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Sample records for neural ridge reshaping

  1. Predicting Physical Time Series Using Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Ghazali, Rozaida; Hussain, Abir

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting naturally occurring phenomena is a common problem in many domains of science, and this has been addressed and investigated by many scientists. The importance of time series prediction stems from the fact that it has wide range of applications, including control systems, engineering processes, environmental systems and economics. From the knowledge of some aspects of the previous behaviour of the system, the aim of the prediction process is to determine or predict its future behaviour. In this paper, we consider a novel application of a higher order polynomial neural network architecture called Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Network that combines the properties of higher order and recurrent neural networks for the prediction of physical time series. In this study, four types of signals have been used, which are; The Lorenz attractor, mean value of the AE index, sunspot number, and heat wave temperature. The simulation results showed good improvements in terms of the signal to noise ratio in comparison to a number of higher order and feedforward neural networks in comparison to the benchmarked techniques. PMID:25157950

  2. Ridge Polynomial Neural Network with Error Feedback for Time Series Forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheeb, Waddah; Ghazali, Rozaida; Herawan, Tutut

    2016-01-01

    Time series forecasting has gained much attention due to its many practical applications. Higher-order neural network with recurrent feedback is a powerful technique that has been used successfully for time series forecasting. It maintains fast learning and the ability to learn the dynamics of the time series over time. Network output feedback is the most common recurrent feedback for many recurrent neural network models. However, not much attention has been paid to the use of network error feedback instead of network output feedback. In this study, we propose a novel model, called Ridge Polynomial Neural Network with Error Feedback (RPNN-EF) that incorporates higher order terms, recurrence and error feedback. To evaluate the performance of RPNN-EF, we used four univariate time series with different forecasting horizons, namely star brightness, monthly smoothed sunspot numbers, daily Euro/Dollar exchange rate, and Mackey-Glass time-delay differential equation. We compared the forecasting performance of RPNN-EF with the ordinary Ridge Polynomial Neural Network (RPNN) and the Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Network (DRPNN). Simulation results showed an average 23.34% improvement in Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) with respect to RPNN and an average 10.74% improvement with respect to DRPNN. That means that using network errors during training helps enhance the overall forecasting performance for the network.

  3. Ridge Polynomial Neural Network with Error Feedback for Time Series Forecasting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waddah Waheeb

    Full Text Available Time series forecasting has gained much attention due to its many practical applications. Higher-order neural network with recurrent feedback is a powerful technique that has been used successfully for time series forecasting. It maintains fast learning and the ability to learn the dynamics of the time series over time. Network output feedback is the most common recurrent feedback for many recurrent neural network models. However, not much attention has been paid to the use of network error feedback instead of network output feedback. In this study, we propose a novel model, called Ridge Polynomial Neural Network with Error Feedback (RPNN-EF that incorporates higher order terms, recurrence and error feedback. To evaluate the performance of RPNN-EF, we used four univariate time series with different forecasting horizons, namely star brightness, monthly smoothed sunspot numbers, daily Euro/Dollar exchange rate, and Mackey-Glass time-delay differential equation. We compared the forecasting performance of RPNN-EF with the ordinary Ridge Polynomial Neural Network (RPNN and the Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Network (DRPNN. Simulation results showed an average 23.34% improvement in Root Mean Square Error (RMSE with respect to RPNN and an average 10.74% improvement with respect to DRPNN. That means that using network errors during training helps enhance the overall forecasting performance for the network.

  4. Reshaping a mesiodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatel, Fredric S

    2003-01-01

    A mesiodens is a supernumerary tooth that is found in the midline of the maxilla. Fifteen percent erupt usually between the ages of 3 and 7. The standard treatment is extraction of the supernumerary to allow the permanent incisors to erupt properly. This case report describes an instance where the primary incisor was prematurely exfoliated due to the eruption of the mesiodens. Because of the favorable position of the mesiodens in the dental arch, it was decided to reshape the supernumerary to resemble a primary incisor. This was accomplished successfully, and the mesiodens is being monitored to assess any need to trim or add to the bonding material as the child grows.

  5. The role of the anterior neural ridge and Fgf-8 in early forebrain patterning and regionalization in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, Gerald W; Dempewolf, Ryan D

    2002-05-01

    The tissue, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate early regional specification of the vertebrate forebrain are largely unknown. We studied the expression patterns of Xbf-1, an anterior (and telencephalon) neural-specific winged helix transcription factor and Fgf-8, an early-secreted factor. This study looked at Xbf-1 and Fgf-8 expression in combination with embryonic grafting experiments and also used beads containing the recombinant Fgf-8 protein to determine these factors' effects upon forebrain patterning events. We provide evidence that additional Fgf-8 displaces Xbf-1 expression posteriorly, suggesting a concentration dependence of Fgf-8 for the early distinct regionalization of the telencephalic primordia. Also, additional stage 15 mid-anterior neural ridge (mANR) transplants inhibited telencephalon development, whereas lateral ANR transplants facilitated increased areas of telencephalon development. In both cases, these transplantations promoted ectopic expression of Xbf-1. These studies suggested that the distinct regionalization of the forebrain primordia involves the inhibitory actions of the mANR towards a telencephalon development and maintaining bilateral telencephali. These telencephalic primordia are initially localized by optimal Fgf-8 expression. The anterior mANR will eventually become the anterior and rostral diencephalic tissue. This in vivo study demonstrated Fgf-8 and the mANR are important in forebrain regionalization.

  6. Reshaping JSON with jq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lincoln

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available JSON (JavaScript Object Notation is a common data sharing format that can describe complex relationships. Many libraries, archives, museums, and social media sites expose their data through JSON-based APIs. (On accessing APIs, see downloading structured data with wget and the series of lessons on working with APIs. However, many tools for data analysis and visualization require input in flat tables (i.e. CSV, and because JSON is such a flexible data format, often with many nested levels of data, there is no one-size-fits-all graphical user interface for transforming JSON into other formats. Working with data from an art museum API and from the Twitter API, this lesson teaches how to use the command-line utility jq to filter and parse complex JSON files into flat CSV files. This lesson will begin with an overview of the basic operators of the jq query syntax. Next, you will learn progressively more complex ways of connecting these operators together. By the end of the lesson, you will understand how to combine basic operators to create queries that can reshape many types of JSON data.

  7. Generalized hidden-mapping ridge regression, knowledge-leveraged inductive transfer learning for neural networks, fuzzy systems and kernel methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhaohong; Choi, Kup-Sze; Jiang, Yizhang; Wang, Shitong

    2014-12-01

    Inductive transfer learning has attracted increasing attention for the training of effective model in the target domain by leveraging the information in the source domain. However, most transfer learning methods are developed for a specific model, such as the commonly used support vector machine, which makes the methods applicable only to the adopted models. In this regard, the generalized hidden-mapping ridge regression (GHRR) method is introduced in order to train various types of classical intelligence models, including neural networks, fuzzy logical systems and kernel methods. Furthermore, the knowledge-leverage based transfer learning mechanism is integrated with GHRR to realize the inductive transfer learning method called transfer GHRR (TGHRR). Since the information from the induced knowledge is much clearer and more concise than that from the data in the source domain, it is more convenient to control and balance the similarity and difference of data distributions between the source and target domains. The proposed GHRR and TGHRR algorithms have been evaluated experimentally by performing regression and classification on synthetic and real world datasets. The results demonstrate that the performance of TGHRR is competitive with or even superior to existing state-of-the-art inductive transfer learning algorithms.

  8. Sutures - ridged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridged sutures ... The borders where these plates intersect are called sutures or suture lines. In an infant only a few minutes ... This makes the bony plates overlap at the sutures and creates a small ridge. This is normal ...

  9. Damage level prediction of non-reshaped berm breakwater using ANN, SVM and ANFIS models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukomal Mandal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The damage analysis of coastal structure is very important as it involves many design parameters to be considered for the better and safe design of structure. In the present study experimental data for non-reshaped berm breakwater are collected from Marine Structures Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics and Hydraulics, NITK, Surathkal, India. Soft computing techniques like Artificial Neural Network (ANN, Support Vector Machine (SVM and Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference system (ANFIS models are constructed using experimental data sets to predict the damage level of non-reshaped berm breakwater. The experimental data are used to train ANN, SVM and ANFIS models and results are determined in terms of statistical measures like mean square error, root mean square error, correlation coefficient and scatter index. The result shows that soft computing techniques i.e., ANN, SVM and ANFIS can be efficient tools in predicting damage levels of non reshaped berm breakwater.

  10. Temperature-feedback direct laser reshaping of silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouassa, M.; Mitsai, E.; Syubaev, S.; Pavlov, D.; Zhizhchenko, A.; Jadli, I.; Hassayoun, L.; Zograf, G.; Makarov, S.; Kuchmizhak, A.

    2017-12-01

    Direct laser reshaping of nanostructures is a cost-effective and fast approach to create or tune various designs for nanophotonics. However, the narrow range of required laser parameters along with the lack of in-situ temperature control during the nanostructure reshaping process limits its reproducibility and performance. Here, we present an approach for direct laser nanostructure reshaping with simultaneous temperature control. We employ thermally sensitive Raman spectroscopy during local laser melting of silicon pillar arrays prepared by self-assembly microsphere lithography. Our approach allows establishing the reshaping threshold of an individual nanostructure, resulting in clean laser processing without overheating of the surrounding area.

  11. Sensory noise predicts divisive reshaping of receptive fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneve, Sophie; Gutkin, Boris

    2017-01-01

    In order to respond reliably to specific features of their environment, sensory neurons need to integrate multiple incoming noisy signals. Crucially, they also need to compete for the interpretation of those signals with other neurons representing similar features. The form that this competition should take depends critically on the noise corrupting these signals. In this study we show that for the type of noise commonly observed in sensory systems, whose variance scales with the mean signal, sensory neurons should selectively divide their input signals by their predictions, suppressing ambiguous cues while amplifying others. Any change in the stimulus context alters which inputs are suppressed, leading to a deep dynamic reshaping of neural receptive fields going far beyond simple surround suppression. Paradoxically, these highly variable receptive fields go alongside and are in fact required for an invariant representation of external sensory features. In addition to offering a normative account of context-dependent changes in sensory responses, perceptual inference in the presence of signal-dependent noise accounts for ubiquitous features of sensory neurons such as divisive normalization, gain control and contrast dependent temporal dynamics. PMID:28622330

  12. Sensory noise predicts divisive reshaping of receptive fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Chalk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to respond reliably to specific features of their environment, sensory neurons need to integrate multiple incoming noisy signals. Crucially, they also need to compete for the interpretation of those signals with other neurons representing similar features. The form that this competition should take depends critically on the noise corrupting these signals. In this study we show that for the type of noise commonly observed in sensory systems, whose variance scales with the mean signal, sensory neurons should selectively divide their input signals by their predictions, suppressing ambiguous cues while amplifying others. Any change in the stimulus context alters which inputs are suppressed, leading to a deep dynamic reshaping of neural receptive fields going far beyond simple surround suppression. Paradoxically, these highly variable receptive fields go alongside and are in fact required for an invariant representation of external sensory features. In addition to offering a normative account of context-dependent changes in sensory responses, perceptual inference in the presence of signal-dependent noise accounts for ubiquitous features of sensory neurons such as divisive normalization, gain control and contrast dependent temporal dynamics.

  13. Globalized Security Reshaping America’s Defense Trade Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    AU/SCHOOL/NNN/2001-04 THE ATLANTIC COUNCIL OF THE UNITED STATES AIR UNIVERSITY NATIONAL DEFENSE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM GLOBALIZED SECURITY RESHAPING...to) - Title and Subtitle Globalized Security Reshaping America’s Defense Trade Policy Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number...20 Globalization

  14. Reshaping Health Care in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2000-01-01

    Reshaping Health Care in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis of Health Care Reform in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Book cover Reshaping Health Care in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis of Health Care Reform. Editor(s):. Sonia Fleury, Susana Belmartino, and Enis Baris. Publisher(s):. IDRC. January 1, 2000.

  15. Feedback-controlled laser-mediated cartilage reshaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, B J; Milner, T E; Harrington, A; Ro, J; Dao, X; Sobol, E N; Nelson, J S

    1999-01-01

    To demonstrate feedback-controlled laser-mediated cartilage reshaping using dynamic measurements of tissue optical properties and radiometric surface temperatures. Flat cartilage specimens were reshaped into curved configurations using a feedback-controlled laser device. Fresh porcine nasal septum, stripped of perichondrium and cut into uniform strips (25 x 10 x 1.5-2.1 mm) with a custom guillotine microtome. Cartilage specimens secured in a cylindrical reshaping jig (2.5 cm in diameter) and irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser (lambda = 1.32 microns, 25 W/cm2, 50-Hz pulse repetition rate). During laser irradiation, radiometric surface temperature was measured along with changes in forward-scattered light from a diode probe laser (lambda = 650 nm, 5 mW), using a lock-in detection technique. Sequential irradiation of the specimen outer surface was made (3 laser passes). Characteristic changes in tissue temperature and light-scattering signals were used to terminate laser irradiation. Effective reshaping was accomplished for both thin (1.5-mm) and thick (2.1-mm) specimens. Following reshaping, specimens were stored in saline solution at 4 degrees C for 21 days. No return to the original flat configuration was noted during this period. The prototype device effectively reshapes flat native porcine cartilage into curve configurations. The use of optical and thermal signals provides effective feedback control for optimizing the reshaping process.

  16. New ridge parameters for ridge regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Dorugade

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hoerl and Kennard (1970a introduced the ridge regression estimator as an alternative to the ordinary least squares (OLS estimator in the presence of multicollinearity. In ridge regression, ridge parameter plays an important role in parameter estimation. In this article, a new method for estimating ridge parameters in both situations of ordinary ridge regression (ORR and generalized ridge regression (GRR is proposed. The simulation study evaluates the performance of the proposed estimator based on the mean squared error (MSE criterion and indicates that under certain conditions the proposed estimators perform well compared to OLS and other well-known estimators reviewed in this article.

  17. Prediction of CO2 Emission in China’s Power Generation Industry with Gauss Optimized Cuckoo Search Algorithm and Wavelet Neural Network Based on STIRPAT model with Ridge Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibo Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Power generation industry is the key industry of carbon dioxide (CO2 emission in China. Assessing its future CO2 emissions is of great significance to the formulation and implementation of energy saving and emission reduction policies. Based on the Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology model (STIRPAT, the influencing factors analysis model of CO2 emission of power generation industry is established. The ridge regression (RR method is used to estimate the historical data. In addition, a wavelet neural network (WNN prediction model based on Cuckoo Search algorithm optimized by Gauss (GCS is put forward to predict the factors in the STIRPAT model. Then, the predicted values are substituted into the regression model, and the CO2 emission estimation values of the power generation industry in China are obtained. It’s concluded that population, per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP, standard coal consumption and thermal power specific gravity are the key factors affecting the CO2 emission from the power generation industry. Besides, the GCS-WNN prediction model has higher prediction accuracy, comparing with other models. Moreover, with the development of science and technology in the future, the CO2 emission growth in the power generation industry will gradually slow down according to the prediction results.

  18. Reshaping the plasmonic properties of an individual nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, J Britt; Knight, Mark W; Mirin, Nikolay A; Halas, Naomi J

    2009-12-01

    When symmetry is broken in plasmonic nanostructures, new optical properties emerge. Here we controllably reshape an individual Au nanoshell into a reduced-symmetry nanoegg, then a semishell or nanocup by a novel electron-beam-induced ablation method, transforming its plasmonic properties. We follow the changes in the plasmonic response at the single nanostructure level throughout this reshaping process, observing the splitting of plasmon modes and the onset of electroinductive plasmons upon controlled, incremental opening of the outer metallic layer of the nanoparticle.

  19. [Cartilage reshaping by laser in stomatology and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, S

    2004-02-01

    The restoration of congenital and traumatic malformations of the head and neck, together with the defects resulting from the trauma of ablative surgery, continue to pose significant problems to surgeons. The post-operative results are not always satisfactory because of the difficulty of shaping the cartilage and because of the tendency of cartilage to return to its original shape. Better understanding of laser-cartilage interaction and the development of a specific instrumentation Lasers (CO2, Nd: YAG, Ho: YAG) has enabled ex situ and in situ cartilage reshaping. A recent clinical study has demonstrated that nondestructive laser irradiation can reshape septal deviations

  20. Grafts for Ridge Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E

    2015-08-07

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome.

  1. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Jamjoom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome.

  2. Overtopping And Rear Slope Stabillity Of Reshaping Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans Falk; Lykke Andersen, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study of overtopping and rear slope stability of reshaping breakwaters has been carried out. The variation of those two parameters with crest width, crest freeboard and sea state was investigated. The tests showed that the variation in overtopping discharge with crest freeboard...

  3. Armor stability of hardly (or partly) reshaping berm breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghim, M. N.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2015-01-01

    of the simple method based on measured data of Rec and hf is better than the presented stability equation based on wave momentum flux parameter. When using the best prediction formulae for recession and depth of intersection the simple method and the momentum flux stability equation provide similar uncertainty.......This paper deals with stability of hardly (or partly) reshaping berm breakwaters. A simple physical argument is used to derive a new stability formula based on the assumption that the maximum wave force causing damage of armor layer is proportional to the maximum wave momentum flux near...... momentum flux approach the damage to the front slope (eroded area) can be very well predicted. Moreover, a simple method to estimate the eroded area based on measured or calculated berm recession (Rec) and depth of intersection of reshaped and initial profile (hf) is presented. The performance...

  4. Reshaped Human Monoclonal Antibodies for Therapy and Passive Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Monoclonal Antibodies for Therapy and Passive Immunisation by Reshaping Rodent Monoclonal Antibodies". Two mouse monoclonal antibody producing cell...could be simply extended to make human monoclonals, but this has proved not to be the case. There are difficulties in finding appropriately immunised ...human donors and suitable fusion partners for the antibody producing cells. In vitro immunisation techniques have been tried, but only low affinity 1gM

  5. Gender Stereotypes and the Reshaping of Stigma in Rehabilitative Eldercare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg Jensen, Maya Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Rehabilitation policies are becoming increasingly popular in eldercare as a means to ensure dignity and reduce costs. This paper examines the implications of rehabilitation within Danish homecare work, a type of work that is often stigmatized due to its associations with low-status ‘dirty’ body w...... understanding of the ambiguous and varying ways rehabilitative eldercare reshapes and reinforces stigma and gender stereotypes among women who do ‘dirty’ body work....

  6. Ridge and Furrow Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per Grau

    2016-01-01

    Ridge and furrow is a specific way of ploughing which makes fields of systematic ridges and furrows like a rubbing washboard. They are part of an overall openfield system, but the focus in this paper is on the functionality of the fields. There are many indications that agro-technological reasons...

  7. Rolling Stones Down Potential Hills: Reshaping Gravitational Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanga, Paolo; Comito, C.; Hestroffer, D.; Paolicchi, P.; Walsh, K.; Richardson, D. C.

    2008-09-01

    Numerical N-body models adopting self-gravitating spherical particles have proven to have interesting properties and are very useful for describing some aspects of the expected behaviour of rubble-piles. In fact, particle interlocking can simulate a certain degree of shear strength (corresponding to a non-zero critical slope in the Mohr-Coulomb approach). At the same time, if the critical slope angle is exceeded for some reason (thus temporarily breaking the sphere packing) the shape of the body can readjust to a new equilibrium. Usually, this re-organisation produces a shape closer to the theoretical fluid equilibrium predicted by theory, at the corresponding angular momentum. We have recently compared this reshaping process of ellipsoidal gravitational aggregates to the field of potential energy associated with incompressible fluid shapes. The gradient of this field suggests the evolutionary track that a reshaping body undergoing a slow (quasi-stationary) modification should follow. The same applies to the gradient of the maximum slope present on the surface. The results show the overall tendency to readjust along the potential slope. However, other effects are at work, making the interpretation more complex - among them we can identify: the granularity of the shape model; the relative flatness of the potential field; and a certain anisotropy of the most compact spherical packings. The results offer an interesting insight into the detailed behaviour of this model, allowing us to characterize its applicability in more realistic situations, such as restructuring due to tidal forces, impact reshaping, or shape build-up during gravitational reaccumulation.

  8. Peripheral Optics with Bifocal Soft and Corneal Reshaping Contact Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticak, Anita; Walline, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether bifocal soft contact lenses with a distance center design provide myopic defocus to the peripheral retina similar to corneal reshaping contact lenses. Methods Myopic subjects underwent five cycloplegic autorefraction readings centrally and at 10, 20, and 30 degrees temporally, nasally, superiorly, inferiorly while wearing a Proclear Multifocal “D” contact lens with a +2.00 D add (CooperVision, Fairport, NY) and after wearing a Corneal Refractive Therapy (Paragon Vision Sciences, Mesa, AZ) contact lens for two weeks Results Fourteen subjects completed the study. Nine (64%) were female, and 12 (86%) were Caucasian. The average (± standard deviation) spherical equivalent non-cycloplegic manifest refraction for the right eye was −2.84 ± 1.29 D. The average logMAR best-corrected, binocular high contrast visual acuity was −0.17 ± 0.15 while wearing the bifocal soft contact lens, and −0.09 ± 0.16 following corneal reshaping contact lens wear (ANOVA, p = 0.27). The orthokeratology contact lens yielded a more myopic peripheral optical profile than the soft bifocal contact lens at 20 and 30 degrees eccentricity (except inferior at 20 degrees); the two modalities were similar at 10 degrees eccentricity. Conclusions Our data suggest that the two modalities are dissimilar despite the statistical similarities. The corneal reshaping contact lens shows an increase in relative peripheral myopic refraction, a pattern achieved by other studies, but the bifocal lens does not exhibit such a pattern. The low statistical power of the study could be a reason for a lack of providing statistical difference in other positions of gaze, but the graphical representation of the data shows a marked difference in peripheral optical profile between the two modalities. More sophisticated methods of measuring the peripheral optical profile may be necessary to accurately compare the two modalities and to determine the true optical effect of the bifocal soft

  9. Strategies for Aesthetic Reshaping of the Postpartum Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarasso, Alan; Smith, Darren M

    2015-08-01

    Statistics reflect that pregnancies are occurring at a later age, multiple births are becoming more common, and a sizeable population--with a keen interest in nutrition, fitness, and a continued desire to retain a youthful figure--is aging. Consequently, postpartum reshaping is a priority for many women, enough so that the phrase "mommy makeover" has entered the vernacular. In this article, the senior author's practice was evaluated to explore patient goals, methods, and outcomes in reshaping the postpartum abdomen. A literature review was conducted to assess the state of the art in methods to meet these goals. The postpartum patient often uses her prepregnancy appearance as a barometer for her postpregnancy goals. Although aging is one force motivating women to pursue abdominoplasty, the majority desires the correction of changes related to pregnancy. The abdomen and breasts are the regions most visibly affected by pregnancy, although numerous aesthetic units of the trunk and surrounding regions concern patients seeking postpartum body contouring and they may be part of the patient's perception and idealization of her appearance. Abdominoplasty is central to postpartum body contouring, and numerous strategies such as concurrent flap, flank, or mons pubis liposuction and waistline enhancement methods are integral components of it. Consideration should also be given to the multiple body areas affected by pregnancy that may enhance the patient's overall appearance. In the appropriate context, multiple procedures can be safely and effectively combined to address the various regions affected by postpartum changes. Therapeutic, V.

  10. Re-shaping King Lear: Space, Place, Costume, and Genre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hattaway Michael

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance studies must enjoy parity of esteem with critical studies because they remind us of the plurality of “readings” that are generated by a Shakespearean text. Shakespeare seems to have apprehended this when, in Othello, he used a nonce-word, “denotement”, which applies to Othello’s reading of his wife in his mind’s eye. I examine other sequences in which we watch a character “reading” on-stage or imagined action, in Hamlet, Titus Andronicus, Cymbeline, Richard II, and Troilus and Cressida. In Hamlet this involves re-reading as well as generic displacement, which, I argue, is a way of rendering inwardness. As I test case, I analyse a production of King Lear by Shakespeare’s Globe, on a fairground stage, in which the king reshaped himself, became a folkloric figure, like a figure in Nashe’s Summer’s Last Will and Testament. The play itself was thus, indecorously, reshaped as “The Tale of King Lear”. “Dramatic truth”, therefore, in no way depends upon theatrical “realism”.

  11. Trajectory reshaping based guidance with impact time and angle constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel impact time and angle constrained guidance law for homing missiles. The guidance law is first developed with the prior-assumption of a stationary target, which is followed by the practical extension to a maneuvering target scenario. To derive the closed-form guidance law, the trajectory reshaping technique is utilized and it results in defining a specific polynomial function with two unknown coefficients. These coefficients are determined to satisfy the impact time and angle constraints as well as the zero miss distance. Furthermore, the proposed guidance law has three additional guidance gains as design parameters which make it possible to adjust the guided trajectory according to the operational conditions and missile’s capability. Numerical simulations are presented to validate the effectiveness of the proposed guidance law.

  12. How Big Data Reshapes Knowledge for International Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyverbom, Mikkel; Madsen, Anders Koed; Rasche, Andreas

    The aim of this paper is conceptualize and illustrate how large-scale data and algorithms condition and reshape knowledge production when addressing international development challenges. Based on a review of relevant literature on the uses of big data in the context of development, we unpack how...... digital traces from cell phone data, social media data or data from internet searches are used as sources of knowledge in this area. We draw on insights from governmentality studies and argue that big data’s impact on how relevant development problems are governed revolves around (1) new techniques...... of visualizing development issues, (2) a reliance on algorithmic operations that synthesize large-scale data, (3) and novel ways of rationalizing the knowledge claims that underlie development efforts. Our discussion shows that the reliance on big data challenges some aspects of traditional ways to collect...

  13. Parameter optimization using GA in SVM to predict damage level of non-reshaped berm breakwater.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Harish, N.; Lokesha.; Mandal, S.; Rao, S.; Patil, S.G.

    In the present study, Support Vector Machines (SVM) and hybrid of Genetic Algorithm (GA) with SVM models are developed to predict the damage level of non-reshaped berm breakwaters. Optimal kernel parameters of SVM are determined by using GA...

  14. Adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system modeling to predict damage level of non-reshaped berm breakwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Harish, N.; Mandal, S.; Rao, S.; Lokesha

    The Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model is constructed using experimental data set to predict the damage level of berm breakwater. Experimental data for non-reshaped berm breakwater are collected from Marine Structures Laboratory...

  15. Ergonomics-inspired Reshaping and Exploration of Collections of Models

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Youyi

    2015-06-22

    This paper examines the following question: given a collection of man-made shapes, e.g., chairs, can we effectively explore and rank the shapes with respect to a given human body – in terms of how well a candidate shape fits the specified human body? Answering this question requires identifying which shapes are more suitable for a prescribed body, and how to alter the input geometry to better fit the shapes to a given human body. The problem links physical proportions of the human body and its interaction with object geometry, which is often expressed as ergonomics guidelines. We present an interactive system that allows users to explore shapes using different avatar poses, while, at the same time providing interactive previews of how to alter the shapes to fit the user-specified body and pose. We achieve this by first constructing a fuzzy shape-to-body map from the ergonomic guidelines to multi-contacts geometric constraints; and then, proposing a novel contact-preserving deformation paradigm to realize a reshaping to adapt the input shape. We evaluate our method on collections of models from different categories and validate the results through a user study.

  16. Santa Elena. Ready to reshape its transport energy matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreano, Hernan [Universidad Estatal Peninsula de Santa Elena (Ecuador). Inst. de Investigacion Cientifica y Desarrollo Tecnologico (INCYT)

    2012-07-01

    The renewable energy issue opens the door to an ambient of opportunities. Santa Elena, one of the coastal provinces of Ecuador has the chance to go from a fossil fuel energy culture to a new energy scheme based on the use of environmental friendly fuels like natural gas and other renewable energy carriers like hydrogen. The marginal production of oil and natural gas from the Gustavo Galindo Velasco field and the updated gas reserves from the Gulf of Guayaquil make it possible. Infrastructure for natural gas production and distribution for vehicles is almost ready and any of the three refineries can generate hydrogen from natural gas. This provides the opportunity to reshape the Santa Elena transport energy matrix, where vehicles can burn natural gas and inter country buses can work with hydrogen. Traditional Fishing boats can be fitted with hydrogen storage and fuel systems later on. Santa Elena should face this challenge through a joint effort of public and private parties. Santa Elena State University and its partners as a focus point to create: The Campus of Energy Knowledge, where research, science and technology will serve companies that work in the energy business with a strong synergy, which will create jobs for the Santa Elena people. (orig.)

  17. Leadership and Reshaping Schooling in a Networked World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Finger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is initiated from a position that, until recently, the nature of schooling globally has remained largely unchanged since its design in the last century, and there has been a hegemony that supported its form to be enduring and largely unchanged. However, in a digital, networked world, there is a need to rethink and redefine schooling. Following an examination of schooling in the 21st Century, summarising the context and critical challenges presented by new and emerging digital technologies, suggestions about what schooling might look like in an increasingly digital, networked world are presented. Guidance is provided in relation to key questions for leadership to reshape schooling in a networked world, including: -    how might schools move into the networked mode? -    what is required to lead and manage a networked school community? -    how will a networked school become defined less by its physical space and timetabled lessons, but by being networked and that learning can take place anywhere, anytime?

  18. THE ROLE OF RESEARCH IN RESHAPING TEXTILE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana UNGUREANU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Apparently, the international competition seems to be moved to the area of investments in new technologies waiting for results in the near future. Nanotechnology is by far the most wanted by investors. The last twenty years the investments in nanotechnology became the priority for all the developed states and this trend was followed by the less developed countries. At the opposite side, there are countries as Romania that seem to lose the start in front of those very active in this field. This paper tries to present the role of the Romanian Research and Development activity to reshape the textile industry through new technologies and nanotechnologies especially. To gather the proper information, the in-depth interview method was used. The conclusions reveal that state keeps the key for a good research activity by offering stable and consistent support. At the same time, a lot of measures or recommendations could be a pragmatic solution to take seriously the role of the research activity to bring its contribution for this big challenge.

  19. Structural Changes Reshaping the World Economy and International Trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Ghibuțiu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Highly dynamic and large scale structural changes are currently reshaping the world economy and international trade. When compared to other similar experiences in the past, astonishing is not only the fast pace of global transformations, but also their wide scope affecting virtually the entire world. At the core of these changes is, undoubtedly, the shift of economic power from the industrialized economies towards the major emerging economies, particularly China and India. The forces underlying these transformations have altered the hierarchy of countries in terms of their contribution to global GDP, reversed the centres of economic growth worldwide, affected the location of manufacturing and changed dramatically the patterns of international trade. The weak and uneven economic recovery following the deepest recession in the postwar period has further accelerated the structural shifts at work in the world economy. Relying on available statistics and insights from economic literature, the present paper addresses the main trends shaping international trade over the last two decades. It takes a look at the major changes occurred in the dynamics, geographical distribution and structure of trade flows and highlights the consequences through the lens of developed and developing/emerging economies. In tackling the major forces driving structural changes in world trade, it stresses the importance of the close interaction between the dynamic expansion of global production networks operated by TNCs and the increasing integration of developing/emerging economies into these networks. While the increasing spread of global production networks is not a new phenomenon, the intensity with which it shapes the current economic reality has substantially increased in recent years. The implications of the ongoing geopolitical and economic changes are profound and manyfold both for traditional production processes and trade flows and social structures, and raise major

  20. Aurelia aurita ephyrae reshape a coastal microbial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eZoccarato

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, increasing attention has been paid to the impact of jellyfish blooms on marine communities. Aurelia aurita is one of the most studied of the Scyphozoans, and several studies have been carried out to describe its role as a top-down controller within the classical food web. However, little data are available to define the effects of these jellyfish on microbial communities. The aims of this study were to describe the predation impact of A. aurita ephyrae on a natural microplanktonic assemblage, and to determine any reshaping effects on the prokaryote community composition and functioning. Surface coastal water was used to set up a 24-h grazing experiment in microcosms. Samples were collected to determine the variations in prey biomass, heterotrophic carbon production, extracellular leucine aminopeptidase activity, and grazing pressure. A next-generation sequencing technique was used to investigate biodiversity shifts within the prokaryote and protist communities through the small subunit rRNA tag approach. This study shows that A. aurita ephyrae were responsible for large decreases in the abundances of the more motile microplankton groups, such as tintinnids, Dinophyceae, and aloricate ciliates. Bacillariophyceae and Mediophyceae showed smaller reductions. No evidence of selective predation emerged in the analysis of the community diversity down to the family level. The heterotrophic prokaryote biomass increased significantly (by up to 45%, in parallel with increases in heterotrophic carbon production and leucine aminopeptidase activity (40%. Significant modifications were detected in prokaryotic community composition. Some classes of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia showed higher relative abundances when exposed to A. aurita ephyrae, while there was a net decrease for Alphaproteobacteria. Overall, this study provides new insight into the effects of A. aurita on microbial communities, underlining their selective

  1. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation-mediated Reshaping of the Root Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Gi Kong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to various types of herbivore and pathogen attack using well-developed defensive machinery designed for self-protection. The phloem-sucking insect infestation such as whitefly and aphid on plant leaves were previously shown to influence both the saprophytic and pathogenic bacterial community in the plant rhizosphere. However, the modulation of the root microbial community by plants following insect infestation has been largely unexplored. Only limited studies of culture-dependent bacterial diversity caused by whitefly and aphid have been conducted. In this study, to obtain a complete picture of the belowground microbiome community, we performed high-speed and high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We sampled the rhizosphere soils of pepper seedlings at 0, 1, and 2 weeks after whitefly infestation versus the water control. We amplified a partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene (V1–V3 region by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers. Our analysis revealed that whitefly infestation reshaped the overall microbiota structure compared to that of the control rhizosphere, even after 1 week of infestation. Examination of the relative abundance distributions of microbes demonstrated that whitefly infestation shifted the proteobacterial groups at week 2. Intriguingly, the population of Pseudomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria significantly increased after 2 weeks of whitefly infestation and confirmed the recruitment of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. exhibiting the insect-killing capacity. Additionally, three taxa, including Caulobacteraceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and Flavobacteriaceae, and three genera, including Achromobacter, Janthinobacterium, and Stenotrophomonas, were the most abundant bacterial groups in the whitefly-infested plant rhizosphere. Our results indicate that whitefly infestation leads plant recruiting specific group of rhizosphere bacteria conferring beneficial traits for host plant. This study provides a new

  2. Urban Landscape Architecture in the Reshaping of the Contemporary Cityscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananiadou-Tzimopoulou, Maria; Bourlidou, Anastasia

    2017-10-01

    The contemporary urban landscape is the evolving image of dynamic social, economic and ecological changes and heterogeneity. It constitutes the mirror of history, natural and cultural, urban processes, as well as locations of hybrid character, such as degraded and fragmented spaces within the urban fabric or in the city boundaries -areas in between, infrastructures, post-industrial and waterfront sites, but also potential grounds for urban development. Along with the awakening of the global ecological awareness and the ongoing discussion on sustainability issues, the cityscape with its new attributes, constitutes a challenging field of research and planning for various disciplines, further more than landscape architecture, such as architecture, planning, ecology, environment and engineering. This paper focuses on the role of urban landscape architecture, via its theory and practice, in the reshaping of the city territory. It aspires to broaden the discussion concerning the upgrading of the contemporary cities, aiming firstly at the determination of a wider vocabulary for the urban landscape and its design, and secondly at the highlighting of landscape architecture’s contribution to the sustainable perspective of urban design and planning. The methodology is based on a comparative research implemented both on a theoretical level and on a level of applied work. Urban landscape architecture is described through theory and practice, along with correlative approaches deriving mainly from landscape urbanism and secondarily from the field of architecture. Urban landscape is approached as a socio-ecological and perceptual legible, a territory of culture, process and production; operating as an entity of ecological, infrastructural systems and planning needs, it is also regarded as a precedent for urban development. Furthermore, the research is supported by selected European and International urban landscape projects, presented in a cohesive multiscalar approach, from the

  3. Four stages of pressure ridging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Mark A.

    1998-09-01

    The pressure ridging process is simulated using a two-dimensional particle model. Blocks are broken from an intact sheet of relatively thin lead ice pushed against a thick, multiyear floe at a constant speed. The blocks of ice rubble accumulate to form the ridge sail and keel. During the simulations the energy consumed in ridge growth, including dissipation, is explicitly calculated. On the basis of the results of simulations performed with the model, the ridging process can be divided into four distinct stages. The first stage begins with an intact sheet of lead ice impacting a floe and ends when the sail reaches its maximum height. In the second stage the ridge keel deepens and widens. The stage ends when the maximum keel draft is reached. In the third stage the direction of growth is leadward creating a rubble field of more or less uniform thickness. The third stage ends when the supply of thin ice is exhausted. In the fourth stage the rubble field is compressed between converging floes. The results of simulations establish the dependence of ridging energetics in the first and second stages on the thickness of the ice sheet and the amount of ice pushed into the ridge. The average profiles of the simulated ridges delineate the growth process in the first, second, and third stages. The energetics and profiles of the fourth stage were described by Hopkins et al. [1991]. Lead ice extents of up to 1300 m are pushed into ridges to determine maximum sail heights, keel drafts, and ridging forces.

  4. Observation of an anisotropic Dirac cone reshaping and ferrimagnetic spin polarization in an organic conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Michihiro; Ishikawa, Kyohei; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tamura, Masafumi; Berthier, Claude; Basko, Denis; Kobayashi, Akito; Matsuno, Genki; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2016-08-31

    The Coulomb interaction among massless Dirac fermions in graphene is unscreened around the isotropic Dirac points, causing a logarithmic velocity renormalization and a cone reshaping. In less symmetric Dirac materials possessing anisotropic cones with tilted axes, the Coulomb interaction can provide still more exotic phenomena, which have not been experimentally unveiled yet. Here, using site-selective nuclear magnetic resonance, we find a non-uniform cone reshaping accompanied by a bandwidth reduction and an emergent ferrimagnetism in tilted Dirac cones that appear on the verge of charge ordering in an organic compound. Our theoretical analyses based on the renormalization-group approach and the Hubbard model show that these observations are the direct consequences of the long-range and short-range parts of the Coulomb interaction, respectively. The cone reshaping and the bandwidth renormalization, as well as the magnetic behaviour revealed here, can be ubiquitous and vital for many Dirac materials.

  5. Novos conceitos em modelamento corneano New concepts in corneal reshaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Coneglian Brocchetto

    2010-04-01

    promote covalent bonds between the lamellae of the cornea to make it stronger and less elastic. Other corneal change that may occur is based on the induction in corneal reshaping by using rigid contact lenses (only during sleeping with high oxygen transmissibility (DK / L. This technique is known as Orthokeratology and its concepts will be addressed in this study.

  6. Multiparameter thermo-mechanical OCT-based characterization of laser-induced cornea reshaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Matveev, Lev A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Vitkin, Alex; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Baum, Olga I.; Shabanov, Dmitry V.; Sovetsky, Alexander A.; Sobol, Emil N.

    2017-02-01

    Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used for visualizing dynamic and cumulative strains and corneashape changes during laser-produced tissue heating. Such non-destructive (non-ablative) cornea reshaping can be used as a basis of emerging technologies of laser vision correction. In experiments with cartilaginous samples, polyacrilamide phantoms and excised rabbit eyes we demonstrate ability of the developed OCT system to simultaneously characterize transient and cumulated strain distributions, surface displacements, scattering tissue properties and possibility of temperature estimation via thermal-expansion measurements. The proposed approach can be implemented in perspective real-time OCT systems for ensuring safety of new methods of laser reshaping of cornea.

  7. Ridges on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This is the highest resolution picture ever taken of the Jupiter moon, Europa. The area shown is about 5.9 by 9.9 miles (9.6 by 16 kilometers) and the smallest visible feature is about the size of a football field. In this view, the ice-rich surface has been broken into a complex pattern by cross-cutting ridges and grooves resulting from tectonic processes. Sinuous rille-like features and knobby terrain could result from surface modifications of unknown origins. Small craters of possible impact origin range in size from less than 330 feet (100 meters) to about 1300 feet (400 meters) across are visible.This image was taken by the solid state imaging television camera aboard the Galileo during its fourth orbit around Jupiter, at a distance of 2060 miles (3340 kilometers). The picture is centered at 325 degrees West, 5.83 degrees North. North is toward the top of this image, with the sun shining from the right.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  8. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Johnson, A.M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  9. Europeanization in VET Policy as a Process of Reshaping the Educational Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loogma, Krista

    2016-01-01

    The EU represents a transforming educational space, where national and supranational boundaries in educational governance are becoming blurred. The EU has become an important actor in educational governance and an important arena for policy learning and transfer. This paper explores how the process of reshaping the educational space manifests…

  10. Transplantation of rib cartilage reshaped with 1.56 μm laser radiation in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, E.; Baum, O.; Alexandrovskaya, Yu.; Shekhter, A.; Selezneva, L.; Svistuskin, V.

    2017-02-01

    As cartilage is an ideal natural material for transplantation, its use in the ENT surgery is limited by a difficulty to get proper shape of cartilage implants. Aim of the work is to make ring-shaped cartilage implants, to check their stability after laser reshaping and to perform transplantation into rabbits in vivo. We experimented with costal cartilages of 1-2 mm in thickness obtained from 3rd and 4rd ribs of a rabbit. 1.56 μm laser (Arcuo Medical Inc.) was used for cartilage reshaping. The laser settings were established taking into account anisotropy of cartilage structure for different orientation of the implants. The reshaped cartilage implants were surgically sewn to rib cartilages of the other rabbits. The rabbits were slaughtered in 3.5-4 months after surgery. The results have shown that (1) all reshaped implants kept circular form, and (2) the implants were adhered to the native rabbit cartilage sites (3) pronounced signs of regeneration in the intermediate zones were observed. The prospects of the cartilage implants use in larynx stenosis surgery are discussed.

  11. Can Taichi reshape the brain? A brain morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao-Xia Wei

    Full Text Available Although research has provided abundant evidence for Taichi-induced improvements in psychological and physiological well-being, little is known about possible links to brain structure of Taichi practice. Using high-resolution MRI of 22 Tai Chi Chuan (TCC practitioners and 18 controls matched for age, sex and education, we set out to examine the underlying anatomical correlates of long-term Taichi practice at two different levels of regional specificity. For this purpose, parcel-wise and vertex-wise analyses were employed to quantify the difference between TCC practitioners and the controls based on cortical surface reconstruction. We also adopted the Attention Network Test (ANT to explore the effect of TCC on executive control. TCC practitioners, compared with controls, showed significantly thicker cortex in precentral gyrus, insula sulcus and middle frontal sulcus in the right hemisphere and superior temporal gyrus and medial occipito-temporal sulcus and lingual sulcus in the left hemisphere. Moreover, we found that thicker cortex in left medial occipito-temporal sulcus and lingual sulcus was associated with greater intensity of TCC practice. These findings indicate that long-term TCC practice could induce regional structural change and also suggest TCC might share similar patterns of neural correlates with meditation and aerobic exercise.

  12. Ridge augmentation in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Goyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimensional changes in the alveolar ridge after extraction often compromises on achieving optimal implant stability and placement of implants in the right prosthodontic positions. These situations demand augmentation of the residual ridge to achieve successful implant placement and long-term survival. Although the available literature speaks of an overabundance of techniques and agents for ridge augmentation, there is a relative paucity of quality evidence to guide the selection of suitable techniques and material. Henceforth, this paper is an endeavor to develop and describe an evidence-based decision pathway for the selection of suitable techniques for various clinical situations. Additionally, a descriptive overview of various techniques and materials is presented.

  13. Mid-ocean ridges, InRidge and the future

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Drolia, R.K.; Ray, Dwijesh

    of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi, has earmarked ridge studies as a thrust programme for the X 5 - year plan. Presently, science plans and proposal are afoot to turn this ?dream? into a reality. 1. Maury, M. F., Physical Geography...

  14. Multiwavelength 25-GHz picosecond pulse generation with phase modulation and double-side Mamyshev reshaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Li; Li, Hongfeng; Wang, Dong; Wang, Qiang; Lou, Caiyun

    2015-06-20

    We demonstrate a simple, robust, and cost-effective method of generating high-speed multiwavelength picosecond optical pulses. This method is based on chirp compression of phase-modulated light, followed by nonlinear pulse compression and reshaping with a double-side Mamyshev reshaper. We show that this method becomes power efficient when the repetition rate is increased to 25 GHz. Wavelength-tunable optical pulses with a repetition rate of 25 GHz and pulse width of ∼2  ps, which can be temporally multiplexed to 100 GHz, are experimentally obtained over a large spectral range with moderate electrical and optical power. Simultaneous pulse generation on four wavelengths is demonstrated.

  15. FROM COUNTERPUBLICS TO COUNTERSPACES: Livable city advocates' efforts to reshape cities through carfree-streets events

    OpenAIRE

    Morhayim, Lusi

    2012-01-01

    American cities have gone through major transformation as the automobile has become the primary means of transportation for the masses. This change has come with long-lasting implications for the experience of urban life and for the streets. This dissertation analyzes various livable city advocates' efforts to reshape cities, and particularly, to challenge automobiles' dominant influence on urban form. The analysis first focuses on three carfree-streets events--Critical Mass, Park(ing) Day an...

  16. Graphene oxide-promoted reshaping and coarsening of gold nanorods and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hanqing; Low, Serena; Weerasuriya, Nisala; Shon, Young-Seok

    2015-02-11

    This paper describes thermally induced reshaping and coarsening behaviors of gold nanorods and nanoparticles immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-stabilized gold nanorods with an aspect ratio of ∼3.5 (54:15 nm) and glutathione-capped gold nanoparticles with an average core size of ∼3 nm were synthesized and self-assembled onto the surface of graphene oxide. The hybrid materials were then heated at different temperatures ranging from 50 to 300 °C. The effects of heat treatments were monitored using UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These results were directly compared with those of heat-treated free-standing gold nanorods and nanoparticles without graphene oxide to understand the heat-induced morphological changes of the nanohybrids. The obtained results showed that the gold nanorods would undergo a complete reshaping to spherical particles at the temperature of 50 °C when they are assembled on graphene oxide. In comparison, the complete reshaping of free-standing gold nanorods to spherical particles would ultimately require a heating of the samples at 200 °C. In addition, the spherical gold nanoparticles immobilized on graphene oxide would undergo a rapid coarsening at the temperature of 100-150 °C, which was lower than the temperature (150-200 °C) required for visible coarsening of free-standing gold nanoparticles. The results indicated that graphene oxide facilitates the reshaping and coarsening of gold nanorods and nanoparticles, respectively, during the heat treatments. The stripping and spillover of stabilizing ligands promoted by graphene oxide are proposed to be the main mechanism for the enhancements in the heat-induced transformations of nanohybrids.

