given that adaptation in nature often results from optimizing gene expression, these conclusions can be widely applicable to other organisms and selective conditions. Poor interactions between individually beneficial alleles affecting gene expression may thus compromise the benefit of sex during adaptation and promote genetic differentiation.

  17. Biological role of Trichoderma harzianum-derived platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on stress response and antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions.

  18. The RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin antagonizes gypsy chromatin insulator function in a tissue-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew R; Matzat, Leah H; Dale, Ryan K; Lim, Su Jun; Lei, Elissa P

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA-protein complexes that are situated throughout the genome that are proposed to contribute to higher-order organization and demarcation into distinct transcriptional domains. Mounting evidence in different species implicates RNA and RNA-binding proteins as regulators of chromatin insulator activities. Here, we identify the Drosophila hnRNP M homolog Rumpelstiltskin (Rump) as an antagonist of gypsy chromatin insulator enhancer-blocking and barrier activities. Despite ubiquitous expression of Rump, decreasing Rump levels leads to improvement of barrier activity only in tissues outside of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, rump mutants restore insulator body localization in an insulator mutant background only in non-CNS tissues. Rump associates physically with core gypsy insulator proteins, and chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing analysis of Rump demonstrates extensive colocalization with a subset of insulator sites across the genome. The genome-wide binding profile and tissue specificity of Rump contrast with that of Shep, a recently identified RNA-binding protein that antagonizes gypsy insulator activity primarily in the CNS. Our findings indicate parallel roles for RNA-binding proteins in mediating tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator activity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Tamoxifen antagonizes the effects of ovarian hormones to induce anxiety and depression-like behavior in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Azizi-Malekabadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tamoxifen (TAM on anxiety and depression-like behavior in ovariectomized (OVX and naïve female rats were investigated. The animals were divided into Sham-TAM, OVX-TAM, Sham and OVX groups. Tamoxifen (1 mg/kg was administered for 4 weeks. In the forced swimming test, the immobility times in the OVX and Sham-TAM groups were higher than in the Sham group. In the open field, the numbers of central crossings in the OVX and Sham-TAM groups were lower than the number in the Sham group, and the number of peripheral crossings in the OVX group was lower than the number in the Sham group. In the elevated plus maze, the numbers of entries to the open arm among the animals in the Sham-TAM and OVX groups were lower than the number in the Sham group, while the number of entries to the open arm in the OVX-TAM group was higher than the number in the OVX group. It was shown that deletion of ovarian hormones induced anxiety and depression-like behavior. Administration of tamoxifen in naïve rats led to anxiety and depression-like behavior that was comparable with the effects of ovarian hormone deletion. It can be suggested that tamoxifen antagonizes the effects of ovarian hormones. It also seems that tamoxifen has anxiolytic effects on ovariectomized rats.

  20. The RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin antagonizes gypsy chromatin insulator function in a tissue-specific manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew R.; Matzat, Leah H.; Dale, Ryan K.; Lim, Su Jun; Lei, Elissa P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin insulators are DNA–protein complexes that are situated throughout the genome that are proposed to contribute to higher-order organization and demarcation into distinct transcriptional domains. Mounting evidence in different species implicates RNA and RNA-binding proteins as regulators of chromatin insulator activities. Here, we identify the Drosophila hnRNP M homolog Rumpelstiltskin (Rump) as an antagonist of gypsy chromatin insulator enhancer-blocking and barrier activities. Despite ubiquitous expression of Rump, decreasing Rump levels leads to improvement of barrier activity only in tissues outside of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, rump mutants restore insulator body localization in an insulator mutant background only in non-CNS tissues. Rump associates physically with core gypsy insulator proteins, and chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing analysis of Rump demonstrates extensive colocalization with a subset of insulator sites across the genome. The genome-wide binding profile and tissue specificity of Rump contrast with that of Shep, a recently identified RNA-binding protein that antagonizes gypsy insulator activity primarily in the CNS. Our findings indicate parallel roles for RNA-binding proteins in mediating tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator activity. PMID:24706949

  1. ACE-inhibition plus mineralocorticoid antagonism versus ACE-inhibition alone in patients with anterior myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, P; Cannizzaro, S; Scandurra, A; Giubilato, A; Scalzo, S; Paterna, S

    2001-07-01

    Aldosterone exerts pro-fibrotic effects, acting via mineralo-corticoid reeptors in cardiovascular tissues. Aldosterone antagonism in combination with ACE inhibition may better protect against untoward effects of aldosterone than ACE inhibition alone. In a double blind, randomised study the tolerability and efficacy of canreonate (25 mg/day) plus captopril versus captopril alone were evaluated in 187 patients with an acute anterior myocardial infarction (MI) and a serum creatinine concentration function and incidence of surgical interventions and angioplasty were comparable. Overall, creatinine, blood urea and serum K did not show significant differences between groups. However, in 9 patients in group A increases in serum K >5.5 mmol/dL and creatinine >2.0 mg/L were observed after 10 days of treatment. At 90 days, the mitral E/A ratio was higher (p = 0.001) and LV end systolic volume smaller (p = 0.021) inpatients treated with canreonate than in those receiving placebo. No further side effects were observed during the study period. Our data suggest that the combination of captopril plus canreonate is well tolerated following an acute myocardial infarction and has a beneficial effect on diastolic and systolic LV parameters and may decrease post-MI remodelling.

  2. Lactobacilli antagonize the growth, motility, and adherence of Brachyspira pilosicoli: a potential intervention against avian intestinal spirochetosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mappley, Luke J; Tchórzewska, Monika A; Cooley, William A; Woodward, Martin J; La Ragione, Roberto M

    2011-08-01

    Avian intestinal spirochetosis (AIS) results from the colonization of the ceca and colorectum of poultry by pathogenic Brachyspira species. The number of cases of AIS has increased since the 2006 European Union ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters, which, together with emerging antimicrobial resistance in Brachyspira, has driven renewed interest in alternative intervention strategies. Probiotics have been reported as protecting livestock against infection with common enteric pathogens, and here we investigate which aspects of the biology of Brachyspira they antagonize in order to identify possible interventions against AIS. The cell-free supernatants (CFS) of two Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus reuteri LM1 and Lactobacillus salivarius LM2, suppressed the growth of Brachyspira pilosicoli B2904 in a pH-dependent manner. In in vitro adherence and invasion assays with HT29-16E three-dimensional (3D) cells and in a novel avian cecal in vitro organ culture (IVOC) model, the adherence and invasion of B. pilosicoli in epithelial cells were reduced significantly by the presence of lactobacilli (P < 0.001). In addition, live and heat-inactivated lactobacilli inhibited the motility of B. pilosicoli, and electron microscopic observations indicated that contact between the lactobacilli and Brachyspira was crucial in inhibiting both adherence and motility. These data suggest that motility is essential for B. pilosicoli to adhere to and invade the gut epithelium and that any interference of motility may be a useful tool for the development of control strategies.

  3. Lactobacilli Antagonize the Growth, Motility, and Adherence of Brachyspira pilosicoli: a Potential Intervention against Avian Intestinal Spirochetosis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mappley, Luke J.; Tchórzewska, Monika A.; Cooley, William A.; Woodward, Martin J.; La Ragione, Roberto M.

    2011-01-01

    Avian intestinal spirochetosis (AIS) results from the colonization of the ceca and colorectum of poultry by pathogenic Brachyspira species. The number of cases of AIS has increased since the 2006 European Union ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters, which, together with emerging antimicrobial resistance in Brachyspira, has driven renewed interest in alternative intervention strategies. Probiotics have been reported as protecting livestock against infection with common enteric pathogens, and here we investigate which aspects of the biology of Brachyspira they antagonize in order to identify possible interventions against AIS. The cell-free supernatants (CFS) of two Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus reuteri LM1 and Lactobacillus salivarius LM2, suppressed the growth of Brachyspira pilosicoli B2904 in a pH-dependent manner. In in vitro adherence and invasion assays with HT29-16E three-dimensional (3D) cells and in a novel avian cecal in vitro organ culture (IVOC) model, the adherence and invasion of B. pilosicoli in epithelial cells were reduced significantly by the presence of lactobacilli (P < 0.001). In addition, live and heat-inactivated lactobacilli inhibited the motility of B. pilosicoli, and electron microscopic observations indicated that contact between the lactobacilli and Brachyspira was crucial in inhibiting both adherence and motility. These data suggest that motility is essential for B. pilosicoli to adhere to and invade the gut epithelium and that any interference of motility may be a useful tool for the development of control strategies. PMID:21666022

  4. TNF-α antagonism with etanercept enhances penile NOS expression, cavernosal reactivity, and testosterone levels in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş Şahin, Tuğçe; Yazir, Yusufhan; Utkan, Tijen; Gacar, Gulcin; Furat Rençber, Selenay; Gocmez, Semil Selcen

    2018-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been reported to be associated with inflammation. This study investigated the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor etanercept on penile neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expressions, testosterone concentrations, neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxations of corpus cavernosum (CC), and circulating and cavernosal levels of inflammatory markers in aged rats. Animals were separated into control, aged, and etanercept-treated aged groups. Aged rats displayed significantly increased serum and cavernosal TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) levels, and decreased penile nNOS and eNOS expressions and serum testosterone levels compared with controls. In etanercept-treated aged group, NOS expressions were similar to that of the control group. The circulating and cavernosal concentrations of TNF-α, CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1, and testosterone were also normalized by etanercept. Neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxant responses significantly decreased in aged rats and etanercept treatment markedly improved these relaxation responses. Our findings indicate that aging decreases penile NOS expression, neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxations of CC, and also suppresses serum testosterone levels by inducing inflammatory response that may contribute to the development of ED. TNF-α antagonism may be a novel strategy to treat aging-associated ED.

  5. Baicalein antagonizes rotenone-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells related to Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ju-Xian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two active compounds, baicalein and its glycoside baicalin were found in the dried root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, and reported to be neuroprotective in vitro and in vivo. This study aims to evaluate the protective effects of baicalein on the rotenone-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells related to parkinsonism. Methods Cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by MTT assay. The degree of nuclear apoptosis was evaluated with a fluorescent DNA-binding probe Hoechst 33258. The production of reactive oxidative species (ROS and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm were determined by fluorescent staining with DCFH-DA and Rhodanmine 123, respectively. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was determined by the Western blots. Results Baicalein significantly increased viability and decreased rotenone-induced death of SH-SY5Y cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pre- and subsequent co-treatment with baicalein preserved the cell morphology and attenuated the nuclear apoptotic characteristics triggered by rotenone. Baicalein antagonized rotenone-induced overproduction of ROS, loss of ΔΨm, the increased expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 and the decreased expression of Bcl-2. Conclusion The antioxidative effect, mitochondrial protection and modulation of anti-and pro-apoptotic proteins are related to the neuroprotective effects of baicalein against rotenone induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells.

  6. Potential antagonism of some Trichoderma strains isolated from Moroccan soil against three phytopathogenic fungi of great economic importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa MOKHTARI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 17 Trichoderma strains were isolated from different soils (crop fields and Argan forests in Morocco. Purified monospore cultures were identified using molecular methods and tested for their potential antagonism against three phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxyxporum, verticillium dahlia and rhizoctonia solani. After DNA extraction, translation elongation factor (tef1 was amplified in extracts of 17 strains, sequenced and compared with their ex-types. As a result, three species were identified among the strains, which clustered in two different subclades of Trichoderma: the species T. afroharzianum, and T. guizhouense belong to the Harzianum clade, while T. longibrachiatum belongs to the Longibrachiatum clade. Investigation of potential antagonistic effects of these strains against the soil-borne phytopathogens F. oxysporum, R. solani and V. dahliae was conducted in a dual culture plate assay, using 17 promising Trichoderma strains that have been selected based on a polymerase chain reaction (PCR screening approach. In vitro, Trichoderma isolates showed effective antagonistic performance by decreasing soil borne pathogens mycelium radial growth. Trichoderma afroharzianum showed the highest Percentage of Radial Inhibition Growth (PRIG %. The highest PRIG% = 98% was for 8A2.3 isolate against R. solani and the lowest PRIG%= 67% for T9i10 against F. oxysporum. On the other hand, T9i12, which is T. reesei species, led to a high radial inhibition of pathogens’ mycelium.

  7. Kinematic and dynamic gait compensations in a rat model of lumbar radiculopathy and the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kyle D; Shamji, Mohammed F; Mata, Brian A; Gabr, Mostafa A; Sinclair, S Michael; Schmitt, Daniel O; Richardson, William J; Setton, Lori A

    2011-08-26

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) has received significant attention as a mediator of lumbar radiculopathy, with interest in TNF antagonism to treat radiculopathy. Prior studies have demonstrated that TNF antagonists can attenuate heightened nociception resulting from lumbar radiculopathy in the preclinical model. Less is known about the potential impact of TNF antagonism on gait compensations, despite being of clinical relevance. In this study, we expand on previous descriptions of gait compensations resulting from lumbar radiculopathy in the rat and describe the ability of local TNF antagonism to prevent the development of gait compensations, altered weight bearing, and heightened nociception. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated for mechanical sensitivity, weight-bearing, and gait pre- and post-operatively. For surgery, tail nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue was collected and the right L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was exposed (Day 0). In sham animals, NP tissue was discarded (n = 6); for experimental animals, autologous NP was placed on the DRG with or without 20 μg of soluble TNF receptor type II (sTNFRII, n = 6 per group). Spatiotemporal gait characteristics (open arena) and mechanical sensitivity (von Frey filaments) were assessed on post-operative Day 5; gait dynamics (force plate arena) and weight-bearing (incapacitance meter) were assessed on post-operative Day 6. High-speed gait characterization revealed animals with NP alone had a 5% decrease in stance time on their affected limbs on Day 5 (P ≤0.032). Ground reaction force analysis on Day 6 aligned with temporal changes observed on Day 5, with vertical impulse reduced in the affected limb of animals with NP alone (area under the vertical force-time curve, P lumbar radiculopathy. Furthermore, TNF antagonism prevented the development of gait compensations subsequent to lumbar radiculopathy in our model.

  8. Differentiated effects of the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine on sleep architecture: Part 2, pharmacological interactions in rodents suggest a role of serotonin-3 receptor antagonism

    OpenAIRE

    Leiser, Steven C; Iglesias-Bregna, Deborah; Westrich, Ligia; Pehrson, Alan L; Sanchez, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants often disrupt sleep. Vortioxetine, a multimodal antidepressant acting through serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) inhibition, 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonism, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonism, and 5-HT1A receptor agonism, had fewer incidences of sleep-related adverse events reported in depressed patients. In the accompanying paper a polysomnographic electroencephalography (sleep-EEG) study of vortioxetine and paroxetine in healthy subjects indicated that at low/inte...

  9. Chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone release prolactin through dopamine antagonism at low concentrations but paradoxically inhibit prolactin release at high concentrations.

    OpenAIRE

    Besser, G M; Delitala, G; Grossman, A; Stubbs, W A; Yeo, T

    1980-01-01

    1. The effects of chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone on the release of prolactin from perfused columns of dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells were studied. 2. Chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone antagonized the dopamine-mediated inhibition of prolactin release at low concentrations. 3. Each dopamine antagonist displaced the dose-response curve for dopamine-induced suppression of prolactin release to the right in a parallel manner. 4. At high...

  10. Cytokinin Antagonizes Abscisic Acid-Mediated Inhibition of Cotyledon Greening by Promoting the Degradation of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 Protein in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chunmei; Wang, Xingchun; Feng, Jian; Hong, Sulei; Liang, Yan; Ren, Bo; Zuo, Jianru

    2014-01-01

    In higher plants, seed germination is followed by postgerminative growth. One of the key developmental events during postgerminative growth is cotyledon greening, which enables a seedling to establish photosynthetic capacity. The plant phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role by inhibiting seed germination and postgerminative growth in response to dynamically changing internal and environmental cues. It has been shown that ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, is an important factor in the regulation of the ABA-mediated inhibitory effect on seed germination and postgerminative growth. Conversely, the phytohormone cytokinin has been proposed to promote seed germination by antagonizing the ABA-mediated inhibitory effect. However, the underpinning molecular mechanism of cytokinin-repressed ABA signaling is largely unknown. Here, we show that cytokinin specifically antagonizes ABA-mediated inhibition of cotyledon greening with minimal effects on seed germination in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that the cytokinin-antagonized ABA effect is dependent on a functional cytokinin signaling pathway, mainly involved in the cytokinin receptor gene CYTOKININ RESPONSE1/ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE4, downstream histidine phosphotransfer protein genes AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5, and a type B response regulator gene, ARR12, which genetically acts upstream of ABI5 to regulate cotyledon greening. Cytokinin has no apparent effect on the transcription of ABI5. However, cytokinin efficiently promotes the proteasomal degradation of ABI5 in a cytokinin signaling-dependent manner. These results define a genetic pathway through which cytokinin specifically induces the degradation of ABI5 protein, thereby antagonizing ABA-mediated inhibition of postgerminative growth. PMID:24443524

  11. Quantification of the uncertainties in extrapolating from in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonism to key events in in vivo screening assays and adverse reproductive outcomes in F1 male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are multiple molecular initiating events (MIEs) that can disrupt male sexual differentiation including AR antagonism and inhibition of synthesis, and metabolism of fetal testosterone. Disruption of this event by pesticides like vinclozolin that act as AR antagonists and ph...