  17. Gold nanorod reshaping in vitro and in vivo using a continuous wave laser.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Harris-Birtill

    Full Text Available Gold nanorods (GNRs are increasingly being investigated for cancer theranostics as they possess features which lend themselves in equal measures as contrast agents and catalysts for photothermal therapy. Their optical absorption spectral peak wavelength is determined by their size and shape. Photothermal therapy using GNRs is typically established using near infrared light as this allows sufficient penetration into the tumour matrix. Continuous wave (CW lasers are the most commonly applied source of near infrared irradiation on GNRs for tumour photothermal therapy. It is perceived that large tumours may require fractionated or prolonged irradiation. However the true efficacy of repeated or protracted CW irradiation on tumour sites using the original sample of GNRs remains unclear. In this study spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are used to demonstrate that GNRs reshape both in vitro and in vivo after CW irradiation, which reduces their absorption efficiency. These changes were sustained throughout and beyond the initial period of irradiation, resulting from a spectral blue-shift and a considerable diminution in the absorption peak of GNRs. Solid subcutaneous tumours in immunodeficient BALB/c mice were subjected to GNRs and analysed with electron microscopy pre- and post-CW laser irradiation. This phenomenon of thermally induced GNR reshaping can occur at relatively low bulk temperatures, well below the bulk melting point of gold. Photoacoustic monitoring of GNR reshaping is also evaluated as a potential clinical aid to determine GNR absorption and reshaping during photothermal therapy. Aggregation of particles was coincidentally observed following CW irradiation, which would further diminish the subsequent optical absorption capacity of irradiated GNRs. It is thus established that sequential or prolonged applications of CW laser will not confer any additional photothermal effect on tumours due to significant attenuations in the

  18. Gold nanorod reshaping in vitro and in vivo using a continuous wave laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Birtill, David; Singh, Mohan; Zhou, Yu; Shah, Anant; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Gallina, Maria Elena; Hanna, George B; Cass, Anthony E G; Porter, Alexandra E; Bamber, Jeffrey; Elson, Daniel S

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) are increasingly being investigated for cancer theranostics as they possess features which lend themselves in equal measures as contrast agents and catalysts for photothermal therapy. Their optical absorption spectral peak wavelength is determined by their size and shape. Photothermal therapy using GNRs is typically established using near infrared light as this allows sufficient penetration into the tumour matrix. Continuous wave (CW) lasers are the most commonly applied source of near infrared irradiation on GNRs for tumour photothermal therapy. It is perceived that large tumours may require fractionated or prolonged irradiation. However the true efficacy of repeated or protracted CW irradiation on tumour sites using the original sample of GNRs remains unclear. In this study spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are used to demonstrate that GNRs reshape both in vitro and in vivo after CW irradiation, which reduces their absorption efficiency. These changes were sustained throughout and beyond the initial period of irradiation, resulting from a spectral blue-shift and a considerable diminution in the absorption peak of GNRs. Solid subcutaneous tumours in immunodeficient BALB/c mice were subjected to GNRs and analysed with electron microscopy pre- and post-CW laser irradiation. This phenomenon of thermally induced GNR reshaping can occur at relatively low bulk temperatures, well below the bulk melting point of gold. Photoacoustic monitoring of GNR reshaping is also evaluated as a potential clinical aid to determine GNR absorption and reshaping during photothermal therapy. Aggregation of particles was coincidentally observed following CW irradiation, which would further diminish the subsequent optical absorption capacity of irradiated GNRs. It is thus established that sequential or prolonged applications of CW laser will not confer any additional photothermal effect on tumours due to significant attenuations in the peak optical

  19. Optical spectral reshaping for directly modulated 4-pulse amplitude modulation signals

    OpenAIRE

    Ozolins, Oskars; Da Ros, Francesco; Cristofori, Valentina; Pang, Xiaodan; Schatz, Richard; Chaibi, Mohamed; Bramerie, Laurent; Popov, Sergei; Galili, Michael; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Peucheret, Christophe; Jacobsen, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The tremendous traffic growth in intra/inter-datacenters requires low-cost high-speed integrated solutions. To enable a significantly reduced footprint directly modulated lasers (DMLs) have been proposed instead of large external modulators. However, it is challenging to use DMLs due to their low dispersion tolerance and limited achievable extinction ratio (ER). A promising solution to this problem is optical spectral reshaping (OSR) since it is possible to increase th...

  20. Innovation for Economic Development: How it has reshaped the global economy

    OpenAIRE

    篠﨑, 彰彦

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss how innovations in information technology have transformed the global economy over the last quarter-century. We then illustrate, from an economic perspective, the manner in which new technology and subsequent innovation will reshape the workplace in the 21st century. Our study yielded three observations. First, innovation revitalizes even sluggish economies of developed countries when the innovations involve drastic changes in business processes and human resource ma...

  1. Reshaping the zygomatic complex: A "small step" in frontotemporal craniotomy and a "big leap" in exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shashwat; Srivastava, Arun K; Kumar, Hitesh; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-01-01

    Pterional or fronto-temporal craniotomy, developed by Prof. M. G. Yasargil, is among the most familiar skull base surgery techniques. The cranio-orbito zygomatic (COZ) approach evolved to address the significant limitations of the pterional exposure in excising some parasellar lesions. Although extremely versatile, the COZ technique involves extensive dissection of the cranio-facial soft tissue and reconstruction towards the end of the procedure. The zygomatic reshaping is a minor modification of the pterional approach, which enhances the exposure possible through the classical approach and often circumvents the need for an orbito-zygomatic osteotomy. To demonstrate the technique of reshaping of the zygomatic complex for an optimum surgical exposure and cosmetic results. Between April 2013 and December 2014, 8 patients with various middle and anterior skull base lesions were operated using this technique. These patients form the clinical material for this study. The clinical details, radiological images and follow-up data of these patients were collected for this clinical series. No mortality or significant morbidity were noted in this series. The post-operative cosmetic results were also acceptable. A quick and easy modification of the classical pterional approach through zygomatic reshaping has the potential to provide a significantly enhanced surgical exposure for parasellar lesions. Using this approach, it might be possible to avoid an extensive orbito-zygomatic osteotomy in suitable lesions.

  2. Pine Ridge Fire summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah Brenkert-Smith; Sarah McCaffrey; Melanie. Stidham

    2013-01-01

    In July 2012, immediately after the Pine Ridge Fire burned outside De Beque, Colorado, a team of researchers interviewed fire managers, local government officials, and residents to understand perceptions of the event itself, communication, evacuation, and pre-fire preparedness in order to identify contributors to success and areas for improvement. Although the fire had...

  3. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are…

  4. The beach ridges of India: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Wagle, B.G.

    An attempt has been made to assemble and synthesize research work conducted on beach ridges and associated geomorphic features around India. Information on location, morphology, origin, and age of beach ridges, has been gathered from the literature...

  5. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 with the mission of standing up a supercomputer 100 times...

  6. InRidge program: Preliminary results from the first cruise

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Iyer, S.D.; Rao, M.M.M.; Banerjee, R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Ghose, I.

    The first cruise under India's own Ridge research initiative, InRidge collected new data on bathymetry, free-air gravity and magnetic anomalies across the ridge axis between the Vema and Zhivago transform faults in the Central Indian Ridge...

  7. DRREP: deep ridge regressed epitope predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Gene; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Shaojie

    2017-10-03

    The ability to predict epitopes plays an enormous role in vaccine development in terms of our ability to zero in on where to do a more thorough in-vivo analysis of the protein in question. Though for the past decade there have been numerous advancements and improvements in epitope prediction, on average the best benchmark prediction accuracies are still only around 60%. New machine learning algorithms have arisen within the domain of deep learning, text mining, and convolutional networks. This paper presents a novel analytically trained and string kernel using deep neural network, which is tailored for continuous epitope prediction, called: Deep Ridge Regressed Epitope Predictor (DRREP). DRREP was tested on long protein sequences from the following datasets: SARS, Pellequer, HIV, AntiJen, and SEQ194. DRREP was compared to numerous state of the art epitope predictors, including the most recently published predictors called LBtope and DMNLBE. Using area under ROC curve (AUC), DRREP achieved a performance improvement over the best performing predictors on SARS (13.7%), HIV (8.9%), Pellequer (1.5%), and SEQ194 (3.1%), with its performance being matched only on the AntiJen dataset, by the LBtope predictor, where both DRREP and LBtope achieved an AUC of 0.702. DRREP is an analytically trained deep neural network, thus capable of learning in a single step through regression. By combining the features of deep learning, string kernels, and convolutional networks, the system is able to perform residue-by-residue prediction of continues epitopes with higher accuracy than the current state of the art predictors.

  8. Brain and language: evidence for neural multifunctionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahana-Amitay, Dalia; Albert, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    This review paper presents converging evidence from studies of brain damage and longitudinal studies of language in aging which supports the following thesis: the neural basis of language can best be understood by the concept of neural multifunctionality. In this paper the term "neural multifunctionality" refers to incorporation of nonlinguistic functions into language models of the intact brain, reflecting a multifunctional perspective whereby a constant and dynamic interaction exists among neural networks subserving cognitive, affective, and praxic functions with neural networks specialized for lexical retrieval, sentence comprehension, and discourse processing, giving rise to language as we know it. By way of example, we consider effects of executive system functions on aspects of semantic processing among persons with and without aphasia, as well as the interaction of executive and language functions among older adults. We conclude by indicating how this multifunctional view of brain-language relations extends to the realm of language recovery from aphasia, where evidence of the influence of nonlinguistic factors on the reshaping of neural circuitry for aphasia rehabilitation is clearly emerging.

  9. Sex Determination from Fingerprint Ridge Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sudesh Gungadin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with an aim to establish a relationship between sex and fingerprint ridge density. The fingerprints were taken from 500 subjects (250 males and 250 females in the age group of 18-60 years. After taking fingerprints, the ridges were counted in the upper portion of the radial border of each print for all ten fingers and mean value was calculated. The results have shown that a finger print ridge of 14 ridges/25 mm2 is more likely of female origin. It has been successful to support the hypothesis that women tend to have a statistically significant greater ridge density than men.

  10. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  12. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinoluk, Tolga [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Armesto, Néstor, E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Beuf, Guillaume [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Kovner, Alex [Physics Department, University of Connecticut, 2152 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Lublinsky, Michael [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-12-17

    We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  13. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Altinoluk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  14. Europeanization in VET Policy as a Process of Reshaping the Educational Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Loogma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The EU represents a transforming educational space, where national and supranational boundaries in educational governance are becoming blurred. The EU has become an  important actor in educational governance and an important arena for policy learning and transfer. This paper explores how the process of reshaping the educational space manifests itself in the process of the Europeanization of VET policy in the case of Estonia. In Estonia, this process was followed by the growth of executive VET institutions and has developed from rather uncritical initial policy transfer to more active learning from the EU, although conformism can still be seen in cases of the introduction of standardizing policy tools.

  15. Advanced Shape Memory Technology to Reshape Product Design, Manufacturing and Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guang Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief review on the advanced shape memory technology (ASMT with a focus on polymeric materials. In addition to introducing the concept and fundamentals of the ASMT, the potential applications of the ASMT either alone or integrated with an existing mature technique (such as, 3D printing, quick response (QR code, lenticular lens and phenomena (e.g., wrinkling and stress-enhanced swelling effect in product design, manufacturing, and recycling are demonstrated. It is concluded that the ASMT is indeed able to provide a range of powerful approaches to reshape part of the life cycle or the whole life cycle of products.

  16. Optical spectral reshaping for directly modulated 4-pulse amplitude modulation signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozolins, Oskars; Da Ros, Francesco; Cristofori, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    of the optical filter for optical spectral reshaping in case of pulse amplitude modulation and(ii) an experimental demonstration of real-time dispersion-uncompensated transmission of 10-GBd and 14-GBd 4-PAM signals up to 10- and 26-km SSMF. This is achieved by combining a commercial 10-Gb/s DML with optical...... spectral shaping, thus removing the need for any complex off-line DSP and improving dispersion tolerance. These achievements are enabled by OSR based on a passive microring resonator fabricated on the SOI platform [4]. Significant improvement in receiver sensitivities was observed for both a 10-GBd signal...

  17. Reshaping Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Frigaard, Peter

    1987-01-01

    at The Hydraulics Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Aalborg. The object was to study the stability/erosion of the breakwater head and the trunk, the latter exposed to both head-on and oblique irregular waves. To avoid too many parameters a simple breakwater geometry and only one class...

  18. Reshaping conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Mikkel; Danielsen, Finn; Ngaga, Yonika

    2013-01-01

    members strengthen the monitoring practices to their advantage, and to some extent move them beyond the reach of government agencies and conservation and development practitioners. This has led to outcomes that are of greater social and strategic value to communities than the original 'planned' benefits......, although the monitoring scheme has also to some extent become dominated by local 'conservation elites' who negotiate the terrain between the state and other community members. Our findings suggest that we need to move beyond simplistic assumptions of community strategies and incentives in participatory...... conservation and allow for more adaptive and politically explicit governance spaces in protected area management....

  19. Changing characteristics of arctic pressure ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, Peter; Toberg, Nick

    2012-04-01

    The advent of multibeam sonar permits us to obtain full three-dimensional maps of the underside of sea ice. In particular this enables us to distinguish the morphological characteristics of first-year (FY) and multi-year (MY) pressure ridges in a statistically valid way, whereas in the past only a small number of ridges could be mapped laboriously by drilling. In this study pressure ridge distributions from two parts of the Arctic Ocean are compared, in both the cases using mainly data collected by the submarine “Tireless” in March 2007 during two specific grid surveys, in the Beaufort Sea at about 75° N, 140° W (N of Prudhoe Bay), and north of Ellesmere Island at about 83° 20‧ N, 64° W. In the Beaufort Sea the ice was mainly FY, and later melted or broke up as this area became ice-free during the subsequent summer. N of Ellesmere Island the ice was mainly MY. Ridge depth and spacing distributions were derived for each region using the boat's upward looking sonar, combined with distributions of shapes of the ridges encountered, using the Kongsberg EM3002 multibeam sonar. The differing shapes of FY and MY ridges are consistent with two later high-resolution multibeam studies of specific ridges by AUV. FY ridges are found to fit the normal triangular shape template in cross-section (with a range of slope angles averaging 27°) with a relatively constant along-crest depth, and often a structure of small ice blocks can be distinguished. MY ridges, however, are often split into a number of independent solid, smooth blocks of large size, giving an irregular ridge profile which may be seemingly without linearity. Our hypothesis for this difference is that during its long lifetime an MY ridge is subjected to several episodes of crack opening; new cracks in the Arctic pack often run in straight lines across the ridges and undeformed ice alike. Such a crack will open somewhat before refreezing, interpolating a stretch of thin ice into the structure, and breaking up

  20. Migration induced by sea-level rise could reshape the US population landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Mathew E.

    2017-04-01

    Many sea-level rise (SLR) assessments focus on populations presently inhabiting vulnerable coastal communities, but to date no studies have attempted to model the destinations of these potentially displaced persons. With millions of potential future migrants in heavily populated coastal communities, SLR scholarship focusing solely on coastal communities characterizes SLR as primarily a coastal issue, obscuring the potential impacts in landlocked communities created by SLR-induced displacement. Here I address this issue by merging projected populations at risk of SLR with migration systems simulations to project future destinations of SLR migrants in the United States. I find that unmitigated SLR is expected to reshape the US population distribution, potentially stressing landlocked areas unprepared to accommodate this wave of coastal migrants--even after accounting for potential adaptation. These results provide the first glimpse of how climate change will reshape future population distributions and establish a new foundation for modelling potential migration destinations from climate stressors in an era of global environmental change.

  1. RE-Shaping. Shaping an effective and efficient European renewable energy market. D23 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathmann, M.; Klessmann, C.; Nabe, C.; De Jager, D.; De Lovinfosse, I. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ragwitz, M.; Steinhilber, S.; Breitschopf, B. [Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI, Karlsruhe (Germany); Burgers, J.; Boots, M. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands); Weoeres, B. [EnergoBanking, Budapest (Hungary); Resch, G.; Panzer, C.; Ortner, A.; Busch, S. [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Energy Systems and Electric Drives, Energy Economics Group EEG, Vienna (Austria); Neuhoff, K.; Boyd, R. [Climate Policy Initiative, German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), Berlin (Germany); Junginger, M.; Hoefnagels, R. [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Cusumano, N.; Lorenzoni, A. [Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Konstantinaviciute, I. [Lithuanian Energy Institute LEI, Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2012-02-15

    The core objective of the RE-Shaping project is to assist Member State governments in preparing for the implementation of Directive 2009/28/EC (on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources) and to guide a European policy for RES (renewable energy sources) in the mid- to long term. The past and present success of policies for renewable energies will be evaluated and recommendations derived to improve future RES support schemes. The core content of this collaborative research activity comprises: Developing a comprehensive policy background for RES support instruments; Providing the European Commission and Member States with scientifically based and statistically robust indicators to measure the success of currently implemented RES policies; Proposing innovative financing schemes for lower costs and better capital availability in RES financing; Initiation of National Policy Processes which attempt to stimulate debate and offer key stakeholders a meeting place to set and implement RES targets as well as options to improve the national policies fostering RES market penetration; Assessing options to coordinate or even gradually harmonize national RES policy approaches. This report marks the end of the research project RE-Shaping and summarizes its research activities, results, and recommendations.

  2. An Evaluation of Ridge Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    of the parameter estimates, is a decreasing function of k. The idea of ridge regression, as suggested by Hoerl and Kennard (Ref 12:58-63), is to pick...CROSS? 0 CR0553 f.812 CR0554 0 CR0555 4.39? CROSS6 0 ALSO 4.922 KSO 0 NVARSO 4. A5059 .622 CONTFNTS OF CASE NUlIPER 209 SEQHUI 209. SUOILE PEGANAL CASWGT...KSQ .000 NVARSO 9. RSOSO .846 CONTENTS OF CASE NUMBER 55 SEONUN 55. SUfTFILE PEGANAL CASWGI 2.0000 459 .970 RI 76600 K .025 NVA? 3. MSE .177 NS[IS

  3. Pendeteksian Outlier dengan Metode Regresi Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Harini

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dalam analisis regresi linier berganda adanya satu atau lebih pengamatan pencilan (outlier akan menimbulkan dilema bagi para peneliti. Keputusan untuk menghilangkan pencilan tersebut harus dilandasi alasan yang kuat, karena kadang-kadang pencilan dapat memberikan informasi penting yang diperlukan. Masalah outlier ini dapat diatasi dengan berbagai metode, diantaranya metode regresi ridge (ridge regression. Untuk mengetahui kekekaran regresi ridge perlu melihat nilai-nilai R2, PRESS, serta leverage (hii, untuk metode regresi ridge dengan berbagai nilai tetapan bias k yang dipilih.

  4. Using GA-Ridge regression to select hydro-geological parameters influencing groundwater pollution vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Joon; Kim, Young Min; Yoo, Keunje; Park, Joonhong; Oh, Kyong Joo

    2012-11-01

    For groundwater conservation and management, it is important to accurately assess groundwater pollution vulnerability. This study proposed an integrated model using ridge regression and a genetic algorithm (GA) to effectively select the major hydro-geological parameters influencing groundwater pollution vulnerability in an aquifer. The GA-Ridge regression method determined that depth to water, net recharge, topography, and the impact of vadose zone media were the hydro-geological parameters that influenced trichloroethene pollution vulnerability in a Korean aquifer. When using these selected hydro-geological parameters, the accuracy was improved for various statistical nonlinear and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, such as multinomial logistic regression, decision trees, artificial neural networks, and case-based reasoning. These results provide a proof of concept that the GA-Ridge regression is effective at determining influential hydro-geological parameters for the pollution vulnerability of an aquifer, and in turn, improves the AI performance in assessing groundwater pollution vulnerability.

  5. Large fault fabric of the Ninetyeast Ridge implies near-spreading ridge formation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sager, W.W.; Paul, C.F.; Krishna, K.S.; Pringle, M.S.; Eisin, A.E.; Frey, F.A.; Rao, D.G.; Levchenko, O.V.

    Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) is a linear volcanic ridge in the Indian Ocean thought to have formed by hotspot volcanism on the northward?drifting Indian plate. Geological data from the ridge are sparse, so its tectonic evolution is poorly known. We...

  6. Petrology of tectonically segmented Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Distribution and mineralogy of various rock types along the 4200-km-long slow-spreading Central Indian Ridge, between Owen fracture zone in the north and Indian Ocean triple junction in the south, is studied in the light of ridge segmentation...

  7. Pulley Ridge Swath Bathymetry Grid - filtered

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  8. An identity for kernel ridge regression

    OpenAIRE

    Zhdanov, Fedor; Kalnishkan, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    This paper derives an identity connecting the square loss of ridge regression in on-line mode with the loss of the retrospectively best regressor. Some corollaries about the properties of the cumulative loss of on-line ridge regression are also obtained.

  9. On the ridging of intact lead ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Mark A.

    1994-08-01

    The sea ice pressure ridging process is modeled using a two-dimensional particle simulation technique. In this model, blocks are broken from an intact sheet of relatively thin lead ice driven against a thick, multiyear floe at a constant speed. The blocks of ice rubble accumulate to form the ridge sail and keel. The energy consumed in ridge growth, including dissipation, is explicitly calculated. A series of numerical experiments are performed to establish the dependence of the energetics on the thickness of the ice sheet and the friction between blocks. The results suggest that the total energy required to create a pressure ridge is an order of magnitude greater than the potential energy in the ridge structure. A typical sea ice cover in the polar regions contains a variety of ice thicknesses that evolve in response to both dynamic and thermodynamic forcing. The variable thickness of the ice cover is created by deformation, which simultaneously causes formation of thick ice through ridge building and thin ice through lead creation. Since the energy expended in deformation is largely determined by the ridging process, an understanding of the energetics of pressure ridging is critical in the determination of ice strength on a geophysical scale.

  10. Sex Determination from Fingerprint Ridge Density | Gungadin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted with an aim to establish a relationship between sex and fingerprint ridge density. The fingerprints were taken from 500 subjects (250 males and 250 females) in the age group of 18-60 years. After taking fingerprints, the ridges were counted in the upper portion of the radial border of each print for all ...

  11. Reshaping the Sword and Chrysanthemum: Regional Implications of Expanding the Mission of the Japan Self Defense Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS RESHAPING THE SWORD AND CHRYSANTHEMUM : REGIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF EXPANDING THE...Sword and Chrysanthemum : Regional Implications of Expanding the Mission of the Japan Self Defense Forces 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert F. Hight Jr. 5. FUNDING...SWORD AND CHRYSANTHEMUM : REGIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF EXPANDING THE MISSION OF THE JAPAN SELF DEFENSE FORCES Robert F. Hight Jr. Lieutenant

  12. Beyond the Elementary Classroom Walls: Exploring the Ways Participation within Web 2.0 Spaces are Reshaping Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phirangee, Krystle

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report on the findings of a study involving four full-time elementary teachers, who incorporated technology into their teaching to various degrees. The study was guided by the overarching question: How is participation within Web 2.0 spaces reshaping teaching and learning in the elementary classroom? To explore this question, a…

  13. Reshaping urban space through studentification in two South African urban centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie Donaldson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accommodation shortages on campus force students to find accommodation in the private sector. These shortages result in single family residents increasingly being targeted for redevelopment into student housing. Studentification is a process where the original residents in the vicinity of tertiary institutions are gradually displaced due to an in-migration of students causing spatial dysfunctionality where, eventually, only the needs of a student subculture are catered for. The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the reshaping of urban space due to studentification in the two South African cities of Bloemfontein and Stellenbosch. Empirical data on key aspects of studentification was obtained from two questionnaire surveys among permanent residents, as well as students, in both cities. The paper proposes that the main role-players, such as universities and local municipalities, should ideally all form part of planning strategies for student housing.

  14. Manastash Ridge Observatory Autoguider Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozo, Jason; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Armstrong, John; Davila, Adrian; Johnson, Courtney; McMaster, Alex; Olinger, Kyle

    2016-06-01

    The Astronomy Undergraduate Engineering Group (AUEG) at the University of Washington has designed and manufactured a novel autoguider system for the 0.8-meter telescope at the Manastash Ridge Observatory in Ellensburg, Washington. The system uses a pickoff mirror placed in the unused optical path, directing the outer field to the guide camera via a system of axi-symmetrically rotating relay mirrors (periscope). This allows the guider to sample nearly 7 times the area that would be possible with the same fixed detector. This system adds closed loop optical feedback to the tracking capabilities of the telescope. When tuned the telescope will be capable of acheiving 0.5 arcsecond tracking or better. Dynamic focusing of the primary optical path will also be an included feature of this system. This unique guider will be a much needed upgrade to the telescope allowing for increased scientific capability.

  15. Impact of contra-lateral breast reshaping on mammographic surveillance in women undergoing breast reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Maurizio B; Rocco, Nicola; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Falco, Giuseppe; Capalbo, Emanuela; Marano, Luigi; Bordoni, Daniele; Spano, Andrea; Scaperrotta, Gianfranco

    2015-08-01

    The ultimate goal of breast reconstruction is to achieve symmetry with the contra-lateral breast. Contra-lateral procedures with wide parenchymal rearrangements are suspected to impair mammographic surveillance. This study aims to evaluate the impact on mammographic detection of mastopexies and breast reductions for contralateral adjustment in breast reconstruction. We retrospectively evaluated 105 women affected by uni-lateral breast cancer who underwent mastectomy and immediate two-stage reconstruction between 2002 and 2007. We considered three groups according to the contra-lateral reshaping technique: mastopexy or breast reduction with inferior dermoglandular flap (group 1); mastopexy or breast reduction without inferior dermoglandular flap (group 2); no contra-lateral reshaping (group 3). We assessed qualitative mammographic variations and breast density in the three groups. Statistically significant differences have been found when comparing reshaped groups with non reshaped groups regarding parenchymal distortions, skin thickening and stromal edema, but these differences did not affect cancer surveillance. The surveillance mammography diagnostic accuracy in contra-lateral cancer detection was not significantly different between the three groups (p = 0.56), such as the need for MRI for equivocal findings at mammographic contra-lateral breast (p = 0.77) and the need for core-biopsies to confirm mammographic suspect of contra-lateral breast cancer (p = 0.90). This study confirms previous reports regarding the safety of mastopexies and breast reductions when performed in the setting of contra-lateral breast reshaping after breast reconstruction. Mammographic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are not affected by the glandular re-arrangement. These results provide a further validation of the safety of current reconstructive paradigms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Carlsberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Comparison of slow spreading centre analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Bramley J.; Rona, Peter A.

    2015-11-01

    Eighty per cent of all mid-ocean spreading centres are slow. Using a mixture of global bathymetry data and ship-board multibeam echosounder data, we explore the morphology of global mid-ocean ridges and compare two slow spreading analogues: the Carlsberg Ridge in the north-west Indian Ocean between 57°E and 60°E, and the Kane to Atlantis super-segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 21°N and 31°N. At a global scale, mid-ocean spreading centres show an inverse correlation between segment length and spreading rate with segmentation frequency. Within this context, both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge are similar: spreading at 22 and 26 mm/yr full rates respectively, being devoid of major transform faults, and being segmented by dextral, non-transform, second-order discontinuities. For these and other slow spreading ridges, we show that segmentation frequency varies inversely with flank height and ridge axis depth. Segments on both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge range in aspect ratio (ridge flank height/axis width), depth and symmetry. Segments with high aspect ratios and deeper axial floors often have asymmetric rift flanks and are associated with indicators of lower degrees of melt flux. Segments with low aspect ratios have shallower axial floors, symmetric rift flanks, and evidence of robust melt supply. The relationship between segmentation, spreading rate, ridge depth and morphology, at both a global and local scale, is evidence that rates of melting of the underlying mantle and melt delivery to the crust play a significant role in determining the structure and morphology of slow spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  17. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone substitutes for alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinduction. Allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin and bone was tested for osteoinductive properties in order to establish an experimental model for further studies. Implantations were...

  18. Petrography of basalts from the Carlsberg ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    and olivine phenocrysts, in addition to numerous filled and unfilled vesicles. These basalts are of the moderately plagioclase phyric basalts (MPPB) variety and are comparable to those of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge...

  19. Internal Tide Generation by Tall Ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    dissipation is not phys- ical but illustrates the level of noise in the computation. Reproduced from [20]. The locations of the Hawaiian and Luzon ridges... assembled Foamlinx foam cutter, and (b) photograph while cutting a model ridge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 2-6 Schematic of...respectively (from left to right): I and II for the subcritical wave field and I and II for the supercritical wave field. Cross-sections I and II are

  20. Dark and Bright Ridges on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This high-resolution image of Jupiter's moon Europa, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft camera, shows dark, relatively smooth region at the lower right hand corner of the image which may be a place where warm ice has welled up from below. The region is approximately 30 square kilometers in area. An isolated bright hill stands within it. The image also shows two prominent ridges which have different characteristics; youngest ridge runs from left to top right and is about 5 kilometers in width (about 3.1 miles). The ridge has two bright, raised rims and a central valley. The rims of the ridge are rough in texture. The inner and outer walls show bright and dark debris streaming downslope, some of it forming broad fans. This ridge overlies and therefore must be younger than a second ridge running from top to bottom on the left side of the image. This dark 2 km wide ridge is relatively flat, and has smaller-scale ridges and troughs along its length.North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the upper left. This image, centered at approximately 14 degrees south latitude and 194 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 15 kilometers by 20 kilometers (9 miles by 12 miles). The resolution is 26 meters (85 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 1300 kilometers (800 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  1. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R. (eds.)

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  2. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Damage level prediction of non-reshaped berm breakwater using ANN, SVM and ANFIS models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; SubbaRao; Harish, N.; Lokesha

    Marine Structures Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics and Hydraulics, NITK, Surathkal, India. Soft computing techniques like Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference system (ANFIS) models...

  4. Unstable reshaping of gold nanorods prepared by a wet chemical method in the presence of silver nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Tae, Giyoong

    2006-11-01

    We characterized the stability of the gold nanorods synthesized by means of a seed mediated growth approach in the presence of AgNO3, which consists of synthesis of small diameter seed particles (approximately 4 nm) and subsequent growth of these nanoparticles into nanorods by addition to gold salt solution containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in the presence of ascorbic acid. The presence of silver nitrate significantly enhanced the nanorod synthesis as previously reported. However, the synthesized nanorods were unstable and reshaped in aqueous environment; the continuous blue-shift of the 2nd plasmon bands was monitored and the changes in the nanorod morphologies were also observed by electron microscopy with increasing storage time. This reshaping was observed at wide CTAB concentration range regardless of the removal of the unreacted gold or silver ions.

  5. The medical reshaping of disabled bodies as a response to stigma and a route to normality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Janice

    2017-12-01

    Disabled people are said to experience stigma because their embodied presence in the world does not fit with how others interact and use their bodies to be social participants. In response they can turn to medical procedures, such as surgery or physiotherapy, in order to reshape their bodies to more closely approximate norms of social interaction and embodiment. This paper explores how medicine plays a role in attempts to be recognised by others as normal and acceptable by minimising disability. It will do so via a focus on disabled young people, in order to explore how their emerging identities and aspirations for the future influence how they think about their bodies, what normality means and their participation in multiple activities that work on their bodies. The paper draws from an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) project that used a range of qualitative research methods with a group of disabled young people. The project explored ways in which participants actively worked on their bodies to be more normal and examined the disciplinary and agency dynamics involved in this work. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Highly Efficient Wave-Front Reshaping of Surface Waves with Dielectric Metawalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shaohua; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Huijie; Duan, Jingwen; Guan, Fuxin; He, Qiong; Zhao, Haibin; Zhou, Lei; Sun, Shulin

    2018-01-01

    Controlling the wave fronts of surface waves (including surface-plamon polaritons and their equivalent counterparts) at will is highly important in photonics research, but the available mechanisms suffer from the issues of low efficiency, bulky size, and/or limited functionalities. Inspired by recent studies of metasurfaces that can freely control the wave fronts of propagating waves, we propose to use metawalls placed on a plasmonic surface to efficiently reshape the wave fronts of incident surface waves (SWs). Here, the metawall is constructed by specifically designed meta-atoms that can reflect SWs with desired phases and nearly unit amplitudes. As a proof of concept, we design and fabricate a metawall in the microwave regime (around 12 GHz) that can anomalously reflect the SWs following the generalized Snell's law with high efficiency (approximately 70%). Our results, in excellent agreement with full-wave simulations, provide an alternative yet efficient way to control the wave fronts of SWs in different frequency domains. We finally employ full-wave simulations to demonstrate a surface-plasmon-polariton focusing effect at telecom wavelength based on our scheme.

  7. Horizontal gene transfer events reshape the global landscape of arm race between viruses and homo sapiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong-Sheng; Wu, Yi-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, San-Jie; Chen, Shan-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) drives the evolution of recipient organism particularly if it provides a novel function which enhances the fitness or its adaption to the environment. Virus-host co-evolution is attractive for studying co-evolutionary processes, since viruses strictly replicate inside of the host cells and thus their evolution is inexorably tangled with host biology. HGT, as a mechanism of co-evolution between human and viruses, has been widely documented, however, the roles HGT play during the interaction between human and viruses are still in their infancy. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis on the genes horizontally transferred between viruses and their corresponding human hosts. Our study suggests that the HGT genes in human are predominantly enriched in immune related GO terms while viral HGT genes are tend to be encoded by viruses which promote the invasion of immune system of hosts. Based on our results, it gives us a hint about the evolution trajectory of HGT events. Overall, our study suggests that the HGT between human and viruses are highly relevant to immune interaction and probably reshaped the arm race between hosts and viruses. PMID:27270140

  8. Using quality report cards for reshaping dentist practice patterns: a pre-play communication approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chinho; Lin, Chun-Mei

    2008-06-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Understanding how information disclosure influences dentists' patterns of practice change is important in developing quality-improvement policies and cost containment. Thus, using quality report cards is a promising strategy for investigating whether dentists will reshape their patterns of practice because of the influence of peer comparison. Methods Based on the coordination game, a data warehouse decision support system (DWDSS) was used as a pre-play communication instrument, along with the disclosure of quality report cards, which allow dentists to search their own service rates of dental restoration and restoration replacement as well as compare those results with others. Results and conclusions The group using the DWDSS had a greater decrease in two indicators (i.e. service rates of dental restoration and restoration replacement) than the dentists who did not use it, which implies that the DWDSS is a useful facility for helping dentists filter and evaluate information for establishing the maximum utility in their practice management. The disclosure of information makes significant contributions to solving managerial problems associated with dentists' deviation of practice patterns.

  9. Mammographic findings after reshaping with autoprosthesis in women undergoing contralateral breast reconstruction and mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Capalbo, Emanuela; Ferranti, Claudio; Falco, Giuseppe; Nava, Maurizio B; Di Leo, Gianni; Marchesini, Monica; Suman, Laura; Panizza, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Breast reduction and mastopexy combined with inferior dermo-lipo-glandular flap (autoprosthesis) gives good breast shape, long-term projection, and upper pole fullness. We assess the impact on breast oncologic surveillance compared to other techniques. A total of 105 patients who underwent mastectomy and reconstruction were divided into 3 groups of 35 patients each: groups 1 and 2 include patients with contralateral breast symmetrization performed with and without autoprosthesis technique, respectively. Group 3 is a control group without contralateral breast reshaping. On mammography, edema, skin thickening, architectural distortion, and calcifications were recorded, as well as further diagnostic examinations, biopsies, and surgical treatments required. Statistically significant differences (p<0.001) in the first follow-up mammography between groups 1 and 2 were stromal edema (6% vs 51%) and architectural distortion (74% vs 63%). The latest findings meant architectural distortion also have significant difference (p<0.001) in the last mammography (79% vs 66%). Microcalcification has statistically significant difference (p<0.001) in the latest postsurgical mammography, increased in group 1. Skin thickening had a similar course in either group. Mammography follow-up was not impaired in most cases notwithstanding the parenchyma distortion as compared with mammography after breast-conserving surgery. Four core biopsies were performed in both groups: 3 new breast cancers and 1 benign epithelial hyperplasia were found. No difficulties were found impairing mammographic evaluation in patients treated with autoprosthesis as compared to other techniques.

  10. Monological Drama to Reshape the Northern Irish Identity: A Night in November by Marie Jones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Privas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this contemporary one-man theatre play, Marie Jones’s character, Kenneth McCallister, is prompted to break free from the prejudices in and against Northern Ireland. Indeed, the playwright aims at finding new ways to deconstruct the preconceived idea that there are two different identities in Northern Ireland closely linked to the division between two religious communities. Instead, she seeks connections, even with the Irish who migrated (the diasporic dimension, though, is not to be discussed within this paper. The author explores this possibility through the psychological evolution of a Northern Irish Protestant who comes to lack references in terms of identity. On stage, he recalls the events that launched him on a quest to redefine his identity, an identity in which his religious denomination is taken into account but is not the only community marker. Marie Jones eventually offers an insight into what being and feeling Irish means for someone who has always lived as a Protestant in Northern Ireland. Monologue and the notion of “frontiers” (be they social, political, geographical, historical or theatrical that emerge only to be destroyed, are some of the theatrical devices she resorts to in order to voice her aim in  this experimental play which ultimately proposes to reshape the contours of Northern Irish drama about the Troubles.

  11. From Anti-Pollution to Climate Change Risk Movement: Reshaping Civic Epistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei Tien Chou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available From the perspective of reflexive governance, this study probes into the transformative capacity and roles of government and civil society, and aims to determine how the authoritative developmental neo-liberalism state was challenged by civil society in democratization from the end of the 1980s, when it encountered a crisis of governance legitimacy. By analyzing the anti-petrochemical movement of the recent two decades, this paper recognizes the important historic line, and proposes that without innovative governance, a regime of expert politics with hidden and delayed risk will result in higher degrees of mistrust and confrontational positions by the public. In contrast to the government, local and civil societies are growing through the anti-pollution appeals of simple group protests into systematic and robust civic knowledge and strategic action. By administrative, legislative, judicial, and risk statement paths, such strategic mobilizations break through authoritative expert politics and reshape new civic epistemology. The process of reflexive governance is extremely radical. When two parties cannot commit to dealing with a high degree of mistrust, they will not be able to manage the more dramatic threat of climate change. Fundamentally speaking, a robust civil society will be an important driving power competing with government, in terms of constructing innovative governance.

  12. Sea Ice Ridge Detection from ICESAR 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingting; Spreen, Gunnar; Dierking, Wolfgang; Heygster, Georg; Li, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Shengkai; Hao, Weifeng; Yuan, Lexian; Xiao, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery can be used to capture sea ice surface deformation features including rafted ice, shear zones, pressure ridges and rubble ice caused by the divergence, convergence and shear of sea ice. It has been shown that pressure ridges can be observed as bright, curvilinear features in C-band and L-band SAR satellite images. A comparison of airborne L-band and C-band SAR data to identify deformation features (ridge) has concluded that L-band is preferable in most cases. To investigate in more detail how sea ice can be observed by SAR, the airborne measurement campaign ICESAR 2007 has been conducted. In this study, we use L-band and C-band airborne SAR data sets to detect ridges from the ICESAR 2007 campaign. Our region of interest (ROI) is the Fram Strait. One goal of this study is to identify possibilities if deformed ice areas can also be detected with the lower resolution (40 m) SAR of the Sentinel-1 satellite mission. We therefore consider the parameter configurations of the Sentinel-1 mission as a baseline in our study. Traditional techniques for ridge detection include line detection, edge detection, and direct threshold method. These methods are insufficient without considering the intensive speckle noise and contextual information in such high spatial resolution SAR imagery like we use here from ICESAR 2007. Another obstacle is to separate ridges from other deformed features in the SAR imagery. For tackling these issues, we propose using a structure tensor algorithm for ridge detection in the ICESAR 2007 data sets. For the tensor structure algorithm, sea ice ridges are described as the target enhanced by the tensor matrix and surrounding pixels are suppressed as the background using the weighted gradient distance. The length to width ratio is used to preserve ridge shaped features and avoids that they are being filtered out as noise. The structure tensor algorithm is validated for the ICESAR L-band HH and HV SAR imagery with a

  13. Sea ice ridging in the eastern Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, V. I.; Ackley, S. F.

    1991-10-01

    In August 1986, sea ice ridge heights and spatial frequency in the eastern Weddell Sea were measured using a ship-based acoustical sounder. Using a minimum ridge sail height of 0.75 m, a total of 933 ridges were measured along a track length of 415 km. The ridge frequency varied from 0.4 to 10.5 ridges km-1. The mean height of the ridges was found to be about 1.1 m regardless of the ridge frequency. These results are compared to other ridging statistics from the Ross Sea and found to be similar. Comparison with Arctic data, however, indicates that the height and frequency of the ridges are considerably less in the Weddell Sea than in the Arctic. Whereas in the Arctic the mean ridge height tends to increase with the ridge frequency, we found that this was not the case in the Weddell Sea, where the mean ridge height remained constant irrespective of the ridge frequency. Estimates of the contribution of deformed ice to the total ice thickness are generally low except for a single 53-km section where the ridge frequency increased by an order of magnitude. This resulted in an increase in the equivalent mean ice thickness due to ridging from 0.04 m in the less deformed areas to 0.45 m in the highly deformed section. These values were found to be consistent with values obtained from drilled profile lines during the same cruise.

  14. Esoko and WhatsApp Communication in Ghana : Mobile Services such as Esoko and WhatsApp in Reshaping Interpersonal Digital Media Communication in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia, Salkovic

    2015-01-01

    The predominant use of mobile media such as SMS and MIM across various sectors in Ghana is incontrovertibly influencing and reshaping interpersonal communications. This paper looked at the use of the Esoko SMS and WhatsApp MIM platforms and how the use of these two dominant platforms are enhancing and reshaping digital communication in the rural and urban Ghana respectively, as barriers of socioeconomic factors limits the use of sophisticated technologies in the rural setting. This is done by...

  15. Preliminary results from the first InRidge cruise to the central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Iyer, S.D.; Rao, M.M.M.; Banerjee, R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Ghose, I.; Ganesan, P.; Rao, A.K.; Suribabu, A.; Ganesh, C.; Naik, G.P.

    stream_size 1 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Inter_Ridge_News_7_40.pdf.txt stream_source_info Inter_Ridge_News_7_40.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  16. The Northern Central Indian Ridge: Geology and tectonics of fracture zones-dominated spreading ridge segments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Drolia, R.K.; Iyer, S.D.; Chakraborty, B; Kodagali, V.N.; Ray, Dwijesh; Misra, S.; Andrade, R.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Rajasekhar, R.P.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    . The ridge segments are characterized by along-axis depth variation: deepening at segment ends and shallowing at the centre. Both the ridge axis and TF areas are complex with intra- and inter-segmental morphotectonic and magnetic variations. Basalts collected...

  17. Ridge trace as a boost to ridge regression estimate in the presence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multicollinearity often causes a huge interpretative problem in linear regression analysis. The ridge estimator is not generally accepted as a vital alternative to the ordinary least squares (OLS) estimator because it depends on unknown parameters. In any specific application of ridges regression, there is no guarantee that ...

  18. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  19. Lithospheric Flexural Modeling of Iapetus' Equatorial Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W.; Ip, W.-H.; Teng, L. S.

    2012-04-01

    Iapetus, which is one of Saturn's ball-shaped satellites, has some unique features in the Solar System. This satellite has a mean radius of 735 km, and there is an approximately 20-kilometer-high mountain lying precisely on its equator. The mountain is known as an "equatorial ridge" since it makes Iapetus appear walnut shaped. The origin of the equatorial ridge is attributed to several hypotheses, including different endogenesis and exogenesis processes. In this work, we attempted to construct a flexural model of the equatorial ridge using elastic lithosphere theory. The equatorial ridge is treated as a linear load which exerts uniform force on Iapetus' hard shell (i.e. elastic lithosphere of Iapetus). To calculate the deflection of surface, we use the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data of Iapetus' leading side published by Giese et al. (2008). Giese et al. also pointed out that the elastic lithospheric thickness of Iapetus must exceed 100 km to support the ridge without deflecting. However, we found possible evidence in the DTM data that implied deflection. There are two sites of surface depression on the northern side of the equatorial ridge. The few-kilometer deflection implies a thinner lithosphere than previous suggested. Assume that the thickness of elastic lithosphere is only 5% below of the radius of Iapetus, so the flat-Earth and one-plate condition could adapt to the flexure model of Iapetus. Based on analysis of the distance between a bulge and the ridge, the calculated lithospheric thickness is 6-10 km. The new result seems controversial, but the modeled surface profile is highly consistent with numerical ridge DTM profile extracted from Giese et al. (2008). Thinner lithosphere also supports the contraction model proposed by Sandwell and Schubert (2010) since the bucking harmonic degree increases. In the other hand, the transformation layer between hard shell and plastic inner core may need constraint on thermal history or crystal form of ice. In

  20. Biomechanical comparison of a novel engine-driven ridge spreader and conventional ridge splitting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gyu-Un; Kim, Jun Hwan; Lim, Nam Hun; Yoon, Gil Ho; Han, Ji-Young

    2017-06-01

    Ridge splitting techniques are used for horizontal ridge augmentation in implant dentistry. Recently, a novel engine-driven ridge splitting technique was introduced. This study compared the mechanical forces produced by conventional and engine-driven ridge splitting techniques in porcine mandibles. In 33 pigs, mandibular premolar areas were selected for the ridge splitting procedures, designed as a randomized split-mouth study. The conventional group underwent a chisel-and-mallet procedure (control group, n = 20), and percussive impulse (Newton second, Ns) was measured using a sensor attached to the mallet. In the engine-driven ridge spreader group (test group, n = 23), a load cell was used to measure torque values (Newton centimeter, Ncm). Horizontal acceleration generated during procedures (control group, n = 10 and test group, n = 10) was compared between the groups. After ridge splitting, the alveolar crest width was significantly increased both in the control (1.23 ± 0.45 mm) and test (0.98 ± 0.41 mm) groups with no significant differences between the groups. The average impulse of the control group was 4.74 ± 1.05 Ns. Torque generated by rotation in the test group was 9.07 ± 2.15 Ncm. Horizontal acceleration was significantly less in the test group (0.82 ± 1.05 g) than the control group (64.07 ± 42.62 g) (P engine-driven ridge spreaders. Within the limits of this study, the results suggested that an engine-driven ridge splitting technique may be less traumatic and less invasive than a conventional ridge splitting technique. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI.