  12. Antagonism or synergism between papaya ringspot virus and papaya mosaic virus in Carica papaya is determined by their order of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Calvillo, Gabriela; Contreras-Paredes, Carlos A; Mora-Macias, Javier; Noa-Carrazana, Juan C; Serrano-Rubio, Angélica A; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Silva-Rosales, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Antagonism between unrelated plant viruses has not been thoroughly described. Our studies show that two unrelated viruses, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) produce different symptomatic outcomes during mixed infection depending on the inoculation order. Synergism occurs in plants infected first with PRSV or in plants infected simultaneously with PRSV and PapMV, and antagonism occurs in plants infected first with PapMV and later inoculated with PRSV. During antagonism, elevated pathogenesis-related (PR-1) gene expression and increased reactive oxygen species production indicated the establishment of a host defense resulting in the reduction in PRSV titers. Polyribosomal fractioning showed that PRSV affects translation of cellular eEF1α, PR-1, β-tubulin, and PapMV RNAs in planta, suggesting that its infection could be related to an imbalance in the translation machinery. Our data suggest that primary PapMV infection activates a defense response against PRSV and establishes a protective relationship with the papaya host. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadtanapuk, S. [Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Teraarusiri, W. [Central Laboratory, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Nanakorn, W. [The Crown Property Bureau, 173 Nakhonratchasrima Road, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S., E-mail: soanu.1@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  14. Neural networks and statistical learning

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ke-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Providing a broad but in-depth introduction to neural network and machine learning in a statistical framework, this book provides a single, comprehensive resource for study and further research. All the major popular neural network models and statistical learning approaches are covered with examples and exercises in every chapter to develop a practical working understanding of the content. Each of the twenty-five chapters includes state-of-the-art descriptions and important research results on the respective topics. The broad coverage includes the multilayer perceptron, the Hopfield network, associative memory models, clustering models and algorithms, the radial basis function network, recurrent neural networks, principal component analysis, nonnegative matrix factorization, independent component analysis, discriminant analysis, support vector machines, kernel methods, reinforcement learning, probabilistic and Bayesian networks, data fusion and ensemble learning, fuzzy sets and logic, neurofuzzy models, hardw...

  15. Multiprocessor Neural Network in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godó, Zoltán Attila; Kiss, Gábor; Kocsis, Dénes

    2015-01-01

    A possible way of creating a multiprocessor artificial neural network is by the use of microcontrollers. The RISC processors' high performance and the large number of I/O ports mean they are greatly suitable for creating such a system. During our research, we wanted to see if it is possible to efficiently create interaction between the artifical neural network and the natural nervous system. To achieve as much analogy to the living nervous system as possible, we created a frequency-modulated analog connection between the units. Our system is connected to the living nervous system through 128 microelectrodes. Two-way communication is provided through A/D transformation, which is even capable of testing psychopharmacons. The microcontroller-based analog artificial neural network can play a great role in medical singal processing, such as ECG, EEG etc.

  16. Principles of neural information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Seelen, Werner v

    2016-01-01

    In this fundamental book the authors devise a framework that describes the working of the brain as a whole. It presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles of Neural Information Processing as well as recent and authoritative research. The books´ guiding principles are the main purpose of neural activity, namely, to organize behavior to ensure survival, as well as the understanding of the evolutionary genesis of the brain. Among the developed principles and strategies belong self-organization of neural systems, flexibility, the active interpretation of the world by means of construction and prediction as well as their embedding into the world, all of which form the framework of the presented description. Since, in brains, their partial self-organization, the lifelong adaptation and their use of various methods of processing incoming information are all interconnected, the authors have chosen not only neurobiology and evolution theory as a basis for the elaboration of such a framework, but also syst...

  17. Performance sustaining intracortical neural prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Fan, Joline M.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural prostheses, or brain-machine interfaces, aim to restore efficient communication and movement ability to those suffering from paralysis. A major challenge these systems face is robust performance, particularly with aging signal sources. The aim in this study was to develop a neural prosthesis that could sustain high performance in spite of signal instability while still minimizing retraining time. Approach. We trained two rhesus macaques implanted with intracortical microelectrode arrays 1-4 years prior to this study to acquire targets with a neurally-controlled cursor. We measured their performance via achieved bitrate (bits per second, bps). This task was repeated over contiguous days to evaluate the sustained performance across time. Main results. We found that in the monkey with a younger (i.e., two year old) implant and better signal quality, a fixed decoder could sustain performance for a month at a rate of 4 bps, the highest achieved communication rate reported to date. This fixed decoder was evaluated across 22 months and experienced a performance decline at a rate of 0.24 bps yr-1. In the monkey with the older (i.e., 3.5 year old) implant and poorer signal quality, a fixed decoder could not sustain performance for more than a few days. Nevertheless, performance in this monkey was maintained for two weeks without requiring additional online retraining time by utilizing prior days’ experimental data. Upon analysis of the changes in channel tuning, we found that this stability appeared partially attributable to the cancelling-out of neural tuning fluctuations when projected to two-dimensional cursor movements. Significance. The findings in this study (1) document the highest-performing communication neural prosthesis in monkeys, (2) confirm and extend prior reports of the stability of fixed decoders, and (3) demonstrate a protocol for system stability under conditions where fixed decoders would otherwise fail. These improvements to decoder

  18. Neural Decoder for Topological Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlai, Giacomo; Melko, Roger G.

    2017-07-01

    We present an algorithm for error correction in topological codes that exploits modern machine learning techniques. Our decoder is constructed from a stochastic neural network called a Boltzmann machine, of the type extensively used in deep learning. We provide a general prescription for the training of the network and a decoding strategy that is applicable to a wide variety of stabilizer codes with very little specialization. We demonstrate the neural decoder numerically on the well-known two-dimensional toric code with phase-flip errors.

  19. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  20. Generalization performance of regularized neural network models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1994-01-01

    Architecture optimization is a fundamental problem of neural network modeling. The optimal architecture is defined as the one which minimizes the generalization error. This paper addresses estimation of the generalization performance of regularized, complete neural network models. Regularization...

  1. voltage compensation using artificial neural network

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Offor Theophilos

    VOLTAGE COMPENSATION USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK: A CASE STUDY OF. RUMUOLA ... using artificial neural network (ANN) controller based dynamic voltage restorer (DVR). ... substation by simulating with sample of average voltage for Omerelu, Waterlines, Rumuola, Shell Industrial and Barracks.

  2. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  3. Neural circulatory control in vasovagal syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, J. J.; Wieling, W.; Karemaker, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The orthostatic volume displacement associated with the upright position necessitates effective neural cardiovascular modulation. Neural control of cardiac chronotropy and inotropy, and vasomotor tone aims at maintaining venous return, thus opposing gravitational pooling of blood in the lower part

  4. Neural overlap in processing music and speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  5. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    such as sea urchins, flies, fish and humans. (ii) Embryos (and so larvae and adults) form by differentiation from these germ layers. (iii) Homologous structures in different animals arise from the same germ layers. The germ-layer theory exerted a profound influence on those claiming a neural crest — that is, an ectodermal.

  6. MEMBRAIN NEURAL NETWORK FOR VISUAL PATTERN RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Popko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of visual patterns is one of significant applications of Artificial Neural Networks, which partially emulate human thinking in the domain of artificial intelligence. In the paper, a simplified neural approach to recognition of visual patterns is portrayed and discussed. This paper is dedicated for investigators in visual patterns recognition, Artificial Neural Networking and related disciplines. The document describes also MemBrain application environment as a powerful and easy to use neural networks’ editor and simulator supporting ANN.

  7. Radioactive fallout and neural tube defects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nejat Akar

    2015-07-10

    Jul 10, 2015 ... Neural tube defects;. Anencephaly;. Spina bifida. Abstract Possible link between radioactivity and the occurrence of neural tube defects is a long lasting debate ... Neural tube defects, are one of the common congenital mal- formations ... ent cities of Turkey (˙Izmir/Aegean Region; Trabzon/Black Sea region ...

  8. Analysis of neural networks through base functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, B.J.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Spaanenburg, L.

    Problem statement. Despite their success-story, neural networks have one major disadvantage compared to other techniques: the inability to explain comprehensively how a trained neural network reaches its output; neural networks are not only (incorrectly) seen as a "magic tool" but possibly even more

  9. Simplified LQG Control with Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    1997-01-01

    A new neural network application for non-linear state control is described. One neural network is modelled to form a Kalmann predictor and trained to act as an optimal state observer for a non-linear process. Another neural network is modelled to form a state controller and trained to produce...

  10. Novel quantum inspired binary neural network algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, a quantum based binary neural network algorithm is proposed, named as novel quantum binary neural network algorithm (NQ-BNN). It forms a neural network structure by deciding weights and separability parameter in quantum based manner. Quantum computing concept represents solution probabilistically ...

  11. Degenerate coding in neural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, Anthony

    2005-11-01

    When the dimensionality of a neural circuit is substantially larger than the dimensionality of the variable it encodes, many different degenerate network states can produce the same output. In this review I will discuss three different neural systems that are linked by this theme. The pyloric network of the lobster, the song control system of the zebra finch, and the odor encoding system of the locust, while different in design, all contain degeneracies between their internal parameters and the outputs they encode. Indeed, although the dynamics of song generation and odor identification are quite different, computationally, odor recognition can be thought of as running the song generation circuitry backwards. In both of these systems, degeneracy plays a vital role in mapping a sparse neural representation devoid of correlations onto external stimuli (odors or song structure) that are strongly correlated. I argue that degeneracy between input and output states is an inherent feature of many neural systems, which can be exploited as a fault-tolerant method of reliably learning, generating, and discriminating closely related patterns.

  12. Optoelectronic Implementation of Neural Networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 9. Optoelectronic Implementation of Neural Networks - Use of Optics in Computing. R Ramachandran. General Article Volume 3 Issue 9 September 1998 pp 45-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Aphasia Classification Using Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axer, H.; Jantzen, Jan; Berks, G.

    2000-01-01

    A web-based software model (http://fuzzy.iau.dtu.dk/aphasia.nsf) was developed as an example for classification of aphasia using neural networks. Two multilayer perceptrons were used to classify the type of aphasia (Broca, Wernicke, anomic, global) according to the results in some subtests...

  14. Memory Storage and Neural Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates memory storage and molecular nature of associative-memory formation by analyzing Pavlovian conditioning in marine snails and rabbits. Presented is the design of a computer-based memory system (neural networks) using the rules acquired in the investigation. Reports that the artificial network recognized patterns well. (YP)

  15. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  16. Neural Control of the Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to highlight key concepts about the neural control of the circulation that graduate and medical students should be expected to incorporate into their general knowledge of human physiology. The focus is largely on the sympathetic nerves, which have a dominant role in cardiovascular control due to their effects to…

  17. Classification using Bayesian neural nets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor); O. van der Meer; R. Potharst (Rob)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractRecently, Bayesian methods have been proposed for neural networks to solve regression and classification problems. These methods claim to overcome some difficulties encountered in the standard approach such as overfitting. However, an implementation of the full Bayesian approach to

  18. Vitamins and neural tube defects

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Rodney

    1988-01-01

    The use of vitamin supplements by women around the time of conception was examined and compared in those having babies with neural tube defects, those with still births or some other type of malformation, and in women who had normal babies.

  19. Neural Mechanisms of Conceptual Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gwyneth A.

    2017-01-01

    An over-arching goal in neurolinguistic research is to characterize the neural bases of semantic representation. A particularly relevant goal concerns whether we represent features and events (a) together in a generalized semantic hub or (b) separately in distinct but complementary systems. While the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL) is strongly…

  20. Neural mechanisms for voice recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andics, A.V.; McQueen, J.M.; Petersson, K.M.; Gal, V.; Rudas, G.; Vidnyanszky, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated neural mechanisms that support voice recognition in a training paradigm with fMRI. The same listeners were trained on different weeks to categorize the mid-regions of voice-morph continua as an individual's voice. Stimuli implicitly defined a voice-acoustics space, and training

  1. Serotonin, neural markers and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo eMeneses

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals’ species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence

  2. Autotaxin is induced by TSA through HDAC3 and HDAC7 inhibition and antagonizes the TSA-induced cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted glycoprotein with the lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity to convert lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid involved in diverse biological actions. ATX is highly expressed in some cancer cells and contributes to their tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastases, while in other cancer cells ATX is silenced or expressed at low level. The mechanism of ATX expression regulation in cancer cells remains largely unknown. Results In the present study, we demonstrated that trichostatin A (TSA), a well-known HDAC inhibitor (HDACi), significantly induced ATX expression in SW480 and several other cancer cells with low or undetectable endogenous ATX expression. ATX induction could be observed when HDAC3 and HDAC7 were down-regulated by their siRNAs. It was found that HDAC7 expression levels were low in the cancer cells with high endogenous ATX expression. Exogenous over-expression of HDAC7 inhibited ATX expression in these cells in a HDAC3-dependent manner. These data indicate that HDAC3 and HDAC7 collaboratively suppress ATX expression in cancer cells, and suggest that TSA induce ATX expression by inhibiting HDAC3 and HDAC7. The biological significance of this regulation mechanism was revealed by demonstrating that TSA-induced ATX protected cancer cells against TSA-induced apoptosis by producing LPA through its lysoPLD activity, which could be reversed by BrP-LPA and S32826, the inhibitors of the ATX-LPA axis. Conclusions We have demonstrated that ATX expression is repressed by HDAC3 and HDAC7 in cancer cells. During TSA treatment, ATX is induced due to the HDAC3 and HDAC7 inhibition and functionally antagonizes the TSA-induced apoptosis. These results reveal an internal HDACi-resistant mechanism in cancer cells, and suggest that the inhibition of ATX-LPA axis would be helpful to improve the efficacy of HDACi-based therapeutics against cancer. PMID:21314984

  3. Autotaxin is induced by TSA through HDAC3 and HDAC7 inhibition and antagonizes the TSA-induced cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Junjie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autotaxin (ATX is a secreted glycoprotein with the lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD activity to convert lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a bioactive lysophospholipid involved in diverse biological actions. ATX is highly expressed in some cancer cells and contributes to their tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastases, while in other cancer cells ATX is silenced or expressed at low level. The mechanism of ATX expression regulation in cancer cells remains largely unknown. Results In the present study, we demonstrated that trichostatin A (TSA, a well-known HDAC inhibitor (HDACi, significantly induced ATX expression in SW480 and several other cancer cells with low or undetectable endogenous ATX expression. ATX induction could be observed when HDAC3 and HDAC7 were down-regulated by their siRNAs. It was found that HDAC7 expression levels were low in the cancer cells with high endogenous ATX expression. Exogenous over-expression of HDAC7 inhibited ATX expression in these cells in a HDAC3-dependent manner. These data indicate that HDAC3 and HDAC7 collaboratively suppress ATX expression in cancer cells, and suggest that TSA induce ATX expression by inhibiting HDAC3 and HDAC7. The biological significance of this regulation mechanism was revealed by demonstrating that TSA-induced ATX protected cancer cells against TSA-induced apoptosis by producing LPA through its lysoPLD activity, which could be reversed by BrP-LPA and S32826, the inhibitors of the ATX-LPA axis. Conclusions We have demonstrated that ATX expression is repressed by HDAC3 and HDAC7 in cancer cells. During TSA treatment, ATX is induced due to the HDAC3 and HDAC7 inhibition and functionally antagonizes the TSA-induced apoptosis. These results reveal an internal HDACi-resistant mechanism in cancer cells, and suggest that the inhibition of ATX-LPA axis would be helpful to improve the efficacy of HDACi-based therapeutics against cancer.