  2. Reshaping polygonal meshes with smoothed normals extracted from ultrasound volume data: an optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose, Raul; Alberola-Lopez, Carlos; Ruiz-Alzola, Juan

    2001-05-01

    Several methods exploit the relative motion between the probe and the object being scanned to figure out an estimate of the normals of the existing structures in a volume. These methods are revealed as a good estimator for normals, at least better than simple gradient schemes. On the other hand, polygonal meshes can be obtained directly from raw data by means of tiling algorithms. Although these meshes are good representations of isosurfaces in CT or MRI data, as far as ultrasound is concerned, results are quite noisy, so more effort is needed in developing algorithms that will be able to enhance the structures in the images. In this paper we propose a method that reshapes the geometry of meshes using the information given by normals. Rendering the meshes with the estimated normals is meaningful smoothness is observed. Therefore it is reasonable to obtain a new geometry for the meshes by imposing the normals as an external condition. In order to achieve coherence between the two entities (polygonal meshes and normals), a local optimization approach is proposed. For each vertex, the position that minimizes the norm of the error between the geometric normal and the external normal is worked out. A second term in the objective function favors solutions that are closer to the current state of the mesh. This minimization process is applied to all vertices that constitute the mesh and it is iterated so as to find a global minimum in the objective function. Our results show a better match of external normals and meshes, which draws more natural surface-rendered images.

  3. Physiography of eastern Mendocino Ridge, NE Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J. V.; Malik, M. A.; Verplank, N. S.

    2009-12-01

    The bathymetry of the eastern 850 km of Mendocino Ridge (MR) was mapped using NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer’s Kongsberg EM302 multibeam as part of mapping trials to support the University of New Hampshire’s U.S. Law of the Sea mapping program. The ridge was mapped from the margin to ~500 km west of the intersection of the ridge with Gorda Ridge (GR) at a spatial resolution of 40 m/sounding. The mapped section can be subdivided into two morphologic styles. East of the GR intersection, along the transform fault, MR is a single 4-18 km wide ridge with summit depths of 1200 to 1700 m deep with slopes of 10-40°. West of the intersection, along the fracture zone, MR has summit depths of >2100 m deep. A series of drag folds formed by basement ridges west of GR and north of the fracture zone reflects the differential spreading rates of GR. The almost 90° bend in the drag folds is often accompanied by large volcanic fields with summit craters in many volcanoes in water depths of 2 to 4 km. Beginning ~45 km west of GR intersection, MR evolves into a series of en echelon ridges striking 290°, some with slopes as steep as 55°. The change in morphology appears to be the effects of compression in the transform fault section between the Gorda Plate to the north and the Pacific Plate to the south, whereas extension is evident in the fracture zone section of the ridge. Mendocino Channel immediately to the north of the easternmost MR was mapped from the margin to ~105 km to the west before the channel relief was below the resolution of the multibeam system. The channel walls have as much as 50 m of relief with decreasing relief down channel. Mendocino Channel is bordered on the north by a large field of levees with bedforms and on the south by the 1200 m high wall of MR. Several large sediment failures have occurred in the levee field. The channel is straight for the first 40+ km with an average channel slope of 0.7° but suddenly begins to meander when the channel slope is

  4. Ridge Splitting Technique for Horizontal Augmentation and Immediate Implant Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papathanasiou Ioannis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient width of the alveolar ridge often prevents ideal implant placement. Guided bone regeneration, bone grafting, alveolar ridge splitting and combinations of these techniques are used for the lateral augmentation of the alveolar ridge. Ridge splitting is a minimally invasive technique indicated for alveolar ridges with adequate height, which enables immediate implant placement and eliminates morbidity and overall treatment time. The classical approach of the technique involves splitting the alveolar ridge into 2 parts with use of ostetomes and chisels. Modifications of this technique include the use of rotating instrument, screw spreaders, horizontal spreaders and ultrasonic device.

  5. Normalization Ridge Regression in Practice I: Comparisons Between Ordinary Least Squares, Ridge Regression and Normalization Ridge Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcock, J. W.

    The problem of model estimation when the data are collinear was examined. Though the ridge regression (RR) outperforms ordinary least squares (OLS) regression in the presence of acute multicollinearity, it is not a problem free technique for reducing the variance of the estimates. It is a stochastic procedure when it should be nonstochastic and it…

  6. Ridge regression estimator: combining unbiased and ordinary ridge regression methods of estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Damodar Gore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Statistical literature has several methods for coping with multicollinearity. This paper introduces a new shrinkage estimator, called modified unbiased ridge (MUR. This estimator is obtained from unbiased ridge regression (URR in the same way that ordinary ridge regression (ORR is obtained from ordinary least squares (OLS. Properties of MUR are derived. Results on its matrix mean squared error (MMSE are obtained. MUR is compared with ORR and URR in terms of MMSE. These results are illustrated with an example based on data generated by Hoerl and Kennard (1975.

  7. Mid-oceanic ridges - Guest editorial

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Ins titutes of Techno logy and national laboratories. A few Inter national re - searchers, notably from the USA, Portugal, France and J a pan too have shown interest in the I n Ridge and are keen to collaborate with India. It is foreseen that In...

  8. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. [ed.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

  10. Anelastic Semigeostrophic Flow Over a Mountain Ridge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bannon, Peter R; Chu, Pe-Cheng

    1987-01-01

    ...) characterize the disturbance generated by the steady flow of a uniform wind (U0, V0) incident on a mountain ridge of width alpha in an isothermal, uniformly rotating, uniformly stratified, vertically semi-infinite atmosphere. Here mu = h(0)/H(R...

  11. tilled soil under different ridge width

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... in different agricultural system with a wide variety of climate, crops and labour intensity. Several strategies have been investigated that ridges could affect soil temperature and water content, as well as soil water and solute movement compared with traditional flat farming. (Waddell and Weil, 2006). Willis et ...

  12. Seismic response of a Taiwanese ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Claire; Meunier, Patrick; Burtin, Arnaud; Wein Hao, Vvn; Wu, Yih-Min; Marc, Odin; Lai, Tz-Shin; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Hovius, Niels

    2017-04-01

    A line of 6 broadband seismometers have been deployed across a ridge in the Hualien County (Eastern Taiwan) in order to study the seismic response of the hill. From March 2015 to June 2016, the network has been continuously recording waves incoming from the Taiwanese regional seismicity. The hill is well approximated by a triangular topography of 3600m in length by 900m in height. We present the primarily analysis performed on 1272 earthquakes of of magnitude (Ml) greater than Ml=3 and less than 200km distant to the study site. We show that most of the uphill records exhibit a systematic amplification of seismic waves (peak to peak velocity) on the resonance frequency band of the ridge [0,5-3Hz] with respect to the referenced records at the base of the hill. Amplification on sharp frequency band also occurs in other sites, reflecting complex local site effects. We found that the average amplification at the top on the transverse component to the ridge elongation is found to be 2.5 time higher than the one on the parallel. This amplification is found to be independent of the shaking intensity (PGV). But we show that it strongly depends on the parameter α defined as the angle between the azimuth of incoming wave and the azimuth of the ridge divide.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A RIDGE PROFILE WEEDER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1980-03-01

    driven rotating horizontal short shaft which is connected by universal joints to two gangs of rotary hoe weeders. With the short shaft nearly at the bottom of a furrow between two ridges, the gangs of weeders lie on the sides of ...

  14. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1, (OU1) which consists of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP). The CRSP are located {approximately}800 ft southeast of the central portion of the Y-12 Plant atop Chestnut Ridge, which is bounded to the northwest by Bear Creek Valley and to the southeast by Bethel Valley. Operated from 1973 to 1988, the CRSP consisted of a series of trenches used for the disposal of classified hazardous and nonhazardous waste materials. Disposal of hazardous waste materials was discontinued in December 1984, while nonhazardous waste disposal ended on November 8, 1988. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern (COC), support an ecological risk assessment (ERA) and a human health risk assessment (HHRA), support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this Work Plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU1. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the overall risk posed to human health and the environment by OU1.

  15. Efficiency of local surface plasmon polariton excitation on ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and numerically the efficiency of surface plasmon polariton excitation by a focused laser beam using gold ridges. The dependence of the efficiency on geometrical parameters of ridges and wavelength dependence are examined. The experimental measurements accomplished...

  16. NPP Tropical Forest: John Crow Ridge, Jamaica, 1974-1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Biomass and productivity for four subtypes of an upper montane tropical forest along John Crow Ridge in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Jamaica from 1974 to 1978

  17. Rapid genome reshaping by multiple-gene loss after whole-genome duplication in teleost fish suggested by mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun; Sato, Yukuto; Sinclair, Robert; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2015-12-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) is believed to be a significant source of major evolutionary innovation. Redundant genes resulting from WGD are thought to be lost or acquire new functions. However, the rates of gene loss and thus temporal process of genome reshaping after WGD remain unclear. The WGD shared by all teleost fish, one-half of all jawed vertebrates, was more recent than the two ancient WGDs that occurred before the origin of jawed vertebrates, and thus lends itself to analysis of gene loss and genome reshaping. Using a newly developed orthology identification pipeline, we inferred the post-teleost-specific WGD evolutionary histories of 6,892 protein-coding genes from nine phylogenetically representative teleost genomes on a time-calibrated tree. We found that rapid gene loss did occur in the first 60 My, with a loss of more than 70-80% of duplicated genes, and produced similar genomic gene arrangements within teleosts in that relatively short time. Mathematical modeling suggests that rapid gene loss occurred mainly by events involving simultaneous loss of multiple genes. We found that the subsequent 250 My were characterized by slow and steady loss of individual genes. Our pipeline also identified about 1,100 shared single-copy genes that are inferred to have become singletons before the divergence of clupeocephalan teleosts. Therefore, our comparative genome analysis suggests that rapid gene loss just after the WGD reshaped teleost genomes before the major divergence, and provides a useful set of marker genes for future phylogenetic analysis.

  18. The structural aspects of the flabby ridge or alveolar fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Thevissen, E; VANSTEENBERGHE, D; Lambrecht, Johan; CREEMERS, Julia; Vandenabeele, Frank

    1997-01-01

    A flabby ridge or alveolar fibrosis is a dcnture-induced change of the oral mucosa. The flabby ridge originates when parts of the alveolar ridge becomes resorbed duc to excessive occlusal trauma on she denture in the affected area. In this case dlsc oral mucosa at the level of the flabby ridgc was studied using light microscopy, electron microscopy and inununohaislochemistry. The structures were compared with the normal oral mucosa of the maxilla. The flabby ridge was surgic...

  19. Optimal Electromechanical Reshaping of the Auricular Ear and Long-term Outcomes in an In Vivo Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Cyrus T; Tjoa, Tjoson; Nguyen, Tony; Su, Erica; Wong, Brian J F

    2016-07-01

    The prominent ear is a common external ear anomaly that is usually corrected through surgery. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) may provide the means to reshape cartilage through the use of direct current (in milliamperes) applied percutaneously with needle electrodes and thus to reduce reliance on open surgery. To determine the long-term outcomes (shape change, cell viability, and histology) of a more refined EMR voltage and time settings for reshaping rabbit auricle. The intact ears of 14 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 received 4 V for 5 minutes (5 ears), 5 V for 4 minutes (5 ears), or no voltage for 5 minutes (control; 4 ears). Group 2 received an adjusted treatment of 4 V for 4 minutes (7 ears) or 5 V for 3 minutes (7 ears). A custom mold with platinum electrodes was used to bend the pinna and to perform EMR. Pinnae were splinted for 6 months along the region of the bend. Rabbits were killed humanely and the ears were harvested the day after splint removal. Data were collected from March 14, 2013, to July 8, 2014, and analyzed from August 29, 2013, to March 1, 2015. Bend angle and mechanical behavior via palpation were recorded through photography and videography. Tissue was sectioned for histologic examination and confocal microscopy to assess changes to microscopic structure and cell viability. Rabbits ranged in age from 6 to 8 months and weighed 3.8 to 4.0 g. The mean (SD) bend angles were 81° (45°) for the controls and, in the 5 EMR groups, 72° (29°) for 4 V for 4 minutes, 101° (19°) for 4 V for 5 minutes, 78° (18°) for 5 V for 3 minutes, and 126° (21°) for 5 V for 4 minutes. At 5 V, an increase in application time from 3 to 4 minutes provided significant shape change (78° [18°] and 126° [21°], respectively; P = .003). Pinnae stained with hematoxylin-eosin displayed localized areas of cell injury and fibrosis in and around electrode insertion sites. This circumferential zone of injury (range, 1.3-2.1 mm

  20. Reshaping of Coastlines as the Beginning of Urban Structures Changes in North Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Izabela M.; Nyka, Lucyna; Borodziuk, Adam

    2017-10-01

    This article discusses the problem of strategies concerning the processes of re-shaping the Baltic Sea southern coastline applied recently in North Poland. The undertaken research is an attempt to identify the relationship between the modifications of coastline forms and the positive changes of urban structures. First of all, it can be seen that these modifications are needed because of the problems of existing shoreline erosion. It can be also observed, that many realized interventions were helpful to save the land but they did not improve the condition of cities situated along the coast. In these cases, it is impossible to connect the sea coastline with the existing grid of public spaces which is a barrier to creating a system that could be perceived as a coherent landscape. The basis for proving the importance of special ways of shoreline modifications are comparative studies and in-field analyses. In facing the problems of coastal cities there is a need to analyse the condition of existing urban structures. Many studies made so far show that there are many problems which have to be identified and solved. Worth noting is the fact that these structures have a unique character because of their location. They play an important role as holiday resorts being an attraction for many inhabitants and visitors from all over the world. Such a role plays, for example, an important part in places such as Jarosławiec, Ustka or Kołobrzeg. However, analysing the strategies applied in recent years, it can be noted that they cannot be the only basis for the strengthening of connections between land and water helping to preserve the land, but they may also play an important role as a factor for initiating urban structures transformations. What is also important, it can be claimed that relationships between sea water and urban structures should be strengthened due to special forms of the coast line. They should be integrated into existing structures making them more comfortable

  1. Does the lateral intercondylar ridge disappear in ACL deficient patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, C.F.; Martins, C.A.Q.; Vyas, S.M.; Celentano, U.; van Dijk, C.N.; Fu, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the presence of the lateral intercondylar ridge and the lateral bifurcate ridge between patients with sub-acute and chronic ACL injuries. We hypothesized that the ridges would be present less often with chronic ACL deficiency.

  2. The Greenland-Iceland-Faroe Ridge Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlendsson, Ögmundur; Hjartarson, Árni; Blischke, Anett

    2017-04-01

    The Greenland-Iceland-Faroe Ridge Complex GIFRC covers 480.000 km2 of a thick volcanic crust that stretches 1150 km across the central Northeast Atlantic Ocean between the central East Greenland and the Northwest European margins. It incorporates the Iceland plateau, the aseismic Greenland-Iceland ridge, and the Iceland-Faroe ridge. GIFRC has been in development since the opening of the NE-Atlantic around 55 Ma. It appears as a prominent feature in all geological and geophysical data sets. Synclines and anticlines in the area will be summarised and, among others, several new ones that were revealed in seismic reflection data near to Iceland. Specifically, the offshore anticlines and synclines may be related to old rift systems prior the forming of Iceland as an insular shelf region (>24 Ma). Synclines are suggested to be manifestations of former rift axes that have been abandoned by rift jumps. These rift jumps appear to be more common inside the GIFRC region than in the ocean basins south and north of the area. They can be confirmed by the observation of cumulative crustal accretion through time as well. The GIFRC represents a complex region of crustal accretion in 3 dimensions due to overlapping rift systems, complex interlinked rift and transform zones, and several unconformities that suggest a variable uplift and subsidence history for the ridge complex. An excellent example to visualise such processes of vertical crustal accretion and rift jumps is seen in seismic reflection data that extends along the southwestern slope of the Iceland-Faroe Ridge. They clearly display the internal structures of basement blocks, separated by a syncline and younger rift system, and the formation of an anticline across the deeply buried basement blocks that are overlain by seaward dipping reflectors (SDR). We suggest a major hiatus (40 Ma - 24-20 Ma) and a related unconformity at the boundary of the volcanic insular shelf edge of East Iceland and the Faroe Ridge, buried beneath

  3. Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwindling Jerome

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p. corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  4. Growth of a tectonic ridge during the Landers earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, R.W.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The formation of tectonic ridges by localized vertical uplift along strike-slip faults has long been suspected, but the actual growth of a tectonic ridge during an earthquake has never been documented. During the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake sequence, an awl-shaped, dome-like topographic ridge along the Emerson fault zone increased its height at least 1 m concurrently with 3 m of right-lateral shift across the fault zone containing the ridge. Five deformation vectors within the ridge reveal dilatant behavior in addition to the uplift and shift on boundary faults.

  5. Optical coherence tomography for visualizing transient strains and measuring large deformations in laser-induced tissue reshaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Matveev, Lev A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Shabanov, Dmitry V.; Baum, Olga I.; Svistushkin, Valery M.; Sobol, Emil N.

    2016-11-01

    In the context of the development of emerging laser-assisted thermo-mechanical technologies for non-destructive reshaping of avascular collagenous tissues (cartilages and cornea), we report the first application of phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) for visualizing transient strains involving supra-wavelength inter-frame displacements of scatterers. Usually phase-sensitive OCT assumes the visualization of sub-pixel and even sub-wavelength displacements of scatterers and fairly small strains (say, <10-3), which conventionally implies the necessity of averaging for enhancing the effective signal-to-noise ratio and, correspondingly, the application of small-amplitude actuators producing periodic deformations. The original approach used here allows for direct estimation of elevated strains ~10-2 (close to onset of intense speckle blinking) obviating the necessity of averaging and phase unwrapping for supra-wavelength inter-frame displacements. We demonstrate the possibility of mapping aperiodic thermally-induced transient strains with resultant large deformations on order of tens per cent. Such strains are typical in laser tissue reshaping, but are far beyond the range of conventionally discussed OCT-based strain mapping.

  6. Formation of plano-convex micro-lens array in fused silica glass using CO2 laser assisted reshaping technique

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, Ik-Bu; Yoo, Dongyoon; Noh, Young-Chul; Ahsan, Md Shamim; Sung, Jae-Hee; Lee, Seong-Ku

    2016-01-01

    We report on fabricating high-fill-factor plano-convex spherical and square micro-lens arrays on fused silica glass surface using CO2 laser assisted reshaping technique. Initially, periodic micro-pillars have been encoded on the glass surface by means of a femtosecond laser beam. Afterwards, the micro-pillars are polished several times by irradiating a CO2 laser beam on top of the micro-pillars. Consequently, spherical micro-lens array with micro-lens size of 50 um x 50 um and square micro-lens array with micro-lens size of 100 um x 100 um are formed on fused silica glass surface. We also study the intensity distribution of light passed through the spherical micro-lens array engraved glass sample. The simulation result shows that, the focal length of the spherical micro-lens array is 35 um. Furthermore, we investigate the optical properties of the micro-lens array engraved glass samples. The proposed CO2 laser based reshaping technique is simple and fast that shows promises in fabrication arrays of smooth mic...

  7. Oak Ridge 25-MV tandem accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, N.F.; Richardson, E.G.; Mann, J.E.; Juras, R.C.; Jones, C.M.; Biggerstaff, J.A.; Benjamin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    A new heavy-ion accelerator facility is nearing completion at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper presents a brief description of the scope and status of this project and a discussion of some aspects of the first operational experience with the 25 MV tandem accelerator which is being provided by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC) as a major component of the first phase of the facility.

  8. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  9. ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory.

  10. Global survey of lunar wrinkle ridge formation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z.; Michael, G. G.; Di, K.; Liu, J.

    2017-11-01

    Wrinkle ridges are a common feature of the lunar maria and record subsequent contraction of mare infill. Constraining the timing of wrinkle ridge formation from crater counts is challenging because they have limited areal extent and it is difficult to determine whether superposed craters post-date ridge formation or have alternatively been uplifted by the deformation. Some wrinkle ridges do allow determination to be made. This is possible where a ridge shows a sufficiently steep boundary or scarp that can be identified as deforming an intersecting crater or the crater obliterates the relief of the ridge. Such boundaries constitute only a small fraction of lunar wrinkle ridge structures yet they are sufficiently numerous to enable us to obtain statistically significant crater counts over systems of structurally related wrinkle ridges. We carried out a global mapping of mare wrinkle ridges, identifying appropriate boundaries for crater identification, and mapping superposed craters. Selected groups of ridges were analyzed using the buffered crater counting method. We found that, except for the ridges in mare Tranquilitatis, the ridge groups formed with average ages between 3.5 and 3.1 Ga ago, or 100-650 Ma after the oldest observable erupted basalts where they are located. We interpret these results to suggest that local stresses from loading by basalt fill are the principal agent responsible for the formation of lunar wrinkle ridges, as others have proposed. We find a markedly longer interval before wrinkle ridge formation in Tranquilitatis which likely indicates a different mechanism of stress accumulation at this site.

  11. Utilization of high resolution satellite gravity over the Carlsberg Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Majumdar, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    The Carlsberg Ridge lies between the equator and the Owen fracture zone. It is the most prominent mid-ocean ridge segment of the western Indian Ocean, which contains a number of earthquake epicenters. Satellite altimetry can be used to infer subsurface geological structures analogous to gravity anomaly maps generated through ship-borne survey. In this study, free-air gravity and its 3D image have been generated over the Carlsberg Ridge using a very high resolution data base, as obtained from Geosat GM, ERS-1, Seasat and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data. As observed in this study, the Carlsberg Ridge shows a slow spreading characteristic with a deep and wide graben (average width ˜15 km). The transform fault spacing confirms variable slow to intermediate characteristics with first and second order discontinuities. The isostatically compensated region of the Carlsberg Ridge could be demarcated with near zero contour values in the free-air gravity anomaly images over and along the Carlsberg Ridge axes and over most of the fracture zone patterns. Few profiles have been generated across the Carlsberg Ridge and the characteristics of slow/intermediate spreading ridge of various orders of discontinuity could be identified. It has also been observed in zero contour image as well as in the characteristics of valley patterns along the ridge from NW to SE that different spreading rates, from slow to intermediate, are occurring in different parts of the Carlsberg ridge. It maintains the morphology of a slow spreading ridge in the NW, where the wide and deep axial valley (˜1.5 3 km) also implies the pattern of a slow spreading ridge. However, a change in the morphology/depth of the axial valley from NW to SE indicates the nature of the Carlsberg Ridge as a slow to intermediate spreading ridge.

  12. Processing of Oak Ridge Mixed Waste Labpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, C. H.; Franco, P.; Bisaria, A.

    2002-02-26

    The Oak Ridge Site Treatment Plan (STP) issued under a Tennessee Commissioner's Order includes a compliance milestone related to treatment of mixed waste labpacks on the Oak Ridge sites. The treatment plan was written and approved in Fiscal Year 1997. The plan involved approximately 1,100 labpacks and 7,400 on-the-shelf labpackable items stored at three Department of Energy (DOE) sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The labpacks and labpack items consist of liquids and solids with various chemical constituents and radiological concerns. The waste must be processed for shipment to a commercial hazardous waste treatment facility or treatment utilizing a Broad Spectrum mixed waste treatment contract. This paper will describe the labpack treatment plan that was developed as required by the Site Treatment Plan and the operations implemented to process the labpack waste. The paper will discuss the labpack inventory in the treatment plan, treatment and disposal options, processing strategies, project risk assessment, and current project status.

  13. Microbial life in ridge flank crustal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Julie A; Johnson, H Paul; Butterfield, David A; Baross, John A

    2006-01-01

    To determine the microbial community diversity within old oceanic crust, a novel sampling strategy was used to collect crustal fluids at Baby Bare Seamount, a 3.5 Ma old outcrop located in the north-east Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Stainless steel probes were driven directly into the igneous ocean crust to obtain samples of ridge flank crustal fluids. Genetic signatures and enrichment cultures of microorganisms demonstrate that these crustal fluids host a microbial community composed of species indigenous to the subseafloor, including anaerobic thermophiles, and species from other deep-sea habitats, such as seawater and sediments. Evidence using molecular techniques indicates the presence of a relatively small but active microbial population, dominated by bacteria. The microbial community diversity found in the crustal fluids may indicate habitat variability in old oceanic crust, with inputs of nutrients from seawater, sediment pore-water fluids and possibly hydrothermal sources. This report further supports the presence of an indigenous microbial community in ridge flank crustal fluids and advances our understanding of the potential physiological and phylogenetic diversity of this community.

  14. Axial seamount: An active ridge axis volcano on the Central Juan De Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, H. Paul; Embley, Robert W.

    1990-08-01

    Axial Seamount (some of the manuscripts in this special section refer to the edifice with the more precise name of "Axial Volcano"), a large ridge axis volcano, is located on the central segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge approximately 250 nautical miles west of the Washington/Oregon/British Columbia coast. Currently both volcanically and hydrothermally active, Axial lies directly at the intersection of the Cobb-Eickelberg Seamount Chain and the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Figure 1). The volcanic activity associated with the seamount formation strongly interacts with, and is affected by, the normal seafloor spreading processes at the intersection. Because of this unique geologic setting, its proximity to west coast ports and oceanographie institutions, and its shallow depth, Axial has become the focus of a large number of scientific investigations over the past decade.

  15. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin, before and during pregnancy prevents most neural tube defects. Neural tube defects are usually diagnosed before the infant is ... or imaging tests. There is no cure for neural tube defects. The nerve damage and loss of function ...

  16. Volcanism and hydrothermalism on a hotspot-influenced ridge: Comparing Reykjanes Peninsula and Reykjanes Ridge, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałgan, Dominik; Devey, Colin W.; Yeo, Isobel A.

    2017-12-01

    Current estimates indicate that the number of high-temperature vents (one of the primary pathways for the heat extraction from the Earth's mantle) - at least 1 per 100 km of axial length - scales with spreading rate and should scale with crustal thickness. But up to present, shallow ridge axes underlain by thick crust show anomalously low incidences of high-temperature activity. Here we compare the Reykjanes Ridge, an abnormally shallow ridge with thick crust and only one high-temperature vent known over 900 km axial length, to the adjacent subaerial Reykjanes Peninsula (RP), which is characterized by high-temperature geothermal sites confined to four volcanic systems transected by fissure swarms with young (Holocene) volcanic activity, multiple faults, cracks and fissures, and continuous seismic activity. New high-resolution bathymetry (gridded at 60 m) of the Reykjanes Ridge between 62°30‧N and 63°30‧N shows seven Axial Volcanic Ridges (AVR) that, based on their morphology, geometry and tectonic regime, are analogues for the volcanic systems and fissure swarms on land. We investigate in detail the volcano-tectonic features of all mapped AVRs and show that they do not fit with the previously suggested 4-stage evolution model for AVR construction. Instead, we suggest that AVR morphology reflects the robust or weak melt supply to the system and two (or more) eruption mechanisms may co-exist on one AVR (in contrast to 4-stage evolution model). Our interpretations indicate that, unlike on the Reykjanes Peninsula, faults on and around AVRs do not cluster in orientation domains but all are subparallel to the overall strike of AVRs (orthogonal to spreading direction). High abundance of seamounts shows that the region centered at 62°47‧N and 25°04‧W (between AVR-5 and -6) is volcanically robust while the highest fault density implies that AVR-1 and southern part of AVR-6 rather undergo period of melt starvation. Based on our observations and interpretations we

  17. Improving the Pass-Band Return Loss in Liquid Crystal Dual-Mode Bandpass Filters by Microstrip Patch Reshaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Torrecilla

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the design and experimental characterization of a tunable microstrip bandpass filter based on liquid crystal technology are presented. A reshaped microstrip dual-mode filter structure has been used in order to improve the device performance. Specifically, the aim is to increase the pass-band return loss of the filter by narrowing the filter bandwidth. Simulations confirm the improvement of using this new structure, achieving a pass-band return loss increase of 1.5 dB at least. Because of the anisotropic properties of LC molecules, a filter central frequency shift from 4.688 GHz to 5.045 GHz, which means a relative tuning range of 7.3%, is measured when an external AC voltage from 0 Vrms to 15 Vrms is applied to the device.

  18. Reshaping clinical science: Introduction to the Special Issue on Psychophysiology and the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christopher J; Hajcak, Greg

    2016-03-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health's (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative seeks to establish new dimensional conceptions of mental health problems, through the investigation of clinically relevant "process" constructs that have neurobiological as well as psychological referents. This special issue provides a detailed overview of the RDoC framework by NIMH officials Michael Kozak and Bruce Cuthbert, and spotlights RDoC-oriented investigative efforts by leading psychophysiological research groups as examples of how clinical science might be reshaped through application of RDoC principles. Accompanying commentaries highlight key aspects of the work by each group, and discuss reported methods/findings in relation to promises and challenges of the RDoC initiative more broadly. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  19. Improving the Pass-Band Return Loss in Liquid Crystal Dual-Mode Bandpass Filters by Microstrip Patch Reshaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecilla, Javier; Urruchi, Virginia; Sánchez-Pena, José Manuel; Bennis, Noureddine; García, Alejandro; Segovia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design and experimental characterization of a tunable microstrip bandpass filter based on liquid crystal technology are presented. A reshaped microstrip dual-mode filter structure has been used in order to improve the device performance. Specifically, the aim is to increase the pass-band return loss of the filter by narrowing the filter bandwidth. Simulations confirm the improvement of using this new structure, achieving a pass-band return loss increase of 1.5 dB at least. Because of the anisotropic properties of LC molecules, a filter central frequency shift from 4.688 GHz to 5.045 GHz, which means a relative tuning range of 7.3%, is measured when an external AC voltage from 0 Vrms to 15 Vrms is applied to the device. PMID:28788690

  20. PKA phosphorylation reshapes the pharmacological kinetics of BmK AS, a unique site-4 sodium channel-specific modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z R; Zhang, H; Wu, J Q; Zhou, J J; Ji, Y H

    2014-01-16

    Although modulation of the activity of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation has been investigated in multiple preparations, the pharmacological sensitivity of VGSCs to scorpion toxins after PKA phosphorylation has rarely been approached. In this study, the effects of BmK AS, a sodium channel-specific modulator from Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, on the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of Nav1.2 were examined before and after PKA activation. After PKA phosphorylation, the pattern of dose-dependent modulation of BmK AS, on both Nav1.2α and Nav1.2 (α + β1) was reshaped. Meanwhile, the shifts in voltage-dependency of activation and inactivation induced by BmK AS were attenuated. The results suggested that PKA might play a role in different patterns how β-like toxins such as BmK AS modulate gating properties and peak currents of VGSCs.

  1. Can origin labels re-shape relationships along international supply chains? – The case of Café de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiomara F. Quiñones-Ruiz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Origin labels, more specifically Geographical Indications (GIs, allow organised producers to define quality standards and defend their food products’ reputation while highlighting their geographical origin and value to consumers. Café de Colombia was the first non-European food product registered as Protected Geographical Indication (PGI under EU legislation (510/2006, followed by 1151/2012. This paper aims to identify the dynamics of collective efforts and the rules of the game developed by coffee growers to protect the collective intellectual property right. Our guiding research questions are: i to what extent can the Ostrom’s design principles explain effective collective action for GI registration and implementation? and ii can collective action for GIs re-shape relations between supply chain actors and support producers in gaining control over origin products? We collected data using semi-structured interviews and document analysis, which we then processed in a qualitative text analysis. Results show that the principles are very helpful for understanding the internal collective action of coffee growers and also clearly show the challenges in the interaction with industrial coffee processors (e.g. international roasters, brand owners. A pure focus on the producers’ collective action for establishing and managing the origin protection does not give a full picture, since green coffee beans are roasted and commercialised abroad. The GI has already re-shaped the relationships along the supply chains, as international roasters sign the producers’ rules governing the PGI use. The commercial GI impact however, will depend on consumers’ willingness to appreciate and pay extra for high quality origin coffee as well as the readiness of international roasters or brand owners to emphasise on origin coffee, in addition to their brands of blended coffee.

  2. Microsurgical treatment of medial sphenoid ridge meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-qi HE

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the microsurgical technique of medial sphenoid ridge meningioma resectional therapy.Methods The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed of 29 patients(13 males and 16 females;aged 18-68 years with average of 42 years;duration of disease was 5 months to 8 years,averaged 28 months with medial sphenoidal ridge meningioma and admitted from Jan.2005 to Jan.2010.The anatomical relationship of the tumor to surrounding structures was assessed intraoperatively,the tumor was then completely resected through cutting off the tumor supplying vessels,shrinking the tumor volume and separating the tumors from adjacent vessels and nerves.All the patients were followed up for 4 months to 4 years.Results Of the 29 cases,20 got total tumor removal,7 got subtotal and 2 got partial tumor removal.Of the 20 patients with obviously preoperative visual impairment,12 were obviously relieved,6 showed no improvement and 2 got symptoms aggravation.Hemiplegia occurred in 2 cases and oculomoter nerve palsy in 6 cases.There was no death after surgery.A 6 months to 4 years follow-up showed that no recurrence was found in 27 patients with tumor resection level of Simpson I and II,2 patients with tumor resection level of Simpson III received postoperative radiotherapy or gamma knife surgery,and 1 recurred and received reoperation.Conclusions Fine intraoperative assessment of the anatomical relationship of the tumor to surrounding structures,separating and excising tumor according to the assessed result is the key of medial sphenoid ridge meningioma resection,and the tumor resection is favorable to visual rehabilitation and tumor control.

  3. Oak Ridge TNS Program: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M

    1978-01-01

    The Oak Ridge TNS activities have been directed at characterizing the design space between TFTR and EPR with a fundamental emphasis on higher beta plasma systems than previously projected, i.e., anti ..beta.. approximately 5 to 10% as compared to 1 to 3%. Based on the results of the FY 1977 System Studies, our activities this year are directed toward preconceptual design with particular emphasis placed on reducing the technological requirements through innovations in plasma engineering. Examples of the new innovations include microwave assisted start up to reduce power requirements and a reduced TF ripple constraint by more refined ripple loss calculations, to increase engineering feasibility through simpler, more maintainable designs.

  4. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Position Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Hill, Jason J [ORNL; Thach, Kevin G [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the business, administration, reliability, and usability aspects of storage systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The OLCF has developed key competencies in architecting and administration of large-scale Lustre deployments as well as HPSS archival systems. Additionally as these systems are architected, deployed, and expanded over time reliability and availability factors are a primary driver. This paper focuses on the implementation of the Spider parallel Lustre file system as well as the implementation of the HPSS archive at the OLCF.

  5. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, David A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site

  6. Comprehensive integrated planning: A process for the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Oak Ridge Comprehensive Integrated Plan is intended to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel in implementing a comprehensive integrated planning process consistent with DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management and Oak Ridge Operations Order 430. DOE contractors are charged with developing and producing the Comprehensive Integrated Plan, which serves as a summary document, providing information from other planning efforts regarding vision statements, missions, contextual conditions, resources and facilities, decision processes, and stakeholder involvement. The Comprehensive Integrated Plan is a planning reference that identifies primary issues regarding major changes in land and facility use and serves all programs and functions on-site as well as the Oak Ridge Operations Office and DOE Headquarters. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a valuable national resource and is managed on the basis of the principles of ecosystem management and sustainable development and how mission, economic, ecological, social, and cultural factors are used to guide land- and facility-use decisions. The long-term goals of the comprehensive integrated planning process, in priority order, are to support DOE critical missions and to stimulate the economy while maintaining a quality environment.

  7. [Neural repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2008-05-01

    Recent progress of stem cell biology gives us the hope for neural repair. We have established methods to specifically induce functional Schwann cells and neurons from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The effectiveness of these induced cells was evaluated by grafting them either into peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, or Parkinson' s disease animal models. MSCs-derived Schwann cells supported axonal regeneration and re-constructed myelin to facilitate the functional recovery in peripheral and spinal cord injury. MSCs-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into host striatum and contributed to behavioral repair. In this review, we introduce the differentiation potential of MSCs and finally discuss about their benefits and drawbacks of these induction systems for cell-based therapy in neuro-traumatic and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  8. From tides to mixing along the Hawaiian ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Daniel L; Boyd, Timothy J; Brainard, Russell E; Carter, Glenn S; Egbert, Gary D; Gregg, Michael C; Holloway, Peter E; Klymak, Jody M; Kunze, Eric; Lee, Craig M; Levine, Murray D; Luther, Douglas S; Martin, Joseph P; Merrifield, Mark A; Moum, James N; Nash, Jonathan D; Pinkel, Robert; Rainville, Luc; Sanford, Thomas B

    2003-07-18

    The cascade from tides to turbulence has been hypothesized to serve as a major energy pathway for ocean mixing. We investigated this cascade along the Hawaiian Ridge using observations and numerical models. A divergence of internal tidal energy flux observed at the ridge agrees with the predictions of internal tide models. Large internal tidal waves with peak-to-peak amplitudes of up to 300 meters occur on the ridge. Internal-wave energy is enhanced, and turbulent dissipation in the region near the ridge is 10 times larger than open-ocean values. Given these major elements in the tides-to-turbulence cascade, an energy budget approaches closure.

  9. Multiple expressions of plume-ridge interaction at the Galapagos: Volcanic lineaments and ridge jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Soule, S. A.; Harpp, K. S.; Fornari, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Despite significant evidence for communication between an upwelling mantle plume beneath the Galápagos Archipelago (GA) and the nearby Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC), little is known about the dynamics of the interaction between the ridge and the hotspot. We use new bathymetry, sidescan sonar, magnetic, subbottom seismic, and gravity data from the FLAMINGO cruise (MV1007) to address the mechanism of plume-ridge interaction in the Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province (NGVP), a region centered on the 90° 50'W Galápagos transform fault (GTF). West of the GTF, the Nazca Plate is dominated by numerous seamounts aligned in 3 volcanic lineaments. Volumetrically, the lineaments are composed of ~1500 km3 of erupted lavas. Faulting patterns and seamount elongations suggest that the locations and orientations of the lineaments may be partly controlled by the lithospheric stress field. In contrast, east of the GTF on the Cocos Plate, there is little evidence of constructional volcanism (~69 km3). However, we observe several linear, nearly ridge-parallel, faulted features separating sediment-filled basins, and two large bathymetric highs with up to 1km of relief. Differences in seafloor west and east of the GTF are also observed in the Residual Mantle Bouguer Anomaly (RMBA). On the Nazca Plate, RMBA lows closely contour the volcanic lineaments with minima at the centers of the largest volcanoes along the Wolf-Darwin Lineament. On the Cocos Plate, the RMBA at a given distance from the ridge axis is generally more negative than at similar locations on the Nazca Plate. In addition, two RMBA lows are observed coincident with the observed bathymetric highs, both of which are slightly elongate in a direction sub-parallel to the Eastern GSC, possibly reflecting a period of increased magma flux along a former ridge axis. Magnetic anomalies reveal a complicated history of plate evolution including a series of ridge jumps since ~3 Ma that result in creation of the GTF. We invert

  10. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2017-06-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  11. Behavior of Cell on Vibrating Micro Ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Hino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of micro ridges on cells cultured at a vibrating scaffold has been studied in vitro. Several parallel lines of micro ridges have been made on a disk of transparent polydimethylsiloxane for a scaffold. To apply the vibration on the cultured cells, a piezoelectric element was attached on the outside surface of the bottom of the scaffold. The piezoelectric element was vibrated by the sinusoidal alternating voltage (Vp-p < 16 V at 1.0 MHz generated by a function generator. Four kinds of cells were used in the test: L929 (fibroblast connective tissue of C3H mouse, Hepa1-6 (mouse hepatoma, C2C12 (mouse myoblast, 3T3-L1 (mouse fat precursor cells. The cells were seeded on the micro pattern at the density of 2000 cells/cm2 in the medium containing 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin/ streptomycin. After the adhesion of cells in several hours, the cells are exposed to the ultrasonic vibration for several hours. The cells were observed with a phase contrast microscope. The experimental results show that the cells adhere, deform and migrate on the scaffold with micro patterns regardless of the ultrasonic vibration. The effects of the vibration and the micro pattern depend on the kind of cells.

  12. Shaping and reshaping the aesthetic brain: Emerging perspectives on the neurobiology of embodied aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Louise P; Urgesi, Cosimo; Cross, Emily S

    2016-03-01

    Less than two decades after its inception, the burgeoning field of neuroaesthetics continues to grow in interest and momentum. Despite the biological and social importance of the human body and the attention people pay to its appearance in daily life, only recently has neuroaesthetic inquiry turned its attention to questions concerning the aesthetic appraisal of the human body. We review evidence illustrating that the complexity of aesthetic experience is reflected by dynamic interplay between brain systems involved in reward, perceptual and motor processing, with a focus on aesthetic perception involving the human body. We then evaluate work demonstrating how these systems are modulated by beholders' expertise or familiarity. Finally, we discuss seminal studies revealing the plasticity of behavioural and neural responses to beauty after perceptual and motor training. This research highlights the rich potential for neuroaesthetic inquiry to extend beyond its typical realm of the fine arts to address important questions regarding the relationship between embodiment, aesthetics and performing arts. We conclude by considering some of the criticisms and limitations of neuroaesthetics, and highlight several outstanding issues for future inquiry. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Neural ensemble dynamics underlying a long-term associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Benjamin F.; Gründemann, Jan; Kitch, Lacey J.; Lecoq, Jerome A.; Parker, Jones G.; Marshall, Jesse D.; Larkin, Margaret C.; Jercog, Pablo E.; Grenier, Francois; Li, Jin Zhong; Lüthi, Andreas; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    The brain’s ability to associate different stimuli is vital to long-term memory, but how neural ensembles encode associative memories is unknown. Here we studied how cell ensembles in the basal and lateral amygdala (BLA) encode associations between conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (CS, US). Using a miniature fluorescence microscope, we tracked BLA ensemble neural Ca2+ dynamics during fear learning and extinction over six days in behaving mice. Fear conditioning induced both up- and down-regulation of individual cells’ CS-evoked responses. This bi-directional plasticity mainly occurred after conditioning and reshaped the CS ensemble neural representation to gain similarity to the US-representation. During extinction training with repetitive CS presentations, the CS-representation became more distinctive without reverting to its original form. Throughout, the strength of the ensemble-encoded CS-US association predicted each mouse’s level of behavioral conditioning. These findings support a supervised learning model in which activation of the US-representation guides the transformation of the CS-representation. PMID:28329757

  14. Carslberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Slow-spreading Apparent Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, P. A.; Murton, B. J.; Bostrom, K.; Widenfalk, L.; Melson, W. G.; O'Hearn, T.; Cronan, D. S.; Jenkins, W. J.

    2005-12-01

    We compare morphology, tectonics, petrology, and hydrothermal activity of a known section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between the Kane and Atlantis fracture zones (full multi-beam coverage 21N to 31N) to the lesser known Carlsberg Ridge (CR; limited multi-beam coverage plus satellite altimetry). The CR extends from the Owen Fracture Zone (10N) to the Vityaz Fracture Zone (5S) and spreads at half-rates (~1.2-1.8 cm/yr) similar to the MAR: 1) Morphology: Both ridges exhibit distinct segmentation (primarily sinistral) and axial valleys with high floor to crest relief (range 1122-1771 m). Average lengths of segments (CR: 70 km; MAR: 50 km) and crest-to crest width of the axial valley are greater on the CR (40 km) than MAR (23 km). Axial volcanic ridges form the neovolcanic zone on both ridges, typically 2.6 km wide and 213 m high on the CR. Average water depth near segment centers is greater on the MAR (3933 m) than the CR (3564 m). V-shaped patterns oblique to the spreading axis are present on both ridges. 2) Tectonics: Segments on each ridge are predominantly separated by short-offset (faults generally spaced hundreds of kilometers apart. Bulls-eye Mantle Bouguer Lows (-30 to -50 mgal) are present at centers of spreading segments on both ridges. Metamorphic core complexes of lower crust and upper mantle are present on the MAR section (at fracture zones) and at least at one locality at 58.33E on the CR. 3) Petrology: MORB composition from our 20 stations along the CR fall into the MORB family, with no evidence of hotspot inputs (no excess K or Nb), or extreme fractionation, similar to the MAR section. REE and trace element patterns between 57E and 61E on the CR indicate increasing melt depletion to the northwest, while glasses exhibit a striking systematic increase in MgO (decrease in fractionation) to the northwest and attain among the most primitive composition of any ocean ridge adjacent to the Owen fracture zone (9.93wt percent). Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic

  15. 60 Years of Great Science (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This issue of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review (vol. 36, issue 1) highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  16. A relook into the crustal architecture of Laxmi Ridge, northeastern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    derived free-air gravity (FAG) data to derive the crustal structure of Laxmi Ridge and adjacent areas. 2D and 3D crustal modelling suggests that the high resolution FAG low associated with the ridge is due to underplating and that it is of ...

  17. Some improved classification-based ridge parameter of Hoerl and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a linear regression model, it is often assumed that the explanatory variables are independent. This assumption is often violated and Ridge Regression estimator introduced by [2]has been identified to be more efficient than ordinary least square (OLS) in handling it. However, it requires a ridge parameter, K, of which many ...

  18. Some Improved Classification-Based Ridge Parameter Of Hoerl And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a linear regression model, it is often assumed that the explanatory variables are independent. This assumption is often violated and Ridge Regression estimator introduced by [2]has been identified to be more efficient than ordinary least square (OLS) in handling it. However, it requires a ridge parameter, K, of which many ...

  19. The Incidence of Finger Ridge Counts among the Christian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract - The present study was attempted to obtain the occurrence total and absolute finger ridge counts from 102 unrelated Christian populations (60 males and 42 females) of Mysore city, Karnataka state of India. Data were collected by biometric scanner (USB finger print reader). The mean values of Total finger ridge ...

  20. Structure and origin of the 85 degrees E ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Chaubey, A.K.; Ramprasad, T.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Krishna, K.S.; Desa, M.; Murty, G.P.S.; Subrahmanyam, C.

    that the rocks of the 85 degrees E Ridge are magnetized with revesed polarity. The well-defined geophysical anomalies and and lack of magnetic polarity reversals together with the deep burial nature of the ridge may not favor a hotspot origin. Two alternative...

  1. Modeling the dynamics of offshore tidal sand ridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.

    2017-01-01

    Tidal sand ridges are large-scale bedforms with horizontal dimensions of several kilometers and heights of tens of meters. They occur in the offshore area of shelf seas that have a wide range of water depths (10-200 m). Based on their present-day behavior, ridges are classified as `active' (sand

  2. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration.

  3. Development of a Ridge Profile Weeder | Odigboh | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prototype weeder described in this paper consists of a ground-driven rotating horizontal short shaft which is connected by universal joints to two gangs of rotary hoe weeders. With the short shaft nearly at the bottom of a furrow between two ridges, the gangs of weeders lie on the sides of the two ridges. The universal ...

  4. Revisiting the Ridge-Push Force Using the Lithospheric Geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Coblentz, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The geoid anomaly and driving force associated with the cooling oceanic lithosphere ("ridge push") are both proportional to dipole moment of the density-depth distribution, and allow a reevaluation of the ridge push force using the geoid. The challenge with this approach is to isolate the "lithospheric geoid" from the full geoid signal. Our approach is to use a band-pass spherical harmonic filter on the full geoid (e.g., EGM2008-WGS84, complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 2159) between orders 6 and 80. However, even this "lithospheric geoid" is noisy, and thus we average over 100 profiles evenly spaced along the global ridge system to obtain an average geoid step associated with the mid-ocean ridges. Because the positive ridge geoid signal is largest near the ridge (and to capture fast-spreading ridges), we evaluate symmetrical profiles extending ±45 m.y. about the ridge. We find an average ridge geoid anomaly of 4.5m, which is equivalent to a 10m anomaly for 100 m.y. old oceanic lithosphere. This geoid step corresponds to a ridge push force of ~2.4 x1012N/m for old oceanic lithosphere of 100 m.y., very similar to earlier estimates of ~2.5 x1012N/m based on simple half-space models. This simple half-space model also predicts constant geoid slopes of about 0.15 m/m.y. for cooling oceanic lithosphere. Our observed geoid slopes are consistent with this value for ages up to 40-50 m.y., but drop off to lower values at greater ages. We model this using a plate cooling model (with a thickness of the order of 125km) to fit the observation that the geoid anomaly and ridge driving force only increase slowly for ages greater than 40 m.y. (in contrast to the half-space model where the linear dependence on age holds for all ages). This reduction of the geoid slope results in a 20% decrease in the predicted ridge push force. This decrease is due to the combined effects of treating the oceanic lithosphere as a cooling plate (vs. a half-space), and the loss of geoidal

  5. Optical dating of dune ridges on Rømø

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, A. S.; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2007-01-01

    The application of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to the dating of recent aeolian sand ridges on Rømø, an island off the southwest coast of Denmark, is tested. These sand ridges began to form approximately 300 years ago, and estimates of the ages are available from historical records....... Samples for OSL dating were taken ~0.5 m below the crests of four different dune ridges; at least five samples were recovered from each ridge to test the internal consistency of the ages. Additional samples were recovered from the low lying areas in the swales and from the scattered dune formations......-defined building phases separated by inactive periods and the first major ridge formed ~235 years ago. This study demonstrates that optical dating can be successfully applied to these young aeolian sand deposits, and we conclude that OSL dating is a powerful chronological tool in studies of coastal change....

  6. The fate of volatiles in mid-ocean ridge magmatism

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Tobias; Hirschmann, Marc M

    2016-01-01

    Deep-Earth volatile cycles couple the mantle with near-surface reservoirs. Volatiles are emitted by volcanism and, in particular, from mid-ocean ridges, which are the most prolific source of basaltic volcanism. Estimates of volatile extraction from the asthenosphere beneath ridges typically rely on measurements of undegassed lavas combined with simple petrogenetic models of the mean degree of melting. Estimated volatile fluxes have large uncertainties; this is partly due to a poor understanding of how volatiles are transported by magma in the asthenosphere. Here, we assess the fate of mantle volatiles through numerical simulations of melting and melt transport at mid-ocean ridges. Our simulations are based on two-phase, magma/mantle dynamics theory coupled to an idealised thermodynamic model of mantle melting in the presence of water and carbon dioxide. We combine simulation results with catalogued observations of all ridge segments to estimate a range of likely volatile output from the global mid-ocean ridge...

  7. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R. (eds.)

    1990-10-01

    The first two volumes of this report are devoted to a presentation of environmental data and supporting narratives for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding environs during 1989. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a stand-alone'' report for the ORR for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1989 data. Volume 2 includes the detailed data summarized in a format to ensure that all environmental data are represented in the tables. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2. The tables in Vol. 2 are addressed in Vol. 1. For this reason, Vol. 2 cannot be considered a stand-alone report but is intended to be used in conjunction with Vol. 1. 16 figs., 194 tabs.

  8. Oak Ridge Health Studies phase 1 report, Volume 1: Oak Ridge Phase 1 overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, M.I.; Van Cleave, M.L.; Turri, P.; Daniel, J.

    1993-09-01

    In July 1991, the State of Tennessee initiated the Health Studies Agreement with the United States Department of Energy to carry out independent studies of possible adverse health effects in people living in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge Reservation. The health studies focus on those effects that could have resulted or could result from exposures to chemicals and radioactivity released at the Reservation since 1942. The major focus of the first phase was to complete a Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. This study was designed to find out if enough data exist about chemical and radionuclide releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation to conduct a second phase. The second phase will lead to estimates of the actual amounts or the ``doses`` of various contaminants received by people as a result of off-site releases. Once the doses of various contaminants have been estimated, scientists and physicians will be better able to evaluate whether adverse health effects could have resulted from the releases.

  9. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  10. Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete.

  11. Tiger team assessment of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1990-02-01

    This document contains findings identified during the Tiger Team Compliance Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Y-12 Plant Tiger Team Compliance Assessment is comprehensive in scope. It covers the Environmental, Safety, and Health (including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance), and Management areas and determines the plant's compliance with applicable federal (including DOE), state, and local regulations and requirements. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Parker, A.F.

    1997-02-01

    This report provides summary information on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) sites as listed in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), dated January 1, 1992, Appendix C. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory was built in 1943 as part of the World War II Manhattan Project. The original mission of ORNL was to produce and chemically separate the first gram-quantities of plutonium as part of the national effort to produce the atomic bomb. The current mission of ORNL is to provide applied research and development in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in nuclear fusion and fission, energy conservation, fossil fuels, and other energy technologies and to perform basic scientific research in selected areas of the physical, life, and environmental sciences. ER is also tasked with clean up or mitigation of environmental impacts resulting from past waste management practices on portions of the approximately 37,000 acres within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Other installations located within the ORR are the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25) and the Y-12 plant. The remedial action strategy currently integrates state and federal regulations for efficient compliance and approaches for both investigations and remediation efforts on a Waste Area Grouping (WAG) basis. As defined in the ORR FFA Quarterly Report July - September 1995, a WAG is a grouping of potentially contaminated sites based on drainage area and similar waste characteristics. These contaminated sites are further divided into four categories based on existing information concerning whether the data are generated for scoping or remedial investigation (RI) purposes. These areas are as follows: (1) Operable Units (OU); (2) Characterization Areas (CA); (3) Remedial Site Evaluation (RSE) Areas; and (4) Removal Site Evaluation (RmSE) Areas.

  13. Greenland Fracture Zone-East Greenland Ridge(s) revisited: Indications of a C22-change in plate motion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Arne; Funck, T.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the lithospheric stress field, causing axial rift migration and reorientation of the transform, are generally proposed as an explanation for anomalously old crust and/or major aseismic valleys in oceanic ridge-transform-ridge settings. Similarly, transform migration of the Greenland...

  14. Tectonics of the Ninetyeast Ridge derived from spreading records in adjacent oceanic basins and age constraints of the ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Abraham, H.; Sager, W.W.; Pringle, M.S.; Frey, F.; Rao, D.G.; Levchenko, O.V.

    and magnetic anomaly ages implies that the hot spot first emplaced NER volcanoes on the Indian plate at a distance from the Wharton Ridge, but as the northward drifting spreading ridge approached the hot spot, the two interacted, keeping later NER volcanism...

  15. Particle swarm optimization based support vector machine for damage level prediction of non-reshaped berm breakwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Harish, N.; Mandal, S.; Rao, S.; Patil, S.G.

    breakwater. Soft computing tools like Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy Logic, Support Vector Machine (SVM), etc, are successfully used to solve complex problems. In the present study, SVM and hybrid of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) with SVM (PSO...

  16. Geomorphological investigation of multiphase glacitectonic composite ridge systems in Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Harold; Benn, Douglas I.; Lukas, Sven; Spagnolo, Matteo; Cook, Simon J.; Swift, Darrel A.; Clark, Chris D.; Yde, Jacob C.; Watts, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Some surge-type glaciers on the High-Arctic archipelago of Svalbard have large glacitectonic composite ridge systems at their terrestrial margins. These have formed by rapid glacier advance into proglacial sediments during the active surge phase, creating multicrested moraine complexes. Such complexes can be formed during single surge advances or multiple surges to successively less-extensive positions. The few existing studies of composite ridge systems have largely relied on detailed information on internal structure and sedimentology to reconstruct their formation and links to surge processes. However, natural exposures of internal structure are commonly unavailable, and the creation of artificial exposures is often problematic in fragile Arctic environments. To compensate for these issues, we investigate the potential for reconstructing composite ridge system formation based on geomorphological evidence alone, focusing on clear morphostratigraphic relationships between ridges within the moraine complex and relict meltwater channels/outwash fans. Based on mapping at the margins of Finsterwalderbreen (in Van Keulenfjorden) and Grønfjordbreen (in Grønfjorden), we show that relict meltwater channels that breach outer parts of the composite ridge systems are in most cases truncated upstream within the ridge complex by an inner pushed ridge or ridges at their ice-proximal extents. Our interpretation of this relationship is that the entire composite ridge system is unlikely to have formed during the same glacier advance but is instead the product of multiple advances to successively less-extensive positions, whereby younger ridges are emplaced on the ice-proximal side of older ridges. This indicates that the Finsterwalderbreen composite ridge system has been formed by multiple separate advances, consistent with the cyclicity of surges. Being able to identify the frequency and magnitude of former surges is important as it provides insight into the past behaviour of

  17. Reshaping Lithium Plating/Stripping Behavior via Bifunctional Polymer Electrolyte for Room-Temperature Solid Li Metal Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Yin, Ya-Xia; Li, Nian-Wu; Du, Wen-Cheng; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-12-14

    High-energy rechargeable Li metal batteries are hindered by dendrite growth due to the use of a liquid electrolyte. Solid polymer electrolytes, as promising candidates to solve the above issue, are expected to own high Li ion conductivity without sacrificing mechanical strength, which is still a big challenge to realize. In this study, a bifunctional solid polymer electrolyte exactly having these two merits is proposed with an interpenetrating network of poly(ether-acrylate) (ipn-PEA) and realized via photopolymerization of ion-conductive poly(ethylene oxide) and branched acrylate. The ipn-PEA electrolyte with facile processing capability integrates high mechanical strength (ca. 12 GPa) with high room-temperature ionic conductance (0.22 mS cm-1), and significantly promotes uniform Li plating/stripping. Li metal full cells assembled with ipn-PEA electrolyte and cathodes within 4.5 V vs Li+/Li operate effectively at a rate of 5 C and cycle stably at a rate of 1 C at room temperature. Because of its fabrication simplicity and compelling characteristics, the bifunctional ipn-PEA electrolyte reshapes the feasibility of room-temperature solid-state Li metal batteries.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI

  19. Bayesian regularization of neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Frank; Winkler, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian regularized artificial neural networks (BRANNs) are more robust than standard back-propagation nets and can reduce or eliminate the need for lengthy cross-validation. Bayesian regularization is a mathematical process that converts a nonlinear regression into a "well-posed" statistical problem in the manner of a ridge regression. The advantage of BRANNs is that the models are robust and the validation process, which scales as O(N2) in normal regression methods, such as back propagation, is unnecessary. These networks provide solutions to a number of problems that arise in QSAR modeling, such as choice of model, robustness of model, choice of validation set, size of validation effort, and optimization of network architecture. They are difficult to overtrain, since evidence procedures provide an objective Bayesian criterion for stopping training. They are also difficult to overfit, because the BRANN calculates and trains on a number of effective network parameters or weights, effectively turning off those that are not relevant. This effective number is usually considerably smaller than the number of weights in a standard fully connected back-propagation neural net. Automatic relevance determination (ARD) of the input variables can be used with BRANNs, and this allows the network to "estimate" the importance of each input. The ARD method ensures that irrelevant or highly correlated indices used in the modeling are neglected as well as showing which are the most important variables for modeling the activity data. This chapter outlines the equations that define the BRANN method plus a flowchart for producing a BRANN-QSAR model. Some results of the use of BRANNs on a number of data sets are illustrated and compared with other linear and nonlinear models.

  20. Aerodynamic roughness length related to non-aggregated tillage ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion in agricultural soils is dependent, in part, on the aerodynamic roughness length (z0 produced by tillage ridges. Although previous studies have related z0 to ridge characteristics (ridge height (RH and spacing (RS, these relationships have not been tested for tillage ridges observed in the North African agricultural fields. In these regions, due to climate and soil conditions, small plowing tools are largely used. Most of these tools produce non-aggregated and closely-spaced small ridges. Thus, experiments were conducted in a 7-m long wind tunnel to measure z0 for 11 ridge types covering the range of geometric characteristics frequently observed in south Tunisia. Experimental results suggest that RH2/RS is the first order parameter controlling z0. A strong relationship between z0 and RH2/RS is proposed for a wide range of ridge characteristics.

  1. Introduction to neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    James, Frederick E

    1994-02-02

    1. Introduction and overview of Artificial Neural Networks. 2,3. The Feed-forward Network as an inverse Problem, and results on the computational complexity of network training. 4.Physics applications of neural networks.

  2. Morphological neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.X.; Sussner, P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we introduce a novel class of neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. In this paper we consider some of these differences and provide some particular examples of morphological neural network.

  3. Financial time series prediction using spiking neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Reid

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel application of a particular type of spiking neural network, a Polychronous Spiking Network, was used for financial time series prediction. It is argued that the inherent temporal capabilities of this type of network are suited to non-stationary data such as this. The performance of the spiking neural network was benchmarked against three systems: two "traditional", rate-encoded, neural networks; a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network and a Dynamic Ridge Polynomial neural network, and a standard Linear Predictor Coefficients model. For this comparison three non-stationary and noisy time series were used: IBM stock data; US/Euro exchange rate data, and the price of Brent crude oil. The experiments demonstrated favourable prediction results for the Spiking Neural Network in terms of Annualised Return and prediction error for 5-Step ahead predictions. These results were also supported by other relevant metrics such as Maximum Drawdown and Signal-To-Noise ratio. This work demonstrated the applicability of the Polychronous Spiking Network to financial data forecasting and this in turn indicates the potential of using such networks over traditional systems in difficult to manage non-stationary environments.

  4. Solar cell with doped groove regions separated by ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesa, Steven Edward; Pass, Thomas; Kraft, Steve

    2017-01-31

    Solar cells with doped groove regions separated by ridges and methods of fabricating solar cells are described. In an example, a solar cell includes a substrate having a surface with a plurality of grooves and ridges. A first doped region of a first conductivity type is disposed in a first of the grooves. A second doped region of a second conductivity type, opposite the first conductivity type, is disposed in a second of the grooves. The first and second grooves are separated by one of the ridges.

  5. Artificial neural networks as quantum associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kathleen; Schrock, Jonathan; Imam, Neena; Humble, Travis

    We present results related to the recall accuracy and capacity of Hopfield networks implemented on commercially available quantum annealers. The use of Hopfield networks and artificial neural networks as content-addressable memories offer robust storage and retrieval of classical information, however, implementation of these models using currently available quantum annealers faces several challenges: the limits of precision when setting synaptic weights, the effects of spurious spin-glass states and minor embedding of densely connected graphs into fixed-connectivity hardware. We consider neural networks which are less than fully-connected, and also consider neural networks which contain multiple sparsely connected clusters. We discuss the effect of weak edge dilution on the accuracy of memory recall, and discuss how the multiple clique structure affects the storage capacity. Our work focuses on storage of patterns which can be embedded into physical hardware containing n States Department of Defense and used resources of the Computational Research and Development Programs as Oak Ridge National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC0500OR22725 with the U. S. Department of Energy.

  6. Cosmic web reconstruction through density ridges: catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Brinkmann, Jon; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wasserman, Larry

    2016-10-01

    We construct a catalogue for filaments using a novel approach called SCMS (subspace constrained mean shift). SCMS is a gradient-based method that detects filaments through density ridges (smooth curves tracing high-density regions). A great advantage of SCMS is its uncertainty measure, which allows an evaluation of the errors for the detected filaments. To detect filaments, we use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which consist of three galaxy samples: the NYU main galaxy sample (MGS), the LOWZ sample and the CMASS sample. Each of the three data set covers different redshift regions so that the combined sample allows detection of filaments up to z = 0.7. Our filament catalogue consists of a sequence of two-dimensional filament maps at different redshifts that provide several useful statistics on the evolution cosmic web. To construct the maps, we select spectroscopically confirmed galaxies within 0.050 filaments using SCMS. The filament catalogue consists of 130 individual 2-D filament maps, and each map comprises points on the detected filaments that describe the filamentary structures at a particular redshift. We also apply our filament catalogue to investigate galaxy luminosity and its relation with distance to filament. Using a volume-limited sample, we find strong evidence (6.1σ-12.3σ) that galaxies close to filaments are generally brighter than those at significant distance from filaments.

  7. Hydrothermal Vents of Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Joyce

    As a member of REVEL (Research and Education: Volcanoes, Exploration and Life), I had an opportunity to participant in a scientific research cruise focused on the active volcanoes along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the submarine spreading center off the Washington- Oregon-Canada coast. REVEL was sponsored by the National Science Foundation, University of Washington, Pennsylvania State University and the American Museum of Natural History. We studied the geological, chemical and biological processes associated with active hydrothermal systems and my research focused on the biological communities of the sulfide structures. We worked on board the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Vessel, R/V Atlantis and the submersible ALVIN was used to sample the "Black Smokers". As a member of the scientific party, I participated in collection and sorting of biological specimens from the vent communities, attended lectures by scientists, contributed to the cruise log website, maintained a journal and developed my own research project. It was my responsibility to bring this cutting-edge research back to the classroom.

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A.R. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the public about the impact of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on the public and the environment. It describes the environmental surveillance and monitoring activities conducted at and around the DOE facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Preparation and publication of this report is in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1. The order specifies a publication deadline of June of the following year for each calendar year of data. The primary objective of this report is to summarize all information collected for the previous calendar year regarding effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and estimates of radiation and chemical dose to the surrounding population. When multiple years of information are available for a program, trends are also evaluated. The first seven sections of Volume 1 of this report address this objective. The last three sections of Volume 1 provide information on solid waste management, special environmental studies, and quality assurance programs.

  9. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE BUILDING 3550 SLAB AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-05-08

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Building 3550 Slab. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey is to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) to document that the final radiological condition of the slab meets the release guidelines. Verification survey activities on the Building 3550 Slab that included scans, measurements, and the collection of smears. Scans for alpha, alpha plus beta, and gamma activity identified several areas that were investigated.

  10. Project plan for the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The Background Soil characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals, organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents.

  11. Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The

  12. Limits of Climate-Driven Wrinkle Ridge Formation on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerski, J. A.

    2017-05-01

    Climate-driven thermal stresses acting upon the upper crust can potentiate pre-existing lithospheric stresses to allow for the creation of wrinkle ridges but are insufficient as the only driving sources of stress.

  13. Ridging, a Mechanized Alternative to Mounding for Yam and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sam Eshun

    Corresponding author ... dietary energy supply from 2001 to 2003, with maize contributing 12% (FAOSTAT, 2006). The importance ..... additional labour is required in the building of continuous ridges, which, when compared with mounds, necessitate the ...

  14. Continuous separation of micropaticles by size in ridged microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenbin; Wang, Gonghao; Sulchek, Todd A.; Alexeev, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Size-based separation and sorting are widely used for biomedical research and clinical application. We design a microfluidic channel with periodically arranged diagonal ridges that separate micrometer-sized particles by size. We use a hybrid numerical method that combines the lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) and lattice spring model (LSM) to examine the dynamics of suspended particles in such channels. Our simulations reveal that particles with different sizes follow distinct trajectories and separate in the lateral direction inside ridged microchannels. The trajectories are determined by the particle equilibrium position in narrow constrictions formed diagonal ridges. We characterize the separation performance by analyzing the effects of ridge geometry and compare our simulation results with experimental data. This microfluidic system can be employed for high throughput sorting and separation of biological cells and synthetic microcapsules.

  15. 60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-01-01

    This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  16. February 2007 Multibeam Mapping of Pulley Ridge, southwest Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This disk or set of disks contain high-resolution multibeam and backscatter maps of the Pulley Ridge Area, near the Tortugas, in the Gulf of Mexico. It includes the...

  17. a comparative study of some robust ridge and liu estimators

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr A.B.Ahmed

    , Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria. ... Liu Estimator, Robust Estimator, Robust Ridge Regression. Estimator, Robust Liu Estimator. 1.0. INTRODUCTION. Regression analysis is used to study the ..... in Probability and Mathematical Statistics.Wiley ...

  18. Ridge Waveguide Structures in Magnesium-Doped Lithium Niobate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AdvR, Inc. proposes the development of an efficient process for fabricating ridge waveguides in magnesium-doped lithium niobate (MgO:LN). The effort will include,...

  19. Geology along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Mark W.; Southworth, C. Scott; Tollo, Richard P.; Merschat, Arthur J.; Wagner, Sara; Lazor, Ava; Aleinikoff, John N.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed geologic mapping and new SHRIMP (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe) U-Pb zircon, Ar/Ar, Lu-Hf, 14C, luminescence (optically stimulated), thermochronology (fission-track), and palynology reveal the complex Mesoproterozoic to Quaternary geology along the ~350 km length of the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia. Traversing the boundary of the central and southern Appalachians, rocks along the parkway showcase the transition from the para-autochthonous Blue Ridge anticlinorium of northern and central Virginia to the allochthonous eastern Blue Ridge in southern Virginia. From mile post (MP) 0 near Waynesboro, Virginia, to ~MP 124 at Roanoke, the parkway crosses the unconformable to faulted boundary between Mesoproterozoic basement in the core of the Blue Ridge anticlinorium and Neoproterozoic to Cambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic cover rocks on the western limb of the structure. Mesoproterozoic basement rocks comprise two groups based on SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology: Group I rocks (1.2-1.14 Ga) are strongly foliated orthogneisses, and Group II rocks (1.08-1.00 Ga) are granitoids that mostly lack obvious Mesoproterozoic deformational features.Neoproterozoic to Cambrian cover rocks on the west limb of the anticlinorium include the Swift Run and Catoctin Formations, and constituent formations of the Chilhowee Group. These rocks unconformably overlie basement, or abut basement along steep reverse faults. Rocks of the Chilhowee Group are juxtaposed against Cambrian rocks of the Valley and Ridge province along southeast- and northwest-dipping, high-angle reverse faults. South of the James River (MP 64), Chilhowee Group and basement rocks occupy the hanging wall of the nearly flat-lying Blue Ridge thrust fault and associated splays.South of the Red Valley high-strain zone (MP 144.5), the parkway crosses into the wholly allochthonous eastern Blue Ridge, comprising metasedimentary and meta-igneous rocks assigned to the Wills Ridge, Ashe, and Alligator

  20. Technical Evaluation of Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kriskovich, J R

    2002-01-01

    Two evaluations of the Oak Ridge Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Facility (FTF) were performed on December 11 and 12, 2001, and consisted of a quality assurance and a technical evaluation. This report documents results of the technical evaluation.

  1. Ridge Waveguide Structures in Magnesium-Doped Lithium Niobate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this NASA Phase I STTR effort, the feasibility of fabricating isolated ridge waveguides in 5% magnesium-doped lithium niobate (5% MgO:LN) will be established....

  2. Lake Wales Ridge National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Lake Wales Ridge NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  3. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared and published each year to inform the public of the environmental activities that take place on the reservation and in the surrounding areas. It is written to comply with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. This document has been prepared to present the highlights of the Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2007 in an easy-to-read, summary format.

  4. Continental ridges in the Arctic Ocean: Lorex constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, J. F.; Weber, J. R.; Blasco, S. M.

    1982-10-01

    Recent multidisciplinary geophysical measurements over the Lomonosov Ridge close to the North Pole support the widely held belief that it was formerly part of Eurasia. The known lithologies, ages, P-wave velocity structure and thickness of the crust along the outer Barents and Kara continental shelves are similar to permitted or measured values of these parameters newly acquired over the Lomonosov Ridge. Seismic, gravity and magnetic data in particular show that the ridge basement is most likely formed of early Mesozoic or older sedimentary or low-grade metasedimentary rocks over a crystalline core that is intermediate to basic in composition. Short-wavelength magnetic anomaly highs along the upper ridge flanks and crest may denote the presence of shallow igneous rocks. Because of the uncertain component of ice-rafted material, seafloor sediments recovered from the ridge by shallow sampling techniques cannot be clearly related to ridge basement lithology without further detailed analysis. The ridge is cut at the surface and at depth by normal faults that appear related to the development of the Makarov Basin. This and other data are consistent with the idea that the Makarov Basin was formed by continental stretching rather than simple seafloor spreading. Hence the flanking Alpha and Lomonosov ridges may originally have been part of the same continental block. It is suggested that in Late Cretaceous time this block was sheared from Eurasia along a trans-Arctic left-lateral offset that may have been associated with the opening of Baffin Bay. The continental block was later separated from Eurasia when the North Altantic rift extended into the Arctic region in the Early Tertiary. The data suggest that the Makarov Basin did not form before the onset of rifting in the Artic.

  5. Buttock Reshaping With Intramuscular Gluteal Augmentation in an Asian Ethnic Group: A Six-Year Experience With 130 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Hwan; Whang, Kwi Whan

    2016-09-01

    Although the definition of what constitutes "beautiful buttocks" has been changing with time, the buttocks are generally perceived as an important element of sexual attraction and beauty in every culture. In Asian culture, "beautiful buttocks" are defined by an aggregate of the following 4 components: S-shaped curvature from the lower back to the buttocks, sufficient muscle volume, sufficient fat volume, and appropriate skin elasticity. The goal of our gluteal augmentation was therefore to restore the back curvature, provide sufficient hip volume (projection), and reposition the point of maximal gluteal projection to be higher than the pubic hair. The purpose of this study was to review the authors' 6-year (2008-2014) experience with intramuscular gluteal augmentation techniques using an oval-shaped smooth-surface silicon elastomer. After intergluteal fusiform incisions were made, we bluntly dissected the subcutaneous tissue deep down to the gluteus maximus muscle by using the xyz method introduced by Dr. Gonzalez. Most of the patients in this case series underwent additional procedures at the time of the gluteal augmentation, whereas 90% of patients underwent concomitant liposuction. The results were assessed objectively using serial photography and subjectively according to patients' assessment on a 5-score scale.The mean rating for patient satisfaction with the procedure was 4.6 of 5, whereas consensus ratings by 2 independent plastic surgeons showed a mean score of 4.2 of 5. The intramuscular gluteal augmentation technique using an oval-shaped smooth surface silicon elastomer resulted in excellent cosmetic outcomes and permitted successful reshaping of the buttocks.

  6. Repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10 induces lipid reshaping in lung parenchyma and in extra-pulmonary tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Rizzo

    Full Text Available Adverse health effects of air pollution attributed mainly to airborne particulate matter have been well documented in the last couple of decades. Short term exposure, referring to a few hours exposure, to high ambient PM10 concentration is linked to increased hospitalization rates for cardiovascular events, typically 24 h after air pollution peaks. Particulate matter exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory status. Previously, we have demonstrated that repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10sum in BALB/c mice leads to respiratory tract inflammation, creating in lung a condition which could potentially evolve in a systemic toxic reaction. Additionally, plasma membrane and tissue lipids are easily affected by oxidative stress and directly correlated with inflammatory products. With this aim, in the present investigation using the same model, we analyzed the toxic potential of PM10sum exposure on lipid plasma membrane composition, lipid peroxidation and the mechanisms of cells protection in multiple organs such as lung, heart, liver and brain. Obtained results indicated that PM10 exposure led to lung lipid reshaping, in particular phospholipid and cholesterol content increases; concomitantly, the generation of oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation. In liver we found significant changes in lipid content, mainly due to an increase of phosphatidylcholine, and in total fatty acid composition with a more pronounced level of docosahexaenoic acid; these changes were statistically correlated to lung molecular markers. Heart and brain were similarly affected; heart was significantly enriched in triglycerides in half of the PM10sum treated mice. These results demonstrated a direct involvement of PM10sum in affecting lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in peripheral tissues that might be related to the serious systemic air-pollution effects on human health.

  7. Tectonic evolution of Gorda Ridge inferred from sidescan sonar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, D.G.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Gorda Ridge is the southern segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge complex, in the north-east Pacific. Along-strike spreading-rate variation on Gorda Ridge and deformation of Gorda Plate are evidence for compression between the Pacific and Gorda Plates. GLORIA sidescan sonographs allow the spreading fabric associated with Gorda Ridge to be mapped in detail. Between 5 and 2 Ma, a pair of propagating rifts re-orientated the northern segment of Gorda Ridge by about 10?? clockwise, accommodating a clockwise shift in Pacific-Juan de Fuca plate motion that occurred around 5 Ma. Deformation of Gorda Plate, associated with southward decreasing spreading rates along southern Gorda Ridge, is accommodated by a combination of clockwise rotation of Gorda Plate crust, coupled with left-lateral motion on the original normal faults of the ocean crust. Segments of Gorda Plate which have rotated by different amounts are separated by narrow deformation zones across which sharp changes in ocean fabric trend are seen. Although minor lateral movement may occur on these NW to WNW structures, no major right-lateral movement, as predicted by previous models, is observed. ?? 1988 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  8. Nonlinear Forecasting With Many Predictors Using Kernel Ridge Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; Heij, Christiaan

    This paper puts forward kernel ridge regression as an approach for forecasting with many predictors that are related nonlinearly to the target variable. In kernel ridge regression, the observed predictor variables are mapped nonlinearly into a high-dimensional space, where estimation of the predi......This paper puts forward kernel ridge regression as an approach for forecasting with many predictors that are related nonlinearly to the target variable. In kernel ridge regression, the observed predictor variables are mapped nonlinearly into a high-dimensional space, where estimation...... of the predictive regression model is based on a shrinkage estimator to avoid overfitting. We extend the kernel ridge regression methodology to enable its use for economic time-series forecasting, by including lags of the dependent variable or other individual variables as predictors, as typically desired...... in macroeconomic and financial applications. Monte Carlo simulations as well as an empirical application to various key measures of real economic activity confirm that kernel ridge regression can produce more accurate forecasts than traditional linear and nonlinear methods for dealing with many predictors based...

  9. Alveolar Ridge Split Technique Using Piezosurgery with Specially Designed Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Moro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with atrophic ridge who need prosthetic rehabilitation is a common problem in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Among the various techniques introduced for the expansion of alveolar ridges with a horizontal bone deficit is the alveolar ridge split technique. The aim of this article is to give a description of some new tips that have been specifically designed for the treatment of atrophic ridges with transversal bone deficit. A two-step piezosurgical split technique is also described, based on specific osteotomies of the vestibular cortex and the use of a mandibular ramus graft as interpositional graft. A total of 15 patients were treated with the proposed new tips by our department. All the expanded areas were successful in providing an adequate width and height to insert implants according to the prosthetic plan and the proposed tips allowed obtaining the most from the alveolar ridge split technique and piezosurgery. These tips have made alveolar ridge split technique simple, safe, and effective for the treatment of horizontal and vertical bone defects. Furthermore the proposed piezosurgical split technique allows obtaining horizontal and vertical bone augmentation.

  10. Characterization plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Area-Wide Groundwater Program, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This characterization plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the characterization plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide subsequent GWOU remedial investigations. The plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It is important to note that the characterization plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. As such, remedial investigations will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This characterization plan outlines the overall strategy for the remedial investigations and defines tasks that are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  11. Sex differences from fingerprint ridge density in Chinese and Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Vinod C; Rastogi, Prateek; Kanchan, Tanuj; Yoganarasimha, K; Kumar, G Pradeep; Menezes, Ritesh G

    2010-04-15

    The fingerprints are very typical for a human being. The present study was undertaken to study the gender differences in fingerprint ridge density in Chinese and Malaysian population. The study done on 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females) of Chinese origin and 100 subjects (50 males and 50 females) of Malaysian origin revealed that significant gender differences occur in the finger ridge density. Fingerprint mean ridge density of 12 ridges/25 mm(2) or less is found to be more likely to be of males and a mean ridge count of more the 13 ridges/25 mm(2) is more likely of female origin in Chinese subjects. Fingerprint mean ridge density of 11 ridges/25 mm(2) or less is found to be more likely to be of males and a mean ridge count of more the 13 ridges/25 mm(2) is more likely of female origin in Malaysian subjects. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Core Competencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, J.B.; Anderson, T.D.; Berven, B.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.; Hartman, F.C.; Honea, R.B.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Moon, R.M. Jr.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shelton, R.B. [and others

    1994-12-01

    A core competency is a distinguishing integration of capabilities which enables an organization to deliver mission results. Core competencies represent the collective learning of an organization and provide the capacity to perform present and future missions. Core competencies are distinguishing characteristics which offer comparative advantage and are difficult to reproduce. They exhibit customer focus, mission relevance, and vertical integration from research through applications. They are demonstrable by metrics such as level of investment, uniqueness of facilities and expertise, and national impact. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has identified four core competencies which satisfy the above criteria. Each core competency represents an annual investment of at least $100M and is characterized by an integration of Laboratory technical foundations in physical, chemical, and materials sciences; biological, environmental, and social sciences; engineering sciences; and computational sciences and informatics. The ability to integrate broad technical foundations to develop and sustain core competencies in support of national R&D goals is a distinguishing strength of the national laboratories. The ORNL core competencies are: 9 Energy Production and End-Use Technologies o Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technology o Advanced Materials Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization & Neutron-Based Science and Technology. The distinguishing characteristics of each ORNL core competency are described. In addition, written material is provided for two emerging competencies: Manufacturing Technologies and Computational Science and Advanced Computing. Distinguishing institutional competencies in the Development and Operation of National Research Facilities, R&D Integration and Partnerships, Technology Transfer, and Science Education are also described. Finally, financial data for the ORNL core competencies are summarized in the appendices.

  13. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAMPUS AND SOUTHEAST LABORATORY COMPLEX BUILDING SLABS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-07-24

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Central Campus and Southeast Lab Complex Building Slabs. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey was to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by SEC, and to independently assess whether the final radiological condition of the slabs met the release guidelines.

  14. Formation and Elimination of Segmentation on the Reykjanes Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, F.; Hey, R. N.

    2016-12-01

    A Paleogene change in plate motion led to the abrupt segmentation of the linear Reykjanes Ridge into a stair-step configuration of ridge segments offset by transform and non-transform discontinuities. In its subsequent evolution the ridge diachronously eliminated the just-formed segmentation and re-established its original linear geometry over the mantle, although now spreading obliquely. During segmented stages accreted crust was thinner and during unsegmented stages southward pointing V-shaped crustal ridges formed. Although mantle plume effects have been invoked to explain the changes in segmentation and crustal features, here we propose that plate boundary processes are more likely. Reassembly of a fragmented axis to its original linear configuration suggests a strong organizing mechanism. We propose that a deep and weak damp melting regime supporting buoyant mantle upwelling persisted in a linear configuration following the abrupt change in opening direction. In contrast, the shallower and stronger mantle of the dry melting regime followed the plate boundary closely, leading to crustal segmentation. The persistent deep linear damp melting regime guided the reassembly of the ridge axis back to its original configuration by asymmetric spreading of the individual ridge segments. Plate boundary segmentation controls mantle upwelling in the high viscosity dry melting interval. A long linear divergent plate boundary induces greater total mantle upwelling than the same length axis offset into multiple segments due to suppression of mantle upwelling approaching segment ends. Thus a segmented ridge will produce regionally thinner crust than an unsegmented one without a need for mantle temperature variations. Buoyant upwelling instabilities propagate along the long linear deep melting regime driven by regional gradients in mantle properties away from Iceland. Once segmentation is eliminated, these propagating upwelling instabilities lead to crustal thickness variations

  15. Reading Ombrone river delta evolution through beach ridges morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammi, Irene; Piccardi, Marco; Pranzini, Enzo; Rossi, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    The present study focuses on the evolution of the Ombrone River delta (Southern Tuscany, Italy) in the last five centuries, when fluvial sediment input was huge also as a consequence of the deforestation performed on the watershed. The aim of this study is to find a correlation between river input and beach ridges morphology and to explain the different distribution of wetlands and sand deposits on the two sides of the delta. Visible, NIR and TIR satellite images were processed to retrieve soil wetness associated to sand ridges and interdune silty deposits. High resolution LiDAR data were analysed using vegetation filter and GIS enhancement algorithms in order to highlight small morphological variations, especially in areas closer to the river where agriculture has almost deleted these morphologies. A topographic survey and a very high resolution 3D model obtained from a set of images acquired by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) were carried out in selected sites, both to calibrate satellite LiDAR 3D data, and to map low relief areas. Historical maps, aerial photography and written documents were analysed for dating ancient shorelines associated to specific beach ridges. Thus allowing the reconstruction of erosive and accretive phases of the delta. Seventy beach ridges were identified on the two wings of the delta. On the longer down-drift side (Northern wing) beach ridges are more spaced at the apex and gradually converge to the extremity, where the Bruna River runs and delimits the sub aerial depositional area of the Ombrone River. On the shorter up-drift lobe (Southern wing), beach ridges are closer, but run almost parallel each other. In this case, a rocky headland called Collelungo promontory closes and cuts the beach ridges sequence but shallow water depth allows sediment by pass. One kilometre to the south a more pronounced promontory encloses a small pocket beach (Cala di Forno) and identifies the limit of the subaerial depositionary area. Beach ridges

  16. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  17. Best management practices plan for the Chestnut Ridge-Filled Coal Ash Pond at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Chestnut Ridge Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP) Project has been established to satisfy Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2. FCAP is on Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant. A 62-foot high earthen dam across Upper McCoy Branch was constructed in 1955 to create a pond to serve as a settling basin for fly and bottom ashes generated by burning coal at the Y-12 Steam Plant. Ash from the steam was mixed with water to form a slurry and then pumped to the crest of Chestnut Ridge and released through a large pipe to flow across the Sluice Channel area and into the pond. The ash slurry eventually overtopped the dam and flowed along Upper McCoy Branch to Rogers Quarry. The purpose of this document is to provide a site-specific Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan for construction associated with environmental restoration activities at the FCAP Site.

  18. Consciousness and neural plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In contemporary consciousness studies the phenomenon of neural plasticity has received little attention despite the fact that neural plasticity is of still increased interest in neuroscience. We will, however, argue that neural plasticity could be of great importance to consciousness studies....... If consciousness is related to neural processes it seems, at least prima facie, that the ability of the neural structures to change should be reflected in a theory of this relationship "Neural plasticity" refers to the fact that the brain can change due to its own activity. The brain is not static but rather...... a dynamic entity, which physical structure changes according to its use and environment. This change may take the form of growth of new neurons, the creation of new networks and structures, and change within network structures, that is, changes in synaptic strengths. Plasticity raises questions about...

  19. Fuzzy and neural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic and neural networks provide new methods for designing control systems. Fuzzy logic controllers do not require a complete analytical model of a dynamic system and can provide knowledge-based heuristic controllers for ill-defined and complex systems. Neural networks can be used for learning control. In this chapter, we discuss hybrid methods using fuzzy logic and neural networks which can start with an approximate control knowledge base and refine it through reinforcement learning.

  20. Management of spent nuclear fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    On June 1, 1995, DOE issued a Record of Decision [60 Federal Register 28680] for the Department-wide management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); regionalized storage of SNF by fuel type was selected as the preferred alternative. The proposed action evaluated in this environmental assessment is the management of SNF on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to implement this preferred alternative of regional storage. SNF would be retrieved from storage, transferred to a hot cell if segregation by fuel type and/or repackaging is required, loaded into casks, and shipped to off-site storage. The proposed action would also include construction and operation of a dry cask SNF storage facility on ORR, in case of inadequate SNF storage. Action is needed to enable DOE to continue operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which generates SNF. This report addresses environmental impacts.

  1. Level 3 Baseline Risk Assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollert, D.A.; Cretella, F.M.; Golden, K.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The baseline risk assessment for the Fission Product Pilot Plant (Building 3515) at the Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) provides the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at ORNL and Building 3515 project managers with information concerning the results of the Level 3 baseline risk assessment performed for this building. The document was prepared under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.2.01 (Activity Data Sheet 3701, Facilities D&D) and includes information on the potential long-term impacts to human health and the environment if no action is taken to remediate Building 3515. Information provided in this document forms the basis for the development of remedial alternatives and the no-action risk portion of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis report.

  2. Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented.

  3. Resource Management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 28, Wetlands on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pounds, Larry [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-01

    A survey of wetlands on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted in 1990. Wetlands occurring on ORR were identified using National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) maps and field surveys. More than 120 sites were visited and 90 wetlands were identified. Wetland types on ORR included emergent communities in shallow embayments on reservoirs, emergent and aquatic communities in ponds, forested wetland on low ground along major creeks, and wet meadows and marshes associated with streams and seeps. Vascular plant species occurring on sites visited were inventoried, and 57 species were added to the checklist of vascular plants on ORR. Three species listed as rare in Tennessee were discovered on ORR during the wetlands survey. The survey provided an intensive ground truth of the wetlands identified by NWI and offered an indication of wetlands that the NWI remote sensing techniques did not detect.

  4. Remedial investigation work plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 4 (Rogers Quarry/Lower McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant includes - 800 acres near the northeast comer of the reservation and adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge (Fig. 1-1). The plant is a manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that produced components for various nuclear weapons systems and provides engineering support to other Energy Systems facilities. More than 200 contaminated sites have been identified at the Y-12 Plant that resulted from past waste management practices. Many of the sites have operable units (OUs) based on priority and on investigative and remediation requirements. This Remedial Investigation RI work plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Chestnut Ridge OU 4 consists of Rogers Quarry and Lower McCoy Branch (MCB). Rogers Quarry, which is also known as Old Rogers Quarry or Bethel Valley Quarry was used for quarrying from the late 1940s or early 1950s until about 1960. Since that time, the quarry has been used for disposal of coal ash and materials from Y-12 production operations, including classified materials. Disposal of coal ash ended in July 1993. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern, support an Ecological Risk Assessment and a Human Health Risk Assessment, support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this work plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the risk posed to human health and the environment by OU 4.

  5. The Reshaping of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    the different paths Europe may follow, this study treats Soviet reform and new -vi- dinking as an independent variable that propels systemic change...Europe dating back to the Bolshevik Revolution to reinstate Russia in the European family of nations. Whether the Soviet Union chooses to behave as a

  6. Reshaping High School English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirie, Bruce

    This book takes up the question of what shape high school English studies should take in the coming years. It describes an English program that blends philosophical depth with classroom practicality. Drawing examples from commonly taught texts such as "Macbeth,""To Kill a Mockingbird," and "Lord of the Flies," the…

  7. Formation and Elimination of Transform Faults on the Reykjanes Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Fernando; Hey, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The Reykjanes Ridge is a type-setting for examining processes that form and eliminate transform faults because it has undergone these events systematically within the Iceland gradient in hot-spot influence. A Paleogene change in plate motion led to the abrupt segmentation of the originally linear axis into a stair-step ridge-transform configuration. Its subsequent evolution diachronously and systematically eliminated the just-formed offsets re-establishing the original linear geometry of the ridge over the mantle, although now spreading obliquely. During segmented stages accreted crust was thinner and during unsegmented stages southward pointing V-shaped crustal ridges formed. Although mantle plume effects have been invoked to explain the changes in segmentation and crustal features, we propose that plate boundary processes can account for these changes [Martinez & Hey, EPSL, 2017]. Fragmentation of the axis was a mechanical effect of an abrupt change in plate opening direction, as observed in other areas, and did not require mantle plume temperature changes. Reassembly of the fragmented axis to its original linear configuration was controlled by a deep damp melting regime that persisted in a linear configuration following the abrupt change in opening direction. Whereas the shallow and stronger mantle of the dry melting regime broke up into a segmented plate boundary, the persistent deep linear damp melting regime guided reassembly of the ridge axis back to its original configuration by inducing asymmetric spreading of individual ridge segments. Effects of segmentation on mantle upwelling explain crustal thickness changes between segmented and unsegmented phases of spreading without mantle temperature changes. Buoyant upwelling instabilities propagate along the long linear deep melting regime driven by regional gradients in mantle properties away from Iceland. Once segmentation is eliminated, these propagating upwelling instabilities lead to crustal thickness

  8. Enabling Integration and Synthesis through the Ridge 2000 Data Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, W. B.; Ferrini, V.; Carbotte, S. M.; O'Hara, S.; Arko, R. A.; Bonczkowski, J.; Chan, S.