  4. 17β-Estradiol Dysregulates Innate Immune Responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Respiratory Infection and Is Modulated by Estrogen Receptor Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Shadaan; Xie, ShangKui; Bose, Moumita; Shaul, Philip W; Terada, Lance S; Brody, Steven L; Thomas, Philip J; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Kim, Sung Hoon; Greenberg, David E; Jain, Raksha

    2017-10-01

    Females have a more severe clinical course than males in terms of several inflammatory lung conditions. Notably, females with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer worse outcomes, particularly in the setting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Sex hormones have been implicated in experimental and clinical studies; however, immune mechanisms responsible for this sex-based disparity are unknown and the specific sex hormone target for therapeutic manipulation has not been identified. The objective of this study was to assess mechanisms behind the impact of female sex hormones on host immune responses to P. aeruginosa We used wild-type and CF mice, which we hormone manipulated, inoculated with P. aeruginosa, and then examined for outcomes and inflammatory responses. Neutrophils isolated from mice and human subjects were tested for responses to P. aeruginosa We found that female mice inoculated with P. aeruginosa died earlier and showed slower bacterial clearance than males (P aeruginosa challenge earlier than progesterone- or vehicle-supplemented mice (P = 0.0003). 17β-Estradiol-treated ovariectomized female mice demonstrated increased lung levels of inflammatory cytokines, and when rendered neutropenic the mortality difference was abrogated. Neutrophils treated with 17β-estradiol demonstrated an enhanced oxidative burst but decreased P. aeruginosa killing and earlier cell necrosis. The estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780 improved survival in female mice infected with P. aeruginosa and restored neutrophil function. We concluded that ER antagonism rescues estrogen-mediated neutrophil dysfunction and improves survival in response to P. aeruginosa ER-mediated processes may explain the sex-based mortality gap in CF and other inflammatory lung illnesses, and the ER blockade represents a rational therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Does pressure antagonize anesthesia? High-pressure stopped-flow study of firefly luciferase and anatomy of initial flash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, I; Minami, H; Matsuki, H; Inoue, T

    1999-01-01

    The antagonizing effect of high pressure against anesthesia is well known. With purified firefly luciferase, however,. Biophys. J. 60:1309-1314) reported that high pressure did not affect the initial flash intensity. Firefly luciferase emits a burst of light when the substrates luciferin and ATP are added in the presence of O2. The light intensity decays rapidly and the weak light lasts for hours. The initial flash is a transient event and is not in a steady state. The steady state is represented by the slope of the linear part of the integral of the light output. The present study used a high-pressure stopped-flow system to compare the pressure effects on the initial flash intensity and the steady-state light intensity. The flash intensity did not change by the application of hydrostatic pressure in the presence or absence of chloroform or 1-octanol. In contrast, high pressure increased the steady-state light intensity. The application of 12 MPa pressure increased the steady-state light intensity of firefly luciferase inhibited by 5 mM chloroform or 0.7 mM 1-octanol by 19.7% and 18.8%, respectively. When analyzed by the rapid reaction kinetics of the transition state theory, the initial peak intensity represents the total amount of active enzyme and is unrelated to the reaction rate. Anesthetics inhibited the initial flash by unfolding the protein, thereby decreasing the concentration of the active enzyme. Pressure affected the steady-state light intensity by changing the reaction rates.

  6. AT1 Receptor Antagonism Improves Structural, Functional and Biomechanical Properties in Resistance Arteries in a Rodent Chronic Kidney Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, K J; Ameer, O Z; Phillips, J K

    2018-02-07

    The renin-angiotensin system, in particular Angiotensin II (AngII), plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Effects of chronic AT1 receptor antagonism were investigated in a genetic hypertensive rat model of CKD, the Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rat. Mixed-sex LPK and Lewis control rats (total n=31) were split between treated (valsartan 60mg/kg/day p.o. from 4-18 weeks) and vehicle groups. Animals were assessed for systolic blood pressure and urine biochemistry, and after euthanasia, blood collected for urea and creatinine analysis, confirming the hypertensive and renal phenotype. Mesenteric resistance vasculature was assessed using pressure myography and histology. Valsartan treatment improved LPK rats vascular structure, increasing internal and external diameter values and reducing wall thickness (untreated vs. treated LPK: 53.19±3.29 vs. 33.93±2.17m) and wall-lumen ratios (untreated vs. treated LPK: 0.52±0.09 vs. 0.16±0.01 (all P<0.0001). Endothelium dysfunction, as measured by maximal response to acetylcholine (Rmax) was normalized with treatment (untreated vs. treated LPK: 69.56±4.34 vs. 103.05±4.13, P<0.05), increasing the relative contributions of nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization to vasorelaxation while down-regulating the prostanoid contribution. Biomechanical properties also improved with treatment, as indicated by an increase in compliance, decrease in intrinsic stiffness, and alterations in the artery wall composition, which included decreases in collagen density and collagen/elastin ratio. Our results highlight the importance of AngII as a driver of resistance vessel structural, functional and biomechanical dysfunction and provide insight as to how AT1 receptor blockade exerts therapeutic efficacy in CKD.

  7. Long-Term Fragility of Y Chromosomes Is Dominated by Short-Term Resolution of Sexual Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Heath; Brandvain, Yaniv

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has fascinated biologists, inspiring theoretical models, experimental studies, and studies of genome structure. This work has produced a clear model, in which heteromorphic sex chromosomes result from repeated fixations of inversions (or other recombination suppression mechanisms) that tether sexually antagonistic alleles to sex-determining regions, followed by the degeneration of these regions induced by the lack of sex chromosome recombination in the heterogametic sex. However, current models do not predict if inversions are expected to preferentially accumulate on one sex-chromosome or another, and do not address if inversions can accumulate even when they cause difficulties in pairing between heteromorphic chromosomes in the heterogametic sex increasing aneuploidy or meiotic arrest. To address these questions, we developed a population genetic model in which the sex chromosome aneuploidy rate is elevated when males carry an inversion on either the X or Y chromosome. We show that inversions fix more easily when male-beneficial alleles are dominant, and that inversions on the Y chromosome fix with lower selection coefficients than comparable X chromosome inversions. We further show that sex-chromosome inversions can often invade and fix despite causing a substantial increase in the risk of aneuploidy. As sexual antagonism can lead to the fixation of inversions that increase sex chromosomes aneuploidy (which underlies genetic diseases including Klinefelter and Turner syndrome in humans) selection could subsequently favor diverse mechanisms to reduce aneuploidy-including alternative meiotic mechanisms, translocations to, and fusions with, the sex chromosomes, and sex chromosome turnover. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Role of proton pump inhibitors in preventing hypergastrinemia-associated carcinogenesis and in antagonizing the trophic effect of gastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y-M; Park, J-M; Kangwan, N; Jeong, M; Lee, S; Cho, J Y; Ko, W J; Hahm, K B

    2015-04-01

    Gastrin is the main hormone stimulating gastric acid secretion, but it exerts proliferative and anti-apoptotic actions on various cancer cell types, in addition to its well-known trophic effect on enterochromaffin-like cells. As treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increases the biosynthesis and secretion of gastrin, it has been postulated that treatment with PPIs could increase the risk of cancer, especially in Barrett's esophagus, gastric carcinoids, and colorectal cancer (CRC). Some tumors produce gastrin of their own, which can act in an autocrine manner to promote tumor growth. In addition, gastrin is known to foster the tumor microenvironment. However, in spite of these potentially increased cancer risks due to PPI-induced hypergastrinemia, prospective, large-scale cohort studies did not show an increase in CRC prevalence. The question as to why the long-term use of PPIs was not associated with an increased cancer risk of CRC might be answered by the fact that the PPIs antagonized the trophic effects of hypergastrinemia. Furthermore, the blockade of proton pumps or potassium channels in cancer cells could limit the abnormal glycolytic energy metabolism of cancer cells. Apart from their suppressive effect on gastric acids, PPIs exert an anti-tumor effect through the selective induction of apoptosis as well as an anti-inflammatory effect, and they protect cells from developing chemo- or radiotherapeutic resistance. Moreover, the anti-carcinogenic actions of PPIs were augmented with PPI-induced hypergastrinemia. Together with their potential targeted killing of cancer stem cells, these effects demonstrate their potential anti-cancer actions.

  9. Shoot ionome to predict the synergism and antagonism between nutrients as affected by substrate and physiological status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pii, Youry; Cesco, Stefano; Mimmo, Tanja

    2015-09-01

    The elemental composition of a tissue or organism is defined as ionome. However, the combined effects on the shoot ionome determined by the taxonomic character, the nutrient status and different substrates have not been investigated. This study tests the hypothesis that phylogenetic variation of monocots and dicots grown in iron deficiency can be distinguished by the shoot ionome. We analyzed 18 elements in barley, cucumber and tomato and in two substrates (hydroponic vs soil) with different nutritional regimes. Multivariate analysis evidenced a clear separation between the species. In hydroponic conditions the main drivers separating the species are non essential-nutrients as Ti, Al, Na and Li, which were positively correlated with macro- (P, K) and micronutrients (Fe, Zn, Mo, B). The separation between species is confirmed when plants are grown on soil, but the distribution is determined especially by macronutrients (S, P, K, Ca, Mg) and micronutrients (B). A number of macro (Mg, Ca, S, P, K) and micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Mo, B) contribute to plant growth and several other important physiological and metabolic plant activities. The results reported here confirmed that the synergism and antagonism between them and other non-essential elements (Ti, Al, Si, Na) define the plant taxonomic character. The ionome profile might thus be exploited as a tool for the diagnosis of plants physiological/nutritional status but also in defining biofortification strategies to optimize both mineral enrichment of staple food crops and the nutrient input as fertilizers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. TRPA1 and TRPV1 contribute to propofol-mediated antagonism of U46619-induced constriction in murine coronary arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritam Sinharoy

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels have emerged as key components contributing to vasoreactivity. Propofol, an anesthetic is associated with adverse side effects including hypotension and acute pain upon infusion. Our objective was to determine the extent to which TRPA1 and/or TRPV1 ion channels are involved in mediating propofol-induced vasorelaxation of mouse coronary arterioles in vitro and elucidate the potential cellular signal transduction pathway by which this occurs.Hearts were excised from anesthetized mice and coronary arterioles were dissected from control C57Bl/6J, TRPA1-/-, TRPV1-/- and double-knockout mice (TRPAV-/-. Isolated microvessels were cannulated and secured in a temperature-controlled chamber and allowed to equilibrate for 1 hr. Vasoreactivity studies were performed in microvessels pre-constricted with U46619 to assess the dose-dependent relaxation effects of propofol on coronary microvascular tone.Propofol-induced relaxation was unaffected in vessels obtained from TRPV1-/- mice, markedly attenuated in pre-constricted vessels obtained from TRPA1-/- mice and abolished in vessels obtained from TRPAV-/- mice. Furthermore, NOS inhibition with L-NAME or endothelium denuding abolished the proporfol-induced depressor response in pre-constricted vessels obtained from all mice. In the absence of L-NAME, BKCa inhibition with penitrem A markedly attenuated propofol-mediated relaxation in vessels obtained from wild-type mice and to a lesser extent in vessels obtained from TRPV1-/-, mice with no effect in vessels obtained from TRPA1-/- or TRPAV-/- mice.TRPA1 and TRPV1 appear to contribute to the propofol-mediated antagonism of U46619-induced constriction in murine coronary microvessels that involves activation of NOS and BKCa.

  11. Autotaxin is induced by TSA through HDAC3 and HDAC7 inhibition and antagonizes the TSA-induced cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Wang, Baolu; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Junjie

    2011-02-12

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted glycoprotein with the lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity to convert lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid involved in diverse biological actions. ATX is highly expressed in some cancer cells and contributes to their tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastases, while in other cancer cells ATX is silenced or expressed at low level. The mechanism of ATX expression regulation in cancer cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that trichostatin A (TSA), a well-known HDAC inhibitor (HDACi), significantly induced ATX expression in SW480 and several other cancer cells with low or undetectable endogenous ATX expression. ATX induction could be observed when HDAC3 and HDAC7 were down-regulated by their siRNAs. It was found that HDAC7 expression levels were low in the cancer cells with high endogenous ATX expression. Exogenous over-expression of HDAC7 inhibited ATX expression in these cells in a HDAC3-dependent manner. These data indicate that HDAC3 and HDAC7 collaboratively suppress ATX expression in cancer cells, and suggest that TSA induce ATX expression by inhibiting HDAC3 and HDAC7. The biological significance of this regulation mechanism was revealed by demonstrating that TSA-induced ATX protected cancer cells against TSA-induced apoptosis by producing LPA through its lysoPLD activity, which could be reversed by BrP-LPA and S32826, the inhibitors of the ATX-LPA axis. We have demonstrated that ATX expression is repressed by HDAC3 and HDAC7 in cancer cells. During TSA treatment, ATX is induced due to the HDAC3 and HDAC7 inhibition and functionally antagonizes the TSA-induced apoptosis. These results reveal an internal HDACi-resistant mechanism in cancer cells, and suggest that the inhibition of ATX-LPA axis would be helpful to improve the efficacy of HDACi-based therapeutics against cancer.

  12. α-Synuclein Delays Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi Transport in Mammalian Cells by Antagonizing ER/Golgi SNAREs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayanidhi, Nandhakumar; Helm, Jared R.; Nycz, Deborah C.; Bentley, Marvin; Liang, Yingjian

    2010-01-01

    Toxicity of human α-synuclein when expressed in simple organisms can be suppressed by overexpression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport machinery, suggesting that inhibition of constitutive secretion represents a fundamental cause of the toxicity. Whether similar inhibition in mammals represents a cause of familial Parkinson's disease has not been established. We tested elements of this hypothesis by expressing human α-synuclein in mammalian kidney and neuroendocrine cells and assessing ER-to-Golgi transport. Overexpression of wild type or the familial disease-associated A53T mutant α-synuclein delayed transport by up to 50%; however, A53T inhibited more potently. The secretory delay occurred at low expression levels and was not accompanied by insoluble α-synuclein aggregates or mistargeting of transport machinery, suggesting a direct action of soluble α-synuclein on trafficking proteins. Co-overexpression of ER/Golgi arginine soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (R-SNAREs) specifically rescued transport, indicating that α-synuclein antagonizes SNARE function. Ykt6 reversed α-synuclein inhibition much more effectively than sec22b, suggesting a possible neuroprotective role for the enigmatic high expression of ykt6 in neurons. In in vitro reconstitutions, purified α-synuclein A53T protein specifically inhibited COPII vesicle docking and fusion at a pre-Golgi step. Finally, soluble α-synuclein A53T directly bound ER/Golgi SNAREs and inhibited SNARE complex assembly, providing a potential mechanism for toxic effects in the early secretory pathway. PMID:20392839

  13. Alpha-synuclein delays endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport in mammalian cells by antagonizing ER/Golgi SNAREs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayanidhi, Nandhakumar; Helm, Jared R; Nycz, Deborah C; Bentley, Marvin; Liang, Yingjian; Hay, Jesse C

    2010-06-01

    Toxicity of human alpha-synuclein when expressed in simple organisms can be suppressed by overexpression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport machinery, suggesting that inhibition of constitutive secretion represents a fundamental cause of the toxicity. Whether similar inhibition in mammals represents a cause of familial Parkinson's disease has not been established. We tested elements of this hypothesis by expressing human alpha-synuclein in mammalian kidney and neuroendocrine cells and assessing ER-to-Golgi transport. Overexpression of wild type or the familial disease-associated A53T mutant alpha-synuclein delayed transport by up to 50%; however, A53T inhibited more potently. The secretory delay occurred at low expression levels and was not accompanied by insoluble alpha-synuclein aggregates or mistargeting of transport machinery, suggesting a direct action of soluble alpha-synuclein on trafficking proteins. Co-overexpression of ER/Golgi arginine soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (R-SNAREs) specifically rescued transport, indicating that alpha-synuclein antagonizes SNARE function. Ykt6 reversed alpha-synuclein inhibition much more effectively than sec22b, suggesting a possible neuroprotective role for the enigmatic high expression of ykt6 in neurons. In in vitro reconstitutions, purified alpha-synuclein A53T protein specifically inhibited COPII vesicle docking and fusion at a pre-Golgi step. Finally, soluble alpha-synuclein A53T directly bound ER/Golgi SNAREs and inhibited SNARE complex assembly, providing a potential mechanism for toxic effects in the early secretory pathway.