    2009-12-01

    Achieving an integrated, holistic understanding of global mid-ocean ridge (MOR) processes through the Ridge 2000 Program relies heavily on the sharing of data across disciplinary boundaries. Although most Ridge 2000 research has been focused on three Integrated Study Sites (ISSs), data from throughout the global mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system will also be important in the integration and synthesis phase of the program. The Ridge 2000 Data Portal (www.marine-geo.org/portals/ridge2000) is a resource established to facilitate the sharing, discovery, and integration of Ridge 2000-relevant data by providing data documentation and access. The Data Portal includes an inventory of field programs and activities, raw and derived data files, and access to publications and remote data sets in specialized data systems (e.g. PetDB, www.petdb.org; GenBank, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; NGDC, www.ngdc.noaa.gov). Access to the R2K database is provided through several pathways, including a web-based search interface (www.marine-geo.org/tools/search) that now includes basic and advanced search functionality. New versions of our data exploration and visualization tool GeoMapApp (www.geomapapp.org) includes a newly designed menu system with cascading and tear-off menus, a new Layer Manager that lists selected layers and enables re-ordering and rendering with variable transparency, a Go To option that allows direct zooming to areas of interest, and an Add Image Overlay option for importing georeferenced images. New data sets are continually added to both GeoMapApp and Virtual Ocean (www.virtualocean.org), a 3D virtual globe with GeoMapApp functionality. Several Ridge 2000 data sets are also bundled for viewing in Google Earth (www.marine-geo.org/tools/kmls.php). This poster will highlight new functionality and data sets relevant to Ridge 2000 Integration and Synthesis, and will provide comparisons of several data sets that exist for each ISS.

  9. Survey of protected vascular plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awl, D.J.; Pounds, L.R.; Rosensteel, B.A.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1996-06-01

    Vascular plant surveys were initiated during fiscal year 1992 by the environmentally sensitive areas program to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered (T&E) vascular plant species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). T&E species receive protection under federal and state regulations. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that federally-funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. T&E plant species found on or near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Twenty-eight species identified on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these have been under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing (listed in the formerly-used C2 candidate category). Additional species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR. A range of habitats support the rare taxa on the ORR: river bluffs, sinkholes, calcareous barrens, wetlands, utility corridors, and forests. The list of T&E plant species and their locations on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated. The purpose of this document is to present information on the listed T&E plant species currently known to occur on the ORR as well as listed species potentially occurring on the ORR based on geographic range and habitat availability. For the purpose of this report, {open_quotes}T&E species{close_quotes} include all federal- and state-listed species, including candidates for listing, and species of special concern. Consideration of T&E plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival.

  10. What Is Neural Plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bernhardi, Rommy; Bernhardi, Laura Eugenín-von; Eugenín, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    "Neural plasticity" refers to the capacity of the nervous system to modify itself, functionally and structurally, in response to experience and injury. As the various chapters in this volume show, plasticity is a key component of neural development and normal functioning of the nervous system, as well as a response to the changing environment, aging, or pathological insult. This chapter discusses how plasticity is necessary not only for neural networks to acquire new functional properties, but also for them to remain robust and stable. The article also reviews the seminal proposals developed over the years that have driven experiments and strongly influenced concepts of neural plasticity.

  11. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  12. A neural flow estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur; Bruun, Erik

    1995-01-01

    is implemented using switched-current technique and is capable of estimating flow in the μl/s range. The neural estimator is built around a multiplierless neural network, containing 96 synaptic weights which are updated using the LMS1-algorithm. An experimental chip has been designed that operates at 5 V......This paper proposes a new way to estimate the flow in a micromechanical flow channel. A neural network is used to estimate the delay of random temperature fluctuations induced in a fluid. The design and implementation of a hardware efficient neural flow estimator is described. The system...

  13. Basalts dredged from the Amirante ridge, western Indian ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R.L.; Engel, C.G.; Hilde, T.W.C.

    1968-01-01

    Oceanic tholeiitic basalts were dredged from 2500 to 3000 m depth on each flank of the Amirante Ridge, 1200 km southeast of Somalia in the western Indian Ocean, by R.V. Argo in 1964. One sample, probably shed from a flow or dike in basement beneath the coralline cap, gave a wholerock KAr age of 82??16??106 years. The age is similar to those reported by others for agglomerate from Providence Reef, nearer Madagascar, and for gabbro from Chain Ridge, the southwest member of Owen Fracture Zone, nearer the Somali coast. The Amirante Cretaceous-Early Tertiary occurrence lies between the "continental" 650 ?? 106 years granites of Seychelles Archipelago and the large Precambrian "continental" block of Madagascar. Trends of major structures and distribution of the related topographic and magnetic-anomaly lineations in 7-8 ?? 106 km2of the surrounding Indian Ocean suggest that in addition to spreading of the seafloor from the seismically-active Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge-Carlsberg Ridge complex there has been, since mid-Mesozoic time, distributed left-lateral shear along 52??-54??E that has moved Madagascar at least 700 km south relative to Seychelles Bank. Measurements by other indicate the absolute movement of Madagascar has been southward as well. The emplacement of oceanic tholeiitic basalts at shallow depth, the development of volcanic topography between the sedimented Somali and Mascarene basins, and the existence of the faulted Amirante Trench and Ridge are consequences of the displacement. ?? 1968.

  14. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant groundwater protection program management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Y- 1 2 Plant (Y-12 Plant) is owned by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) under contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. The Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), which was initiated in 1975, provides for the protection of groundwater resources consistent with Federal, State, and local regulations, and in accordance with DOE orders and Energy Systems policies and procedures. The Y-12 Plant is located in Anderson County, Tennessee, and is within the corporate limits of the City of Oak Ridge. The Y-12 Plant is one of three major DOE complexes that comprise the 37,000-acre Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) located in Anderson and Roane counties. The Y-12 Plant is located in Bear Creek Valley at an elevation of about 950 feet (ft) above sea level. Bear Creek Valley is bounded on the northwest and southeast, and is isolated from populated areas of Oak Ridge, by parallel ridges that rise about 300 ft above the valley floor. The Y-12 Plant and its fenced buffer area are about 0.6 mile wide by 3.2 miles long and cover approximately 4,900 acres. The main industrialized section encompasses approximately 800 acres.

  15. Ridge systems of Caloris - Comparison with lunar basins. [evolution of surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, T. A.; Gifford, A. W.

    1980-01-01

    It has been found that the wrinkle ridge systems of the Caloris basin on Mercury display many of the traits which are characteristic of ridges in the mare-filled lunar multiring basins. The considered investigation is concerned with the ridge systems within the Caloris basin on Mercury, and implications for the origin of ridges within basins on both Mercury and the moon. The observed features are found to indicate that the early evolution of Caloris was similar to that of lunar mascon basins. The morphology of ridges within Caloris compares favorably with lunar ridges when viewed on similar resolution earth-based lunar photographs. Ridges in Caloris occur from 1000 to 1320 km diameter range, and are situated within the boundary delineated by topographic benches in the northeastern and southeastern parts of the basin. The orientation of Caloris ridges is more dominantly concentric than ridge orientations in lunar basins.

  16. Dermal digital ridge density of a penal population: Analysis of association and individualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Sharma, Krishan

    2016-11-01

    The present study is an attempt to analyze an association between dermal digital ridge density and explosive personality based on the study of 100 male prisoners and 50 controls. The control group had higher ridge density than the prisoners. Bilateral differences revealed higher ridge density on left hand than right hand in both the groups, but differences between two groups for directional asymmetry were not significant. Surface area is not correlated with ridge density in all the digits. About 50% of the variation in ridge density may be explained by a single factor which in all probability is the genetic component of variation. Ridge density cannot be used as a marker for assessing individual's height. Individuals having ridge density less than 12 ridges and higher than 15 ridges, i.e. placed on the two extremes were more likely than not to have more explosive personality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. Neural Networks: Implementations and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, E.; Veelenturf, L.P.J.; Jain, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    Artificial neural networks, also called neural networks, have been used successfully in many fields including engineering, science and business. This paper presents the implementation of several neural network simulators and their applications in character recognition and other engineering areas

  18. One Piece Orbitozygomatic Approach Based on the Sphenoid Ridge Keyhole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiriev, Toma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Fugleholm, Kåre

    2016-01-01

    ridge. It was located 22 mm (standard deviation [SD], 0.22 mm) from the superior temporal line; 10.7 mm (SD, 0.08 mm) posterior and 7.1 mm (SD, 0.22 mm) inferior to the frontozygomatic suture. The sphenoid ridge burr hole provides exposure of frontal, temporal dura as well as periorbita, which...... was examined on 20 anatomical dry skull specimens. The results were applied to one-piece OZ approaches performed on freshly frozen cadaver heads. We defined the center of the sphenoid ridge keyhole as a superficial projection on the lateral skull surface of the most anterior and thickest part of the sphenoid...... the usual placement of the McCarty keyhole, with comparative exposure....

  19. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Joan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thompson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Page, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-09-30

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of three major government-owned, contractor-operated facilities: the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park. The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation’s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved, and continue to involve, the use of radiological and hazardous materials. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and supporting data are available at Http://www.ornl.gov/sci/env_rpt or from the project director.

  20. Strong ridge episodes and precipitation deficits in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J.; Pinto, J. G.; Ulbrich, U.; Leckebusch, G. C.; Andrade, C.; Leite, S.; Corte-Real, J.

    2009-04-01

    The occurrence and persistence of strong ridge episodes over the Eastern North Atlantic close to the Iberian Peninsula is investigated in order to identify its role in winter drought episodes over Portugal. With this aim, NCEP reanalysis data is analyzed for the period 1957/58-2007/08. The core winter months (December to February) are considered. As a large part of the annual precipitation falls during these three months, occurring deficits implicate severe impacts for the rest of the hydrological year. Results show that the establishment of hydrological droughts over Western/Central Iberia is often associated with the occurrence of strong and persistent ridges (at least 10 days), which in turn correspond to 17% of all ridge episodes. During the dry (wet) winters there is a high (low) frequency of occurrence of strong ridge days that tend to last for long (short) periods of time. This duality is also evident in the composites of the number of cyclone counts and of the storm track densities: these quantities are significantly reduced (increased) close to Iberia for the dry (wet) winters. Finally, the occurrence of these ridges is classified based on two different weather typing approaches, the empirical Grosswetterlagen (GWL) weather regimes and the previously defined five automatic weather regimes for Portugal (k-mean cluster approach on 500 hPa geopotential height field). Results show that the frequencies of occurrence of dry conditions are associated with an enhanced frequency of GWLs 2 (Cyclonic Westerly), 8 (Cyclonic North-Westerly) and 10 (Zonal Ridge across Central Europe). These GWLs correspond to particular cases of the k-means regimes "NAO+" and "E" regimes, which dominate for dry periods, hence documenting the robustness of the results.

  1. Internal structure of the 85°E ridge, Bay of Bengal: Evidence for multiphase volcanism

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ismaiel, M.; Krishna, K.S.; Srinivas, K.; Mishra, J.; Saha, D.

    in detail below. 4.1 Morphology and Internal Architecture of the 85ºE Ridge In order to examine topography and internal structure of the 85°E Ridge, the seismic profiles (E1240, E1290, E1300X, E1400, E4000 and E6000) that cross the ridge at different... of the ridge is imaged. On adjacent profiles E1290 and E6000, the ridge is observed as a broad dome-like feature with internal features (Figures 2 and 3), whereas the profile E1300X shows only the eastern fringe of the ridge with a less volume of material...

  2. Critical Branching Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical…

  3. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  4. Approximation of Isomorphic Infinite Two-Person Non-Cooperative Games by Variously Sampling the Players’ Payoff Functions and Reshaping Payoff Matrices into Bimatrix Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanuke Vadim V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximation in solving the infinite two-person non-cooperative games is studied in the paper. An approximation approach with conversion of infinite game into finite one is suggested. The conversion is fulfilled in three stages. Primarily the players’ payoff functions are sampled variously according to the stated requirements to the sampling. These functions are defined on unit hypercube of the appropriate Euclidean finite-dimensional space. The sampling step along each of hypercube dimensions is constant. At the second stage, the players’ payoff multidimensional matrices are reshaped into ordinary two-dimensional matrices, using the reversible index-to-index reshaping. Thus, a bimatrix game as an initial infinite game approximation is obtained. At the third stage of the conversion, the player’s finite equilibrium strategy support is checked out for its weak consistency, defined by five types of inequalities within minimal neighbourhood of every specified sampling step. If necessary, the weakly consistent solution of the bimatrix game is checked out for its consistency, strengthened in that the cardinality of every player’s equilibrium strategy support and their densities shall be non-decreasing within minimal neighbourhood of the sampling steps. Eventually, the consistent solution certifies the game approximation acceptability, letting solve even games without any equilibrium situations, including isomorphic ones to the unit hypercube game. A case of the consistency light check is stated for the completely mixed Nash equilibrium situation.

  5. Cell structure of barb ridges in down feathers and juvenile wing feathers of the developing chick embryo: barb ridge modification in relation to feather evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2006-07-01

    The present study deals with the cell structure and three-dimensional organization of barb and barbule cells within barb ridges of down feathers and juvenile feathers in the chick embryo. Juvenile feathers represent the second generation of feathers in the wing, and replace down feathers some weeks after hatching. Within the follicle of juvenile feathers, at 16-18 days of embryonic development, barb ridges are more numerous than in down feathers. Barb ridges of juvenile feathers contain more cells in their barbule and axial plates with respect to barb ridges of down feathers. This condition determines the formation of longer barbules inserted in the rami of juvenile feathers than barbules of down feathers. Barb ridges of juvenile feathers merge with the rachidial ridge so that pennaceous feathers are formed. Barbule cells are surrounded by cytoplasmic elongation from barb vane ridge cells located in the axial plate, which constitute most of the axial plate. The degeneration of supportive cells among barbule cells branching from barbs determine the formation of spaces between barbules. The study emphasizes that, in addition to the size of the dermal papilla, it is the length of barb ridges and the infiltration of barb ridge vane cells among barbule cells that determine the size and length of feathers. The knowledge of the cell structure of barb ridges allows understanding not only of how feathers develop but also gives insights into their evolution. Based on changes of the process of barb ridge morphogenesis some hypotheses on the evolution of plumulaceous and pennaceous feathers are presented. Feathers derived from the process of carving-out supportive cells within barb ridges and from the specific pattern of fusion of barb/barbule cells. This process initially produced variably branched down feathers and later, after barb ridge fusion, a rachis. From the modulation in the pattern of barb ridge formation various pennaceous feathers later evolved.

  6. Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-03-02

    This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for

  7. Lateral ridge split and immediate implant placement in moderately resorbed alveolar ridges: How much is the added width?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Rahpeyma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lateral ridge split technique is a way to solve the problem of the width in narrow ridges with adequate height. Simultaneous insertion of dental implants will considerably reduce the edentulism time. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients who were managed with ridge splitting technique were enrolled. Thirty-eight locations in both jaws with near equal distribution in quadrants received 82 dental fixtures. Beta Tricalcium phosphate (Cerasorb® was used as biomaterial to fill the intercortical space. Submerged implants were used and 3 months later healing caps were placed. Direct bone measurements before and after split were done with a Collis. Patients were clinically re-evaluated at least 6 months after implant loading. All the data were analyzed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software version 11.5 (SPSS Inc, Chicago Illinois, USA. Frequency of edentulous spaces and pre/post operative bone width was analyzed. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Difference was considered significant if P value was less than 0.05. Results: Mean value for presplit width was 3.2 ± 0.34 mm while post-split mean width was 5.57 ± 0.49 mm. Mean gain in crest ridge after ridge splitting was 2 ± 0.3 mm. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in width before and after operation ((P < 0.05. All implants (n = 82 survived and were in full function at follow up (at least 6 months after implant loading. Conclusion: Ridge splitting technique in both jaws showed the predictable outcomes, if appropriate cases selected and special attention paid to details; then the waiting time between surgery and beginning of prosthodontic treatment can be reduced to 3 month.

  8. Remodelación de los colgajos TRAM libres y DIEP Reshaping in free TRAM and DIEP flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fidalgo Rodríguez

    2007-03-01

    surgeons, the practice of this procedure is a genuine challenge which, nowadays, should become a daily task in all Plastic Surgery Units. In our Plastic Surgery Unit, the implementation of these techniques started in 1999, having practiced 42 cases so far. At first, the development of the microsuture was the most important issue; every surgeon"s effort was directed to achieve an optimal suture. The rest was considered of lesser importance. However, our conception has changed: we consider that the most important issue now is not only the effort mentioned above but, mainly, a satisfactory reshaping of the flap in ordee to give the breast an actual appearance. In the present study, we put forward a series of technical advices that can be useful when finishing breast reconstruction through either free TRAM or DIEP, recreating a new breast as similar to the counterside healthy breast as possible. We show up, then, the importance of this fact in order to achieve a successful breast reconstruction.

  9. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Y/ER-301) was prepared (1) to safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently evaluate the environmental impact of solid material in the two debris areas in the context of industrial land uses (as defined in the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study) to support the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Assessment and (2) to evaluate, define, and implement the actions to mitigate these impacts. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.x.01.20.01.08.

  10. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subsequent discussions with regulators, a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The alternative selected to address the risks associated with WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases determine if source control measures are required, and development of technologies that could support the final remediation of WAG 6. Although active source control measures are not being implemented at WAG 6, environmental monitoring is necessary to ensure that any potential changes in contaminant release from the WAG are identified early enough to take appropriate action. Two types of environmental monitoring will be conducted: baseline monitoring and annual routine monitoring. The baseline monitoring will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the WAG, confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COCs), and gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring is expected to begin in 1994 and last for 12--18 months. The annual routine monitoring will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COCs to determine off-WAG contaminant flux and risk, identify mills in releases, and confirm the primary contributors to risk. The annual routine monitoring will continue for {approximately} 4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring.

  11. Screening of contaminants in Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; Hook, L.A.; Suter, G.W.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG 2) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located in the White Oak Creek Watershed and is composed of White Oak Creek Embayment, White Oak Lake and associated floodplain, and portions of White Oak Creek (WOC) and Melton Branch downstream of ORNL facilities. Contaminants leaving other ORNL WAGs in the WOC watershed pass through WAG 2 before entering the Clinch River. Health and ecological risk screening analyses were conducted on contaminants in WAG 2 to determine which contaminants were of concern and would require immediate consideration for remedial action and which contaminants could be assigned a low priority or further study. For screening purposes, WAG 2 was divided into four geographic reaches: Reach 1, a portion of WOC; Reach 2, Melton Branch; Reach 3, White Oak Lake and the floodplain area to the weirs on WOC and Melton Branch; and Reach 4, the White Oak Creek Embayment, for which an independent screening analysis has been completed. Screening analyses were conducted using data bases compiled from existing data on carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic contaminants, which included organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Contaminants for which at least one ample had a concentration above the level of detection were placed in a detectable contaminants data base. Those contaminants for which all samples were below the level of detection were placed in a nondetectable contaminants data base.

  12. Removal site evaluation report for the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This removal site evaluation (RmSE) report of the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Isotopes Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and if remedial site evaluations (RSEs) or removal actions are required. The scope of the project included: (1) a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; (3) a site inspection; and (4) identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. The results of RmSE indicate that no substantial risks exist from contaminants present in the Isotope Facilities because adequate controls and practices exist to protect human health and the environment. The recommended correction from the RmSE are being conducted as maintenance actions; accordingly, this RmSE is considered complete and terminated.

  13. Site characterization report for the Old Hydrofracture Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Several Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) structures (i.e., Building 7852, the bulk storage bins, the pump house, water tank T-5, and pump P-3) are surplus facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). OHF was constructed in 1963 to allow experimentation and operations with an integrated solids storage, handling, mixing, and grout injection facility. It was shut down in 1980 and transferred to ORNL`s Surveillance and Maintenance Program. The hydrofracture process was a unique disposal method that involved injecting waste materials mixed with grout and additives under pumping pressures of 2,000 psi or greater into a deep, low-permeability shale formation. The injected slurry spread along fractures and bedding planes for hundreds of feet from the injection points, forming thin grout sheets (often less than 1/8 in. thick). The grout ostensibly immobilized and solidified the liquid wastes. Site characterization activities were conducted in the winter and spring of 1994 to collect information necessary to plan the D and D of OHF structures. This site characterization report documents the results of the investigation of OHF D and D structures, presenting data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate. 25 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), X-10 site, conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ORNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for ORNL. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the ORNL Survey. 120 refs., 68 figs., 71 tabs.

  15. Underground storage tank management plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems at the facility and to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks. UST systems have been removed or upgraded in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance. With the closure of a significant portion of the USTs, the continuing mission of the UST Management Program is to manage the remaining active UST systems and continue corrective actions in a safe regulatory compliant manner. This Program outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Program provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. The plan is divided into three major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) active UST sites, and (3) out-of-service UST sites. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Program, and the procedures and guidance for compliance.

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1995--FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This report discusses the institutional plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the next five years (1995-2000). Included in this report are the: laboratory director`s statement; laboratory mission, vision, and core competencies; laboratory plan; major laboratory initiatives; scientific and technical programs; critical success factors; summaries of other plans; and resource projections.

  18. Hydrothermal plumes over the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; KameshRaju, K.A; Baker, E.T.; Rao, A; Mudholkar, A; Lupton, J.E.; SuryaPrakash, L.; Gawas, R.B.; VijayaKumar, T.

    Water column surveys and sampling in 2007 and 2009 was conducted to search for hydrothermal plumes over a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge. An evidence for two separate vent fields, one near 3 degrees 42′N, 63 degrees 40′E and another near 3 degrees...

  19. Water quality assessment of streams draining the Akwapim Ridge of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surface water samples from seven streams on the Akwapim Ridge were analysed over a period of 1 year for various water quality parameters following standard methods prescribed in APHA, AWWA, WEF and AOAC. The study was carried out in order to assess the suitability of the streams for drinking and other domestic ...

  20. Oak Ridge Reservation. Physical Characteristics and National Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parr, Patricia Dreyer [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joan, F. Hughes [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2006-10-09

    The topology, geology, hydrology, vegetation, and wildlife of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide a complex and intricate array of resources that directly impact land stewardship and use decisions. The purpose of this document is to consolidate general information regarding the natural resources and physical characteristics of the ORR.

  1. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koncinski, W.S. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics include: site and operations overview; environmental compliance strategies; environmental management program; effluent monitoring; environmental surveillance; radiation doses; chemical doses; ground water; and quality assurance.

  2. Gourds: Bitter, Bottle, Wax, Snake, Sponge and Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor cucurbits include bitter gourd, bottle gourd, wax gourd, snake gourd, and sponge and ridge gourd, which are significant dietary sources of nutrients such as vitamin A and C, iron and calcium. These cucurbits are cultivated and marketed by smallholder farmers and remain important components of ...

  3. Alveolar ridge preservation and biologic width management for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alveolar bone atrophy is a chronically progressive, irreversible process which results in bone loss in both the buccal, lingual and apico-coronal region. Without bone preservation measures, bone resorption is experienced and continues for life. Preservation of alveolar ridge is indicated when a tooth-supported fixed partial ...

  4. Equatorial segment of the mid-atlantic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Equatorial Segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is a part of this mid-oceanic ridge limited by a cluster of fracture zones - Cape Verde, Marathon, Mercury, Vema, Doldrums, Vernadsky and Sierra Leone - in the North, and a similar cluster of fracture zones - St Paul, Romanche and Chain - in the South. During recent decades, following the publication of the 5. edition of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO), there has been a great deal of geological-geophysical research and mapping of the World Ocean. The results have led to the development of a number of theories concerning the essential heterogeneity of the structure of the ocean floor and, in particular, the heterogeneity of the structure and segmentation of mid-oceanic ridges. Research on the nature of such segmentation is of great importance for an understanding of the processes of development of such ridges and oceanic basins as a whole. Chapter 20 is dedicated to the study of the atlantic ocean mantle by using (Th.U)Th, (Th/U)pb and K/Ti systematics 380 refs.

  5. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... lodging accommodations, food and beverage, retail sales, boat rentals, and other services at Crabtree... Doc No: 2011-15060] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-CONC-0511-7182; 2410-OYC] Temporary Concession Contract for Blue Ridge Parkway AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior...

  6. Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-26

    The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

  7. A comparative study of some robust ridge and liu estimators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In multiple linear regression analysis, multicollinearity and outliers are two main problems. When multicollinearity exists, biased estimation techniques such as Ridge and Liu Estimators are preferable to Ordinary Least Square. On the other hand, when outliers exist in the data, robust estimators like M, MM, LTS and S ...

  8. Hybrid plasmonic waveguides formed by metal coating of dielectric ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenin, Volodymyr; Choudhury, Sajid; Saha, Soham

    2017-01-01

    Bound hybrid plasmon-polariton modes supported by waveguides, which are formed by gold coating of ridges etched into a silica substrate, are analyzed using numerical simulations and investigated experimentally using near-field microscopy at telecom wavelengths (1425-1625 nm). Drastic modifications...

  9. Diapycnal Diffusivities over the Southwestern Indian Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.

    2016-02-01

    The southwestern Indian Ocean (SWIO) Ridge stems from the South Atlantic and extends northeastward to Rodrigues Island. The deep trenches and fracture zones between the Crozet Basin and the Madagascar Basin provide the major passages for the deep and the bottom water to enter the Indian Ocean, which is also part of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in the Indian Ocean. More than 70 CTD profiles have been conducted over the SWIO Ridge from 2010 up to now. Besides, a mooring was deployed about 2900 m below the sea surface for almost one year. Three Seaguard current meters, nine Sea-Bird Electronics Temperature-pressure sensor, and one Sea-Bird Electronics Temperature-Conductivity-Pressure Sensor were mounted on the mooring. The diapycnal diffusivity over the SWIO Ridge is estimated with two methods, i.e., the Internal Wave Spectrum Method (GHP) which relies on the energy cascade due to wave interactions, and the Thorpe scale method. Large diffusivities on the order of 10-2 m2 s-1 are found over the rough ridges. Moreover, the temporal and spatial distributions of diapycnal diffusivities are presented and their physical relations with the fine structure of the bottom topography are analyzed in this study.

  10. Oak Ridge Reservation, annual site environmental report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The US DOE currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation; Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and K-25. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its surroundings. The results summarized in this report are based on the data collected during calendar year (CY) 1993 and compiled in; Environmental Monitoring in the Oak Ridge Reservation: CY 1993 Results. Annual environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid, gaseous, or airborne effluents for the purpose of characterizing and quantifying contaminants and process stream characteristics, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards. Environmental surveillance is the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuffs, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs and the measurement of external radiation for purposes of demonstrating compliance with applicable standards, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and assessing effects, if any, on the local environment.

  11. A System with Intelligent Editing for Extracting Ridge and Ravine Terrain Features

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmidt, Greg; Swan, J. E., II; Rosenblum, Lawrence; Tomlin, Erik B; Overby, Derek

    2005-01-01

    We describe a system for extracting ridges and ravines from elevation data. The application context is a map-based military planning tool, which allows users to select ridges and ravines by simple mouse clicks...

  12. Magnetic studies over the northern extension of the Prathap ridge complex, eastern Arabian sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Murty, G.P.S.; Srinivas, K.; Rao, D.G.

    The northern parts of the Prathap and Laccadive Ridge system, eastern Arabian Sea, consist of three parallel basement ridge peaks at varied depths. The topographic highs are associated with either well developed or subdued magnetic signatures. Model...

  13. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  14. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs.

  15. Combined soft and hard tissue augmentation for a localized alveolar ridge defect

    OpenAIRE

    Ritu Rana; Srinivas Sulugodu Ramachandra; Manesh Lahori; Reetika Singhal; K D Jithendra

    2013-01-01

    Ideal alveolar ridge width and height allows placement of a natural appearing pontic, which provides maintenance of a plaque-free environment. The contour of a partially edentulous ridge should be thoroughly evaluated before a fixed partial denture is undertaken. Localized alveolar ridge defect refers to a volumetric deficit of the limited extent of bone and soft-tissue within the alveolar process. These ridge defects can be corrected by hard tissue and/or soft-tissue augmentation. A 30-year-...

  16. Subsidence and volcanism of the Haleakala Ridge, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.A.; Ludwig, K. R.; Mark, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Side-looking sonar (GLORIA) mapping has revealed a series of four arcuate bands of high sonic backscatter on the crest of the Haleakala Ridge, a major rift-zone ridge extending 135 km east of the island of Maui. Dredge recovery indicates that the shallowest of these bands is a drowned coral reef, and the deeper bands are also inferred to be coral reefs. The reefs occur above a prominent submarine bench 1500-2500 m deep on the ridge (H-terrace) that marks the shoreline at the end of vigorous shield building of Haleakala volcano when lava flows ceased crossing and reworking the shoreline. Since their growth these reefs have subsided as much as 2200 m and have tilted systematically about 20 m/km southward as a result of post-reef volcanic loading on the island of Hawaii, whose center of mass is about directly south of the Haleakala Ridge. The 234U/238U age of the dredged coral is 750 ?? 13 ka, in reasonable agreement with an age of 850 ka for the underlying H terrace previously estimated from its relationship to other dated reefs to the southwest. Basalt glass fragments dredged from the Haleakala Ridge below the H terrace are tholeiitic and contain high sulfur indicative of eruption in water deeper than 200 m. Basalt glass fragments associated with the reefs above the H terrace are dominantly tholeiitic and contain intermediate sulfur contents, indicative of subaqueous eruption in shallow, near-shore conditions. One alkalic glass fragment was recovered above the H terrace. These relations indicate that the morphologic end of shield building as recorded by construction of the H terrace was not accompanyed by a change from tholeiitic to alkalic basalt; instead tholeiite eruptions continued for some time before the erupted lava became alkalic. ?? 1990.

  17. European temperature responses to blocking and ridge regional patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Pedro M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Barriopedro, David; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Santos, João A.

    2017-03-01

    Blocking occurrence and its impacts on European temperature have been studied in the last decade. However, most previous studies on blocking impacts have focused on winter only, disregarding its fingerprint in summer and differences with other synoptic patterns that also trigger temperature extremes. In this work, we provide a clear distinction between high-latitude blocking and sub-tropical ridges occurring in three sectors of the Euro-Atlantic region, describing their climatology and consequent impacts on European temperature during both winter and summer. Winter blocks (ridges) are generally associated to colder (warmer) than average conditions over large regions of Europe, in some areas with anomalies larger than 5 °C, particularly for the patterns occurring in the Atlantic and Central European sectors. During summer, there is a more regional response characterized by above average temperature for both blocking and ridge patterns, especially those occurring in continental areas, although negative temperature anomalies persist in southernmost areas during blocking. An objective analysis of the different forcing mechanisms associated to each considered weather regime has been performed, quantifying the importance of the following processes in causing the temperature anomalies: horizontal advection, vertical advection and diabatic heating. While during winter advection processes tend to be more relevant to explain temperature responses, in summer radiative heating under enhanced insolation plays a crucial role for both blocking and ridges. Finally, the changes in the distributions of seasonal temperature and in the frequencies of extreme temperature indices were also examined for specific areas of Europe. Winter blocking and ridge patterns are key drivers in the occurrence of regional cold and warm extreme temperatures, respectively. In summer, they are associated with substantial changes in the frequency of extremely warm days, but with different signatures in

  18. Comparative effect of ridge furrow and zero tillage on cowpea at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trials were carried out to compare effect of different seedbeds on cowpea at Abeokuta and Akure in different microclimates of Nigeria. The values of selected soil physical properties, plant nutrient status and growth and yield of cowpea given by zero tillage, manual clearing, ridge top, ridge side, ridge base, and furrow were ...

  19. Modeling the response of shoreface-connected sand ridges to sand extraction on an inner shelf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nnafie, A.; de Swart, Huib; Calvete, D.; Garnier, R.

    2014-01-01

    Shoreface-connected sand ridges are rhythmic bedforms that occur on many storm-dominated inner shelves. The ridges span several kilometers, are a few meters high, and they evolve on a timescale of centuries. A processbased model is used to gain a fundamental insight into the response of these ridges

  20. Integrated geophysical studies over the 85°E ridge - Evaluation and interpretation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.; Subrahmanyam, V.

    Ship-borne magnetic, gravity, bathymetry and multichannel seismic reflection studies made so far on the linear subsurface ridge known as the 85°E Ridge in the northeastern Indian Ocean are reviewed. The extent and boundaries of the ridge are well...

  1. Beam propagation of tidal internal waves over a submarine slope of the Mascarene Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, E. G.; Nechvolodov, L. V.; Sabinin, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The generation of internal tides over the Mascarene Ridge is studied on the basis of moored measurements and numerical modeling. The beam structure of the internal wave propagation over a submarine ridge is analyzed. The dependence of the beam propagation of the perturbations on the steepness of the slope, the depth of the ridge crest, and the stratification is studied.

  2. Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.R.; Curtis, A.H.; Houlberg, L.M.; Purucker, S.T.; Singer, M.L.; Tardiff, M.F.; Wolf, D.A.

    1994-07-01

    The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to WAG 1 groundwater and presents the rationale, justification, and objectives for conducting this continuing site characterization. This report summarizes the operations that have taken place at each of the areas of concern in WAG 1, summarizes previous characterization studies that have been performed, presents interpretations of previously collected data and information, identifies contaminants of concern, and presents an action plan for further site investigations and early actions that will lead to identification of contaminant sources, their major groundwater pathways, and reduced off-site migration of contaminated groundwater to surface water. Site characterization Activities performed to date at WAG I have indicated that groundwater contamination, principally radiological contamination, is widespread. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to an unknown extent. The general absence of radiological contamination in surface water at the perimeter of WAG 1 is attributed to the presence of pipelines and underground waste storage tank sumps and dry wells distributed throughout WAG 1 which remove more than about 40 million gal of contaminated groundwater per year.

  3. Paleotsunami Inundation of a Beach Ridge Plain: Cobble Ridge Overtopping and Interridge Valley Flooding in Seaside, Oregon, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt D. Peterson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Seaside beach ridge plain was inundated by six paleotsunamis during the last ~2500 years. Large runups (adjusted >10 m in height overtopped seawardmost cobble beach ridges (7 m elevation at ~1.3 and ~2.6 ka before present. Smaller paleotsunami (6–8 m in height likely entered the beach plain interior (4-5 m elevation through the paleo-Necanicum bay mouth. The AD 1700 Cascadia paleotsunami had a modest runup (6-7 m height, yet it locally inundated to 1.5 km landward distance. Bed shear stresses (100–3,300 dyne cm−2 are estimated for paleotsunami surges (0.5–2 m depths that flowed down slopes (0.002–0.017 gradient on the landward side of the cobble beach ridges. Critical entrainment shear stresses of 1,130–1,260 dyne cm−2 were needed to dislodge the largest clasts (26–32 cm diameter in paleotsunami coulees that were cut (100–200 m width into the landward side of the cobble ridges.

  4. The epigenetic switches for neural development and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jingwen; Xin, Yongjuan; Zhou, Wenhao; Qiu, Zilong

    2013-07-20

    The most remarkable feature of the nervous system is that the development and functions of the brain are largely reshaped by postnatal experiences, in joint with genetic landscapes. The nature vs. nurture argument reminds us that both genetic and epigenetic information is indispensable for the normal function of the brain. The epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the central nervous system have been revealed over last a decade. Moreover, the mutations of epigenetic modulator genes have been shown to be implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. The epigenetic study has initiated in the neuroscience field for a relative short period of time. In this review, we will summarize recent discoveries about epigenetic regulation on neural development, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, as well as neuropsychiatric disorders. Although the comprehensive view of how epigenetic regulation contributes to the function of the brain is still not completed, the notion that brain, the most complicated organ of organisms, is profoundly shaped by epigenetic switches is widely accepted. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Hidden neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1999-01-01

    A general framework for hybrids of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and neural networks (NNs) called hidden neural networks (HNNs) is described. The article begins by reviewing standard HMMs and estimation by conditional maximum likelihood, which is used by the HNN. In the HNN, the usual HMM probability...... parameters are replaced by the outputs of state-specific neural networks. As opposed to many other hybrids, the HNN is normalized globally and therefore has a valid probabilistic interpretation. All parameters in the HNN are estimated simultaneously according to the discriminative conditional maximum...... likelihood criterion. The HNN can be viewed as an undirected probabilistic independence network (a graphical model), where the neural networks provide a compact representation of the clique functions. An evaluation of the HNN on the task of recognizing broad phoneme classes in the TIMIT database shows clear...

  6. [Neural codes for perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, R; Salinas, E; Hernández, A; Zainos, A; Lemus, L; de Lafuente, V; Luna, R

    This article describes experiments designed to show the neural codes associated with the perception and processing of tactile information. The results of these experiments have shown the neural activity correlated with tactile perception. The neurones of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) represent the physical attributes of tactile perception. We found that these representations correlated with tactile perception. By means of intracortical microstimulation we demonstrated the causal relationship between S1 activity and tactile perception. In the motor areas of the frontal lobe is to be found the connection between sensorial and motor representation whilst decisions are being taken. S1 generates neural representations of the somatosensory stimuli which seen to be sufficient for tactile perception. These neural representations are subsequently processed by central areas to S1 and seem useful in perception, memory and decision making.

  7. Neural Oscillators Programming Simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McDowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological mechanism used for generating rhythmic patterns for functions such as swallowing, walking, and chewing has been modeled computationally by the neural oscillator. It has been widely studied by biologists to model various aspects of organisms and by computer scientists and robotics engineers as a method for controlling and coordinating the gaits of walking robots. Although there has been significant study in this area, it is difficult to find basic guidelines for programming neural oscillators. In this paper, the authors approach neural oscillators from a programmer’s point of view, providing background and examples for developing neural oscillators to generate rhythmic patterns that can be used in biological modeling and robotics applications.

  8. Level 3 baseline risk evaluation for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, K.M.; Robers, S.K.; Cretella, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Level 3 Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) performed on Building 3506 located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This BRE is intended to provide an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects (current or future) posed by contaminants at the facility. The decision was made to conduct a Level 3 (least rigorous) BRE because only residual contamination exists in the building. Future plans for the facility (demolition) also preclude a rigorous analysis. Site characterization activities for Building 3506 were conducted in fall of 1993. Concrete core samples were taken from the floors and walls of both the cell and the east gallery. These cores were analyzed for radionuclides and organic and inorganic chemicals. Smear samples and direct radiation measurements were also collected. Sediment exists on the floor of the cell and was also analyzed. To adequately characterize the risks posed by the facility, receptors for both current and potential future land uses were evaluated. For the current land use conditions, two receptors were evaluated. The first receptor is a hypothetical maintenance worker who spends 250 days (8 hours/day) for 25 years working in the facility. The remaining receptor evaluated is a hypothetical S and M worker who spends 2 days (8 hours/day) per year for 25 years working within the facility. This particular receptor best exemplifies the current worker scenario for the facility. The two current exposure scenarios and parameters of exposure (e.g., inhalation and ingestion rates) have been developed to provide a conservative (i.e. health protective) estimate of potential exposure.

  9. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S and M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S and M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the EFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of EFDP Facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 2000. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $51M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S and M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

  10. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ``past practice`` technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable.

  11. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  12. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  13. Neural network applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Mary L.; Desai, Utpal; Roppel, T.A.; White, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    A design procedure is suggested for neural networks which accommodates the inclusion of such knowledge-based systems techniques as fuzzy logic and pairwise comparisons. The use of these procedures in the design of applications combines qualitative and quantitative factors with empirical data to yield a model with justifiable design and parameter selection procedures. The procedure is especially relevant to areas of back-propagation neural network design which are highly responsive to the use of precisely recorded expert knowledge.

  14. Building Neural Net Software

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Costa, José Félix

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper [Neto et al. 97] we showed that programming languages can be translated on recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. The goal was not efficiency but simplicity. Indeed we used a number-theoretic approach to machine programming, where (integer) numbers were coded in a unary fashion, introducing a exponential slow down in the computations, with respect to a two-symbol tape Turing machine. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theo...

  15. NEMEFO: NEural MEteorological FOrecast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasero, E.; Moniaci, W.; Meindl, T.; Montuori, A. [Polytechnic of Turin (Italy). Dept. of Electronics

    2004-07-01

    Artificial Neural Systems are a well-known technique used to classify and recognize objects. Introducing the time dimension they can be used to forecast numerical series. NEMEFO is a ''nowcasting'' tool, which uses both statistical and neural systems to forecast meteorological data in a restricted area close to a meteorological weather station in a short time range (3 hours). Ice, fog, rain are typical events which can be anticipated by NEMEFO. (orig.)

  16. Multiple expressions of plume-ridge interaction in the Galápagos: Volcanic lineaments and ridge jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, E.; Soule, S.; Harpp, K.; Fornari, D.; McKee, C.; Tivey, M.; Geist, D.; Kurz, M. D.; Sinton, C.; Mello, C.

    2012-05-01

    Anomalous volcanism and tectonics between near-ridge mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges provide important insights into the mechanics of plume-lithosphere interaction. We present new observations and analysis of multibeam, side scan sonar, sub-bottom chirp, and total magnetic field data collected during the R/V Melville FLAMINGO cruise (MV1007; May-June, 2010) to the Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province (NGVP), the region between the Galápagos Archipelago and the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) on the Nazca Plate, and to the region east of the Galápagos Transform Fault (GTF) on the Cocos Plate. The NGVP exhibits pervasive off-axis volcanism related to the nearby Galápagos hot spot, which has dominated the tectonic evolution of the region. Observations indicate that ˜94% of the excess volcanism in our survey area occurs on the Nazca Plate in three volcanic lineaments. Identified faults in the NGVP are consistent with normal ridge spreading except for those within a ˜60 km wide swath of transform-oblique faults centered on the GTF. These transform-oblique faults are sub-parallel to the elongation direction of larger lineament volcanoes, suggesting that lineament formation is influenced by the lithospheric stress field. We evaluate current models for lineament formation using existing and new observations as well as numerical models of mantle upwelling and melting. The data support a model where the lithospheric stress field controls the location of volcanism along the lineaments while several processes likely supply melt to these eruptions. Synthetic magnetic models and an inversion for crustal magnetization are used to determine the tectonic history of the study area. Results are consistent with creation of the GTF by two southward ridge jumps, part of a series of jumps that have maintained a plume-ridge separation distance of 145 km to 215 km since ˜5 Ma.

  17. Oak Ridge Reservation Physical Characteristics and Natural Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parr, P.D.; Hughes, J.F.

    2006-09-19

    The topography, geology, hydrology, vegetation, and wildlife of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide a complex and intricate array of resources that directly impact land stewardship and use decisions (Fig. 1). The purpose of this document is to consolidate general information regarding the natural resources and physical characteristics of the ORR. The ORR, encompassing 33,114 acres (13,401 ha) of federally owned land and three Department of Energy (DOE) installations, is located in Roane and Anderson Counties in east Tennessee, mostly within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge and southwest of the population center of Oak Ridge. The ORR is bordered on the north and east by the population center of the city of Oak Ridge and on the south and west by the Clinch River/Melton Hill Lake impoundment. All areas of the ORR are relatively pristine when compared with the surrounding region, especially in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province (Fig. 2). From the air, the ORR is clearly a large and nearly continuous island of forest within a landscape that is fragmented by urban development and agriculture. Satellite imagery from 2006 was used to develop a land-use/land-cover cover map of the ORR and surrounding lands (Fig. 3). Following the acquisition of the land comprising the ORR in the early 1940s, much of the Reservation served as a buffer for the three primary facilities: the X-10 nuclear research facility (now known as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL]), the first uranium enrichment facility or Y-12 (now known as the Y-12 National Security Complex [Y-12 Complex]), and a gaseous diffusion enrichment facility (now known as the East Tennessee Technology Park [ETTP]). Over the past 60 years, this relatively undisturbed area has evolved into a rich and diverse eastern deciduous forest ecosystem of streams and reservoirs, hardwood forests, and extensive upland mixed forests. The combination of a large land area with complex physical characteristics

  18. Do ridge-ridge-fault triple junctions exist on Earth? Evidence from the Aden-Owen-Carlsberg junction in the NW Indian Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Fournier, Marc; Petit, Carole; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Fabbri, Olivier; Huchon, Philippe; Maillot, Bertrand; Lepvrier, Claude

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The triple junctions predicted to be ridge^ridge^fault (RRF) types on the basis of large- scale plate motions are theAzores triple junction between theGloria Fault and theMid-AtlanticRidge, the Juan Fernandez triple junction between the ChileTransform and the East Paci¢c Rise and the Aden^ Owen^Carlsberg (AOC) triple junction between theOwen fracture zone (OFZ) and theCarlsberg and Sheba ridges. In the ¢rst two cases, the expected RRF triple junction does not exist bec...

  19. Lenalidomide in combination with R-ESHAP in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a phase 1b study from GELTAMO group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Alejandro; Redondo, Alba M; Dlouhy, Iván; Salar, Antonio; González-Barca, Eva; Canales, Miguel; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Ocio, Enrique M; López-Guillermo, Armando; Caballero, Dolores

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients failing rituximab-containing therapy have a poor outcome with the current salvage regimens. We conducted a phase 1b trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of lenalidomide in combination with R-ESHAP (rituximab, etoposide, cisplatin, cytarabine, methylprednisolone) (LR-ESHAP) in patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL. Efficacy data were collected as a secondary objective. Subjects received 3 cycles of lenalidomide at escalating doses (5, 10 or 15 mg) given on days 1-14 of every 21-day cycle, in combination with R-ESHAP. Responding patients received BEAM (carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation. Lenalidomide 10 mg/d was identified as the MTD because, in the 15 mg cohort, one patient experienced dose-limiting toxicity (grade 3 angioedema) and two patients had mobilization failure. A total of 19 patients (3, 12 and 4 in the 5, 10 and 15 mg cohorts, respectively) were evaluable. All toxicities occurring during LR-ESHAP cycles resolved appropriately and no grade 4-5 non-haematological toxicities were observed. The complete remission and overall response rates were 47·4% and 78·9%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 24·6 (17·4-38·2) months, the 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 44% and 63%, respectively. In conclusion, the LR-ESHAP regimen is feasible and yields encouraging outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Comparative study of three kinds of fibula cutting guides in reshaping fibula for the reconstruction of mandible: An accuracy simulation study in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhiwei; Li, Bei; Xie, Rui; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Li; Bai, Shizhu

    2017-08-01

    In order to get predictable reassembling and higher accuracy in the reconstruction of the mandible, we designed three kinds of fibula cutting guides: (1) Two-edge wide groove guide (WGG); (2) Two-edge narrow groove guide (NGG); and (3) One-edge guide (OEG). The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of fibula remodelling using the three kinds of fibula cutting guides above in a simulation procedure in vitro. Cutting and reshaping of fibula analogs were guided by the three kinds of guides mentioned above. Then the fibula segments were glued together and scanned with CT, and finally the 3D accuracy of fibula reshaping was compared to the virtual plan. Comparisons were made with regard to planned versus actual fibula segment length and angle projections in 3 planes. There were no significant differences in length change among the WGG group, NGG group and OEG group. There were very significant differences in angle projections in 3 planes between every 2 of the 3 groups. 3 kinds of guides do not affect the length of fibula segments. Two-edge narrow groove guides (NGG) caused the smallest error among the 3 kinds of guides. The error caused by two-edge wide groove guide (WGG) was similar to that caused by one-edge guide (OEG). The conclusion was in consistent with the referred groove-restriction-effect in the section of discussion. We suggest that the two-edge narrow groove guide (NGG) is the superior choice for fibula cutting in reconstruction of the mandible. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Data base dictionary for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, B.K.