  14. The rapid recovery of 5-HT cell firing induced by the antidepressant vortioxetine involves 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétry, Cécile; Pehrson, Alan L; Etiévant, Adeline; Ebert, Bjarke; Sánchez, Connie; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2013-06-01

    The therapeutic effect of current antidepressant drugs appears after several weeks of treatment and a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. Here, we report the effects of the multi-modal antidepressant vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), a 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, 5-HT(1B) receptor partial agonist, 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist and 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, on rat 5-HT neurotransmission. Using in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the dorsal raphe nucleus of anaesthetized rats, we assessed the acute and subchronic effects of vortioxetine and/or the selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, SR57227 or the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist flesinoxan, on 5-HT neuronal firing activity. Using ex-vivo autoradiography, we correlated SERT occupancy and presumed 5-HT firing activity. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, was used as comparator. Importantly, the recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing was achieved after 1 d with vortioxetine and 14 d with fluoxetine. SR57227 delayed this recovery. In contrast, vortioxetine failed to alter the reducing action of 3 d treatment of flesinoxan. Acute dosing of vortioxetine inhibited neuronal firing activity more potently than fluoxetine. SR57227 prevented the suppressant effect of vortioxetine, but not of fluoxetine. In contrast, flesinoxan failed to modify the suppressant effect of vortioxetine acutely administered. Differently to fluoxetine, vortioxetine suppressed neuronal firing without saturating occupancy at the SERT. Vortioxetine produced a markedly faster recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing than fluoxetine. This is at least partly due to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism of vortioxetine in association with its reduced SERT occupancy.

  15. Central ghrelin increases food foraging/hoarding that is blocked by GHSR antagonism and attenuates hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael A.; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The stomach-derived “hunger hormone” ghrelin increases in the circulation in direct response to time since the last meal, increasing preprandially and falling immediately following food consumption. We found previously that peripheral injection of ghrelin potently stimulates food foraging (FF), food hoarding (FH), and food intake (FI) in Siberian hamsters. It remains, however, largely unknown if central ghrelin stimulation is necessary/sufficient to increase these behaviors regardless of peripheral stimulation of the ghrelin receptor [growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)]. We injected three doses (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 μg) of ghrelin into the third ventricle (3V) of Siberian hamsters and measured changes in FF, FH, and FI. To test the effects of 3V ghrelin receptor blockade, we used the potent GHSR antagonist JMV2959 to block these behaviors in response to food deprivation or a peripheral ghrelin challenge. Finally, we examined neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus in response to peripheral ghrelin administration and 3V GHSR antagonism. Third ventricular ghrelin injection significantly increased FI through 24 h and FH through day 4. Pretreatment with 3V JMV2959 successfully blocked peripheral ghrelin-induced increases in FF, FH, and FI at all time points and food deprivation-induced increases in FF, FH, and FI up to 4 h. c-Fos immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, but not in the arcuate nucleus, following pretreatment with intraperitoneal JMV2959 and ghrelin. Collectively, these data suggest that central GHSR activation is both necessary and sufficient to increase appetitive and consummatory behaviors in Siberian hamsters. PMID:26561646

  16. Conserved residues within the HIV-1 Vpu transmembrane-proximal hinge region modulate BST2 binding and antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhele, Sabelo; Cohen, Éric A

    2017-03-14

    BST2 inhibits HIV-1 release by tethering nascent virions to the surface of infected cells. HIV-1 Vpu overcomes this restriction by removing BST2 from viral budding sites via BST2 intracellular trapping and sequestration, surface downregulation and/or displacement mechanisms. Vpu is composed of a short luminal tail, a transmembrane domain (TMD) and a cytoplasmic hinge region that is followed by two helices. BST2 counteraction relies on the ability of Vpu to physically bind BST2 through TMD interactions and recruit the clathrin-dependent trafficking machinery via a canonical acidic di-leucine signalling motif within the helix-2 of Vpu. The highly conserved Vpu transmembrane-proximal hinge region encompasses residues that resemble an acidic leucine-based trafficking motif, whose functional roles are currently ill-defined. In this study, we investigated the contribution of these residues towards Vpu-mediated BST2 antagonism. We show that while these conserved residues have no intrinsic activity on the cellular distribution of Vpu in the absence of BST2, they regulate the ability of Vpu to bind to BST2 and, consequently, govern both BST2-dependent trafficking properties of the protein as well as its co-localization with BST2. Moreover, these residues, particularly a glutamic acid residue positioned immediately following the TMD, are a determinant not only for efficient targeting of BST2, but also binding and degradation of CD4, another host membrane protein targeted by Vpu. Mechanistically, our data are consistent with a role of these residues in the maintenance of the Vpu TMD conformational configuration such that interactions with membrane-associated host targets are favoured. Altogether, this work demonstrates an important regulatory role of the transmembrane-proximal Vpu hinge region residues towards enabling the protein to efficiently engage its target host proteins. Thus, this highly conserved, cytosolic Vpu hinge region may represent an attractive target for the

  17. TRPA1 and TRPV1 contribute to propofol-mediated antagonism of U46619-induced constriction in murine coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharoy, Pritam; Bratz, Ian N; Sinha, Sayantani; Showalter, Loral E; Andrei, Spencer R; Damron, Derek S

    2017-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels have emerged as key components contributing to vasoreactivity. Propofol, an anesthetic is associated with adverse side effects including hypotension and acute pain upon infusion. Our objective was to determine the extent to which TRPA1 and/or TRPV1 ion channels are involved in mediating propofol-induced vasorelaxation of mouse coronary arterioles in vitro and elucidate the potential cellular signal transduction pathway by which this occurs. Hearts were excised from anesthetized mice and coronary arterioles were dissected from control C57Bl/6J, TRPA1-/-, TRPV1-/- and double-knockout mice (TRPAV-/-). Isolated microvessels were cannulated and secured in a temperature-controlled chamber and allowed to equilibrate for 1 hr. Vasoreactivity studies were performed in microvessels pre-constricted with U46619 to assess the dose-dependent relaxation effects of propofol on coronary microvascular tone. Propofol-induced relaxation was unaffected in vessels obtained from TRPV1-/- mice, markedly attenuated in pre-constricted vessels obtained from TRPA1-/- mice and abolished in vessels obtained from TRPAV-/- mice. Furthermore, NOS inhibition with L-NAME or endothelium denuding abolished the proporfol-induced depressor response in pre-constricted vessels obtained from all mice. In the absence of L-NAME, BKCa inhibition with penitrem A markedly attenuated propofol-mediated relaxation in vessels obtained from wild-type mice and to a lesser extent in vessels obtained from TRPV1-/-, mice with no effect in vessels obtained from TRPA1-/- or TRPAV-/- mice. TRPA1 and TRPV1 appear to contribute to the propofol-mediated antagonism of U46619-induced constriction in murine coronary microvessels that involves activation of NOS and BKCa.

  18. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  19. Neural networks and applications tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, I.

    1991-09-01

    The importance of neural networks has grown dramatically during this decade. While only a few years ago they were primarily of academic interest, now dozens of companies and many universities are investigating the potential use of these systems and products are beginning to appear. The idea of building a machine whose architecture is inspired by that of the brain has roots which go far back in history. Nowadays, technological advances of computers and the availability of custom integrated circuits, permit simulations of hundreds or even thousands of neurons. In conjunction, the growing interest in learning machines, non-linear dynamics and parallel computation spurred renewed attention in artificial neural networks. Many tentative applications have been proposed, including decision systems (associative memories, classifiers, data compressors and optimizers), or parametric models for signal processing purposes (system identification, automatic control, noise canceling, etc.). While they do not always outperform standard methods, neural network approaches are already used in some real world applications for pattern recognition and signal processing tasks. The tutorial is divided into six lectures, that where presented at the Third Graduate Summer Course on Computational Physics (September 3-7, 1990) on Parallel Architectures and Applications, organized by the European Physical Society: (1) Introduction: machine learning and biological computation. (2) Adaptive artificial neurons (perceptron, ADALINE, sigmoid units, etc.): learning rules and implementations. (3) Neural network systems: architectures, learning algorithms. (4) Applications: pattern recognition, signal processing, etc. (5) Elements of learning theory: how to build networks which generalize. (6) A case study: a neural network for on-line recognition of handwritten alphanumeric characters.

  20. Dynamic properties of cellular neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Slavova

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behavior of a new class of information-processing systems called Cellular Neural Networks is investigated. In this paper we introduce a small parameter in the state equation of a cellular neural network and we seek for periodic phenomena. New approach is used for proving stability of a cellular neural network by constructing Lyapunov's majorizing equations. This algorithm is helpful for finding a map from initial continuous state space of a cellular neural network into discrete output. A comparison between cellular neural networks and cellular automata is made.

  1. Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Optical Neural Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Sileo, Leonardo; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In last decade, the possibility to optically interface with the mammalian brain in vivo has allowed unprecedented investigation of functional connectivity of neural circuitry. Together with new genetic and molecular techniques to optically trigger and monitor neural activity, a new generation of optical neural interfaces is being developed, mainly thanks to the exploitation of both bottom-up and top-down nanofabrication approaches. This review highlights the role of nanotechnologies for optical neural interfaces, with particular emphasis on new devices and methodologies for optogenetic control of neural activity and unconventional methods for detection and triggering of action potentials using optically-active colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:27013939

  2. Spike Neural Models Part II: Abstract Neural Models

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Melissa G.; Chartier, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    Neurons are complex cells that require a lot of time and resources to model completely. In spiking neural networks (SNN) though, not all that complexity is required. Therefore simple, abstract models are often used. These models save time, use less computer resources, and are easier to understand. This tutorial presents two such models: Izhikevich's model, which is biologically realistic in the resulting spike trains but not in the parameters, and the Leaky Integrate and Fire (LIF) model whic...

  3. Genetic attack on neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  4. Neural plasticity across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jonathan D; Schlaggar, Bradley L

    2017-01-01

    An essential feature of the brain is its capacity to change. Neuroscientists use the term 'plasticity' to describe the malleability of neuronal connectivity and circuitry. How does plasticity work? A review of current data suggests that plasticity encompasses many distinct phenomena, some of which operate across most or all of the lifespan, and others that operate exclusively in early development. This essay surveys some of the key concepts related to neural plasticity, beginning with how current patterns of neural activity (e.g., as you read this essay) come to impact future patterns of activity (e.g., your memory of this essay), and then extending this framework backward into more development-specific mechanisms of plasticity. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e216. doi: 10.1002/wdev.216 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Neural Networks Methodology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyfus, Gérard

    2005-01-01

    Neural networks represent a powerful data processing technique that has reached maturity and broad application. When clearly understood and appropriately used, they are a mandatory component in the toolbox of any engineer who wants make the best use of the available data, in order to build models, make predictions, mine data, recognize shapes or signals, etc. Ranging from theoretical foundations to real-life applications, this book is intended to provide engineers and researchers with clear methodologies for taking advantage of neural networks in industrial, financial or banking applications, many instances of which are presented in the book. For the benefit of readers wishing to gain deeper knowledge of the topics, the book features appendices that provide theoretical details for greater insight, and algorithmic details for efficient programming and implementation. The chapters have been written by experts ands seemlessly edited to present a coherent and comprehensive, yet not redundant, practically-oriented...

  6. Autonomic neural functions in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, T

    2005-08-01

    Autonomic neural functions are important to regulate vital functions in the living body. There are different methods to evaluate indirectly and directly autonomic, sympathetic and parasympathetic, neural functions of human body. Among various methods, microneurography is a technique to evaluate directly sympathetic neural functions in humans. Using this technique sympathetic neural traffic leading to skeletal muscles (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA) can be recorded from human peripheral nerves in situ. MSNA plays essentially important roles to maintain blood pressure homeostasis against gravity. Orthostatic intolerance is an important problem as an autonomic dysfunction encountered after exposure of human beings to microgravity. There exist at least two different types of sympathetic neural responses, low and high responders to orthostatic stress in orthostatic hypotension seen in neurological disorders. To answer the question if post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance is induced by low or high MSNA responses to orthostatic stress, MSNA was microneurographically recorded for the first time before, during and after spaceflight in 1998 under Neurolab international research project. The same activity has been recorded during and/or after ground-based short- and long-term simulations of microgravity. MSNA was rather enhanced on the 12(th) and 13(th) day of spaceflight and just after landing day. Postflight MSNA response to head-up tilt was well preserved in astronauts who were orthostatically well tolerant. MSNA was suppressed during short-term simulation of microgravity less than 2 hours but was enhanced after long-term simulation of microgravity more than 3 days. Orthostatic intolerance after exposure to long-term simulation of microgravity was associated with reduced MSNA response to orthostatic stress with impaired baroreflex functions. These findings obtained from MSNA recordings in subjects exposed to space as well as short- and long-term simulations of

  7. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor agonism and antagonism within the amygdaloid central nucleus suppresses pain affect: differential contribution of the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuz, Catherine A; Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Borszcz, George S

    2014-12-01

    The amygdala contributes to the generation of pain affect, and the amygdaloid central nucleus (CeA) receives nociceptive input that is mediated by glutamatergic neurotransmission. The present study compared the contribution of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonism and antagonism in the CeA to generation of the affective response of rats to an acute noxious stimulus. Vocalizations that occur following a brief tail shock (vocalization afterdischarges) are a validated rodent model of pain affect and were preferentially suppressed, in a dose-dependent manner, by bilateral injection into the CeA of NMDA (.1, .25, .5, or 1 μg/side) or the NMDA receptor antagonist d-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5; 1, 2, or 4 μg/side). Vocalizations that occur during tail shock were suppressed to a lesser degree, whereas spinal motor reflexes (tail flick and hind limb movements) were unaffected by injection of NMDA or AP5 into the CeA. Injection of NMDA, but not AP5, into the CeA increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, and unilateral injection of the μ-opiate receptor antagonist H-d-Phe-Cys-Tyr-d-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP; .25 μg) into ventrolateral periaqueductal gray prevented the antinociception generated by injection of NMDA into the CeA. These findings demonstrate that although NMDA receptor agonism and antagonism in the CeA produce similar suppression of pain behaviors, they do so via different neurobiologic mechanisms. The amygdala contributes to production of the emotional dimension of pain. NMDA receptor agonism and antagonism within the CeA suppressed rats' emotional response to acute painful stimulation. Understanding the neurobiology underlying emotional responses to pain will provide insights into new treatments for pain and its associated affective disorders. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Peptide IC-20, encoded by skin kininogen-1 of the European yellow-bellied toad, Bombina variegata, antagonizes bradykinin-induced arterial smooth muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives were to determine if the skin secretion of the European yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata, in common with other related species, contains a bradykinin inhibitor peptide and to isolate and structurally characterize this peptide. Materials and Methods: Lyophilized skin secretion obtained from this toad was subjected to reverse phase HPLC fractionation with subsequent bioassay of fractions for antagonism of the bradykinin activity using an isolated rat tail artery smooth muscle preparation. Subsequently, the primary structure of the peptide was established by a combination of microsequencing, mass spectroscopy, and molecular cloning, following which a synthetic replicate was chemically synthesised for bioassay. Results: A single peptide of molecular mass 2300.92 Da was resolved in HPLC fractions of skin secretion and its primary structure determined as IYNAIWP-KH-NK-KPGLL-. Database interrogation with this sequence indicated that this peptide was encoded by skin kininogen-1 previously cloned from B. variegata. The blank cycles were occupied by cysteinyl (C residues and the peptide was located toward the C-terminus of the skin kininogen, and flanked N-terminally by a classical -KR- propeptide convertase processing site. The peptide was named IC-20 in accordance (I = N-terminal isoleucine, C = C-terminal cysteine, 20 = number of residues. Like the natural peptide, its synthetic replicate displayed an antagonism of bradykinin-induced arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Conclusion: IC-20 represents a novel bradykinin antagonizing peptide from amphibian skin secretions and is the third such peptide found to be co-encoded with bradykinins within skin kininogens.

  9. Adaptive Regularization of Neural Classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1997-01-01

    We present a regularization scheme which iteratively adapts the regularization parameters by minimizing the validation error. It is suggested to use the adaptive regularization scheme in conjunction with optimal brain damage pruning to optimize the architecture and to avoid overfitting. Furthermore......, we propose an improved neural classification architecture eliminating an inherent redundancy in the widely used SoftMax classification network. Numerical results demonstrate the viability of the method...