    1993-04-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base dictionary describes the data contained in the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base structure, conventions, contents, and use.

  2. Comparison of different ridge formation models of Arctic sea ice with observations from laser profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Torge

    Sea ice deforms under convergent and shear motion, causing rafting and ridging. This results in thicker ice than could be formed by thermodynamic growth only. Three different approaches to simulating the formation of pressure ridges in a dynamic-thermodynamic continuum model are considered. They are compared with and evaluated by airborne laser profiles of the sea-ice surface roughness. The respective characteristic of each of the three ridging schemes is (1) a prognostic equation for deformation energy from which ridge parameters are derived; (2) a redistribution function, shifting ice between two categories, level and ridged, combined with a Monte Carlo simulation for ridge parameters; and (3) prognostic equations for ridge density and height, resulting in the formation of ridged-ice volume. The model results show that the ridge density is typically related to the state of ice motion, whereas the mean sail height is related to the parent ice thickness. In general, all of the three models produce realistic distributions of ridges. Finally, the second ridging scheme is regarded as the most appropriate for climate modelling, while the third scheme has advantages in short-term sea-ice forecasting.

  3. Edge wrinkling of a soft ridge with gradient thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Shao, Zhi-Chun; Li, Guo-Yang; Zheng, Yang; Zhang, Wan-Yu; Li, Bo; Cao, Yanping; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the edge wrinkling of a soft ridge with gradient thickness under axial compression. Our experiments show that the wrinkling wavelength undergoes a considerable increase with increasing load. Simple scaling laws are derived based on an upper-bound analysis to predict the critical buckling conditions and the evolution of wrinkling wavelength during the post-buckling stage, and the results show good accordance with our finite element simulations and experiments. We also report a pattern transformation triggered by the edge wrinkling of soft ridge arrays. The results and method not only help understand the correlation between the growth and form observed in some natural systems but also inspire a strategy to fabricate advanced functional surfaces.

  4. Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sharon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) environmental surveillance is to characterize radiological and nonradiological conditions of the off-site environs and estimate public doses related to these conditions, confirm estimations of public dose based on effluent monitoring data, and, where appropriate, provide supplemental data to support compliance monitoring for applicable environmental regulations. This environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is intended to document the rationale, frequency, parameters, and analytical methods for the ORR environmental surveillance program and provides information on ORR site characteristics, environmental pathways, dose assessment methods, and quality management. ORR-wide environmental monitoring activities include a variety of media including air, surface water, vegetation, biota, and wildlife. In addition to these activities, site-specific effluent, groundwater, and best management monitoring programs are conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). This is revision 5.

  5. Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction annual report for calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Calendar year 1997 was the third full year of work on the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction. Activities are summarized on the following individual project tasks: Task 1 -- Investigation of radioiodine releases from X-10 radioactive lanthanum processing; Task 2 -- Investigation of mercury releases from Y-12 lithium enrichment; Task 3 -- Investigation of PCBs in the environment near Oak Ridge; Task 4 -- Investigation of radionuclides released from White Oak Creek to the Clinch River; Task 5 -- Systematic searching of records repositories; Task 6 -- Evaluation of the quality of uranium monitoring data and a screening evaluation of potential off-site health risks; and Task 7 -- Performance of screening for additional materials not evaluated in the feasibility study.

  6. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. (ed.)

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates envirorunental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. This volume, Volume 2, contains logic diagrams with an index. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use.

  7. Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL; Cohen, Kari [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

  8. Eskers in Ireland, analogs for sinuous ridges on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, Xavier; Bourke, Mary

    2014-05-01

    Sinuous ridges on the surface of Mars are often inferred as putative esker ridges. Eskers cover several hundred kilometers of the Irish landscape and are one of the dominant landforms in the Irish Midlands. Well exposed stratigraphic sections and the body of existing knowledge due to extensive research carried out on these landforms make the Irish eskers an excellent analog for sinuous ridges on Mars. The Irish Eskers are sinuous ridges 0.1 - 80 km long, 20 - 500 m wide and 4 - 50 m high laid down by glacial meltwater in tunnels and crevasses in stationary or retreating ice sheets. They are commonly composed of sands and gravels with rounded boulders and cobbles. The gravels are usually bedded and the beds often slump towards the flank of the esker, indicating collapse as the confining ice walls melt. Four types of eskers have been identified in Ireland: (i) Continuous subglacial tunnel fill represents deposition within tunnels underneath or within an ice body originally used as water escape conduits; (ii) Continuous fluvial ice-channel fill deposit in channels cut into the ice on top of the glacier or down to the substrate subsequently infilled by sediments; (iii) Long beads - subglacial tunnel fill are segmented ridges, with a length-width ratio of 5:1 to 10:1, representing sequential deposition near or at the ice margin as the ice sheet retreats; (iv) Short beads are glaciolacustrine deposits interpreted as sequential deposition of ice-contact subaqueous outwash fans. Irish eskers have significant morphological similarities with those identified on Mars providing an opportunity for an insightful morphological and morphometric analysis to determine potential formative environments on Mars. Putative Martian eskers are 2-300 km long, 50-3000 m wide and 10-150 m high. The Irish eskers are similar in scale and present dimensions within these ranges. Eskers in Ireland are composed of sand and gravel with cobbles and boulders. Mars esker-like ridges observed in high

  9. Status report: A hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, D.K.; Toran, L.E.; Dreier, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moore, G.K.; McMaster, W.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1992-05-01

    This first status report on the Hydrologic Studies Task of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) revises earlier concepts of subsurface hydrology and hydrogeochemistry of the ORR. A new classification of hydrogeologic units is given, as well as new interpretations of the gydrogeologic properties and processes that influence contaminant migration. The conceptual hydrologic framework introduced in this report is based primarily on reinterpretations of data acquired during earlier hydrologic investigations of waste areas at and near the three US Department of Energy Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) plant facilities. In addition to describing and interpreting the properties and processes of the groundwater systems as they are presently understood, this report describes surface water-subsurface water relations, influences on contaminant migration,and implications to environmental restoration, environmental monitoring, and waste management.

  10. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. (ed.)

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This report is part A of Volume 3 concerning characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement.

  11. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report summary for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires an annual site environmental report from each of the sites operating under its authority. The reports present the results from the various environmental monitoring and surveillance programs carried out during the year. In addition to meeting the DOE requirement, the reports also document compliance with various state and federal laws and regulations. This report was published to fulfill those requirements for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for calendar year 1995. The report is based on thousands of environmental samples collected on and around the ORR and analyzed during the year. The data on which the report is based are published in Environmental Monitoring and Surveillance on the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1995 Data (ES/ESH-71). Both documents are highly detailed. This summary report is meant for readers who are interested in the monitoring results but who do not need to review the details.

  12. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  13. Efficiency of local surface plasmon polariton excitation on ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, I.P.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Brucoli, G.

    2008-01-01

    The issue of efficient local coupling of light into surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes is an important concern in miniaturization of plasmonic components. Here we present experimental and numerical investigations of efficiency of local SPP excitation on gold ridges of rectangular profile...... experimentally. Numerical simulations based on Green’s tensor approach are in good agreement with the experiment and allow suggesting an optimization of parameters for improving the efficiency of SPP excitation....

  14. Monolithic circuit development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alley, G.T.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Newport, D.F.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The work performed for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 91 is presented in this paper. The work includes preamplifier, analog memory, and analog-digital converter development for Dimuon Pad Readout, and evaluation and development of preamplifier-shapers for silicon strip readout. The approaches for implementation are considered as well as measured data for the various circuits that have been developed.

  15. Defining the nature and geometry of the Porcupine Median Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watremez, Louise; Chen, Chen; Prada, Manel; Minshull, Tim; O'Reilly, Brian; Reston, Tim; Wagner, Gerlind; Gaw, Viola; Klaeschen, Dirk; Shannon, Pat; Lebedev, Sergei

    2017-04-01

    The Porcupine Basin is an elongate failed rift basin of Late Paleozoic to Cenozoic age, with the main rifting phase in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. It is located offshore SW Ireland. The Porcupine Median Ridge (PMR) is a ridge feature in the middle of the southernmost part of the basin. During the last three decades, this ridge has been successively interpreted as a volcanic structure, a diapir of partially serpentinised mantle, or a block of continental crust. Its nature still remains debated today. The interpretation of the nature of the PMR is important for both (1) academic research: to understand the final stages of the rifting of the basin; and (2) oil and gas industry: to improve the understanding of the thermal evolution of the basin for potential resources. We use seismic refraction profiles acquired across the southern Porcupine Basin to derive P-wave velocity models using tomography modelling, following a layer-stripping strategy. Coincident seismic reflection profiles help interpret the seismic velocities. We show seismic velocities up to 5.7 km/s in the PMR, with an average of 4.2 km/s in the PMR picked on the seismic reflection data. These are typical for igneous rocks. A series of seismic reflection profiles imaging the PMR is used to determine its location and geometry along the basin. The location of the PMR coincides with a local magnetic high, implying a magnetised feature. A high velocity zone (velocities up to 5.4 km/s) is observed in the sedimentary sequence, west of the PMR, which can be due to the presence of some magmatism intruded in the sediments but might not be directly related to the emplacement of the PMR. These observations argue in favour of an igneous nature of this ridge and the nearby high velocity layer. The project was funded by the Irish Petroleum Infrastructure Programme (PIP).

  16. Alveolar ridge augmentation by osteoinductive materials in goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Haanaes, H R; Roervik, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alveolar ridge augmentation could be induced in goats. In 12 male goats allogenic, demineralized, and lyophilized dentin or bone was implanted subperiosteally on the buccal sides of the natural edentulous regions of the alveolar process of...... of the mandible. Light microscopic evaluation revealed fibrous encapsulation, a few multinuclear giant cells, little inflammatory reaction, and no osteoinduction. It was concluded that no osteoinduction took place in goats....

  17. Alveolar ridge augmentation in rats by Bio-Oss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Bang, G; Haanaes, H R

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine if Bio-Oss initiated osteoinduction or osteoconduction when implanted into rats. Sintered and unsintered granules of the anorganic bovine bone Bio-Oss was implanted subperiosteally for alveolar ridge augmentation purposes and heterotopically in the abdominal...... muscles of rats. Light microscopic evaluation revealed no osteoinduction or osteoconduction in connection with sintered or unsintered Bio-Oss. A foreign body reaction was observed around both forms....

  18. Localized ridge augmentation/preservation. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorellini, Joseph P; Nevins, Marc L

    2003-12-01

    Osseointegrated implants have been documented as efficacious, however, their placement may be contraindicated in some patients due to insufficient bone volume. Techniques such as guided bone regeneration (GBR), immediate implantation, and distraction osteogenesis (DO) have been utilized as ridge enhancement therapies. This systematic review evaluates dental implant survival rates in patients treated with ridge augmentation or preservation techniques. In patients requiring dental implant placement, what is the effect of localized ridge preservation versus implant placement without augmentation on implant survival and adverse effects? MEDLINE and Cochrane Oral Health Group Specialized Trial Register were searched. Hand searches were performed on Clinical Oral Implants Research, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontology, and Journal of Periodontal Research. All searches were performed for articles published through April 2002. Publications reporting survival rate of dental implants following ridge therapy were included in the analysis. Reports describing techniques were excluded. Due to the absence of controlled studies, a meta-analysis was not performed. Descriptive statistics are used to report the data. 1. A total of 18 studies were included: 13 reporting on guided bone regeneration (GBR, 1,741 patients) and 5 on distraction osteogenesis (DO, 92 patients). 2. There is a high level of predictable implant survival in sites treated by GBR or DO. 3. These survival rates are similar to those of implants placed in native bone. REVIEWERS' INTERPRETATIONS: Survival rates were similar for both GBR and DO implants. These survival rates were similar to implants placed in native bone.

  19. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--FY 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses the institutional plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the next five years. Included in the report are: laboratory director`s statement; laboratory mission, vision, and core competencies; laboratory strategic plan; major laboratory initiatives; scientific and technical programs; critical success factors; summaries of other plans; resource projections; appendix which contains data for site and facilities, user facility, science and mathematic education and human resources; and laboratory organization chart.

  20. Making the diagnosis: metopic ridge versus metopic craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgfeld, Craig B; Saltzman, Babette S; Hing, Anne V; Heike, Carrie L; Khanna, Paritosh C; Gruss, Joseph S; Hopper, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    The metopic suture is the only calvarial suture which normally closes during infancy. Upon closure, a palpable and visible ridge often forms which can be confused with metopic craniosynostosis. Metopic ridging (MR) is treated nonsurgically while metopic craniosynostosis (MCS) is treated surgically. Differentiating between the two is paramount; however, consensus is lacking about where a clear diagnostic threshold lies. The goal of this study is to describe the physical examination and CT scan characteristics which may help to differentiate between physiological closure of the metopic suture with ridging (MR) and MCS. A retrospective chart review of all patients seen at Seattle Children's Hospital between 2004 and 2009 with the diagnosis of either MCS or MR (n = 282) was performed. Physical examination characteristics described by diagnosing practitioners were analyzed. Clinical photos were assessed by 3 expert raters to determine the importance of these characteristics. CT scan findings were abstracted and compared between the two diagnoses. The "classic" triad of narrow forehead, biparietal widening, and hypotelorism was present in only 14% of patients with MCS. Ninety-eight percent of patients in both groups had a palpable metopic ridge. The photographic finding of narrow forehead and pterional constriction was present in all patients with MCS, but only in 11.2% and 2.8% of patients with MR. On CT scan, the presence of 3 or more MCS findings was diagnostic of MCS in 96% of patients. Patients with MCS were more likely to present before 6 months of age (66% vs. 32%). Patients with MCS tend to present earlier than those with MR. Upon physical examination, the relationship between the lateral frontal bone and the lateral orbit is important in distinguishing between the two diagnoses. A CT scan can be helpful in making the diagnosis not to confirm a closed suture but to identify 3 or more MCS characteristics.

  1. Public involvement plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This Public Information Plan is a user`s guide for getting involved in US Department of Energy environmental decisions in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It outlines the many ways the public can help DOE find solutions to its environmental challenges. The plan focuses on DOE`s Environmental Management public involvement activities. Environmental Management is composed of the following programs: environmental restoration, technology development and waste management.

  2. Executive Order 12941 Implementation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, R.J.; Kroon, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E.

    1998-08-01

    Congress enacted the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-124, as amended) to reduce risks to life and property from future earthquakes in the US. To implement the provisions of the Act, the Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in Construction (ICSSC) was chartered. Approximately thirty Federal agencies, including the Department of Energy (DOE), participate in the ICSSC. The ICSSC is chaired by the National Institute of Standards (NIST) which also provides the technical secretariat. EO 12941, Seismic Safety of Existing Federally Owned or Leased Buildings, were prepared and issued by the ICSSC to reduce the vulnerability to buildings owned or leased by agencies or departments for Federal use. This report documents the implementation of EO 12941 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORNL is managed and operated by Lockheed Martin Energy Research, Inc. (LMER) for the DOE-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO). The ORNL building inventory includes buildings that are physically located at ORNL, East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This report addresses buildings physically located at the ORNL plant site. ORNL buildings located at ETTP and Y-12 plant sites will be included in the EO 12941 implementation reports for those sites. The scope of this effort included revising the building inventory for ORNL that was prepared prior to the development of the DOE management plan, evaluating owned buildings not exempt from the requirements of EO 12941, estimating the costs associated with the rehabilitation of vulnerable non-exempt buildings, and preparing this report in the TR-17 prescribed format (CNPE 1996). These activities were performed in accordance with the DOE management plan and as applicable, Phase I - Screening Guidelines To Determine The Structures Exempt From Executive Order 12941 (CNPE 1995).

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review. Volume 25, No. 1, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A. [eds.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  4. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of three major government-owned, contractor-operated facilities: the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park. The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation’s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved, and continue to involve, the use of radiological and hazardous materials. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and supporting data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/env_rpt or from the project director. This document is prepared annually to summarize environmental activities, primarily environmental monitoring activities, on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and within the ORR surroundings. The document fulfills the requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, for an annual summary of environmental data to characterize environmental performance. The environmental monitoring criteria are described in DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2008. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling on the ORR. Additional data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Corrections to the report for the previous year are found in Appendix

  5. Strongly coupled interaction between a ridge of fluid and an inviscid airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, C.

    2015-07-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. The behaviour of a steady thin sessile or pendent ridge of fluid on an inclined planar substrate which is strongly coupled to the external pressure gradient arising from an inviscid airflow parallel to the substrate far from the ridge is described. When the substrate is nearly horizontal, a very wide ridge can be supported against gravity by capillary and/or external pressure forces; otherwise, only a narrower (but still wide) ridge can be supported. Classical thin-aerofoil theory is adapted to obtain the governing singular integro-differential equation for the profile of the ridge in each case. Attention is focused mainly on the case of a very wide sessile ridge. The effect of strengthening the airflow is to push a pinned ridge down near to its edges and to pull it up near to its middle. At a critical airflow strength, the upslope contact angle reaches the receding contact angle at which the upslope contact line de-pins, and continuing to increase the airflow strength beyond this critical value results in the de-pinned ridge becoming narrower, thicker, and closer to being symmetric in the limit of a strong airflow. The effect of tilting the substrate is to skew a pinned ridge in the downslope direction. Depending on the values of the advancing and receding contact angles, the ridge may first de-pin at either the upslope or the downslope contact line but, in general, eventually both contact lines de-pin. The special cases in which only one of the contact lines de-pins are also considered. It is also shown that the behaviour of a very wide pendent ridge is qualitatively similar to that of a very wide sessile ridge, while the important qualitative difference between the behaviour of a very wide ridge and a narrower ridge is that, in general, for the latter one or both of the contact lines may never de-pin.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Index provides a comprehensive list of site problems, problem area/constituents, remedial technologies, and regulatory terms discussed in the D&D sections of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. All entries provide specific page numbers, or cross-reference entries that provide specific page numbers, in the D&D volumes (Vol. 1, Pt. A; Vol. 2, Pt. A; and appropriate parts of Vol. 3). The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA) and WM activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk.

  7. INVENTORY nival-glacial FORMATIONS of the Kodar RIDGE (DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the continuing research of the authors on mapping the nival-glacial formations of Southern Siberia and the establishment of relevant databases. We consider the state of glaciation from the middle of the last century up to the present time in various stages. Different glaciation states of Kodar Ridge were determined: (1 according to the first topographic maps at the beginning of 1960s years, (2 according to the Glacier Catalog of the USSR (in the early 1970s, (3 according to the Map of the glaciers of Kodar Ridge of the 1976 (research of the IGSFE Academy of Sciences of the USSR, and (4 the current state according to remote sensing of the Earth (space images of the 2007-2015 EROS, Quick Bird, Aster, Landsat. Attribute tables are presented in WEBGEO type format. Analysis of the data of different time state shows the dynamics of Kodar Ridge glaciation with the trend of glacier reduction by more than two times. We refined coordinates, area, shape, length, orientation and high-rise location of the preserved and degraded nival-glacial formations. The data and cartographic images of glacial objects specify and complete the international data base of glaciers.

  8. Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

  9. Ridge-like lava tube systems in southeast Tharsis, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiannan; Huang, Jun; Kraft, Michael D.; Xiao, Long; Jiang, Yun

    2017-10-01

    Lava tubes are widely distributed in volcanic fields on a planetary surface and they are important means of lava transportation. We have identified 38 sinuous ridges with a lava-tube origin in southeast Tharsis. The lengths vary between 14 and 740 km, and most of them occur in areas with slopes tubes, including branches, axial cracks, collapsed pits, breakout lobes, and tube-fed lava deltas. Age determination results showed that most of the lava tubes formed in Late Hesperian and were active until the Hesperian-Amazonian boundary. We proposed that these lava tubes formed at relatively low local flow rate, low lava viscosity, and sustained magma supply during a long period. Besides, lava flow inflation is also important in the formation of the ridge-like lava tubes and some associated features. These lava tubes provide efficient lateral pathways for magma transportation over the relatively low topographic slopes in southeast Tharsis, and they are important for the formation of long lava flows in this region. The findings of this study provide an alternative formation mechanism for sinuous ridges on the martian surface.

  10. Upper mantle structure at Walvis Ridge from Pn tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Trond; Braeuer, Benjamin; Weber, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Passive continental margins offer the unique opportunity to study the processes involved in continental extension and break-up. Within the LISPWAL (LIthospheric Structure of the Namibian continental Passive margin at the intersection with the Walvis Ridge from amphibious seismic investigations) project, combined on- and offshore seismic experiments were designed to characterize the Southern African passive margin at the Walvis Ridge in northern Namibia. In addition to extensive analysis of the crustal structures, we carried out seismic investigations targeting the velocity structure of the upper mantle in the landfall region of the Walvis Ridge with the Namibian coast. Upper mantle Pn travel time tomography from controlled source, amphibious seismic data was used to investigate the sub-Moho upper mantle seismic velocity. We succeeded in imaging upper mantle structures potentially associated with continental break-up and/or the Tristan da Cunha hotspot track. We found mostly coast-parallel sub-Moho velocity anomalies, interpreted as structures which were created during Gondwana break-up.

  11. Annual report of 1995 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) and the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) are inactive waste management sites located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The KHQ and CRSDB are regulated as treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The facilities were granted interim status in calendar year (CY) 1986 under Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Hazardous Waste Management Rule 1200-1-11-.05. Historical environmental monitoring data and baseline characterization under interim status indicated that releases of contaminants to groundwater had not occurred; thus, the detection monitoring was implemented at the sites until either clean closure was completed or post-closure permits were issued. The CRSDB was closed in Cy 1989 under a TDEC-approved RCRA closure plan. A revised RCRA PCPA for the CRSDB was submitted by DOE personnel to TDEC staff in September 1994. A final post-closure permit was issued by the TDEC on September 18, 1995. Closure activities at KHQ under RCRA were completed in October 1993. The Record of Decision will also incorporate requirements of the RCRA post-closure permit once it is issued by the TDEC.

  12. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices are discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:26414302

  13. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  14. Groundwater quality in the Valley and Ridge and Piedmont and Blue Ridge carbonate-rock aquifers, eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Bruce; Belitz, Kenneth

    2017-01-19

    Groundwater provides nearly 50 percent of the Nation’s drinking water. To help protect this vital resource, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Project assesses groundwater quality in aquifers that are important sources of drinking water. The Valley and Ridge and Piedmont and Blue Ridge carbonate-rock aquifers constitute two of the important areas being evaluated. One or more inorganic constituents with human-health benchmarks were detected at high concentrations in about 15 percent of the study area and at moderate concentrations in about 17 percent. Organic constituents were not detected at high concentrations in the study area. One or more organic constituents with human-health benchmarks were detected at moderate concentrations in about 2 percent of the study area.

  15. Architectural/historical assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Reservation, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, M.; Slater, M.

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1966, as amended, to identify any properties under its jurisdiction that are included in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places (National Register). In March 1993 Duvall & Associates, Inc., was engaged to survey the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a DOE facility located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee, and to prepare a determination of National Register eligibility for all ORNL properties. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of research into the historical context of ORNL and at to identify historic properties at ORNL that are included in present or eligible for inclusion in the National Register. The identification of archaeological properties at ORNL that are included and eligible for inclusion in the National Register Clinton is addressed in a separate report.

  16. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  17. Results of 1995 characterization of Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This technical memorandum (TM) documents the 1995 characterization of eight underground radioactive waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These tanks belong to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) operable unit, and the characterization is part of the ongoing GAAT remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. This TM reports both field observations and analytical results; analytical results are also available from the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) data base under the project name GAAT (PROJ-NAME = GAAT). This characterization effort (Phase II) was a follow-up to the {open_quotes}Phase I{close_quotes} sampling campaign reported in Results of Fall 1994 Sampling of Gunite and Associated Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ORNL/ER/Sub/87-99053/74, June 1995. The information contained here should be used in conjunction with that in the previous TM. The sampling plan is documented in ORNL Inactive Waste Tanks Sampling and Analysis Plan, ORNL/RAP/LTR-88/24, dated April 1988, as amended by Addendum 1, Revision 2: ORNL Inactive Tanks Sampling and Analysis Plan, DOE/OR/02-1354&D2, dated February 1995. Field team instructions are found in ORNL RI/FS Project Field Work Guides 01-WG-20, Field Work Guide for Sampling of Gunite and Associated Tanks, and 01-WG-21, Field Work Guide for Tank Characterization System Operations at ORNL. The field effort was conducted under the programmatic and procedural umbrella of the ORNL RI/FS Program, and the analysis was in accordance with ORNL Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) procedures. The characterization campaign is intended to provide data for criticality safety, engineering design, and waste management as they apply to the GAAT treatability study and remediation. The Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad office was interested in results of this sampling campaign and provided funding for certain additional sample collection and analysis.

  18. Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

  19. Hyperbolic Hopfield neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, several neural networks using Clifford algebra have been studied. Clifford algebra is also called geometric algebra. Complex-valued Hopfield neural networks (CHNNs) are the most popular neural networks using Clifford algebra. The aim of this brief is to construct hyperbolic HNNs (HHNNs) as an analog of CHNNs. Hyperbolic algebra is a Clifford algebra based on Lorentzian geometry. In this brief, a hyperbolic neuron is defined in a manner analogous to a phasor neuron, which is a typical complex-valued neuron model. HHNNs share common concepts with CHNNs, such as the angle and energy. However, HHNNs and CHNNs are different in several aspects. The states of hyperbolic neurons do not form a circle, and, therefore, the start and end states are not identical. In the quantized version, unlike complex-valued neurons, hyperbolic neurons have an infinite number of states.

  20. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read, compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  1. Stratigraphic framework and distribution of lignite on Crowleys Ridge, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Charles R.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to establish a stratigraphic framework of lignite beds and associated strata of Crowleys Ridge, Arkansas. Drill hole data provided by the Arkansas Geological Commission is used in the synthesis and interpretation. Areas containing lignite of potential resource value are also delineated. To illustrate the regional stratigraphic framework of Crowleys Ridge, a cross section was constructed from logs of selected oil and gas test wells, along or adjacent to the north-south trending ridge over a distance of about 115 miles. This section reveals that lignite-bearing Tertiary formations dip gently southward along the ridge. The Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group forms the bedrock in the northern part of the ridge and successively younger bedrock of the Eocene Claiborne and Jackson Groups is identified in the central and southern part of the ridge. Crowleys Ridge is mantled with alluvium and loess of Quaternary age, and sand and gravel beds of the Lafayette Formation of Pliocene (?) age that unconformably overlie the Paleocene and Eocene rocks. The thickness of lignite-bearing sedimentary deposits ranges from 830 feet in the north to 2,480 feet in the south. The Wilcox, Claiborne, and Jackson Groups of Paleocene and Eocene age are believed to be fluvial-deltaic in origin. The detailed vertical and horizontal stratigraphic characteristics and distribution of lignite beds in the sediments were determined by constructing seven cross sections from lithologic and geophysical logs of the lignite investigations on Crowleys Ridge by the Arkansas Geological Commission and private companies. Correlation and interpretation of the lignite-bearing strata reveal ten lignite beds of resource potential. These lignite beds range from a few inches to 9.5 ft in thickness and are assigned to stratigraphic intervals that are designated as zone 1 through 7. Zone 1 is near the middle of the Wilcox Group and zone 7 is near the middle of the overlying Claiborne Group. Some

  2. Porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone, Bear Creek Valley and Chestnut Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstrand, P.M. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Geology Dept.; Menefee, L.S. [Appalachian State Univ., Boone, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology; Dreier, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1995-12-01

    Matrix porosity data from deep core obtained in Bear Creek Valley indicate that porosities in the Maynardville Limestone are lithology and depth dependent. Matrix porosities are greater in the Cooper Ridge Dolomite than in the Maynardville Limestone, yet there is no apparent correlation with depth. Two interrelated diagenetic processes are the major controlling factors on porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone; dissolution of evaporate minerals and dedolomitization. Both of these diagenetic processes produce matrix porosities between 2.1 and 1.3% in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and upper part of the Maynardville Limestone (Zone 6) to depths of approximately 600 ft bgs. Mean matrix porosities in Zones 5 through 2 of the Maynardville Limestone range from 0.8 to 0.5%. A large number of cavities have been intersected during drilling activities in nearly all zones of the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley. Therefore, any maynardville Limestone zone within approximately 200 ft of the ground surface is likely to contain cavities that allow significant and rapid flow of groundwater. Zone 6 could be an important stratigraphic unit in the Maynardville Limestone for groundwater flow and contaminant transport because of the abundance of vuggy and moldic porosities. There are large variations in the thickness and lithology in the lower part of the Maynardville (Zones 2, 3, and 4 in the Burial Grounds region). The direction and velocity of strike-parallel groundwater flow may be altered in this area within the lower Maynardville Limestone.

  3. Statistical Description of Liquid Low-Level Waste System Transssuranic Wastes at Oak Ridge Nation Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The US DOE has presented plans for processing liquid low-level wastes (LLLW) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the LLLW tank system. These wastes are among the most hazardous on the Oak Ridge reservation and exhibit both RCRA toxic and radiological hazards. The Tennessee Department of Health and Environment has mandated that the processing of these wastes must begin by the year 2002 and the the goal should be permanent disposal at a site off the Oak Ridge Reservation. To meet this schedule, DOE will solicit bids from various private sector companies for the construction of a processing facility on land located near the ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tanks to be operated by the private sector on a contract basis. This report will support the Request for Proposal process and will give potential vendors information about the wastes contained in the ORNL tank farm system. The report consolidates current data about the properties and composition of these wastes and presents methods to calculate the error bounds of the data in the best technically defensible manner possible. The report includes information for only the tank waste that is to be included in the request for proposal.

  4. Wetland Survey of Selected Areas in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Area of Responsibilty, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosensteel

    1997-01-01

    This document was prepared to summarize wetland surveys performed in the Y- 1 2 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994. Wetland surveys were conducted in three areas within the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994: the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Operable Unit (OU), part of the Bear Creek Valley OU (the upper watershed of Bear Creek from the culvert under Bear Creek Road upstream through the Y-12 West End Environmental Management Area, and the catchment of Bear Creek North Tributary 1), and part of Chestnut Ridge OU 2 (the McCoy Branch area south of Bethel Valley Road). Using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual, 18 wetland areas were identified in the 3 areas surveyed; these areas were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin. Fourteen wetlands and one wetland/pond area that are associated with disturbed or remnant stream channels and seeps were identified in the UEFPC OU. Three wetlands were identified in the Bear Creek Valley OU portion of the survey area. One wetland was identified in the riparian zone of McCoy Branch in the southern portion of Chestnut Ridge OU 2.

  5. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  6. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  7. Deconvolution using a neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S.K.

    1990-11-15

    Viewing one dimensional deconvolution as a matrix inversion problem, we compare a neural network backpropagation matrix inverse with LMS, and pseudo-inverse. This is a largely an exercise in understanding how our neural network code works. 1 ref.

  8. The comparison between several robust ridge regression estimators in the presence of multicollinearity and multiple outliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahari, Siti Meriam; Ramli, Norazan Mohamed; Moktar, Balkiah; Zainol, Mohammad Said

    2014-09-01

    In the presence of multicollinearity and multiple outliers, statistical inference of linear regression model using ordinary least squares (OLS) estimators would be severely affected and produces misleading results. To overcome this, many approaches have been investigated. These include robust methods which were reported to be less sensitive to the presence of outliers. In addition, ridge regression technique was employed to tackle multicollinearity problem. In order to mitigate both problems, a combination of ridge regression and robust methods was discussed in this study. The superiority of this approach was examined when simultaneous presence of multicollinearity and multiple outliers occurred in multiple linear regression. This study aimed to look at the performance of several well-known robust estimators; M, MM, RIDGE and robust ridge regression estimators, namely Weighted Ridge M-estimator (WRM), Weighted Ridge MM (WRMM), Ridge MM (RMM), in such a situation. Results of the study showed that in the presence of simultaneous multicollinearity and multiple outliers (in both x and y-direction), the RMM and RIDGE are more or less similar in terms of superiority over the other estimators, regardless of the number of observation, level of collinearity and percentage of outliers used. However, when outliers occurred in only single direction (y-direction), the WRMM estimator is the most superior among the robust ridge regression estimators, by producing the least variance. In conclusion, the robust ridge regression is the best alternative as compared to robust and conventional least squares estimators when dealing with simultaneous presence of multicollinearity and outliers.

  9. The effects of ridging, row-spacing and seeding rate on carrot yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. TAIVALMAA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cool, wet spring weather often delays the early growth of carrots (Daucus carota L. in northern Europe. This effect may be partly obviated by sowing in ridges. Many types of ridges are used, but the most suitable for carrot cultivation under the conditions prevailing in northern Europe has yet to be determined. The effects of ridging, seeding rate and sowing system on the yield and visible quality of carrots were therefore studied in the field during three years. The highest yields were recorded for carrots sown in double rows on a narrow ridge. The effect of sowing system on mean root weight differed depending on the ridging regime. The mean weight of roots was higher for carrots cultivated on broad ridges than in other systems. Seeding rate had the most significant effect on mean root weight. For industrial purposes it is recommended that carrots be cultivated on broad ridges in double rows at low seeding rates with irrigation. The optimal cultivation technique for carrots destined for the fresh vegetable market would be narrow ridges sown in double rows at high seeding rates. The ridging system, seeding rate and row spacing did not appear to affect the external quality of roots. More detailed studies should be carried out to establish the effects of abiotic growth factors under different ridging regimes.;

  10. Summary of the hydrogeology of the Valley and Ridge, Blue Ridge, and Piedmont Physiographic Provinces in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Lindsay A.; Mesko, Thomas O.; Hollyday, Este F.

    2004-01-01

    The Appalachian Valley and Piedmont Regional Aquifer-System Analysis study (1988-1993) analyzed rock types in the 142,000-square-mile study area, identified hydrogeologic terranes, determined transmissivity distributions, determined the contribution of ground water to streamflow, modeled ground-water flow, described water quality, and identified areas suitable for the potential development of municipal and industrial ground-water supplies. Ground-water use in the Valley and Ridge, the Blue Ridge, and the Piedmont Physiographic Provinces exceeds 1.7 billion gallons per day.Thirty-three rock types in the study area were analyzed, and the rock types with similar water-yielding characteristics were combined and mapped as 10 hydrogeologic terranes. Based on well records, the interquartile ranges of estimated transmissivities are between 180 to 17,000 feet squared per day (ft2/d) for five hydrologic terranes in the Valley and Ridge; between 9 to 350 ft2/d for two terranes in the Blue Ridge; and between 9 to 1,400 ft2/d for three terranes in the Piedmont Physiographic Province. Based on streamflow records, the interquartile ranges of estimated transmissivities for all three physiographic provinces are between 290 and 2,900 ft2/d. The mean ground-water contribution to streams from 157 drainage basins ranges from 32 to 94 percent of mean streamflow with a median of 67 percent. In three small areas in two of the physiographic provinces, more than 54 percent of ground-water flow was modeled as shallow and local. Although ground-water chemical composition in the three physiographic provinces is distinctly different, the water generally is not highly mineralized, with a median dissolved-solids concentration of 164 milligrams per liter, and is mostly calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate. Based on aquifer properties and current pumpage, areas favorable for the development of municipal and industrial ground-water supplies are underlain by alluvium of glacial origin near the

  11. Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

  12. Neural Network Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Salamon, Peter

    1990-01-01

    We propose several means for improving the performance an training of neural networks for classification. We use crossvalidation as a tool for optimizing network parameters and architecture. We show further that the remaining generalization error can be reduced by invoking ensembles of similar...... networks....

  13. Neural systems for control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omidvar, Omid; Elliott, David L

    1997-01-01

    ... is reprinted with permission from A. Barto, "Reinforcement Learning," Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks, M.A. Arbib, ed.. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 804-809, 1995. Chapter 4, Figures 4-5 and 7-9 and Tables 2-5, are reprinted with permission, from S. Cho, "Map Formation in Proprioceptive Cortex," International Jour...

  14. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancies each year in the United States. A baby’s neural tube normally develops into the brain and spinal cord. ... fluid in the brain. This is called hydrocephalus. Babies with this condition are treated with surgery to insert a tube (called a shunt) into the brain. The shunt ...

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site). The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation`s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the US. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have produced (and continue to produce) radiological and hazardous wastes. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the ORR and its surroundings. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents prior to release into the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminants, assessment of radiation exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of the collection and analysis of environmental samples from the site and its environs; this provides direct measurement of contaminants in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media subsequent to effluent release into the environment. Environmental surveillance data verify ORR`s compliance status and, combined with data from effluent monitoring, allow the determination of chemical and radiation dose/exposure assessment of ORR operations and effects, if any, on the local environment.

  16. Status Report on the Geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatcher, R.D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. A detailed reported on hydrogeology is being produced in parallel to this one. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR containing subdivisions of all mappable rock units and displaying mesoscopic structural data. Understanding the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. This interim report is the result of cooperation between geologists in two Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) divisions, Environmental Sciences and Energy, and is a major part of one doctoral dissertation in the Department of Geological Sciences at The University of Tennessee--Knoxville. Major long-term goals of geologic investigations in the ORR are to determine what interrelationships exist between fractures systems in individual rock or tectonic units and the fluid flow regimes, to understand how regional and local geology can be used to help predict groundwater movement, and to formulate a structural-hydrologic model that for the first time would enable prediction of the movement of groundwater and other subsurface fluids in the ORR. Understanding the stratigraphic and structural framework and how it controls fluid flow at depth should be the first step in developing a model for groundwater movement. Development of a state-of-the-art geologic and geophysical framework for the ORR is therefore essential for formulating an integrated structural-hydrologic model. This report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the data that establish the need for additional geologic mapping and geohydrologic studies. An additional intended

  17. Critical pressure and multiphase flow in Blake Ridge gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P.B.; Liu, Xiuying; Winters, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    We use core porosity, consolidation experiments, pressure core sampler data, and capillary pressure measurements to predict water pressures that are 70% of the lithostatic stress, and gas pressures that equal the lithostatic stress beneath the methane hydrate layer at Ocean Drilling Program Site 997, Blake Ridge, offshore North Carolina. A 29-m-thick interconnected free-gas column is trapped beneath the low-permeability hydrate layer. We propose that lithostatic gas pressure is dilating fractures and gas is migrating through the methane hydrate layer. Overpressured gas and water within methane hydrate reservoirs limit the amount of free gas trapped and may rapidly export methane to the seafloor.

  18. Ridge augmentation with titanium mesh: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegham, H; Masmoudi, R; Ouertani, H; Blouza, I; Turki, S; Khattech, M B

    2017-06-01

    Insufficient bone volume for dental implant placement in the maxillary anterior segment is a constant challenge in oral surgery. Several techniques have been suggested to reconstruct deficient alveolar ridges and to facilitate dental implant placement. These techniques include bone splitting osteotomy, distraction osteogenesis, inlay and onlay bone grafting. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) is also a promising alternative that increases the bone volume by the use of a subperiosteal barrier. The aim of this case was to demonstrate that the use of rigid titanium occlusive barrier is a reliable alternative to perform a lateral alveolar bone augmentation and treat localized ridge deformities before reaching an ideal implant placement. A 25-year-old healthy male was referred for implant placement in the maxillary central incisor. The alveolar bone width at the implant site 21 was less than 5mm. Hard tissue augmentation was accomplished using guided bone regeneration. A rigid titanium occlusive barrier was customized to desired shape of future alveolar ridge then secured with tent and fixing screws. Autogenous bone graft harvested with an auto-chip-maker adjacent to the surgical site were mixed with a xenograft and putted under the barrier. The wound was closed using a vestibular mucoperiosteal flap. At 4 months, the rigid barrier was removed, and a 7mm crestal width transversal bone was observed. At the same time, a fixture (4×10mm) was placed. A definitive ceramometal crown was completed after full osseointegration with periodical clinical maintenance. The exposure of the titanium mesh occurred in this case and was visible with a circular flap dehiscence at 1-month follow-up visit. This exposure did not affect the successful regenerative outcomes. After removal of the titanium mesh from the grafted defects, the space beneath the membrane enclosure was seen to be almost completely filled with new hard tissue covered by a thin layer of soft tissue. The postoperative

  19. East Greenland Ridge in the North Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Arne Døssing; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Thybo, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The combined Greenland-Senja Fracture Zones (GSFZ) represent a first-order plate tectonic feature in the North Atlantic Ocean. The GSFZ defines an abrupt change in the character of magnetic anomalies with well-defined seafloor spreading anomalies in the Greenland and Norwegian basins to the south...... but ambiguous and weak magnetic anomalies in the Boreas Basin to the north. Substantial uncertainty exists concerning the plate tectonic evolution of the latter area, including the role of the East Greenland Ridge, which is situated along the Greenland Fracture Zone. In 2002, a combined ocean-bottom seismometer...

  20. Airborne geophysical survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, W.E.; Nyquist, J.E.; Beard, L.P.

    1994-07-01

    High-resolution and reconnaissance data, acquired using sensors mounted on a helicopter, were used to characterize waste sites and detect geologic properties that influence contaminant transport on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Tennessee, between December 1992 and April 1994. To date, these data have been used to support several ORR Environmental Restoration (ER) programs. This report summarizes the techniques used, the ways in which the data have been applied to date, and current plans for enhancing the data and making them more useful to the ER programs.

  1. Plume capture by a migrating ridge: Analog geodynamic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, J. S.; Hall, P.

    2010-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from the Hawaii-Emperor Seamount Chain (HESC) suggests that the Hawaiian hotspot moved rapidly (~40 mm/yr) between 81 - 47 Ma but has remained relatively stationary since that time. This implies that the iconic bend in the HESC may in fact reflect the transition from a period of rapid hotspot motion to a stationary state, rather than a change in motion of the Pacific plate. Tarduno et al. (2009) have suggested that this period of rapid hotspot motion might be the surface expression of a plume conduit returning to a largely vertical orientation after having been “captured” and tilted by a migrating mid-ocean ridge. We report on a series of analog fluid dynamic experiments designed to characterize the interaction between a migrating spreading center and a thermally buoyant mantle plume. Experiments were conducted in a clear acrylic tank (100 cm x 70 cm x 50 cm) filled with commercial grade high-fructose corn syrup. Plate-driven flow is modeled by dragging two sheets of Mylar film (driven by independent DC motors) in opposite directions over the surface of the fluid. Ridge migration is achieved by moving the point at which the mylar sheets diverge using a separate motor drive. Buoyant plume flow is modeled using corn syrup introduced into the bottom of the tank from an external, heated, pressurized reservoir. Small (~2 mm diameter), neutrally buoyant Delrin spheres are mixed into reservoir of plume material to aid in visualization. Plate velocities and ridge migration rate are controlled and plume temperature monitored using LabView software. Experiments are recorded using digital video which is then analyzed using digital image analysis software to track the position and shape of the plume conduit throughout the course of the experiment. The intersection of the plume conduit with the surface of the fluid is taken as an analog for the locus of hotspot volcanism and tracked as a function of time to obtain a hotspot migration rate. Experiments are

  2. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koncinski, W.S. [ed.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management program for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics discussed include: site background, climate, and operations; environmental compliance strategies; effluent monitoring; environmental management program including environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, technology development, and public involvement; effluent monitoring of airborne discharges, liquid discharges, toxicity control and monitoring, biological monitoring and abatement; environmental surveillance which encompasses meteorological monitoring, ambient air monitoring, surface water monitoring, soils monitoring, sediment monitoring, and contamination of food stuffs monitoring; radiation doses; chemical exposures; ground water monitoring; and quality assurance.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1987-FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's planned research, development, and demonstration activities associated with energy production and conservation, as well as basic research in the physical and life sciences are described through 1992. The views of the Laboratory's senior management about the future and about the role of ORNL are given. ORNL initiatives are briefly summarized. The range of ORNL's scientific and technical programs is described, including work for DOE and work for other sponsors. The site and facilities of the laboratory are described, and external interactions are discussed. Projected funding is tabulated. (LEW)

  4. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1992. Volume 1: Narrative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koncinski, W.S. [ed.

    1993-09-01

    The two volumes of this report present data and supporting narratives regarding the impact of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on its environs and the public during 1992. This Volume (Volume 1) includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a ``stand-alone`` report for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1992 data for the ORR. Volume 2 includes the detailed data in formats that ensure all the environmental data are represented. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2.

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review: Volume 24, No. 2, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C. [ed.