  10. Functional neural anatomy of talent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbfleisch, M Layne

    2004-03-01

    The terms gifted, talented, and intelligent all have meanings that suggest an individual's highly proficient or exceptional performance in one or more specific areas of strength. Other than Spearman's g, which theorizes about a general elevated level of potential or ability, more contemporary theories of intelligence are based on theoretical models that define ability or intelligence according to a priori categories of specific performance. Recent studies in cognitive neuroscience report on the neural basis of g from various perspectives such as the neural speed theory and the efficiency of prefrontal function. Exceptional talent is the result of interactions between goal-directed behavior and nonvolitional perceptual processes in the brain that have yet to be fully characterized and understood by the fields of psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Some developmental studies report differences in region-specific neural activation, recruitment patterns, and reaction times in subjects who are identified with high IQ scores according to traditional scales of assessment such as the WISC-III or Stanford-Binet. Although as cases of savants and prodigies illustrate, talent is not synonymous with high IQ. This review synthesizes information from the fields of psychometrics and gifted education, with findings from the neurosciences on the neural basis of intelligence, creativity, profiles of expert performers, cognitive function, and plasticity to suggest a paradigm for investigating talent as the maximal and productive use of either or both of one's high level of general intelligence or domain-specific ability. Anat Rec (Part B: New Anat) 277B:21-36, 2004. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Handbook on neural information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Maggini, Marco; Jain, Lakhmi

    2013-01-01

    This handbook presents some of the most recent topics in neural information processing, covering both theoretical concepts and practical applications. The contributions include:                         Deep architectures                         Recurrent, recursive, and graph neural networks                         Cellular neural networks                         Bayesian networks                         Approximation capabilities of neural networks                         Semi-supervised learning                         Statistical relational learning                         Kernel methods for structured data                         Multiple classifier systems                         Self organisation and modal learning                         Applications to ...

  12. [Glutamate signaling and neural plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-07-01

    Proper functioning of the nervous system relies on the precise formation of neural circuits during development. At birth, neurons have redundant synaptic connections not only to their proper targets but also to other neighboring cells. Then, functional neural circuits are formed during early postnatal development by the selective strengthening of necessary synapses and weakening of surplus connections. Synaptic connections are also modified so that projection fields of active afferents expand at the expense of lesser ones. We have studied the molecular mechanisms underlying these activity-dependent prunings and the plasticity of synaptic circuitry using gene-engineered mice defective in the glutamatergic signaling system. NMDA-type glutamate receptors are critically involved in the establishment of the somatosensory pathway ascending from the brainstem trigeminal nucleus to the somatosensory cortex. Without NMDA receptors, whisker-related patterning fails to develop, whereas lesion-induced plasticity occurs normally during the critical period. In contrast, mice lacking the glutamate transporters GLAST or GLT1 are selectively impaired in the lesion-induced critical plasticity of cortical barrels, although whisker-related patterning itself develops normally. In the developing cerebellum, multiple climbing fibers initially innervating given Purkinje cells are eliminated one by one until mono-innervation is achieved. In this pruning process, P/Q-type Ca2+ channels expressed on Purkinje cells are critically involved by the selective strengthening of single main climbing fibers against other lesser afferents. Therefore, the activation of glutamate receptors that leads to an activity-dependent increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration plays a key role in the pruning of immature synaptic circuits into functional circuits. On the other hand, glutamate transporters appear to control activity-dependent plasticity among afferent fields, presumably through adjusting

  13. [Agonism and antagonism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Anne-Lise

    2016-12-01

    This essay considers dissensus as the starting point for the construction of a common epistemic space rather than as the acknowledgement of an irreducible disagreement. In the argumentative confrontation and disagreements, we do not want to identify a process which might lead to agreement through rational debate. The aim of this essay is rather to understand how dissensus leads to the constitution of plural communities. It discusses a certain number of texts of political philosophy (Habermas, Mouffe, etc.), where the notion of agreement is crucial to an analysis of argumentative confrontations. This essay uses the hypothesis to analyse the circulation of Leibniz's dynamics in his correspondence with De Volder. This perspective shows eventually that dissensus is not an obstacle but the basis on which multiple circulations of theories are possible.

  14. Blockade of orexin-1 receptors attenuates orexin-2 receptor antagonism-induced sleep promotion in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugovic, Christine; Shelton, Jonathan E; Aluisio, Leah E; Fraser, Ian C; Jiang, Xiaohui; Sutton, Steven W; Bonaventure, Pascal; Yun, Sujin; Li, Xiaorong; Lord, Brian; Dvorak, Curt A; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2009-07-01

    Orexins are peptides produced by lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in the maintenance of wakefulness by activating orexin-1 (OX1R) and orexin-2 (OX2R) receptor located in wake-active structures. Pharmacological blockade of both receptors by the dual OX1/2R antagonist (2R)-2-[(1S)-6,7-dimethoxy-1-{2-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]ethyl}-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl]-N-methyl-2-phenylethanamide (almorexant) has been shown to promote sleep in animals and humans during their active period. However, the selective distribution of OX1R and OX2R in distinct neuronal circuits may result in a differential impact of these receptors in sleep-wake modulation. The respective role of OX1R and OX2R on sleep in correlation with monoamine release was evaluated in rats treated with selective antagonists alone or in combination. When administered in either phase of the light/dark cycle, the OX2R antagonist 1-(2,4-dibromophenyl)-3-[(4S,5S)-2,2-dimethyl-4-phenyl-1,3-dioxan-5-yl]urea (JNJ-10397049) decreased the latency for persistent sleep and increased nonrapid eye movement and rapid eye movement sleep time. Almorexant produced less hypnotic activity, whereas the OX1R antagonist 1-(6,8-difluoro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]urea (SB-408124) had no effect. Microdialysis studies showed that either OX2R or OX1/2R antagonism decreased extracellular histamine concentration in the lateral hypothalamus, whereas both OX1R and OX1/2R antagonists increased dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex. Finally, coadministration of the OX1R with the OX2R antagonist greatly attenuated the sleep-promoting effects of the OX2R antagonist. These results indicate that blockade of OX2R is sufficient to initiate and prolong sleep, consistent with the hypothesis of a deactivation of the histaminergic system. In addition, it is suggested that simultaneous inhibition of OX1R attenuates the sleep-promoting effects mediated by selective OX2R blockade, possibly correlated

  15. BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibition and RARγ antagonism work cooperatively in human HL60 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, Mariarita; Yap, Jeremy L.; Yu, Jianshi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Cione, Erika [Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, Ed. Polifunzionale, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, CS (Italy); Fletcher, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kane, Maureen A., E-mail: mkane@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by chromosomal translocations that result in fusion proteins, including the promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor, alpha fusion protein (PML–RARα). All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment is the standard drug treatment for APL yielding cure rates >80% by activating transcription and proteasomal degradation of retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARα). Whereas combination therapy with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has increased survival further, patients that experience relapse and are refractory to atRA and/or As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a clinically significant problem. BCL-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and over-expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins has been associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in APL including impairment of the ability of atRA to induce growth arrest and differentiation. Here we investigated the novel BH3 domain mimetic, JY-1-106, which antagonizes the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-x{sub L}) and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) alone and in combination with retinoids including atRA, AM580 (RARα agonist), and SR11253 (RARγ antagonist). JY-1-106 reduced cell viability in HL-60 cells alone and in combination with retinoids. The combination of JY-1-106 and SR11253 had the greatest impact on cell viability by stimulating apoptosis. These studies indicate that dual BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibitors and retinoids could work cooperatively in leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Novel Bcl-x{sub L}/Mcl-1 inhibitor JY-1-106 reduces HL60 cell viability. • JY-1-106 is investigated in combination with retinoic acid, AM580, and SR11253. • AM580 is an RARα agonist; SR11253 is an RARγ antagonist. • Combined use of JY-1-106/SR11253 exhibited the greatest cell viability reduction. • JY-1-106 alone or in combination with retinoids induces apoptosis.

  16. N-cadherin negatively regulates osteoblast proliferation and survival by antagonizing Wnt, ERK and PI3K/Akt signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Haÿ

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoblasts are bone forming cells that play an essential role in osteogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms that control osteoblast number is of major interest for the treatment of skeletal disorders characterized by abnormal bone formation. Canonical Wnt signalling plays an important role in the control of osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and survival. Recent studies indicate that the cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin interacts with the Wnt co-receptors LRP5/6 to regulate osteoblast differentiation and bone accrual. The role of N-cadherin in the control of osteoblast proliferation and survival remains unknown. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells and N-cadherin transgenic mice, we demonstrate that N-cadherin overexpression inhibits cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The negative effect of N-cadherin on cell proliferation results from decreased Wnt, ERK and PI3K/Akt signalling and is restored by N-cadherin neutralizing antibody that antagonizes N-cadherin-LRP5 interaction. Inhibition of Wnt signalling using DKK1 or Sfrp1 abolishes the ability of N-cadherin blockade to restore ERK and PI3K signalling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in N-cadherin overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signalling. Consistently, we found that N-cadherin overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt3a ligand and its downstream targets c-myc and cyclin D1, an effect that is partially reversed by N-cadherin blockade. We also show that N-cadherin overexpression decreases osteoblast survival in vitro and in vivo. This negative effect on cell survival results from inhibition of PI3K/Akt signalling and increased Bax/Bcl-2, a mechanism that is rescued by Wnt3a. CONCLUSION: The data show that N-cadherin negatively controls osteoblast proliferation and survival via inhibition of autocrine/paracrine Wnt3a ligand expression and attenuation of Wnt

  17. Ant-caterpillar antagonism at the community level: interhabitat variation of tritrophic interactions in a neotropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendoya, Sebastián F; Oliveira, Paulo S

    2015-03-01

    Ant foraging on foliage can substantially affect how phytophagous insects use host plants and represents a high predation risk for caterpillars, which are important folivores. Ant-plant-herbivore interactions are especially pervasive in cerrado savanna due to continuous ant visitation to liquid food sources on foliage (extrafloral nectaries, insect honeydew). While searching for liquid rewards on plants, aggressive ants frequently attack or kill insect herbivores, decreasing their numbers. Because ants vary in diet and aggressiveness, their effect on herbivores also varies. Additionally, the differential occurrence of ant attractants (plant and insect exudates) on foliage produces variable levels of ant foraging within local floras and among localities. Here, we investigate how variation of ant communities and of traits among host plant species (presence or absence of ant attractants) can change the effect of carnivores (predatory ants) on herbivore communities (caterpillars) in a cerrado savanna landscape. We sampled caterpillars and foliage-foraging ants in four cerrado localities (70-460 km apart). We found that: (i) caterpillar infestation was negatively related with ant visitation to plants; (ii) this relationship depended on local ant abundance and species composition, and on local preference by ants for plants with liquid attractants; (iii) this was not related to local plant richness or plant size; (iv) the relationship between the presence of ant attractants and caterpillar abundance varied among sites from negative to neutral; and (v) caterpillars feeding on plants with ant attractants are more resistant to ant predation than those feeding on plants lacking attractants. Liquid food on foliage mediates host plant quality for lepidopterans by promoting generalized ant-caterpillar antagonism. Our study in cerrado shows that the negative effects of generalist predatory ants on herbivores are detectable at a community level, affecting patterns of abundance and

  18. Neural prostheses and brain plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2009-12-01

    The success of modern neural prostheses is dependent on a complex interplay between the devices' hardware and software and the dynamic environment in which the devices operate: the patient's body or 'wetware'. Over 120 000 severe/profoundly deaf individuals presently receive information enabling auditory awareness and speech perception from cochlear implants. The cochlear implant therefore provides a useful case study for a review of the complex interactions between hardware, software and wetware, and of the important role of the dynamic nature of wetware. In the case of neural prostheses, the most critical component of that wetware is the central nervous system. This paper will examine the evidence of changes in the central auditory system that contribute to changes in performance with a cochlear implant, and discuss how these changes relate to electrophysiological and functional imaging studies in humans. The relationship between the human data and evidence from animals of the remarkable capacity for plastic change of the central auditory system, even into adulthood, will then be examined. Finally, we will discuss the role of brain plasticity in neural prostheses in general.

  19. Neural correlates of paediatric dysgraphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoorn, Jessika F; Maathuis, Carel G B; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2013-11-01

    Writing is an important skill that is related both to school performance and to psychosocial outcomes such as the child's self-esteem. Deficits in handwriting performance are frequently encountered in children with developmental coordination disorder. This review focuses on what is known about the neural correlates of atypical handwriting in children. Knowledge of the neural correlates is derived from studies using clinical case designs (e.g. lesion studies), studies using neuroimaging, and assessment of minor neurological dysfunction. The two functional imaging studies suggest a contribution of cortical areas and the cerebellum. The largest study indicated that cortical areas in all regions of the brain are involved (frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital). The two lesion studies confirmed cerebellar involvement. The findings of the study on minor neurological dysfunction in children with writing problems correspond to the imaging results. The limited data on the neural substrate of paediatric dysgraphia suggest that at least a subset of the children with dysgraphia have dysfunctions in extensive supraspinal networks. In others, dysfunction may be restricted to either the cerebellum or specific cortical sites. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  20. Three dimensional living neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnenberger, Anna; McLeod, Robert R.; Basta, Tamara; Stowell, Michael H. B.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate holographic optical tweezing combined with step-and-repeat maskless projection micro-stereolithography for fine control of 3D positioning of living cells within a 3D microstructured hydrogel grid. Samples were fabricated using three different cell lines; PC12, NT2/D1 and iPSC. PC12 cells are a rat cell line capable of differentiation into neuron-like cells NT2/D1 cells are a human cell line that exhibit biochemical and developmental properties similar to that of an early embryo and when exposed to retinoic acid the cells differentiate into human neurons useful for studies of human neurological disease. Finally induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) were utilized with the goal of future studies of neural networks fabricated from human iPSC derived neurons. Cells are positioned in the monomer solution with holographic optical tweezers at 1064 nm and then are encapsulated by photopolymerization of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels formed by thiol-ene photo-click chemistry via projection of a 512x512 spatial light modulator (SLM) illuminated at 405 nm. Fabricated samples are incubated in differentiation media such that cells cease to divide and begin to form axons or axon-like structures. By controlling the position of the cells within the encapsulating hydrogel structure the formation of the neural circuits is controlled. The samples fabricated with this system are a useful model for future studies of neural circuit formation, neurological disease, cellular communication, plasticity, and repair mechanisms.

  1. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriya eWatanabe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a group setting, individuals’ perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems’ level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation.

  2. Neural Correlates of Predictive Saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen M; Peltsch, Alicia; Kilmade, Maureen; Brien, Donald C; Coe, Brian C; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Munoz, Douglas P

    2016-08-01

    Every day we generate motor responses that are timed with external cues. This phenomenon of sensorimotor synchronization has been simplified and studied extensively using finger tapping sequences that are executed in synchrony with auditory stimuli. The predictive saccade paradigm closely resembles the finger tapping task. In this paradigm, participants follow a visual target that "steps" between two fixed locations on a visual screen at predictable ISIs. Eventually, the time from target appearance to saccade initiation (i.e., saccadic RT) becomes predictive with values nearing 0 msec. Unlike the finger tapping literature, neural control of predictive behavior described within the eye movement literature has not been well established and is inconsistent, especially between neuroimaging and patient lesion studies. To resolve these discrepancies, we used fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of predictive saccades by contrasting brain areas involved with behavior generated from the predictive saccade task with behavior generated from a reactive saccade task (saccades are generated toward targets that are unpredictably timed). We observed striking differences in neural recruitment between reactive and predictive conditions: Reactive saccades recruited oculomotor structures, as predicted, whereas predictive saccades recruited brain structures that support timing in motor responses, such as the crus I of the cerebellum, and structures commonly associated with the default mode network. Therefore, our results were more consistent with those found in the finger tapping literature.