    1991-12-31

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multiprogram, multipurpose laboratory that conducts research in the physical, chemical, and life sciences; in fusion, fission, and fossil energy; and in energy conservation and other energy-related technologies. This review outlines some current endeavors of the lab. A state of the laboratory presentation is given by director, Alvin Trivelpiece. Research of single crystals for welding is described. The Science Alliance, a partnership between ORNL and the University of Tennessee, is chronicled. And several incites into distinguished personnel at the laboratory are given. (GHH)

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review: Volume 24, No. 2, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multiprogram, multipurpose laboratory that conducts research in the physical, chemical, and life sciences; in fusion, fission, and fossil energy; and in energy conservation and other energy-related technologies. This review outlines some current endeavors of the lab. A state of the laboratory presentation is given by director, Alvin Trivelpiece. Research of single crystals for welding is described. The Science Alliance, a partnership between ORNL and the University of Tennessee, is chronicled. And several incites into distinguished personnel at the laboratory are given. (GHH)

  7. Morphotectonic and petrological variations along the southern Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Ray, Dwijesh; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Drolia, R.K.

    of the segment I, about 160 m above the floor bottom. Interestingly, vesicles on rocks are found filled with zeolites, the largest vesicle was measuring 2 x 20mm. The valley floor is about 6 km wide, and the mound type NVZ shows an elevation between 140... and 160 m. About 10 mm thick glassy veneer with few vesicles was encrusted at times by Fe-Mn oxides and clay. Tectonic Domains: As many as nine well-developed ridge segments, separated by ten discontinuities, were encountered along the stretch...

  8. Postextraction Alveolar Ridge Preservation: Biological Basis and Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following tooth extraction, the alveolar ridge undergoes an inevitable remodeling process that influences implant therapy of the edentulous area. Socket grafting is a commonly adopted therapy for the preservation of alveolar bone structures in combination or not with immediate implant placement although the biological bases lying behind this treatment modality are not fully understood and often misinterpreted. This review is intended to clarify the literature support to socket grafting in order to provide practitioners with valid tools to make a conscious decision of when and why to recommend this therapy.

  9. Testing models for the formation of the equatorial ridge on Iapetus via crater counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damptz, Amanda L.; Dombard, Andrew J.; Kirchoff, Michelle R.

    2018-03-01

    Iapetus's equatorial ridge, visible in global views of the moon, is unique in the Solar System. The formation of this feature is likely attributed to a key event in the evolution of Iapetus, and various models have been proposed as the source of the ridge. By surveying imagery from the Cassini and Voyager missions, this study aims to compile a database of the impact crater population on and around Iapetus's equatorial ridge, assess the relative age of the ridge from differences in cratering between on ridge and off ridge, and test the various models of ridge formation. This work presents a database that contains 7748 craters ranging from 0.83 km to 591 km in diameter. The database includes the study area in which the crater is located, the latitude and longitude of the crater, the major and minor axis lengths, and the azimuthal angle of orientation of the major axis. Analysis of crater orientation over the entire study area reveals that there is no preference for long-axis orientation, particularly in the area with the highest resolution. Comparison of the crater size-frequency distributions show that the crater distribution on the ridge appears to be depleted in craters larger than 16 km with an abruptly enhanced crater population less than 16 km in diameter up to saturation. One possible interpretation is that the ridge is a relatively younger surface with an enhanced small impactor population. Finally, the compiled results are used to examine each ridge formation hypothesis. Based on these results, a model of ridge formation via a tidally disrupted sub-satellite appears most consistent with our interpretation of a younger ridge with an enhanced small impactor population.

  10. Ultra-slow spreading ridges: a response to the interplay between mantle convection and plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bezos, Antoine

    2014-05-01

    Ultra-slow spreading ridges such as the South West Indian ridge or the Arctic ridge system are oddities amongst oceanic ridges. Conversely to faster oceanic ridges, petrographic and seafloor studies have shown that they are characterized by low melt supply and present low crustal thicknesses and heat flow; these features are interpreted as an evidence for a cooler sublithospheric mantle. In cartoonish sketches of plate tectonics, ridges open above upwellings, subduction zones occur over downwellings, and plates are riding over the mantle convection cells. In this study, we designed a simple yet dynamically consistent thermal convection model to test the impact of far-field forces on spreading ridges and show that this pattern is disrupted by plate tectonics. In particular, continental collisions modulate the spreading rates because resisting forces build up at plate boundaries. As a consequence, this modifies the surface boundary conditions and therefore the underlying mantle flow. We show that the ideal convection cell pattern quickly breaks down when plate motion is impeded by continental collisions in the far field. Not only the decreasing spreading rates are diagnostic, but in the same time, (i) the heat flow is decreasing at the ridge, (ii) the thermal structure of the cooling lithosphere no longer matches the cooling half-space model, and (iii) the mantle temperature beneath the ridge drops by more than 100 degrees. We compare our model predictions to available observables and show that this simple mechanism explains the atypical thermo-mechanical evolution of the South West Indian ridge and Arctic ridge system. Last, the recent S wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012) reveals that only away from those two ridges does lithospheric thickening departs from the half-space cooling model, in accord with our model predictions.

  11. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Centerline Longitudinal Shunt Slot Excitation by Elliptic shaped single Ridge Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Moradian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Application of elliptic shaped ridge waveguide is presented for excitation of a centreline longitudinal shunt slot antenna. The proposed method is realized by adding elliptic shaped to the ridge of the single ridge waveguide. The elliptic shaped ridge is placed exactly under the longitudinal slot and the slot placed along centreline of the waveguide. It is shown that for a typical slot, the slot normalized conductance can be increased by increasing the elliptic shaped depth. The simulation results show that the proposed structure can be considered as a proper candidate for replacing the conventional longitudinal shunt slot.

  13. Three-dimensional passive mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges: an analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligi, Marco; Cuffaro, Marco; Chierici, Francesco; Calafato, Antonino

    2008-11-01

    We discuss theoretical and computational method on plate-driven mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges. We consider a steady-state flow induced by motion of overlying rigid plates in an incompressible viscous mantle beneath a generic ridge-transform-ridge plate boundary. No assumption of orthogonal and symmetric spreading at ridge axis is made. Analytical solutions for viscosity flow in a half-space and in a layered viscosity mantle beneath an infinitesimal thickness lithosphere and beneath plates that thicken with increasing age, are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out using a standard fast Fourier transform algorithm. The difficulty of using standard Fourier methods to predict accurately the mantle flow field in the proximity of the plate boundaries is overcome by applying the Gegenbauer reconstruction post-processing technique to the Fourier pseudo-spectral solutions. Finally, we present some examples of flow computations. We consider, for both models, two different ridge-transform-ridge geometries consisting of 100 and 1000 km offsets of two ridge segments spreading at 15 mm/yr half rate. We found a significant difference in the flow structure between the two flow models close to ridge axis and ridge-transform intersections. The proposed model and methods are useful for fast mantle flow calculations to investigate melting processes beneath spreading centres, and to predict the relationship between mantle temperature, crustal thickness and geochemistry of the oceanic crust.

  14. Orientationally ordered ridge structures of aluminum films on hydrogen terminated silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Ulrich; Pantleon, Karen

    2006-01-01

    > directions on the silicon substrate. The ridge structure appears when the film thickness is above 500 nm, and increasing the film thickness makes the structure more distinct. Anodic oxidation enhances the structure even further. X-ray diffraction indicates that grains in the film have mostly (110) facets......Films of aluminum deposited onto Si(100) substrates show a surface structure of parallel ridges. On films deposited on oxidized silicon substrates the direction of the ridges is arbitrary, but on films deposited on hydrogen-terminated Si(100) the ridges are oriented parallel to the

  15. Geochemical variability of MORBs along slow to intermediate spreading Carlsberg-Central Indian Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, D.; Misra, S.; Banerjee, R.

    2013-07-01

    We present new major and ICP-MS trace element data from the Carlsberg Ridge MORBs from two different locations (i.e., 3°35'N/64°05'E and 3°41'N/64°09'E). Using this data we reassess the intra-ridge geochemical variations of the Carlsberg Ridge- Central Indian Ridge MORBs. Trace element contents of the Carlsberg Ridge MORBs are similar to the Rodriguez Triple Junction MORBs [e.g., LIL and REE spidergrams and (La/Sm)N ratio etc.]; both closely resemble the average N-MORB. However, the MORBs from the northern- and southern Central Indian Ridge, significantly vary in composition from the average N- and E-MORBs. Most Carlsberg Ridge- Central Indian Ridge MORBs show significantly less fractionation in FeOt, in the MgO-CaO-FeOt diagram, compared to those of the Mid Atlantic- and East Pacific Rise MORBs. Furthermore, the depleted LREE and nearly flat HREE patterns of the Carlsberg Ridge-Central Indian Ridge MORBs (along with their low compatible trace element (Ni, Cr, Sr) variability compared with the increasing incompatible trace element (Y, Zr) contents in the log-log plots, as well as their increasing incompatible trace element ratios) favor partial melting dominated processes for their petrogenetic evolution. Our (Sr, Nd, Pb) isotope data review shows that the Carlsberg Ridge-Central Indian Ridge MORBs are derived from a depleted mantle source that was variously contaminated by continental crust, perhaps during the third stage of Gondwana break up between 155 and 135 Ma. Such contamination could also have occurred later during the strike slip movement along a mega fracture (a member of the Davie Transform Faults in the Somali Basin that broke Gondwanaland into the East and West Gondwanas). The 208Pb/204Pb versus 206Pb/204Pb plot of above mentioned MORBs suggests that the depleted mantle source of the Rodriguez Triple Junction MORBs was contaminated by ˜21% lower continental crust, whereas the mantle source of the Central Indian Ridge MORBs was contaminated by

  16. Bioinspired design of a ridging shovel with anti-adhesive and drag reducing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Learning from the microstructure of the convex (concave and ridging (triangle and arc-shaped shapes of fresh lotus leaves and shark skin, bionic ridging shovels was designed with the characteristics of adhesion and resistance reduction. Ten ridging shovel models were established, and the interaction process with the soil by ANSYS is discussed. Stress analysis results showed that the bionic ridging shovel was more obvious in visbreaking and in the resistance reduction effect. An indoor soil bin experiment with the bionic ridging shovel and the prototype ridging shovel was operated as follows: the ridging resistance of the three types of ridging shovel was tested under the condition of two soil moistures (18.61% and 20.9% and three different ridging speeds (0.68, 0.87, and 1.11 m/s. In this article, the structure, the mechanism, and their relationship to the functions are discussed. The results of this study will be useful in practical application in the field of agricultural machinery toward practical use and industrialization.

  17. Seismic imaging of the Formosa Ridge cold seep site offshore of southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ho-Han; Liu, Char-Shine; Morita, Sumito; Tu, Shu-Lin; Lin, Saulwood; Machiyama, Hideaki; Azuma, Wataru; Ku, Chia-Yen; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2017-12-01

    Multi-scale reflection seismic data, from deep-penetration to high-resolution, have been analyzed and integrated with near-surface geophysical and geochemical data to investigate the structures and gas hydrate system of the Formosa Ridge offshore of southwestern Taiwan. In 2007, dense and large chemosynthetic communities were discovered on top of the Formosa Ridge at water depth of 1125 m by the ROV Hyper-Dolphin. A continuous and strong BSR has been observed on seismic profiles from 300 to 500 ms two-way-travel-time below the seafloor of this ridge. Sedimentary strata of the Formosa Ridge are generally flat lying which suggests that this ridge was formed by submarine erosion processes of down-slope canyon development. In addition, some sediment waves and mass wasting features are present on the ridge. Beneath the cold seep site, a vertical blanking zone, or seismic chimney, is clearly observed on seismic profiles, and it is interpreted to be a fluid conduit. A thick low velocity zone beneath BSR suggests the presence of a gas reservoir there. This "gas reservoir" is shallower than the surrounding canyon floors along the ridge; therefore as warm methane-rich fluids inside the ridge migrate upward, sulfate carried by cold sea water can flow into the fluid system from both flanks of the ridge. This process may drive a fluid circulation system and the active cold seep site which emits both hydrogen sulfide and methane to feed the chemosynthetic communities.

  18. Micro mirrors based coupling of light to multi-core fiber realizing in-fiber photonic neural network processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eyal; Malka, Dror; Shemer, Amir; Shahmoon, Asaf; London, Michael; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Hardware implementation of artificial neural networks facilitates real-time parallel processing of massive data sets. Optical neural networks offer low-volume 3D connectivity together with large bandwidth and minimal heat production in contrast to electronic implementation. Here, we present a DMD based approaches to realize energetically efficient light coupling into a multi-core fiber realizing a unique design for in-fiber optical neural networks. Neurons and synapses are realized as individual cores in a multi-core fiber. Optical signals are transferred transversely between cores by means of optical coupling. Pump driven amplification in Erbium-doped cores mimics synaptic interactions. In order to dynamically and efficiently couple light into the multi-core fiber a DMD based micro mirror device is used to perform proper beam shaping operation. The beam shaping reshapes the light into a large set of points in space matching the positions of the required cores in the entrance plane to the multi-core fiber.

  19. A canonical correlation neural network for multicollinearity and functional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Zhenkun; Fyfe, Colin

    2004-03-01

    We review a recent neural implementation of Canonical Correlation Analysis and show, using ideas suggested by Ridge Regression, how to make the algorithm robust. The network is shown to operate on data sets which exhibit multicollinearity. We develop a second model which not only performs as well on multicollinear data but also on general data sets. This model allows us to vary a single parameter so that the network is capable of performing Partial Least Squares regression (at one extreme) to Canonical Correlation Analysis (at the other)and every intermediate operation between the two. On multicollinear data, the parameter setting is shown to be important but on more general data no particular parameter setting is required. Finally, we develop a second penalty term which acts on such data as a smoother in that the resulting weight vectors are much smoother and more interpretable than the weights without the robustification term. We illustrate our algorithms on both artificial and real data.

  20. Waste Area Grouping 4 Site Investigation Sampling and Analysis Plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. WAG 4 is located along Lagoon Road south of the main facility at ORNL. WAG 4 is a shallow-waste burial site consisting of three separate areas: (1) Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; (2) an experimental Pilot Pit Area, including a pilot-scale testing pit; and (3) sections of two abandoned underground pipelines formerly used for transporting liquid, low-level radioactive waste. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low-and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk. In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation is being implemented to locate the trenches containing the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources. This investigation has been designed to gather site-specific data to confirm the locations of {sup 90}Sr sources responsible for most off-site releases, and to provide data to be used in evaluating potential interim remedial alternatives prepared to direct the site investigation of the SWSA 4 area at WAG 4.

  1. Radionuclide migration pathways analysis for the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility on the West Chestnut Ridge site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pin, F.G.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Lee, D.W.; Cannon, J.B.; Ketelle, R.H.

    1984-10-01

    A dose-to-man pathways analysis is performed for disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the Central Waste Disposal Facility on the West Chestnut Ridge Site. Both shallow land burial (trench) and aboveground (tumulus) disposal methods are considered. The waste volumes, characteristics, and radionuclide concentrations are those of waste streams anticipated from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The site capacity for the waste streams is determined on the basis of the pathways analysis. The exposure pathways examined include (1) migration and transport of leachate from the waste disposal units to the Clinch River (via the groundwater medium for trench disposal and Ish Creek for tumulus disposal) and (2) those potentially associated with inadvertent intrusion following a 100-year period of institutional control: an individual resides on the site, inhales suspended particles of contaminated dust, ingests vegetables grown on the plot, consumes contaminated water from either an on-site well or from a nearby surface stream, and receives direct exposure from the contaminated soil. It is found that either disposal method would provide effective containment and isolation for the anticipated waste inventory. However, the proposed trench disposal method would provide more effective containment than tumuli because of sorption of some radionuclides in the soil. Persons outside the site boundary would receive radiation doses well below regulatory limits if they were to ingest water from the Clinch River. An inadvertent intruder could receive doses that approach regulatory limits; however, the likelihood of such intrusions and subsequent exposures is remote. 33 references, 31 figures, 28 tables.

  2. The emergence of modern statistics in agricultural science: analysis of variance, experimental design and the reshaping of research at Rothamsted Experimental Station, 1919-1933.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Giuditta

    2015-01-01

    During the twentieth century statistical methods have transformed research in the experimental and social sciences. Qualitative evidence has largely been replaced by quantitative results and the tools of statistical inference have helped foster a new ideal of objectivity in scientific knowledge. The paper will investigate this transformation by considering the genesis of analysis of variance and experimental design, statistical methods nowadays taught in every elementary course of statistics for the experimental and social sciences. These methods were developed by the mathematician and geneticist R. A. Fisher during the 1920s, while he was working at Rothamsted Experimental Station, where agricultural research was in turn reshaped by Fisher's methods. Analysis of variance and experimental design required new practices and instruments in field and laboratory research, and imposed a redistribution of expertise among statisticians, experimental scientists and the farm staff. On the other hand the use of statistical methods in agricultural science called for a systematization of information management and made computing an activity integral to the experimental research done at Rothamsted, permanently integrating the statisticians' tools and expertise into the station research programme. Fisher's statistical methods did not remain confined within agricultural research and by the end of the 1950s they had come to stay in psychology, sociology, education, chemistry, medicine, engineering, economics, quality control, just to mention a few of the disciplines which adopted them.

  3. Nonlinear Observer-Based Robust Passive Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators for Power System Stability Enhancement via Energy Reshaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Dong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale penetration of wind power might lead to degradation of the power system stability due to its inherent feature of randomness. Hence, proper control designs which can effectively handle various uncertainties become very crucial. This paper designs a novel robust passive control (RPC scheme of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG for power system stability enhancement. The combinatorial effect of generator nonlinearities and parameter uncertainties, unmodelled dynamics, wind speed randomness, is aggregated into a perturbation, which is rapidly estimated by a nonlinear extended state observer (ESO in real-time. Then, the perturbation estimate is fully compensated by a robust passive controller to realize a globally consistent control performance, in which the energy of the closed-loop system is carefully reshaped through output feedback passification, such that a considerable system damping can be injected to improve the transient responses of DFIG in various operation conditions of power systems. Six case studies are carried out while simulation results verify that RPC can rapidly stabilize the disturbed DFIG system much faster with less overshoot, as well as supress power oscillations more effectively compared to that of linear proportional-integral-derivative (PID control and nonlinear feedback linearization control (FLC.

  4. Bone grafting for alveolar ridge reconstruction. Review of 166 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FUED SAMIR SALMEN

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the predictive factors of failure in bone grafts for alveolar ridge augmentation and implant surgery. Methods: we reviewed the charts of 166 patients operated between 1995 and 2014. A total of 248 grafting procedures were performed. We submitted the data to the binomial test at 5% significance. Results: grafts to gain width of the alveolar ridge (65.32% were more frequent than sinus lifting (p<0.0001 and the number of grafts to the posterior maxilla (48.8% was greater than in other regions (p<0.01; 6.04% of the grafts were lost. The losses in anterior (p<0.0309 and posterior (p<0.0132 maxilla were higher than in the mandible. There were 269 implants installed in the grafted areas, of which only 4.83% were lost. The number of implants lost (4.51% in areas of onlay grafts was not statistically higher than those placed after sinus lifting (2.63%, p<0.2424. Losses were greater in the anterior (53.85% and posterior (38.46% maxilla than in the mandible (p<0.031. Regarding patients' age, 76.92% of the lost grafts (p<0.006 and 80% of the lost implants (p<0.001 were installed in patients over 40 years. Conclusion: failure rate was higher both for grafts and dental implants in the maxilla and in patients over 40 years of age.

  5. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. (ed.)

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. This Volume, Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume is divided into ten chapters. The first chapter is a brief introduction, and the second chapter details the technical approach of the TLD. These categories are the work activities necessary for successful decontamination and decommissioning, waste management, and remedial action of the K-25 Site. The categories are characterization, decontamination, dismantlement, robotics and automation, remedial action, and waste management. Materials disposition is addressed in Chap. 9. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning.

  6. 2014 Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Joan F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is located in Roane and Anderson counties in East Tennessee, about 40 km (25 miles) from Knoxville. ORR is one of DOE’s most unique and complex sites. It encompasses three major facilities and thousands of employees that perform every mission in the DOE portfolio—energy research, environmental restoration, national security, nuclear fuel supply, reindustrialization, science education, basic and applied research in areas important to US security, and technology transfer. ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project for the purposes of enriching uranium and pioneering methods for producing and separating plutonium. Today, scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), DOE’s largest multipurpose national laboratory, conduct world-leading research in advanced materials, alternative fuels, climate change, and supercomputing. The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 or Y-12 Complex) is vital to maintaining the safety, security, and effectiveness of the US nuclear weapons stockpile and reducing the global threat posed by nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), a former uranium enrichment complex, is being transitioned to a clean, revitalized industrial park.

  7. Holocene formation and evolution of coastal dunes ridges, Brittany (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vliet-Lanoë, Brigitte; Goslin, Jérôme; Hénaff, Alain; Hallégouët, Bernard; Delacourt, Christophe; Le Cornec, Erwan; Meurisse-Fort, Murielle

    2016-07-01

    Holocene coastal dune formation under a continuously rising sea level (SL) is an abnormal response to increasing storm frequency. The aim of this work is to understand the coastal sedimentary budget and the present-day sand starvation, controlled by climate and man. Dating in Brittany shows that Aeolian deposition initiated from ca. 4000 cal BP, with the slowing down of the SL rise. Pre-historical dunes appeared here from ca. 3000 cal BP, without SL regression. After, further building phases recycled the same stock of sands. Historical dunes I developed from ca. 350 AD. Major storms between 900 and 1200 AD resulted in the construction of washover coastal ridges, the Historical dunes II. A part of the sand was evacuated offshore. From ca. 1350 AD, the pre-existing ridges are reworked forming the Historical dunes III, leading to rapid coastal erosion and inland drift. Holocene dunes with a rising SL constitute a temporary anomaly, mostly forced by man, soon erased by storms in Brittany.

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation Bird Records and Population Trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, W. Kelly [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giffen, Neil R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wade, Murray [CDM Smith, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Haines, Angelina [Xcel Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, James W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Nashville, TN (United States); Jett, Robert Trent [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Bird data have been collected through surveys, environmental assessments, and other observations for decades in the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park, located on the US Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in East Tennessee. Birds were recorded in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, interior forests, grasslands, ponds, corridors, forest edges, and more. Most of the information was gathered from waterfowl surveys conducted from 1990 to 2008, from Partners in Flight (PIF) breeding bird surveys conducted from 1995 to 2013, and from past publications and research on Reservation birds. We have also included our own observations and, in a few instances, credible observations of ORR birds of which we have been made aware through eBird or discussions with area ornithologists and bird watchers. For the period 1950 2014, we were able to document 228 species of birds on the ORR. Several of these species are known from historic records only, while others were not known to have ever occurred on the Reservation until recently. This report does not include PIF breeding bird data from the 2014 season or any records after July 2014. Twenty-two species approximately 10% of the total number of species observed have state-listed status in Tennessee as endangered, threatened, or in need of management. Of the 228 species we documented, 120 are believed to be breeding birds on the ORR.

  9. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parr, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Evans, J.W. (Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1992-06-01

    A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division.

  10. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  11. Oak Ridge Reservation Bird Records and Population Trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, W. K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giffen, N. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wade, M. C. [CDM Smith (United States); Haines, A. M. [Xcel Engineering, Inc.(United States); Evans, J. W. [Tennessee WIldlife Resources Agency (WRA), Nashville, TN (United States); Jett, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Bird data have been collected through surveys, environmental assessments, and other observations for decades in the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park, located on the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in East Tennessee. Birds were recorded in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, interior forests, grasslands, ponds, corridors, forest edges, and more. Most of the information was gathered from waterfowl surveys conducted from 1990 to 2008, from Partners in Flight (PIF) breeding bird surveys conducted from 1995 to 2013, and from past publications and research on Reservation birds. We have also included our own observations and, in a few instances, credible observations of ORR birds of which we have been made aware through eBird or discussions with area ornithologists and bird watchers. For the period 1950-2014, we were able to document 228 species of birds on the ORR. Several of these species are known from historic records only, while others were not known to have ever occurred on the Reservation until recently. This report does not include PIF breeding bird data from the 2014 season or any records after July 2014. Twenty-two species--approximately 10% of the total number of species observed--have state-listed status in Tennessee as endangered, threatened, or in need of management. Of the 228 species we documented, 120 are believed to be breeding birds on the ORR.

  12. Volcano collapse along the Aleutian Ridge (western Aleutian Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Montanaro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Aleutian Ridge, in the western part of the Aleutian Arc, consists of a chain of volcanic islands perched atop the crest of a submarine ridge with most of the active Quaternary stratocones or caldera-like volcanoes being located on the northern margins of the Aleutian Islands. Integrated analysis of marine and terrestrial data resulted in the identification and characterization of 17 extensive submarine debris avalanche deposits from 11 volcanoes. Two morphological types of deposits are recognizable, elongate and lobate, with primary controls on the size and distribution of the volcanic debris being the volume and nature of material involved, proportion of fine grained material, depth of emplacement and the paleo-bathymetry. Volume calculations show the amount of material deposited in debris avalanches is as much as three times larger than the amount of material initially involved in the collapse, suggesting the incorporation of large amounts of submarine material during transport. The orientation of the collapse events is influenced by regional fault systems underling the volcanoes. The western Aleutian Arc has a significant tsunamigenic potential and communities within the Aleutian Islands and surrounding areas of the North Pacific as well as shipping and fishing fleets that cross the North Pacific may be at risk during future eruptions in this area.

  13. Cosmic web reconstruction through density ridges: method and algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Wasserman, Larry

    2015-11-01

    The detection and characterization of filamentary structures in the cosmic web allows cosmologists to constrain parameters that dictate the evolution of the Universe. While many filament estimators have been proposed, they generally lack estimates of uncertainty, reducing their inferential power. In this paper, we demonstrate how one may apply the subspace constrained mean shift (SCMS) algorithm (Ozertem & Erdogmus 2011; Genovese et al. 2014) to uncover filamentary structure in galaxy data. The SCMS algorithm is a gradient ascent method that models filaments as density ridges, one-dimensional smooth curves that trace high-density regions within the point cloud. We also demonstrate how augmenting the SCMS algorithm with bootstrap-based methods of uncertainty estimation allows one to place uncertainty bands around putative filaments. We apply the SCMS first to the data set generated from the Voronoi model. The density ridges show strong agreement with the filaments from Voronoi method. We then apply the SCMS method data sets sampled from a P3M N-body simulation, with galaxy number densities consistent with SDSS and WFIRST-AFTA, and to LOWZ and CMASS data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). To further assess the efficacy of SCMS, we compare the relative locations of BOSS filaments with galaxy clusters in the redMaPPer catalogue, and find that redMaPPer clusters are significantly closer (with p-values filaments than to randomly selected galaxies.

  14. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. (ed.)

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

  15. Sound propagation from a ridge wind turbine across a valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    Sound propagation outdoors can be strongly affected by ground topography. The existence of hills and valleys between a source and receiver can lead to the shielding or focusing of sound waves. Such effects can result in significant variations in received sound levels. In addition, wind speed and air temperature gradients in the atmospheric boundary layer also play an important role. All of the foregoing factors can become especially important for the case of wind turbines located on a ridge overlooking a valley. Ridges are often selected for wind turbines in order to increase their energy capture potential through the wind speed-up effects often experienced in such locations. In this paper, a hybrid calculation method is presented to model such a case, relying on an analytical solution for sound diffraction around an impedance cylinder and the conformal mapping (CM) Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) technique. The various aspects of the model have been successfully validated against alternative prediction methods. Example calculations with this hybrid analytical-CM-GFPE model show the complex sound pressure level distribution across the valley and the effect of valley ground type. The proposed method has the potential to include the effect of refraction through the inclusion of complex wind and temperature fields, although this aspect has been highly simplified in the current simulations. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  16. Status Report: A Hydrologic Framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) was established in 1989 as an integrated study of the hydrology, geology, and soils of the reservation in support of the extensive activities in environmental monitoring, environmental restoration, waste management, and regulatory compliance on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Hydrologic Studies Task of ORRHAGS is designed to provide essential information about the hydrologic environment of the ORR to those responsible for dealing with environmental issues, including restoration, environmental monitoring, and waste management, compliance, and enforcement. In order to ensure optimum environmental protection, these systems and their elements must be better understood and quantified. Additionally, in light of the enormous costs attached to environmental protection, restoration, monitoring, and waste management, these activities must be planned and implemented as efficiently as possible. A practical understanding of the hydrologic systems is required for all the objectives associated with contaminants in the hydrologic environment of the ORR. This report describes the current status of the development of a workable framework for the hydrology of the ORR. The framework is based mostly on data and information available from previous investigations.

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan. Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-12-01

    The goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Management Program is the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. A vital aspect of this goal is to comply with all applicable state, federal, and DOE requirements. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  18. Sound propagation from a ridge wind turbine across a valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, Timothy

    2017-04-13

    Sound propagation outdoors can be strongly affected by ground topography. The existence of hills and valleys between a source and receiver can lead to the shielding or focusing of sound waves. Such effects can result in significant variations in received sound levels. In addition, wind speed and air temperature gradients in the atmospheric boundary layer also play an important role. All of the foregoing factors can become especially important for the case of wind turbines located on a ridge overlooking a valley. Ridges are often selected for wind turbines in order to increase their energy capture potential through the wind speed-up effects often experienced in such locations. In this paper, a hybrid calculation method is presented to model such a case, relying on an analytical solution for sound diffraction around an impedance cylinder and the conformal mapping (CM) Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) technique. The various aspects of the model have been successfully validated against alternative prediction methods. Example calculations with this hybrid analytical-CM-GFPE model show the complex sound pressure level distribution across the valley and the effect of valley ground type. The proposed method has the potential to include the effect of refraction through the inclusion of complex wind and temperature fields, although this aspect has been highly simplified in the current simulations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Pyroshock Prediction of Ridge-Cut Explosive Bolts Using Hydrocodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrotechnic release devices such as explosive bolts are prevalent for many applications due to their merits: high reliability, high power-to-weight ratio, reasonable cost, and more. However, pyroshock generated by an explosive event can cause failures in electric components. Although pyroshock propagations are relatively well understood through many numerical and experimental studies, the prediction of pyroshock generation is still a very difficult problem. This study proposes a numerical method for predicting the pyroshock of a ridge-cut explosive bolt using a commercial hydrocode (ANSYS AUTODYN. A numerical model is established by integrating fluid-structure interaction and complex material models for high explosives and metals, including high explosive detonation, shock wave transmission and propagation, and stress wave propagation. To verify the proposed numerical scheme, pyroshock measurement experiments of the ridge-cut explosive bolts with two types of surrounding structures are performed using laser Doppler vibrometers (LDVs. The numerical analysis results provide accurate prediction in both the time (acceleration and frequency domains (maximax shock response spectra. In maximax shock response spectra, the peaks due to vibration modes of the structures are observed in both the experimental and numerical results. The numerical analysis also helps to identify the pyroshock generation source and the propagation routes.

  20. Geologic signature of early Tertiary ridge subduction in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Kusky, Timothy M.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Miller, Marti L.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Nelson, Steven W.; Karl, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    A mid-Paleocene to early Eocene encounter between an oceanic spreading center and a subduction zone produced a wide range of geologic features in Alaska. The most striking effects are seen in the accretionary prism (Chugach–Prince William terrane), where 61 to 50 Ma near-trench granitic to gabbroic plutons were intruded into accreted trench sediments that had been deposited only a few million years earlier. This short time interval also saw the genesis of ophiolites, some of which contain syngenetic massive sulfide deposits; the rapid burial of these ophiolites beneath trench turbidites, followed immediately by obduction; anomalous high-T, low-P, near-trench metamorphism; intense ductile deformation; motion on transverse strike-slip and normal faults; gold mineralization; and uplift of the accretionary prism above sea level. The magmatic arc experienced a brief flare-up followed by quiescence. In the Alaskan interior, 100 to 600 km landward of the paleotrench, several Paleocene to Eocene sedimentary basins underwent episodes of extensional subsidence, accompanied by bimodal volcanism. Even as far as 1000 km inboard of the paleotrench, the ancestral Brooks Range and its foreland basin experienced a pulse of uplift that followed about 40 million years of quiescence.All of these events - but most especially those in the accretionary prism - can be attributed with varying degrees of confidence to the subduction of an oceanic spreading center. In this model, the ophiolites and allied ore deposits were produced at the soon-to-be subducted ridge. Near-trench magmatism, metamorphism, deformation, and gold mineralization took place in the accretionary prism above a slab window, where hot asthenosphere welled up into the gap between the two subducted, but still diverging, plates. Deformation took place as the critically tapered accretionary prism adjusted its shape to changes in the bathymetry of the incoming plate, changes in the convergence direction before and after

  1. The Guadalquivir Diapiric Ridge: Deep Tectonics and Related Gas Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Puga, M. C.; Somoza, L.; Pinheiro, L. M.; Magalhães, V.; Vázquez, J. T.; Díaz-del-Río, V.; Ivanov, M.

    Cooperation between the Spanish TASYO project during the cruises Tasyo/2000, Anastasya/99, Anastasya/00 and Anastasya/01 and the UNESCO-IOC Trainning Trough Research Programme during the TTR9, TTR10 and TTR-11 cruises have per- mitted to identify numerous structures related to hydrocarbon seepages in the Gulf of Cadiz, located between the Africa and Eurasia plate. The interpretation of multibeam bathymetry and a large database of reflection seismic profiles shows two important morphotectonics structures: the Cadiz Diapiric Ridge (CDR) and the Guadalquivir Di- apiric Ridge (GDR). The CDR is a diapiric elongate structure located between 400 and 700m water depth, with a N-S direction. The GDR is an elongated ridge, situated west- ward of this structure and located along the shelf and slope between 300-1100m depth. This highly deformed ridge, formed by several diapirs oriented in NE-SW direction, has been mapped using industrial multifold seismic, core logs, gravity cores, dredge samples and photographs, obtained during the ANASTASYA 01/09 cruise. This data has shown that it is composed of early-middle Miocene blue marls (Maldonado et al, 1999), mud breccias and calcarenites. In fact, this diapiric structure is associated with a complex tectono-sedimentary history related to along slope gravity gliding and tec- tonic compression westward the fronts of the deformed wedges of the SOlistostromic & cedil;allochtonous unitsT (Somoza et al., 1999). According to the observed and sampled structures along the GDR, this ridge can be divided in three areas: (a) The NE area is characterized by the existence of a series of wide single sub-circular mud volcanoes (Anastasya, Tarsis and Pipoca), surrounded by a ring shaped seafloor depression. Mud breccia has been collected from these mud volcanoes (ANAS00-TG5,TG6,TG7,TG8 and ANAS01-TG2); (b) a central sector with long rounded-like crater structures, of unknown origin, from which calcarenites were collected (ANAS01-DA13); and (c) a SW

  2. Neural network technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, James A.

    1991-01-01

    A whole new arena of computer technologies is now beginning to form. Still in its infancy, neural network technology is a biologically inspired methodology which draws on nature's own cognitive processes. The Software Technology Branch has provided a software tool, Neural Execution and Training System (NETS), to industry, government, and academia to facilitate and expedite the use of this technology. NETS is written in the C programming language and can be executed on a variety of machines. Once a network has been debugged, NETS can produce a C source code which implements the network. This code can then be incorporated into other software systems. Described here are various software projects currently under development with NETS and the anticipated future enhancements to NETS and the technology.

  3. Analysis of neural data

    CERN Document Server

    Kass, Robert E; Brown, Emery N

    2014-01-01

    Continual improvements in data collection and processing have had a huge impact on brain research, producing data sets that are often large and complicated. By emphasizing a few fundamental principles, and a handful of ubiquitous techniques, Analysis of Neural Data provides a unified treatment of analytical methods that have become essential for contemporary researchers. Throughout the book ideas are illustrated with more than 100 examples drawn from the literature, ranging from electrophysiology, to neuroimaging, to behavior. By demonstrating the commonality among various statistical approaches the authors provide the crucial tools for gaining knowledge from diverse types of data. Aimed at experimentalists with only high-school level mathematics, as well as computationally-oriented neuroscientists who have limited familiarity with statistics, Analysis of Neural Data serves as both a self-contained introduction and a reference work.

  4. Neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have been used to describe this defect, but spina bifida remains the most useful general term, as it describes the separation of the vertebral elements in the midline.

  5. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  7. Neurally-mediated sincope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, I; Cytron, J; Jhanjee, R; Nguyen, J; Benditt, D G

    2009-08-01

    Syncope is a syndrome characterized by a relatively sudden, temporary and self-terminating loss of consciousness; the causes may vary, but they have in common a temporary inadequacy of cerebral nutrient flow, usually due to a fall in systemic arterial pressure. However, while syncope is a common problem, it is only one explanation for episodic transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). Consequently, diagnostic evaluation should start with a broad consideration of real or seemingly real TLOC. Among those patients in whom TLOC is deemed to be due to ''true syncope'', the focus may then reasonably turn to assessing the various possible causes; in this regard, the neurally-mediated syncope syndromes are among the most frequently encountered. There are three common variations: vasovagal syncope (often termed the ''common'' faint), carotid sinus syndrome, and the so-called ''situational faints''. Defining whether the cause is due to a neurally-mediated reflex relies heavily on careful history taking and selected testing (e.g., tilt-test, carotid massage). These steps are important. Despite the fact that neurally-mediated faints are usually relatively benign from a mortality perspective, they are nevertheless only infrequently an isolated event; neurally-mediated syncope tends to recur, and physical injury resulting from falls or accidents, diminished quality-of-life, and possible restriction from employment or avocation are real concerns. Consequently, defining the specific form and developing an effective treatment strategy are crucial. In every case the goal should be to determine the cause of syncope with sufficient confidence to provide patients and family members with a reliable assessment of prognosis, recurrence risk, and treatment options.

  8. The Neural Noisy Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lei; Blunsom, Phil; Dyer, Chris; Grefenstette, Edward; Kocisky, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    We formulate sequence to sequence transduction as a noisy channel decoding problem and use recurrent neural networks to parameterise the source and channel models. Unlike direct models which can suffer from explaining-away effects during training, noisy channel models must produce outputs that explain their inputs, and their component models can be trained with not only paired training samples but also unpaired samples from the marginal output distribution. Using a latent variable to control ...

  9. Global Models of Ridge-Push Force, Geoid, and Lithospheric Strength of Oceanic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatsente, Rezene

    2017-12-01

    An understanding of the transmission of ridge-push related stresses in the interior of oceanic plates is important because ridge-push force is one of the principal forces driving plate motion. Here, I assess the transmission of ridge-push related stresses in oceanic plates by comparing the magnitude of the ridge-push force to the integrated strength of oceanic plates. The strength is determined based on plate cooling and rheological models. The strength analysis includes low-temperature plasticity (LTP) in the upper mantle and assumes a range of possible tectonic conditions and rheology in the plates. The ridge-push force has been derived from the thermal state of oceanic lithosphere, seafloor depth and crustal age data. The results of modeling show that the transmission of ridge-push related stresses in oceanic plates mainly depends on rheology and predominant tectonic conditions. If a lithosphere has dry rheology, the estimated strength is higher than the ridge-push force at all ages for compressional tectonics and at old ages (>75 Ma) for extension. Therefore, under such conditions, oceanic plates may not respond to ridge-push force by intraplate deformation. Instead, the plates may transmit the ridge-push related stress in their interior. For a wet rheology, however, the strength of young lithosphere (<75 Ma) is much less than the ridge-push force for both compressional and extensional tectonics. In this case, the ridge-push related stress may dissipate in the interior of oceanic plates and diffuses by intraplate deformation. The state of stress within a plate depends on the balance of far-field and intraplate forces.

  10. Phase 1 report on the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Bear Creek Valley (BCV) is located within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes associated with past operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The BCV Remedial Investigation determined that disposal of wastes at the S-3 Site, Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) has caused contamination of both deep and shallow groundwater. The primary contaminants include uranium, nitrate, and VOCs, although other metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and cadmium persist. The BCV feasibility study will describe several remedial options for this area, including both in situ and ex situ treatment of groundwater. This Treatability Study Phase 1 Report describes the results of preliminary screening of treatment technologies that may be applied within BCV. Four activities were undertaken in Phase 1: field characterization, laboratory screening of potential sorbents, laboratory testing of zero valent iron products, and field screening of three biological treatment systems. Each of these activities is described fully in technical memos attached in Appendices A through G.

  11. Remedial investigation work plan for the Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been developed as part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the GWOU RI Work Plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide the ORNL GWOU RI. The Work Plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It Is important to note that the RI Work Plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. The RI will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This Work Plan outlines the overall strategy for the RI and defines tasks which are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  12. Data base management plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    This Data Base Management (DBM) Plan has been prepared for use by Bechtel National, Inc. (Bechtel) and its subcontractors in the performance of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) program activities. The RI/FS program is being performed under subcontract to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), the contractor operating ORNL for the Department of Energy. This DBM Plan defines the procedures and protocol to be followed in developing and maintaining the data base used by Bechtel and its subcontractors for RI/FS activities at ORNL; describes the management controls, policies, and guidelines to be followed; and identifies responsible positions and their Energy Systems functions. The Bechtel RI/FS data base will be compatible with the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System and will include data obtained from field measurements and laboratory and engineering analyses. Personnel health and safety information, document control, and project management data will also be maintained as part of the data base. The computerized data management system is being used to organize the data according to application and is capable of treating data from any given site as a variable entity. The procedures required to implement the DBM Plan are cross-referenced to specific sections of the plan.

  13. Neural Based Orthogonal Data Fitting The EXIN Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cirrincione, Giansalvo

    2008-01-01

    Written by three leaders in the field of neural based algorithms, Neural Based Orthogonal Data Fitting proposes several neural networks, all endowed with a complete theory which not only explains their behavior, but also compares them with the existing neural and traditional algorithms. The algorithms are studied from different points of view, including: as a differential geometry problem, as a dynamic problem, as a stochastic problem, and as a numerical problem. All algorithms have also been analyzed on real time problems (large dimensional data matrices) and have shown accurate solutions. Wh

  14. Soil sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Floodplain at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Floodplain presents the approach and rationale for characterizing potentially contaminated soils and sediments of the Bear Creek floodplain and the impact of any contaminants on the floodplain ecosystem. In addition to this SAP, the Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Bear Creek (Y02-S600) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ES/ER-19&D2) presents background information pertaining to this floodplain investigation.

  15. 78 FR 3909 - Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, IN; Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, MN; Northern...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, IN; Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge... conservation plans (CCP) and associated environmental documents for the Big Oaks, Glacial Ridge, Northern... refuge at the following addresses: Attention: Refuge Manager, Big Oaks NWR, 1661 West JPG Niblo Road...

  16. Pulley Ridge Swath Bathymetry Image - TIFF format, UTM Zone 17 (ALLPR_FILCRPIMG.TIF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  17. Interpretation of the Surficial Geology in the Pulley Ridge Study Area (PULLEY_INTERP.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  18. MPEG Animation of the Northern Portion of the Pulley Ridge Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  19. MPEG Animation of the Central Portion of the Pulley Ridge Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  20. The Effect of Potato Ridge Height and Harvest Date on Tuber Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymuza Katarzyna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A potato experiment was conducted from 2004 to 2006 at the Zawady Experimental Farm. The farm is part of the University of Natural Sciences and Humanities in Siedlce, Poland. Tuber infection and injury by diseases and pathogens of three potato cultivars were assessed according to the potato ridge height and harvest date. The weight of mechanically injured tubers was also determined depending on the potato ridge height and harvest date. The weight of potato tubers infected by fungal and bacterial diseases was influenced by the cultivar, growing season, harvest date, and ridge height. Potatoes grown to their standard height and height ridges, were significantly less infected by diseases at the first harvest date. The weight of tubers in which the tubers were injured by soil pests, was affected by the cultivar and ridge height. Potatoes cultivated in a ridge which was 20 cm high, had tubers with significantly less mechanical injuries compared with a low (16 cm ridge and high (24 cm ridge.

  1. BioTwist : overcoming severe distortions in ridge-based biometrics for succesful identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotzerke, J.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on ridge-based and highly distorted biometrics, the different chal-lenges involved in a verification of identity scenario, and how to overcome them. More specifically, we work on ridge-based biometrics in two different contexts: (i) newborn and infant biometrics and (ii) quality

  2. A correlated-cluster model and the ridge phenomenon in hadron–hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel, E-mail: Miguel.Angel.Sanchis@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC) and Departamento de Física Teórica, Centro Mixto Universitat de València-CSIC, Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward, E-mail: sedward@cern.ch [Experimental Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    A study of the near-side ridge phenomenon in hadron–hadron collisions based on a cluster picture of multiparticle production is presented. The near-side ridge effect is shown to have a natural explanation in this context provided that clusters are produced in a correlated manner in the collision transverse plane.

  3. CUTIN SYNTHASE 2 Maintains Progressively Developing Cuticular Ridges in Arabidopsis Sepals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lilan; Brown, Joel; Segerson, Nicholas A; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2017-04-03

    The cuticle is a crucial barrier on the aerial surfaces of land plants. In many plants, including Arabidopsis, the sepals and petals form distinctive nanoridges in their cuticles. However, little is known about how the formation and maintenance of these nanostructures is coordinated with the growth and development of the underlying cells. Here we report the characterization of the Arabidopsis cutin synthase 2 (cus2) mutant, which causes a great reduction in cuticular ridges on the mature sepal epidermis, but only a moderate effect on petal cone cell ridges. Using scanning electron microscopy and confocal live imaging combined with quantification of cellular growth, we find that cuticular ridge formation progresses down the sepal from tip to base as the sepal grows. pCUS2::GFP-GUS reporter expression coincides with cuticular ridge formation, descending the sepal from tip to base. Ridge formation also coincides with the reduction in growth rate and termination of cell division of the underlying epidermal cells. Surprisingly, cuticular ridges at first form normally in the cus2 mutant, but are lost progressively at later stages of sepal development, indicating that CUS2 is crucial for the maintenance of cuticular ridges after they are formed. Our results reveal the dynamics of both ridge formation and maintenance as the sepal grows. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. absolute migration of pacific basin mid-ocean ridges since 85 ma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. Mid-ocean ridges are major physiographic features that dominate the world seafloor. Their absolute motion and tectonics are recorded in magnetic lineations they created. The absolute migration of mid-ocean ridges in the Pacific basin since 85 Ma and their tectonic implications was investigated in this work ...