  3. Central neural pathways for thermoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate a homeostatic repertoire to maintain body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and to alter body temperature during the inflammatory response. This review summarizes the functional organization of the neural pathways through which cutaneous thermal receptors alter thermoregulatory effectors: the cutaneous circulation for heat loss, the brown adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and heart for thermogenesis and species-dependent mechanisms (sweating, panting and saliva spreading) for evaporative heat loss. These effectors are regulated by parallel but distinct, effector-specific neural pathways that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The thermal afferent circuits include cutaneous thermal receptors, spinal dorsal horn neurons and lateral parabrachial nucleus neurons projecting to the preoptic area to influence warm-sensitive, inhibitory output neurons which control thermogenesis-promoting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus that project to premotor neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla, including the raphe pallidus, that descend to provide the excitation necessary to drive thermogenic thermal effectors. A distinct population of warm-sensitive preoptic neurons controls heat loss through an inhibitory input to raphe pallidus neurons controlling cutaneous vasoconstriction. PMID:21196160

  4. Fuzzy neural networks: theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Madan M.

    1994-10-01

    During recent years, significant advances have been made in two distinct technological areas: fuzzy logic and computational neural networks. The theory of fuzzy logic provides a mathematical framework to capture the uncertainties associated with human cognitive processes, such as thinking and reasoning. It also provides a mathematical morphology to emulate certain perceptual and linguistic attributes associated with human cognition. On the other hand, the computational neural network paradigms have evolved in the process of understanding the incredible learning and adaptive features of neuronal mechanisms inherent in certain biological species. Computational neural networks replicate, on a small scale, some of the computational operations observed in biological learning and adaptation. The integration of these two fields, fuzzy logic and neural networks, have given birth to an emerging technological field -- fuzzy neural networks. Fuzzy neural networks, have the potential to capture the benefits of these two fascinating fields, fuzzy logic and neural networks, into a single framework. The intent of this tutorial paper is to describe the basic notions of biological and computational neuronal morphologies, and to describe the principles and architectures of fuzzy neural networks. Towards this goal, we develop a fuzzy neural architecture based upon the notion of T-norm and T-conorm connectives. An error-based learning scheme is described for this neural structure.

  5. Placenta growth factor-1 antagonizes VEGF-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth by the formation of functionally inactive PIGF-1/VEGF heterodimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, A.; Cao, R.; Pawliuk, R.

    2002-01-01

    , the biological function of its related homolog, placenta growth factor (PlGF), is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that PlGF-1, an alternatively spliced isoform of the PlGF gene, antagonizes VEGF-induced angiogenesis when both factors are coexpressed in murine fibrosarcoma cells. Overexpression of PlGF-1...... signaling pathways. Further, PlGF-1 inhibits the growth of a murine fibrosarcoma by approximately 90% when PlGF-1-expressing tumor cells are implanted in syngeneic mice. In contrast, overexpression of human VEGF in murine tumor cells causes accelerated and exponential growth of primary fibrosarcomas...

  6. Acyl-CoA esters antagonize the effects of ligands on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha conformation, DNA binding, and interaction with Co-factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Dam, I; Jorgensen, C

    2001-01-01

    palmitoyl-CoA analog, antagonizes the effects of agonists on PPARalpha conformation and function in vitro. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, S-hexadecyl-CoA prevented agonist-induced binding of the PPARalpha-retinoid X receptor alpha heterodimer to the acyl-CoA oxidase peroxisome proliferator...... to the buffering effect of high affinity acyl-CoA-binding proteins, especially the acyl-CoA-binding protein. By using PPARalpha expressed in Sf21 cells for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that S-hexadecyl-CoA was able to increase the mobility of the PPARalpha-containing heterodimer even...

  7. Chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone release prolactin through dopamine antagonism at low concentrations but paradoxically inhibit prolactin release at high concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, G. M.; Delitala, G.; Grossman, A.; Stubbs, W. A.; Yeo, T.

    1980-01-01

    1. The effects of chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone on the release of prolactin from perfused columns of dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells were studied. 2. Chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone antagonized the dopamine-mediated inhibition of prolactin release at low concentrations. 3. Each dopamine antagonist displaced the dose-response curve for dopamine-induced suppression of prolactin release to the right in a parallel manner. 4. At higher concentrations, the four drugs became less effective as dopamine antagonists. 5. At high concentrations in the absence of dopamine, chlorpromazine, haloperidol, metoclopramide and domperidone paradoxically suppressed prolactin secretion by an unknown mechanism. PMID:6110459

  8. Utility of the ceftazidime-imipenem antagonism test (CIAT to detect and confirm the presence of inducible AmpC beta-lactamases among enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlademir Vicente Cantarelli

    Full Text Available Detection of AmpC beta-lactamase production by enterobacteria has been problematic. Contrary to ESBLs, no specific guidelines are available for detection and confirmation of AmpC production by clinical relevant microorganisms. Moreover, some bacterial species may produce inducible AmpC beta-lactamases that can be easily overlooked by routine susceptibility tests. We reported here a new test based on the strong inducible effect of imipenem on AmpC genes and the consequent antagonism with ceftazidime. This test is very simple and proved to be helpful in detecting AmpC-inducible enzymes among several species of clinical isolates.

  9. MicroRNA-130b targets Fmr1 and regulates embryonic neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Zhang, Kunshan [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Yanlu; Wang, Junbang; Cui, Yaru [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Li, Siguang, E-mail: siguangli@163.com [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Luo, Yuping, E-mail: luoyuping@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We found that the 3′ UTR of the Fmr1 mRNA is a target of miR-130b. •MiR-130b suppresses the expression of Fmr1 in mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters the proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters fate specification of mouse embryonic stem cell. -- Abstract: Fragile X syndrome, one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat in the 5′-untranslated region of the X-linked Fmr1 gene, which results in transcriptional silencing and loss of expression of its encoded protein FMRP. The loss of FMRP increases proliferation and alters fate specification in adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs). However, little is known about Fmr1 mRNA regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In the present study, we report that miR-130b regulated Fmr1 expression by directly targeting its 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR). Up-regulation of miR-130b in mouse embryonic neural progenitor cells (eNPCs) decreased Fmr1 expression, markedly increased eNPC proliferation and altered the differentiation tendency of eNPCs, suggesting that antagonizing miR-130b may be a new therapeutic entry point for treating Fragile X syndrome.

  10. Satellite image analysis using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    The tremendous backlog of unanalyzed satellite data necessitates the development of improved methods for data cataloging and analysis. Ford Aerospace has developed an image analysis system, SIANN (Satellite Image Analysis using Neural Networks) that integrates the technologies necessary to satisfy NASA's science data analysis requirements for the next generation of satellites. SIANN will enable scientists to train a neural network to recognize image data containing scenes of interest and then rapidly search data archives for all such images. The approach combines conventional image processing technology with recent advances in neural networks to provide improved classification capabilities. SIANN allows users to proceed through a four step process of image classification: filtering and enhancement, creation of neural network training data via application of feature extraction algorithms, configuring and training a neural network model, and classification of images by application of the trained neural network. A prototype experimentation testbed was completed and applied to climatological data.

  11. Neural plasticity of development and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Adriana

    2010-06-01

    Development and learning are powerful agents of change across the lifespan that induce robust structural and functional plasticity in neural systems. An unresolved question in developmental cognitive neuroscience is whether development and learning share the same neural mechanisms associated with experience-related neural plasticity. In this article, I outline the conceptual and practical challenges of this question, review insights gleaned from adult studies, and describe recent strides toward examining this topic across development using neuroimaging methods. I suggest that development and learning are not two completely separate constructs and instead, that they exist on a continuum. While progressive and regressive changes are central to both, the behavioral consequences associated with these changes are closely tied to the existing neural architecture of maturity of the system. Eventually, a deeper, more mechanistic understanding of neural plasticity will shed light on behavioral changes across development and, more broadly, about the underlying neural basis of cognition. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Neurosecurity: security and privacy for neural devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Tamara; Matsuoka, Yoky; Kohno, Tadayoshi

    2009-07-01

    An increasing number of neural implantable devices will become available in the near future due to advances in neural engineering. This discipline holds the potential to improve many patients' lives dramatically by offering improved-and in some cases entirely new-forms of rehabilitation for conditions ranging from missing limbs to degenerative cognitive diseases. The use of standard engineering practices, medical trials, and neuroethical evaluations during the design process can create systems that are safe and that follow ethical guidelines; unfortunately, none of these disciplines currently ensure that neural devices are robust against adversarial entities trying to exploit these devices to alter, block, or eavesdrop on neural signals. The authors define "neurosecurity"-a version of computer science security principles and methods applied to neural engineering-and discuss why neurosecurity should be a critical consideration in the design of future neural devices.

  13. Flexible and Organic Neural Interfaces: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Lago

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neural interfaces are a fundamental tool to interact with neurons and to study neural networks by transducing cellular signals into electronics signals and vice versa. State-of-the-art technologies allow both in vivo and in vitro recording of neural activity. However, they are mainly made of stiff inorganic materials that can limit the long-term stability of the implant due to infection and/or glial scars formation. In the last decade, organic electronics is digging its way in the field of bioelectronics and researchers started to develop neural interfaces based on organic semiconductors, creating more flexible and conformable neural interfaces that can be intrinsically biocompatible. In this manuscript, we are going to review the latest achievements in flexible and organic neural interfaces for the recording of neuronal activity.

  14. Rod-Shaped Neural Units for Aligned 3D Neural Network Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Negishi, Midori; Onoe, Hiroaki; Ito, Akane; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes neural tissue units with aligned nerve fibers (called rod-shaped neural units) that connect neural networks with aligned neurons. To make the proposed units, 3D fiber-shaped neural tissues covered with a calcium alginate hydrogel layer are prepared with a microfluidic system and are cut in an accurate and reproducible manner. These units have aligned nerve fibers inside the hydrogel layer and connectable points on both ends. By connecting the units with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) guide, 3D neural tissues can be constructed and maintained for more than two weeks of culture. In addition, neural networks can be formed between the different neural units via synaptic connections. Experimental results indicate that the proposed rod-shaped neural units are effective tools for the construction of spatially complex connections with aligned nerve fibers in vitro. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Person Movement Prediction Using Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Vintan, Lucian; Gellert, Arpad; Petzold, Jan; Ungerer, Theo

    2006-01-01

    Ubiquitous systems use context information to adapt appliance behavior to human needs. Even more convenience is reached if the appliance foresees the user's desires and acts proactively. This paper proposes neural prediction techniques to anticipate a person's next movement. We focus on neural predictors (multi-layer perceptron with back-propagation learning) with and without pre-training. The optimal configuration of the neural network is determined by evaluating movement sequences of real p...

  16. Neural crest contributions to the lamprey head

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The neural crest is a vertebrate-specific cell population that contributes to the facial skeleton and other derivatives. We have performed focal DiI injection into the cranial neural tube of the developing lamprey in order to follow the migratory pathways of discrete groups of cells from origin to destination and to compare neural crest migratory pathways in a basal vertebrate to those of gnathostomes. The results show that the general pathways of cranial neural crest migration are conserved throughout the vertebrates, with cells migrating in streams analogous to the mandibular and hyoid streams. Caudal branchial neural crest cells migrate ventrally as a sheet of cells from the hindbrain and super-pharyngeal region of the neural tube and form a cylinder surrounding a core of mesoderm in each pharyngeal arch, similar to that seen in zebrafish and axolotl. In addition to these similarities, we also uncovered important differences. Migration into the presumptive caudal branchial arches of the lamprey involves both rostral and caudal movements of neural crest cells that have not been described in gnathostomes, suggesting that barriers that constrain rostrocaudal movement of cranial neural crest cells may have arisen after the agnathan/gnathostome split. Accordingly, neural crest cells from a single axial level contributed to multiple arches and there was extensive mixing between populations. There was no apparent filling of neural crest derivatives in a ventral-to-dorsal order, as has been observed in higher vertebrates, nor did we find evidence of a neural crest contribution to cranial sensory ganglia. These results suggest that migratory constraints and additional neural crest derivatives arose later in gnathostome evolution.

  17. Pediatric Nutritional Requirements Determination with Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Karlık, Bekir; Ece, Aydın

    1998-01-01

    To calculate daily nutritional requirements of children, a computer program has been developed based upon neural network. Three parameters, daily protein, energy and water requirements, were calculated through trained artificial neural networks using a database of 312 children The results were compared with those of calculated from dietary requirements tables of World Health Organisation. No significant difference was found between two calculations. In conclusion, a simple neural network may ...

  18. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  19. Initialization of multilayer forecasting artifical neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bochkarev, Vladimir V.; Maslennikova, Yulia S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new method was developed for initialising artificial neural networks predicting dynamics of time series. Initial weighting coefficients were determined for neurons analogously to the case of a linear prediction filter. Moreover, to improve the accuracy of the initialization method for a multilayer neural network, some variants of decomposition of the transformation matrix corresponding to the linear prediction filter were suggested. The efficiency of the proposed neural netwo...

  20. Texture Based Image Analysis With Neural Nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovici, Irina S.; Ong, Hoo-Tee; Ostrander, Kim E.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper, we combine direct image statistics and spatial frequency domain techniques with a neural net model to analyze texture based images. The resultant optimal texture features obtained from the direct and transformed image form the exemplar pattern of the neural net. The proposed approach introduces an automated texture analysis applied to metallography for determining the cooling rate and mechanical working of the materials. The results suggest that the proposed method enhances the practical applications of neural nets and texture extraction features.

  1. Effects of ethanol and NAP on cerebellar expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule L1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon M Fitzgerald

    Full Text Available The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is critical for brain development and plays a role in learning and memory in the adult. Ethanol inhibits L1-mediated cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs, and these actions might underlie the cerebellar dysmorphology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The peptide NAP potently blocks ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis. We used quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting of extracts of cerebellar slices, CGNs, and astrocytes from postnatal day 7 (PD7 rats to investigate whether ethanol and NAP act in part by regulating the expression of L1. Treatment of cerebellar slices with 20 mM ethanol, 10(-12 M NAP, or both for 4 hours, 24 hours, and 10 days did not significantly affect L1 mRNA and protein levels. Similar treatment for 4 or 24 hours did not regulate L1 expression in primary cultures of CGNs and astrocytes, the predominant cerebellar cell types. Because ethanol also damages the adult cerebellum, we studied the effects of chronic ethanol exposure in adult rats. One year of binge drinking did not alter L1 gene and protein expression in extracts from whole cerebellum. Thus, ethanol does not alter L1 expression in the developing or adult cerebellum; more likely, ethanol disrupts L1 function by modifying its conformation and signaling. Likewise, NAP antagonizes the actions of ethanol without altering L1 expression.

  2. Cognitive Control Signals for Neural Prosthetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S. Musallam; B. D. Corneil; B. Greger; H. Scherberger; R. A. Andersen

    2004-01-01

    Recent development of neural prosthetics for assisting paralyzed patients has focused on decoding intended hand trajectories from motor cortical neurons and using this signal to control external devices...

  3. NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Musallam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultralong multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies.

  4. Neural repair in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury to the adult brain often results in substantial loss of neural tissue and subsequent permanent functional impairment. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been developed to harness the regenerative potential of neural stem cells and the existing fate plasticity of neural cells in the nervous system to prevent tissue loss or to enhance structural and functional regeneration upon injury. Here, we review recent advances of stem cell-associated neural repair in the adult brain, discuss current challenges and limitations, and suggest potential directions to foster the translation of experimental stem cell therapies into the clinic. PMID:26918167

  5. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilim, R.B.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.

    1998-04-28

    A method and system are disclosed for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process. 33 figs.

  6. Fuzzy neural network theory and application

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Puyin

    2004-01-01

    This book systematically synthesizes research achievements in the field of fuzzy neural networks in recent years. It also provides a comprehensive presentation of the developments in fuzzy neural networks, with regard to theory as well as their application to system modeling and image restoration. Special emphasis is placed on the fundamental concepts and architecture analysis of fuzzy neural networks. The book is unique in treating all kinds of fuzzy neural networks and their learning algorithms and universal approximations, and employing simulation examples which are carefully designed to he

  7. Neural reflexes in inflammation and immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    .... Development of advanced neurophysiological and immunological techniques recently enabled the study of reflex neural circuits that maintain immunological homeostasis, and are essential for health in mammals...

  8. Neural network optimization, components, and design selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    Neural Networks are part of a revived technology which has received a lot of hype in recent years. As is apt to happen in any hyped technology, jargon and predictions make its assimilation and application difficult. Nevertheless, Neural Networks have found use in a number of areas, working on non-trivial and non-contrived problems. For example, one net has been trained to "read", translating English text into phoneme sequences. Other applications of Neural Networks include data base manipulation and the solving of routing and classification types of optimization problems. It was their use in optimization that got me involved with Neural Networks. As it turned out, "optimization" used in this context was somewhat misleading, because while some network configurations could indeed solve certain kinds of optimization problems, the configuring or "training" of a Neural Network itself is an optimization problem, and most of the literature which talked about Neural Nets and optimization in the same breath did not speak to my goal of using Neural Nets to help solve lens optimization problems. I did eventually apply Neural Network to lens optimization, and I will touch on those results. The application of Neural Nets to the problem of lens selection was much more successful, and those results will dominate this paper.

  9. Practical neural network recipies in C++

    CERN Document Server

    Masters

    2014-01-01

    This text serves as a cookbook for neural network solutions to practical problems using C++. It will enable those with moderate programming experience to select a neural network model appropriate to solving a particular problem, and to produce a working program implementing that network. The book provides guidance along the entire problem-solving path, including designing the training set, preprocessing variables, training and validating the network, and evaluating its performance. Though the book is not intended as a general course in neural networks, no background in neural works is assum

  10. The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions. PMID:22595346

  11. Sequential neural models with stochastic layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraccaro, Marco; Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Paquet, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    How can we efficiently propagate uncertainty in a latent state representation with recurrent neural networks? This paper introduces stochastic recurrent neural networks which glue a deterministic recurrent neural network and a state space model together to form a stochastic and sequential neural ...... the uncertainty in a latent path, like a state space model, we improve the state of the art results on the Blizzard and TIMIT speech modeling data sets by a large margin, while achieving comparable performances to competing methods on polyphonic music modeling....

  12. Captodiamine, a putative antidepressant, enhances hypothalamic BDNF expression in vivo by synergistic 5-HT2c receptor antagonism and sigma-1 receptor agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Rebecca M; Regan, Ciaran M

    2013-10-01

    The putative antidepressant captodiamine is a 5-HT2c receptor antagonist and agonist at sigma-1 and D3 dopamine receptors, exerts an anti-immobility action in the forced swim paradigm, and enhances dopamine turnover in the frontal cortex. Captodiamine has also been found to ameliorate stress-induced anhedonia, reduce the associated elevations of hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and restore the reductions in hypothalamic BDNF expression. Here we demonstrate chronic administration of captodiamine to have no significant effect on hypothalamic CRF expression through sigma-1 receptor agonism; however, both sigma-1 receptor agonism or 5-HT2c receptor antagonism were necessary to enhance BDNF expression. Regulation of BDNF expression by captodiamine was associated with increased phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB and mediated through sigma-1 receptor agonism but blocked by 5-HT2c receptor antagonism. The existence of two separate signalling pathways was confirmed by immunolocalisation of each receptor to distinct cell populations in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Increased BDNF induced by captodiamine was also associated with enhanced expression of synapsin, but not PSD-95, suggesting induction of long-term structural plasticity between hypothalamic synapses. These unique features of captodiamine may contribute to its ability to ameliorate stress-induced anhedonia as the hypothalamus plays a prominent role in regulating HPA axis activity.

  13. Inducible HSP70 antagonizes IL-1β cytocidal effects through inhibiting NF-kB activation via destabilizing TAK1 in HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Cao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite several reports describing the HSP70-mediated cytoprotection against IL-1, the precise mechanism for this phenomenon remains to be determined. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used HeLa cells, a human epithelial carcinoma cell line, to evaluate the role of inducible HSP70 in response of IL-1β stimulation. We found that inducible HSP70 antagonized the cytotoxicity of IL-1β and improved the survival of HeLa cells. Further investigation demonstrated that increased expression level of inducible HSP70 reduced the complex of TAK1 and HSP90, and promoted the degradation of TAK1 protein via proteasome pathway. By overexpression and RNAi knockdown, we showed that inducible HSP70 modulated the NF-kB but not MAPKs signalings through influencing the stability of TAK1 protein in HeLa cells. Moreover, overexpression of HSP70 attenuated the production of iNOS upon IL-1β stimulation, validating that inducible HSP70 serves as a cytopretective factor to antagonize the cytocidal effects of IL-1β in HeLa cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations provide evidence for a novel signaling mechanism involving HSP70, TAK1, and NF-κB in the response of IL-1β cytocidal effects. This research also provides insight into mechanisms by which HSP70 exerts its cytoprotective action upon toxic stimuli in tumor cells.

  14. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L. D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  15. Antagonizing scalloped with a novel vestigial construct reveals an important role for scalloped in Drosophila melanogaster leg, eye and optic lobe development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ankush; Srivastava, Ajay; Davis, Monica M; O'Keefe, Sandra L; Chow, Leola; Bell, John B

    2007-02-01

    Scalloped (SD), a TEA/ATTS-domain-containing protein, is required for the proper development of Drosophila melanogaster. Despite being expressed in a variety of tissues, most of the work on SD has been restricted to understanding its role and function in patterning the adult wing. To gain a better understanding of its role in development, we generated sd(47M) flip-in mitotic clones. The mitotic clones had developmental defects in the leg and eye. Further, by removing the VG domains involved in activation, we created a reagent (VGDeltaACT) that disrupts the ability of SD to form a functional transcription factor complex and produced similar phenotypes to the flip-in mitotic clones. The VGDeltaACT construct also disrupted adult CNS development. Expression of the VGDeltaACT construct in the wing alters the cellular localization of VG and produces a mutant phenotype, indicating that the construct is able to antagonize the normal function of the SD/VG complex. Expression of the protein:protein interaction portion of SD is also able to elicit similar phenotypes, suggesting that SD interacts with other cofactors in the leg, eye, and adult CNS. Furthermore, antagonizing SD in larval tissues results in cell death, indicating that SD may also have a role in cell survival.

  16. Cultured neural networks: Optimisation of patterned network adhesiveness and characterisation of their neural activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Wim; Ruardij, T.G.; Marani, Enrico; Roelofsen, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    One type of future, improved neural interface is the "cultured probe"?. It is a hybrid type of neural information transducer or prosthesis, for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity. It would consist of a microelectrode array (MEA) on a planar substrate, each electrode being covered and

  17. The LILARTI neural network system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J.D. Jr.; Schell, F.M.; Dodd, C.V.

    1992-10-01

    The material of this Technical Memorandum is intended to provide the reader with conceptual and technical background information on the LILARTI neural network system of detail sufficient to confer an understanding of the LILARTI method as it is presently allied and to facilitate application of the method to problems beyond the scope of this document. Of particular importance in this regard are the descriptive sections and the Appendices which include operating instructions, partial listings of program output and data files, and network construction information.

  18. Phantom limbs and neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, V S; Rogers-Ramachandran, D

    2000-03-01

    The study of phantom limbs has received tremendous impetus from recent studies linking changes in cortical topography with perceptual experience. Systematic psychophysical testing and functional imaging studies on patients with phantom limbs provide 2 unique opportunities. First, they allow us to demonstrate neural plasticity in the adult human brain. Second, by tracking perceptual changes (such as referred sensations) and changes in cortical topography in individual patients, we can begin to explore how the activity of sensory maps gives rise to conscious experience. Finally, phantom limbs also allow us to explore intersensory effects and the manner in which the brain constructs and updates a "body image" throughout life.

  19. Neural processing of natural sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Frédéric E; Elie, Julie E

    2014-06-01

    We might be forced to listen to a high-frequency tone at our audiologist's office or we might enjoy falling asleep with a white-noise machine, but the sounds that really matter to us are the voices of our companions or music from our favourite radio station. The auditory system has evolved to process behaviourally relevant natural sounds. Research has shown not only that our brain is optimized for natural hearing tasks but also that using natural sounds to probe the auditory system is the best way to understand the neural computations that enable us to comprehend speech or appreciate music.

  20. Optical implementation of neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Guo, Ruyan

    2002-12-01

    An adaptive optical neuro-computing (ONC) using inexpensive pocket size liquid crystal televisions (LCTVs) had been developed by the graduate students in the Electro-Optics Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University. Although this neuro-computing has only 8×8=64 neurons, it can be easily extended to 16×20=320 neurons. The major advantages of this LCTV architecture as compared with other reported ONCs, are low cost and the flexibility to operate. To test the performance, several neural net models are used. These models are Interpattern Association, Hetero-association and unsupervised learning algorithms. The system design considerations and experimental demonstrations are also included.

  1. Neural Nets for Scene Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    decision boundaries produced for the arificial database when prototypes are Se- feature 1 lected from reduced training set. ly selected from the 383...CLASSIFIER HIT MISS MOPOGIA CORRELATION LOW-LEVEL VISION IVARL&MCE NEURAL NE. (O D ILER) SE CORRELATION REUCE ETC.(OR I F RS)DI4ENSIONAIM AND TRAINING...A) = J11’, + tOi2Z2 + 61311’ (4) SPE Vol. 1608 mitalwg’t Robots and Coniutef Vision X (991)/501 - "X,, ,v ) X 1112 1P Pa P2 P2 .. 2 33 CL AS INPUT

  2. Pansharpening by Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Masi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new pansharpening method is proposed, based on convolutional neural networks. We adapt a simple and effective three-layer architecture recently proposed for super-resolution to the pansharpening problem. Moreover, to improve performance without increasing complexity, we augment the input by including several maps of nonlinear radiometric indices typical of remote sensing. Experiments on three representative datasets show the proposed method to provide very promising results, largely competitive with the current state of the art in terms of both full-reference and no-reference metrics, and also at a visual inspection.

  3. Neural networks and perceptual learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsodyks, Misha; Gilbert, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Sensory perception is a learned trait. The brain strategies we use to perceive the world are constantly modified by experience. With practice, we subconsciously become better at identifying familiar objects or distinguishing fine details in our environment. Current theoretical models simulate some properties of perceptual learning, but neglect the underlying cortical circuits. Future neural network models must incorporate the top-down alteration of cortical function by expectation or perceptual tasks. These newly found dynamic processes are challenging earlier views of static and feedforward processing of sensory information. PMID:15483598

  4. Optimization with Potts Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Bo

    The Potts Neural Network approach to non-binary discrete optimization problems is described. It applies to problems that can be described as a set of elementary `multiple choice' options. Instead of the conventional binary (Ising) neurons, mean field Potts neurons, having several available states, are used to describe the elementary degrees of freedom of such problems. The dynamics consists of iterating the mean field equations with annealing until convergence. Due to its deterministic character, the method is quite fast. When applied to problems of Graph Partition and scheduling types, it produces very good solutions also for problems of considerable size.

  5. Mir-29b Mediates the Neural Tube versus Neural Crest Fate Decision during Embryonic Stem Cell Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiajie; Wu, Yukang; Li, Guoping; Ma, Li; Feng, Ke; Guo, Xudong; Jia, Wenwen; Wang, Guiying; Yang, Guang; Li, Ping; Kang, Jiuhong

    2017-08-08

    During gastrulation, the neuroectoderm cells form the neural tube and neural crest. The nervous system contains significantly more microRNAs than other tissues, but the role of microRNAs in controlling the differentiation of neuroectodermal cells into neural tube epithelial (NTE) cells and neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unknown. Using embryonic stem cell (ESC) neural differentiation systems, we found that miR-29b was upregulated in NTE cells and downregulated in NCCs. MiR-29b promoted the differentiation of ESCs into NTE cells and inhibited their differentiation into NCCs. Accordingly, the inhibition of miR-29b significantly inhibited the differentiation of NTE cells. A mechanistic study revealed that miR-29b targets DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) to regulate neural differentiation. Moreover, miR-29b mediated the function of Pou3f1, a critical neural transcription factor. Therefore, our study showed that the Pou3f1-miR-29b-Dnmt3a regulatory axis was active at the initial stage of neural differentiation and regulated the determination of cell fate. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. NeuralWISP: A Wirelessly Powered Neural Interface With 1-m Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, D J; Holleman, J; Prasad, R; Smith, J R; Otis, B P

    2009-12-01

    We present the NeuralWISP, a wireless neural interface operating from far-field radio-frequency RF energy. The NeuralWISP is compatible with commercial RF identification readers and operates at a range up to 1 m. It includes a custom low-noise, low-power amplifier integrated circuit for processing the neural signal and an analog spike detection circuit for reducing digital computational requirements and communications bandwidth. Our system monitors the neural signal and periodically transmits the spike density in a user-programmable time window. The entire system draws an average 20 muA from the harvested 1.8-V supply.

  7. Neural network modeling of emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Daniel S.

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the history and development of computational neural network modeling of cognitive and behavioral processes that involve emotion. The exposition starts with models of classical conditioning dating from the early 1970s. Then it proceeds toward models of interactions between emotion and attention. Then models of emotional influences on decision making are reviewed, including some speculative (not and not yet simulated) models of the evolution of decision rules. Through the late 1980s, the neural networks developed to model emotional processes were mainly embodiments of significant functional principles motivated by psychological data. In the last two decades, network models of these processes have become much more detailed in their incorporation of known physiological properties of specific brain regions, while preserving many of the psychological principles from the earlier models. Most network models of emotional processes so far have dealt with positive and negative emotion in general, rather than specific emotions such as fear, joy, sadness, and anger. But a later section of this article reviews a few models relevant to specific emotions: one family of models of auditory fear conditioning in rats, and one model of induced pleasure enhancing creativity in humans. Then models of emotional disorders are reviewed. The article concludes with philosophical statements about the essential contributions of emotion to intelligent behavior and the importance of quantitative theories and models to the interdisciplinary enterprise of understanding the interactions of emotion, cognition, and behavior.

  8. Clustering: a neural network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, K-L

    2010-01-01

    Clustering is a fundamental data analysis method. It is widely used for pattern recognition, feature extraction, vector quantization (VQ), image segmentation, function approximation, and data mining. As an unsupervised classification technique, clustering identifies some inherent structures present in a set of objects based on a similarity measure. Clustering methods can be based on statistical model identification (McLachlan & Basford, 1988) or competitive learning. In this paper, we give a comprehensive overview of competitive learning based clustering methods. Importance is attached to a number of competitive learning based clustering neural networks such as the self-organizing map (SOM), the learning vector quantization (LVQ), the neural gas, and the ART model, and clustering algorithms such as the C-means, mountain/subtractive clustering, and fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithms. Associated topics such as the under-utilization problem, fuzzy clustering, robust clustering, clustering based on non-Euclidean distance measures, supervised clustering, hierarchical clustering as well as cluster validity are also described. Two examples are given to demonstrate the use of the clustering methods.

  9. Imaging Posture Veils Neural Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Thibault

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas modern brain imaging often demands holding body positions incongruent with everyday life, posture governs both neural activity and cognitive performance. Humans commonly perform while upright; yet, many neuroimaging methodologies require participants to remain motionless and adhere to non-ecological comportments within a confined space. This inconsistency between ecological postures and imaging constraints undermines the transferability and generalizability of many a neuroimaging assay.Here we highlight the influence of posture on brain function and behavior. Specifically, we challenge the tacit assumption that brain processes and cognitive performance are comparable across a spectrum of positions. We provide an integrative synthesis regarding the increasingly prominent influence of imaging postures on autonomic function, mental capacity, sensory thresholds, and neural activity. Arguing that neuroimagers and cognitive scientists could benefit from considering the influence posture wields on both general functioning and brain activity, we examine existing imaging technologies and the potential of portable and versatile imaging devices (e.g., functional near infrared spectroscopy. Finally, we discuss ways that accounting for posture may help unveil the complex brain processes of everyday cognition.

  10. Radiation Behavior of Analog Neural Network Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbacher, H.; Zee, F.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A.

    1996-01-01

    A neural network experiment conducted for the Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1) 1-b launched in June 1994. Identical sets of analog feed-forward neural network chips was used to study and compare the effects of space and ground radiation on the chips. Three failure mechanisms are noted.

  11. Deciphering the Cognitive and Neural Mechanisms Underlying ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Deciphering the Cognitive and Neural Mechanisms Underlying Auditory Learning. This project seeks to understand the brain mechanisms necessary for people to learn to perceive sounds. Neural circuits and learning. The research team will test people with and without musical training to evaluate their capacity to learn ...

  12. Neural network approach to parton distributions fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Piccione, Andrea; Forte, Stefano; Latorre, Jose I.; Rojo, Joan; Piccione, Andrea; Rojo, Joan

    2006-01-01

    We will show an application of neural networks to extract information on the structure of hadrons. A Monte Carlo over experimental data is performed to correctly reproduce data errors and correlations. A neural network is then trained on each Monte Carlo replica via a genetic algorithm. Results on the proton and deuteron structure functions, and on the nonsinglet parton distribution will be shown.

  13. NEURAL METHODS FOR THE FINANCIAL PREDICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Balicki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks can be used to predict share investment on the stock market, assess the reliability of credit client or predicting banking crises. Moreover, this paper discusses the principles of cooperation neural network algorithms with evolutionary method, and support vector machines. In addition, a reference is made to other methods of artificial intelligence, which are used in finance prediction.