  5. Deep-sea exploration of the Central Indian Ridge at 19 degrees S

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dyment, J.; Hemond, C.; Asada, M.; Bassoullet, C.; Benoit, M.; Briais, A.; Chaubey, A.K.; Horen, H.; Huot, F.; Kitazawa, M.; Le Gall, B.; Leven, J.H.; Maia, M.; Oldra, J.-P.; Ravilly, M.; Sondroon, V.

    stream_size 4 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name InterRidge_News_9_29.pdf.txt stream_source_info InterRidge_News_9_29.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  6. Gravity anomalies over the Central Indian Ridge between 3 S and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-resolution shipboard geophysical investigations along the Indian Ocean ridge system are sparse especially over the Carlsberg and Central Indian ridges. ... The most significant MBA and RMBA highs were observed over the Vema transform fault suggesting thin crust of 4 km in the deepest part of the transform fault ...

  7. Area A (northeastern portion) Sidescan-Sonar Mosaic, Pulley Ridge: Geographic Coordinate System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  8. Suggested Polygon of the Habitat Area of Particular Concern Associated with Pulley Ridge

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  9. MPEG Animation of the Southern Portion of the Pulley Ridge Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  10. Approximate Bounds of the Zooxanthellate Coral-Rich Area Associated with Pulley Ridge

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  11. First report of fruit rot of ridge gourd (Luffa acutangula) caused by Sclerotium rolfsii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge gourd is a specialty cucurbit vegetable cultivated in the United States on a small scale for select markets. Ridge gourds are generally grown on a trellis which prevents the fruit from curving and lets it grow straight for the market. However some growers cultivate these on raised beds to low...

  12. Performance of Some Stochastic Restricted Ridge Estimator in Linear Regression Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jibo Wu; Chaolin Liu

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers several estimators for estimating the stochastic restricted ridge regression estimators. A simulation study has been conducted to compare the performance of the estimators. The result from the simulation study shows that stochastic restricted ridge regression estimators outperform mixed estimator. A numerical example has been also given to illustrate the performance of the estimators.

  13. Researchers to help develop sustainable tourism strategy for part of the Blue Ridge Parkway

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2008-01-01

    A research team from Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business and College of Natural Resources has received a $266,000 grant from the National Park Service and Blue Ridge Heritage Inc. to help develop a sustainable tourism strategy for the Rocky Knob area of the Blue Ridge Parkway.

  14. Effect of vertical inhomogeneity of the ridge keel filling on its freezing rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Andreev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Field data on ice ridges in the south-eastern and eastern parts of the Barents Sea collected by specialists of the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI in 2003–2007 has been used in attempt to understand the vertical inhomogeneity of the ridge keels filling. New ridges originated from one-year sea ice (with no consolidated layer or or less than 5–10 cm thick have been analyzed. Reduction of original observations under certain additional assumptions has allowed formulating the vertical distribution of the ridge keel fill factor. This approximation has been applied in the one-dimensional thermodynamic ride model developed in AARI to simulate the ice ridges behavior in the Central Arctic and Arctic seas. The modeling of ridge freezing rates for different geographical sites has shown the more intensive freezing of ridge keels in initial stage than expected from previous modeling runs. The new results are consistent with field observations on consolidated layer thickness in ridges. Model calculations for a longer period show no big difference in results obtained with or without the approximation proposed.

  15. Pressley Ridge Treatment Foster Care: The Model of Care Thirty Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunzo, Annette C.; Bishop-Fitzpatrick, Lauren; Strickler, Amy; Doncaster, James

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, trends in children's mental health have moved care from residential and office-based treatment to community-based interventions. The Pressley Ridge Treatment Foster Care (PRTFC) program was developed in 1981 in response to these trends. Currently, Pressley Ridge provides PR-TFC treatment in 15 programs in six states and the…

  16. mobility and immobility of mid-ocean ridges and their implications to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. In the past two decades, the mobility of mid-ocean ridges relative to the mantle (absolute migration) have been correlated with major observable features, such as, spreading asymmetry and asymmetry in the abundance of seamounts. The mobility of mid- ocean ridges is also thought to be an important factor ...

  17. The Narrow Ridge Balance Test : A measure for one-leg lateral balance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Postema, Klaas; Akkermans, Hilda W.; Otten, Bert; Hof, At L.

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of balance capacity for people with widely different balance abilities is an important issue in clinical practice We propose the narrow ridge balance test as a sensitive tool to assess one-leg balance capacity In this test participants are asked to perform single-leg stance on ridges

  18. The Galapagos Spreading Center. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Mid-Ocean Ridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity introduces students to the basic concept of seafloor spreading, the processes involved in creating new seafloor at a mid- ocean ridge, the Galapagos Spreading Center system, and the different types of plate motion associated with ridge segments and transform faults. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed…

  19. Isostatic response of the Laccadive Ridge from admittance analysis of gravity and bathymetry data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A; Srinivas, K.; Ashalatha, B.; Rao, D.G.

    The Laccadive Ridge (L-R), trending roughly parallel to the west coast of India, is an intriguing segmentof the northernmost Chagos-Laccadive Ridge (C-L-R) system. Although crustal nature and isostatic response of the southern C-L-R iswell known...

  20. Seismic and Tectonic Monitoring of the Endeavour Ridge Segment—Recent and Future Expansion of Ocean Networks Canada's NEPTUNE Observatory on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesemann, M.; Davis, E. E.; Scherwath, M.; Kao, H.; Coogan, L. A.; Rogers, G. C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada's (ONC) NEPTUNE observatory provides real-time access to sensors on the Endeavour Ridge Segment (Endeavour)—a focus site on the Juan de Fuca Ridge System that is complementary to one on Axial Volcano that is connected through the Ocean Observatories Initiative's (OOI) Cabled Array. While first instruments (including cameras, a short-period seismometer, and vent monitoring instruments) installed at the Main Endeavour vent field have been sending data since summer 2010, unreliable extension cables precluded continuous time-series from other nearby locations. With the successful installation of four extension cables, the summer of 2016 represents an important milestone in the instrumentation of the Endeavour Ridge Segment. We will present an overview of the data that are available in near real-time from Endeavour and new instrumentation that is scheduled for installation in 2017, and highlight first results derived from the new seismo-tectonic network now in operation. This network consists of three short-period seismometers (Mothra Field, Main Endeavour Field, Regional Circulation North), one broadband seismometer (western Ridge Flank), and four bottom pressure recorders (Mothra Field, Regional Circulation South, Main Endeavour Field, western Ridge Flank). The pressure recorders will provide both seismic and oceanographic data, and allow to measure differential vertical motion among the sites. We will also highlight a new technique to determine long period seafloor deformation from broadband seismometer mass-position measurements, using data from the Ridge Flank instrument as an example.

  1. Neural Correlates of Stimulus Reportability

    OpenAIRE

    Hulme, Oliver J.; Friston, Karl F.; Zeki, Semir

    2009-01-01

    Most experiments on the “neural correlates of consciousness” employ stimulus reportability as an operational definition of what is consciously perceived. The interpretation of such experiments therefore depends critically on understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability. Using a high volume of fMRI data, we investigated the neural correlates of stimulus reportability using a partial report object detection paradigm. Subjects were presented with a random array of circularly arranged...

  2. Symbolic processing in neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Hava T Siegelmann; Costa,J.Félix

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we show that programming languages can be translated into recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theoretical exciting, but has also some practical implications in the recent efforts to merge symbolic and sub symbolic computation. To be of some use, it should be carried in a context of bounded resources. Herein, we show how to use resource bounds to speed up computations over neural nets, thro...

  3. [Artificial neural networks in Neurosciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras Chavarino, Carmen; Salinas Martínez de Lecea, José María

    2011-11-01

    This article shows that artificial neural networks are used for confirming the relationships between physiological and cognitive changes. Specifically, we explore the influence of a decrease of neurotransmitters on the behaviour of old people in recognition tasks. This artificial neural network recognizes learned patterns. When we change the threshold of activation in some units, the artificial neural network simulates the experimental results of old people in recognition tasks. However, the main contributions of this paper are the design of an artificial neural network and its operation inspired by the nervous system and the way the inputs are coded and the process of orthogonalization of patterns.

  4. Neural Correlates of Face Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Xiaokun; Biederman, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Although face detection likely played an essential adaptive role in our evolutionary past and in contemporary social interactions, there have been few rigorous studies investigating its neural correlates...

  5. The effect of high leverage points on the logistic ridge regression estimator having multicollinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Syaiba Balqish; Midi, Habshah

    2014-06-01

    This article is concerned with the performance of logistic ridge regression estimation technique in the presence of multicollinearity and high leverage points. In logistic regression, multicollinearity exists among predictors and in the information matrix. The maximum likelihood estimator suffers a huge setback in the presence of multicollinearity which cause regression estimates to have unduly large standard errors. To remedy this problem, a logistic ridge regression estimator is put forward. It is evident that the logistic ridge regression estimator outperforms the maximum likelihood approach for handling multicollinearity. The effect of high leverage points are then investigated on the performance of the logistic ridge regression estimator through real data set and simulation study. The findings signify that logistic ridge regression estimator fails to provide better parameter estimates in the presence of both high leverage points and multicollinearity.

  6. Measurement of pressure ridges in SAR images of sea ice - Preliminary results on scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Smith, M. P.; Daida, J. M.; Samadani, R.; Camiso, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Sea ice ridges and keels (hummocks and bummocks) are important in sea ice research for both scientific and practical reasons. A long-term objective is to make quantitative measurements of sea ice ridges using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The preliminary results of a scattering model for sea ice ridge are reported. The approach is through the ridge height variance spectrum Psi(K), where K is the spatial wavenumber, and the two-scale scattering model. The height spectrum model is constructed to mimic height statistics observed with an airborne optical laser. The spectrum model is used to drive a two-scale scattering model. Model results for ridges observed at C- and X-band yield normalized radar cross sections that are 10 to 15 dB larger than the observed cross sections of multiyear ice over the range of angles of incidence from 10 to 70 deg.

  7. The Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) Model Version 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, Stanton W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baek, Young Sun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model dispatches power plants in a region to meet the electricity demands for any single given year up to 2030. It uses publicly available sources of data describing electric power units such as the National Energy Modeling System and hourly demands from utility submittals to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that are projected to a future year. The model simulates a single region of the country for a given year, matching generation to demands and predefined net exports from the region, assuming no transmission constraints within the region. ORCED can calculate a number of key financial and operating parameters for generating units and regional market outputs including average and marginal prices, air emissions, and generation adequacy. By running the model with and without changes such as generation plants, fuel prices, emission costs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, distributed generation, or demand response, the marginal impact of these changes can be found.

  8. A History of Classified Activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quist, A.S.

    2001-01-30

    The facilities that became Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were created in 1943 during the United States' super-secret World War II project to construct an atomic bomb (the Manhattan Project). During World War II and for several years thereafter, essentially all ORNL activities were classified. Now, in 2000, essentially all ORNL activities are unclassified. The major purpose of this report is to provide a brief history of ORNL's major classified activities from 1943 until the present (September 2000). This report is expected to be useful to the ORNL Classification Officer and to ORNL's Authorized Derivative Classifiers and Authorized Derivative Declassifiers in their classification review of ORNL documents, especially those documents that date from the 1940s and 1950s.

  9. Overview of the Ridge 2000 Integrated Studies Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, C.

    2005-12-01

    The Ridge 2000 program is in its fourth year and fieldwork at each of the Integrated Studies Sites (ISS) is in full swing. Multidisciplinary monitoring continues at the EPR ISS with seismic, temperature, and current data being continuously recorded. Long-term fluid sampling programs aimed at furthering our understanding of temporal variations in the chemistry of high-temperature hydrothermal vents are continuing. In situ fluid chemistry monitors have been deployed for weeks, and longer deployments are planned as the technology matures. Nested within these monitoring studies are experiments addressing larval dispersal and changes in microbial and macrobiological communities. In early 2006, geodetic monitoring will begin, with an array of pressure gauges as well as a detailed compliance study. By early 2007, a 3-D multichannel seismic survey will have provided unprecedented details of the crustal structure at 9°50'N. Together these studies provide a strong framework for an interdisciplinary understanding of the links between the forces that produce a mid-ocean ridge spreading center and their manifestation on the seafloor. Fieldwork on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge in 2005 also included a balance of monitoring, experimental, and sampling programs across a wide range of disciplines. Four interdisciplinary field programs were conducted to maintain and expand ongoing Ridge 2000 and proto-NEPTUNE experiments. These research programs continued development and testing in situ chemical and microbial sensors, conducted co-registered sampling of fluids, fauna, and chimney material, and recovered moorings that measured heat and chemical fluxes at the segment scale. High-resolution mapping was also completed at this site, which has been chosen for one of the two initial NEPTUNE Canada nodes to prepare the way for the collaborative, cabled observatory projects. The mapping cruise included 5 secondary school teachers as part of the REVEL outreach and education

  10. Oak Ridge Graph Analytics for Medical Innovation (ORiGAMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-01-01

    In this era of data-driven decisions and discovery where Big Data is producing Bigger Data, data scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are leveraging unique leadership infrastructure (e.g., Urika XA and Urika GD appliances) to develop scalable algorithms for semantic, logical and statistical reasoning with Big Data (i.e., data stored in databases as well as unstructured data in documents). ORiGAMI is a next-generation knowledge-discovery framework that is: (a) knowledge nurturing (i.e., evolves seamlessly with newer knowledge and data), (b) smart and curious (i.e. using information-foraging and reasoning algorithms to digest content) and (c) synergistic (i.e., interfaces computers with what they do best to help subject-matter-experts do their best. ORiGAMI has been demonstrated using the National Library of Medicine's SEMANTIC MEDLINE (archive of medical knowledge since 1994).

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.H.; Bates, L.D.; Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Setaro, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that all DOE facilities handling defense transuranic (TRU) waste develop and implement a program whereby all TRU waste will be contained, stored, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in accordance with the requirements set forth in the DOE certification documents WIPP-DOE-069, 114, 120, 137, 157, and 158. The program described in this report describes how Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) intends to comply with these requirements and the techniques and procedures used to ensure that ORNL TRU wastes are certifiable for shipment to WIPP. This document describes the program for certification of newly generated (NG) contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. Previsions have been made for addenda, which will extend the coverage of this document to include certification of stored CH-TRU and NG and stored remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste, as necessary. 24 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. New Seismic Monitoring Station at Mohawk Ridge, Valles Caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Peter Morse [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-20

    Two new broadband digital seismic stations were installed in the Valles Caldera in 2011 and 2012. The first is located on the summit of Cerros del Abrigo (station code CDAB) and the second is located on the flanks of San Antonio Mountain (station code SAMT). Seismic monitoring stations in the caldera serve multiple purposes. These stations augment and expand the current coverage of the Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN), which is operated to support seismic and volcanic hazards studies for LANL and northern New Mexico (Figure 1). They also provide unique continuous seismic data within the caldera that can be used for scientific studies of the caldera’s substructure and detection of very small seismic signals that may indicate changes in the current and evolving state of remnant magma that is known to exist beneath the caldera. Since the installation of CDAB and SAMT, several very small earthquakes have already been detected near San Antonio Mountain just west of SAMT (Figure 2). These are the first events to be seen in that area. Caldera stations also improve the detection and epicenter determination quality for larger local earthquakes on the Pajarito Fault System east of the Preserve and the Nacimiento Uplift to the west. These larger earthquakes are a concern to LANL Seismic Hazards assessments and seismic monitoring of the Los Alamos region, including the VCNP, is a DOE requirement. Currently the next closest seismic stations to the caldera are on Pipeline Road (PPR) just west of Los Alamos, and Peralta Ridge (PER) south of the caldera. There is no station coverage near the resurgent dome, Redondo Peak, in the center of the caldera. Filling this “hole” is the highest priority for the next new LASN station. We propose to install this station in 2018 on Mohawk Ridge just east of Redondito, in the same area already occupied by other scientific installations, such as the MCON flux tower operated by UNM.

  13. Reactive Hydrothermal Flow Model for Mid-Oceanic Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starger, J. L.; Garven, G.; Tivey, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    A two-dimensional finite-element code known as RST2D [1] is being used to study the geothermal energy, geohydrology, and geochemistry of fluid convection in seafloor hydrothermal systems such as the Juan de Fuca Ridge, East Pacific Rise, and TAG hydrothermal fields. Relative to black smoker vents and other discharge features, submarine recharge zones are understudied. We are attempting to model both the recharge and discharge limbs of these flow fields as a coupled system by mathematically and physically linking the fluid dynamics, heat flow, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulations have been made to quantify likely flow rates and relevant geochemical water-rock reactions including mineral precipitation and dissolution using a fully-coupled reactive flow modeling approach. In particular, the reactive flow model is being used to predict the formation, likely spatial-temporal distribution, and preservation of anhydrite in the hydrothermal recharge zone and its feedback influence on permeability, fluid flow, and heat transport in the discharge zone. We are focusing on the geochemical effects and controls of on- and off-ridge geology and geometry, permeability-porosity, vent width and geometry, and thermal boundary conditions on the predicted size and extent of the recharge and discharge zones, and whether hydrothermal recharge is focused along extensional faults or diffused across broad areas of the seafloor. Hydrothermal flow systems of this type are known to represent modern analogs for ancient systems such as those being studied for understanding the origin of life on the planet, but also as modern analogs for the formation of volcanogenic massive sulfide ore deposits. Reactive flow modeling provides a useful tool for developing a better understanding of the physiobiochemistry of these episodic flow systems, and could potentially guide exploration for modern and ancient ore deposits. [1] Raffensperger, J.P.,1996, Advances in Porous Media 3, 185 - 305.

  14. Development of Leaky Wave Antennas for Layered Ridge Dielectric Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1993-01-01

    The millimeter wave, especially above 100 GHz, and the submillimeter wave frequency spectrum offers the possibility for narrow-beam, high-resolution antennas which are critical for high definition radars required for space debris tracking, airport ground avoidance radars, and missile tracking. In addition, the frequency which most atmospheric constituents may be detected lie in this part of the frequency spectrum. Therefore, the development of electronic components for millimeter/submillimeter wave passive sensors is required for environmental monitoring of the Earth's atmosphere. Typical microwave transmission lines such as microstrip and coplanar waveguide rely on two or more electrical conductors to concentrate and guide the electromagnetic energy. Unfortunately, the surface resistance of the conductors increases as the square root of frequency. In addition, the circuit dimensions must be decreased with increasing frequency to maintain a single mode transmission line which further increases the conductor loss. An alternative family of transmission lines are formed from two or more insulating materials and rely on the differences in the permittivities between the two materials to guide the wave. No metal conductors are required although some dielectric waveguides do utilize a metallic ground plane to facilitate the interconnections of active electrical elements or to reduce the transmission line size. Examples of such transmission lines are image guides, insulated image guides, trapped image guides, ridge guide, and layered ridge dielectric waveguide (LRDW). Although most dielectric waveguides have dimensions on the order of lambda to provide sufficient field confinement, the LRDW has been shown to provide good field confinement for electrically small lines. This offers an advantage in circuit integration. It has been shown that a periodic array of metallic strips placed either along or on top of a dielectric waveguide forms an effective radiator. This antenna is

  15. [Soft-ridged bench terrace design in hilly loess region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shixiong; Chen, Li; Gao, Wangsheng

    2005-08-01

    Reconfiguration of hillside field into terrace is regarded as one of the key techniques for water and soil conservation in mountainous regions. On slopes exceeding 30 degrees, the traditional techniques of terracing are difficult to apply as risers (i.e., backslopes), and if not reinforced, are so abrupt and easy to collapse under gravity alone, thus damaging the terrace. To improve the reconfiguration of hillside field into terrace, holistic techniques of soft-ridged bench terrace engineering, including revegetation, with trees and planting grasses on riser slopes, were tested between 1997 and 2001 in Xiabiangou watershed of Yan' an, Shaanxi Province. A "working with Nature" engineering approach, riser slopes of 45 degrees, similar to the pre-existing slope of 35 degrees, was employed to radically reduce gravity-erosion. Based on the concepts of biodiversity and the principles of landscape ecology, terrace benches, bunds, and risers were planted with trees, shrubs, forage grasses, and crops, serving to generate a diverse array of plants, a semi-forested area, and to stabilize terrace bunds. Soft-ridged bench terrace made it possible to significantly reduce hazards arising from gravity erosion, and reduce the costs of individual bench construction and maintenance by 24.9% and 55.5% of the costs under traditional techniques, respectively. Such a construction allowed an enrichment and concentration of nutrients in the soils of terrace bunds, providing an ideal environment for a range of plants to grow and develop. The terrace riser could be planted with drought-resistant plants ranging from forage grasses to trees, and this riser vegetation would turn the exposed bunds and risers existing under traditional techniques into plant-covered belts, great green ribbons decorating farmland and contributing to the enhancement of the landscape biology.

  16. Bone grafting for alveolar ridge reconstruction. Review of 166 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmen, Fued Samir; Oliveira, Marina Reis; Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida Cabrini; Piveta, Ana Cláudia Gabrielli; Pereira, Valfrido Antonio; Gabrielli, Mario Francisco Real

    2017-01-01

    to investigate the predictive factors of failure in bone grafts for alveolar ridge augmentation and implant surgery. we reviewed the charts of 166 patients operated between 1995 and 2014. A total of 248 grafting procedures were performed. We submitted the data to the binomial test at 5% significance. grafts to gain width of the alveolar ridge (65.32%) were more frequent than sinus lifting (pimplants installed in the grafted areas, of which only 4.83% were lost. The number of implants lost (4.51%) in areas of onlay grafts was not statistically higher than those placed after sinus lifting (2.63%, pimplants (pdental implants in the maxilla and in patients over 40 years of age. investigar os fatores preditivos de falhas em enxertos ósseos para aumento do rebordo alveolar e cirurgia de implantes. os prontuários de 166 pacientes, operados entre 1995 e 2014, foram revistos. Um total de 248 enxertos foi realizado. Os dados foram submetidos ao teste binomial a 5% de significância. os enxertos para ganho em espessura do rebordo alveolar (65,32%) foram mais frequentes do que levantamentos de seio maxilar (pimplantes nas áreas enxertadas e apenas 4,83% perdidos. O número de implantes perdidos (4,51%) em áreas de enxertos em bloco não foi estatisticamente maior do que na área de seios maxilares enxertados (2,63%) (pimplantes perdidos (pimplantes dentários realizados em maxila e em pacientes com mais de 40 anos de idade.

  17. Sleep modulates the neural substrates of both spatial and contextual memory consolidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Rauchs

    Full Text Available It is known that sleep reshapes the neural representations that subtend the memories acquired while navigating in a virtual environment. However, navigation is not process-pure, as manifold learning components contribute to performance, notably the spatial and contextual memory constituents. In this context, it remains unclear whether post-training sleep globally promotes consolidation of all of the memory components embedded in virtual navigation, or rather favors the development of specific representations. Here, we investigated the effect of post-training sleep on the neural substrates of the consolidation of spatial and contextual memories acquired while navigating in a complex 3D, naturalistic virtual town. Using fMRI, we mapped regional cerebral activity during various tasks designed to tap either the spatial or the contextual memory component, or both, 72 h after encoding with or without sleep deprivation during the first post-training night. Behavioral performance was not dependent upon post-training sleep deprivation, neither in a natural setting that engages both spatial and contextual memory processes nor when looking more specifically at each of these memory representations. At the neuronal level however, analyses that focused on contextual memory revealed distinct correlations between performance and neuronal activity in frontal areas associated with recollection processes after post-training sleep, and in the parahippocampal gyrus associated with familiarity processes in sleep-deprived participants. Likewise, efficient spatial memory was associated with posterior cortical activity after sleep whereas it correlated with parahippocampal/medial temporal activity after sleep deprivation. Finally, variations in place-finding efficiency in a natural setting encompassing spatial and contextual elements were associated with caudate activity after post-training sleep, suggesting the automation of navigation. These data indicate that post

  18. Optics in neural computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Michael John

    In all attempts to emulate the considerable powers of the brain, one is struck by both its immense size, parallelism, and complexity. While the fields of neural networks, artificial intelligence, and neuromorphic engineering have all attempted oversimplifications on the considerable complexity, all three can benefit from the inherent scalability and parallelism of optics. This thesis looks at specific aspects of three modes in which optics, and particularly volume holography, can play a part in neural computation. First, holography serves as the basis of highly-parallel correlators, which are the foundation of optical neural networks. The huge input capability of optical neural networks make them most useful for image processing and image recognition and tracking. These tasks benefit from the shift invariance of optical correlators. In this thesis, I analyze the capacity of correlators, and then present several techniques for controlling the amount of shift invariance. Of particular interest is the Fresnel correlator, in which the hologram is displaced from the Fourier plane. In this case, the amount of shift invariance is limited not just by the thickness of the hologram, but by the distance of the hologram from the Fourier plane. Second, volume holography can provide the huge storage capacity and high speed, parallel read-out necessary to support large artificial intelligence systems. However, previous methods for storing data in volume holograms have relied on awkward beam-steering or on as-yet non- existent cheap, wide-bandwidth, tunable laser sources. This thesis presents a new technique, shift multiplexing, which is capable of very high densities, but which has the advantage of a very simple implementation. In shift multiplexing, the reference wave consists of a focused spot a few millimeters in front of the hologram. Multiplexing is achieved by simply translating the hologram a few tens of microns or less. This thesis describes the theory for how shift

  19. Site characterization report for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), also known as the Fission Product Pilot Plant, is a surplus facility in the main plant area to the east of the South Tank Farm slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The building consists of two concrete cells (north and south) on a concrete pad and was used to extract radioisotopes of ruthenium, strontium, cesium, cerium, rhenium and other elements from aqueous fission product waste. Site characterization activities of the building were initiated. The objective of the site characterization was to provide information necessary for engineering evaluation and planning of D&D approaches, planning for personal protection of D&D workers, and estimating waste volumes from D&D activities. This site characterization report documents the investigation with a site description, a summary of characterization methods, chemical and radiological sample analysis results, field measurement results, and waste volume estimates.

  20. Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. This volume contains the data from the Background Soil Characterization Project. When available, the following validation qualifiers are used in the appendixes. When validation qualifiers are not available, the corresponding contract laboratory data qualifiers appearing on the next page are used.

  1. Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

  2. Morphology of sea ice pressure ridges in the northwestern Weddell Sea in winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bing; Li, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Peng; Haas, Christian; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the morphology and distribution of pressure ridges in the northwestern Weddell Sea, ice surface elevation profiles were measured by a helicopter-borne laser altimeter during Winter Weddell Outflow Study with the German R/V Polarstern in 2006. An optimal cutoff height of 0.62 m, derived from the best fits between the measured and theoretical ridge height and spacing distributions, was first used to separate pressure ridges from other sea ice surface undulations. It was found that the measured ridge height distribution was well modeled by a negative exponential function, and the ridge spacing distribution by a lognormal function. Next, based on the ridging intensity Ri (the ratio of mean ridge sail height to mean spacing), all profiles were clustered into three regimes by an improved k-means clustering algorithm: Ri ≤ 0.01, 0.01 0.026 (denoted as C1, C2, and C3 respectively). Mean (and standard deviation) of sail height was 0.99 (±0.07) m in Regime C1, 1.12 (±0.06) m in C2, and 1.17 (±0.04) m in C3, respectively, while the mean spacings (and standard deviations) were 232 (±240) m, 54 (±20) m, and 31 (±5.6) m. These three ice regimes coincided closely with distinct sea ice regions identified in a satellite radar image, where C1 corresponded to the broken ice in the marginal ice zone and level ice formed in the Larsen Polynya, C2 corresponded to the deformed first- and second-year ice formed by dynamic action in the center of the study region, and C3 corresponded to heavily deformed ice in the outflowing branch of the Weddell Gyre. The results of our analysis showed that the relationship between the mean ridge height and frequency was well modeled by a logarithmic function with a correlation coefficient of 0.8, although such correlation was weaker when considering each regime individually. The measured ridge height and frequency were both greater than those reported by others for the Ross Sea. Compared with reported values for other parts of the

  3. Phase I remedial investigation report of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.E. [ed.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents the activities and findings of the first phase of a three-phase remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and updates the scope and strategy for WAG-2-related efforts. WAG 2 contains White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, White Oak Creek Embayment on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This report includes field activities completed through October 1992. The remediation of WAG 2 is scheduled to follow the cessation of contaminant input from hydrologically upgradient WAGs. While upgradient areas are being remediated, the strategy for WAG 2 is to conduct a long-term monitoring and investigation program that takes full advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator of contaminant fluxes from other ORNL WAGs and focuses on four key goals: (1) Implement, in concert with other programs, long-term, multimedia environmental monitoring and tracking of contaminants leaving other WAGs, entering WAG 2, and being transported off-site. (2) Provide a conceptual framework to integrate and develop information at the watershed-level for pathways and processes that are key to contaminant movement, and so support remedial efforts at ORNL. (3) Provide periodic updates of estimates of potential risk (both human health and ecological) associated with contaminants accumulating in and moving through WAG 2 to off-site areas. (4) Support the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program efforts to prioritize, remediate, and verify remedial effectiveness for contaminated sites at ORNL, through long-term monitoring and continually updated risk assessments.

  4. An archaeological reconnaissance and evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Reservation, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuVall, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    At the request of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee, an archaeological reconnaissance and evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed areas was conducted between June I and September 2, 1993. The project was conducted by Glyn D. DuVall, Principal Investigator. ORNL project representative, Peter Souza, accompanied the principal investigator during all project evaluations. The reconnaissance to assess adverse impacts to cultural resources located within the boundaries of federally licensed, permitted, funded or assisted projects was conducted in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (Public Law 89-665; 16 USC 470; 80 Stat. 915), National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Public Law 91-190; 91 Stat. 852; 42 USC 4321-4347) and Executive Order 11593 (May 13, 1971). Based upon the reconnaissance, a search of the site files at the Tennessee Division of Archaeology and a search of the National Register of Historic Places, the proposed construction on the site will have no impact on any property included in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places pursuant to 36 CFR 60.4. This judgement is based on the amount of prior disturbance associated with ORNL during the past 50 years. Construction in the vicinity of the New Bethel Baptist Church and Cemetery should allow sufficient buffer to avoid direct and visual impact to the property. The determination of sufficient buffer area, either distance or vegetative, should be coordinated with the Tennessee Historical Commission, Office of the State Historic Preservation Officer.

  5. Postconstruction report for the mercury tanks interim action at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voskuil, T.L.

    1993-09-01

    Three underground concrete settling tanks (tanks 2101-U, 2104-U, and 2100-U) at the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contained contaminated sludges contributing mercury to the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC). These tanks were cleaned out as an interim action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act as part of the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluent subproject. Cleaning out these tanks prevented the sludge that had settled in the bottom from resuspending and carrying mercury into UEFPC. Tanks 2104-U and 2100-U were returned to service and will continue to receive effluent from buildings 9201-4 and 9201-5. Tank 2101-U had been abandoned and its effluent redirected to Tank 2100-U during previous activities. This interim action permanently sealed Tank 2101-U from the storm sewer system. Upon removal of materials and completion of cleanup, inspections determined that the project`s cleanup criteria had been met. The structural integrity of the tanks was also inspected, and minor cracks identified in tanks 2101-U and 2104-U were repaired. This project is considered to have been completed successfully because it met its performance objectives as addressed in the Interim Record of Decision and the work plan: to remove the waste from the three storage tanks; to ensure that the tanks were cleaned to the levels specified; to return tanks 2100-U and 2104-U to service; to isolate Tank 2101-U permanently; and to manage the wastes in an appropriate fashion.

  6. Analysis of neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Heiden, Uwe

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is a unified and general treatment of activity in neural networks from a mathematical pOint of view. Possible applications of the theory presented are indica­ ted throughout the text. However, they are not explored in de­ tail for two reasons : first, the universal character of n- ral activity in nearly all animals requires some type of a general approach~ secondly, the mathematical perspicuity would suffer if too many experimental details and empirical peculiarities were interspersed among the mathematical investigation. A guide to many applications is supplied by the references concerning a variety of specific issues. Of course the theory does not aim at covering all individual problems. Moreover there are other approaches to neural network theory (see e.g. Poggio-Torre, 1978) based on the different lev­ els at which the nervous system may be viewed. The theory is a deterministic one reflecting the average be­ havior of neurons or neuron pools. In this respect the essay is writt...

  7. Artificial Neural Networks·

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    differences between biological neural networks (BNNs) of the brain and ANN s. A thorough understanding of ... neurons. Artificial neural models are loosely based on biology since a complete understanding of the .... A learning scheme for updating a neuron's connections (weights) was proposed by Donald Hebb in 1949.

  8. Neural Networks for Optimal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process.......Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process....

  9. The Neural Support Vector Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; van der Ree, Michiel; Embrechts, Mark; Stollenga, Marijn; Meijster, Arnold; Nolte, A; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new machine learning algorithm for regression and dimensionality reduction tasks. The Neural Support Vector Machine (NSVM) is a hybrid learning algorithm consisting of neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The output of the NSVM is given by SVMs that take a

  10. Application of artificial neural networks to segmentation and classification of topographic profiles of ridge-flank seafloor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Lourenco, E.; Kodagali, V.N.; Baracho, J.

    unsupervised learning to train itself, where the ne t- work is u n aware of the number of segments among which a particular set of depth data will be divided. For precise segmentation, we present an overview of SOM in the next section. Self - organizing... maps The SOM architecture comprises a flat one - dimensional grid of learning units called neurons, similar to those in the human brain 4 . Every input element is connected to all the neurons in the grid. When an input vector is presented...

  11. Neural fields theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Graben, Peter; Potthast, Roland; Wright, James

    2014-01-01

    With this book, the editors present the first comprehensive collection in neural field studies, authored by leading scientists in the field - among them are two of the founding-fathers of neural field theory. Up to now, research results in the field have been disseminated across a number of distinct journals from mathematics, computational neuroscience, biophysics, cognitive science and others. Starting with a tutorial for novices in neural field studies, the book comprises chapters on emergent patterns, their phase transitions and evolution, on stochastic approaches, cortical development, cognition, robotics and computation, large-scale numerical simulations, the coupling of neural fields to the electroencephalogram and phase transitions in anesthesia. The intended readership are students and scientists in applied mathematics, theoretical physics, theoretical biology, and computational neuroscience. Neural field theory and its applications have a long-standing tradition in the mathematical and computational ...

  12. The Neural Correlates of Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tiffany A.; Bartholow, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral analyses are a natural choice for understanding the wide-ranging behavioral consequences of racial stereotyping and prejudice. However, neuroimaging and electrophysiological research has recently considered the neural mechanisms that underlie racial categorization and the activation and application of racial stereotypes and prejudice, revealing exciting new insights. Work reviewed here points to the importance of neural structures previously associated with face processing, semantic knowledge activation, evaluation, and self-regulatory behavioral control, allowing for the specification of a neural model of race processing. We show how research on the neural correlates of race can serve to link otherwise disparate lines of evidence on the neural underpinnings of a broad array of social-cognitive phenomena, and consider implications for effecting change in race relations. PMID:19896410

  13. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... examined, and it appears that considering 'normal' neural network models with, say, 500 samples, the problem of over-fitting is neglible, and therefore it is not taken into consideration afterwards. Numerous model types, often met in control applications, are implemented as neural network models...... Kalmann filter) representing state space description. The potentials of neural networks for control of non-linear processes are also examined, focusing on three different groups of control concepts, all considered as generalizations of known linear control concepts to handle also non-linear processes...

  14. Sensitivity enhancement of a micro-scale biomimetic tactile sensor with epidermal ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhua

    2010-08-01

    A microscale biomimetic tactile sensor with epidermal ridges is proposed to enhance the sensitivity of force detection. Guided by the principles of the human tactile perception mechanism, specifically the epidermal ridges, artificial epidermal ridges made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were designed and placed on micro-fabricated metal strain gauge arrays. A polyimide layer was fabricated to facilitate attachment between the metal and PDMS, so that patterned copper could be deposited on the polyimide to function as the strain gauges. The aspect ratio of the artificial epidermal ridges was optimized using material stability calculations and finite element method (FEM) simulations, and the optimal structure obtained was 400 µm in width and 110 µm in height. Experiments verified the effectiveness of enhancing the sensitivity of such a tactile sensor with the artificial epidermal ridges, in that the outputs of the strain gauges were 1.8 times more sensitive than those of a tactile sensor without ridges. The proposed artificial epidermal ridges are readily applicable to any developed tactile sensors for performance enhancement.

  15. III/V nano ridge structures for optical applications on patterned 300 mm silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, B.; Guo, W.; Mols, Y.; Tian, B.; Wang, Z.; Shi, Y.; Van Thourhout, D.; Pantouvaki, M.; Van Campenhout, J.; Langer, R.; Barla, K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on an integration approach of III/V nano ridges on patterned silicon (Si) wafers by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Trenches of different widths (≤500 nm) were processed in a silicon oxide (SiO2) layer on top of a 300 mm (001) Si substrate. The MOVPE growth conditions were chosen in a way to guarantee an efficient defect trapping within narrow trenches and to form a box shaped ridge with increased III/V volume when growing out of the trench. Compressively strained InGaAs/GaAs multi-quantum wells with 19% indium were deposited on top of the fully relaxed GaAs ridges as an active material for optical applications. Transmission electron microcopy investigation shows that very flat quantum well (QW) interfaces were realized. A clear defect trapping inside the trenches is observed whereas the ridge material is free of threading dislocations with only a very low density of planar defects. Pronounced QW photoluminescence (PL) is detected from different ridge sizes at room temperature. The potential of these III/V nano ridges for laser integration on Si substrates is emphasized by the achieved ridge volume which could enable wave guidance and by the high crystal quality in line with the distinct PL.

  16. Crustal structure of the Agulhas Ridge (South Atlantic Ocean): Formation above a hotspot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokat, Wilfried; Hagen, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    The southern South Atlantic Ocean contains several features believed to document the traces of hotspot volcanism during the early formation of the ocean basin, namely the Agulhas Ridge and the Cape Rise seamounts located in the southeast Atlantic between 36°S and 50°S. The Agulhas Ridge parallels the Agulhas-Falkland Fracture Zone, one of the major transform zones of the world. The morphology of the ridge changes dramatically from two parallel segments in the southwest, to the broad plateau-like Agulhas Ridge in the northeast. Because the crustal fabric of the ridge is unknown relating its evolution to hotspots in the southeast Atlantic is an open question. During the RV Polarstern cruise ANT-XXIII-5 seismic reflection and refraction data were collected along a 370 km long profile with 8 Ocean Bottom Stations to investigate its crustal fabric. The profile extends in NNE direction from the Agulhas Basin, 60 km south of the Agulhas Ridge, and continues into the Cape Basin crossing the southernmost of the Cape Rise seamounts. In the Cape Basin we found a crustal thickness of 5.5-7.5 km, and a velocity distribution typical for oceanic crust. The Cape Rise seamounts, however, show a higher velocity in comparison to the surrounding oceanic crust and the Agulhas Ridge. Underplated material is evident below the southernmost of the Cape Rise seamounts. It also has a 5-8% higher density compared to the Agulhas Plateau. The seismic velocities of the Agulhas Ridge are lower, the crustal thickness is approximately 14 km, and age dating of dredge samples from its top provides clear evidence of rejuvenated volcanism at around 26 Ma. Seismic data indicate that although the Cape Rise seamounts formed above a mantle thermal anomaly it had a limited areal extent, whereas the hotspot material that formed the Agulhas Ridge likely erupted along a fracture zone.

  17. Patch behaviour and predictability properties of modelled finite-amplitude sand ridges on the inner shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Vis-Star

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The long-term evolution of shoreface-connected sand ridges is investigated with a nonlinear spectral model which governs the dynamics of waves, currents, sediment transport and the bed level on the inner shelf. Wave variables are calculated with a shoaling-refraction model instead of using a parameterisation. The spectral model describes the time evolution of amplitudes of known eigenmodes of the linearised system. Bottom pattern formation occurs if the transverse bottom slope of the inner shelf, β, exceeds a critical value βc. For fixed model parameters the sensitivity of the properties of modelled sand ridges to changes in the number (N−1 of resolved subharmonics (of the initially fastest growing mode is investigated. For any N the model shows the growth and subsequent saturation of the height of the sand ridges. The saturation time scale is several thousands of years, which suggests that observed sand ridges have not reached their saturated stage yet. The migration speed of the ridges and the average longshore spacing between successive crests in the saturated state differ from those in the initial state. Analysis of the potential energy balance of the ridges reveals that bed slope-induced sediment transport is crucial for the saturation process. In the transient stage the shoreface-connected ridges occur in patches. The overall characteristics of the bedforms (saturation time, final maximum height, average longshore spacing, migration speed hardly vary with N. However, individual time series of modal amplitudes and bottom patterns strongly depend on N, thereby implying that the detailed evolution of sand ridges can only be predicted over a limited time interval. Additional experiments show that the critical bed slope βc increases with larger offshore angles of wave incidence, larger offshore wave heights and longer wave periods, and that the corresponding maximum height of the ridges

  18. Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranski, Micahel J [self

    2009-11-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Oak Ridge Reservation, encompassing 33,639 acres in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of East Tennessee, has long been known for its unfragmented forests and high biodiversity. Many areas on the Reservation have been recognized as important natural areas, but no comprehensive treatment has been performed to evaluate the relative significance and importance of these areas compared to each other. The present study was conducted to develop a set of guidelines for evaluating the natural value of specific areas, to evaluate all the terrestrial areas that are currently delineated, and to rank all areas according to their relative biodiversity importance. All available data, reports and site-specific information relevant to Reservation lands, including Tennessee Division of Natural Areas database information, were evaluated and field work was conducted. Methodologies and criteria for assessment and evaluation of areas were developed; categories of criteria were devised; and a ranking system for evaluation of natural areas was produced. There were 70 areas evaluated during the study. The system is flexible, dynamic and easily revised to reflect updated and new information and interpretations. Eight categories of evaluation factors were established and used to characterize each site. These were the following: size of area, number or status taxa present, number of Endangered and Threatened taxa present, rarity of the Endangered and Threatened taxa on the Reservation, community diversity, site integrity and quality, disturbance and threat levels, and other significant features and factors. Each category generally consisted of a 5-point ranking scale from 0-4, allowing for a possible composite score of 32, with higher ranked, more important, sites attaining higher scores. Highly ranked sites are representative of regional natural diversity; contain outstanding natural features, communities or geology and/or very rare taxa or other elements; are

  19. Hydroxyl in garnets from Garnet Ridge, northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Y.; Sakamaki, K.; Koga, I.

    2012-12-01

    Various kinds of garnets and garnet-bearing rocks occur in Garnet Ridge, northern Arizona. These garnets have diverse origins such as mantle peridotite, subducted oceanic slab and crustal level metasomatic products (Koga & Ogasawara, 2012, AGU Fall Meeting Abstract). A typical garnet from Garnet Ridge, called "Navajo Ruby" is Cr-bearing pyrope-rich garnet that could be of the mantle peridotite origin, and another interesting garnet occurs in eclogite xenoliths of subducted slab origin, probably of Farallon plate origin (Usui et al., 2003). To understand the water behavior underneath the Colorado Plateau, we measured micro FT-IR spectra for several kinds of garnets from Garnet Ridge. The samples for micro FT-IR analyses are thick sections (50 - 500 micrometer in thickness). The size of analyzed areas is 50 x 50 μm square. We detected significant amounts of OH in "Navajo Ruby" garnets and in other types of garnets; however, OH in the garnet in eclogite xenolith was negligible or below detection limit. The peridotitic garnets (up to 2 cm across) look purplish to red brownish and are rich in pyrope component (up to 78 mol%) with significant amounts of Cr2O3 (up to 5.9 wt%) without chemical zonation. The inclusions of olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and apatite were confirmed by laser Raman spectroscopy. The representative FT-IR absorption spectra of this type garnet are: 1) grain A (Pyp52 Alm29 Sps1 Grs14 And2 Uv2) shows two very strong IR absorption bands by OH centered at 3575 and 3660 cm-1, 2) grain B (Pyp63 Alm14 Sps0 Grs12 And1 Uv10) shows a very strong IR absorption at 3575 cm-1, and 3) grain C (Pyp62 Alm20 Sps1 Grs12 And0 Uv5) did not show IR absorption by OH. No heterogeneity of IR absorption by OH was detected in a single grain. The garnets in eclogite xenolith show clear prograde chemical zonation; core (Pyp6 Alm54 Sps1 Grs34 And5 Uv0) to rim (Pyp21 Alm64 Sps2 Grs15 And1 Uv0). The well developed rim of this garnet has no IR absorption band by OH

  20. Biological and Geological Characteristics of the Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, T. M.; Bailey, J.; Edmonds, H.; Forte, P.; Helmke, E.; Humphris, S.; Kemp, J.; Nakamura, K.; Reves-Sohn, R.; Singh, H.; Willis, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) is one of the slowest (1.0 cm per yr), deepest (5000 m axial depth), and most hydrographically and tectonically isolated mid-ocean ridge systems on earth. This isolation from the global ridge system should have profound implications for the evolution and ecology of resident chemosynthetic fauna. The July 2007 Arctic GAkkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE) sought to define this Arctic biogeographic province and the relationship of Arctic vent fauna to Atlantic, Pacific, and hydrocarbon seep fauna through the use of an new under- ice vehicle `Camper', a fiber-optic video-guided sampling system drift towed 1 to 3 m above the seafloor. The imaging, sampling, and sensing capabilities were used to obtain high-resolution seafloor imagery to identify and collect benthic samples with a clamshell `grab' sampler and a suction 'slurp' sampler. Imagery from five video cameras, including obliquely-mounted video and downlooking digital high-definition color cameras were used to construct maps of seafloor features and faunal composition during 3 dives in the peridotite-hosted 7°E region and 13 dives in the volcanic 85°E region. The 7°E site was dominated by an almost continuous cover of pelagic sediment with abundant animal tracks, brittle stars, anemones, and shrimp. The explored 85°E area was dominated by relatively diverse and young lava morphologies- from large pillows hosting delicate surface ornamentation to lobates, long lava tubes, and fresh sheet flows, all with the upper surfaces covered (often cm thick) of fresh volcanic glass 'sediment' suggestive of explosive volcanic activity in the `recent' past. Fauna in these areas consisted mainly of sponges, anemones, amphipods and shrimp. Characterization of the newly-discovered Asgard volcanic chain, including `Oden', `Thor', and `Loke' volcanoes, in the 85°E axial valley revealed extensive microbial mats in the form of: 1) yellow `fluffy' material (often >5 cm thick) in places; and 2) yellow