  14. Self-organization of neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J.W.; Winston, J.V.; Rafelski, J.

    1984-05-14

    The plastic development of a neural-network model operating autonomously in discrete time is described by the temporal modification of interneuronal coupling strengths according to momentary neural activity. A simple algorithm (brainwashing) is found which, applied to nets with initially quasirandom connectivity, leads to model networks with properties conducive to the simulation of memory and learning phenomena. 18 references, 2 figures.

  15. Medical image analysis with artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J; Trundle, P; Ren, J

    2010-12-01

    Given that neural networks have been widely reported in the research community of medical imaging, we provide a focused literature survey on recent neural network developments in computer-aided diagnosis, medical image segmentation and edge detection towards visual content analysis, and medical image registration for its pre-processing and post-processing, with the aims of increasing awareness of how neural networks can be applied to these areas and to provide a foundation for further research and practical development. Representative techniques and algorithms are explained in detail to provide inspiring examples illustrating: (i) how a known neural network with fixed structure and training procedure could be applied to resolve a medical imaging problem; (ii) how medical images could be analysed, processed, and characterised by neural networks; and (iii) how neural networks could be expanded further to resolve problems relevant to medical imaging. In the concluding section, a highlight of comparisons among many neural network applications is included to provide a global view on computational intelligence with neural networks in medical imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cockayne syndrome b maintains neural precursor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Raffaele; Tamblyn, Laura; Rajakulendran, Nishani; Bralha, Fernando N; Tropepe, Vincent; Laposa, Rebecca R

    2013-02-01

    Neurodevelopmental defects are observed in the hereditary disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS). The gene most frequently mutated in CS, Cockayne Syndrome B (CSB), is required for the repair of bulky DNA adducts in transcribed genes during transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. CSB also plays a role in chromatin remodeling and mitochondrial function. The role of CSB in neural development is poorly understood. Here we report that the abundance of neural progenitors is normal in Csb(-/-) mice and the frequency of apoptotic cells in the neurogenic niche of the adult subependymal zone is similar in Csb(-/-) and wild type mice. Both embryonic and adult Csb(-/-) neural precursors exhibited defective self-renewal in the neurosphere assay. In Csb(-/-) neural precursors, self-renewal progressively decreased in serially passaged neurospheres. The data also indicate that Csb and the nucleotide excision repair protein Xpa preserve embryonic neural stem cell self-renewal after UV DNA damage. Although Csb(-/-) neural precursors do not exhibit altered neuronal lineage commitment after low-dose UV (1J/m(2)) in vitro, neurons differentiated in vitro from Csb(-/-) neural precursors that had been irradiated with 1J/m(2) UV exhibited defective neurite outgrowth. These findings identify a function for Csb in neural precursors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hidden neural networks: application to speech recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1998-01-01

    We evaluate the hidden neural network HMM/NN hybrid on two speech recognition benchmark tasks; (1) task independent isolated word recognition on the Phonebook database, and (2) recognition of broad phoneme classes in continuous speech from the TIMIT database. It is shown how hidden neural networks...

  18. Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Networks Ensemble as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvements in neural network calibration models by a novel approach using neural network ensemble (NNE) for the simultaneous spectrophotometric multicomponent analysis are suggested, with a study on the estimation of the components of an antihypertensive combination, namely, atenolol and losartan potassium.

  19. Neural Networks for Non-linear Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes how a neural network, structured as a Multi Layer Perceptron, is trained to predict, simulate and control a non-linear process.......This paper describes how a neural network, structured as a Multi Layer Perceptron, is trained to predict, simulate and control a non-linear process....

  20. Application of Neural Networks for Energy Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Damgov, Jordan

    2002-01-01

    The possibility to use Neural Networks for reconstruction ofthe energy deposited in the calorimetry system of the CMS detector is investigated. It is shown that using feed-forward neural network, good linearity, Gaussian energy distribution and good energy resolution can be achieved. Significant improvement of the energy resolution and linearity is reached in comparison with other weighting methods for energy reconstruction.

  1. Neural Network to Solve Concave Games

    OpenAIRE

    Zixin Liu; Nengfa Wang

    2014-01-01

    The issue on neural network method to solve concave games is concerned. Combined with variational inequality, Ky Fan inequality, and projection equation, concave games are transformed into a neural network model. On the basis of the Lyapunov stable theory, some stability results are also given. Finally, two classic games’ simulation results are given to illustrate the theoretical results.

  2. Recognizing changing seasonal patterns using neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); G. Draisma (Gerrit)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we propose a graphical method based on an artificial neural network model to investigate how and when seasonal patterns in macroeconomic time series change over time. Neural networks are useful since the hidden layer units may become activated only in certain seasons or

  3. Neural plasticity in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic nerves undergo prominent alterations during the evolution and progression of human chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Intrapancreatic nerves increase in size (neural hypertrophy) and number (increased neural density). The proportion of autonomic and sensory fibres (neural remodelling) is switched, and are infiltrated by perineural inflammatory cells (pancreatic neuritis) or invaded by pancreatic cancer cells (neural invasion). These neuropathic alterations also correlate with neuropathic pain. Instead of being mere histopathological manifestations of disease progression, pancreatic neural plasticity synergizes with the enhanced excitability of sensory neurons, with Schwann cell recruitment toward cancer and with central nervous system alterations. These alterations maintain a bidirectional interaction between nerves and non-neural pancreatic cells, as demonstrated by tissue and neural damage inducing neuropathic pain, and activated neurons releasing mediators that modulate inflammation and cancer growth. Owing to the prognostic effects of pain and neural invasion in pancreatic cancer, dissecting the mechanism of pancreatic neuroplasticity holds major translational relevance. However, current in vivo models of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis contain many discrepancies from human disease that overshadow their translational value. The present Review discusses novel possibilities for mechanistically uncovering the role of the nervous system in pancreatic disease progression.

  4. Neural Plasticity in Speech Acquisition and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yue

    2007-01-01

    Neural plasticity in speech acquisition and learning is concerned with the timeline trajectory and the mechanisms of experience-driven changes in the neural circuits that support or disrupt linguistic function. In this selective review, we discuss the role of phonetic learning in language acquisition, the "critical period" of learning, the agents…

  5. Neural plasticity: the biological substrate for neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warraich, Zuha; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2010-12-01

    Decades of basic science have clearly demonstrated the capacity of the central nervous system (CNS) to structurally and functionally adapt in response to experience. The field of neurorehabilitation has begun to use this body of work to develop neurobiologically informed therapies that harness the key behavioral and neural signals that drive neural plasticity. The present review describes how neural plasticity supports both learning in the intact CNS and functional improvement in the damaged or diseased CNS. A pragmatic, interdisciplinary definition of neural plasticity is presented that may be used by both clinical and basic scientists studying neurorehabilitation. Furthermore, a description of how neural plasticity may act to drive different neural strategies underlying functional improvement after CNS injury or disease is provided. The understanding of the relationship between these different neural strategies, mechanisms of neural plasticity, and changes in behavior may facilitate the development of novel, more effective rehabilitation interventions. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural constructivism or self-organization?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maas, H.L.J.; Molenaar, P.C.M.

    2000-01-01

    Comments on the article by S. R. Quartz et al (see record 1998-00749-001) which discussed the constructivist perspective of interaction between cognition and neural processes during development and consequences for theories of learning. Three arguments are given to show that neural constructivism

  7. Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1990-01-01

    Training time decreases dramatically. In improved mathematical model of neural-network processor, temperature of neurons (in addition to connection strengths, also called weights, of synapses) varied during supervised-learning phase of operation according to mathematical formalism and not heuristic rule. Evidence that biological neural networks also process information at neuronal level.

  8. A Fuzzy Neural Tree for Possibilistic Reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciftcioglu, O.

    2008-01-01

    An innovative neural fuzzy system is considered for possibilistic reliability using a neural tree structure with nodes of neuronal type. The total tree structure works effectively as a fuzzy logic system where the possibility theory plays important role with Gaussian possibility distribution at the

  9. Neural Adaptive Sensory Processing for Undersea Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    neurobionic conceptual framework- [71 -, "Neural target locator," Naval Ocean Systems Center, Tech. Mr. Speidel is a member of the American Association...for the Ad- Document 77)1914, 1990. vancement of Science (AAAS), the International Neural Network Soci- [8) -, "Sonar scene analysis using neurobionic

  10. Neural bases of accented speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Patti eAdank; Nuttall, Helen E.; Briony eBanks; Dan eKennedy-Higgins

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Adank, Evans, Stuart-Smith, & Scott, 2009; Floccia, Goslin, Girard, & Konopczynski, 2006). Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented...

  11. Learning from large scale neural simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serban, Maria

    2017-01-01

    -possibly explanations of neural and cognitive phenomena, or they can be used to test explanatory hypotheses and identify sufficient causal factors in specific neurobiological mechanisms, or yet again they can be deployed exploratorily to evaluate the hierarchy of multiple neural and cognitive models that are put...

  12. A new perspective on behavioral inconsistency and neural noise in aging: Compensatory speeding of neural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lee Hong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to present a new perspective on the aging brain. Here, we make connections between two key phenomena of brain aging: 1 increased neural noise or random background activity; and 2 slowing of brain activity. Our perspective proposes the possibility that the slowing of neural processing due to decreasing nerve conduction velocities leads to a compensatory speeding of neuron firing rates. These increased firing rates lead to a broader distribution of power in the frequency spectrum of neural oscillations, which we propose, can just as easily be interpreted as neural noise. Compensatory speeding of neural activity, as we present, is constrained by the: A availability of metabolic energy sources; and B competition for frequency bandwidth needed for neural communication. We propose that these constraints lead to the eventual inability to compensate for age-related declines in neural function that are manifested clinically as deficits in cognition, affect, and motor behavior.

  13. International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks (ICANN)

    CERN Document Server

    Mladenov, Valeri; Kasabov, Nikola; Artificial Neural Networks : Methods and Applications in Bio-/Neuroinformatics

    2015-01-01

    The book reports on the latest theories on artificial neural networks, with a special emphasis on bio-neuroinformatics methods. It includes twenty-three papers selected from among the best contributions on bio-neuroinformatics-related issues, which were presented at the International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, held in Sofia, Bulgaria, on September 10-13, 2013 (ICANN 2013). The book covers a broad range of topics concerning the theory and applications of artificial neural networks, including recurrent neural networks, super-Turing computation and reservoir computing, double-layer vector perceptrons, nonnegative matrix factorization, bio-inspired models of cell communities, Gestalt laws, embodied theory of language understanding, saccadic gaze shifts and memory formation, and new training algorithms for Deep Boltzmann Machines, as well as dynamic neural networks and kernel machines. It also reports on new approaches to reinforcement learning, optimal control of discrete time-delay systems, new al...

  14. Neural network signal understanding for instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pau, L. F.; Johansen, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    A report is presented on the use of neural signal interpretation theory and techniques for the purpose of classifying the shapes of a set of instrumentation signals, in order to calibrate devices, diagnose anomalies, generate tuning/settings, and interpret the measurement results. Neural signal...... understanding research is surveyed, and the selected implementation and its performance in terms of correct classification rates and robustness to noise are described. Formal results on neural net training time and sensitivity to weights are given. A theory for neural control using functional link nets is given......, and an explanation facility designed to help neural signal understanding is described. The results are compared to those obtained with a knowledge-based signal interpretation system using the same instrument and data...

  15. Neural scaling laws for an uncertain world

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    The Weber-Fechner law describes the form of psychological space in many behavioral experiments involving perception of one-dimensional physical quantities. If the physical quantity is expressed using multiple neural receptors, then placing receptive fields evenly along a logarithmic scale naturally leads to the psychological Weber-Fechner law. In the visual system, the spacing and width of extrafoveal receptive fields are consistent with logarithmic scaling. Other sets of neural "receptors" appear to show the same qualitative properties, suggesting that this form of neural scaling reflects a solution to a very general problem. This paper argues that these neural scaling laws enable the brain to represent information about the world efficiently without making any assumptions about the statistics of the world. This analysis suggests that the organization of neural scales to represent one-dimensional quantities, including more abstract quantities such as numerosity, time, and allocentric space, should have a uni...

  16. Neural networks with discontinuous/impact activations

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmet, Marat

    2014-01-01

    This book presents as its main subject new models in mathematical neuroscience. A wide range of neural networks models with discontinuities are discussed, including impulsive differential equations, differential equations with piecewise constant arguments, and models of mixed type. These models involve discontinuities, which are natural because huge velocities and short distances are usually observed in devices modeling the networks. A discussion of the models, appropriate for the proposed applications, is also provided. This book also: Explores questions related to the biological underpinning for models of neural networks\\ Considers neural networks modeling using differential equations with impulsive and piecewise constant argument discontinuities Provides all necessary mathematical basics for application to the theory of neural networks Neural Networks with Discontinuous/Impact Activations is an ideal book for researchers and professionals in the field of engineering mathematics that have an interest in app...

  17. 22nd Italian Workshop on Neural Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Bassis, Simone; Esposito, Anna; Morabito, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    This volume collects a selection of contributions which has been presented at the 22nd Italian Workshop on Neural Networks, the yearly meeting of the Italian Society for Neural Networks (SIREN). The conference was held in Italy, Vietri sul Mare (Salerno), during May 17-19, 2012. The annual meeting of SIREN is sponsored by International Neural Network Society (INNS), European Neural Network Society (ENNS) and IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (CIS). The book – as well as the workshop-  is organized in three main components, two special sessions and a group of regular sessions featuring different aspects and point of views of artificial neural networks and natural intelligence, also including applications of present compelling interest.

  18. Decentralized neural control application to robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Hernandez, Ramon; Sanchez, Edgar N; Alanis, Alma y; Ruz-Hernandez, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a decentralized approach for the identification and control of robotics systems. It also presents recent research in decentralized neural control and includes applications to robotics. Decentralized control is free from difficulties due to complexity in design, debugging, data gathering and storage requirements, making it preferable for interconnected systems. Furthermore, as opposed to the centralized approach, it can be implemented with parallel processors. This approach deals with four decentralized control schemes, which are able to identify the robot dynamics. The training of each neural network is performed on-line using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The first indirect decentralized control scheme applies the discrete-time block control approach, to formulate a nonlinear sliding manifold. The second direct decentralized neural control scheme is based on the backstepping technique, approximated by a high order neural network. The third control scheme applies a decentralized neural i...

  19. Flexible body control using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccullough, Claire L.

    1992-01-01

    Progress is reported on the control of Control Structures Interaction suitcase demonstrator (a flexible structure) using neural networks and fuzzy logic. It is concluded that while control by neural nets alone (i.e., allowing the net to design a controller with no human intervention) has yielded less than optimal results, the neural net trained to emulate the existing fuzzy logic controller does produce acceptible system responses for the initial conditions examined. Also, a neural net was found to be very successful in performing the emulation step necessary for the anticipatory fuzzy controller for the CSI suitcase demonstrator. The fuzzy neural hybrid, which exhibits good robustness and noise rejection properties, shows promise as a controller for practical flexible systems, and should be further evaluated.

  20. Neural network topology design for nonlinear control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haecker, Jens; Rudolph, Stephan

    2001-03-01

    Neural networks, especially in nonlinear system identification and control applications, are typically considered to be black-boxes which are difficult to analyze and understand mathematically. Due to this reason, an in- depth mathematical analysis offering insight into the different neural network transformation layers based on a theoretical transformation scheme is desired, but up to now neither available nor known. In previous works it has been shown how proven engineering methods such as dimensional analysis and the Laplace transform may be used to construct a neural controller topology for time-invariant systems. Using the knowledge of neural correspondences of these two classical methods, the internal nodes of the network could also be successfully interpreted after training. As further extension to these works, the paper describes the latest of a theoretical interpretation framework describing the neural network transformation sequences in nonlinear system identification and control. This can be achieved By incorporation of the method of exact input-output linearization in the above mentioned two transform sequences of dimensional analysis and the Laplace transformation. Based on these three theoretical considerations neural network topologies may be designed in special situations by pure translation in the sense of a structural compilation of the known classical solutions into their correspondent neural topology. Based on known exemplary results, the paper synthesizes the proposed approach into the visionary goals of a structural compiler for neural networks. This structural compiler for neural networks is intended to automatically convert classical control formulations into their equivalent neural network structure based on the principles of equivalence between formula and operator, and operator and structure which are discussed in detail in this work.